WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma sound waves

  1. Fundamental plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for fundamental plasma emission by the three-wave processes L + or - S to T (where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and transverse waves, respectively) is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes are identified. In addition the rates, path-integrated wave temperatures, and limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation are derived.

  2. Second harmonic plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for second harmonic plasma emission by the weak turbulence (or random phase) processes L + L + or - S to T, proceeding in two three-wave steps, L + or - S to L prime and L + L prime to T, where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and electromagnetic waves, respectively, is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes, and constraints on the characteristics of the source plasma, are derived. Limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation and the levels of the L prime and S waves are determined. Expressions for the growth rates and path-integrated wave temperatures are derived for simple models of the wave spectra and source plasma.

  3. Sound waves and resonances in electron-hole plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the recent experimental signatures of relativistic hydrodynamics in graphene, we investigate theoretically the behavior of hydrodynamic sound modes in such quasirelativistic fluids near charge neutrality, within linear response. Locally driving an electron fluid at a resonant frequency to such a sound mode can lead to large increases in the electrical response at the edges of the sample, a signature, which cannot be explained using diffusive models of transport. We discuss the robustness of this signal to various effects, including electron-acoustic phonon coupling, disorder, and long-range Coulomb interactions. These long-range interactions convert the sound mode into a collective plasmonic mode at low frequencies unless the fluid is charge neutral. At the smallest frequencies, the response in a disordered fluid is quantitatively what is predicted by a "momentum relaxation time" approximation. However, this approximation fails at higher frequencies (which can be parametrically small), where the classical localization of sound waves cannot be neglected. Experimental observation of such resonances is a clear signature of relativistic hydrodynamics, and provides an upper bound on the viscosity of the electron-hole plasma.

  4. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2006-01-01

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2 supersymmetric SU(N) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  5. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Starinets, A O; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2005-01-01

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2^* supersymmetric SU(N_c) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N_c and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  6. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Starinets, Andrei O. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada)]. E-mail: starina@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2006-01-16

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2* supersymmetric SU(N{sub c}) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N{sub c} and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  7. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Benincasa, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Gauge/string correspondence provides an efficient method to investigate gauge theories. In this talk we discuss the results of the paper (to appear) by P. Benincasa, A. Buchel and A. O. Starinets, where the propagation of sound waves is studied in a strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. In particular, a prediction for the speed of sound as well as for the bulk viscosity is made for the N=2* gauge theory in the high temperature limit. As expected, the results achieved show a devi...

  8. Kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in ultrarelativistic pair plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Marklund, M; Stenflo, L

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in an ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is developed. It is shown that the effect of a spatial spectral broadening of the electromagnetic pulse is to introduce a reduction of the growth rates for the decay and modulational instabilities. Such spectral broadening could be due to a finite pulse coherence length, or through the use of random phase filters, and would stabilize the propagation of electromagnetic pulses.

  9. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P

    2005-01-01

    Gauge/string correspondence provides an efficient method to investigate gauge theories. In this talk we discuss the results of the paper (to appear) by P. Benincasa, A. Buchel and A. O. Starinets, where the propagation of sound waves is studied in a strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. In particular, a prediction for the speed of sound as well as for the bulk viscosity is made for the N=2* gauge theory in the high temperature limit. As expected, the results achieved show a deviation from the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity for a conformal theory. It is pointed out that such results depend on the particular gauge theory considered.

  10. Interaction of linear and nonlinear ion-sound waves with inclusions of dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimalsky, V V [National Institute for Astrophysics, Optics, and Electronics (INAOE), Z.P. 72000, Puebla (Mexico); Koshevaya, S V [Autonomous University of Morelos (UAEM), FCQeI, CIICAp, Z.P. 62210, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Enriquez, R Perez- [UNAM, Center of Geoscience, Juriquilla 1-742, Z.P. 76230, Que. (Mexico); Kotsarenko, A N [UNAM, Center of Geoscience, Juriquilla 1-742, Z.P. 76230, Que. (Mexico)

    2006-09-15

    Diverse phenomena exist in the ionosphere caused by the presence of dusty plasma objects. These have a bearing on problems of space communication and possibly on the Earth's weather, among others. Therefore, it is very important to study them so that many questions on the subject can be answered. In this paper, the interaction of plasma waves with these objects is studied and some instrumentation to measure such interactions is proposed. In particular, the interaction of ion-sound waves (ISW) by non-soliton and soliton pulses propagating in dusty plasma is investigated. It is shown that inclusions of dusty components of the ionosphere plasma behave as resonators for non-soliton pulses, so that ISW are excited. Korteveg-de Vries (KdV) solitons practically do not resonate with the inclusions of dusty plasma. Instead, the presence of dusty plasma inclusions can lead to the presence of transverse instabilities and the eventual destruction of the KdV solitons.

  11. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  12. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  13. Properties of a Sound Wave

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This interactive tutorial covers the following properties of sound wave: frequency, period, amplitude, total pressure, ambient pressure, and peak sound pressure. Students need to have a sound card on their computer and speakers to hear the sounds produced. The interactions in this tutorial include: Mouse over some text for visual explanations., Varying the frequency and amplitude of a sound wave, and be able to listen to the changing pitch of the sound., A short self-check quiz. PH2401 ...

  14. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  15. Sound Waves Levitate Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    System recently tested uses acoustic waves to levitate liquid drops, millimeter-sized glass microballoons, and other objects for coating by vapor deposition or capillary attraction. Cylindrical contactless coating/handling facility employs a cylindrical acoustic focusing radiator and a tapered reflector to generate a specially-shaped standing wave pattern. Article to be processed is captured by the acoustic force field under the reflector and moves as reflector is moved to different work stations.

  16. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  17. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  18. Ion heating, burnout of the HF field and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichok, A V; Pryimak, A V; Zagorodny, A G

    2015-01-01

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long-wave plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, when electrons are treated as a fluid and ions are regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model -- ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model -- SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency (LF) oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. Reduced absorption of the HF field leads to the retardation of the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the i...

  19. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  20. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  1. Monitoring of the velocity field of the plasma motion under sounding of F ionospheric region by the probe waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Evgeny; Komrakov, G. P.; Smyshlyaev, Sergey E.

    Results of investigations of the motions in F region of the ionosphere by means of the method of the space-frequency diversity reception are presented. Measurements of the vertical and horizontal plasma drift velocities have been performed over SURA facility (Russia) using of multifrequency dopler station for vertical sounding and diversity three point reception of the reflected radiosignals. Possibilities of a day (15 hours) monitoring of the drift velocity space at different altitudes were studied by using of the three fixed probe frequencies 4353 kHz, 5853 kHz and 7353 kHz. For another experimental series complex investigations of the pumped ionospheric volume were performed by its diagnostics at different frequencies with the short (¡ 200 mks) wide frequency band (˜ 500 kHz) and powerful (˜ 20 - 150 MW ERP) pulses. Data about a fine distribution structure of the vertical and horizontal plasma drift velocities in the turbulence plasma range were first obtained with a high frequency (˜ 1 kHz) and temporal (˜ 20 ms) resolution. The work was supported by RFBR grants 07-02-00464 and 06-02-17334.

  2. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirichok, A. V., E-mail: sandyrcs@gmail.com; Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V. [Institute for High Technologies, V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine); Zagorodny, A. G. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-09-15

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  3. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichok, A. V.; Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  4. Advances in Effects of Sound Waves on Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reda H. E. Hassanien; HOU Tian-zhen; LI Yu-feng; and LI Bao-ming

    2014-01-01

    Sound waves technology has been applied to different plants. It has been found that sound waves were at different frequencies, sound pressure levels (SPLs), exposure periods, and distances from the source of sound inlfuence plant growth. Experiments have been conducted in the open ifeld and under greenhouse growing conditions with different levels of audible sound frequencies and sound pressure levels. Sound waves at 1 kHz and 100 dB for 1 h within a distance of 0.20 m could signiifcantly promote the division and cell wall lfuidity of callus cells and also signiifcantly enhance the activity of protective enzymes and endogenous hormones. Sound waves stimulation could increase the plant plasma-membrane H+-ATPase activity, the contents of soluble sugar, soluble protein, and amylase activity of callus. Moreover, sound waves could increase the content of RNA and the level of transcription. Stress-induced genes could switch on under sound stimulation. Sound waves at 0.1-1 kHz and SPL of (70±5) dB for 3 h from plant acoustic frequency technology (PAFT) generator within a distance ranged from 30 to 60 m every other day signiifcantly increased the yieldof sweet pepper, cucumber and tomato by 30.05, 37.1 and 13.2%, respectively. Furthermore, the yield of lettuce, spinach, cotton, rice, and wheat were increased by 19.6, 22.7, 11.4, 5.7, and 17.0%, respectively. Sound waves may also strengthen plant immune systems. It has been proved that spider mite, aphids, gray mold, late blight and virus disease of tomatoes in the greenhouses decreased by 6.0, 8.0, 9.0, 11.0, and 8.0%, respectively, and the sheath blight of rice was reduced by 50%. This paper provides an overview of literature for the effects of sound waves on various growth parameters of plant at different growth stages.

  5. Waves and Sound, An Experiment that Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunschwig, Fernand

    An experiment on sound waves, developed for non-science majors in a college physics course, is described. The student investigates the interference of two sound waves and measures and wavelength as he uses a prerecorded tape and a cassette player. The student is tutored by the cassette tape recorder, which also produces the overlapping sound…

  6. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Zhidkov, A G; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2011-01-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses as they diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we report on theoretical study of relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking. These waves may be suitable as particle injectors or as flying mirrors that both reflect and focus radiation, enabling unique X-ray sources and nonlinear QED phenomena.

  7. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lominadze, D G

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotron Waves in Plasma is a four-chapter text that covers the basic physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities, brought about by the existence of steady or alternating plasma currents flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field.This book considers first a wide range of questions associated with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium plasmas and in electron plasmas in metals and semiconductors. The next chapter deals with the parametric excitation of electron cyclotron oscillations in plasma in an alternating electric field. A chapter f

  8. Wave Superposition Based Sound Field Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-qing; CHEN Jin; YANG Chao

    2008-01-01

    In order to overcome the obstacle of singular integral in boundary element method (BEM), wepresented an efficient sound field reconstruction technique based on the wave superposition method (WSM). Itsprinciple includes three steps: first, the sound pressure field of an arbitrary shaped radiator is measured witha microphone array; then, the exterior sound field of the radiator is computed backward and forward using theWSM; at last, the final results are visualized in terms of sound pressure contours or animations. With thesevisualized contours or animations, noise sources can be easily located and quantified; also noise transmissionpath can be found out. By numerical simulation and experimental results, we proved that the technique aresuitable and accurate for sound field reconstruction. In addition, we presented a sound field reconstruction sys-tem prototype on the basis of this technique. It makes a foundation for the application of wave superpositionin the sound field reconstruction in industry situations.

  9. Solar system plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  10. Oscillatory Flow in Thermoacoustic Sound Wave Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masayasu HATAZAWA

    2006-01-01

    Oscillatory flow in a thermoacoustic sound wave generator is described. The thermoacoustic sound wave generator plays an important role in thermoacoustic equipment. The heat exchange between the working fluid and the stack, the acceleration and deceleration of the working fluid and viscous friction loss both in the stack and in the resonance tube influence the performance of the thermoacoustic sound wave generator. Particularly,oscillatory flow significantly influences the heat exchange mechanism between the working fluid and the stack.Temporal changes in pressure and velocity are sinusoidal inside the resonance tube. Flow forms an oscillatory jet just behind the tube outlet, and becomes intermittent far downstream outside the resonance tube. The open-end corrections of 0.63R, that is, the region where oscillatory flow characteristics are maintained downstream in spite of being outside the tube outlet, are confirmed by velocity measurements and flow visualization. Also, they are almost equal to acoustical theoretical results.

  11. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, F; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F; Veltri, P; Morrison, P J; O'Neil, T M

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named {\\it corner modes}. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the $(k,\\omega_{_R})$ plane ($\\omega_{_R}$ being the real part of the wave frequency and $k$ the wavenumber), away from the well-known `thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existenc...

  12. Crova's Disc: A Way to Make Sound Waves "Visible."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Explained are the differences between and offered are examples of longitudinal and transverse sound waves. Described is the construction of the Crova's Disc, a device used in the teaching of the propagation and properties of sound waves. (DS)

  13. Sound Wave in Vortex with Sink

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S

    2003-01-01

    Using Komar's definition, we give expressions for the mass and angular momentum of a rotating acoustic black hole. We show that the mass and angular momentum so defined, obey the equilibrium version of the first law of Black Hole thermodynamics. We also show that when a phonon passes by a vortex with a sink, its trajectory is bent. The angle of bending of the sound wave to leading order is quadratic in $A/cb$ and $B/cb$, where $b$ is the impact parameter and $A$ and $B$ are the parameters in the velocity of the fluid flow. The time delay in the propagation of sound wave which to first order depends only on $B/c^2$ and is independent of $A$.

  14. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  15. How to Use a Candle to Study Sound Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, P. Simeão; Briosa, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Pereira, C.; Ataíde, M.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that sound waves in air are longitudinal waves. Although teachers use analogies such as compressing horizontal springs to demonstrate what longitudinal waves look like, students still present some difficulty in understanding that (1) sound waves correspond to oscillations of air particles, and (2) there is no "air flow"…

  16. How to Use a Candle to Study Sound Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, P. Simeão; Briosa, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Pereira, C.; Ataíde, M.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that sound waves in air are longitudinal waves. Although teachers use analogies such as compressing horizontal springs to demonstrate what longitudinal waves look like, students still present some difficulty in understanding that (1) sound waves correspond to oscillations of air particles, and (2) there is no "air flow"…

  17. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  18. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  19. Rayleigh scattering of a spherical sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic Green's functions for a homogeneous medium with an embedded spherical obstacle arise in analyses of scattering by objects on or near an interface, radiation by finite sources, sound attenuation in and scattering from clouds of suspended particles, etc. An exact solution of the problem of diffraction of a monochromatic spherical sound wave on a sphere is given by an infinite series involving products of Bessel functions and Legendre polynomials. In this paper, a simple, closed-form solution is obtained for scattering by a sphere with a radius that is small compared to the wavelength. Soft, hard, impedance, and fluid obstacles are considered. The solution is valid for arbitrary positions of the source and receiver relative to the scatterer. Low-frequency scattering is shown to be rather sensitive to boundary conditions on the surface of the obstacle. Low-frequency asymptotics of the scattered acoustic field are extended to transient incident waves. The asymptotic expansions admit an intuitive interpretation in terms of image sources and reduce to classical results in appropriate limiting cases.

  20. Universal instability of dust ion-sound waves and dust-acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsytovich, V.N. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science Moscow, Moscow (Russian Federation); Watanabe, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the dust ion-sound waves (DISW) and the dust-acoustic waves (DAW) are universally unstable for wave numbers less than some critical wave number. The basic dusty plasma state is assumed to be quasi-neutral with balance of the plasma particle absorption on the dust particles and the ionization with the rate proportional to the electron density. An analytical expression for the critical wave numbers, for the frequencies and for the growth rates of DISW and DAW are found using the hydrodynamic description of dusty plasma components with self-consistent treatment of the dust charge variations and by taking into account the change of the ion and electron distributions in the dust charging process. Most of the previous treatment do not take into account the latter process and do not treat the basic state self-consistently. The critical lengths corresponding to these critical wave numbers can be easily achieved in the existing experiments. It is shown that at the wave numbers larger than the critical ones DISW and DAW have a large damping which was not treated previously and which can be also measured. The instabilities found in the present work on their non linear stage can lead to formation of different types of dust self-organized structures. (author)

  1. Wave turbulence in magnetized plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galtier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent progress on wave turbulence for magnetized plasmas (MHD, Hall MHD and electron MHD in the incompressible and compressible cases. The emphasis is made on homogeneous and anisotropic turbulence which usually provides the best theoretical framework to investigate space and laboratory plasmas. The solar wind and the coronal heating problems are presented as two examples of application of anisotropic wave turbulence. The most important results of wave turbulence are reported and discussed in the context of natural and simulated magnetized plasmas. Important issues and possible spurious interpretations are also discussed.

  2. Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, Sergei V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic “Four-Ray Star” pattern.

  3. Visualization of Sound Waves Using Regularly Spaced Soap Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, F.; Hutzler, S.; Ferreira, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel demonstration experiment for the visualization and measurement of standing sound waves in a tube. The tube is filled with equally spaced soap films whose thickness varies in response to the amplitude of the sound wave. The thickness variations are made visible based on optical interference. The distance between two antinodes is…

  4. Spin current-induced by a sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapilin, Igor I

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of conduction electrons with a longitudinal sound wave propagating in a crystal in a constant magnetic field is investigated. It is shown that the transverse spin current arises when the longitudinal sound wave propagation through the system. The average power absorbed by the spin subsystem of the conduction electrons and the spin-Hall conductivity have a resonant character.

  5. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Liu

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these notes are selective and tend to emphasize more on kinetic-theory approaches to waves and instabilities in both uniform and non-uniform plasmas, students are assumed to have some basic knowledge of plasma dynamics in terms of single-particle and fluid descriptions.

  6. A simple electron plasma wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, G., E-mail: gert.brodin@physics.umu.se [Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Stenflo, L. [Department of Physics, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-03-18

    Considering a class of solutions where the density perturbations are functions of time, but not of space, we derive a new exact large amplitude wave solution for a cold uniform electron plasma. This result illustrates that most simple analytical solutions can appear even if the density perturbations are large. - Highlights: • The influence of large amplitude electromagnetic waves on electrostatic oscillations is found. • A generalized Mathieu equation is derived. • Anharmonic wave profiles are computed numerically.

  7. Wave rectification in plasma sheaths surrounding electric field antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M. H.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J. P.; Clemmons, J. H.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Combined measurements of Langmuir or broadband whistler wave intensity and lower-frequency electric field waveforms, all at 10-microsecond time resolution, were made on several recent sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere. It is found that Langmuir and whistler waves are partically rectified in the plasma sheaths surrounding the payload and the spheres used as antennas. This sheath rectification occurs whenever the high frequency (HF) potential across the sheath becomes of the same order as the electron temperature or higher, for wave frequencies near or above the ion plasma frequency. This rectification can introduce false low-frequency waves into measurements of electric field spectra when strong high-frequency waves are present. Second harmonic signals are also generated, although at much lower levels. The effect occurs in many different plasma conditions, primarily producing false waves at frequencies that are low enough for the antenna coupling to the plasma to be resistive.

  8. Nonlinear Plasma Wave in Magnetized Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei V; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K; Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic "Four-Ray Star" pattern which has been observed in the image of the electron bunch in experiments [T. Hosokai, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 075004 (2006)].

  9. A mechanism study of sound wave-trapping barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Pan, Jie; Cheng, Li

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a sound barrier is usually degraded if a large reflecting surface is placed on the source side. A wave-trapping barrier (WTB), with its inner surface covered by wedge-shaped structures, has been proposed to confine waves within the area between the barrier and the reflecting surface, and thus improve the performance. In this paper, the deterioration in performance of a conventional sound barrier due to the reflecting surface is first explained in terms of the resonance effect of the trapped modes. At each resonance frequency, a strong and mode-controlled sound field is generated by the noise source both within and in the vicinity outside the region bounded by the sound barrier and the reflecting surface. It is found that the peak sound pressures in the barrier's shadow zone, which correspond to the minimum values in the barrier's insertion loss, are largely determined by the resonance frequencies and by the shapes and losses of the trapped modes. These peak pressures usually result in high sound intensity component impinging normal to the barrier surface near the top. The WTB can alter the sound wave diffraction at the top of the barrier if the wavelengths of the sound wave are comparable or smaller than the dimensions of the wedge. In this case, the modified barrier profile is capable of re-organizing the pressure distribution within the bounded domain and altering the acoustic properties near the top of the sound barrier.

  10. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  11. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  12. Demonstrating Sound Wave Propagation with Candle Flame and Loudspeaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrepic, Zdeslav; Nettles, Corey; Bonilla, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    The motion of a candle flame in front of a loudspeaker has been suggested as a productive demonstration of the longitudinal wave nature of sound. The demonstration has been used also as a research tool to investigate students' understanding about sound. The underpinning of both applications is the expectation of a horizontal, back-and-forth…

  13. Analyzing Sound Waves Produced by Musical Notes & Chords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Michael

    This project description is designed to show how graphing calculators and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) can be used to explore topics in the physics of sound. The activities address topics such as sound waves, musical notes, and chords. Teaching notes, calculator instructions, and blackline masters are included. (MM)

  14. Air-borne sound generated by sea waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Karl; Åbom, Mats

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a semi-empiric model and measurements of air-borne sound generated by breaking sea waves. Measurements have been performed at the Baltic Sea. Shores with different slopes and sediment types have been investigated. Results showed that the sound pressure level increased from 60 dB at 0.4 m wave height to 78 dB at 2.0 m wave height. The 1/3 octave spectrum was dependent on the surf type. A scaling model based on the dissipated wave power and a surf similarity parameter is proposed and compared to measurements. The predictions show satisfactory agreement to the measurements.

  15. A simple electron plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, G.; Stenflo, L.

    2017-03-01

    Considering a class of solutions where the density perturbations are functions of time, but not of space, we derive a new exact large amplitude wave solution for a cold uniform electron plasma. This result illustrates that most simple analytical solutions can appear even if the density perturbations are large.

  16. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  17. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave.......Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave....

  18. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  19. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  20. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  1. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  2. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  3. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  4. Effects of parallel sound wave damping and drift kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode stability with various plasma rotation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yue

    2015-10-01

    > The effect of a parallel viscous force induced damping and the magnetic precessional drift resonance induced damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is numerically investigated for one of the advanced steady-state scenarios in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The key element of the investigation is to study how different plasma rotation profiles affect the stability prediction. The single-fluid, toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 7, 2000, p. 3681) and the MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 15, 2008, 112503) are used for this purpose. Three extreme rotation profiles are considered: (a) a uniform profile with no shear, (b) a profile with negative flow shear at the rational surface ( is the equilibrium safety factor), and (c) a profile with positive shear at . The parallel viscous force is found to be effective for the mode stabilization at high plasma flow speed (about a few percent of the Alfven speed) for the no shear flow profile and the negative shear flow profile, but the stable domain does not appear with the positive shear flow profile. The predicted eigenmode structure is different with different rotation profiles. With a self-consistent inclusion of the magnetic precession drift resonance of thermal particles in MARS-K computations, a lower critical flow speed, i.e. the minimum speed needed for full suppression of the mode, is obtained. Likewise the eigenmode structure is also modified by different rotation profiles in the kinetic results.

  5. Electron waves and resonances in bounded plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenplas, Paul E

    1968-01-01

    General theoretical methods and experimental techniques ; the uniform plasma slab-condenser system ; the hollow cylindrical plasma ; scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a plasma column in steady magnetic fields (cold plasma approximation) ; hot non-uniform plasma column ; metallic and dielectric resonance probes, plasma-dielectric coated antenna, general considerations.

  6. Scattering of sound waves by a compressible vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    Scattering of plane sound waves by a compressible vortex is investigated by direct computation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Nonreflecting boundary conditions are utilized, and their accuracy is established by comparing results on different sized domains. Scattered waves are directly measured from the computations. The resulting amplitude and directivity pattern of the scattered waves is discussed, and compared to various theoretical predictions. For compact vortices (zero circulation), the scattered waves directly computed are in good agreement with predictions based on an acoustic analogy. Strong scattering at about + or - 30 degrees from the direction of incident wave propagation is observed. Back scattering is an order of magnitude smaller than forward scattering. For vortices with finite circulation refraction of the sound by the mean flow field outside the vortex core is found to be important in determining the amplitude and directivity of the scattered wave field.

  7. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  8. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  9. Monograph on propagation of sound waves in curved ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    After reviewing and evaluating the existing material on sound propagation in curved ducts without flow, it seems strange that, except for Lord Rayleigh in 1878, no book on acoustics has treated the case of wave motion in bends. This monograph reviews the available analytical and experimental material, nearly 30 papers published on this subject so far, and concisely summarizes what has been learned about the motion of sound in hard-wall and acoustically lined cylindrical bends.

  10. Determining the speed of sound in the air by sound wave interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A.

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical waves propagate through material media. Sound is an example of a mechanical wave. In fluids like air, sound waves propagate through successive longitudinal perturbations of compression and decompression. Audible sound frequencies for human ears range from 20 to 20 000 Hz. In this study, the speed of sound v in the air is determined using the identification of maxima of interference from two synchronous waves at frequency f. The values of v were correct to 0 °C. The experimental average value of {\\bar{ν }}\\exp =336 +/- 4 {{m}} {{{s}}}-1 was found. It is 1.5% larger than the reference value. The standard deviation of 4 m s-1 (1.2% of {\\bar{ν }}\\exp ) is an improved value by the use of the concept of the central limit theorem. The proposed procedure to determine the speed of sound in the air aims to be an academic activity for physics classes of scientific and technological courses in college.

  11. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samiran Ghosh; Nikhil Chakrabarti; Manoranjan Khan; M R Gupta

    2013-02-01

    The conditions for the existence of low-frequency electrostatic drift wave in pair-ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  12. Scattering of coherent sound waves by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P. L.; Liu, C. H.; Maestrello, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study of the propagation of coherent sound waves through an atmosphere containing both mean and fluctuating flow variables is presented. The general flow problem is formulated as a time-dependent wave propagation in a half-space containing the turbulent medium. The coherent acoustic waves are analyzed by a smoothing technique, assuming that mean flow variables vary with the height only. The general equations for the coherent waves are derived, and then applied to two special cases, corresponding to uniform and shear mean flow, respectively. The results show that mean shear and turbulence introduce pronounced effects on the propagation of coherent acoustic disturbances.

  13. Glottal Waves via Inverse Filtering of Vowel Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huiqun; Ward, Rabab; Beddoes, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows how to obtain accurate glottal waves via inverse filtering of vowel sounds and how to determine if these glottal waves contain any significant resonance of vocal tracts. We obtain vocal-tract filter (VTF) estimates for the inverse filtering from sustained vowel sounds over closed glottal phases using a new method, which minimizes the effects of glottal waves on the VTF estimates. It is common that VTF estimates contain the effects of incomplete glottal closures, and the glottal waves obtained via inverse filtering contain residual vocal-tract resonance. Our simulations show that the residual resonance appears as stationary ripples superimposed on the derivatives of the original glottal waves over the duration of a glottal cycle. The VTF estimates and the glottal waves obtained from sustained vowel sounds /a/ produced by male and female subjects are presented. The derivatives of the obtained glottal waves exhibit transient positive peaks during vocal-fold collision and negative levels in the earlier stage of vocal-fold parting.

  14. A tomographic visualization of electric discharge sound fields in atmospheric pressure plasma using laser diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Yoichiro; Ikegami, Tomoaki; Tsuda, Ryoichi; Sonoda, Yoshito; Danuta Stryczewska, Henryka

    2013-02-01

    The phase modulation of transparent gas can be detected using Fraunhofer diffraction technique, which we call optical wave microphone (OWM). The OWM is suitable for the detection of sonic wave from audible sound to ultrasonic wave. Because this technique has no influence on sound field or electric field during the measurement, we have applied it to the sound detection for the electric discharges. There is almost no research paper that uses the discharge sound to examine the electrical discharge phenomenon. Two-dimensional visualization of the sound field using the OWM is also possible when the computerized tomography (CT) is combined. In this work, coplanar dielectric barrier discharge sin different gases of Ar, N2, He were characterized via the OWM as well as applied voltage and discharge current. This is the first report to investigate the influence of the type of the atmospheric gas on the two-dimensional sound field distribution for the coplanar dielectric barrier discharge using the OWM with CT. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  15. On the propagation of sound waves in a stellar wind traversed by periodic strong shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Pijpers, F. P.

    1994-01-01

    It has been claimed that in stellar winds traversed by strong shocks the mechanism for driving the wind by sound wave pressure cannot operate because sound waves cannot propagate past the shocks. It is shown here that sound waves can propagate through shocks in one direction and that this is a sufficient condition for the sound wave pressure mechanism to work. A strong shock amplifies a sound wave passing through it and can drag the sound wave away from the star. It is immaterial for the soun...

  16. Sounding-Rocket Studies of Langmuir-Wave Microphysics in the Auroral Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Micah P.

    Since their discovery in laboratory plasmas in the 1920s, Langmuir waves have been observed to be ubiquitous in plasma environments, particularly in space plasmas. From the greater solar wind to planetary foreshocks and the auroral ionosphere, Langmuir waves are a key factor mediating electron temperature, and controlling electron beam propagation and beam-plasma energy transfer. Because they are so important, Langmuir waves in the space environment have been intensively investigated; however, there remain two challenging types of experiments that are relatively lacking: three-dimensional measurements of Langmuir-wave fields, and measurements of Langmuir wave-electron correlations. This thesis works on filling these two gaps, plus development of new Langmuir-wave instrumentation. The CHARM-II wave-particle Correlator instrument was designed to study the energy transfer between electron beams and plasmas via the sorting of incoming particles by concurrent Langmuir-wave phase, allowing for direct observation of electron bunching. Data from the CHARM-II sounding rocket comprises the first such observations with statistical levels of events, revealing an association between the polarity of the resistive component of the electron phase-bunching and changes in the electron flux at the associated energy, such that a negative resistive component goes with an increase in electron flux, and vice versa, effectively showing energy flow from the beam to the waves, and subsequent enhancements of wave damping. Surprisingly, the results also show comparable amounts of resistive and reactive activity. A test-particle simulation was developed to confirm the details of the theoretical explanation for the observed effect. A three-dimensional Langmuir-wave receiver flown on the TRICE sounding rocket mission reveals the beat signature of the amplitude-modulated 'bursty' form of Langmuir waves which has been observed in many environments. An analysis of the three-dimensional data shows

  17. Dichromatic Langmuir waves in degenerate quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinov, A. E.; Kitayev, I. N.

    2015-06-01

    Langmuir waves in fully degenerate quantum plasma are considered. It is shown that, in the linear approximation, Langmuir waves are always dichromatic. The low-frequency component of the waves corresponds to classical Langmuir waves, while the high-frequency component, to free-electron quantum oscillations. The nonlinear problem on the profile of dichromatic Langmuir waves is solved. Solutions in the form of a superposition of waves and in the form of beatings of its components are obtained.

  18. Strength and wave parameters for sound propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Wilson, D Keith

    2017-03-01

    Line-of-sight sound propagation of plane and spherical waves in a statistically isotropic, random moving medium is considered. The variances of the phase and log-amplitude fluctuations of these waves are expressed in terms of the strength and wave parameters for arbitrary spectra of temperature and velocity fluctuations, and results are then derived specifically for the Gaussian and generalized von Kármán spectra. This representation of the variances reduces significantly the number of independent parameters of the problem and enables better understanding of sound scattering by plane and spherical waves, and due to temperature and velocity fluctuations. Using this representation, the boundary between the weak and strong scattering regimes is determined in terms of the strength and wave parameters. The results obtained are compared with the Λ - Φ diagram adopted in ocean acoustics. Other statistical moments of plane and spherical waves in a medium with arbitrary spectra of temperature and velocity fluctuations such as the mean sound field, the spatial and temporal mutual coherence functions, the coherence bandwidth, and the variance of the angle-of-arrival fluctuations are expressed in terms of the strength parameter and length scale of the fluctuations.

  19. Understanding and Affecting Student Reasoning about Sound Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Michael C.; Steinberg, Richard N.; Redish, Edward F.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the design and development of curriculum materials that ask students to think about physics from a different view. These group-learning classroom materials specifically aim to bring about improvement of student understanding of sound waves. (Contains 29 references.) (Author/SOE)

  20. The dust acoustic waves in three dimensional scalable complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukhovitskii, D I

    2015-01-01

    Dust acoustic waves in the bulk of a dust cloud in complex plasma of low pressure gas discharge under microgravity conditions are considered. The dust component of complex plasma is assumed a scalable system that conforms to the ionization equation of state (IEOS) developed in our previous study. We find singular points of this IEOS that determine the behavior of the sound velocity in different regions of the cloud. The fluid approach is utilized to deduce the wave equation that includes the neutral drag term. It is shown that the sound velocity is fully defined by the particle compressibility, which is calculated on the basis of the scalable IEOS. The sound velocities and damping rates calculated for different 3D complex plasmas both in ac and dc discharges demonstrate a good correlation with experimental data that are within the limits of validity of the theory. The theory provides interpretation for the observed independence of the sound velocity on the coordinate and for a weak dependence on the particle ...

  1. Low-Frequency Waves in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiling, Andreas; Lee, Dong-Hun; Nakariakov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency waves in space plasmas have been studied for several decades, and our knowledge gain has been incremental with several paradigm-changing leaps forward. In our solar system, such waves occur in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of planets, and around our Moon. They occur in the solar wind, and more recently, they have been confirmed in the Sun's atmosphere as well. The goal of wave research is to understand their generation, their propagation, and their interaction with the surrounding plasma. Low-frequency Waves in Space Plasmas presents a concise and authoritative up-to-date look on where wave research stands: What have we learned in the last decade? What are unanswered questions? While in the past waves in different astrophysical plasmas have been largely treated in separate books, the unique feature of this monograph is that it covers waves in many plasma regions, including: Waves in geospace, including ionosphere and magnetosphere Waves in planetary magnetospheres Waves at the Moon Waves in the solar wind Waves in the solar atmosphere Because of the breadth of topics covered, this volume should appeal to a broad community of space scientists and students, and it should also be of interest to astronomers/astrophysicists who are studying space plasmas beyond our Solar System.

  2. Three-dimensional sound signals and their relevance to wave energy quantities and sound interference products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakis, Pantelis

    2003-10-01

    Signals are graphic representations of vibrations/waves and, like every representation, capture only selected attributes of the phenomenon they are meant to represent. The often assumed equivalence between signals and sound waves obscures the fact that two-dimensional signals are not fit to (a) represent wave-energy quantities consistently across frequencies, (b) account for the alternating positive/negative amplitude values of modulated waves with AM-depth>100%, and (c) represent the energy content of interference. An alternative sound-signal representation is proposed, based on the complex equation of motion describing a wave. It results in spiral sine signals and twisted-spiral complex signals, similar to complex analytic signals. Spiral sine signals offer a consistent measure of sine-wave energy across frequencies, while twisted spiral complex signals account for the negative amplitudes observed in modulated signals and map the modulation parameters onto the twisting parameters. In terms of interference, 3-D signals illustrate that amplitude fluctuations and the signal envelopes that describe them are not just boundary curves but waves that trace changes in the total instantaneous energy of a signal over time, representing the oscillation between potential and kinetic energies within a wave. Examples of 3-D animations illustrating the proposed signals are presented. a)Work completed while at the Department of Ethnomusicology, University of California, Los Angeles.

  3. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  4. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    CERN Document Server

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  5. Plasma Waves as a Benchmark Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Kilian, Patrick; Schreiner, Cedric; Spanier, Felix

    2016-01-01

    A large number of wave modes exist in a magnetized plasma. Their properties are determined by the interaction of particles and waves. In a simulation code, the correct treatment of field quantities and particle behavior is essential to correctly reproduce the wave properties. Consequently, plasma waves provide test problems that cover a large fraction of the simulation code. The large number of possible wave modes and the freedom to choose parameters make the selection of test problems time consuming and comparison between different codes difficult. This paper therefore aims to provide a selection of test problems, based on different wave modes and with well defined parameter values, that is accessible to a large number of simulation codes to allow for easy benchmarking and cross validation. Example results are provided for a number of plasma models. For all plasma models and wave modes that are used in the test problems, a mathematical description is provided to clarify notation and avoid possible misunderst...

  6. Electromagnetic waves in a strong Schwarzschild plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, J.; Tajima, T.

    1996-11-01

    The physics of high frequency electromagnetic waves in a general relativistic plasma with the Schwarzschild metric is studied. Based on the 3 + 1 formalism, we conformalize Maxwell`s equations. The derived dispersion relations for waves in the plasma contain the lapse function in the plasma parameters such as in the plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency, but otherwise look {open_quotes}flat.{close_quotes} Because of this property this formulation is ideal for nonlinear self-consistent particle (PIC) simulation. Some of the physical consequences arising from the general relativistic lapse function as well as from the effects specific to the plasma background distribution (such as density and magnetic field) give rise to nonuniform wave equations and their associated phenomena, such as wave resonance, cutoff, and mode-conversion. These phenomena are expected to characterize the spectroscopy of radiation emitted by the plasma around the black hole. PIC simulation results of electron-positron plasma are also presented.

  7. Multiple slow waves in metaporous layers for broadband sound absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2017-01-01

    Sound absorption for a broad frequency range requires sound dissipation. The mechanics of acoustic metamaterials for non-dissipative applications has been extensively studied, but sound absorption using dissipative porous metamaterials has been less explored because of the complexity resulting from the coupling of its dissipative mechanism and metamaterial behavior. We investigated broadband sound absorption by engineering dissipative metaporous layers, which absorb sound by the mechanism of multiple slow waves, and combined local and global resonance phenomena. A set of rigid partitions of varying lengths was elaborately inserted in a hard-backed porous layer of a finite thickness. An effective medium theory was used to explain the physics involved; high performance at a low-frequency range was found to be mainly due to the formation of global resonances caused by multiple slow waves over the thickness of the metaporous layer, while enhancement at a high-frequency range was attributed to the combined effects of the global resonances and the local resonances directly related to the sizes of the inserted partitions.

  8. ON INTERACTION OF SHOCK AND SOUND WAVE (I)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENSHUXING

    1996-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction of shock and gradient wave (sound wave) of solutions to the system of inviscid isentropic gas dynamics as a model for the corresponding problems for nonlinear hyperbolic systems. The problem can be reduced to a boundary value problem in a wedged dormain, By using the method of constructing asymptotic solutions and Newton'siteration process it is proved that if a weak shock hits a gradient wave, then the grandient wave will split into two gradient waves, while the shock continuses propagating. In this paper the author reduces the problem to a standard form and constructs asymptotic solution of the problem. The existence of the genuine solution will he given in the following paper.

  9. Sound topology, duality, coherence and wave-mixing an introduction to the emerging new science of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Deymier, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This book offers an essential introduction to the notions of sound wave topology, duality, coherence and wave-mixing, which constitute the emerging new science of sound. It includes general principles and specific examples that illuminate new non-conventional forms of sound (sound topology), unconventional quantum-like behavior of phonons (duality), radical linear and nonlinear phenomena associated with loss and its control (coherence), and exquisite effects that emerge from the interaction of sound with other physical and biological waves (wave mixing).  The book provides the reader with the foundations needed to master these complex notions through simple yet meaningful examples. General principles for unraveling and describing the topology of acoustic wave functions in the space of their Eigen values are presented. These principles are then applied to uncover intrinsic and extrinsic approaches to achieving non-conventional topologies by breaking the time revers al symmetry of acoustic waves. Symmetry brea...

  10. Phonon gas and changes of shape of second sound wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ruggeri

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available A generalized non linear Maxwell-Cattaneo equation is used to study shock waves propagating in a rigid heat conductor at low temperature. Taking into account the experimental values for the second sound velocity, the existence of a critical temperature characteristic of the materials and separating two families of shocks, the “hot” and the “cold” ones, is proved both numerically and analytically. Finally a possible explanation of the distortion of the initial second sound thermal pulse during its propagation is proposed.

  11. Solitary Waves in Relativistic Electromagnetic Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-Song; HUA Cun-Cai

    2005-01-01

    Solitary waves in relativistic electromagnetic plasmas are obtained numerically. The longitudinal momentum of electrons has been taken into account in the problem. It is found that in the moving frame with electromagnetic field propagating the solitary waves can exist in both cases, where the vector potential frequency is larger or smaller than the plasma characteristic frequency.

  12. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik M Salomons

    Full Text Available Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii reduction of the lattice spacing.

  13. Simulation of sound waves using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for fluid flow: Benchmark cases for outdoor sound propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Lohman, W.J.A.; Zhou, H.

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-fi

  14. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Erik M; Lohman, Walter J A; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i) reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii) reduction of the lattice spacing.

  15. Determination of ocean surface wave shape from forward scattered sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-08-01

    Forward scattered sound from the ocean surface is inverted for wave shape during three periods: low wind, mix of wind and swell, and stormy. Derived wave profiles are spatially limited to a Fresnel region at or near the nominal surface specular reflection point. In some cases, the surface wave profiles exhibit unrealistic temporal and spatial properties. To remedy this, the spatial gradient of inverted waves is constrained to a maximum slope of 0.88. Under this global constraint, only surface waves during low wind conditions result in a modeled surface multipath that accurately matches data. The power spectral density of the inverted surface wave field saturates around a frequency of 8 Hz while upward looking SONAR saturates at 1 Hz. Each shows a high frequency spectral slope of -4 that is in agreement with various empirical ocean wave spectra. The improved high frequency resolution provided by the scattering inversion indicates that it is possible to remotely gain information about high frequency components of ocean waves. The inability of the inversion algorithm to determine physically realistic surface waves in periods of high wind indicates that bubbles and out of plane scattering become important in those operating scenarios.

  16. Mixing of blackbodies: entropy production and dissipation of sound waves in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Khatri, Rishi; Chluba, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Mixing of blackbodies with different temperatures creates a spectral distortion which, at lowest order, is a y-type distortion, indistinguishable from the thermal y-type distortion produced by the scattering of CMB photons by hot electrons residing in clusters of galaxies. This process occurs in the radiation-pressure dominated early Universe, when the primordial perturbations excite standing sound waves on entering the sound horizon. Photons from different phases of the sound waves, having different temperatures, diffuse through the electron-baryon plasma and mix together. This diffusion, with the length defined by Thomson scattering, dissipates sound waves and creates spectral distortions in the CMB. Of the total dissipated energy, 2/3 raises the average temperature of the blackbody part of spectrum, while 1/3 creates a distortion of y-type. It is well known that at redshifts 10^5< z< 2x10^6, comptonization rapidly transforms y-distortions into a Bose-Einstein spectrum. The chemical potential of the B...

  17. Alfven Wave Tomography for Cold MHD Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-07

    Alfven waves propagation in slightly nonuniform cold plasmas is studied by means of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nonlinear equations. The evolution of the MHD spectrum is shown to be governed by a matrix linear differential equation with constant coefficients determined by the spectrum of quasi-static plasma density perturbations. The Alfven waves are shown not to affect the plasma density inhomogeneities, as they scatter off of them. The application of the MHD spectrum evolution equation to the inverse scattering problem allows tomographic measurements of the plasma density profile by scanning the plasma volume with Alfven radiation.

  18. A Network Model on the Processing of Sound Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng; WU Guo-wen

    2008-01-01

    On the base of auditory neural system,the network model on the processing of the sound wave is presented.The mathematic equation of the network is also discussed.In the network model,in addition to the negative feedback of the nfural cell in the ontput layer,the cell in the input layer excites the corresponding cell in the output layer meanwhile it inhibits the lateral cells.The network has its advantage on the processing of sound wave.In addition to filter the noise,it can search the significance frequency segments (Barks).Thc "channel supprcssgr" feature,the special phenomena of the human ear,is explained based on the model.The learning algorithm of the network model is discussed,too.In the end,an example is introduced about the application of the network.

  19. Understanding and Affecting Student Reasoning About Sound Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, M C; Redish, E F; Wittmann, Michael C.; Steinberg, Richard N.; Redish, Edward F.

    2002-01-01

    Student learning of sound waves can be helped through the creation of group-learning classroom materials whose development and design rely on explicit investigations into student understanding. We describe reasoning in terms of sets of resources, i.e. grouped building blocks of thinking that are commonly used in many different settings. Students in our university physics classes often used sets of resources that were different from the ones we wish them to use. By designing curriculum materials that ask students to think about the physics from a different view, we bring about improvement in student understanding of sound waves. Our curriculum modifications are specific to our own classes, but our description of student learning is more generally useful for teachers. We describe how students can use multiple sets of resources in their thinking, and raise questions that should be considered by both instructors and researchers.

  20. The Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS) for the Europa Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, J. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Case, A. W.; Rymer, A. M.; Stevens, M. L.; Jia, X.; Paty, C.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, H. T.; Korth, H.; Krupp, N.; Roussous, E.; Saur, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present the Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS) selected for the Europa Mission. We specifically address how PIMS plasma measurements will improve the accuracy of magnetic sounding of Europa's subsurface ocean.

  1. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  2. Effect of Intense Sound Waves on a Stationary Gas Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnemann, H; Ehret, L

    1950-01-01

    Intense sound waves with a resonant frequency of 5000 cycles per second were imposed on a stationary propane-air flame issuing from a nozzle. In addition to a slight increase of the flame velocity, a fundamental change both in the shape of the burning zone and in the flow pattern could be observed. An attempt is made to explain the origin of the variations in the flame configuration on the basis of transition at the nozzle from jet flow to potential flow.

  3. Laboratory measurements of the effect of internal waves on sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsong

    2016-11-01

    The fidelity of acoustic signals used in communication and imaging in the oceans is limited by density fluctuations arising from many sources, particularly from internal waves. We present results from laboratory experiments on sound propagation through an internal wave field produced by a wave generator consisting of multiple oscillating plates. The fluid density as a function of height is measured and used to determine the sound speed as a function of the height. Sound pulses from a transducer propagate through the fluctuating stratified density field and are detected to determine sound refraction, pulse arrival time, and sound signal distortion. The results are compared with sound ray model and numerical models of underwater sound propagation. The laboratory experiments can explore the parameter dependence by varying the fluid density profile, the sound pulse signal, and the internal wave amplitude and frequency. The results lead to a better understanding of sound propagation through and scattered by internal waves.

  4. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  5. Research on attenuation characteristic of sound wave in coal or rock body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Bai-sheng; HE Xue-qiu; LI Xiang-chun; GAO Hong

    2007-01-01

    In order to using power sound wave increase permeability of coal, rules of attenuation of sound wave in coal should be studied. In this paper, characteristic and mechanism of attenuation of sound wave in coal was researched according to acoustic theory and attenuation coefficients was estimated by acoustic parameter of coal. The research results show that the main attenuation mechanism of sound wave in coal is absorption attenuation and scattering attenuation. The absorption attenuation includes viscous absorption, thermal conduction absorption and relaxation absorption. Attenuation coefficient of sound wave in gaseous coal is 38.5 Np/m. Researches on attenuation characteristic of sound wave will provide the theoretical basis for power sound wave improving permeability of coal and accelerating desorption of coal bed gas.

  6. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is invoked to study the effect of solar-wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type-III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type-III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar-flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir-wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Riegel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations {approximately}1%. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action-principle approach is used to develop a theory of nonlinear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability.

  7. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  8. Kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.P. [Plasma Simulation Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Sachin, E-mail: dynamicalfven@gmail.co [Plasma Simulation Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016, New Delhi (India)

    2010-07-26

    This work presents the derivation of nonlinear coupled equations for the evolution of solar wind turbulence. These equations are governing the coupled dynamics of kinetic Alfven wave and ion acoustic wave. Numerical simulation of these equations is also presented. The ponderomotive nonlinearity is incorporated in the wave dynamics. Filamentation of kinetic Alfven wave and the turbulent spectra are presented in intermediate-{beta} plasmas at heliocentric distances (0.3 AU{<=}r<1.0 AU). The growing filaments and steeper turbulent spectra (of power law k{sup -S}, 5/3{<=}S{<=}3) can be responsible for plasma heating and particle acceleration in solar wind.

  9. Nonlinear Electron Waves in Strongly Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1980-01-01

    dynamics in the analysis is also demonstrated. As a particular case the authors investigate nonlinear waves in a strongly magnetized plasma filled wave-guide, where the effects of finite geometry are important. The relevance of this problem to laboratory experiments is discussed.......Weakly nonlinear dispersive electron waves in strongly magnetized plasma are considered. A modified nonlinear Schrodinger equation is derived taking into account the effect of particles resonating with the group velocity of the waves (nonlinear Landau damping). The possibility of including the ion...

  10. The 2011 marine heat wave in Cockburn Sound, southwest Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Rose

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 2000 km of Western Australian coastline experienced a significant marine heat wave in February and March 2011. Seawater temperature anomalies of +2–4 °C were recorded at a number of locations, and satellite-derived SSTs (sea surface temperatures were the highest on record. Here, we present seawater temperatures from southwestern Australia and describe, in detail, the marine climatology of Cockburn Sound, a large, multiple-use coastal embayment. We compared temperature and dissolved oxygen levels in 2011 with data from routine monitoring conducted from 2002–2010. A significant warming event, 2–4 °C in magnitude, persisted for > 8 weeks, and seawater temperatures at 10 to 20 m depth were significantly higher than those recorded in the previous 9 yr. Dissolved oxygen levels were depressed at most monitoring sites, being ~ 2 mg l−1 lower than usual in early March 2011. Ecological responses to short-term extreme events are poorly understood, but evidence from elsewhere along the Western Australian coastline suggests that the heat wave was associated with high rates of coral bleaching; fish, invertebrate and macroalgae mortalities; and algal blooms. However, there is a paucity of historical information on ecologically-sensitive habitats and taxa in Cockburn Sound, so that formal examinations of biological responses to the heat wave were not possible. The 2011 heat wave provided insights into conditions that may become more prevalent in Cockburn Sound, and elsewhere, if the intensity and frequency of short-term extreme events increases as predicted.

  11. Nonlinear Electrostatic Wave Equations for Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dysthe, K.B.; Mjølhus, E.; Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The lowest order kinetic effects are included in the equations for nonlinear electrostatic electron waves in a magnetized plasma. The modifications of the authors' previous analysis based on a fluid model are discussed.......The lowest order kinetic effects are included in the equations for nonlinear electrostatic electron waves in a magnetized plasma. The modifications of the authors' previous analysis based on a fluid model are discussed....

  12. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  13. Waves in plasmas (part 1 - wave-plasma interaction general background); Ondes dans les plasmas (Partie 1 - interaction onde / plasma: bases physiques)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, R

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers a series of transparencies presented in the framework of the week-long lectures 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to the physics of wave-plasma interaction. The structure of this document is as follows: 1) wave and diverse plasmas, 2) basic equations (Maxwell equations), 3) waves in a fluid plasma, and 4) waves in a kinetic plasma (collisionless plasma)

  14. Digitizing Sound: How Can Sound Waves be Turned into Ones and Zeros?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    From MP3 players to cell phones to computer games, we're surrounded by a constant stream of ones and zeros. Do we really need to know how this technology works? While nobody can understand everything, digital technology is increasingly making our lives a collection of "black boxes" that we can use but have no idea how they work. Pursuing scientific literacy should propel us to open up a few of these metaphorical boxes. High school physics offers opportunities to connect the curriculum to sports, art, music, and electricity, but it also offers connections to computers and digital music. Learning activities about digitizing sounds offer wonderful opportunities for technology integration and student problem solving. I used this series of lessons in high school physics after teaching about waves and sound but before optics and total internal reflection so that the concepts could be further extended when learning about fiber optics.

  15. Chaotic ion motion in magnetosonic plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvoglis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The motion of test ions in a magnetosonic plasma wave is considered, and the 'stochasticity threshold' of the wave's amplitude for the onset of chaotic motion is estimated. It is shown that for wave amplitudes above the stochasticity threshold, the evolution of an ion distribution can be described by a diffusion equation with a diffusion coefficient D approximately equal to 1/v. Possible applications of this process to ion acceleration in flares and ion beam thermalization are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of Interaction Between Fundamental Landscapes and Sounds in a District via Brain Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutani, Iwao; Takase, Tatsuo

    Interactions between regional landscape and sound are investigated in terms of subjects’ brain wave properties, i.e., α wave power spectrum and frequency fluctuation index of brain wave. The landscape samples consist of sea, buildings, crowds, trees, flowers, streamlet, vehicular traffic flow and residential area while the sound samples are made up of crowds sound, insect chirpings, rustling sound of leaves, wave sound, stream murmurings, bird chirpings and supersonic. It is revealed that (1) most of the best combinations of landscape and sound include natural landscape and sound whereas the worst combinations are associated with artificial environments, (2) best(worst) combinations determined via fluctuation index are composed of the landscape and sound which are evaluated as bests(worsts) at landscape only or sound only stimulus tests, (3) based on theα wave power spectrum, some of the best combinations include the landscapes and sounds which are evaluated low at the single stimulus tests and also some worst combinations include the stream murmuring sound or wave sound which are highly ranked at the sound only tests, (4) since supersonic appears in many worst combinations, it is likely to bring about unpleasant effects on human psychology.

  17. Weakly nonlinear electron plasma waves in collisional plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Tagare, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a high frequency plasma wave in a weakly magnetized, collisional plasma is considered. In addition to the ponderomotive-force-nonlinearity the nonlinearity due to the heating of the electrons is taken into account. A set of nonlinear equations including the effect...... of a constantly maintained pump wave is derived and a general dispersion relation describing the modulation of the high frequency wave due to different low frequency responses is obtained. Particular attention is devoted to a purely growing modulation. The relative importance of the ponderomotive force...

  18. Wind wave spectral observations in Currituck Sound, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Charles E.; Resio, Donald T.

    2007-05-01

    We examine a set of 1626 high-resolution frequency-direction wind wave spectra and collocated winds collected during a 7-month period at a site in Currituck Sound, North Carolina, in terms of one-dimensional spectral structure and directional distribution functions. The data set includes cases of shore-normal winds in broad-fetch conditions as well as winds oblique to the basin geometry, with all fetches of order 10 km or less. Using equilibrium-range scaling, all one-dimensional spectra have a spectral peak region, an equilibrium range of finite bandwidth following an f-4 slope at slightly higher frequencies, and a high-frequency tail that falls off more rapidly than f-4. For shore-normal winds, spectral peakedness appears to be high and approximately constant for young waves, low and approximately constant for old waves, and steeply graded for intermediate inverse wave ages in the range 1.0 variable equilibrium-range bandwidths in oblique-wind conditions, clearly indicating a more complex balance of source terms in these cases than in the more elementary situation of shore-normal winds. These complications are not without consequence in wave modeling, as any bounded or semibounded lake or estuary will be subject to oblique winds, and current operational models do not deal well with conditions like those we find here.

  19. Generalized Langmuir Waves in Magnetized Kinetic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willes, A. J.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of unmagnetized Langmuir waves and cold plasma magnetoionic waves (x, o, z and whistler) are well known. However, the connections between these modes in a magnetized kinetic plasma have not been explored in detail. Here, wave properties are investigated by numerically solving the dispersion equation derived from the Vlasov equations both with and without a beam instability present. For omega(sub p)>Omega(sub e), it is shown that the generalized Langmuir mode at oblique propagation angles has magnetic z-mode characteristics at low wave numbers and thermal Langmuir mode characteristics at high wave numbers. For omega(sub p)Langmuir mode instead connects to the whistler mode at low wave numbers. The transition from the Langmuir/z mode to the Langmuir/whistler mode near omega(sub p) = Omega(sub e) is rapid. In addition, the effects on wave dispersion and polarization after adding a beam are investigated. Applications of this theory to magnetized Langmuir waves in Earth's foreshock and the solar wind, to waves observed near the plasma frequency in the auroral regions, and to solar type III bursts are discussed.

  20. Standing Sound Waves in a tube: Approach analysis \\& sugestions

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, L P; Lara, V O M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to present some questions with respect to the approach used in some brazilian mid-level textbooks on the topic of stationary sound waves in tubes. In addition to ranking the textbooks within a set of criteria, we also present some suggestions for further discussions of this topic. We suggest the use of gifs and animations and the use of two experiments that allow you to view the profiles of variation of pressure and air displacement for the harmonic modes of vibration.

  1. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  2. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Erik M. Salomons; Lohman, Walter J. A.; Han Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equation...

  3. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  4. Does the schock wave in a highly ionized non-isothermal plasma really exist ?

    CERN Document Server

    Rukhadze, A A; Samkharadze, T

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the structure of a highly ionizing shock wave in a gas of high atmospheric pressure. We take into account the gas ionization when the gas temperature reaches few orders of an ionization potential. It is shown that after gasdynamic temperature-raising shock and formation of a highly-ionized nonisothermal plasma $T_e>>T_i$ only the solitary ion-sound wave (soliton) can propagate in this plasma. In such a wave the charge separation occurs: electrons and ions form the double electric layer with the electric field. The shock wave form, its amplitude and front width are obtained.

  5. Colliding solitary waves in quark gluon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, Azam; Javidan, Kurosh

    2016-09-01

    We study the head-on collision of propagating waves due to perturbations in quark gluon plasmas. We use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology bag model, hydrodynamics equation, and suitable equation of state for describing the time evolution of such localized waves. A nonlinear differential equation is derived for the propagation of small amplitude localized waves using the reductive perturbation method. We show that these waves are unstable and amplitude of the left-moving (right-moving) wave increases (decreases) after the collision, and so they reach the borders of a quark gluon plasma fireball with different amplitudes. Indeed we show that such arrangements are created because of the geometrical symmetries of the medium.

  6. Sound Wave in Hot Dense Matter Created in Heavy Ion Collision

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, X.; Yang, Z.

    2005-01-01

    A model to study the sound wave in hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions by jet is proposed.The preliminary data of jet shape analysis of PHENIX Collaboration for all centralities and two directions is well explained in this model. Then the wavelength of the sound wave, the natural frequency of the hot dense matter and the speed of sound wave are estimated from the fit.

  7. Generation of acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas through three-dimensional particle focusing by distorted waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Rogue waves--rare uncertainly emerging localized events with large amplitudes--have been experimentally observed in many nonlinear wave phenomena, such as water waves, optical waves, second sound in superfluid He II (ref. ) and ion acoustic waves in plasmas. Past studies have mainly focused on one-dimensional (1D) wave behaviour through modulation instabilities, and to a lesser extent on higher-dimensional behaviour. The question whether rogue waves also exist in nonlinear 3D acoustic-type plasma waves, the kinetic origin of their formation and their correlation with surrounding 3D waveforms are unexplored fundamental issues. Here we report the direct experimental observation of dust acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas and construct a picture of 3D particle focusing by the surrounding tilted and ruptured wave crests, associated with the higher probability of low-amplitude holes for rogue-wave generation.

  8. Collapse of nonlinear electron plasma waves in a plasma layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimalsky, V.; Koshevaya, S.; Rapoport, Yu; Kotsarenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electron plasma waves in the plasma layer is investigated theoretically. This excitation is realized by means of initial oscillatory perturbations of the volume electron concentration or by initial oscillatory distributions of the longitudinal electron velocity. The amplitudes of the initial perturbations are small and the manifestation of the volume nonlinearity is absent. When the amplitudes of the initial perturbations exceed some thresholds, the values of the electron concentration near the plasma boundary increase catastrophically. The maxima of the electron concentration reach extremely high magnitudes, and sharp peaks in the electron concentration occur, which are localized both in the longitudinal and transverse directions. This effect is interpreted as wave collapse near the plasma boundary.

  9. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  10. Towards a matter wave interferometer on a sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zoest, Tim; Peters, Achim; Ahlers, Holger; Wicht, Andreas; Vogel, Anika; Wenzlawski, Anderas; Deutsch, Christian; Kajari, Endre; Gaaloul, Naceur; Dittus, Hansjürg; Hartwig, Jonas; Herr, Waldemar; Herrmann, Sven; Reichel, Jakob; Bongs, Kai; Koenemann, Thorben; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, Wojtek; Schiemangk, Max; Müntinga, Hauke; Meyer, Nadine; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Walser, Reinhold; Resch, Andreas; Rode, Christina; Seidel, Stephan; Sengstock, Klaus; Singh, Yeshpal; Schleich, Wolfgang; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rosenbusch, Peter; Wilken, Tobias; Goeklue, Ertan

    Applications of coherent matter waves are high resolution interferometers for measuring inertial and gravitational forces as well as testing fundamental physics, for which they may serve as a laser like source with mesoscopic quantum features. Out of possible applications, the test of the principle of equivalence in the quantum domain is selected as a target with the highest scientific interest on timescales of a microgravity experiment at the ISS or on a free flyer (ATV, FOTON or other satellites). The QUANTUS project demonstrated the technological feasibil-ity of coherent matter waves in microgravity. As a next step, the consortium will prepare and procure a sounding rocket mission to demonstrate technologies for matter wave interferome-try based on the broad experience of former developments with experiments in the droptower. Therefore, the experiment has to withstand strong requirements concerning environmental con-ditions (Temperature, shock, environmental pressure, etc.) and needs to be designed to fit in a 600 l volume (diameter 35 cm, length 160 cm). It is considered as an important step towards the technology required for the ISS and other platforms. These experiments will give further insights on the potential of inertial sensors based on atom interferometers and the technology is for example of interest for applications in earth observation and geodesy. They could replace classical techniques relying on test masses and promise a further improvement in the accuracy of such devices.

  11. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  12. Transmission of high frequency sound waves through a slug flow jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Vijayaraghavan, A.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis has been performed of sound waves which propagate in a pipe with gas flow. At the pipe exit these waves are partially reflected and the remainder are diffracted. The analysis is carried out by resolving the sound at the exit into its Fourier components and then continuing the solution, which is a combination of elementary plane waves, beyond the exit. These waves are of two types: homogeneous waves which propagate to infinity, and inhomogeneous waves with complex wave numbers which decay. The reflected waves are evaluated from the inhomogeneous waves. At the boundary of the jet, refraction of the elementary plane waves is accounted for and the far field sound is evaluated by the method of stationary phase. Comparisons of the theoretical calculations are made with experimental results and with calculations of other theories.

  13. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-09-15

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  14. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2017-08-08

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  15. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-09-15

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  16. Collisional Drift Waves in Stellarator Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-10-07

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a stellarator with an helical magnetic axis is presented. Three coupled field equations, describing the collisional drift wave dynamics in the linear approximation, are solved as an initial-value problem along the magnetic field line. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  17. On the freak waves in mesospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Shewy, E. K.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; El-Razek, H. N. Abd; El-Rahman, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear properties of dusty ionic freak waves have been studied in homogeneous, unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing ions, isothermal electrons, negative and positive grains. By using the derivative expansion method and assuming strongly dispersive medium, the basic model equations are reduced to a nonlinear form of Schrodinger equation (NLSE). One of the solutions of the NLSE in the unstable region is the rational one which is responsible for the creation of the freak profiles. The reliance of freak waves profile on dusty grains charge and carrier wave number are discussed.

  18. Plasma shock waves excited by THz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, S.; Rupper, G.; Shur, M.

    2016-10-01

    The shock plasma waves in Si MOS, InGaAs and GaN HEMTs are launched at a relatively small THz power that is nearly independent of the THz input frequency for short channel (22 nm) devices and increases with frequency for longer (100 nm to 1 mm devices). Increasing the gate-to-channel separation leads to a gradual transition of the nonlinear waves from the shock waves to solitons. The mathematics of this transition is described by the Korteweg-de Vries equation that has the single propagating soliton solution.

  19. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  20. Does the schock wave in a highly ionized non-isothermal plasma really exist ?

    OpenAIRE

    Rukhadze, A. A.; Sadykova, S.; Samkharadze, T.

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the structure of a highly ionizing shock wave in a gas of high atmospheric pressure. We take into account the gas ionization when the gas temperature reaches few orders of an ionization potential. It is shown that after gasdynamic temperature-raising shock and formation of a highly-ionized nonisothermal plasma $T_e>>T_i$ only the solitary ion-sound wave (soliton) can propagate in this plasma. In such a wave the charge separation occurs: electrons and ions form the double electri...

  1. Solitons and Weakly Nonlinear Waves in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical descriptions of solitons and weakly nonlinear waves propagating in plasma media are reviewed, with particular attention to the Korteweg-de Vries (KDV) equation and the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). The modifications of these basic equations due to the effects of resonant...

  2. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  3. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  4. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  5. Electron Bernstein Wave Emission from RFP Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nornberg, M. D.; Thomas, M.; Anderson, J.; Forest, C. B.

    1998-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has proven to be a powerfull diagnostic tool in tokamak plasmas for determining the time evolution of the electron temperature profile. The standard technique of observing O-mode or X-mode electromagnetic waves normal to the magnetic field is not applicable to reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas since the plasma frequency is much larger than the electron cyclotron frequency. We are investigating the use of electron Bernstein waves (presumed to be in thermal equilibrium with the electrons) through the aip.org/journal_cgi/ getpdf?KEY=PRLTAO&cvips=PRLTAO000078000018003467000001>O-X-B mode conversion process. At oblique incidence, the evanescent layer separating the plamsa cutoff from the cyclotron cutoff vanishes, allowing conversion of the Bernstein mode waves to the extraordinary mode and finally to the ordinary mode. The O-mode radiation is received by a phased array antenna consisting of two waveguides on the edge of the plasma, and the spectrum of emitted radiation is measured using a radiometer spanning 4-8 GHz. In addition to providing information about the electron temperature profile, the spectrum can provide a novel method of measuring the central magnetic field strength for current profile reconstructions.

  6. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N. [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thomas, H. M. [Research Group Complex Plasma, DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen, 82234 Wessling (Germany); Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schwabe, M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Graves Lab, D75 Tan Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. The estimate for the pressure in a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a scaling law for the complex plasma make it possible to derive an evaluation for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in complex plasmas.

  7. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Molotkov, V I; Lipaev, A M; Naumkin, V N; Thomas, H M; Ivlev, A V; Schwabe, M; Morfill, G E

    2014-01-01

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are fully incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. We explore the analogy between a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a solid. A scaling law for the complex plasma makes it possible to derive a theoretical estimate for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in strongly coupled complex plasmas.

  8. Plasma Limiter Based on Surface Wave Plasma Excited by Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Geng; TAN Jichun; SHEN Benjian

    2008-01-01

    A novel plasma limiter, in which the plasma is excited by surface wave, is presented. The breakdown time of some gases filled in the limiter were calculated as a function of gas pres-sure, ionization degree and density of seed electrons under low pressure (0.01 ~1 Torr) and high pressure (10 ~1000 Torr) cases. The results show that the limiter filled with Xe with a pressure of 0.9 Torr, seed electron density of 1016 m-3, and ionization degree of 10-4, has a breakdown time of approximate 19.6 ns.

  9. Excitation of instability waves in a two-dimensional shear layer by sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation of instability waves in a plane compressible shear layer by sound waves is studied. The problem is formulated mathematically as an inhomogeneous boundary-value problem. A general solution for abitrary incident sound wave is found by first constructing the Green's function of the problem. Numerical values of the coupling constants between incident sound waves and excited instability waves for a range of flow Mach number are calculated. The effect of the angle of incidence in the case of a beam of acoustic waves is analyzed. It is found that for moderate subsonic Mach numbers a narrow beam aiming at an angle between 50 to 80 deg to the flow direction is most effective in exciting instability waves.

  10. Tunable Plasma-Wave Laser Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, J.; Haberberger, D.; Davies, A.; Bucht, S.; Zuegel, J. D.; Froula, D. H.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Sadler, J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Raman amplification is a process by which a long energetic pump pulse transfers its energy to a counter-propagating short seed pulse through a resonant electron plasma wave. Since its conception, theory and simulations have shown exciting results with up to tens of percent of energy transfer from the pump to the seed pulse. However, experiments have yet to surpass transfer efficiencies of a few percent. A review of past literature shows that largely chirped pump pulses and finite temperature wave breaking could have been the two most detrimental effects. A Raman amplification platform is being developed at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics where a combination of a high-intensity tunable seed laser with sophisticated plasma diagnostics (dynamic Thomson scattering) will make it possible to find the optimal parameter space for high-energy transfer. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Non-planar and Non-linear Second Sound Waves in He Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; KIMURA Seiji; MURAKAMI Masahide; WANG Ru-zhu

    2000-01-01

    Non-planar and non-linear second sound wave are experimentally investigated in an open He Ⅱ bath. It is found that second sound wave characterized by a negative tail part in an open He Ⅱ bath is different from that propagating through a channel, and the shape of the negative tail part of second sound wave varies at different location in an open He Ⅱ bath. Theoretical consideration is also carried out based on two-fluid model and vortex evolution equation. It is found that experimental and theoretical results agree rather well with each other. Second sound wave may develop into the thermal shock wave provided that the heat flux is large.

  12. High-frequency sound waves to eliminate a horizon in the mixmaster universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitre, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    From the linear wave equation for small-amplitude sound waves in a curved space-time, there is derived a geodesiclike differential equation for sound rays to describe the motion of wave packets. These equations are applied in the generic, nonrotating, homogeneous closed-model universe (the 'mixmaster universe,' Bianchi type IX). As for light rays described by Doroshkevich and Novikov (DN), these sound rays can circumnavigate the universe near the singularity to remove particle horizons only for a small class of these models and in special directions. Although these results parallel those of DN, different Hamiltonian methods are used for treating the Einstein equations.

  13. Source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Antani, Lakulish; Kim, Sujeong; Manocha, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    We present an approach to model dynamic, data-driven source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation in virtual environments and computer games. Our directional source representation is expressed as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic (SH) sources. In the preprocessing stage, we precompute and encode the propagated sound fields due to each SH source. At runtime, we perform the SH decomposition of the varying source directivity interactively and compute the total sound field at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave decomposition approach based on higher-order derivatives of the sound field that enables dynamic HRTF-based listener directivity at runtime. We provide a generic framework to incorporate our source and listener directivity in any offline or online frequency-domain wave-based sound propagation algorithm. We have integrated our sound propagation system in Valve's Source game engine and use it to demonstrate realistic acoustic effects such as sound amplification, diffraction low-passing, scattering, localization, externalization, and spatial sound, generated by wave-based propagation of directional sources and listener in complex scenarios. We also present results from our preliminary user study.

  14. Geotail MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1997-01-01

    The primary goals of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program are identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and the Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail and throughout the Earth's outer magnetosphere. GEOTAIL was launched on July 24, 1992, and began its scientific mission with eighteen extensions into the deep-tail region with apogees ranging from around 60 R(sub e) to more than 208 R(sub e) in the period up to late 1994. Due to the nature of the GEOTAIL trajectory which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, magnetosheath, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near-Earth phase. Perigee was reduced to 10 R(sub e) and apogee first to 50 R(sub e) and finally to 30 R(sub e) in early 1995. This orbit provides many more opportunities for GEOTAIL to explore the upstream solar wind, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere as well as the near-Earth tail regions. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994 and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to be used to conduct the global research for which the ISTP program was designed. The measurement and study of plasma waves have made and will continue to make important contributions to reaching the ISTP/GGS goals and solving the

  15. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Waves in relativistic electron beam in low-density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, I.; Sheinman (Chernenco, J.

    2016-11-01

    Waves in electron beam in low-density plasma are analyzed. The analysis is based on complete electrodynamics consideration. Dependencies of dispersion laws from system parameters are investigated. It is shown that when relativistic electron beam is passed through low-density plasma surface waves of two types may exist. The first type is a high frequency wave on a boundary between the beam and neutralization area and the second type wave is on the boundary between neutralization area and stationary plasma.

  17. Relationship between sound signal and weld pool status in plasma arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sound features of the weld pool status in plasma arc welding were systematically investigated after the sound signal was collected with a microphone. The results show that it is difficult to extract information about the weld pool status directly in time domain although the sound signal varies with the weld pool behaviors to some extent. The frequency spectra of the sound signal contain plenty of information about the weld pool behaviors. It is shown from the analysis of the sound generation mechanism that the sound signal of plasma arc welding is mainly caused by the weld pool oscillation, the power source fluctuation and so on. RS algorithm is designed to determine the weld pool status, and it is able to offer the feedback information for the closed-loop control of the penetration quality of plasma arc welding.

  18. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v vphvph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  19. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10-100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC_LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  20. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anania, M.P., E-mail: maria.pia.anania@lnf.infn.it [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [University of Rome Tor Vergata - INFN, via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Croia, M.; Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.P. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Filippi, F. [University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Romeo, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10–100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10–100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC-LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  1. Sound Radiated by a Wave-Like Structure in a Compressible Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, V. V.; Prieto, A. F.; Mankbadi, R. R.; Dahl, M. D.; Hixon, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper extends the analysis of acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. Compared to previous work, a modified approach to the sound source modeling is examined that employs a set of solutions to linearized Euler equations. The sound radiation is then calculated using an integral surface method.

  2. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    is absorbed into said plasma (104), and where a sound pressure level of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) is at least substantially 140 dB and where an acoustic power of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102); is at least......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount...... of acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy...

  3. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Waves and Spherical Arc-Polarized Waves in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B.; Ho, Christian M.; Arballo, John K.; Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Neubauer, Fritz M.

    1997-01-01

    We review observations of nonlinear plasma waves detected by interplanetary spacecraft. For this paper we will focus primarily on the phase-steepened properties of such waves. Plasma waves at comet Giacobini-Zinner measured by the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), at comets Halley and Grigg-Skjellerup measured by Giotto, and interplanetary Alfven waves measured by Ulysses, will be discussed and intercompared.

  4. Gravitational waves in a free isotropic plasma. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtsov, D.V.; Grats, IU.V.; Melkumova, E.IU.

    1985-07-01

    The generation of gravitational waves in an isotropic homogeneous plasma is investigated theoretically, within the frame work of a recently developed formalism. The effectiveness of different mechanisms generating gravitational waves is considered. Attention is given to thermal gravitational radiation by a two-component plasma; the transformation of longitudinal plasma waves into gravitons due to current fluctuations; and the generation of gravitational waves due to Langmuir turbulence. It is shown that collective plasma effects play a critical role in the generation of gravitational waves.

  5. Diagnosis of ankylosis in permanent incisors by expert ratings, Periotest and digital sound wave analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Karen M; Casas, Michael J; Kenny, David J; Chau, Tom

    2005-08-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to: (i) assess the reliability of expert raters to detect ankylosis from recordings of percussion sounds, (ii) measure differences in Periotest values (PTV) between ankylosed and non-ankylosed incisors and (iii) identify characteristic differences in recorded percussion sounds from ankylosed and non-ankylosed incisors using digital sound wave analysis. A convenience sample of healthy children (age range 7-18 years) was invited to participate. Ankylosis group children had one or more documented ankylosed maxillary incisors. Control group children had intact, non-ankylosed incisors. Digital recordings of percussion sounds and PTV were acquired for each incisor of interest. Four experienced pediatric dentists rated the randomized percussion sound pairs for the presence of ankylosis. Percussion sounds were also subjected to digital sound wave analysis. Overall agreement for the expert raters was substantial (kappa = 0.7). Intra-rater agreement was substantial to almost perfect (kappa = 0.6-0.9). Diagnosis of ankylosis demonstrated sensitivity of 76-92% and specificity of 74-100%. PTV from ankylosed incisors were statistically lower than PTV from non-ankylosed incisors. Ankylosed incisor digital sound wave signals exhibited significantly more energy in high-frequency bands than non-ankylosed incisors. This investigation demonstrated that: (i) experienced pediatric dentists reliably detected ankylosis by percussion sound alone; (ii) PTV for ankylosed incisors were statistically lower than PTV from non-ankylosed incisors; and (iii) ankylosed incisors exhibited a higher proportion of their signal energy in high-frequency bands.

  6. An in-ear pulse wave velocity measurement system using heart sounds as time reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusche R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulse wave measurements provide vital information in medical diagnosis. For this reason, a measurement system is developed for determining the transient time of the pulse wave between the heart and the ear. To detect pressure variations in the sealed ear canal, caused by the arriving pulse wave, an in-ear sensor is developed which uses heart sounds as time reference. Furthermore, for extracting the heart sounds from the pressure measurements and calculating the pulse wave transient time, a MATLAB-based algorithm is described. An embedded microcontroller based measurement board is presented, which realizes an interface between the sensor and the computer for signal processing.

  7. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  8. Effective isolation of primo vessels in lymph using sound- and ultrasonic-wave stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Do-Young; Lee, Hye-Rie; Rho, Min-Suk; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2014-12-01

    The effects of stimulation with sound and ultrasonic waves of a specific bandwidth on the microdissection of primo vessels in lymphatic vessels of rabbit were investigated. The primo vessels stained with alcian-blue dye injected in the lymph nodes were definitely visualized and more easily isolated by sound-wave vibration and ultrasonic stimulation applied to rabbits at various frequencies and intensities. With sound wave at 7 Hz and ultrasonic waves at 2 MHz, the probability of detecting the primo vessels was improved to 90%; however, without wave stimulation the probability of discovering primo vessels was about 50% only. Sound and ultrasonic waves at specific frequency bands should be effective for microdissection of the primo vessels in the abdominal lymph of rabbit. We suggest that oscillation of the primo vessels by sound and ultrasonic waves may be useful to visualize specific primo structure, and wave vibration can be a very supportive process for observation and isolation of the primo vessels of rabbits.

  9. A nonlinear acoustic metamaterial: Realization of a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2016-06-01

    An ordinary waveguide with periodic vibration plates and side holes can realize an acoustic metamaterial that simultaneously possesses a negative bulk modulus and a negative mass density. The study is further extended to a nonlinear case and it is predicted that a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave can be obtained through the nonlinear propagation of a sound wave in such a metamaterial.

  10. Model of the Dynamics of Plasma-Wave Channels in Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokov, E. A.; Chugunov, Yu. V.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the plasma-wave channels excited in magnetized plasmas in the whistler frequency range. A linear theory of excitation of a plasma waveguide by an external source is developed using the quasistatic approximation. Self-consistent spatio-temporal distributions of the electric field of quasipotential waves and plasma density, which are solutions of the nonlinear nonstationary problem of the ionizing self-channeling of waves in plasmas are found on the basis of the linear theory.

  11. Effective action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we study a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well-known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasma...

  12. Supersonic propagation of ionization waves in an under-dense, laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, C; Back, C A; Fournier, K B; Gregori, G; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Dewald, E L; Miller, M C

    2004-10-22

    We observe a laser-driven supersonic ionization wave heating a mm-scale plasma of sub-critical density up to 2-3 keV electron temperatures. Propagation velocities initially 10 times the sound speed were measured by means of time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics. The measured ionization wave trajectory is modeled analytically and by a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code. The comparison to the modeling suggests that nonlocal heat transport effects may contribute to the attenuation of the heat wave propagation.

  13. Effect of Disorder on Bulk Sound Wave Speed : A Multiscale Spectral Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rohit; Luding, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Disorder in the form of size (polydispersity) and mass of discrete elements/particles in a disordered media (a granular matter like soil) have numerous effects on it's sound propagation characteristics [1,2]. The influence of disorder on the sound wave speed and it's frequency filtering characteristics is the subject of investigation. The study will assist in understanding the connection between particle-scale dynamics and system-scale behavior of wave propagation which can be further used for modeling during non-destructive testing, seismic exploration of buried objects (oil, mineral, etc.) or to study the internal structure of the Earth. Studying the wave propagation characteristics through Discrete Element Models with varying polydispersity and mass of discrete elements in real-time, frequency space as well as through dispersion curves (ω (frequency) v/s k (wavenumber)) can shed light on this aspect by providing better microscopic understanding. To isolate the P-wave from shear and rotational modes, a one-dimensional system of elements/particles is used to study the effect of mass disorder on bulk sound wave speed through ensemble averaging of signals. Increasing polydispersity/disorder decreases the sound wave speed because of decrease in the number of contacts between particles [2] but, in contrast, increasing mass disorder increases the sound wave speed (in 1 D chains). Thus we conclude that a competition exists between these two kinds of disorder for their influence on the bulk sound wave speed. References [1] Brian P. Lawney and Stefan Luding. Frequency filtering in disordered granular chains. Acta Mechanica, 225(8):2385-2407, 2014. [2] O. Mouraille and S. Luding. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials. Ultrasonics, 48(6-7):498 - 505, 2008. Selected Papers from ICU 2007.

  14. Spin waves and spin instabilities in quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, P A

    2014-01-01

    We describe main ideas of method of many-particle quantum hydrodynamics allows to derive equations for description of quantum plasma evolution. We also present definitions of collective quantum variables suitable for quantum plasmas. We show that evolution of magnetic moments (spins) in quantum plasmas leads to several new branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered. Instabilities appearing due to interaction of magnetic moments of neutrons with plasma are described.

  15. Plasma Waves and Jets from Moving Conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Samuel E

    2016-01-01

    We consider force-free plasma waves launched by the motion of conducting material through a magnetic field. We develop a spacetime-covariant formalism for perturbations of a uniform magnetic field and show how the transverse motion of a conducting fluid acts as a source. We show that fast-mode waves are sourced by the compressibility of the fluid, with incompressible fluids launching a pure-Alfven outflow. Remarkably, this outflow can be written down in closed form, at the nonlinear level, for an arbitrary incompressible flow. The instantaneous flow velocity is imprinted on the magnetic field and transmitted away at the speed of light, carrying detailed information about the conducting source at the time of emission. These results can be applied to transients in pulsar outflows and to jets from neutron stars orbiting in the magnetosphere of another compact object. We discuss jets from moving conductors in some detail.

  16. Radiation Heat Waves in Gold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-Min; XU Yan; DING Yao-Nan; LAI Dong-Xian; DING Yong-Kun; JIANG Shao-En; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; MIAO Wen-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Eight beams 0.35/um laser with pulse duration of about 1.0ns and energy of 260 J per beam was injected into a cylindrical cavity to generate intense x-ray radiation on the "Shengguang I" high power laser facility. Gold foils with a thickness in the range of 0.09-0.52/j,m were attached on the diagnostic hole of the cavity and ablated by the intense x-ray radiation. The propagating radiation heat wave in the high-Z gold plasma was observed clearly. For comparison, we also simulated the experimental results.

  17. Frequency-domain electromagnetic sounding with combination wave in near-field zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏发; 何继善

    1996-01-01

    By analysing the propagation law of electromagnetic wave,the distribution pattern of the field and the theory of frequency electromagnetic sounding,the physical mechanisms that make the frequency electromagnetic sounding in near-field zone difficult are discussed.Based on the theory of near source field,a new method of dual-frequency electromagnetic sounding of combination wave in near-field zone is advanced.Meanwhile,the method of measurement of fields,the definition of apparent resistivity and the numerical algorithm are approached.

  18. Influence of Sound Wave Stimulation on the Growth of Strawberry in Sunlight Greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lirong; Teng, Guanghui; Hou, Tianzhen; Zhu, Baoying; Liu, Xiaona

    In this paper, we adopt the QGWA-03 plant audio apparatus to investigate the sound effects on strawberry in the leaf area, the photosynthetic characteristics and other physiological indexes. It was found that when there were no significant differences between the circumstances of the two sunlight greenhouses, the strawberry after the sound wave stimulation grew stronger than in the control and its leaf were deeper green, and shifted to an earlier time about one week to blossom and bear fruit. It was also found that the resistance of strawberry against disease and insect pest were enhanced. The experiment results show that sound wave stimulation can certainly promote the growth of plants.

  19. High-frequency sound wave propagation in binary gas mixtures flowing through microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, M.; Lorenzani, S.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of high-frequency sound waves in binary gas mixtures flowing through microchannels is investigated by using the linearized Boltzmann equation based on a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK)-type approach and diffuse reflection boundary conditions. The results presented refer to mixtures whose constituents have comparable molecular mass (like Ne-Ar) as well as to disparate-mass gas mixtures (composed of very heavy plus very light molecules, like He-Xe). The sound wave propagation model considered in the present paper allows to analyze the precise nature of the forced-sound modes excited in different gas mixtures.

  20. Plasma-maser instability of the ion acoustics wave in the presence of lower hybrid wave turbulence in inhomogeneous plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Singh; P N Deka

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical study is made on the generation mechanism of ion acoustics wave in the presence of lower hybrid wave turbulence field in inhomogeneous plasma on the basis of plasma-maser interaction. The lower hybrid wave turbulence field is taken as the low-frequency turbulence field. The growth rate of test high frequency ion acoustics wave is obtained with the involvement of spatial density gradient parameter. A comparative study of the role of density gradient for the generation of ion acoustics wave on the basis of plasma-maser effect is presented. It is found that the density gradient influences the growth rate of ion acoustics wave.

  1. Fluid approach to evaluate sound velocity in Yukawa systems (complex plasmas)

    CERN Document Server

    Khrapak, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional fluid description of multi-component plasma, supplemented by an appropriate equation of state for the macroparticle component, is used to evaluate the longitudinal sound velocity of Yukawa fluids. The obtained results are in very good agreement with those obtained earlier employing the quasi-localized charge approximation and molecular dynamics simulations in a rather broad parameter regime. Thus, a simple yet accurate tool to estimate the sound velocity across coupling regimes is proposed, which can be particularly helpful in estimating the dust-acoustic velocity in strongly coupled dusty (complex) plasmas. It is shown that, within the present approach, the sound velocity is completely determined by particle-particle correlations and the neutralizing medium (plasma), apart from providing screening of the Coulomb interaction, has no other effect on the sound propagation. The ratio of the actual sound velocity to its "ideal gas" (weak coupling) scale only weakly depends on the coupling strengt...

  2. Nonlinear interactions in superfluid dynamics: Nonstationary heat transfer due to second sound shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound techniques were used to study superfluid helium. Second sound shock waves produced relative velocities in the bulk fluid. Maximum counterflow velocities produced in this way are found to follow the Langer-Fischer prediction for the fundamental critical velocity in its functional dependence on temperature and pressure. Comparison of successive shock and rotating experiments provides strong evidence that breakdown results in vorticity production in the flow behind the shock. Schlieren pictures have verified the planar nature of second sound shocks even after multiple reflections. The nonlinear theory of second sound was repeatedly verified in its prediction of double shocks and other nonlinear phenomena.

  3. Wave field synthesis of a sound field described by spherical harmonics expansion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Jens; Spors, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Near-field compensated higher order Ambisonics (NFC-HOA) and wave field synthesis (WFS) constitute the two best-known analytic sound field synthesis methods. While WFS is typically used for the synthesis of virtual sound scenes, NFC-HOA is typically employed in order to synthesize sound fields that have been captured with appropriate microphone arrays. Such recorded sound fields are essentially represented by the coefficients of the underlying surface spherical harmonics expansion. A sound field described by such coefficients cannot be straightforwardly synthesized in WFS. This is a consequence of the fact that, unlike in NFC-HOA, it is critical in WFS to carefully select those loudspeakers that contribute to the synthesis of a given sound source in a sound field under consideration. In order to enable such a secondary source selection, it is proposed to employ the well-known concept of decomposing the sound field under consideration into a continuum of plane waves, for which the secondary source selection is straightforward. The plane wave representation is projected onto the horizontal plane and a closed form expression of the secondary source driving signals for horizontal WFS systems of arbitrary convex shape is derived.

  4. Enhancement of CO2 capture in limestone and dolomite granular beds by high intensity sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perez-Ebri, Jose Manuel; Sanchez-Quintanilla, Miguel Angel

    2017-06-01

    The calcium looping (CaL) process, based on the calcination/carbonation of CaCO3 at high temperatures, has emerged in the last years as a potentially low cost technology for CO2 capture. In this work, we show that the application of high intensity sound waves to granular beds of limestone and dolomite in a CaL reactor enhances significantly their multicycle CO2 capture capacity. Sound waves are applied either during the calcination stage of each CaL cycle or in the carbonation stage. The effect of sound is to intensify the transfer of heat, mass and momentum and is more marked when sound is applied during calcination by promoting CaO regeneration. The application of sound would allow reducing the calcination temperature thereby mitigating the decay of capture capacity with the number of cycles and reducing the energy penalty of the technology.

  5. Stable Propagating Waves and Wake Fields in Relativistic Electromagnetic Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi-Shi; XIE Bai-Song; TIAN Miao; YIN Xin-Tao; ZHANG Xin-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Stable propagating waves and wake fields in relativistic electromagnetic plasma are investigated. The incident electromagnetic field has a finite initial constant amplitude meanwhile the longitudinal momentum of electrons is taken into account in the problem. It is found that in the moving frame with transverse wave group velocity the stable propagating transverse electromagnetic waves and longitudinal plasma wake fields can exist in the appropriate regime of plasma.

  6. Second sound shock waves and critical velocities in liquid helium 2. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Large amplitude second-sound shock waves were generated and the experimental results compared to the theory of nonlinear second-sound. The structure and thickness of second-sound shock fronts are calculated and compared to experimental data. Theoretically it is shown that at T = 1.88 K, where the nonlinear wave steepening vanishes, the thickness of a very weak shock must diverge. In a region near this temperature, a finite-amplitude shock pulse evolves into an unusual double-shock configuration consisting of a front steepened, temperature raising shock followed by a temperature lowering shock. Double-shocks are experimentally verified. It is experimentally shown that very large second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium 2, which is dramatically displayed as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. The value of the maximum shock-induced relative velocity represents a significant lower bound to the intrinsic critical velocity of helium 2.

  7. Wave field synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Jens; Spors, Sascha

    2011-11-01

    An approach to the synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties in wave field synthesis is presented. The approach exploits the fact that any stationary sound source of finite spatial extent radiates spherical waves at sufficient distance. The angular dependency of the radiation properties of the source under consideration is reflected by the amplitude and phase distribution on the spherical wave fronts. The sound field emitted by a uniformly moving monopole source is derived and the far-field radiation properties of the complex virtual source under consideration are incorporated in order to derive a closed-form expression for the loudspeaker driving signal. The results are illustrated via numerical simulations of the synthesis of the sound field of a sample moving complex virtual source.

  8. Time Domain Simulation of Sound Waves Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Algorithm with Artificial Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH, as a Lagrangian, meshfree method, is supposed to be useful in solving acoustic problems, such as combustion noise, bubble acoustics, etc., and has been gradually used in sound wave computation. However, unphysical oscillations in the sound wave simulation cannot be ignored. In this paper, an artificial viscosity term is added into the standard SPH algorithm used for solving linearized acoustic wave equations. SPH algorithms with or without artificial viscosity are both built to compute sound propagation and interference in the time domain. Then, the effects of the smoothing kernel function, particle spacing and Courant number on the SPH algorithms of sound waves are discussed. After comparing SPH simulation results with theoretical solutions, it is shown that the result of the SPH algorithm with the artificial viscosity term added attains good agreement with the theoretical solution by effectively reducing unphysical oscillations. In addition, suitable computational parameters of SPH algorithms are proposed through analyzing the sound pressure errors for simulating sound waves.

  9. Stationary waves in tubes and the speed of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lutz; Vogt, Patrik; Strohmeyer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The opportunity to plot oscillograms and frequency spectra with smartphones creates many options for experiments in acoustics, including several that have been described in this column.1-3 The activities presented in this paper are intended to complement these applications, and include an approach to determine sound velocity in air by using standard drain pipes4 and an outline of an investigation of the temperature dependency of the speed of sound.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic waves in fusion and astrophysical plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    Macroscopic plasma dynamics in both controlled thermonuclear confinement machines and in the atmospheres of X-ray emitting stars is described by the equations of magnetohydrodynamics. This provides a vast area of overlapping research activities which is presently actively pursued. In this lecture the author concentrates on some important differences in the dynamics of the two confined plasma systems related to the very different geometries that are encountered and, thus, the role of the different boundary conditions that have to be posed. As a result, the basic MHD waves in a tokamak are quite different from those found in a solar magnetic flux tube. The result is that, whereas the three well-known MHD waves can be traced stepwise in the curved geometry of a tokamak, their separate existence is eliminated right from the start in a line-tied coronal loop because line-tying in general conflicts with the phase relationships between the vector components of the three velocity fields. The consequences are far-reaching, viz. completely different resonant frequencies and continuous spectra, absence of rational magnetic surfaces, and irrelevance of local marginal stability theory for coronal magnetic loops.

  11. Breaking of Large Amplitude Electron Plasma Wave in a Maxwellian Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    The determination of maximum possible amplitude of a coherent longitudinal plasma oscillation/wave is a topic of fundamental importance in non-linear plasma physics. The amplitudes of these large amplitude plasma waves is limited by a phenomena called wave breaking which may be induced by several non-linear processes. It was shown by Coffey [T. P. Coffey, Phys. Fluids 14, 1402 (1971)] using a "water-bag" distribution for electrons that, in a warm plasma the maximum electric field amplitude and density amplitude implicitly depend on the electron temperature, known as Coffey's limit. In this paper, the breaking of large amplitude freely running electron plasma wave in a homogeneous warm plasma where electron's velocity distribution is Maxwellian has been studied numerically using 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulation method. It is found that Coffey's propagating wave solutions, which was derived using a "water-bag" distribution for electrons, also represent propagating waves in a Maxwellian plasma. Coffey's wave...

  12. Deltas, freshwater discharge, and waves along the Young Sound, NE Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Aart; Abermann, Jakob; Bendixen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    , and bathymetry), fluvial discharges and associated sediment load, and processes by waves and currents. Main factors steering the Arctic fluvial discharges into the Young Sound are the snow and ice melt and precipitation in the catchment, and extreme events like glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Waves...

  13. Teaching about Mechanical Waves and Sound with a Tuning Fork and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Silvio; Colantonio, Arturo; Puddu, Emanuella; Galano, Silvia; Testa, Italo

    2015-01-01

    Literature in "Physics Education" has shown that students encounter many difficulties in understanding wave propagation. Such difficulties lead to misconceptions also in understanding sound, often used as context to teach wave propagation. To address these issues, we present in this paper a module in which the students are engaged in…

  14. Teaching about Mechanical Waves and Sound with a Tuning Fork and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Silvio; Colantonio, Arturo; Puddu, Emanuella; Galano, Silvia; Testa, Italo

    2015-01-01

    Literature in "Physics Education" has shown that students encounter many difficulties in understanding wave propagation. Such difficulties lead to misconceptions also in understanding sound, often used as context to teach wave propagation. To address these issues, we present in this paper a module in which the students are engaged in…

  15. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  16. Magnetoacoustic waves in a partially ionized two-fluid plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by the ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma $\\beta$, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional da...

  17. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : Ionospheric plasma by VHF waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Patel; Abhay Kumar Singh; R P Singh

    2000-11-01

    The amplitude scintillations of very high frequency electromagnetic wave transmitted from geo-stationary satellite at 244.168 MHz have been recorded at Varanasi (geom. lat. 14° 55'N) during 1991 to 1999. The data are analyzed to determine the statistical features of overhead ionospheric plasma irregularities which are mostly of small duration < 30 minutes and are predominant during pre-midnight period. The increase of solar activity generally increases the depth of scintillation. The auto-correlation functions and power spectra of scintillations predict that the scale length of these irregularities varies from 200–500 m having velocity of movement between 75 m/sec to 200 m/sec. These results agree well with the results obtained by other workers.

  18. Athermal Annealing of Semiconductors Using Shock Waves Generated by a Laser-Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, R. P.; Grun, J.; Mignogna, R.; Donnelly, D. W.; Covington, B.

    2004-07-01

    We are investigating an annealing technique in which shock or sound waves generated by a laser-plasma are used to anneal a semiconductor. The athermal annealing (AA) process occurs very rapidly, which results in almost no diffusion of. dopants. A HeNe laser is used to measure the reflectivity of the silicon as a function of time. Measurements show that the annealing occurs in 1.8 μsec, which is the acoustic time scale for waves to propagate from the focus through the AA region. A knife-edge technique is employed to study acoustic waves in the sample by measuring the deflection of the probe beam. Initial results for aluminum samples irradiated at modest laser intensities (200 mJ, 50 nsec) show well-defined surface acoustic waves. However, both silicon and GaAs have more complicated structure which resemble Lamb (plate) waves.

  19. High latitude electromagnetic plasma wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The principal types of electromagnetic plasma wave emission produced in the high latitude auroral regions are reviewed. Three types of radiation are described: auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, and Z mode radiation. Auroral kilometric radiation is a very intense radio emission generated in the free space R-X mode by electrons associated with the formation of discrete auroral arcs in the local evening. Theories suggest that this radiation is an electron cyclotron resonance instability driven by an enhanced loss cone in the auroral acceleration region at altitudes of about 1 to 2 R sub E. Auroral hiss is a somewhat weaker whistler mode emission generated by low energy (100 eV to 10 keV) auroral electrons. The auroral hiss usually has a V shaped frequency time spectrum caused by a freqency dependent beaming of the whistler mode into a conical beam directed upward or downward along the magnetic field.

  20. A sound nebula: the origin of the Solar System in the field of a standing sound wave

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    According to the planetary origin conceptual model proposed in this paper, the protosun centre of the pre-solar nebula exploded, resulting in a shock wave that passed through it and then returned to the centre, generating a new explosion and shock wave. Recurrent explosions in the nebula resulted in a spherical standing sound wave, whose antinodes concentrated dust into rotating rings that transformed into planets. The extremely small angular momentum of the Sun and the tilt of its equatorial plane were caused by the asymmetry of the first, most powerful explosion. Differences between inner and outer planets are explained by the migration of solid matter, while the Oort cloud is explained by the division of the pre-solar nebula into a spherical internal nebula and an expanding spherical shell of gas. The proposed conceptual model can also explain the origin and evolution of exoplanetary systems and may be of use in searching for new planets.

  1. A robust technique to reconstruct sound field for all wave-numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Fei; CHEN Jian; LI Weibing; CHEN Xinzhao

    2004-01-01

    A robust technique has been proposed for reconstructing sound field for all wave-numbers, which is suitable for the radiation analysis on an arbitrarily-shaped body.According to the wave superposition formulation, the spatial sound field of an actual radiator can be represented equivalently by superposing the fields generated by some fictitious sources interior to the actual radiator. Meanwhile, the strength density on the fictitious sources can be obtained by matching the sound pressures of a finite number of field points. Once the strength density is calculated, the acoustic information at any field point can be obtained subsequently. Finally, some typical numerical examples are given to validate the theoretical analysis, and some investigations are made to analyze the influence of sound frequency and the fictitious source position on the reconstruction precision, which are helpful to the application of the proposed technique to real industrial measurements.

  2. Sound power spectrum and wave drag of a propeller in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    Theory is presented for the sound power and sound power spectrum of a single rotation propeller in forward flight. Calculations are based on the linear wave equation with sources distributed over helicoidal surfaces to represent effects of blade thickness and steady loading. Sound power is distributed continuously over frequecy, as would be expected from Doppler effects, rather than in discrete harmonics. The theory is applied to study effects of sweep and Mach number in propfans. An acoustic efficiency is defined as the ratio of radiated sound power to shaft input power. This value is the linear estimate of the effect of wave drag due to the supersonic blade section speeds. It is shown that the acoustic efficiency is somewhat less than 1 percent for a well designed propfan.

  3. Sound waves in two-dimensional ducts with sinusoidal walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to analyze the wave propagation in two-dimensional hard-walled ducts with sinusoidal walls. For traveling waves, resonance occurs whenever the wall wavenumber is equal to the difference of the wavenumbers of any two duct acoustic modes. The results show that neither of these resonating modes could occur without strongly generating the other.

  4. Effects of Schwarzschild Geometry on Isothermal Plasma Wave Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of isothermal plasma waves has been analyzed near the Schwarzschild horizon. We consider a non-rotating background with non-magnetized and magnetized plasmas. The general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations for the Schwarzschild planar analogue spacetime with an isothermal state of the plasma are formulated. The perturbed form of these equations is linearized and Fourier analyzed by introducing simple harmonic waves. The determinant of these equations in each case leads to a complex dispersion relation, which gives complex values of the wave number. This has been used to discuss the nature of the waves and their characteristics near the horizon.

  5. Sensory illusions: Common mistakes in physics regarding sound, light and radio waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briles, T. M.; Tabor-Morris, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    Optical illusions are well known as effects that we see that are not representative of reality. Sensory illusions are similar but can involve other senses than sight, such as hearing or touch. One mistake commonly noted among instructors is that students often mis-identify radio signals as sound waves and not as part of the electromagnetic spectrum. A survey of physics students from multiple high schools highlights the frequency of this common misconception, as well as other nuances on this misunderstanding. Many students appear to conclude that, since they experience radio broadcasts as sound, then sound waves are the actual transmission of radio signals and not, as is actually true, a representation of those waves as produced by the translator box, the radio. Steps to help students identify and correct sensory illusion misconceptions are discussed. School of Education

  6. On the conical refraction of hydromagnetic waves in plasma with anisotropic thermal pressure general consideration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, D

    1996-01-01

    A phenomenon analogous to the conical refraction well-known in the crystalooptics and crystaloacoustics is considered for the magnetohydrodynamical waves in a collisionless plasma with anisotropic thermal pressure. Imposing the most general (generalization of Tsiklauri, 1996, Phys. Plasmas, 3, 800) condition for the existence of the phenomenon, angle of the conical refraction is calculated which appeared to be dependent on the ratio of the Alfven velocity and sound speed measured in the perpendicular direction in respect to the external magnetic field. Feasible ways of experimental demonstration of the phenomenon are discussed and a novelty brought by the general consideration is outlined.

  7. An Exact Transfer Matrix Formulation of Plane Sound Wave Transmission in Inhomogeneous Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockumaci, E.

    1998-11-01

    The impedance, or the reflection coefficient, of plane sound waves in inhomogeneous ducts satisfies a Riccati equation. The present paper shows that the duct impedance matrix, or the scattering matrix, can be related explicitly to the solutions of the associated linear equation of the Riccati equation for duct impedance, or reflection coefficient, respectively. New exact analytical scattering matrix solutions, which follow as consequences of this connection, are given for two significant duct acoustics problems, namely, the sound transmission in non-uniform ducts carrying an incompressible subsonic low Mach number mean flow transmission of sound in uniform ducts with a full quadratic axial mean temperature gradient.

  8. Motion of a rigid prolate spheroid in a sound wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2014-08-01

    The motions of a rigid and unconstrained prolate spheroid subjected to plane sound waves are computed using preliminary analytic derivation and numerical approach. The acoustically induced motions are found comprising torsional motion as well as translational motion in the case of acoustic oblique incidence and present great relevance to the sound wavelength, body geometry, and density. The relationship between the motions and acoustic particle velocity is obtained through finite element simulation in terms of sound wavelengths much longer than the overall size of the prolate spheroid. The results are relevant to the design of inertial acoustic particle velocity sensors based on prolate spheroids.

  9. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  10. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber).

  11. Effects of Schwarzschild Geometry on Isothermal Plasma Wave Dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, M.; Sheikh, Umber

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of isothermal plasma waves has been analyzed near the Schwarzschild horizon. We consider a non-rotating background with non-magnetized and magnetized plasmas. The general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations for the Schwarzschild planar analogue spacetime with an isothermal state of the plasma are formulated. The perturbed form of these equations is linearized and Fourier analyzed by introducing simple harmonic waves. The determinant of these equations in each case leads ...

  12. Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves with frequencies near the cyclotron frequency {Omega}{sub c{sub s}} of a given plasma species s is developed for a multispecies non-neutral plasma column with general radial density and electric field profiles. Terms in the perturbed distribution function up to O(1/{Omega}{sub c{sub s}{sup 2}}) are kept, as are the effects of finite cyclotron radius r{sub c} up to O(r{sub c}{sup 2}). At this order, the equilibrium distribution is not Maxwellian if the plasma temperature or rotation frequency is not uniform. For r{sub c}{yields}0, the theory reproduces cold-fluid theory and predicts surface cyclotron waves propagating azimuthally. For finite r{sub c}, the wave equation predicts that the surface wave couples to radially and azimuthally propagating Bernstein waves, at locations where the wave frequency equals the local upper hybrid frequency. The equation also predicts a second set of Bernstein waves that do not couple to the surface wave, and therefore have no effect on the external potential. The wave equation is solved both numerically and analytically in the WKB approximation, and analytic dispersion relations for the waves are obtained. The theory predicts that both types of Bernstein wave are damped at resonances, which are locations where the Doppler-shifted wave frequency matches the local cyclotron frequency as seen in the rotating frame.

  13. The energy density of a Landau damped plasma wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, R. W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper some theories about the energy of a Landau damped plasma wave are discussed and new initial conditions are proposed. Analysis of a wave packet, rather than an infinite wave, gives a clear picture of the energy transport from field to particles. Initial conditions are found which excite

  14. Does the Decay Wave Propagate Forwards in Dusty Plasmas?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢柏松

    2002-01-01

    The decay interaction of the ion acoustic wave in a dusty plasma with variable-charge dust grains is studied.Even if strong charging relaxation for dust grains and the short wavelength regime for ion waves are included, it is found that the decay wave must be backward propagating.

  15. Evidence for Langmuir wave collapse in the interplanetary plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, K.; Howard, R. L.; Monson, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    With the Fast Envelope Sampler part of the URAP experiment on Ulysses, there is observed much rapidly varying structure in plasma waves in the solar wind. Extremely narrow (1 ms) structures observed together with electrostatic Langmuir waves, as well as some broader Langmuir wave packets are discussed.

  16. Linear theory of plasma filled backward wave oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preeti Vyas; Arti Gokhale; Y Choyal; K P Maheshwari

    2001-05-01

    An analytical and numerical study of backward wave oscillator (BWO) in linear regime is presented to get an insight into the excitation of electromagnetic waves as a result of the interaction of the relativistic electron beam with a slow wave structure. The effect of background plasma on the BWO instability is also presented.

  17. Surface wave and linear operating mode of a plasma antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogachev, N. N., E-mail: bgniknik@yandex.ru; Bogdankevich, I. L.; Gusein-zade, N. G.; Rukhadze, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The relation between the propagation conditions of a surface electromagnetic wave along a finiteradius plasma cylinder and the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna is investigated. The solution to the dispersion relation for a surface wave propagating along a finite-radius plasma cylinder is analyzed for weakly and strongly collisional plasmas. Computer simulations of an asymmetrical plasma dipole antenna are performed using the KARAT code, wherein the dielectric properties of plasma are described in terms of the Drude model. The plasma parameters corresponding to the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna are determined. It is demonstrated that the characteristics of the plasma antenna in this mode are close to those of an analogous metal antenna.

  18. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, M., E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  19. The study of sound wave propagation in rarefied gases using unified gas-kinetic scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Jie Wang; Kun Xu

    2012-01-01

    Sound wave propagation in rarefied monatomic gases is simulated using a newly developed unified gaskinetic scheme (UGKS).The numerical calculations are carried out for a wide range of wave oscillating frequencies.The corresponding rarefaction parameter is defined as the ratio of sound wave frequency to the intermolecular particle collision frequency.The simulation covers the flow regime from the continuum to free molecule one.The treatment of the oscillating wall boundary condition and the methods for evaluating the absorption coefficient and sound wave speed are presented in detail.The simulation results from the UGKS are compared to the Navier-Stokes solutions,the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulation,and experimental measurements.Good agreement with the experimental data has been obtained in the whole flow regimes for the corresponding Knudsen number from 0.08 to 32.The current study clearly demonstrates the capability of the UGKS method in capturing the sound wave propagation and its usefulness for the rarefied flow study.

  20. Efficient techniques for wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish

    Sound propagation techniques model the effect of the environment on sound waves and predict their behavior from point of emission at the source to the final point of arrival at the listener. Sound is a pressure wave produced by mechanical vibration of a surface that propagates through a medium such as air or water, and the problem of sound propagation can be formulated mathematically as a second-order partial differential equation called the wave equation. Accurate techniques based on solving the wave equation, also called the wave-based techniques, are too expensive computationally and memory-wise. Therefore, these techniques face many challenges in terms of their applicability in interactive applications including sound propagation in large environments, time-varying source and listener directivity, and high simulation cost for mid-frequencies. In this dissertation, we propose a set of efficient wave-based sound propagation techniques that solve these three challenges and enable the use of wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications. Firstly, we propose a novel equivalent source technique for interactive wave-based sound propagation in large scenes spanning hundreds of meters. It is based on the equivalent source theory used for solving radiation and scattering problems in acoustics and electromagnetics. Instead of using a volumetric or surface-based approach, this technique takes an object-centric approach to sound propagation. The proposed equivalent source technique generates realistic acoustic effects and takes orders of magnitude less runtime memory compared to prior wave-based techniques. Secondly, we present an efficient framework for handling time-varying source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation. The source directivity is represented as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic sources. This spherical harmonic-based representation of source directivity can support analytical, data

  1. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  2. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ryżak

    Full Text Available The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa. We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop. The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  3. Dynamic of Langmuir and Ion-Sound Waves in Type 3 Solar Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type 3 sources is investigated, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. The resulting prediction for the electrostatic decay threshold is consistent with the observed high-field cutoff in the Langmuir field distribution. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; rather, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be fast enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The resulting levels of product Langmuir and ion-sound waves are estimated theoretically and shown to be consistent with in situ ISEE 3 observations of type 3 events at 1 AU. Nonlinear interactions slave the growth and decay of product sound waves to that of the product Langmuir waves. The resulting probability distribution of ion-sound field strengths is predicted to have a flat tail extending to a high-field cutoff. This prediction is consistent with statistics derived here from ISEE 3 observations. Agreement is also found between the frequencies of the observed waves and predictions for the product S waves. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasilinear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth. When wave and beam inhomogeneities are accounted for, arguments from quasi-linear relaxation yield an upper bound on the Langmuir fields that is too high to be relevant. Nor are the criteria for direct wave collapse of the beam-driven waves met, consistent with earlier simulation results that imply that this process is not responsible for saturation of the beam instability. Indeed, even

  4. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  5. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  6. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  7. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...

  8. Sound Absorption Characteristics of Aluminum Foams Treated by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Open-celled aluminum foams with different pore sizes were fabricated. A plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO treatment was applied on the aluminum foams to create a layer of ceramic coating. The sound absorption coefficients of the foams were measured by an impedance tube and they were calculated by a transfer function method. The experimental results show that the sound absorption coefficient of the foam increases gradually with the decrease of pore size. Additionally, when the porosity of the foam increases, the sound absorption coefficient also increases. The PEO coating surface is rough and porous, which is beneficial for improvement in sound absorption. After PEO treatment, the maximum sound absorption of the foam is improved to some extent.

  9. Horizontal ducting of sound by curved nonlinear internal gravity waves in the continental shelf areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Tsong; McMahon, Kara G; Lynch, James F; Siegmann, William L

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic ducting effect by curved nonlinear gravity waves in shallow water is studied through idealized models in this paper. The internal wave ducts are three-dimensional, bounded vertically by the sea surface and bottom, and horizontally by aligned wavefronts. Both normal mode and parabolic equation methods are taken to analyze the ducted sound field. Two types of horizontal acoustic modes can be found in the curved internal wave duct. One is a whispering-gallery type formed by the sound energy trapped along the outer and concave boundary of the duct, and the other is a fully bouncing type due to continual reflections from boundaries in the duct. The ducting condition depends on both internal-wave and acoustic-source parameters, and a parametric study is conducted to derive a general pattern. The parabolic equation method provides full-field modeling of the sound field, so it includes other acoustic effects caused by internal waves, such as mode coupling/scattering and horizontal Lloyd's mirror interference. Two examples are provided to present internal wave ducts with constant curvature and meandering wavefronts.

  10. Analog of Optical Elements for Sound Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Paul; Perkalskis, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Optical elements manipulate light waves. They may be used to focus the light or to change the phase, the polarization, the direction, or the intensity of light. Many of these functions are often demonstrated with microwaves, since the devices normally available in teaching laboratories produce wavelengths in the centimeter range and are therefore…

  11. Illustrations and Supporting Texts for Sound Standing Waves of Air Columns in Pipes in Introductory Physics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liang; Smith, Chris; Poelzer, G. Herold; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Corpuz, Edgar; Yanev, George

    2014-01-01

    In our pilot studies, we found that many introductory physics textbook illustrations with supporting text for sound standing waves of air columns in open-open, open-closed, and closed-closed pipes inhibit student understanding of sound standing wave phenomena due to student misunderstanding of how air molecules move within these pipes. Based on…

  12. Illustrations and Supporting Texts for Sound Standing Waves of Air Columns in Pipes in Introductory Physics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liang; Smith, Chris; Poelzer, G. Herold; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Corpuz, Edgar; Yanev, George

    2014-01-01

    In our pilot studies, we found that many introductory physics textbook illustrations with supporting text for sound standing waves of air columns in open-open, open-closed, and closed-closed pipes inhibit student understanding of sound standing wave phenomena due to student misunderstanding of how air molecules move within these pipes. Based on…

  13. Deltas, freshwater discharge, and waves along the Young Sound, NE Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Aart; Abermann, Jakob; Bendixen, Mette; Lund, Magnus; Sigsgaard, Charlotte; Skov, Kirstine; Hansen, Birger Ulf

    2017-02-01

    A wide range of delta morphologies occurs along the fringes of the Young Sound in Northeast Greenland due to spatial heterogeneity of delta regimes. In general, the delta regime is related to catchment and basin characteristics (geology, topography, drainage pattern, sediment availability, and bathymetry), fluvial discharges and associated sediment load, and processes by waves and currents. Main factors steering the Arctic fluvial discharges into the Young Sound are the snow and ice melt and precipitation in the catchment, and extreme events like glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Waves are subordinate and only rework fringes of the delta plain forming sandy bars if the exposure and fetch are optimal. Spatial gradients and variability in driving forces (snow and precipitation) and catchment characteristics (amount of glacier coverage, sediment characteristics) as well as the strong and local influence of GLOFs in a specific catchment impede a simple upscaling of sediment fluxes from individual catchments toward a total sediment flux into the Young Sound.

  14. Numerical study of three-dimensional sound reflection from corrugated surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Youngmin; Song, H C; Seong, Woojae

    2016-10-01

    When a sound wave propagates in a water medium bounded by a smooth surface wave, reflection from a wave crest can lead to focusing and result in rapid variation of the received waveform as the surface wave moves [Tindle, Deane, and Preisig, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 66-72 (2009)]. In prior work, propagation paths have been constrained to be in a plane parallel to the direction of corrugated surface waves, i.e., a two-dimensional (2-D) propagation problem. In this paper, the azimuthal dependence of sound propagation as a three-dimensional (3-D) problem is investigated using an efficient, time-domain Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral formulation. When the source and receiver are in the plane orthogonal to the surface wave direction, the surface wave curvature vanishes in conventional 2-D treatments and the flat surface simply moves up and down, resulting in minimal temporal variation of the reflected signal intensity. On the other hand, the 3-D propagation analysis reveals that a focusing phenomenon occurs in the reflected signal due to the surface wave curvature formed along the orthogonal plane, i.e., out-of-plane scattering.

  15. Excitation of surface plasma waves over corrugated slow-wave structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim P Jain; Jetendra Parashar

    2005-08-01

    A microwave propagating along vacuum–dielectric–plasma interface excites surface plasma wave (SPW). A periodic slow-wave structure placed over dielectric slows down the SPW. The phase velocity of slow SPW is sensitive to height, periodicity, number of periods, thickness and the separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure. These slow SPW can couple the microwave energy to the plasma and can sustain the discharge. The efficiency of the power coupling is few per cent and is sensitive to separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure.

  16. Freak waves in negative-ion plasmas: an experiment revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourakis, Ioannis; Elkamash, Ibrahem; Reville, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Extreme events in the form of rogue waves (freak waves) occur widely in the open sea. These are space- and time-localised excitations, which appear unexpectedly and are characterised by a significant amplitude. Beyond ocean dynamics, the mechanisms underlying rogue wave formation are now being investigated in various physical contexts, including materials science, nonlinear optics and plasma physics, to mention but a few. We have undertaken an investigation, from first principles, of the occurrence of rogue waves associated with the propagation of electrostatic wavepackets in plasmas. Motivated by recent experimental considerations involving freak waves in negative-ion plasmas (NIP), we have addresed the occurrence of freak waves in NIP from first principles. An extended range of plasma parameter values was identified, where freak wave formation is possible, in terms of relevant plasma parameters. Our results extend -and partly contradict- the underlying assumptions in the interpretation of the aforementioned experiment, where a critical plasma configuration was considered and a Gardner equation approach was adopted. This work was supported from CPP/QUB funding. One of us (I. Elkamash) acknowledges financial support by an Egyptian Government fellowship.

  17. A laboratory search for plasma erosion by Alfven waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincena, S.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.

    2007-12-01

    Obliquely propagating shear Alfven waves with transverse wavelengths on the order of the electron inertial length or even the ion gyro-radius are commonly observed in the earth's low-altitude auroral zones. These regions are also replete with observations of electron beams and transversely heated ions. A kinetic treatment of shear Alfven wave-particle interaction reveals how these waves can be responsible for some of the observed particle acceleration. The auroral plasma environment is further enriched by the presence of field-aligned depletions in plasma density, and it has been suggested* that the Alfven waves may, in fact, be the cause of the erosion of ionospheric density. In this laboratory experiment, shear waves will be launched using a variety of proven antennas, and also allowed to grow spontaneously as Drift-Alfven modes in seeded density depletions**. Detailed measurements of the wave magnetic fields in the perpendicular density gradient regions will be presented which demonstrate the generation of short perpendicular wave scales due to the perpendicular gradient in parallel wave phase speed. Miniature in-situ particle diagnostics will also be used to look for electron and ion acceleration. The waves will also be launched into an increasing region of background magnetic field in an attempt to model the ratios of Alfven speed to electron thermal speed, and density gradient scale length to electron inertial length appropriate to the earth's auroral zone. Preliminary results will be presented on the efficacy of shear Alfven waves to self-generate plasma density depletions, or deepen ambient density inhomogeneities. The experiments are conducted at UCLA's Basic Plasma Science Facility in the Large Plasma Device. *Chaston, et al., "Ionospheric erosion by Alfven Waves," JGR, V 111, A03206, 2006. **Penano, et al., "Drift-Alfven fluctuations associated with a narrow pressure striation," Phys. Plasmas, V 7, Issue 1, pp. 144-157 (2000).

  18. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  19. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph. D. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-10-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  20. The generation of sound by vorticity waves in swirling duct flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, M. S.; Liu, J. T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Swirling flow in an axisymmetric duct can support vorticity waves propagating parallel to the axis of the duct. When the cross-sectional area of the duct changes a portion of the wave energy is scattered into secondary vorticity and sound waves. Thus the swirling flow in the jet pipe of an aeroengine provides a mechanism whereby disturbances produced by unsteady combustion or turbine blading can be propagated along the pipe and subsequently scattered into aerodynamic sound. In this paper a linearized model of this process is examined for low Mach number swirling flow in a duct of infinite extent. It is shown that the amplitude of the scattered acoustic pressure waves is proportional to the product of the characteristic swirl velocity and the perturbation velocity of the vorticity wave. The sound produced in this way may therefore be of more significance than that generated by vorticity fluctuations in the absence of swirl, for which the acoustic pressure is proportional to the square of the perturbation velocity. The results of the analysis are discussed in relation to the problem of excess jet noise.

  1. Acceleration of injected electrons by the plasma beat wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, C.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Leemans, W. P.; Williams, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W. B.

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we describe the recent work at UCLA on the acceleration of externally injected electrons by a relativistic plasma wave. A two frequency laser was used to excite a plasma wave over a narrow range of static gas pressures close to resonance. Electrons with energies up to our detection limit of 9.1 MeV were observed when 2.1 MeV electrons were injected in the plasma wave. No accelerated electrons above the detection threshold were observed when the laser was operated on a single frequency or when no electrons were injected. Experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions, and future prospects for the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed.

  2. Relativistic effects on the modulational instability of electron plasma waves in quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudev Ghosh; Swarniv Chandra; Sailendra Nath Paul

    2012-05-01

    Relativistic effects on the linear and nonlinear properties of electron plasma waves are investigated using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model for a twocomponent electron–ion dense quantum plasma. Using standard perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) containing both relativistic and quantum effects has been derived. This equation has been used to discuss the modulational instability of the wave. Through numerical calculations it is shown that relativistic effects significantly change the linear dispersion character of the wave. Unlike quantum effects, relativistic effects are shown to reduce the instability growth rate of electron plasma waves.

  3. A climatology of gravity wave parameters based on satellite limb soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Gravity waves are one of the main drivers of atmospheric dynamics. The resolution of most global circulation models (GCMs) and chemistry climate models (CCMs), however, is too coarse to properly resolve the small scales of gravity waves. Horizontal scales of gravity waves are in the range of tens to a few thousand kilometers. Gravity wave source processes involve even smaller scales. Therefore GCMs/CCMs usually parametrize the effect of gravity waves on the global circulation. These parametrizations are very simplified, and comparisons with global observations of gravity waves are needed for an improvement of parametrizations and an alleviation of model biases. In our study, we present a global data set of gravity wave distributions observed in the stratosphere and the mesosphere by the infrared limb sounding satellite instruments High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). We provide various gravity wave parameters (for example, gravity variances, potential energies and absolute momentum fluxes). This comprehensive climatological data set can serve for comparison with other instruments (ground based, airborne, or other satellite instruments), as well as for comparison with gravity wave distributions, both resolved and parametrized, in GCMs and CCMs. The purpose of providing various different parameters is to make our data set useful for a large number of potential users and to overcome limitations of other observation techniques, or of models, that may be able to provide only one of those parameters. We present a climatology of typical average global distributions and of zonal averages, as well as their natural range of variations. In addition, we discuss seasonal variations of the global distribution of gravity waves, as well as limitations of our method of deriving gravity wave parameters from satellite data.

  4. Excitation of Chirping Whistler Waves in a Laboratory Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Compernolle, B.; An, X.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Gekelman, W. N.; Pribyl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Whistler mode chorus emissions with a characteristic frequency chirp are an important magnetospheric wave, responsible for the acceleration of outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies and also for the scattering loss of these electrons into the atmosphere. Here, we report on the first laboratory experiment where whistler waves exhibiting fast frequency chirping have been artificially produced using a beam of energetic electrons launched into a cold plasma. Frequency chirps are only observed for a narrow range of plasma and beam parameters, and show a strong dependence on beam density, plasma density and magnetic field gradient. Broadband whistler waves similar to magnetospheric hiss are also observed, and the parameter ranges for each emission are quantified. The research was funded by NSF/DOE Plasma Partnership program by grant DE-SC0010578. Work was done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility (BAPSF) also funded by NSF/DOE.

  5. Application of the Wave and Finite Element Method to Calculate Sound Transmission Through Cylindrical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingan, Michael J.; Yang, Yi; Mace, Brian R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the prediction of sound transmission through a cylindrical structure. The problem considered is that of sound generated by a line source located exterior to a two-dimensional circular cylinder which produces sound waves which transmit through the cylinder to an internal medium. An analytical solution is presented for the case of sound transmission through a thin cylindrical shell, by modelling the shell response using the Flugge- Byrne-Lur'ye equations. This solution is then compared to calculations where the response of the cylinder is calculated using the Wave and Finite Element (WFE) method. The WFE method involves modelling a small segment of a structure using traditional finite element (FE) methods. The mass and stiffness matrices of the segment are then used to calculate the response of the structure to excitation by an acoustic field. The WFE approach for calculating sound transmission is validated by comparison with the analytic solution. Formulating analytic solutions for more complicated structures can be cumbersome whereas using a numerical technique, such as the WFE method, is relatively straightforward.

  6. Sound waves in the compactified D0-D4 brane system

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Wenhe

    2016-01-01

    As an extension to our previous work, we study the transport properties of the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model in the black D4-brane background with smeared D0-branes (D0-D4/D8 system). Because of the presence of the D0-branes, this model is holographically dual to 4d QCD or Yang-Mills theory with a Chern-Simons term in the bubble configuration. And the number density of the D0-branes corresponds to the coupling constant ($\\theta$ angle) of the Chern-Simons term in the dual field theory. In this paper, we accordingly focus on small number density of the D0-branes to study the sound mode in the black D0-D4 brane system since the coupling of the Chern-Simons term should be quite weak in QCD. Then we derive its 5d effective theory and analytically compute the speed of sound and the sound wave attenuation in the approach of Gauge/Gravity duality. Our result shows the speed of sound and the sound wave attenuation is modified by the presence of the D0-branes. Thus they depend on the $\\theta$ angle or chiral potential i...

  7. Kinetic simulations of ladder climbing by electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on whether the wave spectrum is discrete (bounded plasma) or continuous (boundless plasma), this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autoresonant acceleration of plasmons. It was first proposed by Barth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 075001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.075001] based on a linear fluid model. In this paper, LC of electron plasma waves is investigated using fully nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. It is shown that, in agreement with the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. Since nonlinear effects decrease the damping rate, LC is even more efficient when practiced on structures like quasiperiodic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) waves rather than on Langmuir waves per se.

  8. Alfven waves in a partially ionized two-fluid plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, R; Ballester, J L; Terradas, J

    2013-01-01

    Alfv\\'en waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfv\\'en waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfv\\'en waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cut-off values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mo...

  9. A wave field synthesis approach to reproduction of spatially correlated sound fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Alain; Dia, Rokhiya; Robin, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    This article discusses an open-loop wave field synthesis (WFS) approach for the reproduction of spatially correlated sound fields. The main application concerns laboratory reproduction of turbulent boundary layer wall pressure on aircraft fuselages and measurement of their sound transmission loss. The problem configuration involves reconstruction of random sound pressure distributions on a planar reproduction surface using a planar array of reproduction monopoles parallel to the reproduction plane. In this paper, the WFS formulation is extended to sound fields with imposed time and spatial correlation properties (or equivalently imposed cross-spectral density in the frequency and wave number domains). Numerical examples are presented for the reproduction of a propagating plane wave, diffuse acoustic field and wall pressure in subsonic or supersonic turbulent boundary layers. The reproduction accuracy is examined in terms of the size of the source plane and reproduction plane, their separation, and the number of reproduction sources required per acoustic wavelength. While the reproduction approach cannot reconstruct sub-wavelength correlation scales of subsonic turbulent boundary layers, it effectively reconstructs correlation scales larger than the acoustic wavelength, making it appropriate for diffuse acoustic field and supersonic turbulent layers.

  10. Analysis of sound propagation in ducts using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for sound propagation in a rectangular two-dimensional duct without steady flow for plane wave input. Before the difference equations are formulated, the governing Helmholtz equation is first transformed to a form whose solution does not oscillate along the length of the duct. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude, and the number of grid points becomes independent of the sound frequency. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. Example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a one-dimensional straight hard-wall duct and in a two-dimensional straight soft-wall duct without steady flow. The numerical solutions show evidence of the existence along the duct wall of a developing acoustic pressure diffusion boundary layer which is similar in nature to the conventional viscous flow boundary layer. In order to better illustrate this concept, the wave equation and boundary conditions are written such that the frequency no longer appears explicitly in them. The frequency effects in duct propagation can be visualized solely as an expansion and stretching of the suppressor duct.

  11. Dynamics of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III solar radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The study traces the evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III sources, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; instead, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be rapid enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasi-linear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth.

  12. Intermittent large amplitude internal waves observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. C.; Decker, L.

    2017-07-01

    A previously unreported internal tidal bore, which evolves into solitary internal wave packets, was observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound, and the timing, speed, and amplitude of the waves were measured by CTD and visual observation. Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were attempted, but unsuccessful. The waves appear to be generated with the ebb flow along the tidal flats of the Stillaguamish River, and the speed and width of the resulting waves can be predicted from second-order KdV theory. Their eventual dissipation may contribute significantly to surface mixing locally, particularly in comparison with the local dissipation due to the tides. Visually the waves appear in fair weather as a strong foam front, which is less visible the farther they propagate.

  13. Scattering of radio frequency waves by turbulence in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2016-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments and incoherent fluctuations due to turbulence are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, there are telltale signs, arising from differences between results from simulations and from experiments, that fluctuations can modify the spectrum of RF waves. Any effect on RF waves in the scrape-off layer can have important experimental consequences. For example, electron cyclotron waves are expected to stabilize the deleterious neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in ITER. Spectral and polarization changes due to scattering will modify the spatial location and profile of the current driven by the RF waves, thereby affecting the control of NTMs. Pioneering theoretical studies and complementary computer simulations have been pursued to elucidate the impact of fluctuations on RF waves. From the full complement of Maxwell's equations for cold, magnetized plasmas, it is shown that the Poynting flux in the wake of filaments develops spatial structure due to diffraction and shadowing. The uniformity of power flow into the plasma is affected by side-scattering, modifications to the wave spectrum, and coupling to plasma waves other than the incident RF wave. The Snell's law and the Fresnel equations have been reformulated within the context of magnetized plasmas. They are distinctly different from their counterparts in scalar dielectric media, and reveal new and important physical insight into the scattering of RF waves. The Snell's law and Fresnel equations are the basis for the Kirchhoff approximation necessary to determine properties of the scattered waves. Furthermore, this theory is also relevant for studying back

  14. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  15. Surface Waves in the paritally ionized solar plasma slab

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2013-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in the partially ionized, incompressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in the present work. The waves are affected by the non ideal MHD effects which causes the finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the finite drift of the magnetic field is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in the partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization of the medium. In the presence of Hall diffusion, the propagation of the sausage and kink surface waves depends on the level of fractional ionization of the medium. When both the Hall and Pedersen diffusion are present in the medium, the waves undergoes damping. For typical solar parameters, waves may damp over few minutes.

  16. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the theoretical properties of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves which occur in the plasma depletion layer are presented. The analysis assumes a homogeneous plasma with the characteristics which were measured by the AMPTE/CCE satellite at 1450-1501 UT on October 5, 1984. Waves were observed in the Pc 1 frequency range below the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and these waves are identified as EMIC waves. The higher-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the H(+) ions, while the lower-frequency instability is driven by the temperature anisotropy of the He(2+) ions. It is argued that the higher-frequency waves will have k roughly parallel to B(0) and will be left-hand polarized, while the lower frequency wave band will have k oblique to B(0) and will be linearly polarized, in agreement with observations.

  17. Surface-wave plasma source with magnetic multicusp fields; Multicusp jiba tojikome hyomenha plasma gen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, M.; Ono, K.; Tsuchihashi, M.; Hanazaki, M.; Komemura, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    A new-type microwave plasma source has been developed for materials processing. The plasma reactor employed a launcher of azimuthally symmetric surface waves at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and also magnetic multicusp fields around the reactor chamber walls. This configuration yielded high-density (Ne {>=} 10{sup 11}cm{sup -3}) plasmas sustained by surface waves even at low gas pressures below 10 m Torr, following easy plasma ignition by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharges. Electrical and optical diagnostics were made to obtain the plasma properties in Ar. It was shown that a transition from ECR excited to surface-wave excited plasmas occurs under conditions where the plasma electron density exceeds a critical value of Ne-1 times 10{sup 11}cm{sup -3}. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to 10(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross-diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  19. Sound wave energy emitted by water drop during the splash on the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    A drop of rain falling on the surface of bare soil not only moisturizes but also can cause splash or compaction, depending on the energy of incident drops and the condition of the surface on which it falls. The splash phenomenon can be characterized by the weight of detached soil material (using splash cups) as well as the number and trajectory of splashed particles (using high-speed cameras). The study presents a new aspect of the analysis of the splash phenomenon by measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out in an anechoic chamber. Three soils (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol, and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa, and 16 kPa) were tested. Drops of 4.2 mm diameter were falling from a height of 1.5m. The sound pressure level was recorded after 10 consecutive water drop impacts using a special set of microphones. In all measuring conditions with 1m distance, the sound pressure level ranged from 27 to 42dB. The impact of water drops on the ground created sound pulses, which were recalculated to the energy emitted in the form of sound waves. For all soil samples, the sound wave energy was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ, which corresponds to 0.03-1.07% of the energy of the incident drops (Ryżak et al., 2016). This work was partly financed from the National Science Centre, Poland; project no. 2014/14/E/ST10/00851. References Ryżak M., Bieganowski A., Korbiel T.: Sound wave Energy resulting from the impact of water drops on the soil surface. PLoS One 11(7):e0158472. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0158472, 2016

  20. Waves generated in the vicinity of an argon plasma gun in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lysak, R. L.; Peria, W.; Lynch, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    Wave and particle observations were made in the close vicinity of an argon plasma gun carned to over 600 km altitude on a sounding rocket. The gun was carned on a subpayload, separated from the main payload early in the flight. Twelve-second argon ion ejections were energized alternately with a peak energy of 100 or 200 eV. They produced waves, with multiple harmonics, in the range of ion cyclotron waves, 10 to 1000 Hz at rocket altitudes. Many of these waves could not be identified as corresponding to the cyclotron frequencies of any of the ions, argon or ambient, known to be present. In addition, the wave frequencies were observed to rise and fall and to change abruptly during a 12-s gun operation. The wave amplitudes, near a few hundred Hertz, were of the order of O. 1 V/m. Some of the waves may be ion-ion hybrid waves. Changes in ion populations were observed at the main payload and at the subpayload during gun operations. A gun-related, field-aligned, electron population also appeared.

  1. Surface waves on a quantum plasma half-space

    CERN Document Server

    Lázár, M; Smolyakov, A

    2007-01-01

    Surface modes are coupled electromagnetic/electrostatic excitations of free electrons near the vacuum-plasma interface and can be excited on a sufficiently dense plasma half-space. They propagate along the surface plane and decay in either sides of the boundary. In such dense plasma models, which are of interest in electronic signal transmission or in some astrophysical applications, the dynamics of the electrons is certainly affected by the quantum effects. Thus, the dispersion relation for the surface wave on a quantum electron plasma half-space is derived by employing the quantum hydrodynamical (QHD) and Maxwell-Poison equations. The QHD include quantum forces involving the Fermi electron temperature and the quantum Bohm potential. It is found that, at room temperature, the quantum effects are mainly relevant for the electrostatic surface plasma waves in a dense gold metallic plasma.

  2. Surface plasma waves over bismuth–vacuum interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim P Jain; J Parashar

    2003-09-01

    A surface plasma wave (SPW) over bismuth–vacuum interface has a signature of mass anisotropy of free electrons. For SPW propagation along the trigonal axis there is no birefringence. The frequency cutoff of SPW cutoff=$_{p}/\\sqrt{2(_{L}+)}$ lies in the far infrared region and can be accessed using free electron laser. The damping rate of waves at low temperatures is low. The surface plasma wave may be excited by an electron beam of current ∼ 100 mA propagating parallel to the interface in its close proximity.

  3. Finite Amplitude Electron Plasma Waves in a Cylindrical Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear behaviour of the electron plasma wave propagating in a cylindrical plasma waveguide immersed in an infinite axial magnetic field is investigated using the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky perturbation method, by means of which is deduced the nonlinear Schrodinger equation governing...... the long-time slow modulation of the wave amplitude. From this equation the amplitude-dependent frequency and wavenumber shifts are calculated, and it is found that the electron waves with short wavelengths are modulationally unstable with respect to long-wavelength, low-frequency perturbations...

  4. Nonlinear interactions between electromagnetic waves and electron plasma oscillations in quantum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B

    2007-08-31

    We consider nonlinear interactions between intense circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) in a dense quantum plasma, taking into account the electron density response in the presence of the relativistic ponderomotive force and mass increase in the CPEM wave fields. The dynamics of the CPEM waves and EPOs is governed by the two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations and Poisson's equation. The nonlinear equations admit the modulational instability of an intense CPEM pump wave against EPOs, leading to the formation and trapping of localized CPEM wave pipes in the electron density hole that is associated with a positive potential distribution in our dense plasma. The relevance of our investigation to the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments is discussed.

  5. Electrostatic solitary waves in dusty pair-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A. P. [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan-731 235, West Bengal (India); Adhikary, N. C. [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati-781035, Assam (India)

    2013-10-15

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized collisionless pair-ion plasma with immobile positively charged dusts is studied for both large- and small-amplitude perturbations. Using a two-fluid model for pair-ions, it is shown that there appear two linear ion modes, namely the “fast” and “slow” waves in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of these wave modes are studied with different mass (m) and temperature (T) ratios of negative to positive ions, as well as the effects of immobile charged dusts (δ). For large-amplitude waves, the pseudopotential approach is performed, whereas the standard reductive perturbation technique is used to study the small-amplitude Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons. The profiles of the pseudopotential, the large amplitude solitons as well as the dynamical evolution of KdV solitons, are numerically studied with the system parameters as above. It is found that the pair-ion plasmas with positively charged dusts support the propagation of solitary waves (SWs) with only the negative potential. The results may be useful for the excitation of SWs in laboratory dusty pair-ion plasmas, electron-free industrial plasmas as well as for observation in space plasmas where electron density is negligibly small compared to that of negative ions.

  6. Instability wave control in turbulent jet by plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Akishev, Y. S.; Belyaev, I. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Bityurin, V. A.; Faranosov, G. A.; Grushin, M. E.; Klimov, A. I.; Kopiev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Moralev, I. A.; Ostrikov, N. N.; Taktakishvili, M. I.; Trushkin, N. I.; Zaytsev, M. Yu

    2014-12-01

    Instability waves in the shear layer of turbulent jets are known to be a significant source of jet noise, which makes their suppression important for the aviation industry. In this study we apply plasma actuators in order to control instability waves in the shear layer of a turbulent air jet at atmospheric pressure. Three types of plasma actuators are studied: high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge, slipping surface discharge, and surface barrier corona discharge. Particle image velocimetry measurements of the shear layer demonstrate that the plasma actuators have control authority over instability waves and effectively suppress the instability waves artificially generated in the shear layer. It makes these actuators promising for application in active control systems for jet noise mitigation.

  7. On the propagation of hydromagnetic waves in a plasma of thermal and suprathermal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Sikka, Himanshu

    2007-12-01

    The propagation of MHD waves is studied when two ideal fluids, thermal and suprathermal gases, coupled by magnetic field are moving with the steady flow velocity. The fluids move independently in a direction perpendicular to the magnetic field but gets coupled along the field. Due to the presence of flow in suprathermal and thermal fluids there appears forward and backward waves. All the forward and backward modes propagate in such a way that their rate of change of phase speed with the thermal Mach number is same. It is also found that besides the usual hydromagnetic modes there appears a suprathermal mode which propagates with faster speed. Surface waves are also examined on an interface formed with composite plasma (suprathermal and thermal gases) on one side and the other is a non-magnetized plasma. In this case, the modes obtained are two or three depending on whether the sound velocity in thermal gas is equal to or greater than the sound velocity in suprathermal gas. The results lead to the conclusion that the interaction of thermal and suprathermal components may lead to the occurrence of an additional mode called suprathermal mode whose phase velocity is higher than all the other modes.

  8. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzi, Oreste; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attach, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view, and which requires in general to approximate the original collisional Landau integral by simplified differential operators in reduced dimensionality. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear form. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator...

  9. Surface waves in the magnetized, collisional dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B. P. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Ishihara, O. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The properties of the low frequency surface waves in inhomogeneous, magnetized collisional complex dusty plasma are investigated in this work. The inhomogeneity is modelled by the two distinct regions of the dusty medium with different dust densities. The external magnetic field is assumed to be oriented along the interface dividing the two medium. It is shown that the collisional momentum exchange that is responsible for the relative drift between the plasma particles affects the propagation of the surface waves in the complex plasma via the Hall drift of the magnetic fluctuations. The propagation properties of the sausage and kink waves depend not only on the grain charge and size distribution but also on the ambient plasma thermal conditions.

  10. Low-Frequency Waves in Cold Three-Component Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Ying; Zhao, Jinsong; Lu, Jianyong

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion relation and electromagnetic polarization of the plasma waves are comprehensively studied in cold electron, proton, and heavy charged particle plasmas. Three modes are classified as the fast, intermediate, and slow mode waves according to different phase velocities. When plasmas contain positively-charged particles, the fast and intermediate modes can interact at the small propagating angles, whereas the two modes are separate at the large propagating angles. The near-parallel intermediate and slow waves experience the linear polarization, circular polarization, and linear polarization again, with the increasing wave number. The wave number regime corresponding to the above circular polarization shrinks as the propagating angle increases. Moreover, the fast and intermediate modes cause the reverse change of the electromagnetic polarization at the special wave number. While the heavy particles carry the negative charges, the dispersion relations of the fast and intermediate modes are always separate, being independent of the propagating angles. Furthermore, this study gives new expressions of the three resonance frequencies corresponding to the highly-oblique propagation waves in the general three-component plasmas, and shows the dependence of the resonance frequencies on the propagating angle, the concentration of the heavy particle, and the mass ratio among different kinds of particles. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11303099, 41531071 and 41574158), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS

  11. Measured and calculated transmission losses of sound waves through a helium layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was performed to measure the transmission losses of sound waves traversing an impedance layer. The sound emanated from a point source and the impedance layer was created by a low-speed helium jet. The transmission losses measured were of the order of 12 db for frequencies of the source between 4 and 12 kHz. These losses are greater than those predicted from analysis when the observer angle is less than about 35 deg, but less than those predicted for larger observer angles. The experimental results indicate that appreciable noise reductions can be realized for an observer shielded by an impedance layer, irrespective of his position relative to the source of sound.

  12. Advanced Accelerators: Particle, Photon and Plasma Wave Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ronald L. [Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2017-06-29

    The overall objective of this project was to study the acceleration of electrons to very high energies over very short distances based on trapping slowly moving electrons in the fast moving potential wells of large amplitude plasma waves, which have relativistic phase velocities. These relativistic plasma waves, or wakefields, are the basis of table-top accelerators that have been shown to accelerate electrons to the same high energies as kilometer-length linear particle colliders operating using traditional decades-old acceleration techniques. The accelerating electrostatic fields of the relativistic plasma wave accelerators can be as large as GigaVolts/meter, and our goal was to study techniques for remotely measuring these large fields by injecting low energy probe electron beams across the plasma wave and measuring the beam’s deflection. Our method of study was via computer simulations, and these results suggested that the deflection of the probe electron beam was directly proportional to the amplitude of the plasma wave. This is the basis of a proposed diagnostic technique, and numerous studies were performed to determine the effects of changing the electron beam, plasma wave and laser beam parameters. Further simulation studies included copropagating laser beams with the relativistic plasma waves. New interesting results came out of these studies including the prediction that very small scale electron beam bunching occurs, and an anomalous line focusing of the electron beam occurs under certain conditions. These studies were summarized in the dissertation of a graduate student who obtained the Ph.D. in physics. This past research program has motivated ideas for further research to corroborate these results using particle-in-cell simulation tools which will help design a test-of-concept experiment in our laboratory and a scaled up version for testing at a major wakefield accelerator facility.

  13. Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in an Inhomogeneous Coronal Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nagendra Kumar; Pradeep Kumar; Shiv Singh; Anil Kumar

    2008-03-01

    We study the propagation and dissipation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous viscous coronal loop plasma permeated by uniform magnetic field. Only viscosity and thermal conductivity are taken into account as dissipative processes in the coronal loop. The damping length of slow-mode waves exhibit varying behaviour depending upon the physical parameters of the loop in an active region AR8270 observed by TRACE. The wave energy flux associated with slow magnetoacoustic waves turns out to be of the order of 106 erg cm-2 s-1 which is high enough to replace the energy lost through optically thin coronal emission and the thermal conduction belowto the transition region. It is also found that only those slow-mode waves which have periods more than 240 s provide the required heating rate to balance the energy losses in the solar corona. Our calculated wave periods for slow-mode waves nearly match with the oscillation periods of loop observed by TRACE.

  14. Wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in hot plasmas: a French historical point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Guy; Pesme, Denis; Adam, Jean-Claude

    2016-11-01

    The first researches on nuclear fusion for energy applications marked the entrance of hot plasmas into the laboratory. It became necessary to understand the behavior of such plasmas and to learn how to manipulate them. Theoreticians and experimentalists, building on the foundations of empirical laws, had to construct this new plasma physics from first principles and to explain the results of more and more complicated experiments. Along this line, two important topics emerged: wave-particle and wave-wave interactions. Here, their history is recalled as it has been lived by a French team from the end of the sixties to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

  15. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui, E-mail: xuejk@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronics Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  16. Saturation of Langmuir waves in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    This dissertation deals with the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma (a quasineutral collection of electrons and ions). During this interaction, the laser drives large-amplitude waves through a class of processes known as parametric instabilities. Several such instabilities drive one type of wave, the Langmuir wave, which involves oscillations of the electrons relative to the nearly-stationary ions. There are a number of mechanisms which limit the amplitude to which Langmuir waves grow. In this dissertation, these mechanisms are examined to identify qualitative features which might be observed in experiments and/or simulations. In addition, a number of experiments are proposed to specifically look for particular saturation mechanisms. In a plasma, a Langmuir wave can decay into an electromagnetic wave and an ion wave. This parametric instability is proposed as a source for electromagnetic emission near half of the incident laser frequency observed from laser-produced plasmas. This interpretation is shown to be consistent with existing experimental data and it is found that one of the previous mechanisms used to explain such emission is not. The scattering version of the electromagnetic decay instability is shown to provide an enhanced noise source of electromagnetic waves near the frequency of the incident laser.

  17. Heterodyne mixing of millimetre electromagnetic waves and sub-THz sound in a semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Sarah L.; Glavin, Boris A.; Beardsley, Ryan P.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Carr, Michael W.; Norman, James; Norton, Philip C.; Prime, Brian; Priestley, Nigel; Kent, Anthony J.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate heterodyne mixing of a 94 GHz millimetre wave photonic signal, supplied by a Gunn diode oscillator, with coherent acoustic waves of frequency ~100 GHz, generated by pulsed laser excitation of a semiconductor surface. The mixing takes place in a millimetre wave Schottky diode, and the intermediate frequency electrical signal is in the 1–12 GHz range. The mixing process preserves all the spectral content in the acoustic signal that falls within the intermediate frequency bandwidth. Therefore this technique may find application in high-frequency acoustic spectroscopy measurements, exploiting the nanometre wavelength of sub-THz sound. The result also points the way to exploiting acoustoelectric effects in photonic devices working at sub-THz and THz frequencies, which could provide functionalities at these frequencies, e.g. acoustic wave filtering, that are currently in widespread use at lower (GHz) frequencies.

  18. Sound radiation from an infinite elastic cylinder with dual-wave propagation-intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an elastic cylindrical shell filled with fluid and supporting multiwave propagation is studied analytically. Combinations of supersonic and subsonic shell waves are considered. The radiated field is mapped by using acoustic intensity vectors evaluated at various locations. Both time averaged and instantaneous intensity are investigated. The acoustic intensity is seen to vary markedly with axial distance down the cylinder. The effect is shown to be associated with cross terms in the intensity relations, and its magnitude and location to depend upon the relative phase and amplitudes of individual waves. Subsonic shell waves are demonstrated to interact strongly with supersonic shell waves to cause a large modification in the radiated intensity distributions near the shell surface.

  19. Development of a hybrid wave based-transfer matrix model for sound transmission analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijckmans, A; Vermeir, G

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a hybrid wave based-transfer matrix model is presented that allows for the investigation of the sound transmission through finite multilayered structures placed between two reverberant rooms. The multilayered structure may consist of an arbitrary configuration of fluid, elastic, or poro-elastic layers. The field variables (structural displacements and sound pressures) are expanded in terms of structural and acoustic wave functions. The boundary and continuity conditions in the rooms determine the participation factors in the pressure expansions. The displacement of the multilayered structure is determined by the mechanical impedance matrix, which gives a relation between the pressures and transverse displacements at both sides of the structure. The elements of this matrix are calculated with the transfer matrix method. First, the hybrid model is numerically validated. Next a comparison is made with sound transmission loss measurements of a hollow brick wall and a sandwich panel. Finally, numerical simulations show the influence of structural damping, room dimensions and plate dimensions on the sound transmission loss of multilayered structures.

  20. Underwater Sound Levels at a Wave Energy Device Testing Facility in Falmouth Bay, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joanne K; Witt, Matthew J; Johanning, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring devices were deployed at FaBTest in Falmouth Bay, UK, a marine renewable energy device testing facility during trials of a wave energy device. The area supports considerable commercial shipping and recreational boating along with diverse marine fauna. Noise monitoring occurred during (1) a baseline period, (2) installation activity, (3) the device in situ with inactive power status, and (4) the device in situ with active power status. This paper discusses the preliminary findings of the sound recording at FabTest during these different activity periods of a wave energy device trial.

  1. The Impact of Sound on Electroencephalographic Waves during Sleep in Patients Suffering from Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Pedemonte

    2014-09-01

    The main results found were that the largest number of changes, considering both the power spectrum and wave׳s coherence, occurred in stages N2 and N3. The delta and theta bands were the most changed, with important changes also in coherence of spindles during N2. All changes were more frequent in temporal areas. The differences between the two hemispheres do not depend, at least exclusively, on the side where the tinnitus is perceived and, hence, of the stimulated side. These results demonstrate that sound stimulation during sleep in tinnitus patients׳ influences brain activity and open an avenue for investigating the mechanism underlying tinnitus and its treatment.

  2. A Reconfigurable Sound Wave Decomposition Filterbank for Hearing Aids Based on Nonlinear Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaoguang; Tian, Lan; Ma, Xiaojie; Wei, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Hearing impaired people have their own hearing loss characteristics and listening preferences. Therefore hearing aid system should become more natural, humanized and personalized, which requires the filterbank in hearing aids provides flexible sound wave decomposition schemes, so that patients are likely to use the most suitable scheme for their own hearing compensation strategy. In this paper, a reconfigurable sound wave decomposition filterbank is proposed. The prototype filter is first cosine modulated to generate uniform subbands. Then by non-linear transformation the uniform subbands are mapped to nonuniform subbands. By changing the control parameters, the nonlinear transformation changes which leads to different subbands allocations. It provides four different sound wave decomposition schemes without changing the structure of the filterbank. The performance of the proposed reconfigurable filterbank was compared with that of fixed filerbanks, fully customizable filterbanks and other existing reconfigurable filterbanks. It is shown that the proposed filterbank provides satisfactory matching performance as well as low complexity and delay, which make it suitable for real hearing aid applications.

  3. A Discrete Constraint for Entropy Conservation and Sound Waves in Cloud-Resolving Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi-Ping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Ideal cloud-resolving models contain little-accumulative errors. When their domain is so large that synoptic large-scale circulations are accommodated, they can be used for the simulation of the interaction between convective clouds and the large-scale circulations. This paper sets up a framework for the models, using moist entropy as a prognostic variable and employing conservative numerical schemes. The models possess no accumulative errors of thermodynamic variables when they comply with a discrete constraint on entropy conservation and sound waves. Alternatively speaking, the discrete constraint is related to the correct representation of the large-scale convergence and advection of moist entropy. Since air density is involved in entropy conservation and sound waves, the challenge is how to compute sound waves efficiently under the constraint. To address the challenge, a compensation method is introduced on the basis of a reference isothermal atmosphere whose governing equations are solved analytically. Stability analysis and numerical experiments show that the method allows the models to integrate efficiently with a large time step.

  4. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  5. Investigation on laser accelerators. Plasma beat wave accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Hagiwara, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sudo, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-04-01

    Laser accelerator technology has characteristics of high energy, compact, short pulse and high luminescence{center_dot}low emittance. This means potential many applications in wide ranges of fields as well as high energy and nuclear physics. High power short laser pulses are injected to a plasma in the typical example of laser accelerators. Large electric fields are induced in the plasma. Electrons in the plasma are accelerated with the ponderomotive force of the electric field. The principles of interaction on beat wave, wakefield accelerators, inverse free electron laser and inverse Cherenkov radiation are briefly introduced. The overview of plasma beat wave accelerator study is briefly described on the programs at Chalk River Laboratories(Canada), UCLA(USA), Osaka Univ. (Japan) and Ecole Polytechnique (France). Issues of the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed from the viewpoint of application. Existing laser technologies of CO{sub 2}, YAG and YFL are available for the present day accelerator technology. An acceleration length of beat wave interaction is limited due to its phase condition. Ideas on multi-staged acceleration using the phasing plasma fiber are introduced. (Y. Tanaka)

  6. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmood, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter $H_{e}$ which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  7. Excitation of Chirping Whistler Waves in a Laboratory Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Compernolle, B; An, X; Bortnik, J; Thorne, R M; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W

    2015-06-19

    Whistler mode chorus emissions with a characteristic frequency chirp are important magnetospheric waves, responsible for the acceleration of outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies and also for the scattering loss of these electrons into the atmosphere. Here, we report on the first laboratory experiment where whistler waves exhibiting fast frequency chirping have been artificially produced using a beam of energetic electrons launched into a cold plasma. Frequency chirps are only observed for a narrow range of plasma and beam parameters, and show a strong dependence on beam density, plasma density, and magnetic field gradient. Broadband whistler waves similar to magnetospheric hiss are also observed, and the parameter ranges for each emission are quantified.

  8. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, E; Cavazzana, R; Adámek, J; Antoni, V; Serianni, G; Spolaore, M; Vianello, N

    2014-01-01

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  9. Some notes on ideology of waves in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Soshnikov, V N

    2002-01-01

    Our last three papers provide an occasion to make some brief notes on ideology of waves in plasmas and to rehabilitate Vlasov prescription to calculate relevant logarithmically divergent integrals in the principal value sense. In this approach asymptotical solutions of plasma oscillations are selected according to self-consistent boundary physical conditions. Landau damping is absent in this case by definition. Boundary electrical field together with conditions of absence of unphysical backward and kinematical waves define single-valued dependence of boundary distribution function on electron velocity \\vec{v} in the case of transversal waves and on the surface break of the normal electrical field in the case of longitudinal oscillations. We have proposed physically more justified modified iteration procedure of collisional damping calculation and demonstrated some results of damping decrements calculations in a low-collision electron-ion plasma. Dispersion smearing of both longitudinal and transversal high-fr...

  10. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  11. Collapse of a nanoscopic void triggered by a spherically symmetric traveling sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Garstecki, Piotr

    2012-05-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones fluid (up to 10(7) atoms) are used to analyze the collapse of a nanoscopic bubble. The collapse is triggered by a traveling sound wave that forms a shock wave at the interface. The peak temperature T(max) in the focal point of the collapse is approximately ΣR(0)(a), where Σ is the surface density of energy injected at the boundary of the container of radius R(0) and α ≈ 0.4-0.45. For Σ = 1.6 J/m(2) and R(0) = 51 nm, the shock wave velocity, which is proportional to √Σ, reaches 3400 m/s (4 times the speed of sound in the liquid); the pressure at the interface, which is proportional to Σ, reaches 10 GPa; and T(max) reaches 40,000 K. The Rayleigh-Plesset equation together with the time of the collapse can be used to estimate the pressure at the front of the shock wave.

  12. Solar Wind Strahl Broadening by Self-Generated Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  13. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) traveling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW comoves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high-frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves that are generated directly by the latter as a second-order phenomenon.

  14. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) travelling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW co-moves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves, that are generated directly by the latter as a second order phenomenon.

  15. Electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma near the critical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, Aleksandr V [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-06-30

    Electromagnetic waves in a plasma in a magnetic field give rise to enhanced refraction, produce a change in polarization, and cause electromagnetic energy to flow from one wave mode to another when propagating near the critical surface (CS), the one where the electron Langmuir frequency is equal to the wave frequency. A simple unified model of all phenomena taking place near the CS is proposed. These phenomena are due to electromagnetic waves linearly interacting with electron Langmuir oscillations which are localized at the CS in a cold plasma. This interaction manifests itself most strikingly in electron Langmuir oscillation energy escaping directly into a vacuum in the form of electromagnetic radiation. (reviews of topical problems)

  16. Full-wave solution of short impulses in inhomogeneous plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Orsolya E Ferencz

    2005-02-01

    In this paper the problem of real impulse propagation in arbitrarily inhomogeneous media will be presented on a fundamentally new, general, theoretical way. The general problem of wave propagation of monochromatic signals in inhomogeneous media was enlightened in [1]. The earlier theoretical models for spatial inhomogeneities have some errors regarding the structure of the resultant signal originated from backward and forward propagating parts. The application of the method of inhomogeneous basic modes (MIBM) and the complete full-wave solution of arbitrarily shaped non-monochromatic plane waves in plasmas made it possible to obtain a better description of the problem, on a fully analytical way, directly from Maxwell's equations. The model investigated in this paper is inhomogeneous of arbitrary order (while the wave pattern can exist), anisotropic (magnetized), linear, cold plasma, in which the gradient of the one-dimensional spatial inhomogeneity is parallel to the direction of propagation.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Scattering of a Plane Wave by an Inhomogeneous Plasma Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Fa-Lun; CAO Jin-Xiang; WANG Ge; WANG Yan; ZHU Ying; ZHU Jian; WANG Liang; NIU Tian-Ye

    2006-01-01

    @@ Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an inhomogeneous plasma sphere has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The offset angles of electromagnetic waves caused by the plasma sphere have been observed experimentally. The effects of the electromagnetic wave frequency and plasma density on the offset angle are discussed. The plasma density is estimated with the offset angle.

  18. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin [School of Electronical and Mechanical Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710071 (China); Liu Yanming [School of Telecommunications Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Laser-driven plasma waves in capillary tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojda, F; Cassou, K; Genoud, G; Burza, M; Glinec, Y; Lundh, O; Persson, A; Vieux, G; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Jaroszynski, D; Andreev, N E; Wahlström, C-G; Cros, B

    2009-12-01

    The excitation of plasma waves over a length of up to 8 cm is demonstrated using laser guiding of intense laser pulses through hydrogen-filled glass capillary tubes. The plasma waves are diagnosed by spectral analysis of the transmitted laser radiation. The dependence of the spectral redshift-measured as a function of filling pressure, capillary tube length, and incident laser energy-is in excellent agreement with simulation results. The longitudinal accelerating field inferred from the simulations is in the range of 1-10 GV/m.

  20. On the rogue wave propagation in ion pair superthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@yahoo.com, E-mail: hgomaa-eg@mans.edu.eg; Zahran, M. A. [Physics Department, College of Sciences and Humanities Studies Al-Kharj, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K., E-mail: emadshewy@yahoo.com; Elwakil, S. A. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2016-02-15

    Effects of superthermal electron on the features of nonlinear acoustic waves in unmagnetized collisionless ion pair plasma with superthermal electrons have been examined. The system equations are reduced in the form of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The rogue wave characteristics dependences on the ionic density ratio (ν = n{sub –0}/n{sub +0}), ionic mass ratio (Q = m{sub +}/m{sub −}), and superthermality index (κ) are investigated. It is worth mentioning that the results present in this work could be applicable in the Earth's ionosphere plasmas.

  1. Refraction of VHF radio waves in artificial plasma formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashirin, A. I.; Kliueva, N. M.; Mikhailik, P. P.; Chkalov, V. G.

    1991-09-01

    The defocusing refraction of VHF waves during the radio occultation of artificial plasma clouds in the ionosphere is calculated in the framework of the geometrical-optics approximation. The possibility of determining the main cloud parameters from characteristic power variations of the received radio waves in the case of a monotonic change in the sighting parameter during the experiment is demonstrated. Results of a rocket experiment implementing this method are presented.

  2. Collisionless damping of electron waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Soshnikov, V. N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we have criticized the so-called Landau damping theory. We have analyzed solutions of the standard dispersion equations for longitudinal (electric) and transversal (electromagnetic and electron) waves in half-infinite slab of the uniform collisionless plasmas with non-Maxwellian and Maxwellian-like electron energy distribution functions. One considered the most typical cases of both the delta-function type distribution function (the plasma stream with monochromatic electrons) an...

  3. Phase conjugation by four-wave mixing in inhomogeneous plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Edward A.; Lininger, Diana M.; Goldman, Martin V.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of density, temperature, and velocity gradients on four-wave mixing (FWM) in a plasma are investigated. A fluid model is used in which the stimulated Brillouin terms are included, but pump depletion is neglected. The steady state phase conjugate reflectivity and signal transmission coefficients are calculated and discussed for both degenerate and resonant FWM. The substantial effects of inhomogeneity on the use of FWM as a plasma diagnostic are discussed.

  4. Electron plasma wave filamentation in the kinetic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, Pavel; Rose, Harvey; Silantyev, Denis

    2016-10-01

    We consider nonlinear electron plasma wave (EPW) dynamics in the kinetic wavenumber regime, 0.25 Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) mode. Transverse perturbations of any of these initial conditions grow with time eventually producing strongly nonlinear filamentation followed by plasma turbulence. We compared these simulations with the theoretical results on growth rates of the transverse instability BGK mode showing the satisfactory agreement. Supported by the New Mexico Consortium and NSF DMS-1412140.

  5. Harmonics Effect on Ion-Bulk Waves in CH Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Q S; Liu, Z J; Cao, L H; Xiao, C Z; Wang, Q; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    The harmonics effect on ion-bulk (IBk) waves has been researched by Vlasov simulation. The condition of excitation of a large-amplitude IBk waves is given to explain the phenomenon of strong short-wavelength electrostatic activity in solar wind. When $k$ is much lower than $k_{lor}/2$ ($k_{lor}$ is the wave number at loss-of-resonance point), the IBk waves will not be excited to a large amplitude, because a large part of energy will be spread to harmonics. The nature of nonlinear IBk waves in the condition of $kwaves with harmonics superposition. Only when the wave number $k$ of IBk waves satisfies $k_{lor}/2\\lesssim k\\leq k_{lor}$, can a large-amplitude and mono-frequency IBk wave be excited. These results give a guidance for a novel scattering mechanism related to IBk waves in the field of laser plasma interaction.

  6. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, R. K., E-mail: rfollett@lle.rochester.edu; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  7. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 1021 cm-3, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  8. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves: 1: Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described.

  9. Degenerate mixing of plasma waves on cold, magnetized single-species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M. W.; O' Neil, T. M.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Gould, R. W. [Physics Department, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    In the cold-fluid dispersion relation {omega}={omega}{sub p}/[1+(k{sub perpendicular}/k{sub z}){sup 2}]{sup 1/2} for Trivelpiece-Gould waves on an infinitely long magnetized plasma cylinder, the transverse and axial wavenumbers appear only in the combination k{sub perpendicular}/k{sub z}. As a result, for any frequency {omega}<{omega}{sub p}, there are infinitely many degenerate waves, all having the same value of k{sub perpendicular}/k{sub z}. On a cold finite-length plasma column, these degenerate waves reflect into one another at the ends; thus, each standing-wave normal mode of the bounded plasma is a mixture of many degenerate waves, not a single standing wave as is often assumed. A striking feature of the many-wave modes is that the short-wavelength waves often add constructively along resonance cones given by dz/dr={+-}({omega}{sub p}{sup 2}/{omega}{sup 2}-1){sup 1/2}. Also, the presence of short wavelengths in the admixture for a predominantly long-wavelength mode enhances the viscous damping beyond what the single-wave approximation would predict. Here, numerical solutions are obtained for modes of a cylindrical plasma column with rounded ends. Exploiting the fact that the modes of a spheroidal plasma are known analytically (the Dubin modes), a perturbation analysis is used to investigate the mixing of low-order, nearly degenerate Dubin modes caused by small deformations of a plasma spheroid.

  10. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  11. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near...

  12. Evolution of Modulated Dispersive Electron Waves in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugai, H.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1979-01-01

    The linear propagation of amplitude-modulated electron waves was examined in a low-density Q-machine plasma. Three effects of the strong dispersion on the modulated wave have been demonstrated: (i) a wavepacket expands along its direction of propagation, followed by a shift of the frequency through...... the wavepacket, (ii) the number of oscillations in the temporally observed packet is not identical with that in the spatially observed packet and (iii) continuously modulated waves exhibit recurrence of modulation. The experimental results agree with both a simple analysis based on the Schrodinger equation...

  13. Statistical behavior of foreshock Langmuir waves observed by the Cluster wideband data plasma wave receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sigsbee

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the statistics of Langmuir wave amplitudes in the Earth's foreshock using Cluster Wideband Data (WBD Plasma Wave Receiver electric field waveforms from spacecraft 2, 3 and 4 on 26 March 2002. The largest amplitude Langmuir waves were observed by Cluster near the boundary between the foreshock and solar wind, in agreement with earlier studies. The characteristics of the waves were similar for all three spacecraft, suggesting that variations in foreshock structure must occur on scales greater than the 50-100km spacecraft separations. The electric field amplitude probability distributions constructed using waveforms from the Cluster WBD Plasma Wave Receiver generally followed the log-normal statistics predicted by stochastic growth theory for the event studied. Comparison with WBD receiver data from 17 February 2002, when spacecraft 4 was set in a special manual gain mode, suggests non-optimal auto-ranging of the instrument may have had some influence on the statistics.

  14. Kinetic treatment of nonlinear magnetized plasma motions - General geometry and parallel waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galinskii, V. L.; Verheest, F.

    1992-01-01

    The expansion of kinetic equations in the limit of a strong magnetic field is presented. This gives a natural description of the motions of magnetized plasmas, which are slow compared to the particle gyroperiods and gyroradii. Although the approach is 3D, this very general result is used only to focus on the parallel propagation of nonlinear Alfven waves. The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger-like equation is obtained. Two new terms occur compared to earlier treatments, a nonlinear term proportional to the heat flux along the magnetic field line and a higher-order dispersive term. It is shown that kinetic description avoids the singularities occurring in magnetohydrodynamic or multifluid approaches, which correspond to the degenerate case of sound speeds equal to the Alfven speed, and that parallel heat fluxes cannot be neglected, not even in the case of low parallel plasma beta. A truly stationary soliton solution is derived.

  15. Separation of radiated sound field components from waves scattered by a source under non-anechoic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    A method of estimating the sound field radiated by a source under non-anechoic conditions has been examined. The method uses near field acoustic holography based on a combination of pressure and particle velocity measurements in a plane near the source for separating outgoing and ingoing wave...... components. The outgoing part of the sound field is composed of both radiated and scattered waves. The method compensates for the scattered components of the outgoing field on the basis of the boundary condition of the problem, exploiting the fact that the sound field is reconstructed very close...... to the source. Thus the radiated free-field component is estimated simultaneously with solving the inverse problem of reconstructing the sound field near the source. The method is particularly suited to cases in which the overall contribution of reflected sound in the measurement plane is significant....

  16. Plasma wave instabilities in nonequilibrium graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryal, Chinta M.; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We study two-stream instabilities in a nonequilibrium system in which a stream of electrons is injected into doped graphene. As with equivalent nonequilibrium parabolic band systems, we find that the graphene systems can support unstable charge-density waves whose amplitudes grow with time. We...... of the injected electrons that maximizes the growth rate increases with increasing | q |. We compare the range and strength of the instability in graphene to that of two- and three-dimensional parabolic band systems....

  17. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W., E-mail: wendell.horton@gmail.com; Michoski, C. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78654 (United States); Peysson, Y.; Decker, J. [CEA, IRFM, 13108, Saint-Paul, Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  18. Estimation of Plasma Density by Surface Plasmons for Surface-Wave Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; LAN Chao-Hui; CHEN Wei; LUO Zhi-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ An estimation method of plasma density based on surface plasmons theory for surface-wave plasmas is proposed. The number of standing-wave is obtained directly from the discharge image, and the propagation constant is calculated with the trim size of the apparatus in this method, then plasma density can be determined with the value of 9.1 × 1017 m-3. Plasma density is measured using a Langmuir probe, the value is 8.1 × 1017 m-3 which is very close to the predicted value of surface plasmons theory. Numerical simulation is used to check the number of standing-wave by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method also. All results are compatible both of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement.

  19. Interaction of High Intensity Electromagnetic Waves with Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Shvets

    2008-10-03

    The focus of our work during the duration of this grant was on the following areas: (a) the fundamental plasma physics of intense laser-plasma interactions, including the nonlinear excitation of plasma waves for accelerator applications, as well as the recently discovered by us phenomenon of the relativistic bi-stability of relativistic plasma waves driven by a laser beatwave; (b) interaction of high power microwave beams with magnetized plasma, including some of the recently discovered by us phenomena such as the Undulator Induced Transparency (UIT) as well as the new approaches to dynamic manipulation of microwave pulses; (c) investigations of the multi-color laser pulse interactions in the plasma, including the recently discovered by us phenomenon of Electromagnetic Cascading (EC) and the effect of the EC of three-dimensional dynamics of laser pulses (enhanced/suppressed selffocusing etc.); (d) interaction of high-current electron beams with the ambient plasma in the context of Fast Ignitor (FI) physics, with the emphasis on the nonlinear dynamics of the Weibel instability and beam filamentation.

  20. First results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Gurnett

    Full Text Available In this report we present the first results from the Cluster wideband plasma wave investigation. The four Cluster spacecraft were successfully placed in closely spaced, high-inclination eccentric orbits around the Earth during two separate launches in July – August 2000. Each spacecraft includes a wideband plasma wave instrument designed to provide high-resolution electric and magnetic field wave-forms via both stored data and direct downlinks to the NASA Deep Space Network. Results are presented for three commonly occurring magnetospheric plasma wave phenomena: (1 whistlers, (2 chorus, and (3 auroral kilometric radiation. Lightning-generated whistlers are frequently observed when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. Usually the same whistler can be detected by all spacecraft, indicating that the whistler wave packet extends over a spatial dimension at least as large as the separation distances transverse to the magnetic field, which during these observations were a few hundred km. This is what would be expected for nonducted whistler propagation. No case has been found in which a strong whistler was detected at one spacecraft, with no signal at the other spacecraft, which would indicate ducted propagation. Whistler-mode chorus emissions are also observed in the inner region of the magnetosphere. In contrast to lightning-generated whistlers, the individual chorus elements seldom show a one-to-one correspondence between the spacecraft, indicating that a typical chorus wave packet has dimensions transverse to the magnetic field of only a few hundred km or less. In one case where a good one-to-one correspondence existed, significant frequency variations were observed between the spacecraft, indicating that the frequency of the wave packet may be evolving as the wave propagates. Auroral kilometric radiation, which is an intense radio emission generated along the auroral field lines, is frequently observed over the polar regions. The

  1. Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic Waves In The Collisionless Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Staude, J.

    2007-12-01

    The instability of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) waves in an anisotropic, collisionless, rarefied hot plasma is studied. Anisotropy properties of such a plasma are caused by a strong magnetic field, when the thermal gas pressures across and along the field become unequal. Moreover, there appears an anisotropy of the thermal fluxes. The study of the anisotropy features of the plasma are motivated by observed solar coronal data. The 16 moments equations derived from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation are used. These equations strongly differ from the usual isotropic MHD case. For linear disturbances the wave equations in homogenous anisotropic plasma are deduced. The general dispersion relation for the incompressible wave modes is derived, solved and analyzed. It is shown that a wide wave spectrum with stable and unstable behavior is possible, in contrast to the usual isotropic MHD case. The dependence of the instability on magnetic field, pressure anisotropy, and heat fluxes is investigated. The general instability condition is obtained. The results can be applied to the theory of solar and stellar coronal heating, to wind models and in other modeling, where the collisionless approximation is valid.

  2. Electrostatic solitary waves in dusty pair-ion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A P

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized collisionless pair-ion plasma with immobile positively charged dusts is studied for both large- and small-amplitude perturbations. Using a two-fluid model for pair-ions, it is shown that there appear two linear ion modes, namely the "fast" and "slow" waves in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of these wave modes are studied with different mass $(m)$ and temperature $(T)$ ratios of negative to positive ions, as well as the effects of immobile charged dusts $(\\delta)$. For large-amplitude waves, the pseudopotential approach is performed, whereas the standard reductive perturbation technique (RPT) is used to study the small-amplitude Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons. The profiles of the pseudopotential, the large amplitude solitons as well as the dynamical evolution of KdV solitons are numerically studied with the system parameters as above. It is found that the pair-ion plasmas with positively charged dusts support the propagation of solitary waves ...

  3. Surface Wave Propagation in non--ideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2015-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the nonideal magnetohydrodynamic effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few percent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall diffusion dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut off is introduce...

  4. Revisiting linear plasma waves for finite value of the plasma parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismayer, Thomas; Fahlen, Jay; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2010-11-01

    We investigate through theory and PIC simulations the Landau-damping of plasma waves with finite plasma parameter. We concentrate on the linear regime, γφB, where the waves are typically small and below the thermal noise. We simulate these condition using 1,2,3D electrostatic PIC codes (BEPS), noting that modern computers now allow us to simulate cases where (nλD^3 = [1e2;1e6]). We study these waves by using a subtraction technique in which two simulations are carried out. In the first, a small wave is initialized or driven, in the second no wave is excited. The results are subtracted to provide a clean signal that can be studied. As nλD^3 is decreased, the number of resonant electrons can be small for linear waves. We show how the damping changes as a result of having few resonant particles. We also find that for small nλD^3 fluctuations can cause the electrons to undergo collisions that eventually destroy the initial wave. A quantity of interest is the the life time of a particular mode which depends on the plasma parameter and the wave number. The life time is estimated and then compared with the numerical results. A surprising result is that even for large values of nλD^3 some non-Vlasov discreteness effects appear to be important.

  5. A Schamel equation for ion acoustic waves in superthermal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G., E-mail: gwilliams06@qub.ac.uk; Kourakis, I. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Verheest, F. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Anowar, M. G. M. [Department of Physics, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, Rangpur-5400 (Bangladesh)

    2014-09-15

    An investigation of the propagation of ion acoustic waves in nonthermal plasmas in the presence of trapped electrons has been undertaken. This has been motivated by space and laboratory plasma observations of plasmas containing energetic particles, resulting in long-tailed distributions, in combination with trapped particles, whereby some of the plasma particles are confined to a finite region of phase space. An unmagnetized collisionless electron-ion plasma is considered, featuring a non-Maxwellian-trapped electron distribution, which is modelled by a kappa distribution function combined with a Schamel distribution. The effect of particle trapping has been considered, resulting in an expression for the electron density. Reductive perturbation theory has been used to construct a KdV-like Schamel equation, and examine its behaviour. The relevant configurational parameters in our study include the superthermality index κ and the characteristic trapping parameter β. A pulse-shaped family of solutions is proposed, also depending on the weak soliton speed increment u{sub 0}. The main modification due to an increase in particle trapping is an increase in the amplitude of solitary waves, yet leaving their spatial width practically unaffected. With enhanced superthermality, there is a decrease in both amplitude and width of solitary waves, for any given values of the trapping parameter and of the incremental soliton speed. Only positive polarity excitations were observed in our parametric investigation.

  6. Sound wave generation by a spherically symmetric outburst and AGN feedback in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaping; Churazov, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    We consider the evolution of an outburst in a uniform medium under spherical symmetry, having in mind active galactic nucleus feedback in the intracluster medium. For a given density and pressure of the medium, the spatial structure and energy partition at a given time tage (since the onset of the outburst) are fully determined by the total injected energy Einj and the duration tb of the outburst. We are particularly interested in the late phase evolution when the strong shock transforms into a sound wave. We studied the energy partition during such transition with different combinations of Einj and tb. For an instantaneous outburst with tb → 0, which corresponds to the extension of classic Sedov-Taylor solution with counter-pressure, the fraction of energy that can be carried away by sound waves is ≲12 per cent of Einj. As tb increases, the solution approaches the 'slow piston' limit, with the fraction of energy in sound waves approaching zero. We then repeat the simulations using radial density and temperature profiles measured in Perseus and M87/Virgo clusters. We find that the results with a uniform medium broadly reproduce an outburst in more realistic conditions once proper scaling is applied. We also develop techniques to map intrinsic properties of an outburst (Einj, tb and tage) to the observables like the Mach number of the shock and radii of the shock and ejecta. For the Perseus cluster and M87, the estimated (Einj, tb and tage) agree with numerical simulations tailored for these objects with 20-30 per cent accuracy.

  7. Acoustic Energy Harvesting Using Piezoelectric Generator for Low Frequency Sound Waves Energy Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Fazilah Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The applications of electronic devices with low power consumption, such as wireless sensor network and electronic communication devices, are rapidly increasing. Thus, utilizing environmental energy as an alternative to electrochemical battery, which has a finite lifespan, can be a great advantage to these electronic devices. Harvesting environmental energy, such as solar, thermal, wind flow, water current, and raindrops, has attracted increasing research interest in the field of energy harvesting. In this paper, harvesting sound energy in the form of pressure waves is investigated as an alternative to existing energy harvesting methods. In the experimental work, a piezoelectric generator lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5A cantilever type is used to extract sound energy from the loudspeaker from various distances and then to convert this energy into electrical energy. A direct piezoelectric effect operating in 31 coupling mode is used. The maximum voltage generated by the piezoelectric generator occurs when its resonant frequency is operating near the frequency of sound. An analytical method with an appropriate equation is used to determine the resonant frequency and is then validated using the experimental result. The result shows that the maximum output voltage of 26.7 mVrms was obtained with the sound intensity of 78.6 dB at resonant frequency of 62 Hz at 1 cm distance in the first mode. In the second mode, the maximum output voltage of 91 mVrms was obtained with the sound intensity of 102.6 dB at resonant frequency of 374 Hz at 1 cm distance which is larger than that of the first mode. However, for both modes, voltage decreases as distance increases.

  8. Nonextensive dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Mustapha; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2012-01-01

    Our recent analysis on nonlinear nonextensive dust-acoustic waves (DA) [Amour and Tribeche in Phys. Plasmas 17:063702, 2010] is extended to include self-consistent nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation. The appropriate nonextensive electron charging current is rederived based on the orbit-limited motion theory. Our results reveal that the amplitude, strength and nature of the nonlinear DA waves (solitons and shocks) are extremely sensitive to the degree of ion nonextensivity. Stronger is the electron correlation, more important is the charge variation induced nonlinear wave damping. The anomalous dissipation effects may prevail over that dispersion as the electrons evolve far away from their Maxwellian equilibrium. Our investigation may be of wide relevance to astronomers and space scientists working on interstellar dusty plasmas where nonthermal distributions are turning out to be a very common and characteristic feature.

  9. Modulated envelope localized wavepackets associated with electrostatic plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kourakis, I; Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear amplitude modulation of known electrostatic plasma modes is examined in a generic manner, by applying a collisionless fluid model. Both cold (zero-temperature) and warm fluid descriptions are discussed and the results are compared. The moderately nonlinear oscillation regime is investigated by applying a multiple scale technique. The calculation leads to a Nonlinear Schrodinger-type Equation (NLSE), which describes the evolution of the slowly varying wave amplitude in time and space. The NLSE admits localized envelope (solitary wave) solutions of bright- (pulses) or dark- (holes, voids) type, whose characteristics (maximum amplitude, width) depend on intrinsic plasma parameters. Effects like amplitude perturbation obliqueness, finite temperature and defect (dust) concetration are explicitly considered. The relevance with similar highly localized modulated wave structures observed during recent satellite missions is discussed.

  10. Solitary and freak waves in superthermal plasma with ion jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, U. M.; Abdelsalam

    2013-06-01

    The nonlinear solitary and freak waves in a plasma composed of positive and negative ions, superthermal electrons, ion beam, and stationary dust particles have been investigated. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the system. The latter admits solitary wave solution, while the dynamics of the modulationally unstable wavepackets described by the KdV equation gives rise to the formation of freak/rogue excitation described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In order to show that the characteristics of solitary and freak waves are influenced by plasma parameters, relevant numerical analysis of appropriate nonlinear solutions are presented. The results from this work predict nonlinear excitations that may associate with ion jet and superthermal electrons in Herbig-Haro objects.

  11. Generation of Diffuse Large Volume Plasma by an Ionization Wave from a Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Razavi, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature plasma jets emitted in ambient air are the product of fast ionization waves that are guided within a channel of a gas flow, such as helium. This guided ionization wave can be transmitted through a dielectric material and under some conditions can ignite a discharge behind the dielectric material. Here we present a novel way to produce large volume diffuse low pressure plasma inside a Pyrex chamber that does not have any electrodes or electrical energy directly applied to it. The diffuse plasma is ignited inside the chamber by a plasma jet located externally to the chamber and that is physically and electrically unconnected to the chamber. Instead, the plasma jet is just brought in close proximity to the external wall/surface of the chamber or to a dielectric tubing connected to the chamber. The plasma thus generated is diffuse, large volume and with physical and chemical characteristics that are different than the external plasma jet that ignited it. So by using a plasma jet we are able to ``remotely'' ignite volumetric plasma under controlled conditions. This novel method of ``remote'' generation of a low pressure, low temperature diffuse plasma can be useful for various applications including material processing and biomedicine.

  12. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang

    for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa- Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa......-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron......Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important...

  13. Radiative amplification of sound waves in the winds of O and B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Hartmann, L.; Raymond, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The velocity perturbation associated with an outwardly propagating sound wave in a radiation-driven stellar wind gives rise to a periodic Doppler shifting of absorption lines formed in the flow. A linearized theory applicable to optically thin waves is used to show that the resulting fluctuation in the absorption-line force can cause the wave amplitude to grow. Detailed calculations of the acceleration due to a large number of lines indicate that significant amplification can occur throughout the high-velocity portion of winds in which the dominant force-producing lines have appreciable optical depths. In the particular case of the wind of Zeta Pup (O4f), it is found that the e-folding distance for wave growth is considerably shorter than the scale lengths over which the physical properties of the flow vary. A qualitative estimate of the rate at which mechanical energy due to nonlinear waves can be dissipated suggests that this mechanism may be important in heating the supersonic portion of winds of early-type stars.

  14. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B{sub 0}. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel [“Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name “helicon” to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B{sub 0}. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B{sub 0} and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B{sub 0}. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  15. Bernstein wave aided laser third harmonic generation in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Yachna; Tripathi, Deepak; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    The process of Bernstein wave aided resonant third harmonic generation of laser in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The extra-ordinary mode (X-mode) laser of frequency ω 0 and wave number k → 0 , travelling across the magnetic field in a plasma, exerts a second harmonic ponderomotive force on the electrons imparting them an oscillatory velocity v → 2 ω0 , 2 k → 0 . This velocity beats with the density perturbation due to the Bernstein wave to produce a density perturbation at cyclotron frequency shifted second harmonic. The density perturbation couples with the oscillatory velocity v → ω0 , k → 0 of X-mode of the laser to produce the cyclotron frequency shifted third harmonic current density leading to harmonic radiation. The phase matching condition for the up shifted frequency is satisfied when the Bernstein wave is nearly counter-propagating to the laser. As the transverse wave number of the Bernstein wave is large, it is effective in the phase matched third harmonic generation, when the laser frequency is not too far from the upper hybrid frequency.

  16. Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Schamel, Hans [Theoretical Physics, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics is presented using Lagrangian fluid approach in a compressible collisional magnetized plasma. In the framework of two fluid dynamics, finite electron inertia is shown to serve as a dispersive effect acting against the convective nonlinearity. In a moving frame, the Alfvén wave can, therefore, form an arbitrarily strong amplitude solitary wave structure due to the balance between nonlinearity and dispersion. Weak amplitude Alfvén waves are shown to be governed by a modified KdV equation, which extends for finite dissipation to a mKdV-Burgers equation. These equations have well known solutions. Next, we have analyzed the fourth order nonlinear Alfvén wave system of equations both numerically and by approximation method. The results indicate a collapse of the density and magnetic field irrespective of the presence of dispersion. The wave magnetic field, however, appears to be less singular showing collapse only when the dispersive effects are negligible. These results may contribute to our understanding of the generation of strongly localized magnetic fields (and currents) in plasmas and are expected to be of special importance in the astrophysical context of magnetic star formation.

  17. Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Schamel, Hans

    2015-07-01

    Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics is presented using Lagrangian fluid approach in a compressible collisional magnetized plasma. In the framework of two fluid dynamics, finite electron inertia is shown to serve as a dispersive effect acting against the convective nonlinearity. In a moving frame, the Alfvén wave can, therefore, form an arbitrarily strong amplitude solitary wave structure due to the balance between nonlinearity and dispersion. Weak amplitude Alfvén waves are shown to be governed by a modified KdV equation, which extends for finite dissipation to a mKdV-Burgers equation. These equations have well known solutions. Next, we have analyzed the fourth order nonlinear Alfvén wave system of equations both numerically and by approximation method. The results indicate a collapse of the density and magnetic field irrespective of the presence of dispersion. The wave magnetic field, however, appears to be less singular showing collapse only when the dispersive effects are negligible. These results may contribute to our understanding of the generation of strongly localized magnetic fields (and currents) in plasmas and are expected to be of special importance in the astrophysical context of magnetic star formation.

  18. Observation of nonlinear wave decay processes in the solar wind by the AMPTE IRM plasma wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, H. C.; Roeder, J. L.; Bauer, O. H.; Haerendel, G.; Treumann, R.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear wave decay processes have been detected in the solar wind by the plasma wave experiment aboard the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) IRM spacecraft. The main process is the generation of ultralow-frequency ion acoustic waves from the decay of Langmuir waves near the electron plasma frequency. Frequently, this is accompanied by an enhancement of emissions near twice the plasma frequency. This enhancement is most likely due to the generation of electromagnetic waves from the coalescence of two Langmuir waves. These processes occur within the electron foreshock in front of the earth's bow shock.

  19. Potential role of kinetic Alfvén waves and whistler waves in solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations indicate the signatures of highly oblique kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and whistler waves in the solar wind plasma. In the present work, we explore the possible role of KAWs and whistler waves in the observed solar wind magnetic turbulent spectrum. The nonlinear spatial evolution of KAW is studied including the effects of the ponderomotive force which results in intense localized structures due to the background density modification. Weak quasi-transverse whistler wave propagating through these localized structures also gets localized in the form of small-scale localized structures. We present numerically calculated magnetic power spectra for both KAW as well as for whistler wave. Our obtained results demonstrate the important role that KAWs and whistler waves play in the energy cascading from larger to smaller scales. The relevance of these results to recent spacecraft observations is also pointed out.

  20. Analysis of plasma waves observed in the inner Saturn magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma waves observed in the Saturn magnetosphere provide an indication of the plasma population present in the rotationally dominated inner magnetosphere. Electrostatic cyclotron emissions often with harmonics and whistler mode emission are a common feature of Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The electron observations for a region near 5 RS outside and near a plasma injection region indicate a cooler low-energy (<100 eV, nearly isotropic plasma, and a much warmer (E>1000 eV more pancake or butterfly distribution. We model the electron plasma distributions to conduct a linear dispersion analysis of the wave modes. The results suggest that the electrostatic electron cyclotron emissions can be generated by phase space density gradients associated with a loss cone that may be up to 20° wide. This loss cone is sometimes, but not always, observed because the field of view of the electron detectors does not include the magnetic field line at the time of the observations. The whistler mode emission can be generated by the pancake-like distribution and temperature anisotropy (T/T||>1 of the warmer plasma population.

  1. Obliquely propagating large amplitude solitary waves in charge neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals in a consistent way with the implications, for the existence of large amplitude stationary structures in general plasmas, of assuming strict charge neutrality between electrons and ions. With the limit of pair plasmas in mind, electron inertia is retained. Combining in a fluid dynamic treatment the conservation of mass, momentum and energy with strict charge neutrality has indicated that nonlinear solitary waves (as e.g. oscillitons cannot exist in electron-ion plasmas, at no angle of propagation with respect to the static magnetic field. Specifically for oblique propagation, the proof has turned out to be more involved than for parallel or perpendicular modes. The only exception is pair plasmas that are able to support large charge neutral solitons, owing to the high degree of symmetry naturally inherent in such plasmas. The nonexistence, in particular, of oscillitons is attributed to the breakdown of the plasma approximation in dealing with Poisson's law, rather than to relativistic effects. It is hoped that future space observations will allow to discriminate between oscillitons and large wave packets, by focusing on the time variability (or not of the phase, since the amplitude or envelope graphs look very similar.

  2. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  3. Ultrawideband VNA Based Channel Sounding System for Centimetre and Millimetre Wave Bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejselbæk, Johannes; Fan, Wei; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    Channel characterization of multipath channels at centimetre and millimetre wave bands is of interest from both academia and industry, especially for the frequency bands that are under consideration for 5G mobile communication systems. In this paper, we first demonstrate the limitations of an exi......Channel characterization of multipath channels at centimetre and millimetre wave bands is of interest from both academia and industry, especially for the frequency bands that are under consideration for 5G mobile communication systems. In this paper, we first demonstrate the limitations...... of an existing vector network analyzer (VNA) based channel sounding system in terms of frequency range and measurement range. After that, an improved system is proposed to address these limitations. The proposed system is capable of measuring from 2 to 50 GHz at 30 meters distances. A measurement campaign...

  4. Evidence for 2D Solitary Sound Waves in a Lipid Controlled Interface and its Biological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Shrivastava, Shamit

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes by virtue of their elastic properties should be capable of propagating localized perturbations analogous to sound waves. However, the existence and the possible role of such waves in communication in biology remains unexplored. Here we report the first observations of 2D solitary elastic pulses in lipid interfaces, excited mechanically and detected by FRET. We demonstrate that the nonlinearity near a maximum in the susceptibility of the lipid monolayer results in solitary pulses that also have a threshold for excitation. These experiments clearly demonstrate that the state of the interface regulates the propagation of pulses both qualitatively and quantitatively. We elaborate on the striking similarity of the observed phenomenon to nerve pulse propagation and a thermodynamic basis of cell signaling in general.

  5. Gravitational waves from the sound of a first order phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David J

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first 3-dimensional numerical simulations of first-order phase transitions in the early universe to include the cosmic fluid as well as the scalar field order parameter. We calculate the gravitational wave (GW) spectrum resulting from the nucleation, expansion and collision of bubbles of the low-temperature phase, paying particular attention to those sourced by the fluid. We find that the fluid continues to be a source of GWs long after the bubbles have merged, a new effect not taken into account in previous modelling of the GW source based on the envelope approximation. The kinetic energy of the fluid is in the form of compression waves: the main source of the GWs after a phase transition is therefore the sound the bubbles make.

  6. Gravitational Waves from the Sound of a First Order Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Huber, Stephan J.; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first three-dimensional numerical simulations of first-order phase transitions in the early Universe to include the cosmic fluid as well as the scalar field order parameter. We calculate the gravitational wave (GW) spectrum resulting from the nucleation, expansion, and collision of bubbles of the low-temperature phase, for phase transition strengths and bubble wall velocities covering many cases of interest. We find that the compression waves in the fluid continue to be a source of GWs long after the bubbles have merged, a new effect not taken properly into account in previous modeling of the GW source. For a wide range of models, the main source of the GWs produced by a phase transition is, therefore, the sound the bubbles make.

  7. Do sound waves transport the AGN energy in the Perseus cluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A. C.; Walker, S. A.; Russell, H. R.; Pinto, C.; Sanders, J. S.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2017-01-01

    The level of random motions in the intracluster gas lying between 20 and 60 kpc radius in the core of the Perseus cluster has been measured by the Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) at 164 ± 10 km s-1. The maximum energy density in turbulent motions on that scale is therefore low. If dissipated as heat, the turbulent energy will be radiated away in less than 80 Myr and cannot spread across the core. A higher velocity is needed to prevent a cooling collapse. Gravity waves are shown to travel too slowly in a radial direction. Here we investigate propagation of energy by sound waves. The energy travels at ˜ 1000 km s-1 and can cross the core in a cooling time. We show that the displacement velocity amplitude of the gas required to carry the power is consistent with the Hitomi result and that the inferred density and temperature variations are consistent with Chandra observations.

  8. Transmission of singularities through a shock wave and the sound generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, L.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of a plane shock wave of finite strength with a vortex line, point vortex, doublet or quadrupole of weak strength is studied. Based upon the physical condition that a free vortex line cannot support a pressure difference, rules are established which define the change of the linear intensity of the segment of the vortex line after its passage through the shock. The rules for point vortex, doublet, and quadrupole are then established as limiting cases. These rules can be useful for the construction of the solution of the entire flow field and for its physical interpretation. However, the solution can be obtained directly by the technique developed for shock diffraction problems. Explicit solutions and the associated sound generation are obtained for the passage of a point vortex through the shock wave.

  9. Do sound waves transport the AGN energy in the Perseus Cluster?

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Russell, H R; Pinto, C; Sanders, J S; Reynolds, C S

    2016-01-01

    The level of random motions in the intracluster gas lying between 20 and 60 kpc radius in the core of the Perseus cluster has been measured by the Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer at 164 +/- 10 km/s. The maximum energy density in turbulent motions on that scale is therefore low. If dissipated as heat the turbulent energy will be radiated away in less than 80 Myr and cannot spread across the core. A higher velocity is needed to prevent a cooling collapse. Gravity waves are shown to travel too slowly in a radial direction. Here we investigate propagation of energy by sound waves. The energy travels at about 1000 km/s and can cross the core in a cooling time. We show that the displacement velocity amplitude of the gas required to carry the power is consistent with the Hitomi result and that the inferred density and temperature variations are consistent with Chandra observations.

  10. Observationally constrained modeling of sound in curved ocean internal waves: examination of deep ducting and surface ducting at short range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Timothy F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    A study of 400 Hz sound focusing and ducting effects in a packet of curved nonlinear internal waves in shallow water is presented. Sound propagation roughly along the crests of the waves is simulated with a three-dimensional parabolic equation computational code, and the results are compared to measured propagation along fixed 3 and 6 km source/receiver paths. The measurements were made on the shelf of the South China Sea northeast of Tung-Sha Island. Construction of the time-varying three-dimensional sound-speed fields used in the modeling simulations was guided by environmental data collected concurrently with the acoustic data. Computed three-dimensional propagation results compare well with field observations. The simulations allow identification of time-dependent sound forward scattering and ducting processes within the curved internal gravity waves. Strong acoustic intensity enhancement was observed during passage of high-amplitude nonlinear waves over the source/receiver paths, and is replicated in the model. The waves were typical of the region (35 m vertical displacement). Two types of ducting are found in the model, which occur asynchronously. One type is three-dimensional modal trapping in deep ducts within the wave crests (shallow thermocline zones). The second type is surface ducting within the wave troughs (deep thermocline zones).

  11. Oblique solitary waves in a five component plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijo, S.; Manesh, M.; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, C., E-mail: cvgmgphys@yahoo.co.in [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, 686 560 Kerala (India); Neethu, T. W. [Department of Physics, CMS College, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, 686 001 Kerala (India); Renuka, G. [Kerala State Council for Science, Technology and Environment, Thiruvananthapuram, 695 004 Kerala (India)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the influence of a second electron component on oblique dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a five component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged dust, hydrogen ions, and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier dust and colder photo-electrons are of cometary origin while the other two are of solar origin; electron components are described by kappa distributions. The K-dV equation is derived, and different attributes of the soliton such as amplitude and width are plotted for parameters relevant to comet Halley. We find that the second electron component has a profound influence on the solitary wave, decreasing both its amplitude and width. The normalized hydrogen density strongly influences the solitary wave by decreasing its width; the amplitude of the solitary wave, however, increases with increasing solar electron temperatures.

  12. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  13. Quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in weak relativistic plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Sahu

    2011-06-01

    Small amplitude quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves are studied in an unmagnetized twospecies relativistic quantum plasma system, comprised of electrons and ions. The one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) is used to obtain a deformed Korteweg–de Vries (dKdV) equation by reductive perturbation method. A linear dispersion relation is also obtained taking into account the relativistic effect. The properties of quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves, obtained from the deformed KdV equation, are studied taking into account the quantum mechanical effects in the weak relativistic limit. It is found that relativistic effects significantly modify the properties of quantum ion-acoustic waves. Also the effect of the quantum parameter on the nature of solitary wave solutions is studied in some detail.

  14. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I (Italy); Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Di Donato, L. [Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Isernia, T. [Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  15. Transfer Matrix for Obliquely Incident Electromagnetic Waves Propagating in One Dimension Plasma Photonic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Bin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic theory and by using an analytical technique-the transfer matrix method,the obliquely incident electromagnetic waves propagating in one-dimension plasma photonic crystals is studied.The dispersion relations for both the P-polarization waves and S-polarization waves,depending on the plasma density,plasma thickness and period,are discussed.

  16. Reconstruction of nonstationary sound fields based on the time domain plane wave superposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Thomas, Jean-Hugh; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Pascal, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    A time-domain plane wave superposition method is proposed to reconstruct nonstationary sound fields. In this method, the sound field is expressed as a superposition of time convolutions between the estimated time-wavenumber spectrum of the sound pressure on a virtual source plane and the time-domain propagation kernel at each wavenumber. By discretizing the time convolutions directly, the reconstruction can be carried out iteratively in the time domain, thus providing the advantage of continuously reconstructing time-dependent pressure signals. In the reconstruction process, the Tikhonov regularization is introduced at each time step to obtain a relevant estimate of the time-wavenumber spectrum on the virtual source plane. Because the double infinite integral of the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transform is discretized directly in the wavenumber domain in the proposed method, it does not need to perform the two-dimensional spatial fast Fourier transform that is generally used in time domain holography and real-time near-field acoustic holography, and therefore it avoids some errors associated with the two-dimensional spatial fast Fourier transform in theory and makes possible to use an irregular microphone array. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and an experiment with two speakers.

  17. Illustrations and supporting texts for sound standing waves of air columns in pipes in introductory physics textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zeng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In our pilot studies, we found that many introductory physics textbook illustrations with supporting text for sound standing waves of air columns in open-open, open-closed, and closed-closed pipes inhibit student understanding of sound standing wave phenomena due to student misunderstanding of how air molecules move within these pipes. Based on the construct of meaningful learning from cognitive psychology and semiotics, a quasiexperimental study was conducted to investigate the comparative effectiveness of two alternative approaches to student understanding: a traditional textbook illustration approach versus a newly designed air molecule motion illustration approach. Thirty volunteer students from introductory physics classes were randomly assigned to two groups of 15 each. Both groups were administered a presurvey. Then, group A read the air molecule motion illustration handout, and group B read a traditional textbook illustration handout; both groups were administered postsurveys. Subsequently, the procedure was reversed: group B read the air molecule motion illustration handout and group A read the traditional textbook illustration handout. This was followed by a second postsurvey along with an exit research questionnaire. The study found that the majority of students experienced meaningful learning and stated that they understood sound standing wave phenomena significantly better using the air molecule motion illustration approach. This finding provides a method for physics education researchers to design illustrations for abstract sound standing wave concepts, for publishers to improve their illustrations with supporting text, and for instructors to facilitate deeper learning in their students on sound standing waves.

  18. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  19. Excitation and evolution of finite-amplitude plasma wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y. W.; Wu, Y. C., E-mail: yican.wu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Chen, M. X. [School of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Yu, M. Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Wu, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The evolution of a small spatially periodic perturbation in the electron velocity distribution function in collisionless plasma is reconsidered by numerically solving the Vlasov and Poisson equations. The short as well as long time behaviors of the excited oscillations and damping/modulation are followed. In the small but finite-amplitude excited plasma wave, resonant electrons become trapped in the wave potential wells and their motion affects the low-velocity electrons participating in the plasma oscillations, leading to modulation of the latter at an effective trapping frequency. It is found that the phase space of the resonant and low-velocity electrons becomes chaotic, but then self-organization takes place but remains fine-scale chaotic. It is also found that as long as particles are trapped, there is only modulation and no monotonic damping of the excited plasma wave. The modulation period/amplitude increases/decreases as the magnitude of the initial disturbance is reduced. For the initial and boundary conditions used here, linear Landau damping corresponds to the asymptotic limit of the modulation period becoming infinite, or no trapping of the resonant electrons.

  20. Dust Acoustic Wave Excitation in a Plasma with Warm Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Thomas, E., Jr.; Marcus, L.; Fisher, R.; Williams, J. D.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the dust acoustic wave dispersion relation in dusty plasmas formed in glow discharges at the University of Iowa [1] and Auburn University [2] have shown the importance of finite dust temperature effects. The effect of dust grains with large thermal speeds was taken into account using kinetic theory of the ion-dust streaming instability [3]. The results of analytic and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation based on the kinetic theory will be presented and compared with the experimental results. [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [3] M. Rosenberg, E. Thomas Jr., and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 15, 073701 (2008).

  1. Synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding of atmospheric temperature and minor constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Ugo; Del Bianco, Samuele; Ceccherini, Simone; Gai, Marco; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Castelli, Elisa; Oelhaf, Hermann; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Gerber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Synergistic exploitation of redundant and complementary information from independent observations of the same target remains a major issue in atmospheric remote sounding and increasing attention is devoted to investigate optimized or innovative methods for the combination of two or more measured data sets. This paper focuses on the synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition and temperature and reports the results of a study conducted as part of the preparatory activities of the PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimeter-wave Emitted Radiation) mission candidate to the Core Missions of the European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Explorer 7. The activity was based on data acquired by the MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) and MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding) instruments on-board the high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica during the flight of the PremierEx (PREMIER Experiment) campaign on 10 March 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden, for observation of the Arctic upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The cloud coverage observed along the flight provided representative test cases to evaluate the synergy in three different scenarios: low clouds in the first part, no clouds in the central part and high tropospheric clouds at the end. The calculation of synergistic profiles of four atmospheric targets (i.e., O3, HNO3, H2O and temperature) was performed using a posteriori combination of individual retrieved profiles, i.e., Level 2 (L2) data rather than simultaneous inversion of observed radiances, i.e., Level 1 (L1) data. An innovative method of data fusion, based on the Measurement Space Solution (MSS) was applied along with the standard approach of inversion of MARSCHALS spectral radiances using MIPAS-STR retrieval products as a priori

  2. Adaptive wave field synthesis for broadband active sound field reproduction: signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction is a physical approach to the reproduction of the natural spatial character of hearing. It is also useful in experimental acoustics and psychoacoustics. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. A real reflective reproduction space thus reduces the objective accuracy of WFS. Recently, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a combination of WFS and active compensation. AWFS is based on the minimization of reproduction errors and on the penalization of departure from the WFS solution. This paper focuses on signal processing for AWFS. A classical adaptive algorithm is modified for AWFS: filtered-reference least-mean-square. This modified algorithm and the classical equivalent leaky algorithm have similar convergence properties except that the WFS solution influences the adaptation rule of the modified algorithm. The paper also introduces signal processing for independent radiation mode control of AWFS on the basis of plant decoupling. Simulation results for AWFS are introduced for free-field and reflective spaces. The two algorithms effectively reproduce the sound field and compensate for the reproduction errors at the error sensors. The independent radiation mode control allows a more flexible tuning of the algorithm.

  3. Sound-wave coherence in atmospheric turbulence with intrinsic and global intermittency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D Keith; Ostashev, Vladimir E; Goedecke, George H

    2008-08-01

    The coherence function of sound waves propagating through an intermittently turbulent atmosphere is calculated theoretically. Intermittency mechanisms due to both the turbulent energy cascade (intrinsic intermittency) and spatially uneven production (global intermittency) are modeled using ensembles of quasiwavelets (QWs), which are analogous to turbulent eddies. The intrinsic intermittency is associated with decreasing spatial density (packing fraction) of the QWs with decreasing size. Global intermittency is introduced by allowing the local strength of the turbulence, as manifested by the amplitudes of the QWs, to vary in space according to superimposed Markov processes. The resulting turbulence spectrum is then used to evaluate the coherence function of a plane sound wave undergoing line-of-sight propagation. Predictions are made by a general simulation method and by an analytical derivation valid in the limit of Gaussian fluctuations in signal phase. It is shown that the average coherence function increases as a result of both intrinsic and global intermittency. When global intermittency is very strong, signal phase fluctuations become highly non-Gaussian and the average coherence is dominated by episodes with weak turbulence.

  4. Using second-sound shock waves to probe the intrinsic critical velocity of liquid helium II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. N.

    1983-01-01

    A critical velocity truly intrinsic to liquid helium II is experimentally sought in the bulk fluid far from the apparatus walls. Termed the 'fundamental critical velocity,' it necessarily is caused by mutual interactions which operate between the two fluid components and which are activated at large relative velocities. It is argued that flow induced by second-sound shock waves provides the ideal means by which to activate and isolate the fundamental critical velocity from other extraneous fluid-wall interactions. Experimentally it is found that large-amplitude second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium II, which is dramatically manifested as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. This breakdown is shown to be caused by a fundamental critical velocity. Secondary effects include boiling for ambient pressures near the saturated vapor pressure or the formation of helium I boundary layers at higher ambient pressures. When compared to the intrinsic critical velocity discovered in highly restricted geometries, the shock-induced critical velocity displays a similar temperature dependence and is the same order of magnitude.

  5. Active listening room compensation for massive multichannel sound reproduction systems using wave-domain adaptive filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spors, Sascha; Buchner, Herbert; Rabenstein, Rudolf; Herbordt, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The acoustic theory for multichannel sound reproduction systems usually assumes free-field conditions for the listening environment. However, their performance in real-world listening environments may be impaired by reflections at the walls. This impairment can be reduced by suitable compensation measures. For systems with many channels, active compensation is an option, since the compensating waves can be created by the reproduction loudspeakers. Due to the time-varying nature of room acoustics, the compensation signals have to be determined by an adaptive system. The problems associated with the successful operation of multichannel adaptive systems are addressed in this contribution. First, a method for decoupling the adaptation problem is introduced. It is based on a generalized singular value decomposition and is called eigenspace adaptive filtering. Unfortunately, it cannot be implemented in its pure form, since the continuous adaptation of the generalized singular value decomposition matrices to the variable room acoustics is numerically very demanding. However, a combination of this mathematical technique with the physical description of wave propagation yields a realizable multichannel adaptation method with good decoupling properties. It is called wave domain adaptive filtering and is discussed here in the context of wave field synthesis.

  6. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-04-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  7. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  8. Effect of sound wave stress on antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation of Dendrobium candidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Wei, Jinmin; Wei, Xiaolan; Tang, Kun; Liang, Yilong; Shu, Kunxian; Wang, Bochu

    2008-06-01

    The effect of sound wave stress on important medicinal plant, Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl, was investigated, including the responses on malondialdehyde (MDA) content, the activities change of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Results were found that the activities of SOD, CAT, POD and APX enhanced totally in different organs of D. candidum, as leaves, stems and roots, in response to the stress. Furthermore there happened similar shift of antioxidant enzymes activities, which increased in the initial stimulation and decreased afterwards. Data showed SOD, CAT, POD and APX activities ascended to max at day 9, 6, 9 and 12 in leaves, at day 9, 6, 12 and 9 in stems, and at day 12, 6, 9 and 9 in roots, respectively. As a lipid peroxidation parameter, MDA content in different organs increased in the beginning, dropped afterward, and increased again in the late. Anyway the total trend was the rise of MDA level compared to the control. It was interesting that the MDA content appeared the lowest levels almost when the antioxidant enzymes activities were up to the highest. Our results demonstrated the different organs of D. candidum might produce accumulation of active oxygen species (AOS) under initial treatment of sound wave stress. Later AOS might start to reduce due to the enhancement of antioxidant enzymes activities treated by the stress. The data revealed that the antioxidant metabolism was to be important in determining the ability of plants to survive in sound stress, and the up regulation of these enzymes activities would help to reduce the build up of AOS, which could protect plant cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, different cell compartments might activate different defensive system to reduce excessive amount of AOS. Finally the mechanism of this action was also discussed simply.

  9. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near boundary sheaths or double layers, where the passing interval can be modeled as Maxwellian with a lower temperature than the trapped interval. The depleted Maxwellian is used as an example to demonstrate the utility of using the incomplete plasma dispersion function for calculating modifications to wave dispersion relations.

  10. The Nonlinear Landau Damping Rate of a Driven Plasma Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benisti, D; Strozzi, D J; Gremillet, L; Morice, O

    2009-08-04

    In this Letter, we discuss the concept of the nonlinear Landau damping rate, {nu}, of a driven electron plasma wave, and provide a very simple, practical, analytic formula for {nu} which agrees very well with results inferred from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering. {nu} actually is more complicated an operator than a plain damping rate, and it may only be seen as such because it assumes almost constant values before abruptly dropping to 0. The decrease of {nu} to 0 is moreover shown to occur later when the wave amplitude varies in the direction transverse to its propagation.

  11. Wave propagation in a moving cold magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, H.

    1980-03-01

    Polarization relations and dispersion equations are derived for media that are electrically anisotropic in the comoving frame. Three-dimensional calculations for media at rest recover the known dispersion equations, i.e., Astrom's dispersion equation for magnetized cold plasmas and Fresnel's wave normal equation for uniaxial crystals. An analogous four-dimensional calculation yields the generalization to moving media. The dispersion equations so obtained for moving gyrotropic media are then discussed qualitatively for various special media and special directions of wave propagation. Finally, the polarization relations are specialized to media gyrotropic in the comoving frame.

  12. Ladder Climbing and Autoresonant Acceleration of Plasma Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2015-01-01

    Classical plasma waves are predicted to exhibit quantumlike ladder climbing, which is achieved by chirped modulations of the background density. An equivalence with the quantum particle in a box is identified and used to calculate the efficiency and the rate of this effect. In the limit of densely spaced spectrum, ladder climbing transforms into continuous autoresonance; plasmons may then be manipulated by chirped background modulations much like electrons are autoresonantly manipulated by chirped fields. Such ladder climbing and autoresonance effects are also predicted for other classical waves by means of a unifying Lagrangian theory.

  13. Characteristics of surface sound pressure and absorption of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, K S; Pan, J

    2007-07-01

    Distributions of sound pressure and intensity on the surface of a flat impedance strip flush-mounted on a rigid baffle are studied for a grazing incident plane wave. The distributions are obtained by superimposing the unperturbed wave (the specularly reflected wave as if the strip is rigid plus the incident wave) with the radiated wave from the surface vibration of the strip excited by the unperturbed pressure. The radiated pressure interferes with the unperturbed pressure and distorts the propagating plane wave. When the plane wave propagates in the baffle-strip-baffle direction, it encounters discontinuities in acoustical impedance at the baffle-strip and strip-baffle interfaces. The radiated pressure is highest around the baffle-strip interface, but decreases toward the strip-baffle interface where the plane wave distortion reduces accordingly. As the unperturbed and radiated waves have different magnitudes and superimpose out of phase, the surface pressure and intensity increase across the strip in the plane wave propagation direction. Therefore, the surface absorption of the strip is nonzero and nonuniform. This paper provides an understanding of the surface pressure and intensity behaviors of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave, and of how the distributed intensity determines the sound absorption coefficient of the strip.

  14. Optical Multi-hysteresises and "Rogue Waves" in Nonlinear Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, A E

    2010-01-01

    An overdense plasma layer irradiated by an intense light can exhibit dramatic nonlinear-optical effects due to a relativistic mass-effect of free electrons: highly-multiple hysteresises of reflection and transition, and emergence of gigantic "rogue waves". Those are trapped quasi-soliton field spikes inside the layer, sustained by an incident radiation with a tiny fraction of their peak intensity once they have been excited by orders of magnitude larger pumping. The phenomenon persists even in the layers with "soft" boundaries, as well as in a semi-infinite plasma with low absorption.

  15. Degenerate mixing of plasma waves on cold, magnetized single-species plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. W.; O'Neil, T. M.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Gould, R. W.

    2011-10-01

    In the cold-fluid dispersion relation ω =ωp/[1+(k⊥/kz)2]1/2 for Trivelpiece-Gould waves on an infinitely long magnetized plasma cylinder, the transverse and axial wavenumbers appear only in the combination k⊥/kz. As a result, for any frequency ω Dubin modes), a perturbation analysis is used to investigate the mixing of low-order, nearly degenerate Dubin modes caused by small deformations of a plasma spheroid.

  16. The Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS) on The Europa Clipper Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Joseph H.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Kasper, Justin C.; Case, Anthony W.; Grey, Matthew P.; Kim, Cindy K.; Battista, Corina C.; Rymer, Abigail; Paty, Carol S.; Jia, Xianzhe; Stevens, Michael L.; Khurana, Krishan; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje H.; Smith, Howard T.; Krupp, Norbert; Roussos, Elias; Saur, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The Europa Clipper mission is equipped with a sophisticated suite of 9 instruments to study Europa's interior and ocean, geology, chemistry, and habitability from a Jupiter orbiting spacecraft. The Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS) on Europa Clipper is a Faraday Cup based plasma instrument whose heritage dates back to the Voyager spacecraft. PIMS will measure the plasma that populates Jupiter's magnetosphere and Europa's ionosphere. The science goals of PIMS are to: 1) estimate the ocean salinity and thickness by determining Europa's magnetic induction response, corrected for plasma contributions; 2) assess mechanisms responsible for weathering and releasing material from Europa's surface into the atmosphere and ionosphere; and 3) understand how Europa influences its local space environment and Jupiter's magnetosphere and vice versa.Europa is embedded in a complex Jovian magnetospheric plasma, which rotates with the tilted planetary field and interacts dynamically with Europa's ionosphere affecting the magnetic induction signal. Plasma from Io's temporally varying torus diffuses outward and mixes with the charged particles in Europa's own torus producing highly variable plasma conditions at Europa. PIMS works in conjunction with the Interior Characterization of Europa using Magnetometry (ICEMAG) investigation to probe Europa's subsurface ocean. This investigation exploits currents induced in Europa's interior by the moon's exposure to variable magnetic fields in the Jovian system to infer properties of Europa's subsurface ocean such as its depth, thickness, and conductivity. This technique was successfully applied to Galileo observations and demonstrated that Europa indeed has a subsurface ocean. While these Galileo observations contributed to the renewed interest in Europa, due to limitations in the observations the results raised major questions that remain unanswered. PIMS will greatly refine our understanding of Europa's global liquid ocean by

  17. Second harmonic wave generation from a nonlinear combination of volume wave and overdense plasma in negative permeability space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Akinori; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    We clarify the relation between second harmonic wave (SH wave) and plasma generation in various experimental conditions by detecting properties of propagating electromagnetic waves (EM waves). Plasma has a nonlinear reaction against EM wave, generating harmonic waves which depends on electron density ne. In the case with increased ne, EM wave comes to be prevented from going into plasma with negative permittivity ɛp. Double-split-ring resonators (DSRRs), one of metamaterials, make permeability μD negative. We have shown that EM wave being volume wave can propagate into the combination of overdense plasma and DSRRs because of real negative value refractive index N. In our previous paper, we have confirmed enhanced SH wave (4.9 GHz) generation in the composite with 2.45-GHz input. In this report, we show the dependence of the SH wave emission with plasma generation on plasma parameters and gas conditions of plasma. Furthermore, we show the phase change with N variation of the composite space in the case with various input power as the proof of the negative index state.

  18. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  19. Classification of biological cells using a sound wave based flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Van De Vondervoort, Mia; Daghighi, Yasaman; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    A flow cytometer that uses sound waves to determine the size of biological cells is presented. In this system, a microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was developed to hydrodynamically flow focus cells in a single file through a target area. Integrated into the microfluidic device was an ultrasound transducer with a 375 MHz center frequency, aligned opposite the transducer was a pulsed 532 nm laser focused into the device by a 10x objective. Each passing cell was insonfied with a high frequency ultrasound pulse, and irradiated with the laser. The resulting ultrasound and photoacoustic waves from each cell were analyzed using signal processing methods, where features in the power spectra were compared to theoretical models to calculate the cell size. Two cell lines with different size distributions were used to test the system: acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) and melanoma cells. Over 200 cells were measured using this system. The average calculated diameter of the AML cells was 10.4 +/- 2.5 μm using ultrasound, and 11.4 +/- 2.3 μm using photoacoustics. The average diameter of the melanoma cells was 16.2 +/- 2.9 μm using ultrasound, and 18.9 +/- 3.5 μm using photoacoustics. The cell sizes calculated using ultrasound and photoacoustic methods agreed with measurements using a Coulter Counter, where the AML cells were 9.8 +/- 1.8 μm and the melanoma cells were 16.0 +/- 2.5 μm. These results demonstrate a high speed method of assessing cell size using sound waves, which is an alternative method to traditional flow cytometry techniques.

  20. Dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dissipative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, B. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2000-12-01

    The theory of dust acoustic waves is revisited in the frame of the generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic theory for highly correlated dusts. Physical processes relevant to many experiments on dusts in plasmas, such as ionization and recombination, dust-charge variation, elastic electron and ion collisions with neutral and charged dust particles, as well as relaxation due to strong dust coupling, are taken into account. These processes can be on similar time scales and are thus important for the conservation of particles and momenta in a self-consistent description of the system. It is shown that the dispersion properties of the dust acoustic waves are determined by a sensitive balance of the effects of strong dust coupling and collisional relaxation. The predictions of the present theory applicable to typical parameters in laboratory strongly coupled dusty plasmas are given and compared with the experiment results. Some possible implications and discrepanies between theory and experiment are also discussed.

  1. Nonlinear electrostatic wave equations for magnetized plasmas - II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dysthe, K. B.; Mjølhus, E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.26, p.443-7 (1984). The problem of extending the high frequency part of the Zakharov equations for nonlinear electrostatic waves to magnetized plasmas, is considered. Weak electromagnetic and thermal effects are retained on an equal footing. Direction dependent (electrosta......For pt.I see ibid., vol.26, p.443-7 (1984). The problem of extending the high frequency part of the Zakharov equations for nonlinear electrostatic waves to magnetized plasmas, is considered. Weak electromagnetic and thermal effects are retained on an equal footing. Direction dependent...... (electrostatic) cut-off implies that various cases must be considered separately, leading to equations with rather different properties. Various equations encountered previously in the literature are recovered as limiting cases....

  2. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  3. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  4. Ionization wave propagation on a micro cavity plasma array

    CERN Document Server

    Wollny, Alexander; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Boettner, Henrik; Winter, Joerg; der Gathen, Volker Schulz-von; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Microcavity plasma arrays are regular arrays of inverse pyramidal cavities created on positive doped silicon wafers. Each cavity acts as a microscopic dielectric barrier discharge. Operated at atmospheric pressure in argon and excited with high voltage at about 10 kHz frequency each cavity develops a localized microplasma. Experiments show a strong interaction of the individual cavities, leading to the propagation of wave-like emission structures along the array surface. This paper studies the ignition process of a micro cavity plasma array by means of a numerical simulation and confirms the experimental results. The propagation of an ionization wave is observed. Its propagation speed of 1 km/s matches experimental findings.

  5. Sound shell model for acoustic gravitational wave production at a first-order phase transition in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hindmarsh, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A model for the acoustic production of gravitational waves at a first order phase transition is presented. The source of gravitational radiation is the sound waves generated by the explosive growth of bubbles of the stable phase. The model assumes that the sound waves are linear and that their power spectrum is determined by the characteristic form of the sound shell around the expanding bubble. The predicted power spectrum has two length scales, the average bubble separation and the sound shell width when the bubbles collide. The peak of the power spectrum is at wavenumbers set by the sound shell width. For higher wavenumber $k$, the power spectrum decreases as $k^{-3}$. At wavenumbers below the inverse bubble separation, the power spectrum goes as $k^5$. For bubble wall speeds near the speed of sound where these two length scales are distinguished, there is an intermediate $k^{1}$ power law. The detailed dependence of the power spectrum on the wall speed and the other parameters of the phase transition rais...

  6. Radiation of Sound Waves Via Soliton Excitation of the Angarmonic Chain of Atoms in a Dislocation Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Shchukina, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    It is demonstrated that propagation of the soliton described by the Boussinesq equation along a linear defect of the crystal structure leads to radiation of sound waves (analog of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect). Radiation that has a continuous spectrum diverges conically from the dislocation line, and the apex angle of the cone is determined by the ratio of the sound speed in the crystal to the soliton speed. With increasing soliton speed, the maximum of the spectral flux density of sound energy is displaced toward higher frequencies. An analytical expression for energy losses is derived.

  7. Structures of Strong Shock Waves in Dense Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhong-He; HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei; LV Jian-Hong; HU Ye-Min

    2007-01-01

    @@ Structures of strong shock waves in dense plasmas are investigated via the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations and Poisson equation. The structures from fluid simulation agree with the ones from kinetic simulation. The effects of the transport coefficients on the structures are analysed. The enhancements of the electronic heat conduction and ionic viscosity both will broaden the width of the shock fronts, and decrease the electric fields in the fronts.

  8. Secondary fast magnetoacoustic waves trapped in randomly structured plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Ding; Walsh, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic wave is an important tool for inferring solar atmospheric parameters. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas mimicking the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the fast wave speed, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period ($\\bar{p}$) on the initial pulse width ($w_0$) as well as the density contrast ($\\delta_\\rho$) and correlation length ($L_c$) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, $\\delta_\\rho$ does not alter $\\bar{p}$ significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when $\\delta_\\rho$ is small but have a smoothing effect when $\\delta_\\rho$ is suffic...

  9. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  10. FDTD Simulation on Terahertz Waves Propagation Through a Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maoyan; Zhang, Meng; Li, Guiping; Jiang, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaochuan; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The frequency dependent permittivity for dusty plasmas is provided by introducing the charging response factor and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles. The field equations that describe the characteristics of Terahertz (THz) waves propagation in a dusty plasma sheath are derived and discretized on the basis of the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Compared with numerical solutions in reference, the accuracy for the ADE FDTD method is validated. The reflection property of the metal Aluminum interlayer of the sheath at THz frequencies is discussed. The effects of the thickness, effective collision frequency, airborne particle density, and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles on the electromagnetic properties of Terahertz waves through a dusty plasma slab are investigated. Finally, some potential applications for Terahertz waves in information and communication are analyzed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097, 11504252, 61201007, 41304119), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. ZYGX2015J039, ZYGX2015J041), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120185120012)

  11. Nonlinear electromagnetic waves in a degenerate electron-positron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Labany, S.K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta (Egypt); El-Taibany, W.F., E-mail: eltaibany@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia); El-Samahy, A.E.; Hafez, A.M.; Atteya, A., E-mail: ahmedsamahy@yahoo.com, E-mail: am.hafez@sci.alex.edu.eg, E-mail: ahmed_ateya2002@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2015-08-15

    Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic solitary waves in an ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron-positron (EP) plasma (containing ultracold, degenerate electron, and positron fluids) is investigated. The set of basic equations is reduced to a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the lowest-order perturbed magnetic field and to a KdV type equation for the higher-order perturbed magnetic field. The solutions of these evolution equations are obtained. For better accuracy and searching on new features, the new solutions are analyzed numerically based on compact objects (white dwarf) parameters. It is found that including the higher-order corrections results as a reduction (increment) of the fast (slow) electromagnetic wave amplitude but the wave width is increased in both cases. The ranges where the RPT can describe adequately the total magnetic field including different conditions are discussed. (author)

  12. Characteristics of Wave-Particle Interaction in a Hydrogen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hui-Yong; CHEN Liang-Xu; LI Jiang-Fan

    2008-01-01

    We study the characteristics of cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a typical hydrogen plasma. The numerical calculations of minimum resonant energy Emin, resonant wave frequency w, and pitch angle diffusion coefficient Dαα for interactions between R-mode/L-mode and electrons/protons are presented. It is found that Emin decreases with ω for R-mode/electron, L-mode/proton and L-mode/electron interactions, but increase with w for R-mode/proton interaction. It is shown that both R-mode and L-mode waves can efficiently scatter energetic (10 keV~100 keV) electrons and protons and cause precipitation loss at L=4, indicating that perhaps waveparticle interaction is a serious candidate for the ring current decay.

  13. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Waves in a Degenerate Electron-Positron Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Samahy, A. E.; Hafez, A. M.; Atteya, A.

    2015-08-01

    Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic solitary waves in an ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron-positron (EP) plasma (containing ultracold, degenerate electron, and positron fluids) is investigated. The set of basic equations is reduced to a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the lowest-order perturbed magnetic field and to a KdV type equation for the higher-order perturbed magnetic field. The solutions of these evolution equations are obtained. For better accuracy and searching on new features, the new solutions are analyzed numerically based on compact objects (white dwarf) parameters. It is found that including the higher-order corrections results as a reduction (increment) of the fast (slow) electromagnetic wave amplitude but the wave width is increased in both cases. The ranges where the RPT can describe adequately the total magnetic field including different conditions are discussed.

  14. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; and V.S. Chan

    2001-08-09

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile.

  15. High harmonic fast waves in high beta plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki

    1995-04-01

    High harmonic fast magnetosonic wave in high beta/high dielectric plasmas is investigated. including the finite-Larmor-radius effects. In this regime, due to the combination of group velocity slow down and the high beta enhancement, the electron absorption via electron Landau and electron magnetic pumping becomes significant enough that one can expect a strong ({approximately} 100%) single pass absorption. By controlling the wave spectrum, the prospect of some localized electron heating and current drive appears to be feasible in high beta low-aspect-ratio tokamak regimes. Inclusion of finite-Larmor-radius terms shows an accessibility limit in the high ion beta regime ({beta}{sub i} = 50% for a deuterium plasma) due to mode-conversion into an ion Bernstein-wave-like mode while no beta limit is expected for electrons. With increasing ion beta, the ion damping can increase significantly particularly near the beta limits. The presence of energetic ion component expected during intense NBI and {alpha}-heating does not appear to modify the accessibility condition nor cause excessive wave absorption.

  16. Sound waves effectively assist tobramycin in elimination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; Harb, A; Kolacny, D; Martins, P; Smyth, H D C

    2014-12-01

    Microbial biofilms are highly refractory to antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of low-frequency vibration therapy (20-20 kHz) on antibiotic-mediated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm eradication. In screening studies, low-frequency vibrations were applied on model biofilm compositions to identify conditions in which surface standing waves were observed. Alginate surface tension and viscosity were also measured. The effect of vibration on P. aeruginosa biofilms was studied using a standard biofilm assay. Subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of tobramycin (5 μg/ml) were added to biofilms 3 h prior, during, and immediately after vibration and quantitatively assessed by (2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay (XTT) and, qualitatively, by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The standing waves occurred at frequencies vibrated without sub-MIC tobramycin showed a significantly reduced metabolism compared to untreated controls (p vibrated simultaneously (450, 530, 610, and 650 Hz), or vibrated (450 and 650 Hz) then treated with tobramycin subsequently, or vibrated (610 Hz, 650 Hz) after 3 h of tobramycin treatment showed significantly lower metabolism compared to P. aeruginosa biofilm treated with tobramycin alone (p vibrations assisted tobramycin in killing P. aeruginosa biofilms at sub-MIC. Thus, sound waves together with antibiotics are a promising approach in eliminating pathogenic biofilms.

  17. Low frequency waves in streaming quantum dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozina, Ch.; Jamil, M.; Khan, Arroj A.; Zeba, I.; Saman, J.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of quantum effects on the excitation of two instabilities, namely quantum dust-acoustic and quantum dust-lower-hybrid waves due to the free streaming of ion/dust particles in uniformly magnetized dusty plasmas has been investigated using a quantum hydrodynamic model. We have obtained dispersion relations under some particular conditions applied on streaming ions and two contrastreaming dust particle beams at equilibrium and have analyzed the growth rates graphically. We have shown that with the increase of both the electron number density and the streaming speed of ion there is enhancement in the instability due to the fact that the dense plasma particle system with more energetic species having a high speed results in the increase of the growth rate in the electrostatic mode. The application of this work has been pointed out for laboratory as well as for space dusty plasmas.

  18. Dynamic Thomson Scattering from Nonlinear Electron Plasma Waves in a Raman Plasma Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A.; Katz, J.; Bucht, S.; Haberberger, D.; Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J. D.; Froula, D. H.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Sadler, J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Electron plasma waves (EPW's) can be used to transfer significant energy from a long-pulse laser to a short-pulse seed laser through the Raman scattering instability. Successful implementation of Raman amplification could open an avenue to producing high-intensity pulses beyond the capabilities of current laser technology ( 1022 W / cm 2). This three-wave interaction takes advantage of the plasma's ability to sustain large-amplitude plasma waves. Having complete knowledge of the EPW amplitude is essential to establishing optimal parameters for high-efficiency Raman amplification. A dynamic Thomson-scattering diagnostic is being developed to spatially and temporally resolve the amplitude of the driven and thermal EPW's. By imaging the scattered probe light onto a novel pulse-front tilt compensated streaked optical spectrometer, the diffraction efficiency of this plasma wave can be measured as a function of space and time. These data will be used in conjunction with particle-in-cell simulations to determine the EPW's spatial and temporal profile. This will allow the effect of the EPW profile on Raman scattering to be experimentally determined. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. Laser plasma simulations of the generation processes of Alfven and collisionless shock waves in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopov, P. A.; Zakharov, Yu P.; Tishchenko, V. N.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Melekhov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Terekhin, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Generation of Alfven waves propagating along external magnetic field B0 and Collisionless Shock Waves propagating across B0 are studied in experiments with laser- produced plasma and magnetized background plasma. The collisionless interaction of interpenetrating plasma flows takes place through a so-called Magnetic Laminar Mechanism (MLM) or Larmor Coupling. At the edge of diamagnetic cavity LP-ions produce induction electric field Eφ which accelerates BP-ions while LP-ions rotate in opposite direction. The ions movement generates sheared azimuthal magnetic field Bφ which could launches torsional Alfven wave. In previous experiments at KI-1 large scale facility a generation of strong perturbations propagating across B0 with magnetosonic speed has been studied at a moderate value of interaction parameter δ∼0.3. In the present work we report on experiments at conditions of 5∼R2 and large Alfven-Mach number MA∼10 in which strong transverse perturbations traveling at a scale of ∼1 m in background plasma at a density of ∼3*1013 cm-3 is observed. At the same conditions but smaller MA ∼ 2 a generation, the structure and dynamic of Alfven wave with wavelength ∼0.5 m propagating along fields B0∼100÷500 G for a distance of ∼2.5 m is studied.

  20. Three-in-one resonance tube for harmonic series sound wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Rosly; Nazihah Mat Daud, Anis; Ali, Shaharudin; Kadri Ayop, Shahrul

    2017-07-01

    In this study we constructed a special three-in-one resonance tube for a harmonic series sound waves experiment. It is designed for three different experiments: both-open-end, one-closed-end and both-closed-end tubes. The resonance tube consists of a PVC conduit with a rectangular hole, rubber tube, plastic stopper with an embedded microphone and a plastic stopper. The resonance tube is utilized with visual analyser freeware to detect, display and measure the resonance frequencies for each harmonic series. The speeds of sound in air, v, are determined from the gradient of the 2(L+e) versus n fn-1 , 4(L+e) versus n fn-1 and 2L versus n fn-1 graphs for both-open-end, one-closed-end and both-closed-end tubes, respectively. The compatibility of a resonance tube for a harmonic series experiment is determined by comparing the experimental and standard values of v. The use of a resonance tube produces accurate results for v within a 1.91% error compared to its standard value. It can also be used to determine the values of end correction, e, in both-open-end and one-closed-end tubes. The special resonance tube can also be used for the values of n for a harmonic series experiment in the three types of resonance tubes: both-open-end, one-closed-end and both-closed-end tubes.

  1. Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Drift Vortex in Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; CHEN Yinhua; WANG Ge

    2008-01-01

    In a quasi-two-dimensional model, the scattering of incident ordinary electromag-netic waves by a dipole-electrostatic drift vortex is studied with first-order Born approximation. The distribution of the scattering cross-section and total cross-section are evaluated analytically in different approximate conditions, and the physical interpretations are discussed. When the wavelength of incident wave is much longer than the vortex radius (kia << 1), it is found that the angle at which the scattering cross-section reaches its maxim depends significantly on the approxi-mation of the parameters of the vortex used. It is also found that the total scattering cross-section has an affinitive relation with the parameters of the plasma, while it is irrelevant to the frequency of the incident wave in a wide range of parameters of the vortex. In a totally different range of parameters when incident wave is in the radar-frequency range (then ki<< 1, the wavelength of incident wave is much shorter than the vortex radius), the numerical procedure is conducted with computer in order to obtain the distribution and the total expression of the scattering cross-section. Then it is found that the total scattering cross-section in the low frequency range is much larger than that in high frequency range, so the scattering is more effective in the low frequency range than in high frequency range.

  2. Decay of Langmuir wave in dense plasmas and warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S; Moon, Sung Joon

    2010-01-01

    The decays of the Langmuir waves in dense plasmas are computed using the dielectric function theory widely used in the solid state physics. Four cases are considered: a classical plasma, a Maxwellian plasma, a degenerate quantum plasma, and a partially degenerate plasma. The result is considerably different from the conventional Landau damping theory.

  3. On the Self-Focusing of Whistler Waves in a Radial Inhomogeneous Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balmashnov, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The process of whistler wave self-focusing is experimentally investigated. It was found that a whistler wave propagating along the plasma column with a density crest excites a longitudinal wave of the same frequency propagating across the external magnetic field. The amplitude modulation...... of the latter wave is accompanied by a density modification, which leads to trapping of the whistler wave in a density trough in the center of the plasma column....

  4. Wild Elephant Conservation Using Sound Waves to Obstruct Them from Plantations: a Case Study at Kui Buri District, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratheep Meewattana1

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A trial of the 2,300-2,800 Hz band of frequency in sound waves were made more intense in decibels (dB, similar to a firecracker or firecracker ball was made for use of the local people to dislodge and/or obstruct wild elephants from agricultural areas (pineapple plantations within Kui Buri District, Prachuap Khiri Khan Province, Thailand. The 3 point source was checked between 10 -50 meters, sound sources to the elephants in distances and loudness are as discussed later; firecracker balls were 151, 142, 138, 128, 119 decibels (dB, firecrackers were 99, 95, 91, 85, 72 dB, and the frequency of the sound waves (2,800 Hz were 85, 80, 74, 70, 62 dB, respectively. The results can be analyzed through the laboratory and fundamentals of sound wave, anatomy and physiology of mammals, including comparisons to the standard sound intensities of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA. The energy and pressure of firecracker ball is strong and were transferred into some auditory mechanisms and behaviors of wild elephants. As a consequence, the elephant’s auditory mechanism has been affected from the energy and pressure; at least 1 individual of wild elephant had shown sensorineural hearing loss in the case study, their behavior became more aggressive and more easily angered.

  5. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  6. Nonlinear processes in the strong wave-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Francesco; Califano, Francesco; Attico, Nicola; Bulanov, Sergei

    2000-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions in hot laboratory and/or astrophysical plasmas are a very efficient mechanism able to transfer the energy from the large to the small spatial scales of the system. As a result, kinetic processes are excited and play a key role in the plasma dynamics since the typical fluid dissipative length scales (where the nonlinear cascade is stopped) are (much) smaller then the kinetic length scales. Then, the key point is the role of the kinetic effects in the global plasma dynamics, i.e. whether the kinetic effects remains confined to the small scales of the system or whether there is a significant feedback on the large scales. Here we will address this problem by discussing the nonlinear kinetic evolution of the electromagnetic beam plasma instability where phase space vortices, as well as large scale vortex like magnetic structures in the physical space, are generated by wave - particle interactions. The role and influence of kinetic effects on the large scale plasma dynamics will be also discussed by addressing the problem of collisionless magnetic reconection.

  7. Residual Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal-like waves after one-dimensional electron wave breaking in a cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabal Singh; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-07-01

    A one-dimensional particle in cell simulation of large amplitude plasma oscillations is carried out to explore the physics beyond wave breaking in a cold homogeneous unmagnetized plasma. It is shown that after wave breaking, all energy of the plasma oscillation does not end up as random kinetic energy of particles, but some fraction, which is decided by Coffey's wave breaking limit in warm plasma, always remains with two oppositely propagating coherent Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal like modes with supporting trapped particle distributions. The randomized energy distribution of untrapped particles is found to be characteristically non-Maxwellian with a preponderance of energetic particles.

  8. Study of nonlinear waves in astrophysical quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossen, M.R.; Mamun, A.A., E-mail: rasel.plasma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinear propagation of the electron acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) in an unmagnetized, collisionless degenerate quantum plasma system has been investigated theoretically. Our considered model consisting of two distinct groups of electrons (one of inertial non-relativistic cold electrons and other of inertialess ultrarelativistic hot electrons) and positively charged static ions. The Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation has been derived by employing the reductive perturbation method and numerically examined to identify the basic features (speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of EASWs. It is shown that only rarefactive solitary waves can propagate in such a quantum plasma system. It is found that the effect of degenerate pressure and number density of hot and cold electron fluids, and positively charged static ions, significantly modify the basic features of EASWs. It is also noted that the inertial cold electron fluid is the source of dispersion for EA waves and is responsible for the formation of solitary structures. The applications of this investigation in astrophysical compact objects (viz. non-rotating white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.) are briefly discussed. (author)

  9. Energy Conservation and Gravity Waves in Sound-proof Treatments of Stellar Interiors: Part I Anelastic Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Benjamin P

    2012-01-01

    Typical flows in stellar interiors are much slower than the speed of sound. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof equations are in wide use, particularly in stellar astrophysical fluid dynamics. These low-Mach number equations include the anelastic equations. Generally, these equations are valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may not be valid in the sub-adiabatic, stably stratified stellar radiative interiors. Understanding the coupling between the convection zone and the radiative interior is a problem of crucial interest and may have strong implications for solar and stellar dynamo theories as the interface between the two, called the tachocline in the Sun, plays a crucial role in many solar dynamo theories. Here we study the properties of gravity waves in stably-stratified atmospheres. In particular, we explore how gravity waves are handled in various sound-proof equations. We find that some anelastic treatments fail to conserve...

  10. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  11. Radio and Plasma Waves Synergistic Science Opportunities with EJSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; André, Nicolas; Bougeret, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    The radio and plasma wave (RPW) diagnostics provide a unique access to critical parameters of space plasma, in particular in planetary and satellite environments. Concerning giant planets, this has been demonstrated by major results obtained by the radio investigation on the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, but also during the Ulysses, Voyager, and Pioneer flybys of Jupiter. Several other missions, past or in flight, demonstrate the uniqueness and relevance of RPW diagnostics to basic problems of astrophysics. The EJSM mission consists of two platforms operating in the Jupiter environment: the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). JEO and JGO will execute a choreographed exploration of the Jupiter System before settling into orbit around Europa and Ganymede, respectively. The EJSM mission architecture hence offers unique opportunities for synergistic and complementary observations that significantly enhance the overall science return of the mission. In this paper, we will first review new and unique science aspects of the Jupiter system that may benefit from different capabilities of RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO: spectral and polarization information, mapping of radio sources, measurements of in situ plasma waves, currents, thermal noise, dust and nano-particle detection and characterization. We will then illustrate unique synergistic and complementary science opportunities offered by RPW investigations onboard JGO and/or JEO, both in terms of Satellite science and in terms of Magnetospheric Science.

  12. Freak waves in a plasma having Cairns particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Awady, E. I.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-12-01

    The probability of the existence of the ion-acoustic rogue waves in a plasma composed of warm ions and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal or Kappa) electrons is investigated in the framework of the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation. Using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived. After numerical analysis, it is found that the present plasma system populated with nonthermal (Cairns) electrons leads to generation of compressive and rarefactive pulses, in contrast to the case of Kappa distribution. Thus, only for the nonthermal populated electrons, there is a critical value of the nonthermal parameter at which the coefficient of the nonlinear term of the KdV equation vanishes. In this case, we derived the modified KdV (mKdV) equation to describe the evolution of the system. To investigate the rogue waves propagation in our system, the mKdV equation should transfer to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Our results provide a better understanding of observations in space plasmas which indicate the existence of nonthermal particles.

  13. Analysis of propagation characteristics of flexural wave in honeycomb sandwich panel and design of loudspeaker for radiating inclined sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    A loudspeaker for an auditory guiding system is proposed. This loudspeaker utilizes inclined sound transformed from a flexural wave in a honeycomb sandwich panel. We focused on the fact that the inclined sound propagates extensively with uniform level and direction. Furthermore, sound can be generated without group delay dispersion because the phase velocity of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel becomes constant with increasing frequency. These characteristics can be useful for an auditory guiding system in public spaces since voice-guiding navigation indicates the right direction regardless of position on a pathway. To design the proposed loudspeaker, the behavior of the sandwich panel is predicted using a theoretical equation in which the honeycomb core is assumed as an orthotropic continuum. We calculated the phase velocity dispersion of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel and compared the results obtained using the equation with those of a simulation based on the finite element method and an experiment in order to confirm the applicability of the theoretical equation. It was confirmed that the phase velocities obtained using the theoretical equation and by the simulation were in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. The obtained results suggest that the behavior of the sandwich panel can be predicted using the parameters of the panel. In addition, we designed an optimized honeycomb sandwich panel for radiating inclined sound by calculating the phase velocity characteristics of various panels that have different parameters of core height and cell size using the theoretical equation. Sound radiation from the optimized panel was simulated and compared with that of a homogeneous plate. It was clear that the variance of the radiation angle with varying frequency of the optimized panel was smaller than that of the homogeneous plate. This characteristic of sound radiation with a uniform angle is useful for indicating the destination direction. On

  14. Cross-polarization scattering from low-frequency waves in a tandem mirror plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Mase, Atsushi; Bruskin, L.G.; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Itakura, Akiyosi; Hojo, Hitoshi; Tamano, Teruo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Plasma Research Center

    1997-05-01

    Cross-polarization scattering (CPS) diagnostic was applied to the central-cell plasma of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror in order to study electromagnetic plasma waves with frequencies of less than 200 kHz. In the CPS process, an incident ordinary (extraordinary) wave is converted to an extraordinary (ordinary) wave by magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. The converted wave propagates through the cutoff layer and reaches the opposite diagnostic port. The experimental data suggest that the power spectral density of the CPS signal satisfies the Bragg condition, while the reflectometer detects the waves near the cutoff layer where the wave number cannot be resolved. (author)

  15. Plasma wave and third harmonic generation by a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodha, M.S.; Govind; Sharma, R.P. (Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi. Centre of Energy Studies)

    1981-05-01

    An investigation of the plasma wave and third harmonic generation by a Gaussian electromagnetic (em) beam, propagating in extraordinary mode in a collisionless hot magnetoplasma has been made. On account of the (VXB) force, a plasma wave at twice the pump wave frequency gets excited. The interaction of the plasma wave with the pump wave leads to third harmonic generation. By taking into account the self-focusing of the pump wave on account of non-uniform intensity distribution along the wave front, a modification is effected in the power of the plasma wave and the third harmonic em wave. The dependence of these phenomena on the strength of the static magnetic field has also been studied.

  16. Ultrawideband VNA Based Channel Sounding System for Centimetre and Millimetre Wave Bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejselbæk, Johannes; Fan, Wei; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    Channel characterization of multipath channels at centimetre and millimetre wave bands is of interest from both academia and industry, especially for the frequency bands that are under consideration for 5G mobile communication systems. In this paper, we first demonstrate the limitations of an exi...... utilizing the proposed setup equipped with rotational directive horn antennas, with a focus on multi-band power-angle-delay profiles, was performed. The measured frequency bands are 18 - 20 GHz, 25 - 27 GHz, 28 - 30 GHz and 38 - 40 GHz.......Channel characterization of multipath channels at centimetre and millimetre wave bands is of interest from both academia and industry, especially for the frequency bands that are under consideration for 5G mobile communication systems. In this paper, we first demonstrate the limitations...... of an existing vector network analyzer (VNA) based channel sounding system in terms of frequency range and measurement range. After that, an improved system is proposed to address these limitations. The proposed system is capable of measuring from 2 to 50 GHz at 30 meters distances. A measurement campaign...

  17. Wideband characterization of the complex wave number and characteristic impedance of sound absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salissou, Yacoubou; Panneton, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    Several methods for measuring the complex wave number and the characteristic impedance of sound absorbers have been proposed in the literature. These methods can be classified into single frequency and wideband methods. In this paper, the main existing methods are revisited and discussed. An alternative method which is not well known or discussed in the literature while exhibiting great potential is also discussed. This method is essentially an improvement of the wideband method described by Iwase et al., rewritten so that the setup is more ISO 10534-2 standard-compliant. Glass wool, melamine foam and acoustical/thermal insulator wool are used to compare the main existing wideband non-iterative methods with this alternative method. It is found that, in the middle and high frequency ranges the alternative method yields results that are comparable in accuracy to the classical two-cavity method and the four-microphone transfer-matrix method. However, in the low frequency range, the alternative method appears to be more accurate than the other methods, especially when measuring the complex wave number.

  18. A wave-envelope of sound propagation in nonuniform circular ducts with compressible mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Shaker, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic theory is developed to determine the sound transmission and attenuation through an infinite, hard-walled or lined circular duct carrying compressible, sheared, mean flows and having a variable cross section. The theory is applicable to large as well as small axial variations, as long as the mean flow does not separate. The technique is based on solving for the envelopes of the quasi-parallel acoustic modes that exist in the duct instead of solving for the actual wave, thereby reducing the computation time and the round-off error encountered in purely numerical techniques. The solution recovers the solution based on the method of multiple scales for slowly varying duct geometry. A computer program was developed based on the wave-envelope analysis for general mean flows. Results are presented for the reflection and transmission coefficients as well as the acoustic pressure distributions for a number of conditions: both straight and variable area ducts with and without liners and mean flows from very low to high subsonic speeds are considered.

  19. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  20. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  1. Nonextensivity effect on radio-wave transmission in plasma sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new theoretical findings on the application of magnetic field in effective transmission of electromagnetic (EM) waves through a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle are reported. The results are obtained by assuming the plasma sheath to consist of nonextensive electrons and thermal ions. The expressions for the electric field and effective collision frequency are derived analytically in the framework of nonextensive statistics. Examination of the reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients regarding the strength of the ambient magnetic field shows the significance of q-nonextensive parameter effect on these entities. For small values of the magnetic field, the transmission coefficient increases to unity only in the range of - 1 hypersonic flights.

  2. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  3. Polarizer design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Jacobsen, A S; Jessen, M; Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Nielsen, S K; Stejner, M

    2013-08-01

    Radiation from magnetized plasmas is in general elliptically polarized. In order to convert the elliptical polarization to linear polarization, mirrors with grooved surfaces are currently employed in our collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade. If these mirrors can be substituted by birefringent windows, the microwave receivers can be designed to be more compact at lower cost. Sapphire windows (a-cut) as well as grooved high density polyethylene windows can serve this purpose. The sapphire window can be designed such that the calculated transmission of the wave energy is better than 99%, and that of the high density polyethylene can be better than 97%.

  4. ‘Magneto-elastic’ waves in an anisotropic magnetised plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Tenerani, A.

    2017-04-01

    The linear waves that propagate in a two fluid magnetised plasma allowing for a non-gyrotropic perturbed ion pressure tensor are investigated. For perpendicular propagation and perturbed fluid velocity a low frequency (magnetosonic) and a high frequency (ion Bernstein) branch are identified and discussed. For both branches a comparison is made with the results of a truncated Vlasov treatment. For the low frequency branch we show that a consistent expansion procedure allows us to recover the correct expression of the finite Larmor radius corrections to the magnetosonic dispersion relation.

  5. "Magneto-elastic" waves in an anisotropic magnetised plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The linear waves that propagate in a two fluid magnetised plasma allowing for a non-gyrotropic perturbed ion pressure tensor are investigated. For perpendicular propagation and perturbed fluid velocity a low frequency (magnetosonic) and a high frequency (ion Bernstein) branch are identified and discussed. For both branches a comparison is made with the results of a kinetic Vlasov treatment. For the low frequency branch we show that a consistent expansion procedure allows us to recover the correct expression of the FLR corrections to the magnetosonic dispersion relation in agreement with Mikhailovskii and Smoliakov, Soviet Phys., JETP, 11, 1469 (1985).

  6. Wave Localization and Density Bunching in Pair Ion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2008-01-01

    By investigating the nonlinear propagation of high intensity electromagnetic (EM) waves in a pair ion plasma, whose symmetry is broken via contamination by a small fraction of high mass immobile ions, it is shown that this new and interesting state of (laboratory created) matter is capable of supporting structures that strongly localize and bunch the EM radiation with density excess in the region of localization. Testing of this prediction in controlled laboratory experiments can lend credence, inter alia, to conjectures on structure formation (via the same mechanism) in the MEV era of the early universe.

  7. Broadband notch filter design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furtula, Vedran; Michelsen, Poul; Leipold, Frank;

    2010-01-01

    Notch filters are integrated in plasma diagnostic systems to protect millimeter-wave receivers from intensive stray radiation. Here we present a design of a notch filter with a center frequency of 140 GHz, a rejection bandwidth of ∼ 900 MHz, and a typical insertion loss below 2 dB in the passband...... of ±9 GHz. The design is based on a fundamental rectangular waveguide with eight cylindrical cavities coupled by T-junction apertures formed as thin slits. Parameters that affect the notch performance such as physical lengths and conductor materials are discussed. The excited resonance mode...

  8. Finite-difference theory for sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform flow using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference equations are derived for sound propagation in a two dimensional, straight, soft wall duct with a uniform flow by using the wave envelope concept. This concept reduces the required number of finite difference grid points by one to two orders of magnitude depending on the length of the duct and the frequency of the sound. The governing acoustic difference equations in complex notation are derived. An exit condition is developed that allows a duct of finite length to simulate the wave propagation in an infinitely long duct. Sample calculations presented for a plane wave incident upon the acoustic liner show the numerical theory to be in good agreement with closed form analytical theory. Complete pressure and velocity printouts are given to some sample problems and can be used to debug and check future computer programs.

  9. Sound generated by instability waves of supersonic flows. I Two-dimensional mixing layers. II - Axisymmetric jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Burton, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the phenomenon of sound generation by spatially growing instability waves in high-speed flows. It is pointed out that this process of noise generation is most effective when the flow is supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. The inner and outer asymptotic expansions corresponding to an excited instability wave in a two-dimensional mixing layer and its associated acoustic fields are constructed in terms of the inner and outer spatial variables. In matching the solutions, the intermediate matching principle of Van Dyke and Cole is followed. The validity of the theory is tested by applying it to an axisymmetric supersonic jet and comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements. Very favorable agreements are found both in the calculated instability-wave amplitude distribution (the inner solution) and the near pressure field level contours (the outer solution) in each case.

  10. Nonlinear instability and chaos in plasma wave-wave interactions. II. Numerical methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueny, C.S.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    In Part I of this work and Physics of Plasmas, June 1995, the behavior of linearly stable, integrable systems of waves in a simple plasma model was described using a Hamiltonian formulation. It was shown that explosive instability arises from nonlinear coupling between modes of positive and negative energy, with well-defined threshold amplitudes depending on the physical parameters. In this concluding paper, the nonintegrable case is treated numerically. Several sets of waves are considered, comprising systems of two and three degrees of freedom. The time evolution is modelled with an explicit symplectic integration algorithm derived using Lie algebraic methods. When initial wave amplitudes are large enough to support two-wave decay interactions, strongly chaotic motion destroys the separatrix bounding the stable region for explosive triplets. Phase space orbits then experience diffusive growth to amplitudes that are sufficient for explosive instability, thus effectively reducing the threshold amplitude. For initial amplitudes too small to drive decay instability, small perturbations might still grow to arbitrary size via Arnold diffusion. Numerical experiments do not show diffusion in this case, although the actual diffusion rate is probably underestimated due to the simplicity of the model.

  11. Mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Rui; Liang Zhong-Cheng; Han Bing; Zhang Hong-Chao; Xu Rong-Qing; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe the mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air. To verify the validity of the theoretical model, an optical beam deflection technique is employed to track the plasma shock wave evolution process. The theoretical model and the experimental signals are found to be in good agreement with each other. It is shown that the laser-induced plasma shock wave undergoes formation, increase and decay processes; the increase and the decay processes of the laser-induced plasma shock wave result from the overlapping of the compression wave and the rarefaction wave, respectively. In addition, the laser-induced plasma shock wave speed and pressure distributions, both a function of distance, are presented.

  12. Features of electromagnetic waves in a complex plasma due to surface plasmon resonances on macroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations significantly modifies plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The results are discussed in the context of dusty plasma experiments.

  13. Plane Wave-Perturbative Method for Evaluating the Effective Speed of Sound in 1D Phononic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Flores Méndez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for calculating the effective sound velocities for a 1D phononic crystal is presented; it is valid when the lattice constant is much smaller than the acoustic wave length; therefore, the periodic medium could be regarded as a homogeneous one. The method is based on the expansion of the displacements field into plane waves, satisfying the Bloch theorem. The expansion allows us to obtain a wave equation for the amplitude of the macroscopic displacements field. From the form of this equation we identify the effective parameters, namely, the effective sound velocities for the transverse and longitudinal macroscopic displacements in the homogenized 1D phononic crystal. As a result, the explicit expressions for the effective sound velocities in terms of the parameters of isotropic inclusions in the unit cell are obtained: mass density and elastic moduli. These expressions are used for studying the dependence of the effective, transverse and longitudinal, sound velocities for a binary 1D phononic crystal upon the inclusion filling fraction. A particular case is presented for 1D phononic crystals composed of W-Al and Polyethylene-Si, extending for a case solid-fluid.

  14. Visualizing a Dusty Plasma Shock Wave via Interacting Multiple-Model Mode Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Oxtoby, Neil P.; Ralph, Jason F.; Durniak, Céline; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Particles in a dusty plasma crystal disturbed by a shock wave are tracked using a three-mode interacting multiple model approach. Color-coded mode probabilities are used to visualize the shock wave propagation through the crystal.

  15. Theoretical study of nonlinear waves and shock-like phenomena in hot plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B. D.; Banos, A., Jr.; Kennel, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    Summaries are presented of research in basic plasma physics. Nonlinear waves and shock-like phenomena were studied which are pertinent to space physics applications, and include specific problems of magnetospheric and solar wind plasma physics.

  16. Shukla-Spatschek diffusion effects on surface plasma waves in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    The effects of Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion on a temporal mode of surface waves propagating at the interface of an astrophysical turbulent plasma are investigated. The damping rates for high and low modes of surface wave are kinetically derived by employing the Vlasov-Poisson equation and the specular reflection boundary condition. We found that the diffusion caused by the fluctuating electric fields leads to damping for both high and low modes of surface waves. The high-mode damping is enhanced with an increase of the wavenumber and the diffusion coefficient, but suppressed by an increase of electron thermal energy. By contrast, the low-mode damping is suppressed as the wavenumber and the thermal energy increase although it is enhanced as the diffusion increases. The variation of the damping rate due to the Shukla-Spatschek turbulent diffusion is also discussed.

  17. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  18. Poloidal rotation induced by injecting lower hybrid waves in tokamak plasma edge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The poloidal rotation of the magnetized edge plasma in tokamak driven by theponderomotive force which is generated by injecting lower hybrid wave(LHW) electric field hasbeen studied. The LHW is launched from a waveguide in the plasma edge, and by Brambilla’sgrill theory, analytic expressions for the wave electric field in the slab model of an inhomogeneouscold plasma have been derived. It is shown that a strong wave electric field will be generated inthe plasma edge by injecting LH wave of the power in MW magnitude, and this electric field willinduce a poloidal rotation with a sheared poloidal velocity.PACS: 52.55.Fa

  19. Response characteristics of a viscoelastic gel under the co-action of sound waves and an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Baoxiang; Zhao, Yan

    2006-02-01

    We design a flexible sound tunable sandwiched panel structure, which is composed of a nanoelectrorheological gel layer and two conductive rubber sheets, and experimentally investigate the tunable behaviors of the sound transmitted through the panel. For the frequency range of 380-500 Hz the transmitted sound pressure level (SPL) decreases with the electric field strength Ee, while at about 550-650 Hz the SPL increases with Ee. Within 500-550 Hz a hump appears and the hump apex shifts in the high frequency direction with increase of Ee. Besides this, the phase angle of the transmitted sound wave changes with Ee within these frequency ranges. The weight fraction of particles in the electrorheological gels also influences these observed tunable characteristics. The theoretical calculation based on a vibration-radiation model agrees with the experimental results, qualitatively. It is revealed that the electric field induced viscoelasticity change in the electrorheological gel and hence the vibration-radiation variation on the sandwiched panel is the origin of the phenomenon. The flexible composite electrorheological panel could be used in sound sensitive artificial skins or sound tunable actuators and has potential for use in robots and intelligent structures and systems.

  20. Quasi-periodic behavior of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-ion quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India); Poria, Swarup [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta Kolkata-700009 (India); Narayan Ghosh, Uday [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University Santiniketan (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute Kolkata-700108 (India)

    2012-05-15

    The ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated in an unmagnetized electron-ion quantum plasmas. The one dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. It is shown that ion temperature plays a critical role in the dynamics of quantum electron ion plasma, especially for arbitrary amplitude nonlinear waves. In the small amplitude region Korteweg-de Vries equation describes the solitonic nature of the waves. However, for arbitrary amplitude waves, in the fully nonlinear regime, the system exhibits possible existence of quasi-periodic behavior for small values of ion temperature.

  1. Propagation of Surface Wave Along a Thin Plasma Column and Its Radiation Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhijiang; ZHAO Guowei; XU Yuemin; LIANG Zhiwei; XU Jie

    2007-01-01

    Propagation of the surface waves along a two-dimensional plasma column and the far-field radiation patterns are studied in thin column approximation. Wave phase and attenuation coefficients are calculated for various plasma parameters. The radiation patterns are shown. Results show that the radiation patterns are controllable by flexibly changing the plasma length and other parameters in comparison to the metal monopole antenna. It is meaningful and instructional for the optimization of the plasma antenna design.

  2. ISIS Topside-Sounder Plasma-Wave Investigations as Guides to Desired Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) Data Search Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.

    2008-01-01

    Many plasma-wave phenomena, observed by space-borne radio sounders, cannot be properly explained in terms of wave propagation in a cold plasma consisting of mobile electrons and infinitely massive positive ions. These phenomena include signals known as plasma resonances. The principal resonances at the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, the plasma frequency, and the upper-hybrid frequency are well explained by the warm-plasma propagation of sounder-generated electrostatic waves, Other resonances have been attributed to sounder-stimulated plasma instability and non-linear effects, eigenmodes of cylindrical electromagnetic plasma oscillations, and plasma memory processes. Data from the topside sounders of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program played a major role in these interpretations. A data transformation and preservation effort at the Goddard Space Flight Center has produced digital ISIS topside ionograms and a metadata search program that has enabled some recent discoveries pertaining to the physics of these plasma resonances. For example, data records were obtained that enabled the long-standing question (several decades) of the origin of the plasma resonance at the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency to be explained [Muldrew, Radio Sci., 2006]. These data-search capabilities, and the science enabled by them, will be presented as a guide to desired data search capabilities to be included in the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO).

  3. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  4. Surface-wave capillary plasmas in helium: modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Noel, C.; Belmonte, T.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we use both simulations and experiments to study helium discharges (99.999% purity) sustained by surface-waves (2.45 GHz frequency), in capillary tubes (3 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. Simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, the He^+ and He2^+ ions, the He(nexcimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled to the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). Experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density (Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature (ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations), and the populations of different excited states. Model predictions at 1.7x10^13 cm-3 electron density (within the range estimated experimentally) are in good agreement with measurements (deviations < 10%) of (i) the excitation spectrum and the excitation temperatures (2795 ± 115 K, obtained from the Boltzmann-plot of the excited state populations, with energies lying between 22.7 and 24.2 eV), (ii) the power coupled to the plasma (˜ 180 ± 10 W), and (iii) the gas temperature (˜ 1700 ± 100 K). We discuss the extreme dependence of model results (particularly the gas temperature) on the power coupled to the plasma.

  5. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  6. Generation and detection of whistler wave induced space plasma turbulence at Gakona, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooker, L. A.; Lee, M. C.; Pradipta, R.; Watkins, B. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report on high-frequency wave injection experiments using the beat wave technique to study the generation of very-low-frequency (VLF) whistler waves in the ionosphere above Gakona, Alaska. This work is aimed at investigating whistler wave interactions with ionospheric plasmas and radiation belts. The beat wave technique involves injecting two X-mode waves at a difference frequency in the VLF range using the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility. A sequence of beat wave-generated whistler waves at 2, 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5, 11.5, 15.5, 22.5, 28.5 and 40.5 kHz were detected in our 2011 experiments. We present Modular Ultra-high-frequency Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) (446 MHz) measurements of ion lines as the primary diagnosis of ionospheric plasma effects caused by beat wave-generated whistler waves. A magnetometer and digisonde were used to monitor the background ionospheric plasma conditions throughout the experiments. Our theoretical and data analyses show that VLF whistler waves can effectively interact with ionospheric plasmas via two different four-wave interaction processes leading to energization of electrons and ions. These preliminary results support our Arecibo experiments to study NAU-launched 40.75 kHz whistler wave interactions with space plasmas.

  7. Numerical evaluation of external magnetic effect on electromagnetic wave transmission through reentry plasma layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Bo, Yong; Lei, Mingda; Liu, Shuzhang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jianwei; Zhao, Yizhe

    2016-11-01

    Numerical study of electromagnetic (EM) wave transmission through the magnetized plasma layer is presented in this paper. The plasma parameters are derived from computational fluid dynamics simulation of the flow field around a blunt body flying at supersonic speed and serve as the background plasma condition in the numerical modeling for EM wave transmission. The EM wave is generated by our newly designed coaxial feed GPS patch antenna. The external magnetic field is applied and assumed to vary linearly as a function of wall distance. The effects of the external applied magnetic field and the plasma parameters on wave transmission are studied, and the results show that EM wave propagation in the non-uniformly magnetized plasma is a matter of impedance matching, and the EM wave transmission can be adjusted only when the proper strength of the magnetic field is applied.

  8. Comment on "Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 122106 (2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    In a recent article [Niknam et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122106 (2013)], Niknam et al. investigated the propagation of TM surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma in the Faraday configuration (in this case, the magnetic field is parallel to the both of the plasma surface and direction of propagation). Here, we present a fresh look at the problem and show that TM surface waves cannot propagate on surface of the present system. We find in the Faraday configuration the surface waves acquire both TM and TE components due to the cyclotron motion of electrons. Therefore, the main result of the work by Niknam et al. is incorrect.

  9. Kinetic theory of the interaction of gravitational waves with a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtsov, D.V.; Melkumova, E.Iu.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of weak gravitational waves (GWs) with a plasma is described in terms of kinetic equations and is reduced to the mutual excitation and a energy exchange between the GW, plasmons, and charged particles of the plasma. The approach used is based on elementary quantum considerations, which makes it possible to obtain a closed system of balance equations for the distribution functions of plasma particles, plasmons, and gravitons. The calculation of probabilities included in the balance equations is based on the correspondence principle, which makes it necessary to consider only those processes which accompany gravitational-wave emission. Particular consideration is given to the gravitational susceptibility of the plasma, gravitational-wave generation during the merging of plasma waves, and the 'super-light-speed' Cerenkov emission of gravitational waves from a plasma filament.

  10. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nafis Ahmad; V K Tripathi; Moiz Ahmad; M Rafat

    2016-01-01

    The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be susceptible to the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). The plasma wave couples to two short wavelength plasma wave sidebands. The pump plasma wave and sidebands exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons driving a low-frequency quasimode. The electron density perturbation associated with this mode couples with the pump-driven electron oscillatory velocity to produce nonlinear currents driving the sidebands. At large pump amplitude, the instability grows faster than the ion plasma frequency and ions do not play a significant role. The growth rate of the quasimode, at large pump amplitude scales faster than linear. The growth rate is maximum for an optimum wave number of the quasimode and also increases with pump amplitude. Nonlocal effects, however reduce the growth rate by about half.

  11. Construction Of Critical Thinking Skills Test Instrument Related The Concept On Sound Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruroh, F.; Suhandi, A.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to construct test instrument of critical thinking skills of high school students related the concept on sound wave. This research using a mixed methods with sequential exploratory design, consists of: 1) a preliminary study; 2) design and review of test instruments. The form of test instruments in essay questions, consist of 18 questions that was divided into 5 indicators and 8 sub-indicators of the critical thinking skills expressed by Ennis, with questions that are qualitative and contextual. Phases of preliminary study include: a) policy studies; b) survey to the school; c) and literature studies. Phases of the design and review of test instruments consist of two steps, namely a draft design of test instruments include: a) analysis of the depth of teaching materials; b) the selection of indicators and sub-indicators of critical thinking skills; c) analysis of indicators and sub-indicators of critical thinking skills; d) implementation of indicators and sub-indicators of critical thinking skills; and e) making the descriptions about the test instrument. In the next phase of the review test instruments, consist of: a) writing about the test instrument; b) validity test by experts; and c) revision of test instruments based on the validator.

  12. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics Talk: On Nonlinear Physics of Shear Alfv'en Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liu

    2012-10-01

    Shear Alfv'en Waves (SAW) are electromagnetic oscillations prevalent in laboratory and nature magnetized plasmas. Due to its anisotropic propagation property, it is well known that the linear wave propagation and dispersiveness of SAW are fundamentally affected by plasma nonuniformities and magnetic field geometries; for example, the existence of continuous spectrum, spectral gaps, and discrete eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas. This talk will discuss the crucial roles that nonuniformity and geometry could also play in the physics of nonlinear SAW interactions. More specifically, the focus will be on the Alfv'enic state and its breaking up by finite compressibility, non-ideal kinetic effects, and geometry. In the case of compressibility, finite ion-Larmor-radius effects are shown to qualitatively and quantitatively modify the three-wave parametric decays via the ion-sound perturbations. In the case of geometry, the spontaneous excitation of zonal structures by toroidal Alfv'en eigenmodes is investigated; demonstrating that, for realistic tokamak geometries, zonal current dominates over zonal flow. [4pt] Present address: Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

  13. Energy conservation and gravity waves in sound-proof treatments of stellar interiors: Part II Lagrangian constrained analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vasil, Geoffrey M; Brown, Benjamin P; Wood, Toby S; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2013-01-01

    The speed of sound greatly exceeds typical flow velocities in many stellar and planetary interiors. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof models attempt to remove fast acoustic waves whilst retaining stratified convection and buoyancy dynamics. In astrophysics, anelastic models typically receive the most attention in the class of sound-filtered stratified models. Generally, anelastic models remain valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may break down in strongly sub-adiabatic, stably stratified layers common in stellar radiative zones. However, studying stellar rotation, circulation, and dynamos requires understanding the complex coupling between convection and radiative zones, and this requires robust equations valid in both regimes. Here we extend the analysis of equation sets begun in Brown Vasil & Zweibel 2012, which studied anelastic models, to two types of pseudo-incompressible models. This class of models has received atte...

  14. SPH Simulation of Acoustic Waves: Effects of Frequency, Sound Pressure, and Particle Spacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. O. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic problems consisting of multiphase systems or with deformable boundaries are difficult to describe using mesh-based methods, while the meshfree, Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH method can handle such complicated problems. In this paper, after solving linearized acoustic equations with the standard SPH theory, the feasibility of the SPH method in simulating sound propagation in the time domain is validated. The effects of sound frequency, maximum sound pressure amplitude, and particle spacing on numerical error and time cost are then subsequently discussed based on the sound propagation simulation. The discussion based on a limited range of frequency and sound pressure demonstrates that the rising of sound frequency increases simulation error, and the increase is nonlinear, whereas the rising sound pressure has limited effects on the error. In addition, decreasing the particle spacing reduces the numerical error, while simultaneously increasing the CPU time. The trend of both changes is close to linear on a logarithmic scale.

  15. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : Sun–Earth connection: Boundary layer waves and auroras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Lakhina; B T Tsurutani; J K Arballo; C Galvan

    2000-11-01

    Boundary layers are the sites where energy and momentum are exchanged between two distinct plasmas. Boundary layers occurring in space plasmas can support a wide spectrum of plasma waves spanning a frequency range of a few mHz to 100 kHz and beyond. The main characteristics of the broadband plasma waves (with frequencies > 1 Hz) observed in the magnetopause, polar cap, and plasma sheet boundary layers are described. The rapid pitch angle scattering of energetic particles via cyclotron resonant interactions with the waves can provide sufficient precipitated energy flux to the ionosphere to create the diffused auroral oval. The broadband plasma waves may also play an important role in the processes of local heating/acceleration of the boundary layer plasma.

  16. The ''phase velocity'' of nonlinear plasma waves in the laser beat-wave accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, W.L.

    1985-04-01

    A calculational scheme for beat-wave accelerators is introduced that includes all orders in velocity and in plasma density, and additionally accounts for the influence of plasma nonlinearities on the wave's phase velocity. The main assumption is that the laser frequencies are very large compared to the plasma frequency - under which it is possible to sum up all orders of forward Raman scattering. It is found that the nonlinear plasma wave does not have simply a single phase velocity, but that the beat-wave which drives it is usefully described by a non-local ''effective phase velocity'' function. A time-space domain approach is followed. (LEW)

  17. Prediction of Sound Waves Propagating Through a Nozzle Without/With a Shock Wave Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The benchmark problems in Category 1 (Internal Propagation) of the third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Work-shop sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The first problem addresses the propagation of sound waves through a nearly choked transonic nozzle. The second one concerns shock-sound interaction in a supersonic nozzle. A quasi one-dimension CE/SE Euler solver for a nonuniform mesh is developed and employed to solve both problems. Numerical solutions are compared with the analytical solution for both problems. It is demonstrated that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple way. Furthermore, the simple nonreflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well.

  18. Plasma depletion layer: the role of the slow mode waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding values in the upstream magnetosheath. The depletion layer usually occurs during northward (IMF conditions with low magnetic shear across the magnetopause. We have previously validated the Raeder global model by comparing the computed formation of a magnetosheath density depletion with in-situ observations. We also have performed a detailed force analysis and found the varying roles that different MHD forces play along the path of a plasma parcel flowing around the magnetopause. That study resulted in a new description of the behavior of magnetosheath magnetic flux tubes which better explains the plasma depletion along a flux tube. The slow mode waves have been observed in the magnetosheath and have been used to explain the formation of the PDL in some of the important PDL models. In this study, we extend our former work by investigating the possible role of the slow mode waves for the formation of the PDL, using global MHD model simulations. We propose a new technique to test where a possible slow mode front may occur in the magnetosheath by comparing the slow mode group velocity with the local flow velocity. We find that the slow mode fronts can exist in certain regions in the magnetosheath under certain solar wind conditions. The existence and location of such fronts clearly depend on the IMF. We do not see from our global simulation results either the sharpening of the slow mode front into a slow mode shock or noticeable changes of the flow and field in the magnetosheath across the slow mode front, which implies that the slow mode front is not likely responsible for the formation of the PDL, at least for the stable solar wind conditions used in these simulations. Also, we do not see the two-layered slow mode structures shown in some observations and proposed in certain PDL

  19. Effects of external magnetic field on oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal wave in nonextensive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad Kiyaei, Forough; Dorranian, Davoud

    2017-01-01

    Effects of the obliqueness and the strength of external magnetic field on the ion acoustic (IA) cnoidal wave in a nonextensive plasma are investigated. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the corresponding KdV equation for the IA wave. Sagdeev potential is extracted, and the condition of generation of IA waves in the form of cnoidal waves or solitons is discussed in detail. In this work, the domain of allowable values of nonextensivity parameter q for generation of the IA cnoidal wave in the plasma medium is considered. The results show that only the compressive IA wave may generate and propagate in the plasma medium. Increasing the strength of external magnetic field will increase the frequency of the wave and decrease its amplitude, while increasing the angle of propagation will decrease the frequency of the wave and increase its amplitude.

  20. Full-wave Analyses of Scattering of Electromagnetic Wave from the Weakly Ionized Plasma in Plane Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Falun; Cao Jinxiang; Wang Ge

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to present a full-wave analysis of scattering from the weakly ionized plasma in the plane geometry. We have yielded an approximate solution in an analytic form to the electromagnetic wave scattering from the weakly ionizsd plasma. In the normal and oblique incidence, the analytic solution works well, as compared with the exact solution and the solution based on the Wenzell-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) approximation to the uniform density profile.

  1. The effect of low-intensity pulsed sound waves delivered by the Exogen device on Staphylococcus aureus morphology and genetics

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed sound waves delivered by the Exogen device, which is recommended for the treatment of delayed union and nonunion in orthopedic surgery, on the colony number, antimicrobial susceptibility, bacterial morphology, and genetics of Staphylococcus aureus, which is a frequent pathogen in orthopedic infections. Methods: Thirty tubes containing 0.5 McFarland suspensions of S. aureus (ATCC 25923) were used. Fifteen tubes forming the test ...

  2. Effect of a progressive sound wave on the profiles of spectral lines. 2: Asymmetry of faint Fraunhofer lines. [absorption spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyk, R. I.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficient profile was calculated for lines of different chemical elements in a medium with progressive sound waves. Calculations show that (1) the degree and direction of asymmetry depend on the atomic ionization potential and the potential of lower level excitation of the individual line; (2) the degree of asymmetry of a line decreases from the center toward the limb of the solar disc; and (3) turbulent motions 'suppress' the asymmetry.

  3. Wave spectra of 2D dusty plasma solids and liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Lu-Jing; Piel, Alexander; Murillo, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations were carried out to study wave spectra of two-dimensional dusty plasma liquids and solids for a wide range of wavelengths. The existence of a longitudinal dust thermal mode was confirmed in simulations, and a cutoff wavenumber in the transverse mode was measured. Dispersion relations, resulting from simulations, were compared with those from analytical theories, such as the random-phase approximation (RPA), quasi-localized charged approximation (QLCA), and harmonic approximation (HA). An overall good agreement between the QLCA and simulations was found for wide ranges of states and wavelengths after taking into account the direct thermal effect in the QLCA, while for the RPA and HA good agreement with simulations were found in the high and low temperature limits, respectively.

  4. Plasma and cyclotron frequency effects on output power of the plasma wave-pumped free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolghadr, S. H.; Jafari, S.; Raghavi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress has been made employing plasmas in the free-electron lasers (FELs) interaction region. In this regard, we study the output power and saturation length of the plasma whistler wave-pumped FEL in a magnetized plasma channel. The small wavelength of the whistler wave (in sub-μm range) in plasma allows obtaining higher radiation frequency than conventional wiggler FELs. This configuration has a higher tunability by adjusting the plasma density relative to the conventional ones. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is employed which governs on the self-consistent evolution of an electromagnetic wave. The electron bunching process of the whistler-pumped FEL has been investigated numerically. The result reveals that for a long wiggler length, the bunching factor can appreciably change as the electron beam propagates through the wiggler. The effects of plasma frequency (or plasma density) and cyclotron frequency on the output power and saturation length have been studied. Simulation results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency, the power increases and the saturation length decreases. In addition, when density of background plasma is higher than the electron beam density (i.e., for a dense plasma channel), the plasma effects are more pronounced and the FEL-power is significantly high. It is also found that with increasing the strength of the external magnetic field frequency, the power decreases and the saturation length increases, noticeably.

  5. Assessing student understanding of sound waves and trigonometric reasoning in a technology-rich, project-enhanced environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jennifer Anne

    This case study examined what student content understanding could occur in an inner city Industrial Electronics classroom located at Tree High School where project-based instruction, enhanced with technology, was implemented for the first time. Students participated in a project implementation unit involving sound waves and trigonometric reasoning. The unit was designed to foster common content learning (via benchmark lessons) by all students in the class, and to help students gain a deeper conceptual understanding of a sub-set of the larger content unit (via group project research). The objective goal of the implementation design unit was to have students gain conceptual understanding of sound waves, such as what actually waves in a wave, how waves interfere with one another, and what affects the speed of a wave. This design unit also intended for students to develop trigonometric reasoning associated with sinusoidal curves and superposition of sinusoidal waves. Project criteria within this design included implementation features, such as the need for the student to have a driving research question and focus, the need for benchmark lessons to help foster and scaffold content knowledge and understanding, and the need for project milestones to complete throughout the implementation unit to allow students the time for feedback and revision. The Industrial Electronics class at Tree High School consisted of nine students who met daily during double class periods giving 100 minutes of class time per day. The class teacher had been teaching for 18 years (mathematics, physics, and computer science). He had a background in engineering and experience teaching at the college level. Benchmark activities during implementation were used to scaffold fundamental ideas and terminology needed to investigate characteristics of sound and waves. Students participating in benchmark activities analyzed motion and musical waveforms using probeware, and explored wave phenomena using waves

  6. A Review of Nonlinear Low Frequency (LF) Wave Observations in Space Plasmas: On the Development of Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    As the lead-off presentation for the topic of nonlinear waves and their evolution, we will illustrate some prominent examples of waves in space plasmas. We will describe recent observations detected within planetary foreshocks, near comets and in interplanetary space. It is believed that the nonlinear LF plasma wave features discussed here are part of and may be basic to the development of plasma turbulence. In this sense, this is one area of space plasma physics that is fundamental, with applications to fusion physics and astrophysics as well. It is hoped that the reader(s) will be stimulated to study nonlinear wave development themselves, if he/she is not already involved.

  7. Interference pattern of the sound field in the presence of an internal Kelvin wave in a stratified lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lunkov, Andrey; Ostrovsky, Ilia

    2016-02-01

    Internal Kelvin waves (IKWs) initiated by rotation of the Earth are one of the main hydrodynamic phenomena in large stratified lakes where baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation is smaller than the horizontal scale of the lake. IKWs can be identified using the spectra of internal waves, where in the presence of IKWs, the inertial frequency is at maximum. IKWs play a rather important role in the lake's dynamics for different processes, both in the water layer and sediment, especially at the periphery of lake. Due to influence of internal waves on the sound propagation, acoustical methods can be used for estimation of behaviour of IKWs. In this paper, the spatiotemporal variability of the mid-frequency (∼1 kHz) sound field in the presence of IKWs in a deep stratified Lake Kinneret is studied using numerical simulations based on normal-mode theory. Due to the specific character of perturbation of the water layer, IKWs can cause specific variations of interference pattern, in particular, a significant shift of the sound interference pattern both in spatial and frequency domain. These shifts can be easily measured and used for reconstruction of IKW parameters.

  8. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, H. [Department of Space Science, Institute of Space Technology, 1-Islamabad Highway, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, S. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  9. Generation of fast electrons by breaking of a laser-induced plasma wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trines, Rmgm; Goloviznin, V. V.; Kamp, L. P. J.; Schep, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for fast electron generation by an intense, nonevolving laser pulse propagating through an underdense plasma has been developed. Plasma wave breaking is considered to be the dominant mechanism behind this process, and wave breaking both in front of and behind the laser pulse

  10. geometric optics and WKB method for electromagnetic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous plasma near cutoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Max Eugene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-04-13

    This report outlines the theory underlying electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in an unmagnetized, inhomogeneous plasma. The inhomogeneity is given by a spatially nonuniform plasma electron density ne(r), which will modify the wave propagation in the direction of the gradient rne(r).

  11. WIND observations of plasma waves inside the magnetic cloud boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fengsi; ZHONG Dingkun; FENG Xueshang; YANG Fang; LIU Rui

    2005-01-01

    Based on the WIND observational data for the plasma waves from thermal noise receptor (TNR) working on the frequency 4―256 kHz and the solar wind and the magnetic fields, we analyze the plasma wave activities in the 60 magnetic cloud's boundary layers (BLs) and find that there are often various plasma wave activities in the BLs, which are different from those in the adjacent solar wind (SW) and the magnetic clouds (MC). The basic characteristics are that: (1) the enhancement of the Langmuir wave near the electronic plasma frequency (fpe) is a dominant wave activity, which occupies 75% investigated samples; (2) the events enhanced both in the langmuir and ion acustic (f < fpe) waves are about 60% of investigated samples; (3) broadband, continuous enhancement events in the plasma wave activities were observed in the whole frequency band of TNR, and about 30% of the 60 samples, however, were not observed in the SW and the MC investigated events; (4) although the ratio of the temperatures between the electon and proton, Te/Tp≤1, the ion caustic wave enhancement activities are still often observed in the BLs, which makes it difficult to ex-plain them by the traditional plasma theory. New results reported in this paper further show that the magnetic cloud's BL is an important dynamic structure, which could provide useful diagnosis for understanding the cloud's BL physics and could expand a space developing space plasma wave theory.

  12. CO2 Laser Beat-Wave Experiment in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Hong, Sean; Evans, Russell

    2012-10-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas is a basic yet important investigation in experimental plasma physics and fusion energy research. It is even more advantageous if the wave penetration is independent of the electron acceleration process. Plasma current can be generated through beat-wave mixing process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves (φ>>φpe) into plasma. The beat wave formation process can be efficient if the difference frequency of the two pump waves is matched to a local resonant frequency of the medium, i.e. in this case the local plasma frequency. Beat wave can accelerate plasma electrons via quasi-linear Landau process, which has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves.footnotetextRogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992). The CO2 lasers provide the high tunability for the wave-particle interaction experiment at a variety of plasma densities with plasma frequency in THz range. Two sections of Lumonics TEA CO2 lasers have been modified to serve as the two pump wave sources with peak power over 100MW. The development of the tunable CO2 lasers, a high-density plasma target source and diagnostics system will be presented. The initial results of unbalanced beat-wave experiment using one high-power pulsed and one low-power CW CO2 lasers will be presented and discussed using the independent plasma source to control the φpe of the interaction region. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-10ER55083.

  13. Effective-action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we give two examples: a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasmas are cold. These waves account for cyclotron absorption features observed in spectra of x-ray pulsars. Moreover, cutoff frequencies of the two nondegenerate electromagnetic waves are red-shifted by different amounts. These corrections need to be taken into account in order to correctly interpret diagnostic results in laser plasma experiments.

  14. Low-Frequency Electrostatic Ion Surface Waves in Magnetized Electron-Positron Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Hee J.

    The dispersion relations of a surface ion wave propagating on the interface between a warm electron-positron plasma and vacuum when a static magnetic field is directed either normal to the interface (x-wave) or parallel to the wave vector (z-wave) are solved analytically, and the influence of the magnetic field on the ion surface wave is investigated in detail using some numerical work. It is shown that ion surface waves do not exist if the magnetic field is large enough to make the ion gyrofrequency greater than the ion plasma frequency. The attenuation constant of x-waves is more attenuated than that of z-waves and the x-wave is more attenuated as the parameter normalized ion gyrofrequency ζ increases toward 1, but this tendency is reversed for the z-wave. The z-wave does not exist for k2λD2< (ζ/(1-ζ))(p + 1) while the x-wave exists over the whole range of k, where the fractional number p is the ratio between the unperturbed positron and the electron number density. Additionally, we compare the ion surface wave properties of electron-positron plasma with conventional electron-ion plasma.

  15. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeão; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-09-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels.1-4 Experimental studies usually involve expensive and sophisticated equipment that is out of reach of school laboratory facilities.3-6 In this paper we show how to investigate quantitatively the sounds produced by a flexible sound tube corrugated on the inside by using educational equipment readily available in school laboratories, such as the oscilloscope, the microphone, the anemometer, and the air pump. We show that it is possible for students to study the discontinuous spectrum of sounds produced by a flexible corrugated tube and go even further, computing the speed of sound in air with a simple experimental procedure.

  16. Ultrahigh-gradient acceleration of injected eletrons by laser-excited relativistic electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Leemans, W. P.; Williams, R.; Joshi, C.

    1993-01-01

    High-gradient acceleration of externally injected 2.1-MeV electrons by a laser beat wave driven relativistic plasma wave has been demonstrated for the first time. Electrons with energies up to the detection limit of 9.1 MeV were detected when such a plasma wave was resonantly excited using a two-frequency laser. This implies a gradient of 0.7 GeV/m, corresponding to a plasma-wave amplitude of more than 8%. The electron signal was below detection threshold without injection or when the laser was operated on a single frequency.

  17. Characteristics of Plasma Shock Waves Generated in the Pulsed Laser Ablation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李智华; 张端明; 郁伯铭; 关丽

    2002-01-01

    We modify the Sedov theory to describe plasma shock waves generated in a pulsed laser ablating process. We also study the propagation characteristics of plasma shock waves during the preparation process of functional thin films deposited by a pulsed laser. In particular, we discuss in detail the temporal behaviour of energy causing the difference of the propagation characteristics between the plasma shock wave and the ideal shock wave in the point explosion model. Under the same experimental conditions, the theoretical results calculated with our modified Sedov theory are in good agreement with the existing experimental data.

  18. Impact of the Collisional Plasma on the Propagation of Millimeter Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁忠才; 时家明; 汪家春; 许波

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated in the low-altitude atmosphere is of high collision frequencies.In this paper, the transmission coefficients of millimeter(MM) waves normally incident upon the plasma with high collision frequencies are calculated and analyzed. The experimental results of reflection and attenuation are presented for the eight-millimeter waves propagating through the plasma. Both the calculated experimental results indicate that the MM-waves concerned are attenuated significantly and reflected weakly, when propagating through the plasma of high collision frequencies.

  19. The Nonlinear Langmuir Waves in a Multi-ion-Component Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yin-Hua; LU Wei; WANG Wen-Hao

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the nonlinear Langmuir waves in a multi-ion-component low-temperature plasma. Beginning with the fluid theory of plasma, and taking fully nonlinear response of the low-frequency ion motion into account, we derived a set of equations governing the nonlinear coupling of the amplitude of the Langmuir wave and the Iow-frequency perturbation density. Using the Sagdeev potential method, we analyzed the characteristics of solitary wave. In the limit of small amplitude, the envelope soliton was found. Our investigation demonstrates that the properties of soliton in a multi-ion-component plasma are different from those of soliton in an electron-ion plasma.

  20. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  1. The effect of lower hybrid waves on JET plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, M. F. F.; Kirov, K.; Bernardo, J.; Brix, M.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hellsten, T.; Jonsson, T.; Mailloux, J.; Ongena, J.; Parra, F.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on observations of rotation in JET plasmas with lower hybrid current drive. Lower hybrid (LH) has a clear impact on rotation. The changes in core rotation can be either in the co- or counter-current directions. Experimental features that could determine the direction of rotation were investigated. Changes from co- to counter-rotation as the q-profile evolves from above unity to below unity suggests that magnetic shear could be important. However, LH can drive either co- or counter-rotation in discharges with similar magnetic shear and at the same plasma current. It is not clear if a slightly lower density is significant. A power scan at fixed density, shows a lower hybrid power threshold around 3 MW. For smaller LH powers, counter rotation increases with power, while for larger powers a trend towards co-rotation is found. The estimated counter-torque from the LH waves, would not explain the observed angular frequencies, neither would it explain the observation of co-rotation.

  2. Resonant Alfven waves in partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, R; Goossens, M

    2011-01-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. In magnetic waveguides resonant absorption due to plasma inhomogeneity naturally transfers wave energy from large-scale motions to small-scale motions. In the cooler parts of the solar atmosphere as, e.g., the chromosphere, effects due to partial ionization may be relevant for wave dynamics and heating. Aims. We study resonant Alfven waves in partially ionized plasmas. Methods. We use the multifluid equations in the cold plasma approximation. We investigate propagating resonant MHD waves in partially ionized flux tubes. We use approximate analytical theory based on normal modes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations along with numerical eigenvalue computations. Results. We find that the jumps of the wave perturbations across the resonant layer are the same as in fully ionized plasmas. The damping length due to resonant absorption is inversely proportional to the frequency, while that due to ion-neutral collisions is in...

  3. The sound generated by a fast parton in the quark-gluon plasma is a crescendo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, R. B.; Müller, B.

    2009-11-01

    The total energy deposited into the medium per unit length by a fast parton traversing a quarkgluon plasma is calculated. We take the medium excitation due to collisions to be given by the well known expression for the collisional drag force. The parton's radiative energy loss contributes to the energy deposition because each radiated gluon acts as an additional source of collisional energy loss in the medium. In our model, this leads to a length dependence on the differential energy loss due to the interactions of radiated gluons with the medium. The final result, which is a sum of the primary and the secondary contributions, is then treated as the coefficient of a local hydrodynamic source term. Results are presented for energy density wave induced by two fast, back-to-back partons created in an initial hard interaction.

  4. The sound generated by a fast parton in the quark-gluon plasma is a crescendo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, R.B.; Mueller, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The total energy deposited into the medium per unit length by a fast parton traversing a quarkgluon plasma is calculated. We take the medium excitation due to collisions to be given by the well known expression for the collisional drag force. The parton's radiative energy loss contributes to the energy deposition because each radiated gluon acts as an additional source of collisional energy loss in the medium. In our model, this leads to a length dependence on the differential energy loss due to the interactions of radiated gluons with the medium. The final result, which is a sum of the primary and the secondary contributions, is then treated as the coefficient of a local hydrodynamic source term. Results are presented for energy density wave induced by two fast, back-to-back partons created in an initial hard interaction.

  5. The sound generated by a fast parton in the quark-gluon plasma is a crescendo

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, R B

    2009-01-01

    The total energy deposited into the medium per unit length by a fast parton traversing a quark-gluon plasma is calculated. We take the medium excitation due to collisions to be given by the well known expression for the collisional drag force. The parton's radiative energy loss contributes to the energy deposition because each radiated gluon acts as an additional source of collisional energy loss in the medium. In our model, this leads to a length dependence on the differential energy loss due to the interactions of radiated gluons with the medium. The final result, which is a sum of the primary and the secondary contributions, is then treated as the coefficient of a local hydrodynamic source term. Results are presented for energy density wave induced by two fast, back-to-back partons created in an initial hard interaction.

  6. Power Absorption of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves in a Partially Ionized Plasma Layer in Atmosphere Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭斌; 王晓钢

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the absorption, reflection, and transmission of electromagnetic waves in an unmagnetized uniform plasma layer covering a metal surface in atmosphere conditions.Instead of the absorption of the electromagnetic wave propagating only once in previous work on the plasma layer, a general formula of total power absorption by the plasma layer with an infinite time of reflections between the atmosphere-plasma interface and the metal surface has been derived for the first time. Effects of plasma parameters, especially the dependence of the fraction of positive ions, negative ions and electrons in plasmas on the power absorption processes are discussed. The results show that the existence of negative ions significantly reduces the power absorption of the electromagnetic wave. Absorptions of electromagnetic waves are calculated.

  7. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a warm plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛具奎; 段文山; 郎和

    2002-01-01

    Using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrodinger equation is derived to study themodulational instability of finite-amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a non-magnetized warm plasma. It is found thatthe inclusion of ion temperature in the equation modifies the nature of the ion-acoustic wave stability and the solitonstructures. The effects of ion plasma temperature on the modulational stability and ion-acoustic wave properties areinvestigated in detail.

  8. Nonlinear coupling of kinetic Alfven waves with acoustic waves in a self-gravitating dusty plasma with adiabatic trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeen, A.; Masood, W.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Shah, H. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, linear and nonlinear coupling of kinetic Alfven and acoustic waves has been studied in a dusty plasma in the presence of trapping and self-gravitation effects. In this regard, we have derived the linear dispersion relations for positively and negatively coupled dust kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves. Stability analysis of the coupled dust kinetic Alfven-acoustic wave has also been presented. The formation of solitary structures has been investigated following the Sagdeev potential approach by using the two-potential theory. Numerical results show that the solitary structures can be obtained only for sub-Alfvenic regimes in the scenario of space plasmas.

  9. Nonlinear acoustic waves in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Zhi-Rong; Yang Zeng-Qiang; Yin Bao-Xiang; Sun Mao-Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Using the reductive perturbation method,we investigate the small amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma.The result shows that the small amplitude dust acoustic wave can be expressed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation,and the nonlinear wave is instable because of the collisions between the neutral gas molecules and the charged particles.

  10. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission Indicator of Glow Plasma Discharges from Ionospheric HF Wave Transmissions with HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Scales, W.; Briczinski, S. J.; Fu, H.; Mahmoudian, A.; Samimi, A.

    2012-12-01

    High power radio waves resonantly interact with to accelerate electrons for production of artificial aurora and plasma clouds. These plasma clouds are formed when the HF frequency is tuned near a harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. At a narrow band resonance, large electrostatic fields are produced below the F-layer and the neutral atmosphere breaks down with a glow plasma discharge. The conditions for this resonance are given by matching the pump wave frequency and wave-number with the sum of daughter frequencies and wave-numbers for several plasma modes. The most likely plasma mode that accelerates the electrons is the electron Bernstein wave in conjunction with an ion acoustic wave. Both upper hybrid and whistler mode waves are also possible sources of electron acceleration. To determine the plasma process for electron acceleration, stimulated electromagnetic emissions are measured using ground receivers in a north-south chain from the HAARP site. Recent observations have shown that broad band spectral lines downshifted from the HF pump frequency are observed when artificial plasma clouds are formed. For HF transmissions are the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th gyro harmonic, the downshifted indicators are found 500 Hz, 20 kHz, and 140 kHz, respectively, from the pump frequency. This Indicator Mode (IM) anticipates that a plasma layer will be formed before it is recorded with an ionosonde or optical imager.

  11. Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Timothy F; Collis, Jon M; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Newhall, Arthur E; Lynch, James F; DeFerrari, Harry A

    2012-02-01

    Sound at 85 to 450 Hz propagating in approximately 80-m depth water from fixed sources to a joint horizontal/vertical line array (HLA/VLA) is analyzed. The data are from a continental shelf area east of Delaware Bay (USA) populated with tidally generated long- and short-wavelength internal waves. Sound paths are 19 km in the along-shore (along internal-wave crest) direction and 30 km in the cross-shore direction. Spatial statistics of HLA arrivals are computed as functions of beam steering angle and time. These include array gain, horizontally lagged spatial correlation function, and coherent beam power. These quantities vary widely in magnitude, and vary over a broad range of time scales. For example, correlation scale can change rapidly from forty to five wavelengths, and correlation-scale behavior is anisotropic. In addition, the vertical array can be used to predict correlation expected for adiabatic propagation with cylindrical symmetry, forming a benchmark. Observed variations are in concert with internal-wave activity. Temporal variations of three coherence measures, horizontal correlation length, array gain, and ratio of actual correlation length to predicted adiabatic-mode correlation length, are very strong, varying by almost a factor of ten as internal waves pass.

  12. Investigation of sound field for a standing wave tube system with flow and with lateral Helmholtz resonator Ⅰ. Theoretical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ke; LI Song; GUO Qing; HUANG Dongtao

    2005-01-01

    A lateral Helmholtz resonator added to a standing wave tube without flow has been validated as a method of noise reduction for combustion noise radiated from combustion channel of rockets or turbines. But in fact there is a flow with low velocity in the combustion channel. Therefore the theoretical analysis carried out is aimed at sound field of standing wave tube with flow and with lateral Helmholtz resonator. Certainly a relevant math-physical model should first be formulated. Here three key problems need to be solved: (1) To formulate the discontinuity condition at the joint between the standing wave tube and Helmholtz resonator in the case of flow. (2) To determine the acoustic impedance of Helnholtz resonator, considering the effects of flow, viscous and multihole. (3) To formulate the reflection condition at the end of the standing wave tube. Some formulas for analysis of the sound field in the tube with flow and with lateral Helmholtz resonator are deduced. These theoretical works have been validated by experiments.

  13. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M.

    2015-11-01

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  14. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Tantawy, S. A., E-mail: samireltantawy@yahoo.com; El-Awady, E. I., E-mail: eielawady@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Tribeche, M., E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  15. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  16. A Simple Experiment to Explore Standing Waves in a Flexible Corrugated Sound Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Maria Eva; Sousa, Teresa Delmira; Carvalho, P. Simeao; Sousa, Adriano Sampaioe

    2011-01-01

    Sound tubes, pipes, and singing rods are used as musical instruments and as toys to perform amusing experiments. In particular, corrugated tubes present unique characteristics with respect to the sounds they can produce; that is why they have been studied so intensively, both at theoretical and experimental levels. Experimental studies usually…

  17. Plasma heating via electron Bernstein wave heating using ordinary and extraodinary mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically confined plasma can be heated with high power microwave sources. In spherical torus the electron plasma frequency exeeds the electron cyclotron frequency (EC and, as a consequence, electromagnetic waves at fundamental and low harmonic EC cannot propagate within the plasma. In contrast, electron Bernstein waves (EBWs readily propagate in spherical torus plasma and are absorbed strongly at the electron cyclotron resonances. In order to proagate EBWs beyond the upper hybrid resonance (UHR, that surrounds the plasma, the EBWs must convert via one of two processes to either ordinary (O-mode or extraordinary (X-mode electromagnetic waves. O-mode and X-mode electromagnetic waves lunched at the plasma edge can convert to the electron Bernstein waves (EBWs which can propagate without and cut-off into the core of the plasma and damp on electrons. Since the electron Bernstein wave (EBW has no cut-off limits, it is well suited to heat an over-dense plasma by resonant absorption. An important problem is to calculate mode conversion coefficient that is very sensitive to density. Mode conversion coefficient depends on Budden parameter ( ñ and density scale length (Ln in upper hybrid resonance (UHR. In Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, the optimized conversion efficiency approached 72.5% when Ln was 4.94 cm and the magnetic field was 0.475 Tesla in the core of the plasma.

  18. New numerical tools to study waves and instabilities of flowing plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beliën, A.J.C.; Botchev, M.A.; Goedbloed, J.P.; Holst, van der B.; Keppens, R.

    2002-01-01

    Studying plasma waves and instabilities is an indispensable part of present thermonuclear fusion and astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Up till recently, spectral analysis was mostly restricted to static plasmas. However, the assumption of a static plasma is unrealistic not only for astrophys

  19. Electrostatic Waves in Dense Dusty Plasmas with High Fugacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. N.

    Propagation of electrostatic dust modes has been reviewed in the light of the concept of dust fugacity defined by f≡4πnd0λD2R, where nd0 and R are the dust number density and the grain size (radius) while the plasma Debye length (λD) is given through λD-2=λDe-2+λDi-2. Dusty plasmas are defined to be tenuous, dilute or dense when f≪1, ˜1, or ≫1, respectively. Attention is focused on “Dust-Acoustic Waves” (DAWs) and “Dust-Coulomb Waves” (DCWs) which exist in the tenuous (f≪1) and the dense (f≫1) regimes, respectively. A simple physical picture of the DCWs has been proposed in terms of an effective pressure called “Coulomb Pressure defined by PC≡nd0qd02/R, where qd0 is the grain charge. In the lowest order, the DCW phase speed is given by ω/k=PC/ρdδ, where ρd≡nd0md is the dust mass density and δ≡ω2/ω1 is the ratio of charging frequencies. Thus, DCWs which are driven by the Coulomb pressure can be considered as the electrostatic analogue of hydromagnetic (Alfvén or magnetoacoustic) modes which are driven by magnetic field pressure. In the dilute regime, the two waves loose their identities and merge into a single mode, which may be called “Dust Charge-Density Wave” (DCDW). When the grains are closest, DCW dispersion relation is identical with that of “Dust-Lattice Waves” (DLWs). Dense dusty plasmas are governed by a new scale-length defined by λR≡1/4πnd0Rδ, which characterizes the effective shielding length due to grain collective interactions. The scale-length λR plays a fundamental role in dense dusty plasmas, which is very similar to that of the Debye length λD in the tenuous regime. The two scale-lengths are related to the fugacity through fδ≡λD2/λR2. The frequency spectrum as well as the damping rates for various dust modes have been analytically obtained, and compared with the numerical solutions of the kinetic (Vlasov) dispersion relation.

  20. Understanding the Hellings and Downs curve for pulsar timing arrays in terms of sound and electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jenet, Fredrick A

    2014-01-01

    Searches for gravitational-wave backgrounds using pulsar timing arrays look for correlations in the timing residuals induced by the background across the pulsars in the array. The correlation signature of an isotropic, unpolarized gravitational-wave background predicted by general relativity follows the so-called Hellings and Downs curve, which is a relatively simple function of the angle between a pair of pulsars. To aid students and beginning researchers interested in pulsar timing, we give a pedagogical discussion of the Helling and Downs curve for pulsar timing arrays, considering simpler analogous scenarios involving sound and electromagnetic waves. We calculate Hellings-and-Downs type functions for these two scenarios and develop a framework suitable for doing more general correlation calculations.