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Sample records for plasma sheet responsible

  1. Plasma dynamics in current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, S.Yu.; Drejden, G.V.; Kirij, N.P.; AN SSSR, Leningrad

    1992-01-01

    Plasma dynamics in successive stages of current sheet evolution is investigated on the base of analysis of time-spatial variations of electron density and electrodynamic force fields. Current sheet formation is realized in a two-dimensional magnetic field with zero line under the action of relatively small initial disturbances (linear regimes). It is established that in the limits of the formed sheet is concentrated dense (N e ∼= 10 16 cm -3 ) (T i ≥ 100 eV, bar-Z i ≥ 2) hot pressure of which is balanced by the magnetic action of electrodynamic forces is carried out both plasma compression in the sheet limits and the acceleration along the sheet surface from a middle to narrow side edges

  2. Plasma sheet behavior during substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Auroral or magnetic substorms are periods of enhanced auroral and geomagnetic activity lasting one to a few hours that signify increased dissipation of energy from the magnetosphere to the earth. Data acquired during the past decade from satellites in the near-earth sector of the magnetotail have suggested that during a substorm part of the plasma sheet is severed from earth by magnetic reconnection, forming a plasmoid, i.e., a body of plasma and closed magnetic loops, that flows out of the tail into the solar wind, thus returning plasma and energy that have earlier been accumulated from the solar wind. Very recently this picture has been dramatically confirmed by observations, with the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the magnetotail 220 R/sub E/ from earth, of plasmoids passing that location in clear delayed response to substorms. It now appears that plasmoid release is a fundamental process whereby the magnetosphere gives up excess stored energy and plasma, much like comets are seen to do, and that the phenomena of the substorm seen at earth are a by-product of that fundamental process

  3. On Jovian plasma sheet structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurana, K.K.; Kivelson, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors evaluate several models of Jovian plasma sheet structure by determining how well they organize several aspects of the observed Voyager 2 magnetic field characteristics as a function of Jovicentric radial distance. It is shown that in the local time sector of the Voyager 2 outbound pass (near 0300 LT) the published hinged-magnetodisc models with wave (i.e., models corrected for finite wave velocity effects) are more successful than the published magnetic anomaly model in predicting locations of current sheet crossings. They also consider the boundary between the plasma sheet and the magnetotail lobe which is expected to vary slowly with radial distance. They use this boundary location as a further test of the models of the magnetotail. They show that the compressional MHD waves have much smaller amplitude in the lobes than in the plasma sheet and use this criterion to refine the identification of the plasma-sheet-lobe boundary. When the locations of crossings into and out of the lobes are examined, it becomes evident that the magnetic-anomaly model yields a flaring plasma sheet with a halfwidth of ∼ 3 R J at a radial distance of 20 R J and ∼ 12 R J at a radial distance of 100 R J . The hinged-magnetodisc models with wave, on the other hand, predict a halfwidth of ∼ 3.5 R J independent of distance beyond 20 R J . New optimized versions of the two models locate both the current sheet crossings and lobe encounters equally successfully. The optimized hinged-magnetodisc model suggests that the wave velocity decreases with increasing radial distance. The optimized magnetic anomaly model yields lower velocity contrast than the model of Vasyliunas and Dessler (1981)

  4. Pressure balance between lobe and plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luehr, H.

    1990-01-01

    Using eight months of AMPTE/IRM plasma and magnetic field data, the authors have done a statistical survey on the balance of total (thermal and magnetic) pressure in the Earth's plasma sheet and tail lobe. About 300,000 measurements obtained in the plasma sheet and the lobe were compared for different levels of magnetic activity as well as different distances from the Earth. The data show that lobe and plasma sheet pressure balance very well. Even in the worst case they do not deviate by more than half of the variance in the data itself. Approximately constant total pressure was also seen during a quiet time pass when IRM traversed nearly the whole magnetotail in the vertical direction, from the southern hemisphere lobe through the neutral sheet and into the northern plasma sheet boundary layer

  5. Substorms in the Inner Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.; Pellat, R.; Korth, A.

    Thin Current Sheets (TCS) are regularly formed prior to substorm breakup, even in the near-Earth plasma sheet, as close as the geostationary orbit. A self-consistent kinetic theory describing the response of the plasma sheet to an electromagnetic perturbation is given. This perturbation corresponds to an external forcing, for instance caused by the solar wind (not an internal instability). The equilibrium of the configuration of this TCS in the presence of a time varying perturbation is shown to produce a strong parallel thermal anisotropy (T∥ > T⊺) of energetic electrons and ions (E>50keV) as well as an enhanced diamagnetic current carried by low energy ions (Ecurrents tend to enhance the confinement of this current sheet near the magnetic equator. These results are compared with data gathered by GEOS-2 at the geostationary orbit, where the magnetic signatures of TCS, and parallel anisotropies are regularly observed prior to breakup. By ensuring quasi-neutrality everywhere we find, when low frequency electromagnetic perturbations are applied, that although the magnetic field line remains an equipotential to the lowest order in Te/Ti, a field-aligned potential drop exists to the next order in (Te/Ti). Thus the development of a TCS implies the formation of a field-aligned potential drop (~= few hundred volts) to ensure the quasi-neutrality everywhere. For an earthward directed pressure gradient, a field-aligned electric field, directed towards the ionosphere, is obtained, on the western edge of the perturbation (i.e. western edge of the current sheet). Thus field aligned beams of electrons are expected to flow towards the equatorial region on the western edge of the current sheet. We study the stability of these electron beams and show that they are unstable to ``High Frequency'' (HF) waves. These ``HF'' waves are regularly observed at frequencies of the order of the proton gyrofrequency (fH+) just before, or at breakup. The amplitude of these HF waves is so

  6. The storm time central plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schödel

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The plasma sheet plays a key role during magnetic storms because it is the bottleneck through which large amounts of magnetic flux that have been eroded from the dayside magnetopause have to be returned to the dayside magnetosphere. Using about five years of Geotail data we studied the average properties of the near- and midtail central plasma sheet (CPS in the 10–30 RE range during magnetic storms. The earthward flux transport rate is greatly enhanced during the storm main phase, but shows a significant earthward decrease. Hence, since the magnetic flux cannot be circulated at a sufficient rate, this leads to an average dipolarization of the central plasma sheet. An increase of the specific entropy of the CPS ion population by a factor of about two during the storm main phase provides evidence for nonadiabatic heating processes. The direction of flux transport during the main phase is consistent with the possible formation of a near-Earth neutral line beyond ~20 RE.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma convection; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  7. MHD Ballooning Instability in the Plasma Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Zaharia, S.

    2003-01-01

    Based on the ideal-MHD model the stability of ballooning modes is investigated by employing realistic 3D magnetospheric equilibria, in particular for the substorm growth phase. Previous MHD ballooning stability calculations making use of approximations on the plasma compressibility can give rise to erroneous conclusions. Our results show that without making approximations on the plasma compressibility the MHD ballooning modes are unstable for the entire plasma sheet where beta (sub)eq is greater than or equal to 1, and the most unstable modes are located in the strong cross-tail current sheet region in the near-Earth plasma sheet, which maps to the initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the ionosphere. However, the MHD beq threshold is too low in comparison with observations by AMPTE/CCE at X = -(8 - 9)R(sub)E, which show that a low-frequency instability is excited only when beq increases over 50. The difficulty is mitigated by considering the kinetic effects of ion gyrorad ii and trapped electron dynamics, which can greatly increase the stabilizing effects of field line tension and thus enhance the beta(sub)eq threshold [Cheng and Lui, 1998]. The consequence is to reduce the equatorial region of the unstable ballooning modes to the strong cross-tail current sheet region where the free energy associated with the plasma pressure gradient and magnetic field curvature is maximum

  8. Gas isotope separation method using plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, K.; Takagi, K.; Fukvi, R.

    1988-03-01

    A high frequency electric field is applied to a plasma sheet with a frequency equal to the cyclotronic frequency of the ions to be separated. Because of resonance the cyclotronic radius of the isotope has increased and the electric charge is eliminated by collision with a separator and the isotope is separated in neutral particles [fr

  9. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  10. Vietnamese Hurricane Response Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Các tờ dữ kiện được cung cấp nơi đây mô tả vai trò của EPA trong việc đáp ứng với bão và cách các chương trình cụ thể cung cấp sự hỗ trợ. The Vietnamese fact sheets provided here describe EPA's role in a hurricane response.

  11. High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Equator-S frequently encountered, i.e. on 30% of the orbits between 1 March and 17 April 1998, strong variations of the magnetic field strength of typically 5–15-min duration outside about 9RE during the late-night/early-morning hours. Very high-plasma beta values were found, varying between 1 and 10 or more. Close conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail revealed the spatial structure of these "plasma blobs" and their lifetime. They are typically 5–10° wide in longitude and have an antisymmetric plasma or magnetic pressure distribution with respect to the equator, while being altogether low-latitude phenomena  (≤ 15°. They drift slowly sunward, exchange plasma across the equator and have a lifetime of at least 15–30 min. While their spatial structure may be due to some sort of mirror instability, little is known about the origin of the high-beta plasma. It is speculated that the morningside boundary layer somewhat further tailward may be the source of this plasma. This would be consistent with the preference of the plasma blobs to occur during quiet conditions, although they are also found during substorm periods. The relation to auroral phenomena in the morningside oval is uncertain. The energy deposition may be mostly too weak to generate a visible signature. However, patchy aurora remains a candidate for more disturbed periods.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma convection; plasma sheet; plasma waves and instabilities

  12. The plasma sheet boundary and Ksub(p)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Freeman and Maguire (1967) first drew attention to the intrusion of energetic plasma from the tail to the geostationary orbit during geomagnetically disturbed times. Vasyliunas (1968) reported a correlation between the inward extension of the inner boundary of the plasma sheet and the Ksub(p) index and pointed out that the plasma sheet could occasionally reach the geostationary orbit distance. More recently McIlwain (1972) using the more refined detectors aboard the ATS-5 geostationary space-craft, has emphasized the correlation between the location of the plasma sheet boundary along the ATS orbit and geomagnetic activity. Using some older but unpublished data from the Suprathermal Ion Detector aboard the ATS-1 geostationary satellite, the relation between the local time occurrence of the plasma sheet at the geostationary orbit (6.6Rsub(E)) and Ksub(p) index is reported and then a relationship for the shift in the plasma sheet radial position is derived. (Auth.)

  13. High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    Full Text Available Equator-S frequently encountered, i.e. on 30% of the orbits between 1 March and 17 April 1998, strong variations of the magnetic field strength of typically 5–15-min duration outside about 9RE during the late-night/early-morning hours. Very high-plasma beta values were found, varying between 1 and 10 or more. Close conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail revealed the spatial structure of these "plasma blobs" and their lifetime. They are typically 5–10° wide in longitude and have an antisymmetric plasma or magnetic pressure distribution with respect to the equator, while being altogether low-latitude phenomena 
    (≤ 15°. They drift slowly sunward, exchange plasma across the equator and have a lifetime of at least 15–30 min. While their spatial structure may be due to some sort of mirror instability, little is known about the origin of the high-beta plasma. It is speculated that the morningside boundary layer somewhat further tailward may be the source of this plasma. This would be consistent with the preference of the plasma blobs to occur during quiet conditions, although they are also found during substorm periods. The relation to auroral phenomena in the morningside oval is uncertain. The energy deposition may be mostly too weak to generate a visible signature. However, patchy aurora remains a candidate for more disturbed periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma convection; plasma sheet; plasma waves and instabilities

  14. Relativistic current sheets in electron-positron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenitani, S.

    2008-01-01

    The current sheet structure with magnetic field reversal is one of the fundamental structure in space and astrophysical plasmas. It draws recent attention in high-energy astrophysical settings, where relativistic electron-positron plasmas are considered. In this talk we will review the recent progress of the physical processes in the relativistic current sheet. The kinetic stability of a single current sheet, the nonlinear behavior of these instabilities, and recent challenges on the multi current sheet systems are introduced. We will also introduce some problems of magnetic reconnection in these relativistic environments. (author)

  15. On the balance of stresses in the plasma sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, F. J.; Wolf, R. A.; Vasyliunas, V. M.

    1972-01-01

    The stress resulting from magnetic tension on the neutral sheet must, in a steady state, be balanced by any one or a combination of (1) a pressure gradient in the direction along the axis of the tail, (2) a similar gradient of plasma flow kinetic energy, and (3) the tension resulting from a pressure anisotropy within the plasma sheet. Stress balance in the first two cases requires that the ratios h/LX and BZ/BX be of the same order of magnitude, where h is the half-thickness of the neutral sheet, LX is the length scale for variations along the axis of the tail, and BZ and BX are the magnetic field components in the plasma sheet just outside the neutral sheet. The second case requires, in addition, that the plasma flow speed within the neutral sheet be of the order of or larger than the Alfven speed outside the neutral sheet. Stress balance in the third case requires that just outside the neutral sheet the plasma pressure obey the marginal firehose stability condition.

  16. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  17. Predicting Pulsar Scintillation from Refractive Plasma Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Dana; Pen, Ue-Li

    2018-05-01

    The dynamic and secondary spectra of many pulsars show evidence for long-lived, aligned images of the pulsar that are stationary on a thin scattering sheet. One explanation for this phenomenon considers the effects of wave crests along sheets in the ionized interstellar medium, such as those due to Alfvén waves propagating along current sheets. If these sheets are closely aligned to our line-of-sight to the pulsar, high bending angles arise at the wave crests and a selection effect causes alignment of images produced at different crests, similar to grazing reflection off of a lake. Using geometric optics, we develop a simple parameterized model of these corrugated sheets that can be constrained with a single observation and that makes observable predictions for variations in the scintillation of the pulsar over time and frequency. This model reveals qualitative differences between lensing from overdense and underdense corrugated sheets: Only if the sheet is overdense compared to the surrounding interstellar medium can the lensed images be brighter than the line-of-sight image to the pulsar, and the faint lensed images are closer to the pulsar at higher frequencies if the sheet is underdense, but at lower frequencies if the sheet is overdense.

  18. Effects of the IMF on the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.; Meng, C.-I.

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that the IMF Bsub(z) component controls partially the geometry of the cross-section (y-z plane) of the plasma sheet. Our vacuum superposition model suggests that the cross-section has a dumbbell shape for te IMF Bsub(z) O. It is also suggested that the thinning and subsequent expansion of the plasma sheet during magnetospheric substorms are partially due to a direct effect of the IMF Bsub(z). (author)

  19. The statistical studies of the inner boundary of plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of plasma sheet ions into the inner magnetosphere is very important to the inner magnetospheric dynamics since plasma sheet ions are one of the major particle sources of ring current during storm times. However, the direct observations of the inner boundary of the plasma sheet are fairly rare due to the limited number of satellites in near equatorial orbits outside 6.6 RE. In this paper, we used the ion data recorded by TC-1 from 2004 to 2006 to study the distribution of inner boundary of ion plasma sheet (IBIPS and for the first time show the observational distribution of IBIPS in the equatorial plane. The IBIPS has a dawn-dusk asymmetry, being farthest to the Earth in the 06:00 08:00 LT bin and closest to the Earth in the 18:00–20:00 LT bin. Besides, the IBIPS has also a day-night asymmetry, which may be due to the fact that the ions on the dayside are exposed more time to loss mechanisms on their drift paths. The radial distance of IBIPS decrease generally with the increase of Kp index. The mean radial distance of IBIPS is basically larger than 6.6 RE during quiet times and smaller than 6.6 RE during active times. When the strength of convection electric field increases, the inward shift of IBIPS is most significant on the night side (22:00–02:00 LT. For Kp ≤ 0+, only 16% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. For 2 ≤ Kp +, however, 70% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. The IBIPS has weak correlations with the AE and Dst indexes. The average correlation coefficient between Ri and Kp is −0.58 while the correlation coefficient between Ri and AE/Dst is only −0.29/0.17. The correlation coefficients are local time dependent. Particularly, Ri and Kp are highly correlated (r=−0.72 in the night sector, meaning that the radial distance of IBIPS Ri in the night sector has the good response to the Kp index These observations indicate that Kp plays a key role in determining the position of

  20. Complete plasma dropouts at Vela satellites during thinning of the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Venkatesan, D.; Akasofu, S.; Bame, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    Five satellite years of Vela data are examined for plasma sheet thinnings. Complete proton disappearances (plasma dropouts) are the main subject here. During such times, the Vela satellite is temporarily in the high-latitude tail lobe. The distribution of such plasma dropouts within the magnetotail suggests that the semithickness of the plasma sheet near midnight seldom reaches less than 1 R/sub E/ during substorms and that the dawn and dusk portions of the plasma sheet remain thicker than the midnight portion. But it is also shown that the plasma sheet occasionally becomes very thin near the dusk magnetopause. No such severe thinnings of the plasma sheet are found near the dawn magnetopause. Plasma dropouts can occur regardless of the sign of the Z component of the IMF, but their frequency of occurrence seems to be greater when the Z component is negative.Three plasma dropouts which occurred in the midnight sector at unusually large distances from the estimated position of the neutral sheet were observed during geomagnetic storms. It is likely that the midnight sector of the plasma sheet can become very thick (approx.18 R/sub E/) at certain times during the main phase of storms. Detailed measurements in the plasma sheet were obtained near the beginning of a geomagnetic storm whose sc triggered a substorm. A compression of the plasma sheet at X/sub SM/approx. =-15 R/sub E/ occurred about 10 min after the sc onset at the earth and about 5 min after the start of plasma sheet thinning associated with the sc-related substorm. If compression-thinning of the plasma sheet initiated this substorm, the triggering action must have occurred earthward of X/sub SM/approx. =-15 R/sub E/

  1. Electrodynamic forces and plasma conductivity inside the current sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, S.Yu.; Frank, A.G.; Markov, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    The process of accumulation and explosive release of magnetic energy was studied in a current sheet of plasma of a high-current linear discharge. The distribution of current density and of electrodynamic forces were measured and the time evolution of these quantities was determined. The evolution of the plasma conductivity was also obtained. The measured and calculated electrodynamic forces may explain the plasma acceleration up to the velocities about 3x10 4 m/s only near the sheet edges. (D.Gy.)

  2. Fast Fermi acceleration in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.S.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1989-01-01

    A longstanding question in the field of magnetospheric physics is the source of the energetic particles which are commonly observed along the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Several models have been suggested for the acceleration of these particles. We suggest a means by which the fast Fermi acceleration mechanism [Wu, 1984] can accelerate electrons at the plasma sheet and perhaps account for some of the observations. We propose the following: A localized hydromagnetic disturbance propagating through the tail lobe region impinges upon the PSBL deforming it and displacing it in towards the central plasma sheet. The boundary layer can then act like a moving magnetic mirror. If the disturbance is propagating nearly perpendicular to the layer then its velocity projected parallel to the layer (and the magnetic field) can be very large resulting in significant acceleration of reflected particles. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  3. Interaction of a charge with a thin plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordag, M.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the electromagnetic field with a two-dimensional plasma sheet intended to describe the pi-electrons of a carbon nanotube or a C 60 molecule is investigated. By first integrating out the displacement field of the plasma or the electromagnetic field, different representations for quantities like the Casimir energy are derived which are shown to be consistent with one another. Starting from the covariant gauge for the electromagnetic field, it is shown that the matching conditions to which the presence of the plasma sheet can be reduced are different from the commonly used ones. The difference in the treatments does not show up in the Casimir force between two parallel sheets, but it is present in the Casimir-Polder force between a charge or a neutral atom and a sheet. At once, since the plasma sheet is a regularization of the conductor boundary conditions, this sheds light on the difference in physics found earlier in the realization of conductor boundary conditions as 'thin' or 'thick' boundary conditions in Phys. Rev. D 70, 085010 (2004)

  4. Modeling of plasma-sheet convection: implications for substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An answer is suggested to the question of why plasma and magnetic energy accumulate in the Earth's magnetotail to be released in sporadic events, namely substorms. It is shown that the idea of steady convection is inconsistent with the idea of slow, approximately lossless, plasma convection in a long, closed-field-line region that extends into a long magnetotail, such as occurs during Earthward convection in the Earth's plasma sheet. This inconsistency is argued generally and demonstrated specifically using several quantitative models of the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field. These results suggest that plasma-sheet convection is necessarily time dependent. If flux tubes are to convect adiabatically earthward, the confining magnetic pressure in the tail lobes must increase with time, and the magnetotail must evolve into a more stretched configuration. Eventually, the magnetosphere must find some way to release plasma from inner-plasma-sheet flux tubes. This suggests an obvious role for the magnetospheric substorm in the convection process. To probe this process further, a two-dimensional, self-consistent, quasi-static convection model was developed. This model self consistently includes a dipole field and can reasonably account for the effects of inner-magnetospheric shielding

  5. Geomagnetic activity effects on plasma sheet energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use three years (2001, 2002, and 2004 of Cluster plasma sheet data to investigate what happens to localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the plasma sheet during times of high magnetospheric activity. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have studied the influence on Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs from variations in the geomagnetic disturbance level as expressed by the Kp, the AE, and the Dst indices. We find that the ECR occurrence frequency increases during higher magnetospheric activities, and that the ECRs become stronger. This is true both for CLRs and for CGRs, and the localized energy conversion therefore concerns energy conversion in both directions between the particles and the fields in the plasma sheet. A higher geomagnetic activity hence increases the general level of energy conversion in the plasma sheet. Moreover, we have shown that CLRs live longer during magnetically disturbed times, hence converting more electromagnetic energy. The CGR lifetime, on the other hand, seems to be unaffected by the geomagnetic activity level. The evidence for increased energy conversion during geomagnetically disturbed times is most clear for Kp and for AE, but there are also some indications that energy conversion increases during large negative Dst. This is consistent with the plasma sheet magnetically mapping to the auroral zone, and therefore being more tightly coupled to auroral activities and variations in the AE and Kp indices, than to variations in the ring current region as described by the Dst index.

  6. Nonadiabatic heating of the central plasma sheet at substorm onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.Y.; Frank, L.A.; Rostoker, G.; Fennell, J.; Mitchell, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Heating events in the plasma sheet boundary layer and central plasma sheet are found to occur at the onset of expansive phase activity. The main effect is a dramatic increase in plasma temperature, coincident with a partial dipolarization of the magnetic field. Fluxes of energetic particles increase without dispersion during these events which occur at all radial distances up to 23 R E , the apogee of the ISEIE spacecraft. A major difference between these heating events and those observed at geosynchronous distances lies in the heating mechanism which is nonadiabatic beyond 10 R E but may be adiabatic closer to Earth. The energy required to account for the increase in plasma thermal energy is comparable with that required for Joule heating of the ionosphere. The plasma sheet must be considered as a major sink in the energy balance of substorm. The authors estimate lobe magnetic pressures during these events. Changes in lobe pressure are generally not correlated with onsets or intensifications of expansive phase activity

  7. Thermal catastrophe in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.; Goertz, C.K.; Grossmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This letter presents a first step towards a substorm model including particle heating and transport in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). The heating mechanism discussed is resonant absorption of Alfven waves. For some assumed MHD perturbation incident from the tail lobes onto the plasma sheet, the local heating rate in the PSBL has the form of a resonance function of the one-fluid plasma temperature. Balancing the local heating by convective transport of the heated plasma toward the central plasma sheet, and ''equation of state'' is found for the steady-state PSBL whose solution has the form of a mathematical catastrophe: at a critical value of a parameter containing the incident power flux, the local density, and the convection velocity, the equilibrium temperature jumps discontinuously. Associating this temperature increase with the abrupt onset of the substorm expansion phase, the catastrophe model indicates at least three ways in which the onset may be triggered. Several other consequences related to substorm dynamics are suggested by the simple catastrophe model

  8. Two-and-one-half-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasma sheet in the presence of oxygen ions: The plasma sheet oscillation and compressional Pc 5 waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Li; Liu Zhenxing; Cao Jinbin

    2002-01-01

    Two-and-one-half-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the multicomponent plasma sheet with the velocity curl term in the magnetic equation are represented. The simulation results can be summarized as follows: (1) There is an oscillation of the plasma sheet with the period on the order of 400 s (Pc 5 range); (2) the magnetic equator is a node of the magnetic field disturbance; (3) the magnetic energy integral varies antiphase with the internal energy integral; (4) disturbed waves have a propagating speed on the order of 10 km/s earthward; (5) the abundance of oxygen ions influences amplitude, period, and dissipation of the plasma sheet oscillation. It is suggested that the compressional Pc 5 waves, which are observed in the plasma sheet close to the magnetic equator, may be caused by the plasma sheet oscillation, or may be generated from the resonance of the plasma sheet oscillation with some Pc 5 perturbation waves coming from the outer magnetosphere

  9. On the nature of the plasma sheet boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hones, E.W. Jr. (Mission Research Corp., Los Alamos, NM (USA) Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The regions of the plasma sheet adjacent to the north and south lobes of the magnetotail have been described by many experimenters as locations of beams of energetic ions and fast-moving plasma directed primarily earthward and tailward along magnetic field lines. Measurements taken as satellites passed through one or the other of these boundary layers have frequently revealed near-earth mirroring of ions and a vertical segregation of velocities of both earthward-moving and mirroring ions with the fastest ions being found nearest the lobe-plasma sheet interface. These are features expected for particles from a distant tail source {bar E} {times} {bar B} drifting in a dawn-to-dusk electric field and are consistent with the source being a magnetic reconnection region. The plasma sheet boundary layers are thus understood as separatrix layers, bounded at their lobeward surfaces by the separatrices from the distant neutral line. This paper will review the observations that support this interpretation. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Acceleration of O+ from the cusp to the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.; Klecker, B.; Dandouras, I.

    2015-02-01

    Heavy ions from the ionosphere that are accelerated in the cusp/cleft have been identified as a direct source for the hot plasma in the plasma sheet. However, the details of the acceleration and transport that transforms the originally cold ions into the hot plasma sheet population are not fully understood. The polar orbit of the Cluster satellites covers the main transport path of the O+ from the cusp to the plasma sheet, so Cluster is ideal for tracking its velocity changes. However, because the cusp outflow is dispersed according to its velocity as it is transported to the tail, due to the velocity filter effect, the observed changes in beam velocity over the Cluster orbit may simply be the result of the spacecraft accessing different spatial regions and not necessarily evidence of acceleration. Using the Cluster Ion Spectrometry/Composition Distribution Function instrument onboard Cluster, we compare the distribution function of streaming O+ in the tail lobes with the initial distribution function observed over the cusp and reveal that the observations of energetic streaming O+ in the lobes around -20 RE are predominantly due to the velocity filter effect during nonstorm times. During storm times, the cusp distribution is further accelerated. In the plasma sheet boundary layer, however, the average O+ distribution function is above the upper range of the outflow distributions at the same velocity during both storm and nonstorm times, indicating that acceleration has taken place. Some of the velocity increase is in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, indicating that the E × B velocity is enhanced. However, there is also an increase in the parallel direction, which could be due to nonadiabatic acceleration at the boundary or wave heating.

  11. Singular Sheet Etching of Graphene with Oxygen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider Al-Mumen; Fubo Rao; Wen Li; Lixin Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a simple and controllable post-synthesis method for engineering the number of graphene layers based on oxygen plasma etching. Singular sheet etching(SSE) of graphene was achieved with the optimum process duration of 38 seconds. As a demonstration of this SSE process, monolayer graphene films were produced from bilayer graphenes. Experimental investigations verified that the oxygen plasma etching removes a single layer graphene sheet in an anisotropic fashion rather than anisotropic mode. In addition,etching via the oxygen plasma at the ground electrodes introduced fewer defects to the bottom graphene layer compared with the conventional oxygen reactive ion etching using the powered electrodes. Such defects can further be reduced with an effective annealing treatment in an argon environment at 900-1000?C. These results demonstrate that our developed SSE method has enabled a microelectronics manufacturing compatible way for single sheet precision subtraction of graphene layers and a potential technique for producing large size graphenes with high yield from multilayer graphite materials.

  12. Singular Sheet Etching of Graphene with Oxygen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider Al-Mumen; Fubo Rao; Wen Li; Lixin Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a simple and controllable post-synthesis method for engineering the number of graphene layers based on oxygen plasma etching. Singular sheet etching (SSE) of graphene was achieved with the optimum process duration of 38 seconds. As a demonstration of this SSE process, monolayer graphene films were produced from bilayer graphenes. Experimental investigations verified that the oxygen plasma etching removes a single layer graphene sheet in an anisotropic fashion rather than anisotropic mode. In addition, etching via the oxygen plasma at the ground electrodes introduced fewer defects to the bottom graphene layer compared with the conventional oxygen reactive ion etching using the powered electrodes. Such defects can further be reduced with an effective annealing treatment in an argon environment at 900-1000◦C. These results demonstrate that our developed SSE method has enabled a microelectronics manufacturing compatible way for single sheet precision subtraction of graphene layers and a potential technique for producing large size graphenes with high yield from multilayer graphite materials.

  13. Ion and electron Kappa distribution functions in the plasma sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, P. S.; Stepanova, M. V.; Espinoza, C.; Antonova, E. E.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a study of ion and electron flux spectra in the Earth's plasma sheet using kappa distribution functions. Satellite data from the THEMIS mission were collected for thousands of crossings through the plasma sheet, between 7 and 35 Re and during the years 2008-2009. The events were separated according to the geomagnetic activity at the time. Our results show the distribution of the kappa index and characteristic energies across the plasma sheet and its evolution with distance to Earth for quiet times and for the substorm expansion and recovery phases. For the ions, it is observed that the kappa values tend to decrease outwards and that this effect is more significant in the dusk sector, where the smallest values are found for distances beyond 15 Re. The main effect of the substorms appears as an enhancement of this behavior. The electrons show a much more homogeneous distribution in quiet times, with a mild tendency for larger kappa values at larger distances. During substorms, the kappa values tend to equalize and appear very homogenous during expansion. However, they exhibit a significant increase in the dusk sector during the recovery substorm phase. Finally, we observe that the characteristic energy of the particles during substorms increases and concentrate at distances less than 15 Re.

  14. Sheet Fluorescence and Annular Analysis of Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.; Gao, H.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Annular analysis of fluorescence imaging measurements on Ultracold Neutral Plasmas (UNPs) is demonstrated. Spatially-resolved fluorescence imaging of the strontium ions produces a spectrum that is Doppler-broadened due to the thermal ion velocity and shifted due to the ion expansion velocity. The fluorescence excitation beam is spatially narrowed into a sheet, allowing for localized analysis of ion temperatures within a volume of the plasma with small density variation. Annular analysis of fluorescence images permits an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio compared to previous fluorescence measurements done in strontium UNPs. Using this technique and analysis, plasma ion temperatures are measured and shown to display characteristics of plasmas with strong coupling such as disorder induced heating and kinetic energy oscillations.

  15. Slow convection of a magnetized plasma and the earth plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hruska, A.

    1980-01-01

    Stationary convection of an isotropic, infinitely conducting plasma in a magnetic field with non-trivial geometry is discussed under the assumption that the inertial term in the equation of motion may be ignored. The energy gained or lost by a volume element of plasma per unit time does not vary along the field-lines. Simple relations between the components of the current density, depending on the field-line geometry, exist. Similar relations hold for the components of the plasma velocity. The theoretical analysis is applied to the geomagnetically-quiet plasma sheet and a qualitative physical picture of the sheet is suggested. The observed structure of the sheet is compatible with Axford-Hines type of convection perhaps combined with a low-speed flow from a distant neutral point. The magnetic-field-aligned currents are driven by the deformations of the closed field-lines which are enforced by the solar wind. (orig.)

  16. Survey of Galileo Plasma Observations in Jupiter's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Wilson, Robert J.; Siler, Scott; Paterson, William R.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) Instrument on the Galileo spacecraft (orbiting Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003) measured properties of the ions that were trapped in the magnetic field. The PLS data provide a survey of the plasma properties between approx. 5 and 30 Jupiter radii [R(sub J)] in the equatorial region. We present plasma properties derived via two analysis methods: numerical moments and forward modeling. We find that the density decreases with radial distance by nearly 5 orders of magnitude from approx. 2 to 3000 cm(exp.-3) at 6R(sub j) to approx. 0.05cm(sub -3) at 30 R(sub j). The density profile did not show major changes from orbit to orbit, suggesting that the plasma production and transport remained constant within about a factor of 2. The radial profile of ion temperature increased with distance which implied that contrary to the concept of adiabatic cooling on expansion, the plasma heats up as it expands out from Io's orbit (where TI is approx.60-80 eV) at approx. 6R(sub j) to a few keV at 30R(sub j).There does not seem to be a long-term, systematic variation in ion temperature with either local time or longitude. This latter finding differs from earlier analysis of Galileo PLS data from a selection of orbits. Further examination of all data from all Galileo orbits suggests that System Ill variations are transitory on timescales of weeks, consistent with the modeling of Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations. The plasma flow is dominated by azimuthal flow that is between 80% and 100% of corotation out to 25 R(sub j).

  17. Statistical study of plasma sheet dynamics using ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandouras, J.; Reme, H.; Saint-Marc, A.; Sauvaud, J.A.; Parks, G.K.; Anderson, K.A.; Lin, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    During magnetospheric substorms, satellites embedded in the plasma sheet often detect transient dropouts of plasma and energetic particle fluxes, a phenomemon generally interpreted as indicating the exit of the satellite into the magnetospheric lobe due to a plasma sheet thinning. In order to determine the large-scale dynamics of the near-earth plasma sheet during substorms, three satellite years of ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data (1.5 and 6 keV), corresponding to 461 particle flux dropouts, have been analyzed. The principal results show that flux dropouts can be observed anywhere in the nightside plasma sheet, independent of the satellite's geocentric distance (for R>12R/sub E/), magnetic local time (except near the magnetospheric flanks) and estimated distance to the neutral sheet. Furthermore, flux dropouts can be observed for any combination of the AE index value and the satellite's distance to the neutral sheet, which shows that the plasma sheet is dynamic even during weak magnetospheric disturbances. Substorms during which the satellites, though situated in the plasma sheet, did not detect any flux dropout, have also been examined, and it is found that the plasma sheet thickness can locally remain unaffected by substorm development for AE index values up to at least 1000 nT. The predictions of the two major plasma sheet thinning models, i.e., the near-tail X-type magnetic neutral line formation model and the MHD rarefaction wave propagation model, are compared to the experimental results, and it is concluded that neither model can account for all of the observations; plasma sheet dynamics are more complex. Phenomenologically, this study suggests that multiple pinching of the plasma sheet and/or large-amplitude three-dimensional plasma sheet oscillations are important in plasma sheet dynamics

  18. Composition and plasma properties of the plasma sheet in the Earth's magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, S.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of the plasma sheet properties, based on 300 h of data from the ISEE-1 Ion Composition Experiment, yiels a description of H + and He ++ densities and temperatures as functions of magnetospheric substorm activity and geocentric distance. The H + and He ++ temperatures are found to be well correlated, such that a ratio T(He ++ )/T(H + ) = 2.7±0.1 is typical. However, linear-regression analysis typically yields a nonvanishing T(He ++ ) in the limit T(H + ) #-> # 0, a limit that is approached through the addition of cold ionospheric H + to the plasma sheet during active periods. The plasma sheet proton temperature T(H + ) varies inversely with geocentric distance, and the radial gradient of T(H + ) increases with increasing activity index AE. The density ratio N (He ++ )/N(H + ) increases with geocentric distance, irrespective of AE

  19. Compressional Pc5 type pulsations in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vaivads

    Full Text Available We study compressional pulsations in Pc5 frequency range observed in the dawn-side at distances of about 10 RE , close to the magnetic equator. We use data obtained during two events of conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail: 1000–1700 UT on 9 March 1998, and 0200–0600 UT on 25 April 1998. In both events, pulsations are observed after substorm activity. The pulsations are antisymmetric with respect to the equatorial plane (even mode, and move eastward with phase velocity close to plasma velocity. The pulsations tend to be pressure balanced. We also discuss possible generation mechanisms of the pulsations.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and instabilities; plasma sheet

  20. Compressional Pc5 type pulsations in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vaivads

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We study compressional pulsations in Pc5 frequency range observed in the dawn-side at distances of about 10 RE , close to the magnetic equator. We use data obtained during two events of conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail: 1000–1700 UT on 9 March 1998, and 0200–0600 UT on 25 April 1998. In both events, pulsations are observed after substorm activity. The pulsations are antisymmetric with respect to the equatorial plane (even mode, and move eastward with phase velocity close to plasma velocity. The pulsations tend to be pressure balanced. We also discuss possible generation mechanisms of the pulsations.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and instabilities; plasma sheet

  1. Oscillation of the current sheet velocity in plasma focus discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melzacki, K.; Nardi, V.

    1994-01-01

    The oscillation of the propagation speed of the plasma focus current sheet has been recorded with schlieren photography. The sheet stuttering in the propagation during the implosion phase has a frequency of about 60 MHz. The effect could be recorded due to application of long exposure time (60 ns) technique. It is not detectable in the subnanosecond pictures. The pictures are taken in black schlieren. The probing range of the electron density gradient, with integration along the path of the 1 J, Q-switched ruby laser beam, has been selected by the size of the stop and aperture within 3 x 10 18 cm -3 and 3 x 10 20 cm -3 . Raising the sensitivity threshold to 2 x 10 19 cm -3 (refraction angle of 4 mrad) has helped to clear the pictures by limiting their image to high gradients of density only. With this technique (and other diagnostic methods) the dynamics of 6 kJ, 16 kV plasma focus discharges in deuterium at 5 torr, with a 10% decrease of the magnetic insulation at the breech has been investigated. The average implosion velocity of the current sheath obtained with this effect, 5 x 10 6 cm/s, is consistent with those measured by the smear effect, and the electric probe. The electron density gradient has been determined at several instants; at the pinch time it is (3 ± 1.5) x 10 20 cm -4 . The data are discussed on the basis of several pictures

  2. Distribution of energetic oxygen and hydrogen in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, E. A.; Grigorenko, E. E.; Haaland, S. E.; Daly, P. W.; Delcourt, D. C.; Luo, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Dandouras, I.

    2015-05-01

    The spatial distributions of different ion species are useful indicators for plasma sheet dynamics. In this statistical study based on 7 years of Cluster observations, we establish the spatial distributions of oxygen ions and protons at energies from 274 to 955 keV, depending on geomagnetic and solar wind (SW) conditions. Compared with protons, the distribution of energetic oxygen has stronger dawn-dusk asymmetry in response to changes in the geomagnetic activity. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is directed southward, the oxygen ions show significant acceleration in the tail plasma sheet. Changes in the SW dynamic pressure (Pdyn) affect the oxygen and proton intensities in the same way. The energetic protons show significant intensity increases at the near-Earth duskside during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, enhanced SW Pdyn, and southward IMF, implying there location of effective inductive acceleration mechanisms and a strong duskward drift due to the increase of the magnetic field gradient in the near-Earth tail. Higher losses of energetic ions are observed in the dayside plasma sheet under disturbed geomagnetic conditions and enhanced SW Pdyn. These observations are in agreement with theoretical models.

  3. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm² sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Udit Narayan; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ∼1 kA/cm(2) from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ∼200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  4. Superposed epoch analysis of pressure and magnetic field configuration changes in the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebius, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Nagai, T.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report on an analysis of pressure and magnetic configuration within the plasma sheet following the initiation of substorm events. They have constructed this time dependent picture by using an epoch analysis of data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft. This analysis procedure can be used to construct a unified picture of events, provided they are reproducible, from a statistical analysis of a series of point measurements. The authors first determine the time dependent pressure changes in the plasma sheet. With some simplifying assumptions they then determine the z dependence of the pressure profiles, and from this distribution determine how field lines in the plasma sheet map to the neutral sheet

  5. The quiet evening auroral arc and the structure of the growth phase near-Earth plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Pritchett, P. L.

    2014-03-01

    The plasma pressure and current configuration of the near-Earth plasma sheet that creates and sustains the quiet evening auroral arc during the growth phase of magnetospheric substorms is investigated. We propose that the quiet evening arc (QEA) connects to the thin near-Earth current sheet, which forms during the development of the growth phase enhancement of convection. The current sheet's large polarization electric fields are shielded from the ionosphere by an Inverted-V parallel potential drop, thereby producing the electron precipitation responsible for the arc's luminosity. The QEA is located in the plasma sheet region of maximal radial pressure gradient and, in the east-west direction, follows the vanishing of the approximately dawn-dusk-directed gradient or fold in the plasma pressure. In the evening sector, the boundary between the Region1 and Region 2 current systems occurs where the pressure maximizes (approximately radial gradient of the pressure vanishes) and where the approximately radial gradient of the magnetic flux tube volume also vanishes in an inflection region. The proposed intricate balance of plasma sheet pressure and currents may well be very sensitive to disruption by the arrival of equatorward traveling auroral streamers and their associated earthward traveling dipolarization fronts.

  6. Spontaneous magnetic fluctuations and collisionless regulation of the Earth's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, P. S.; Espinoza, C.; Stepanova, M. V.; Antonova, E. E.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Even in the absence of instabilities, plasmas often exhibit inherent electromagnetic fluctuations which are present due to the thermal motion of charged particles, sometimes called thermal (quasi-thermal) noise. One of the fundamental and challenging problems of laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasma physics is the understanding of the relaxation processes of nearly collisionless plasmas, and the resultant state of electromagnetic plasma turbulence. The study of thermal fluctuations can be elegantly addressed by using the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem that describes the average amplitude of the fluctuations through correlations of the linear response of the media with the perturbations of the equilibrium state (the dissipation). Recently, it has been shown that solar wind plasma beta and temperature anisotropy observations are bounded by kinetic instabilities such as the ion cyclotron, mirror, and firehose instabilities. The magnetic fluctuations observed within the bounded area are consistent with the predictions of the Fluctuation-Dissipation theorem even far below the kinetic instability thresholds, with an enhancement of the fluctuation level near the thresholds. Here, for the very first time, using in-situ magnetic field and plasma data from the THEMIS spacecraft, we show that such regulation also occurs in the Earth's plasma sheet at the ion scales and that, regardless of the clear differences between the solar wind and the magnetosphere environments, spontaneous fluctuation and their collisionless regulation seem to be fundamental features of space and astrophysical plasmas, suggesting the universality of the processes.

  7. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catapano, F.; Zimbardo, G.; Artemyev, A. V.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed

  8. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, F., E-mail: menacata3@gmail.com; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com; Vasko, I. Y. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  9. A statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind based on DSP explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Yan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available By using the data of two spacecraft, TC-1 and ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer, a statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind has been carried out. The results obtained show that the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re has an apparent driving relationship with the solar wind. It is found that (1 there is a positive correlation between the duskward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the duskward component of the geomagnetic field in the plasma sheet, with a proportionality constant of about 1.09. It indicates that the duskward component of the IMF can effectively penetrate into the near-Earth plasma sheet, and can be amplified by sunward convection in the corresponding region at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re; (2 the increase in the density or the dynamic pressure of the solar wind will generally lead to the increase in the density of the plasma sheet; (3 the ion thermal pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is significantly controlled by the dynamic pressure of solar wind; (4 under the northward IMF condition, the ion temperature and ion thermal pressure in the plasma sheet decrease as the solar wind speed increases. This feature indicates that plasmas in the near-Earth plasma sheet can come from the magnetosheath through the LLBL. Northward IMF is one important condition for the transport of the cold plasmas of the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet through the LLBL, and fast solar wind will enhance such a transport process.

  10. Relationship between energetic particles and plasmas in the distant plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarris, E.T.; Krimigis, S.M.; Lui, A.T.Y.; Ackerson, K.L.; Frank, L.A.; Williams, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of ions from three different instruments on the IMP-7 and 8 spacecraft are combined to yield with differential energy spectra of ions over the entire energy range of approx.100 eV to 4 MeV in the earth's distant (approx.30 to approx.40 R/sub e/) plasma sheet. These spectra, obtained during times of relatively small bulk flow velocities, span the intensity range from approx.10 -5 to 10 5 (cm 2 sec sr keV) -1 , varying smoothly over the entire energy range both when the plasma is cold (approx.1 keV) and hot (approx.9 keV). Overall, the shape of the spectrum resembles a Maxwellian but with a high energy (> or approx. =50 keV) tail described well by a power law (proportionalE -7 ). The high energy tail is displaced in a parallel fashion to higher or lower intensities when the plasma is hot or cold, respectively. The transition between the Maxwellian and the power law occurs at Eapprox. =(g+1)kT. It is found that the energetic particle populations in the plasma sheet appear to be directly related to the mean thermal energies of the corresponding plasmas

  11. Theoretical modeling of the plasma-assisted catalytic growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Neha

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical modeling for the catalyst-assisted growth of graphene sheet in the presence of plasma has been investigated. It is observed that the plasma parameters can strongly affect the growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet. The model developed accounts for the charging rate of the graphene sheet; number density of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms; various elementary processes on the surface of the catalyst nanoparticle; surface diffusion and accretion of ions; and formation of carbon-clusters and large graphene islands. In our investigation, it is found that the thickness of the graphene sheet decreases with the plasma parameters, number density of hydrogen ions and RF power, and consequently, the field emission of electrons from the graphene sheet surface increases. The time evolution of the height of graphene sheet with ion density and sticking coefficient of carbon species has also been examined. Some of our theoretical results are in compliance with the experimental observations

  12. The Response of Ice Sheets to Climate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, K.; Goldberg, D. N.; Holland, P. R.; Jordan, J. R.; Arthern, R. J.; Jenkins, A.

    2017-12-01

    West Antarctic Ice Sheet loss is a significant contributor to sea level rise. While the ice loss is thought to be triggered by fluctuations in oceanic heat at the ice shelf bases, ice sheet response to ocean variability remains poorly understood. Using a synchronously coupled ice-ocean model permitting grounding line migration, this study evaluates the response of an ice sheet to periodic variations in ocean forcing. Resulting oscillations in grounded ice volume amplitude is shown to grow as a nonlinear function of ocean forcing period. This implies that slower oscillations in climatic forcing are disproportionately important to ice sheets. The ice shelf residence time offers a critical time scale, above which the ice response amplitude is a linear function of ocean forcing period and below which it is quadratic. These results highlight the sensitivity of West Antarctic ice streams to perturbations in heat fluxes occurring at decadal time scales.

  13. Particle pitch angle diffusion due to nonadiabatic effects in the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.C.; Lee, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    In order to understand certain aspects of the plasma sheet dynamics, a numerical study of the nonadiabatic behavior of particles in a model field geometry is performed. The particle's magnetic moment as a function of time is calculated for various initial parameters, corresponding to various particle energies and degrees of field curvature. It is shown that the magnetic moment changes as the particle passes through the plasma sheet and that the magnitude of the change is related to the curvature of the field at the middle of the plasma sheet. The relation of the magnitude of the change in magnetic moment to the particle's pitch and phase angles as it passes through the sheet is numerically resolved. The nature of the change may be considered as a mechanism for pitch angle diffusion, and the diffusion coefficient is calculated. This scattering mechanism is significant for plasma sheet ions (1--10 keV) as well as energetic electrons (>100 keV)

  14. The Interaction of C-Band Microwaves with Large Plasma Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Liang; Huo Wenqing; Yang Xinjie; Xu Yuemin

    2012-01-01

    A large plasma sheet 60 cm×60 cm×2 cm in size was generated using a hollow cathode, and measurements were conducted for interactions including transmission, reflection and absorption. With different discharge parameters, plasma sheets can vary and influence microwave strength. Microwave reflection decreases when the discharge current rises, and the opposite occurs in transmission. The C-band microwave is absorbed when it is propagated through large plasma sheets at higher pressure. When plasma density and collision frequency are fitted with incident microwave frequency, a large amount of microwave energy is consumed. Reflection, transmission and absorption all exist simultaneously. Plasma sheets are an attractive alternative to microwave steering at low pressure, and the microwave reflection used in receiving radar can be altered by changing the discharge parameters.

  15. Pressure changes in the plasma sheet during substorm injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebuis, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Hamilton, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have determined the particle pressure and total pressure as a function of radial distance in the plasma sheet for periods before and after the onset of substorm-associated ion enhancements over the radial range 7-19 R E . They have chosen events occurring during times of increasing magnetospheric activity, as determined by an increasing AE index, in which a sudden increase, or injection, of energetic particle flux is observed. During these events the particle energy of maximum contribution to the pressure increases from about 12 to about 27 keV. In addition, the particle pressure increases, and the magnetic pressure decreases, with the total pressure only changing slightly. For radial distances of less than 10 R E the total pressure tends to increase with the injection, while outside 10 R E it tends to decrease or remain the same. Because the fraction of the pressure due to particles has increased and higher energies are contributing to the pressure, a radial gradient is evident in the postinjection, but not preinjection, flux measurements. These observations show that the simulations appearance of energetic particles and changes in the magnetic field results naturally from pressure balance and does not necessarily indicate that the local changing field is accelerating the particles. The changes in the total pressure outside 10 R E are consistent with previous measurements of pressure changes at substorm onset and can be understood in terms of the unloading of energy in the magnetotail and the resulting change in the magnetic field configuration

  16. Ion flow ripples in the Earth's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Pitkänen, Timo; Norqvist, Patrik; Mann, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, magnetotail flows were considered rather smooth and laminar, and primarily dominated by a simple convection flow pattern. However, in the early 90's, high speed bursty bulk flows (BBFs) were discovered and found to commonly perturb the underlying convection flows. In addition, there are other disturbances complicating the magnetotail flow pattern. Instabilities such as the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and the kink instability can cause different types of magnetic field oscillations, such as field line resonances. It is expected that ions will follow these oscillations if the typical time and length scales are larger than the gyroperiod and gyroradius of the ions. Though low-velocity sloshing and ripple disturbances of the average magnetotail convection flows have been observed, their connection with magnetic field oscillations is not fully understood. Furthermore, when studying BFFs, these "Ion Flow Ripples" (IFRs) are often neglected, dismissed as noise or can even erroneously be identified as BBFs. It is therefore of utter importance to find out and understand the role of IFRs in magnetotail dynamics. In a statistical investigation, we use several years of Cluster plasma sheet data to study the low-speed flows in the magnetotail. We investigate different types of IFRs, study their occurrence, and discuss their possible causes.

  17. Grounding line transient response in marine ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Drouet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine ice-sheet stability is mostly controlled by the dynamics of the grounding line, i.e. the junction between the grounded ice sheet and the floating ice shelf. Grounding line migration has been investigated within the framework of MISMIP (Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, which mainly aimed at investigating steady state solutions. Here we focus on transient behaviour, executing short-term simulations (200 yr of a steady ice sheet perturbed by the release of the buttressing restraint exerted by the ice shelf on the grounded ice upstream. The transient grounding line behaviour of four different flowline ice-sheet models has been compared. The models differ in the physics implemented (full Stokes and shallow shelf approximation, the numerical approach, as well as the grounding line treatment. Their overall response to the loss of buttressing is found to be broadly consistent in terms of grounding line position, rate of surface elevation change and surface velocity. However, still small differences appear for these latter variables, and they can lead to large discrepancies (> 100% observed in terms of ice sheet contribution to sea level when cumulated over time. Despite the recent important improvements of marine ice-sheet models in their ability to compute steady state configurations, our results question the capacity of these models to compute short-term reliable sea-level rise projections.

  18. Polar Plasma at Ganymede: Ionospheric outflow and discovery of the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G.; Paterson, W.; Dorelli, J.; Glocer, A.; Sarantos, M.; Wilson, R. J.; Bard, C.

    2017-12-01

    On the 27th of June 1996, the NASA Galileo spacecraft made humanities first flyby of Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, discovering that it is unique to science in being the only moon known to possess an internally generated magnetic dynamo field. Although Galileo carried a plasma spectrometer, the Plasma Subsystem (PLS), converting its highly complex raw data stream into meaningful plasma moments (density, temperature, velocity) is extremely challenging, and was only ever performed for the second (out of six) Ganymede flybys. Resurrecting the original Galileo PLS data analysis software, we processed the raw PLS data from G01, and for the first time present the properties of plasmas encountered. Dense, cold ions were observed outflowing from the moon's north pole (presumed to be dominated by H+ from the icy surface), with more diffuse, warmer field-aligned outflows in the lobes. Dropouts in plasma density combined with velocity perturbations either side of this suggest that Galileo briefly crossed the cusps onto closed magnetic field lines. PLS observations show that upon entry into the magnetosphere, Galileo crossed through the plasma sheet, observing plasma flows consistent with reconnection-driven convection, highly energized 105 eV ions, and a reversal in the magnetic field. The densities of plasmas flowing upwards from Ganymede's ionosphere were higher on open "lobe" field lines than on closed field lines, suggesting that the ionospheric source of these plasmas may be denser at the poles, there may be additional acceleration mechanisms at play, or the balance of ions were outside the energy range of PLS.

  19. XUV laser-produced plasma sheet beam and microwave agile mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, W.; Scharer, J.E.; Porter, B.; Lam, N.T.

    1994-01-01

    An excimer-laser (λ = 193 nm) produced plasma in an organic gas (TMAE) has been generated and studied. These studies have determined the ion-electron recombination coefficient and the photon absorption cross-section, of the neutral gas. The dependences of wave transmission, reflection and absorption on plasma density are obtained. A new optical system with an array of cylindrical XUV coated lenses has been implemented to form a plasma sheet to study its usage as agile mirror microwave reflector. The lens system expands the incident laser beam in X direction and compresses it in Y direction to form a sheet beam. The expanded beam then passes through a vacuum chamber filled with TMAE at 50--500 nTorr to produce the plasma sheet. Space-time measurements of the plasma density and temperature as measured by a Langmuir probe are presented. XUV optical measurements of the laser beam as measured by a photodiode are presented. Initial experiments have generated a plasma sheet of 5--10 mm x 11 cm with peak plasma density of 5 x 10 13 cm -3 . A microwave source will be utilized to study the agile mirror character of the plasma sheet. Modeling of the microwave reflection from the plasma profile will also be discussed

  20. Impact of the storm-time plasma sheet ion composition on the ring current energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Petrinec, S. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Cohen, I.

    2017-12-01

    The adiabatic inward transport of the night-side near-earth ( 6 Re) hot plasma sheet is the dominant contributor to the ring current pressure during storm times. During storm times, the plasma sheet composition in the 6 - 12 Re tail region changes due to O+ entry from the lobes (from the cusp) and the direct feeding from the night side auroral region. In addition, at substorm onset the plasma sheet O+ ions can be preferentially accelerated. We use MMS and observations during two magnetic storms, 5/8/2016 and 7/16/2017, to monitor the composition changes and energization in the 6 - 12 Re plasma sheet region. For both storms the MMS apogee was in the tail. In addition, we use subsequent Van Allen Probe observations (with apogee in the dawn and dusk respectively) to test if the 6-12 Re plasma sheet, observed by MMS, is a sufficient source of the O+ in the ring current. For this we will compare the phase space density (PSD) of the plasma sheet source population and the PSD of the inner magnetosphere at constant magnetic moment values as used in Kistler et al., [2016].

  1. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  2. Associations of geomagnetic activity with plasma sheet thinning and expansion: A statistical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hones, E.W. Jr.; Pytte, T.; West, H.I. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Associations of geomagnetic activity in the auroral zone with thinnings and expansions of the magnetotail plasma sheet are examined statistically in this paper. We first identified many plasma sheet thinnings and expansions in plasma and particle data from VELA satellites and from OGO 5 without reference to the ground magnetic data. These events were grouped according to the location of the detecting satellite in the magnetotail. For each such group the times of thinning or expansion were then used as fiducial times in a superposed-epoch analysis of the geomagnetic AL index values that were recorded in 8-hour intervals centered on the event times. The results show that many plasma sheet thinnings and expansions are related to discrete negative bay structures that are the classical signature of substorms. Furthermore, they support earlier findings that plasma sheet thinning and expansion at the VELA orbit (rroughly-equal18 R/sub E/) tend to be associated with the onset of the auroral zone negative bay and the beginning of its subsidence, respectively. Earthward of rroughly-equal13-15 R/sub E/, plasma sheet expansion occurs near the time of the onset of the negative bay, again in agreement with earlier findings. A large fraction of plasma sheet expansions to half thicknesses of > or approx. =6 R/sub E/ at the VELA orbit are associated not with a baylike geomagnetic disturbance but with subsidence of a prolonged interval of disturbance. The study also shows that many plasma sheet expansions are related simply to generally enhanced geomagnetic activity showing no baylike or other distinctive features

  3. Bi-directional electrons in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shiokawa

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the occurrence characteristics of bi-directional electron pitch angle anisotropy (enhanced flux in field-aligned directions, F^ /F|| > 1.5 at energies of 0.1–30 keV using plasma and magnetic field data from the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near-Earth plasma sheet. The occurrence rate increases in the tailward direction from XGSM = - 9 RE to - 19 RE . The occurrence rate is also enhanced in the midnight sector, and furthermore, whenever the elevation angle of the magnetic field is large while the magnetic field intensity is small, B ~ 15 nT. From these facts, we conclude that the bi-directional electrons in the central plasma sheet are produced mainly in the vicinity of the neutral sheet and that the contribution from ionospheric electrons is minor. A high occurrence is also found after earthward high-speed ion flows, suggesting Fermi-type field-aligned electron acceleration in the neutral sheet. Occurrence characteristics of bi-directional electrons in the plasma sheet boundary layer are also discussed.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; magnetotail; plasma sheet

  4. Generation mechanism of the whistler-mode waves in the plasma sheet prior to magnetic reconnection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wei, X. H.; Cao, J. B.; Zhou, G. C.; Fu, H. S.; Santolík, Ondřej; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Cornilleau, N.; Fazakerley, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2013), s. 205-210 ISSN 0273-1177 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : whistler-mode waves * electron temperature anisotropy * Reconnection * the plasma sheet Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.238, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0273117713001221

  5. The lobe to plasma sheet boundary layer transition: Theory and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Treumann, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kistler, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer in the Earth's magnetotail are regions of different plasma conditions and share a common interface. The transition from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer is examined here using AMPTE/IRM data. When the satellite crossed from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer, intense narrow banded wave bursts at 1 kHz were observed an d then broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) immediately followed. Simultaneous with the onset of BEN, high energy earthward streaming proton beams at > 40 keV (> 2,700 km/s) were detected. These results are used as input into a numerical simulation to study ion beam instabilities in the PSBL

  6. A Modified Porous Titanium Sheet Prepared by Plasma-Activated Sintering for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimichi Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a contamination-free porous titanium scaffold by a plasma-activated sintering within an originally developed TiN-coated graphite mold. The surface of porous titanium sheet with or without a coated graphite mold was characterized. The cell adhesion property of porous titanium sheet was also evaluated in this study. The peak of TiC was detected on the titanium sheet processed with the graphite mold without a TiN coating. Since the titanium fiber elements were directly in contact with the carbon graphite mold during processing, surface contamination was unavoidable event in this condition. The TiC peak was not detectable on the titanium sheet processed within the TiN-coated carbon graphite mold. This modified plasma-activated sintering with the TiN-coated graphite mold would be useful to fabricate a contamination-free titanium sheet. The number of adherent cells on the modified titanium sheet was greater than that of the bare titanium plate. Stress fiber formation and the extension of the cells were observed on the titanium sheets. This modified titanium sheet is expected to be a new tissue engineering material in orthopedic bone repair.

  7. Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the Earth's plasma sheet. In total we have studied 151 ECRs within 660 h of plasma sheet data from the summer and fall of 2001 when Cluster was close to apogee at an altitude of about 15–20 RE. Cluster offers appropriate conditions for the investigation of energy conversion by the evaluation of the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J the current density. From the sign of the power density, we have identified more than three times as many Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs as Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. We also note that the CLRs appear to be stronger. To our knowledge, these are the first in situ observations confirming the general notion of the plasma sheet, on the average, behaving as a load. At the same time the plasma sheet appears to be highly structured, with energy conversion occurring in both directions between the fields and the particles. From our data we also find that the CLRs appear to be located closer to the neutral sheet, while CGRs prefer locations towards the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL. For both CLRs and CGRs, E and J in the GSM y (cross-tail direction dominate the total power density, even though the z contribution occasionally can be significant. The prevalence of the y-direction seems to be weaker for the CGRs, possibly related to a higher fluctuation level near the PSBL.

  8. Combination of platelet-rich plasma within periodontal ligament stem cell sheets enhances cell differentiation and matrix production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu; Li, Bei; Yuan, Lin; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Han; Sun, Jin; Ge, Song; Jin, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The longstanding goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate periodontal tissues. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been gaining increasing popularity for use in the orofacial region, whether PRP is useful for periodontal regeneration is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mixture of periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets and PRP promoted bone regeneration, one of the most important measurement indices of periodontal tissue regenerative capability in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different doses of PRP on the differentiation of human PDLSCs. Then cell sheet formation, extracellular matrix deposition and osteogenic gene expression in response to different doses of PRP treatment during sheet grafting was investigated. Furthermore, we implanted PDLSC sheets treated with 1% PRP subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice to evaluate their bone-regenerative capability. The results revealed that 1% PRP significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Based on the production of extracellular matrix proteins, the results of scanning electron microscopy and the expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, Runx2, Col-1 and OCN, the provision of 1% PRP for PDLSC sheets was the most effective PRP administration mode for cell sheet formation. The results of in vivo transplantation showed that 1% PRP-mediated PDLSC sheets exhibited better periodontal tissue regenerative capability than those obtained without PRP intervention. These data suggest that a suitable concentration of PRP stimulation may enhance extracellular matrix production and positively affect cell behaviour in PDLSC sheets. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Upper Hybrid Resonance of Microwaves with a Large Magnetized Plasma Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Wenqing; Guo Shijie; Ding Liang; Xu Yuemin

    2013-01-01

    A large magnetized plasma sheet with size of 60 cm × 60 cm × 2 cm was generated by a linear hollow cathode discharge under the confinement of a uniform magnetic field generated by a Helmholtz Coil. The microwave transmission characteristic of the plasma sheet was measured for different incident frequencies, in cases with the electric field polarization of the incident microwave either perpendicular or parallel to the magnetic field. In this measurement, parameters of the plasma sheet were changed by varying the discharge current and magnetic field intensity. In the experiment, upper hybrid resonance phenomena were observed when the electric field polarization of the incident wave was perpendicular to the magnetic field. These resonance phenomena cannot be found in the case of parallel polarization incidence. This result is consistent with theoretical consideration. According to the resonance condition, the electron density values at the resonance points are calculated under various experimental conditions. This kind of resonance phenomena can be used to develop a specific method to diagnose the electron density of this magnetized plasma sheet apparatus. Moreover, it is pointed out that the operating parameters of the large plasma sheet in practical applications should be selected to keep away from the upper hybrid resonance point to prevent signals from polarization distortion

  10. The double layers in the plasma sheet boundary layer during magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Yu, B.

    2014-11-01

    We studied the evolutions of double layers which appear after the magnetic reconnection through two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation results show that the double layers are formed in the plasma sheet boundary layer after magnetic reconnection. At first, the double layers which have unipolar structures are formed. And then the double layers turn into bipolar structures, which will couple with another new weak bipolar structure. Thus a new double layer or tripolar structure comes into being. The double layers found in our work are about several ten Debye lengths, which accords with the observation results. It is suggested that the electron beam formed during the magnetic reconnection is responsible for the production of the double layers.

  11. Production of free radical by magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takatori, Masahiko; Kawamura, Kazutaka

    1995-01-01

    Free radicals play an important role in plasma processing, environment problem, and space plasma and so on because of their outstanding physical properties. Although much work has been done on the free radicals in the reactive plasma, very little is known about the production mechanism of the free radicals against various plasma parameters. To overcome this problem, we have proposed to do a new system of a magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow. The sheet plasma is a special type of strongly magnetized highly ionized slab plasma. This system is controlled to the parameters of radicals and plasma independently. Therefore, it is possible to make a quantitative analysis of free radicals as the simple one. In this paper, we describe the magnetized sheet plasma with vertical gas-flow system and report the preliminary results of production of the free radical. In particular, we show to produce and control the OH free radical which has been the most commonly studied combustion species

  12. Casimir effects for a flat plasma sheet: II. Fields and stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, G

    2005-01-01

    We study the self-stresses experienced by the single plasma sheet modelled in the preceding paper, and determine the exact mean-squared Maxwell fields in vacuum around it. These are effects that probe the physics of such systems further than do the ground-state eigenvalues responsible for the cohesive energy β; in particular, unlike β they depend not only on the collective properties but also on the self-fields of the charge carriers. The classical part of the interaction between the sheet and a slowly moving charged particle follows as a byproduct. The main object is to illustrate, in simple closed or almost closed form, the consequences of imperfect (dispersive) reflectivity. The largely artificial limit of perfect reflection reduces all the results to those long familiar outside a half-space taken to reflect perfectly from the outset; but a careful examination of the approach to this limit is needed in order to resolve paradoxes associated with the surface energy, and with the mechanism which, in the limit, disjoins the two flanking half-spaces both electromagnetically and quantally

  13. Cross-tail velocity component in the plasma sheet fast flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Dmitrieva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The flux transfer in the magnetotail plasma sheet is mainly provided by the tail-aligned fast plasma flows (Bursty Bulk Flows – BBFs. In this paper we study the events with a large cross-tail velocity component, including their occurrence and relationship to the standard BBFs. We found out that a significant part of large Vy events are a subgroup connected with the BBFs propagation. The maximal deviation of the velocity vector from the X direction (about 40–50 degrees, on average is observed near the BBFs' leading front in the sheath, where the fast flow interacts with surrounding plasma. The average variation of the velocity direction in the vicinity of the BBF resembles a plasma vortex. Our results support the model, in which the BBF represents a polarized, bubble-like flux tube, propagating through the plasma sheet.

  14. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  15. A triggering of solar flare by magnetosonic waves in a neutral sheet plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Jun-ichi; Washimi, Haruichi.

    1981-09-01

    A theoretical model of the triggering of a solar flare by magnetosonic waves in a neutral sheet plasma is discussed. It is shown that the ponderomotive force due to the magnetosonic waves strongly excites the plasma convection flow in the magnetic neutral sheet which in turn enhances the tearing instability. The system of basic equations for the tearing mode including the time-averaged nonlinear effects due to the magnetosonic waves is derived and the boundary value problem is solved. The results show that the growth time of the instability is shortened to about 100 sec for reasonable magnetosonic wave intensity. (author)

  16. Survey of 0.1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Shelley, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    A large statistical survey of the 0.1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition has been carried out using data obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE 1 between 10 and 23 R/sub E/ during 1978 and 1979. This survey includes more than 10 times the quantity of data used in earlier studies of the same topic and makes it possible to investigate in finer detail the relationship between the ion composition and the substorm activity. The larger data base also makes it possible for the first time to study the spatial distribution of the principal ion species. As found in previous studies, the ion composition has a large variance at any given value of the AE index, but a number of distinct trends emerge when the data are averaged at each activity level. During quiet conditions the plasma sheet is dominated by ions of solar origin (H + and He ++ ), as found in earlier studies, and these ions are most numerous during extended periods of very low activity (AE< or approx. =30 γ). The quiet time density of these ions is particularly large in the flanks of the plasma sheet (GSM Yapprox. +- 10 R/sub E/), where it is about twice as large as it is near the central axis of the plasma sheet (Y = Z = 0). In contrast, the energy of these ions peaks near the central axis

  17. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillman, Eric D., E-mail: eric.gillman.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [National Research Council Postdoctoral Associate at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Amatucci, W. E. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  18. The plasma sheet and boundary layers under northward IMF: A multi-point and multi-instrument perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Lavraud, B.; Escoubet, C. P.; Milan, S.E.; Nykyri, K.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J.A.; Friedel, R.H.W.; Frey, H.; Bogdanova, Y.V.; Asnes, A.; Laakso, H.; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Masson, A.; Opgenoorth, H.; Vallat, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Lahiff, A.; Owen, C. J.; Pitout, F.; Pu, Y.; Shen, C.; Zong, Q.-G.; Rème, H.; Scudder, J. D.; Zhang, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2008), s. 1619-1629 ISSN 0273-1177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : plasma sheet * magnetopshere * cold dense plasma sheet Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2008

  19. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  20. Spectral functions for the flat plasma sheet model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirozhenko, I G

    2006-01-01

    The present work is based on Bordag M et al 2005 (J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 11027) where the spectral analysis of the electromagnetic field on the background of an infinitely thin flat plasma layer is carried out. The solutions to Maxwell equations with the appropriate matching conditions at the plasma layer are derived and the spectrum of electromagnetic oscillations is determined. The spectral zeta function and the integrated heat kernel are constructed for different branches of the spectrum in an explicit form. The asymptotic expansion of the integrated heat kernel at small values of the evolution parameter is derived. The local heat kernels are considered also

  1. Energization of the Ring Current through Convection of Substorm Enhancements of the Plasma Sheet Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, A.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C.; Spence, H. E.; Henderson, M. G.; Matsui, H.

    2017-12-01

    It has been shown that electric field strength and night-side plasma sheet density are the two best predictors of the adiabatic energy gain of the ring current during geomagnetic storms (Liemohn and Khazanov, 2005). While H+ dominates the ring current during quiet times, O+ can contribute substantially during geomagnetic storms. Substorm activity provides a mechanism to enhance the energy density of O+ in the plasma sheet during geomagnetic storms, which is then convected adiabatically into the inner-magnetosphere. Using the Van Allen Probes data in the the plasma sheet source region (defined as L>5.5 during storms) and the inner magnetosphere, along with LANL-GEO data to identify substorm injection times, we show that adiabatic convection of O+ enhancements in the source region can explain the observed enhancements in the inner magnetosphere. We use the UNH-IMEF electric field model to calculate drift times from the source region to the inner magnetosphere to test whether enhancements in the inner-magnetosphere can be explained by dipolarization driven enhancements in the plasma sheet source hours before.

  2. Communication through a plasma sheet around a fast moving vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-10-01

    Investigation of the complicated problem of scattering of electromagnetic waves on turbulent pulsations induced by a sheared flow inside a plasma sheath is important for many applications including communication with hypersonic and re-entry vehicles. Theoretical and computational work aimed at improving the understanding of electromagnetic wave scattering processes in such turbulent plasmas is presented. We analyze excitation of low frequency ion-acoustic type oscillations in a compressible plasma flow with flow velocity shear and influence of such turbulent pulsations on scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves used for communication purposes. We have appropriately included in our analysis the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals as well as electron - ion collisions. Results of numerical solutions for plasma density and electric field perturbations for different velocity profiles have been used in the derived expressions for scattered wave energy and scattering cross section. Work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory and Air Force Office Of Scientific Research Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, A Lockheed Martin Company, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Evaluation of the sheet mechanical response to laser welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmignani, B.; Daneri, A.; Toselli, G.; Bellei, M.

    1995-07-01

    The simulation of the mechanical response of steel sheets, due to the heating during welding processes by a laser source beam, obtained by Abaqus standard code, is discussed. Different hypotheses for the material behaviour at temperatures greater than the fusion one have been tested and compared; in particular, some tests have been made taking the annealing effect into account by means of an user routine UMAT developed ad hoc. This work was presented at the 8th international Abaqus Users' conference at Paris, 31 May - 2 June 1995

  4. Ion beam generation at the plasma sheet boundary layer by kinetic Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K.; Smith, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave, an Alfven wave with a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the ion gyroradius, can diffuse ions both in velocity and coordinate spaces with comparable transport rates. This may lead to the generation of ion beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). To investigate the ion beam generation process numerically, a two-dimensional quasi-linear code was constructed. Assuming that the plasma β (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) varies from β = 1 to β << 1 across the magnetic field, the dynamics of the ion beam generation in the PSBL was studied. It was found that if your start with an ion distribution function which monotonically decreases with velocity along the magnetic field and a density gradient across the magnetic field, ions diffuse in velocity-coordinate space until nearly a plateau is established along the diffusion path. Depending on the topology of the magnetic field at the lobe side of the simulation system, i.e., open or closed field lines, the ion distribution function may or may not reach a steady state. If the field lines are open there, i.e., if the diffusion extends into the lobe, the double diffusion process may provide a mechanism for continuously transferring the ions from the central plasma sheet to the lobe. The authors comment on the effect of the particle loss on the establishment of the pressure balance in the plasma sheet

  5. Plasma sheet fast flows and auroral dynamics during substorm: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Borodkova

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Interball-1 observations of a substorm development in the mid-tail on 16 December 1998 are compared with the auroral dynamics obtained from the Polar UV imager. Using these data, the relationship between plasma flow directions in the tail and the location of the auroral activation is examined. Main attention is given to tailward and earth-ward plasma flows, interpreted as signatures of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL. It is unambiguously shown that in the mid-plasma sheet the flows were directed tailward when the auroral bulge developed equatorward of the spacecraft ionospheric footprint. On the contrary, when active auroras moved poleward of the Interball-1 projection, earthward fast flow bursts were observed. This confirms the concept that the NENL (or flow reversal region is the source of auroras forming the poleward edge of the auroral bulge. The observed earthward flow bursts have all typical signatures of Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs, described by Angelopolous et al. (1992. These BBFs are related to substorm activations starting at the poleward edge of the expanded auroral bulge. We interpret the BBFs as a result of reconnection pulses occurring tail-ward of Interball-1. In addition, some non-typically observed phenomena were detected in the plasma sheet during this substorm: (i tailward/earthward flows were superimposed on a very strong duskward flow, and (ii wavy structures of both magnetic field and plasma density were registered. The latter observation is probably linked to the filamentary structure of the current sheet.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  6. Compressional Pc5 type pulsations in the morningside plasma sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaivads, A.; Baumjohann, W.; Haerendel, G.; Nakamura, R.; Kucharek, H.; Klecker, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Lessard, M.R. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Kistler, L.M. [New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United States). Space Science Center; Mukai, T.; Nishida, A. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    We study compressional pulsations in Pc5 frequency range observed in the dawn-side at distances of about 10 R{sub E}, close to the magnetic equator. We use data obtained during two events of conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail: 1000-1700 UT on 9 March 1998, and 0200-0600 UT on 25 April 1998. In both events, pulsations are observed after substorm activity. The pulsations are antisymmetric with respect to the equatorial plane (even mode), and move eastward with phase velocity close to plasma velocity. The pulsations tend to be pressure balanced. We also discuss possible generation mechanisms of the pulsations. (orig.)

  7. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  8. Latitudinal distribution of the Jovian plasma sheet ions observed by Juno JADE-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. K. H.; Valek, P. W.; McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Ebert, R. W.; Levin, S.; Louarn, P.; Pollock, C. J.; Ranquist, D. A.; Szalay, J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Jovian plasma sheet is a region where the centrifugal force dominates the heavy ion plasma. Properties of the plasma sheet ions near the equatorial plane have been studied with in-situ measurements from the Pioneer, Voyager, and Galileo spacecraft. However, the ion properties for the off-equator regions are not well known due to the limited measurements. Juno is the first polar orbiting spacecraft that can investigate the high latitude region of the Jovian magnetosphere. With Juno's unique trajectory, we will investigate the latitudinal distribution of the Jovian plasma sheet ions using measurements from the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment Ion sensor (JADE-I). JADE-I measures an ion's energy-per-charge (E/Q) from 0.01 keV/q to 46.2 keV/q with an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) and a mass-per-charge (M/Q) up to 64 amu/q with a carbon-foil-based time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. We have shown that the ambiguity between and (both have M/Q of 16) can be resolved in JADE-I using a semi-empirical simulation tool based on carbon foil effects (i.e., charge state modification, angular scattering, and energy loss) from incident ions passing through the TOF mass spectrometer. Based on the simulation results, we have developed an Ion Composition Analysis Tool (ICAT) that determines ion composition at each energy step of JADE-I (total of 64 steps). The velocity distribution for each ion species can be obtained from the ion composition as a function of each energy step. Since there is an ambipolar electric field due to mobile electrons and equatorially confined heavy ions, we expect to see acceleration along the field line. This study will show the species separated velocity distribution at various latitudes to investigate how the plasma sheet ions evolve along the field line.

  9. Localized fast flow disturbance observed in the plasma sheet and in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nakamura

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available An isolated plasma sheet flow burst took place at 22:02 UT, 1 September 2002, when the Cluster footpoint was located within the area covered by the Magnetometers-Ionospheric Radars-All-sky Cameras Large Experiment (MIRACLE. The event was associated with a clear but weak ionospheric disturbance and took place during a steady southward IMF interval, about 1h preceding a major substorm onset. Multipoint observations, both in space and from the ground, allow us to discuss the temporal and spatial scale of the disturbance both in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Based on measurements from four Cluster spacecraft it is inferred that Cluster observed the dusk side part of a localized flow channel in the plasma sheet with a flow shear at the front, suggesting a field-aligned current out from the ionosphere. In the ionosphere the equivalent current pattern and possible field-aligned current location show a pattern similar to the auroral streamers previously obtained during an active period, except for its spatial scale and amplitude. It is inferred that the footpoint of Cluster was located in the region of an upward field-aligned current, consistent with the magnetospheric observations. The entire disturbance in the ionosphere lasted about 10min, consistent with the time scale of the current sheet disturbance in the magnetosphere. The plasma sheet bulk flow, on the other hand, had a time scale of about 2min, corresponding to the time scale of an equatorward excursion of the enhanced electrojet. These observations confirm that localized enhanced convection in the magnetosphere and associated changes in the current sheet structure produce a signature with consistent temporal and spatial scale at the conjugate ionosphere.

  10. Convective growth of broadband turbulence in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Convective growth of slow and fast beam acoustic waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) is investigated. It has been shown previously that a could ion population must be present in order to excite beam acoustic waves in the PSBL. However, growth rates are significantly enhanced when warm plasma sheet boundary layer ions are present. Net wave growth along a ray path is determined by convective growth. This quantity is calculated for particle distribution models consistent with the PSBL where the intensity of broadband turbulence is observed to peak. Total number density dependence on beam acoustic convective growth is evaluated, and it is found that even for low density conditions of ∼0.01 cm -3 , a measurable level of broadband turbulence is expected. Relative drift effects between cold and warm ion populations are also considered. In particular, it is found that slow mode convective growth can be enhanced when slowly streaming cold ions are present, compared to fast ion streams

  11. Frequency-dependent absorbance of broadband terahertz wave in dense plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Qi, Binbin; Jiang, Xiankai; Zhu, Zhi; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Yiming

    2018-05-01

    Due to the ability of accurate fingerprinting and low-ionization for different substances, terahertz (THz) technology has a lot of crucial applications in material analysis, information transfer, and safety inspection, etc. However, the spectral characteristic of atmospheric gas and ionized gas has not been widely investigated, which is important for the remote sensing application. Here, in this paper, we investigate the absorbance of broadband terahertz wave in dense plasma sheet generated by femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that as the terahertz wave transmits through the plasma sheet formed, respectively, in carbon dioxide, oxygen, argon and nitrogen, spectrum presents completely different and frequency-dependent absorbance. The reasons for these absorption peaks are related to the molecular polarity, electric charge, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, and collisional absorption of gas molecules. These results have significant implications for the remote sensing of gas medium.

  12. Plasma sheet instability related to the westward traveling surge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.; Perraut, S.; Robert, P.; Morane, A.; Pedersen, A.; Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Aparicio, B.; Rodgers, D.; Pellinen, R.

    1991-01-01

    The detailed analysis of an isolated dispersionless substorm is performed on the basis of field and particle data collected in situ by the geostationary satellite GEOS 2 and of data from ground-based instruments installed close to the GEOS 2 magnetic footprint. These data give evidence for (1) quasi-periodic variations of the magnetic field configuration, which is alternatively taillike and dipolelike, (2) in-phase oscillations of the flux of energetic electrons, which is high when the configuration is dipolelike and vice versa, (3) a gradient in the flux of energetic ions, which is, on the average, earthward but undergoes large fluctuations around this average direction, and (4) large transient fluctuations of the quasi-dc electric field, which reverses its direction from eastward to westward. It is shown that these results are consistent with the development of an instability which leads to a westward propagating wave. The source of the instability is the differential drift of energetic electrons and ions in a highly stressed magnetic field configuration (in a high β plasma). Evidence is given for a system of localized field-aligned currents flowing alternately earthward and equatorward at the leading and trailing edges of the westward propagating wave. This current system resulting from the temporal development of the instability produces the so-called Pi 2 pulsations, at the ionospheric level. The closure of this current system in the equatorial region leads to a current antiparallel to the tail current, and therefore to its reduction or cancellation. This reduction/cancellation of the tail current restores the dipole magnetic field (dipolarization) and generates a large westward directed induced electric field (injection)

  13. Particle balance analysis on carbon sheet pump applied to the GAMMA10 tandem mirror plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimoto, Yuki; Nakashima, Yousuke; Ishinuki, Eiichi; Kobayashi, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Tamano, Teruo; Yatsu, Kiyoshi; Sagara, Akio

    2000-01-01

    Carbon Sheet Pump (CSP) is expected as a tool for reduction of hydrogen recycling. In this paper, particle balance in the CSP is described. The pumping efficiencies estimated from the time evolution of hydrogen pressures during plasma discharges and those estimated from the thermal desorption experiments have no remarkable difference between the cases of 30degC and 200degC within experimental errors. In cases that CSP is used in actual plasma conditions, we established a method which reduces adsorbed gases on the CSP surface with sustaining a sufficient pumping efficiency by continuously heating CSP. (author)

  14. Oil Notifications: Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) fact sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) is a national computer database which provides the only centralized mechanism for documenting and verifying incident notification information as initially reported to the National Response Center (NRC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and to a limited extent, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). The initial notification data may be followed up with updated information from various Federal, State and local response authorities, as appropriate. ERNS contains data that can be used to analyze release notifications, support emergency planning efforts, and assist decision makers in developing spill prevention programs. The fact sheet provides summary information on notifications of releases of oil reported in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA). Under Section 311 of the CWA, discharges of oil which: (1) cause a sheen to appear on the surface of the water; (2) violate applicable water quality standards; or (3) cause sludge or emulsion to be deposited beneath the surface of the water or adjoining shoreline, must be reported to the NRC

  15. Ice Sheet Roughness Estimation Based on Impulse Responses Acquired in the Global Ice Sheet Mapping Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamsuwan, N.; Johnson, J. T.; Jezek, K. C.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    The Global Ice Sheet Mapping Orbiter (GISMO) mission was developed to address scientific needs to understand the polar ice subsurface structure. This NASA Instrument Incubator Program project is a collaboration between Ohio State University, the University of Kansas, Vexcel Corporation and NASA. The GISMO design utilizes an interferometric SAR (InSAR) strategy in which ice sheet reflected signals received by a dual-antenna system are used to produce an interference pattern. The resulting interferogram can be used to filter out surface clutter so as to reveal the signals scattered from the base of the ice sheet. These signals are further processed to produce 3D-images representing basal topography of the ice sheet. In the past three years, the GISMO airborne field campaigns that have been conducted provide a set of useful data for studying geophysical properties of the Greenland ice sheet. While topography information can be obtained using interferometric SAR processing techniques, ice sheet roughness statistics can also be derived by a relatively simple procedure that involves analyzing power levels and the shape of the radar impulse response waveforms. An electromagnetic scattering model describing GISMO impulse responses has previously been proposed and validated. This model suggested that rms-heights and correlation lengths of the upper surface profile can be determined from the peak power and the decay rate of the pulse return waveform, respectively. This presentation will demonstrate a procedure for estimating the roughness of ice surfaces by fitting the GISMO impulse response model to retrieved waveforms from selected GISMO flights. Furthermore, an extension of this procedure to estimate the scattering coefficient of the glacier bed will be addressed as well. Planned future applications involving the classification of glacier bed conditions based on the derived scattering coefficients will also be described.

  16. Growth of carbon fibres, sheets and tubes on diamond films under high power plasma etching conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalpando, I. [Centro de Investigacion de los Recursos Naturales, Antigua Normal Rural, Salaices, Lopez, Chihuahua (Mexico); John, P.; Wilson, J. I. B., E-mail: isaelav@hotmail.com [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh, EH14-4AS (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-01

    The application of diamond as a plasma facing material for fusion reactors can be limited by unknown reactions between diamond and the chamber materials transported by the plasma. Transformation of diamond to other structures can cause problems such as contamination of the plasma with loose particles or retention of gases. We have seen that diamond thin films are eroded under hydrogen plasma etching, but if silicon is present the growth of various carbon structures on diamond films is observed. We have produced carbon with different morphologies on diamond films including fibres, sheets with flower-like shapes and tubes and proposed growth mechanisms based on the results of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Sample surfaces contain silicon and are oxidised having COO and CO groups as seen by XP S analysis. Raman analyses revealed a spectrum typical for graphite combined with that from diamond that remains on the surface after hydrogen bombardment. The results of this sturdy show the experimental conditions in which carbon fibres, sheets and tubes are produced under high-power hydrogen etching of diamond films and open the possibility to other applications such as catalysts, sensors and the production of electrodes. (Author)

  17. Growth of carbon fibres, sheets and tubes on diamond films under high power plasma etching conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalpando, I.; John, P.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2017-01-01

    The application of diamond as a plasma facing material for fusion reactors can be limited by unknown reactions between diamond and the chamber materials transported by the plasma. Transformation of diamond to other structures can cause problems such as contamination of the plasma with loose particles or retention of gases. We have seen that diamond thin films are eroded under hydrogen plasma etching, but if silicon is present the growth of various carbon structures on diamond films is observed. We have produced carbon with different morphologies on diamond films including fibres, sheets with flower-like shapes and tubes and proposed growth mechanisms based on the results of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Sample surfaces contain silicon and are oxidised having COO and CO groups as seen by XP S analysis. Raman analyses revealed a spectrum typical for graphite combined with that from diamond that remains on the surface after hydrogen bombardment. The results of this sturdy show the experimental conditions in which carbon fibres, sheets and tubes are produced under high-power hydrogen etching of diamond films and open the possibility to other applications such as catalysts, sensors and the production of electrodes. (Author)

  18. Interpretation of magnetosonic waves in the boundary regions of the plasma sheet as seen by the ISEE 3 spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Hopcraft, K.I.; Murphy, N.

    1987-01-01

    Recent calculations that derive the normal-mode spectrum of an idealized magnetic current sheet are discussed. The Harris neutral-sheet equilibrium is perturbed with an ideal MHD displacement. The longitudinal polarization of the fundamental modes is calculated as a function of the position in the sheet. Using data from the energetic-ion instrument aboard ISEE 3, the thickness of the plasma sheet in the deep geomagnetic tail is estimated. This parameter enables a quantitative comparison between the boundary oscillations reported by Tsurutani and Smith (1984) and the normal mode oscillations derived by Hopcraft and Smith (1985) to be performed. The normal-mode solutions are found to be consistent with observation. Further aspects of the MHD wave spectrum that may lead to an observable variation of the mode character across the boundary of the plasma sheet are pointed out. 12 references

  19. Equilibrium structure of the plasma sheet boundary layer-lobe interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, H.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1990-01-01

    Observations are presented which show that plasma parameters vary on a scale length smaller than the ion gyroradius at the interface between the plasma sheet boundary layer and the lobe. The Vlasov equation is used to investigate the properties of such a boundary layer. The existence, at the interface, of a density gradient whose scale length is smaller than the ion gyroradius implies that an electrostatic potential is established in order to maintain quasi-neutrality. Strongly sheared (scale lengths smaller than the ion gyroradius) perpendicular and parallel (to the ambient magnetic field) electron flows develop whose peak velocities are on the order of the electron thermal speed and which carry a net current. The free energy of the sheared flows can give rise to a broadband spectrum of electrostatic instabilities starting near the electron plasma frequency and extending below the lower hybrid frequency.

  20. The Plasma Sheet as Natural Symmetry Plane for Dipolarization Fronts in the Earth's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühauff, D.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, observations of multispacecraft mission Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms are used for statistical investigation of dipolarization fronts in the near-Earth plasma sheet of the magnetotail. Using very stringent criteria, 460 events are detected in almost 10 years of mission data. Minimum variance analysis is used to determine the normal directions of the phase fronts, providing evidence for the existence of a natural symmetry of these phenomena, given by the neutral sheet of the magnetotail. This finding enables the definition of a local coordinate system based on the Tsyganenko model, reflecting the intrinsic orientation of the neutral sheet and, therefore, the dipolarization fronts. In this way, the comparison of events with very different background conditions is improved. Through this study, the statistical results of Liu, Angelopoulos, Runov, et al. (2013) are both confirmed and extended. In a case study, the knowledge of this plane of symmetry helps to explain the concave curvature of dipolarization fronts in the XZ plane through phase propagation speeds of magnetoacoustic waves. A second case study is presented to determine the central current system of a passing dipolarization front through a constellation of three spacecraft. With this information, a statistical analysis of spacecraft observations above and below the neutral sheet is used to provide further evidence for the neutral sheet as the symmetry plane and the central current system. Furthermore, it is shown that the signatures of dipolarization fronts are under certain conditions closely related to that of flux ropes, indicating a possible relationship between these two transient phenomena.

  1. Simultaneous Measurements of Substorm-Related Electron Energization in the Ionosphere and the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J.; Nishimura, Y.; Kero, A.

    2017-10-01

    On 26 March 2008, simultaneous measurements of a large substorm were made using the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS) spacecraft, and all sky cameras. After the onset, electron precipitation reached energies ≳100 keV leading to intense D region ionization. Identifying the source of energetic precipitation has been a challenge because of lack of quantitative and magnetically conjugate measurements of loss cone electrons. In this study, we use the maximum entropy inversion technique to invert altitude profiles of ionization measured by the radar to estimate the loss cone energy spectra of primary electrons. By comparing them with magnetically conjugate measurements from THEMIS-D spacecraft in the nightside plasma sheet, we constrain the source location and acceleration mechanism of precipitating electrons of different energy ranges. Our analysis suggests that the observed electrons ≳100 keV are a result of pitch angle scattering of electrons originating from or tailward of the inner plasma sheet at 9RE, possibly through interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The electrons of energy 10-100 keV are produced by pitch angle scattering due to a potential drop of ≲10 kV in the auroral acceleration region (AAR) as well as wave-particle interactions in and tailward of the AAR. This work demonstrates the utility of magnetically conjugate ground- and space-based measurements in constraining the source of energetic electron precipitation. Unlike in situ spacecraft measurements, ground-based incoherent scatter radars combined with an appropriate inversion technique can be used to provide remote and continuous-time estimates of loss cone electrons in the plasma sheet.

  2. Distribution of O+ ions in the plasma sheet and locations of substorm onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Y.; Christon, S. P.; Frey, H. U.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the effect of O+ ions on substorm onsets by examining the relation between the substorm onset location and the distribution of the O+/H+ number density ratio before the onset in the various regions within the plasma sheet (-8 RE > XGSM > -32 RE). We use 9-212 keV/e ion flux data observed by Geotail/Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC)/Suprathermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS) instrument and the IMAGE/Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) substorm onset list presented by Frey et al. [Frey, H. U., S. B. Mende, V. Angelopoulos, and E. F. Donovan (2004), Substorm onset observations by IMAGE-FUV, J. Geophys. Res., 109, A10304, doi:10.1029/2004JA010607]. The results are summarized as follows. Substorm onsets, which we identify by auroral initial brightenings, are likely to occur in the more dusk-(dawn-)ward region when the O+/H+ number density ratio is high in the dusk (dawn) side. This property is observed only in the near-Earth plasma sheet (at -8 RE > XGSM > -14 RE). The above-mentioned property holds in each of two groups: substorm events due to internal instability of the magnetosphere (i.e., internally triggered substorms) and events due to external changes in the solar wind or the interplanetary magnetic field (i.e., externally triggered substorms). Thus, we conclude that the substorm onset location depends on the density of O+ ions in the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to onset, whether the substorm is triggered internally or externally.

  3. Modes of supraglacial lake drainage and dynamic ice sheet response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S. B.; Behn, M. D.; Joughin, I. R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate modes of supraglacial lake drainage using geophysical, ground, and remote sensing observations over the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet. Lakes exhibit a characteristic life cycle defined by a pre-drainage, drainage, and post-drainage phase. In the pre-drainage phase winter snow fills pre-existing cracks and stream channels, efficiently blocking past drainage conduits. As temperatures increase in the spring, surface melting commences, initially saturating the snow pack and subsequently forming a surface network of streams that fills the lake basins. Basins continue to fill until lake drainage commences, which for individual lakes occurs at different times depending on the previous winter snow accumulation and summer temperatures. Three styles of drainage behavior have been observed: (1) no drainage, (2) slow drainage over the side into an adjacent pre-existing crack, and (3) rapid drainage through a new crack formed beneath the lake basin. Moreover, from year-to-year individual lakes exhibit different drainage behaviors. Lakes that drain slowly often utilize the same outflow channel for multiple years, creating dramatic canyons in the ice. Ultimately, these surface channels are advected out of the lake basin and a new channel forms. In the post-drainage phase, melt water continues to access the bed typically through a small conduit (e.g. moulin) formed near a local topographic minimum along the main drainage crack, draining the lake catchment throughout the remainder of the melt season. This melt water input to the bed leads to continued basal lubrication and enhanced ice flow compared to background velocities. Lakes that do not completely drain freeze over to form a surface ice layer that persists into the following year. Our results show that supraglacial lakes show a spectrum of drainage behaviors and that these styles of drainage lead to varying rates and timing of surface meltwater delivery to the bed resulting in different dynamic ice

  4. Cluster view of the plasma sheet boundary layer and bursty bulk flow connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. W. Lennartsson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The high-latitude boundaries of the plasma sheet (PSBL are dynamic latitude zones of recurring and transient (minutes to tens of minutes earthward and magnetic field-aligned bursts of plasma, each being more or less confined in longitude as well, whose ionic component is dominated by protons with flux, energies and density that are consistent with a central plasma sheet (CPS source at varying distance (varying rates of energy time dispersion, sometimes as close as the ~19 RE Cluster apogees, or closer still. The arguably most plausible source consists of so called "bursty bulk flows" (BBFs, i.e. proton bulk flow events with large, positive and bursty GSE vx. Known mainly from CPS observations made at GSE x>−30 RE, the BBF type events probably take place much further downtail as well. What makes the BBFs an especially plausible source are (1 their earthward bulk flow, which helps explain the lack of distinctive latitudinal PSBL energy dispersion, and (2 their association with a transient strong increase of the local tail Bz component ("local dipolarization". The enhanced Bz provides intermittent access to higher latitudes for the CPS plasma, resulting in local density reductions in the tail midplane, as illustrated here by proton data from the Cluster CIS CODIF instruments. Another sign of kinship between the PSBL bursts and the BBFs is their similar spatial fine structure. The PSBL bursts have prominent filaments aligned along the magnetic field with transverse flux gradients that are often characterized by local ~10 keV proton gyroradii scale size (or even smaller, as evidenced by Cluster measurements. The same kind of fine structure is also found during Cluster near-apogee traversals of the tail midplane, as illustrated here and implied by recently published statistics on BBFs obtained with Cluster multipoint observations at varying satellite separations. Altogether, the Cluster observations described here mesh rather well with theories

  5. Compressional wave events in the dawn plasma sheet observed by Interball-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Verkhoglyadova

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Compressional waves with periods greater than 2 min (about 10-30 min at low geomagnetic latitudes, namely compressional Pc5 waves, are studied. The data set obtained with magnetometer MIF-M and plasma analyzer instrument CORALL on board the Interball-1 are analyzed. Measurements performed in October 1995 and October 1996 in the dawn plasma sheet at -30 RE ≤ XGSM and |ZGSM| ≤ 10 RE are considered. Anti-phase variations of magnetic field and ion plasma pressures are analyzed by searching for morphological similarities in the two time series. It is found that longitudinal and transverse magnetic field variations with respect to the background magnetic field are of the same order of magnitude. Plasma velocities are processed for each time period of the local dissimilarity in the pressure time series. Velocity disturbances occur mainly transversely to the local field line. The data reveal the rotation of the velocity vector. Because of the field line curvature, there is no fixed position of the rotational plane in the space. These vortices are localized in the regions of anti-phase variations of the magnetic field and plasma pressures, and the vortical flows are associated with the compressional Pc5 wave process. A theoretical model is proposed to explain the main features of the nonlinear wave processes. Our main goal is to study coupling of drift Alfven wave and magnetosonic wave in a warm inhomogeneous plasma. A vortex is the partial solution of the set of the equations when the compression is neglected. A compression effect gives rise to a nonlinear soliton-like solution.Key words. Magnetosphere physics (magnetotail · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; non-linear phenomena

  6. Spatial variations in the suprathermal ion distributions during substorms in the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebius, E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F.M.; Hamilton, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Using data from AMPTE IRM and AMPTE CCE, the authors have determined the pre- and post-injection suprathermal energy spectra for the ion species H + , O + , He + , and He ++ for six events in which substorm-associated particle injections are observed in both the near-Earth plasma sheet and farther down the tail. They find similar spectral changes in both locations, with the spectra becoming harder with the injection. Post-injection, the flux decreases exponentially with radial distance. Approximately the same gradient is observed in all species. In addition, they find that although the O + /H + and the He ++ /H + ratios increase with energy per charge, the ratios are approximately the same at the same energy per charge at the two spacecraft. The observations are difficult to explain either with a model in which the ions are accelerated at a neutral line and transported toward Earth or with a model in which the ions are accelerated in the near-Earth region by current disruption/diversion and transported down the tail. In either case, the ions would have to be transported throughout the tail without much energization or deenergization in order to explain the energy per charge correlations. Further, earthward transport without energization would not lead to the observed radial gradient. A combination of these acceleration mechanisms, a disturbance that propagates throughout the plasma sheet, or a more global mechanism may explain the observations

  7. Geotail observations of plasma sheet ion composition over 16 years: On variations of average plasma ion mass and O+ triggering substorm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, M.; Ieda, A.; Christon, S. P.

    2009-07-01

    We examined long-term variations of ion composition in the plasma sheet, using energetic (9.4-212.1 keV/e) ion flux data obtained by the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS) sensor of the energetic particle and ion composition (EPIC) instrument on board the Geotail spacecraft. EPIC/STICS observations are available from 17 October 1992 for more than 16 years, covering the declining phase of solar cycle 22, all of solar cycle 23, and the early phase of solar cycle 24. This unprecedented long-term data set revealed that (1) the He+/H+ and O+/H+ flux ratios in the plasma sheet were dependent on the F10.7 index; (2) the F10.7 index dependence is stronger for O+/H+ than He+/H+; (3) the O+/H+ flux ratio is also weakly correlated with the ΣKp index; and (4) the He2+/H+ flux ratio in the plasma sheet appeared to show no long-term trend. From these results, we derived empirical equations related to plasma sheet ion composition and the F10.7 index and estimated that the average plasma ion mass changes from ˜1.1 amu during solar minimum to ˜2.8 amu during solar maximum. In such a case, the Alfvén velocity during solar maximum decreases to ˜60% of the solar minimum value. Thus, physical processes in the plasma sheet are considered to be much different between solar minimum and solar maximum. We also compared long-term variation of the plasma sheet ion composition with that of the substorm occurrence rate, which is evaluated by the number of Pi2 pulsations. No correlation or negative correlation was found between them. This result contradicts the O+ triggering substorm model, in which heavy ions in the plasma sheet increase the growth rate of the linear ion tearing mode and play an important role in localization and initiation of substorms. In contrast, O+ ions in the plasma sheet may prevent occurrence of substorms.

  8. Thermomechanical responses of concrete members strengthened with cfrp sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Abdulaziz

    Strengthening structural members means to be able to carry additional loads. Since, 1990s, a lot of materials and techniques have been established to not only increasing the capacity of member but also facing deterioration. Deterioration has become one of the worst highly maintenance cost. According to The ASCE, 27.1% of all bridges in the United States are not effectual. This is because the high traffic reflects negatively to structural members and cause deterioration of these members. This problem has been cost a lot of money. In addition, FRP has approved that it can increase the capacity of member and overcome some disadvantages such as deterioration. Therefore, CFRP sheet has become widely used. However, high temperatures affect the performance of externally bonded CFRP sheet negatively. Investigation should be carried out on relaxation and flexural performance of members under different temperatures. Therefore, this thesis focus on analyzing and investigating the performance of strengthened members exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 175 °C). The experimental program was divided to two main parts. First, 144 strengthen concrete blocks 100mm X 150mm X 75mm has been exposed to elevated temperatures. These blocks have two main categories, which are different CFRP sheet width, and different CFRP sheet length. Different CFRP width has three types, which are type 0.25B (25mm x 100mm), type 0.5B (50mm x 100mm) and type 0.75B (75mm x 100mm). Also, Different CFRP length has three types, which are type L e (bonded area of 50 mm by 90mm), 1.25 Le (area of 50mm by 125mm) and type 1.5Le (50mm by 137 mm). Second, studying the performance of RC beams exposed to elevated temperatures.

  9. Initial rigid response and softening transition of highly stretchable kirigami sheet materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Midori; Okumura, Ko

    2016-04-27

    We study, experimentally and theoretically, the mechanical response of sheet materials on which line cracks or cuts are arranged in a simple pattern. Such sheet materials, often called kirigami (the Japanese words, kiri and gami, stand for cut and paper, respectively), demonstrate a unique mechanical response promising for various engineering applications such as stretchable batteries: kirigami sheets possess a mechanical regime in which sheets are highly stretchable and very soft compared with the original sheets without line cracks, by virtue of out-of-plane deformation. However, this regime starts after a transition from an initial stiff regime governed by in-plane deformation. In other words, the softness of the kirigami structure emerges as a result of a transition from the two-dimensional to three-dimensional deformation, i.e., from stretching to bending. We clarify the physical origins of the transition and mechanical regimes, which are revealed to be governed by simple scaling laws. The results could be useful for controlling and designing the mechanical response of sheet materials including cell sheets for medical regeneration and relevant to the development of materials with tunable stiffness and mechanical force sensors.

  10. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Observations of Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Earth's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Akhavan-Tafti, M.; Poh, G.; Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Gershman, D. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    A major discovery by the Cluster mission and the previous generation of science missions is the presence of earthward and tailward moving magnetic flux ropes in the Earth's plasma sheet. However, the lack of high-time resolution plasma measurements severely limited progress concerning the formation and evolution of these reconnection generated structures. We use high-time resolution magnetic and electric field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission's first tail season to investigate: 1) the distribution of flux rope diameters relative to the local ion and electron inertial lengths; 2) the internal force balance sustaining these structures; and 3) the magnetic connectivity of the flux ropes to the Earth and/or the interplanetary medium; 4) the specific entropy of earthward moving flux ropes and the possible effect of "buoyancy" on how deep they penetrate into the inner magnetosphere; and 5) evidence for coalescence of adjacent flux ropes and/or the division of existing flux ropes through the formation of secondary X-lines. The results of these initial analyses will be discussed in terms of their implications for reconnection-driven magnetospheric dynamics and substorms.

  11. Spatial Distribution and Semiannual Variation of Cold-Dense Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shichen; Shi, Quanqi; Tian, Anmin; Nowada, Motoharu; Degeling, Alexander W.; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Rae, I. Jonathan; Fu, Suiyan; Zhang, Hui; Pu, Zuyin; Fazakerly, Andrew N.

    2018-01-01

    The cold-dense plasma sheet (CDPS) plays an important role in the entry process of the solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere. Investigating the seasonal variation of CDPS occurrences will help us better understand the long-term variation of plasma exchange between the solar wind and magnetosphere, but any seasonal variation of CDPS occurrences has not yet been reported in the literature. In this paper, we investigate the seasonal variation of the occurrence rate of CDPS using Geotail data from 1996 to 2015 and find a semiannual variation of the CDPS occurrences. Given the higher probability of solar wind entry under stronger northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, 20 years of IMF data (1996-2015) are used to investigate the seasonal variation of IMF Bz under northward IMF conditions. We find a semiannual variation of IMF Bz, which is consistent with the Russell-McPherron (R-M) effect. We therefore suggest that the semiannual variation of CDPS may be related to the R-M effect.

  12. Numerical simulations of plasma equilibrium in a one-dimensional current sheet with a nonzero normal magnetic field component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingalev, O. V.; Mingalev, I. V.; Malova, Kh. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2007-01-01

    The force balance in a thin collisionless current sheet in the Earth's magnetotail with a given constant magnetic field component B z across the sheet is numerically studied for the first time in a self-consistent formulation of the problem. The current sheet is produced by oppositely directed plasma flows propagating from the periphery of the sheet toward the neutral plane. A substantially improved version of a macroparticle numerical model is used that makes it possible to simulate on the order of 10 7 macroparticles even with a personal computer and to calculate equilibrium configurations with a sufficiently low discrete noise level in the first-and second-order moments of the distribution function, which determine the stress tensor elements. Quasisteady configurations were calculated numerically for several sets of plasma parameters in some parts of the magnetotail. The force balance in the sheet was checked by calculating the longitudinal and transverse pressures as well as the elements of the full stress tensor. The stress tensor in the current sheet is found to be nondiagonal and to differ appreciably from the gyrotropic stress tensor in the Chew-Goldberger-Low model, although the Chew-Goldberger-Low theory and numerical calculations yield close results for large distances from the region of reversed magnetic field

  13. Spatial and Temporal Extent of Ion Spectral Structures at the Inner Edge of the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Reeves, G. D.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-12-01

    Several ion spectral structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift and loss in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. Their study helps us understand ion access and losses in this region. Several studies have found that these structures vary with geomagnetic activity, local time, and ion species, but their spatial and temporal extent remain undetermined. We use data from the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometers onboard the Van Allen Probes to analyze the spectral structures in the energy range of 1- 50 keV. HOPE measurements on both Van Allen Probes spacecraft enable us to resolve the extent of these ion structures in space and time. As the structures respond to changes in the convection electric field on a variety of time scales, the lapping of the two spacecraft on time scales of minutes to hours helps determine their spatial and temporal evolution.

  14. Extraction of volume produced H- or D- ions from a sheet plasma, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Joshin.

    1984-02-01

    A development to large area H - or D - ion source is tried by using three extraction electrodes: The first electrode bias voltage is set near the wall potential (floating), the second electrode is set near 13 % of main extraction voltage and the third electrode is the main acceleration electrode. An ion current of 13 mA (3.3 mA/cm 2 ) for H - or 11 mA (2.8 mA/ cm 2 ) for D - at 3 KeV is extracted from 9 apertures of 6 mm phi in 4 cm 2 outside of the sheet plasma (14 cm wide and 1.0 cm thick) under a pressure of 7.7 x 10 -4 H2 or D2 gas and a weak magnetic field 50 gauss. Then, it is noted that the corresponding electron current is suppressed below 1/10 of the H - or D - ion current. (author)

  15. Electron precipitation morphology and plasma sheet dynamics: ground and magnetotail studies of the magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytte, T.

    1976-12-01

    The main results of some recent studies of the magnetospheric substorm are summarised and discussed in view of the fundamental role of magnetospheric convection. The substorm growth phase is described in terms of a temporary imbalance between the rates of magnetic field-line merging on the dayside, and reconnection on the nightside, of the magnetosphere following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. Some new understanding of the possible causal relationship between growth-phase and expansion-phase phenomena is provided through studies of multiple-onset substorms, during which substorm expansions are observed to occur at intervals of 10-15 min. Detailed observations have revealed new features of the radial and azimuthal dynamics of these substorms that are not consistent with recent models proposed by Akasofu and by Rostoker and his co-workers. It is shown that the behaviour of the near-earth plasma sheet early in a substorm cannot be inferred from measurements at larger distances (e.g., in the Vela satellite orbits), and that the triggering of a substorm expansion may well be directly related to pre-substorm thinning of the near-earth plasma sheet, even though the most significant thinning in the tailward region may occur at the onset, and therefore appears to be an effect rather than a cause of triggering. Initial results from studies of a new type of magnetospheric activity, characterised by strong auroral-zone bay activity but no other indications of substorm expansions, are shown to be consistent with current models of the growth and expansion phases of substorms and of substorm triggering. (JIW)

  16. Transient, Small-Scale Field-Aligned Currents in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer During Storm Time Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Sergeev, V. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Varsani, A.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on field-aligned current observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft near the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) during two major substorms on 23 June 2015. Small-scale field-aligned currents were found embedded in fluctuating PSBL flux tubes near the Separatrix region. We resolve, for the first time, short-lived earthward (downward) intense field-aligned current sheets with thicknesses of a few tens of kilometers, which are well below the ion scale, on flux tubes moving equatorward earth ward during outward plasma sheet expansion. They coincide with upward field-aligned electron beams with energies of a few hundred eV. These electrons are most likely due to acceleration associated with a reconnection jet or high-energy ion beam-produced disturbances. The observations highlight coupling of multiscale processes in PSBL as a consequence of magnetotail reconnection.

  17. Characteristics of electrostatic solitary waves observed in the plasma sheet boundary: Statistical analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kojima

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the characteristics of the Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESW observed by the Geotail spacecraft in the plasma sheet boundary layer based on the statistical analyses. We also discuss the results referring to a model of ESW generation due to electron beams, which is proposed by computer simulations. In this generation model, the nonlinear evolution of Langmuir waves excited by electron bump-on-tail instabilities leads to formation of isolated electrostatic potential structures corresponding to "electron hole" in the phase space. The statistical analyses of the Geotail data, which we conducted under the assumption that polarity of ESW potentials is positive, show that most of ESW propagate in the same direction of electron beams, which are observed by the plasma instrument, simultaneously. Further, we also find that the ESW potential energy is much smaller than the background electron thermal energy and that the ESW potential widths are typically shorter than 60 times of local electron Debye length when we assume that the ESW potentials travel in the same velocity of electron beams. These results are very consistent with the ESW generation model that the nonlinear evolution of electron bump-on-tail instability leads to the formation of electron holes in the phase space.

  18. Dielectric response of planar relativistic quantum plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardos, D.C.; Frankel, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    The dielectric response of planar relativistic charged particle-antiparticle plasmas is investigated, treating Fermi and Bose plasmas. The conductivity tensor in each case is derived in the self-consistent Random Phase Approximation. The tensors are then evaluated at zero temperature for the case of no external fields, leading to explicit dispersion relations for the electrodynamic modes of the plasma. The longitudinal and transverse modes are in general coupled for plasma layers. This coupling vanishes, however, in the zero field case, allowing 'effective' longitudinal and transverse dielectric functions to be defined in terms of components of the conductivity tensor. Solutions to the longitudinal mode equations (i.e. plasmon modes) are exhibited, while purely transverse modes are found not to exist. In the case of the Bose plasma the screening of a test charge is investigated in detail. 41 refs., 1 fig

  19. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  20. A feature of negative hydrogen ion production in the Uramoto-type sheet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimbo, Kouichi [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1997-02-01

    It seems that negative hydrogen ions H{sup -} are formed directly from atomic hydrogens H. When the chamber was biased more negative against the anode potential at constant are power, forming a much deeper electrostatic well in the Uramoto-type sheet plasma negative ion source, more negative hydrogen ion currents were extracted. The chamber potential V{sub B} was biased down to -100V in the 150V discharge. The negative ion current J{sup -} was evaluated by the JAERI-probe measurement. J{sup -} increases linearly with the chamber current I{sub B}. The largest J{sup -} value was obtained at absolute value of |V{sub prob,f}|=15V and absolute value of |V{sub B}|=100V; the discharge was not operated for absolute value of |V{sub B}|>100V. We speculate the following collisional (three-body) electron attachment to H as a possible production process for H{sup -}; e+e+H{yields}e+H{sup -}. This process may explain the linear increase of J{sup -} with absolute value of |V{sub prob,f}|. (S.Y.)

  1. Modeling the effect of doping on the catalyst-assisted growth and field emission properties of plasma-grown graphene sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the effect of doping on the plasma-assisted catalytic growth of graphene sheet has been developed. The model accounts the charging rate of the graphene sheet, kinetics of all the plasma species, including the doping species, and the growth rate of graphene nuclei and graphene sheet due to surface diffusion, and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. Using the model, it is observed that nitrogen and boron doping can strongly influence the growth and field emission properties of the graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation indicate that nitrogen doping results in reduced thickness and shortened height of the graphene sheet; however, boron doping increases the thickness and height of the graphene sheet. The time evolutions of the charge on the graphene sheet and hydrocarbon number density for nitrogen and boron doped graphene sheet have also been examined. The field emission properties of the graphene sheet have been proposed on the basis of the results obtained. It is concluded that nitrogen doped graphene sheet exhibits better field emission characteristics as compared to undoped and boron doped graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation are consistent with the existing experimental observations.

  2. Modeling the effect of doping on the catalyst-assisted growth and field emission properties of plasma-grown graphene sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical model describing the effect of doping on the plasma-assisted catalytic growth of graphene sheet has been developed. The model accounts the charging rate of the graphene sheet, kinetics of all the plasma species, including the doping species, and the growth rate of graphene nuclei and graphene sheet due to surface diffusion, and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. Using the model, it is observed that nitrogen and boron doping can strongly influence the growth and field emission properties of the graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation indicate that nitrogen doping results in reduced thickness and shortened height of the graphene sheet; however, boron doping increases the thickness and height of the graphene sheet. The time evolutions of the charge on the graphene sheet and hydrocarbon number density for nitrogen and boron doped graphene sheet have also been examined. The field emission properties of the graphene sheet have been proposed on the basis of the results obtained. It is concluded that nitrogen doped graphene sheet exhibits better field emission characteristics as compared to undoped and boron doped graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation are consistent with the existing experimental observations.

  3. Current sheet characteristics of a parallel-plate electromagnetic plasma accelerator operated in gas-prefilled mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Huang, Yizhi; Guo, Haishan; Lin, Tianyu; Huang, Dong; Yang, Lanjun

    2018-05-01

    The axial characteristics of a current sheet in a parallel-plate electromagnetic plasma accelerator operated in gas-prefilled mode are reported. The accelerator is powered by a fourteen stage pulse forming network. The capacitor and inductor in each stage are 1.5 μF and 300 nH, respectively, and yield a damped oscillation square wave of current with a pulse width of 20.6 μs. Magnetic probes and photodiodes are placed at various axial positions to measure the behavior of the current sheet. Both magnetic probe and photodiode signals reveal a secondary breakdown when the current reverses the direction. An increase in the discharge current amplitude and a decrease in pressure lead to a decrease in the current shedding factor. The current sheet velocity and thickness are nearly constant during the run-down phase under the first half-period of the current. The current sheet thicknesses are typically in the range of 25 mm to 40 mm. The current sheet velocities are in the range of 10 km/s to 45 km/s when the discharge current is between 10 kA and 55 kA and the gas prefill pressure is between 30 Pa and 800 Pa. The experimental velocities are about 75% to 90% of the theoretical velocities calculated with the current shedding factor. One reason for this could be that the idealized snowplow analysis model ignores the surface drag force.

  4. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers response to aerobic versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma inflammatory biomarkers response to aerobic versus resisted exercise training for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. ... Recent studies proved that morbidity and mortality of COPD is related to systemic inflammation as it contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Deposition Rate and Energy Enhancements of TiN Thin-Film in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Source

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdi Muhyuddin D. Barra; Henry J. Ramos

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been synthesized using the sheet plasma negative ion source (SPNIS). The parameters used for its effective synthesis has been determined from previous experiments and studies. In this study, further enhancement of the deposition rate of TiN synthesis and advancement of the SPNIS operation is presented. This is primarily achieved by the addition of Sm-Co permanent magnets and a modification of the configuration in the TiN deposition process. The ...

  6. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 10: The Understory Response Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutherland; Melanie Miller

    2005-01-01

    The Understory Response Model is a species-specific computer model that qualitatively predicts change in total species biomass for grasses, forbs, and shrubs after thinning, prescribed fire, or wildfire. The model examines the effect of fuels management on plant survivorship and reproduction. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what...

  7. Modelling the short-term response of the Greenland ice-sheet to global warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, R.S.W. van de; Oerlemans, J.

    1997-01-01

    A two-dimensional vertically integrated ice flow model has been developed to test the importance of various processes and concepts used for the prediction of the contribution of the Greenland ice-sheet to sea-level rise over the next 350 y (short-term response). The mass balance is modelled by the

  8. An Exploration of Heating Mechanisms in a Supra-arcade Plasma Sheet Formed after a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Katharine K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St. MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Freed, Michael S.; McKenzie, David E. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Savage, Sabrina L., E-mail: kreeves@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    We perform a detailed analysis of the thermal structure of the region above the post-eruption arcade for a flare that occurred on 2011 October 22. During this event, a sheet of hot plasma is visible above the flare loops in the 131 Å bandpass of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory . Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are observed traveling sunward through the post-eruption plasma sheet. We calculate differential emission measures using the AIA data and derive an emission measure weighted average temperature in the supra-arcade region. In areas where many SADs occur, the temperature of the supra-arcade plasma tends to increase, while in areas where no SADs are observed, the temperature tends to decrease. We calculate the plane-of-sky velocities in the supra-arcade plasma and use them to determine the potential heating due to adiabatic compression and viscous heating. Of the 13 SADs studied, 10 have noticeable signatures in both the adiabatic and the viscous terms. The adiabatic heating due to compression of plasma in front of the SADs is on the order of 0.1–0.2 MK/s, which is similar in magnitude to the estimated conductive cooling rate. This result supports the notion that SADs contribute locally to the heating of plasma in the supra-arcade region. We also find that in the region without SADs, the plasma cools at a rate that is slower than the estimated conductive cooling, indicating that additional heating mechanisms may act globally to keep the plasma temperature high.

  9. An Exploration of Heating Mechanisms in a Supra-arcade Plasma Sheet Formed after a Coronal Mass Ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, Katharine K.; Freed, Michael S.; McKenzie, David E.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2017-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the thermal structure of the region above the post-eruption arcade for a flare that occurred on 2011 October 22. During this event, a sheet of hot plasma is visible above the flare loops in the 131 Å bandpass of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory . Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are observed traveling sunward through the post-eruption plasma sheet. We calculate differential emission measures using the AIA data and derive an emission measure weighted average temperature in the supra-arcade region. In areas where many SADs occur, the temperature of the supra-arcade plasma tends to increase, while in areas where no SADs are observed, the temperature tends to decrease. We calculate the plane-of-sky velocities in the supra-arcade plasma and use them to determine the potential heating due to adiabatic compression and viscous heating. Of the 13 SADs studied, 10 have noticeable signatures in both the adiabatic and the viscous terms. The adiabatic heating due to compression of plasma in front of the SADs is on the order of 0.1–0.2 MK/s, which is similar in magnitude to the estimated conductive cooling rate. This result supports the notion that SADs contribute locally to the heating of plasma in the supra-arcade region. We also find that in the region without SADs, the plasma cools at a rate that is slower than the estimated conductive cooling, indicating that additional heating mechanisms may act globally to keep the plasma temperature high.

  10. Dielectric response in guiding center plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Similon, P.

    1979-12-01

    The dielectric function for guiding center plasma is derived from the direct-interaction approximation. For the special case of thermal equilibrium, the reslt agrees with, although is more detailed than, an earlier calculation of Taylor. An explicit formula for the collision operator Σ' is given. The calculation illustrates several important features of renormalized turbulence theory: cancellation between the so-called diffusion and polarization parts of Σ', and the role of the renormalization in providing the proper description of adiabatic response

  11. Nuclear responses in INTOR plasma stabilization elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Gilligan, J.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Miley, G.H.; Wiffen, F.W.; Yang, S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear responses in the plasma stabilization elements were studied in a parametric fashion as a part of the transient electromagnetics critical issue C of ETR/INTOR activity. The main responses are neutron fluence and radiation dose in the insulator material, induced resistivity and atomic displacement in the conductor material, nuclear heating and life analysis for the elements. Copper and aluminum conductors with either MgAl 2 O 4 or MgO insulating material were investigated. Radiation damage and life analysis for these elements were also discussed

  12. The Inner Magnetosphere Plasma Response to Interplanetary Shocks: Van Allen Probes HOPE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, L. M.; Denton, M.; Ferradas, C.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R. M.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes' Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) sensors measure ion and electron populations in the plasmasphere, plasma sheet, and lower-energy ring current, providing unique observations at low energies (0.001-50 keV) and low L-shell (down to 1.5 RE). We use the capabilities of these two spacecraft to probe changes in the low energy particles in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks. We focus on changes in the plasma energies, composition, and pitch angle distributions following IP shocks and storm sudden commencements from 2012-2017 through a comparison of HOPE observations preceding and post shock.

  13. Radial evolution of the finite-width plasma sheet in a z-pinch: A parametric analysis based on conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    A simple method that allows to estimate the macroscopic variables (width, temperature, density, radial velocity, etc.) of the plasma sheet in the first compression of a z-pinch, is presented. Following the snow-plow model, the radial compression is assumed as a process in which the mass is swept by a sheet of finite width. Very high pressures can be reached inside the sheet due to magnetic compression, higher than the filling gas pressure. A quasi-equilibrium hypothesis for the pressure of the layer is defined. From this assumption the thickness of the dense plasma sheet can be estimated. A set of MHD equations that include a term to compute total energy losses is used. The system of equations is written in the interface reference system in which the internal boundary of the sheet is at rest. In this early stage of the compression, the plasma temperature is mainly due to heavy particles. The results obtained using this model can explain ionic temperatures measured in cold plasmas which cannot be explained from electron-ion collisions. From an analytical study of the formation solution, a well-defined range of validity for each parameter of the model has been found. Based on physical conditions, these ranges of validity give a criterion to understanding the necessary conditions to build and maintain a moving plasma sheet. Using this model, other geometries besides the cylindrical one can be analyzed in the future

  14. Spatial structure of the plasma sheet boundary layer at distances greater than 180 RE as derived from energetic particle measurements on GEOTAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yamamoto

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the onsets of energetic particle bursts detected by the ICS and STICS sensors of the EPIC instrument on board the GEOTAIL spacecraft in the deep magnetotail (i.e., at distances greater than 180 RE. Such bursts are commonly observed at the plasma-sheet boundary layer (PSBL and are highly collimated along the magnetic field. The bursts display a normal velocity dispersion (i.e., the higher-speed particles are seen first, while the progressively lower speed particles are seen later when observed upon entry of the spacecraft from the magnetotail lobes into the plasma sheet. Upon exit from the plasma sheet a reverse velocity dispersion is observed (i.e., lower-speed particles disappear first and higher-speed particles disappear last. Three major findings are as follows. First, the tailward-jetting energetic particle populations of the distant-tail plasma sheet display an energy layering: the energetic electrons stream along open PSBL field lines with peak fluxes at the lobes. Energetic protons occupy the next layer, and as the spacecraft moves towards the neutral sheet progressively decreasing energies are encountered systematically. These plasma-sheet layers display spatial symmetry, with the plane of symmetry the neutral sheet. Second, if we consider the same energy level of energetic particles, then the H+ layer is confined within that of the energetic electron, the He++ layer is confined within that of the proton, and the oxygen layer is confined within the alpha particle layer. Third, whenever the energetic electrons show higher fluxes inside the plasma sheet as compared to those at the boundary layer, their angular distribution is isotropic irrespective of the Earthward or tailward character of fluxes, suggesting a closed field line topology.

  15. Spatial structure of the plasma sheet boundary layer at distances greater than 180 RE as derived from energetic particle measurements on GEOTAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the onsets of energetic particle bursts detected by the ICS and STICS sensors of the EPIC instrument on board the GEOTAIL spacecraft in the deep magnetotail (i.e., at distances greater than 180 RE. Such bursts are commonly observed at the plasma-sheet boundary layer (PSBL and are highly collimated along the magnetic field. The bursts display a normal velocity dispersion (i.e., the higher-speed particles are seen first, while the progressively lower speed particles are seen later when observed upon entry of the spacecraft from the magnetotail lobes into the plasma sheet. Upon exit from the plasma sheet a reverse velocity dispersion is observed (i.e., lower-speed particles disappear first and higher-speed particles disappear last. Three major findings are as follows. First, the tailward-jetting energetic particle populations of the distant-tail plasma sheet display an energy layering: the energetic electrons stream along open PSBL field lines with peak fluxes at the lobes. Energetic protons occupy the next layer, and as the spacecraft moves towards the neutral sheet progressively decreasing energies are encountered systematically. These plasma-sheet layers display spatial symmetry, with the plane of symmetry the neutral sheet. Second, if we consider the same energy level of energetic particles, then the H+ layer is confined within that of the energetic electron, the He++ layer is confined within that of the proton, and the oxygen layer is confined within the alpha particle layer. Third, whenever the energetic electrons show higher fluxes inside the plasma sheet as compared to those at the boundary layer, their angular distribution is isotropic irrespective of the Earthward or tailward character of fluxes, suggesting a closed field line topology.

  16. Contrasting dynamics of electrons and protons in the near-Earth plasma sheet during dipolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhin, Andrey Y.; Grigorenko, Elena E.; Kronberg, Elena A.; Koleva, Rositza; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Kozak, Ludmila; Daly, Patrick W.

    2018-05-01

    The fortunate location of Cluster and the THEMIS P3 probe in the near-Earth plasma sheet (PS) (at X ˜ -7-9 RE) allowed for the multipoint analysis of properties and spectra of electron and proton injections. The injections were observed during dipolarization and substorm current wedge formation associated with braking of multiple bursty bulk flows (BBFs). In the course of dipolarization, a gradual growth of the BZ magnetic field lasted ˜ 13 min and it was comprised of several BZ pulses or dipolarization fronts (DFs) with duration ≤ 1 min. Multipoint observations have shown that the beginning of the increase in suprathermal ( > 50 keV) electron fluxes - the injection boundary - was observed in the PS simultaneously with the dipolarization onset and it propagated dawnward along with the onset-related DF. The subsequent dynamics of the energetic electron flux was similar to the dynamics of the magnetic field during the dipolarization. Namely, a gradual linear growth of the electron flux occurred simultaneously with the gradual growth of the BZ field, and it was comprised of multiple short ( ˜ few minutes) electron injections associated with the BZ pulses. This behavior can be explained by the combined action of local betatron acceleration at the BZ pulses and subsequent gradient drifts of electrons in the flux pile up region through the numerous braking and diverting DFs. The nonadiabatic features occasionally observed in the electron spectra during the injections can be due to the electron interactions with high-frequency electromagnetic or electrostatic fluctuations transiently observed in the course of dipolarization. On the contrary, proton injections were detected only in the vicinity of the strongest BZ pulses. The front thickness of these pulses was less than a gyroradius of thermal protons that ensured the nonadiabatic acceleration of protons. Indeed, during the injections in the energy spectra of protons the pronounced bulge was clearly observed in a

  17. Observation of enhanced electric field in an RF-plugged sheet plasma in the RFC-XX-M open-ended machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, T.; Takiyama, K.; Kadota, K.

    1987-12-01

    We report nonperturbing observation of the electric field in the sheet plasma for RF end-plugging on the RFC XX-M open-ended machine by using the Stark effect with a combined technique of beam-probe and laser-induced fluorescence. Under the optimum condition for the RF plugging, enhanced electric field is found in the sheet plasma by about 2.5 times with respect to the electric field when no plasma is produced. The field spatial profile is also measured, which is discussed in connection with the electrostatic eigenmode. (author)

  18. Energetic particle beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer following substorm expansion - Simultaneous near-earth and distant tail observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Baker, D. N.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Klecker, B.; Terasawa, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of ions and electron beams in the near-earth and deep magnetotail following the onset of substorm are analyzed in terms of the substorm neutral line model. The observations were collected on March 20, 1983 with ISSE 1 and 3. Energy fluxes and intensity-time profiles of protons and electrons are studied. The data reveal that the reconnection at the near-earth neutral line produces ions and electrons for the plasma sheet boundary layer. The maximum electric potential along the neutral line is evaluated.

  19. Latitude-energy structure of multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS data in plasma sheet boundary layer and boundary plasma sheet below 6 RE radial distance: basic properties and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity dispersed ion signatures (VDIS occurring at the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL are a well reported feature. Theory has, however, predicted the existence of multiple ion beamlets, similar to VDIS, in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, i.e. at latitudes below the PSBL. In this study we show evidence for the multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS ion data and basic properties of the ion beamlets will be presented. Statistics of the occurrence frequency of ion multiple beamlets show that they are most common in the midnight MLT sector and for altitudes above 4 RE, while at low altitude (≤3 RE, single beamlets at PSBL (VDIS are more common. Distribution functions of ion beamlets in velocity space have recently been shown to correspond to 3-dimensional hollow spheres, containing a large amount of free energy. We also study correlation with ~100 Hz waves and electron anisotropies and consider the possibility that ion beamlets correspond to stable auroral arcs.

  20. Analytical theory of neutral current sheets with a sheared magnetic field in collisionless relativistic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocharovsky, V. V.; Kocharovsky, Vl V.; Martyanov, V. Yu; Nechaev, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    We derive and describe analytically a new wide class of self-consistent magnetostatic structures with sheared field lines and arbitrary energy distributions of particles. To do so we analyze superpositions of two planar current sheets with orthogonal magnetic fields and cylindrically symmetric momentum distribution functions, such that the magnetic field of one of them is directed along the symmetry axis of the distribution function of the other. These superpositions satisfy the pressure balance equation and allow one to construct configurations with an almost arbitrarily sheared magnetic field. We show that most of previously known current sheet families with sheared magnetic field lines are included in this novel class.

  1. Sawtooth events and O+ in the plasma sheet and boundary layer: CME- and SIR-driven events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, E. J.; Nowrouzi, N.; Kistler, L. M.; Cai, X.; Liao, J.

    2017-12-01

    The role of ionospheric ions in sawtooth events is an open question. Simulations[1,2,3] suggest that O+ from the ionosphere produces a feedback mechanism for driving sawtooth events. However, observational evidence[4,5] suggest that the presence of O+ in the plasma sheet is neither necessary nor sufficient. In this study we investigate whether the solar wind driver of the geomagnetic storm has an effect on the result. Building on an earlier study[4] that used events for which Cluster data is available in the plasma sheet and boundary layer, we perform a superposed epoch analysis for coronal mass ejection (CME) driven storms and streaming interaction region (SIR) driven storms separately, to investigate the hypothesis that ionospheric O+ is an important contributor for CME-driven storms but not SIR-driven storms[2]. [1]O. J. Brambles et al. (2011), Science 332, 1183.[2]O. J. Brambles et al. (2013), JGR 118, 6026.[3]R. H. Varney et al. (2016), JGR 121, 9688.[4]J. Liao et al. (2014), JGR 119, 1572.[5]E. J. Lund et al. (2017), JGR, submitted.

  2. Multi-instrument observations of the ionospheric counterpart of a bursty bulk flow in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On 07 September 2001 the Cluster spacecraft observed a "bursty bulk flow" event in the near-Earth central plasma sheet. This paper presents a detailed study of the coincident ground-based observations and attempts to place them within a simple physical framework. The event in question occurs at ~22:30 UT, some 10min after a southward turning of the IMF. IMAGE and SAMNET magnetometer measurements of the ground magnetic field reveal perturbations of a few tens of nT and small amplitude Pi2 pulsations. CUTLASS radar observations of ionospheric plasma convection show enhanced flows out of the polar cap near midnight, accompanied by an elevated transpolar voltage. Optical data from the IMAGE satellite also show that there is a transient, localised ~1 kR brightening in the UV aurora. These observations are consistent with the earthward transport of plasma in the tail, but also indicate the absence of a typical "large-scale" substorm current wedge. An analysis of the field-aligned current system implied by the radar measurements does suggest the existence of a small-scale current "wedgelet", but one which lacks the global scale and high conductivities observed during substorm expansions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheremagnetosphere interactions; plasma convection

  3. Thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogels as temporary substrate for cell sheet biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Lina; Cochis, Andrea; Carletta, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; Farè, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Methylcellulose (MC), a water-soluble polymer derived from cellulose, was investigated as a possible temporary substrate having thermo-responsive properties favorable for cell culturing. MC-based hydrogels were prepared by a dispersion technique, mixing MC powder (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 % w/v) with selected salts (sodium sulphate, Na2SO4), sodium phosphate, calcium chloride, or phosphate buffered saline, to evaluate the influence of different compositions on the thermo-responsive behavior. The inversion test was used to determine the gelation temperatures of the different hydrogel compositions; thermo-mechanical properties and thermo-reversibility of the MC hydrogels were investigated by rheological analysis. Gelation temperatures and rheological behavior depended on the MC concentration and type and concentration of salt used in hydrogel preparation. In vitro cytotoxicity tests, performed using L929 mouse fibroblasts, showed no toxic release from all the tested hydrogels. Among the investigated compositions, the hydrogel composed of 8 % w/v MC with 0.05 M Na2SO4 had a thermo-reversibility temperature at 37 °C. For that reason, this formulation was thus considered to verify the possibility of inducing in vitro spontaneous detachment of cells previously seeded on the hydrogel surface. A continuous cell layer (cell sheet) was allowed to grow and then detached from the hydrogel surface without the use of enzymes, thanks to the thermo-responsive behavior of the MC hydrogel. Immunofluorescence observation confirmed that the detached cell sheet was composed of closely interacting cells.

  4. Escitalopram plasma levels and antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Vincenzo; Porcelli, Stefano; Saria, Alois; Serretti, Alessandro; Conca, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) has a highly variable treatment response due to the large inter-individual variation in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug treatments. In detail the correlation between plasma level and efficacy has been much debated. Among first-line drugs for MDD, one of the most used is escitalopram. In the present study we investigated the association between serum concentration of escitalopram (SCE) and antidepressant response (AR). 70 MDD patients treated with escitalopram monotherapy were recruited and followed for three months. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - 21 (HAMD-21) was administrated at baseline, month 1, and month 3 to assess AR. SCE was measured at steady state. Linear regression analysis and nonlinear least-squares regression were used to estimate association between SCE and AR. We found an association between SCE and AR both at month 1 (pescitalopram the association between SCE and AR likely follows a nearly-asymptotic function, with poor AR at sub-therapeutic SCE and stable AR response at therapeutic SCE. Thus, when a patient reaches the therapeutic SCE range, further increase of escitalopram dosage seems to be useless, although further studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Three-dimensional earthward fast flow in the near-Earth plasma sheet in a sheared field: comparisons between simulations and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kondoh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional configuration of earthward fast flow in the near-Earth plasma sheet is studied using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD simulations on the basis of the spontaneous fast reconnection model. In this study, the sheared magnetic field in the plasma sheet is newly considered in order to investigate the effects of it to the earthward fast flow, and the results are discussed in comparison with no-shear simulations. The virtual probes located at different positions in our simulation domain in shear/no-shear cases could explain different behavior of fast flows in the real observations.

  6. Model of an electric field produced by viscous interaction in the plasma sheet of the magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkaev, N.V.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional model of flow in a plasma layer of magnetotail is considered with account of low viscosity. The general Ohm's law is used for electric current. The role of viscous forces is most sufficient in boundary layers, which expand with moving away along the flow and located along the boundaries of plasma layer and solar wind. Auto model solution, describing the distribution of potential and velocity in boundary layers was obtained. The solution for boundary layers dictates boundary conditions for determination of large-scale distribution of electric potential in plasma layer. 7 refs., 4 figs

  7. The role of current sheet formation in driven plasmoid reconnection in laser-produced plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhnin, Kirill; Fox, William; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-10-01

    We conduct a multiparametric study of driven magnetic reconnection relevant to recent experiments on colliding magnetized laser produced plasmas using the PIC code PSC. Varying the background plasma density, plasma resistivity, and plasma bubble geometry, the results demonstrate a variety of reconnection behavior and show the coupling between magnetic reconnection and global fluid evolution of the system. We consider both collision of two radially expanding bubbles where reconnection is driven through an X-point, and collision of two parallel fields where reconnection must be initiated by the tearing instability. Under various conditions, we observe transitions between fast, collisionless reconnection to a Sweet-Parker-like slow reconnection to complete stalling of the reconnection. By varying plasma resistivity, we observe the transition between fast and slow reconnection at Lundquist number S 103 . The transition from plasmoid reconnection to a single X-point reconnection also happens around S 103 . We find that the criterion δ /di < 1 is necessary for fast reconnection onset. Finally, at sufficiently high background density, magnetic reconnection can be suppressed, leading to bouncing motion of the magnetized plasma bubbles.

  8. Spatial Evolution of Electrostatic Solitary Waves along Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer Adjacent to the Magnetic Reconnection X-Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shi-You; Zhang Shi-Feng; Cai Hong; Deng Xiao-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Analysis on the spatial structure of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) along the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) near an on-going magnetic reconnection X-line is performed. Most of the ESWs in the PSBL of R3 region near reconnection X-line are propagating earthwards away from the reconnecting site. An analysis of their spatial structure shows that, when ESWs propagate along the ambient field in the PSBL, outwards from the magnetic reconnection X-line, their amplitude will finally attenuate and thus the electron hole will fade away but their spatial scale remains unchanged. However, the spatial structure of propagating ESWs evolves from 1-D-like to 2-D-like though totally in a 1-D structure. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  9. Magnetic reconnection through the current sheets as the universal process for plasma dynamics in nonuniform magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.G.; Bogdanov, S.Yu.; Burilina, V.B.; Kyrie, N.P.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported, in which we studied the possibilities of the formation of current sheets (CS) in different magnetic configurations, as well as the magnetic reconnection phenomena. In 2D magnetic fields with null-lines the CS formation was shown to be a typical process in both linear and nonlinear regimes. The problem of CS formation is of a fundamental importance in the general case of 3D magnetic configurations. We have revealed experimentally, that the formation of CS occurs in the various 3D configurations, both containing magnetic null-points and without them. At the same time, the CS parameters essentially depend on the local characteristics of the configuration. We may conclude therefore, that the self-organization of CS represents the universal process for the plasma dynamics in the nonuniform magnetic fields. (author)

  10. Dispersive O+ conics observed in the plasma-sheet boundary layer with CRRES/LOMICS during a magnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wüest

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available We present initial results from the Low-energy magnetospheric ion composition sensor (LOMICS on the Combined release and radiation effects satellite (CRRES together with electron, magnetic field, and electric field wave data. LOMICS measures all important magnetospheric ion species (H+, He++, He+, O++, O+ simultaneously in the energy range 60 eV to 45 keV, as well as their pitch-angle distributions, within the time resolution afforded by the spacecraft spin period of 30 s. During the geomagnetic storm of 9 July 1991, over a period of 42 min (0734 UT to 0816 UT the LOMICS ion mass spectrometer observed an apparent O+ conic flowing away from the southern hemisphere with a bulk velocity that decreased exponentially with time from 300 km/s to 50 km/s, while its temperature also decreased exponentially from 700 to 5 eV. At the onset of the O+ conic, intense low-frequency electromagnetic wave activity and strong pitch-angle scattering were also observed. At the time of the observations the CRRES spacecraft was inbound at L~7.5 near dusk, magnetic local time (MLT, and at a magnetic latitude of –23°. Our analysis using several CRRES instruments suggests that the spacecraft was skimming along the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL when the upward-flowing ion conic arrived. The conic appears to have evolved in time, both slowing and cooling, due to wave-particle interactions. We are unable to conclude whether the conic was causally associated with spatial structures of the PSBL or the central plasma sheet.

  11. Plasma equilibrium response modelling and validation on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Sharma, A.; Limebeer, D.J.N.; Wainwright, J.P.; Nakamura, Y.; Yoshino, R.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic procedure to identify the plasma equilibrium response to the poloidal field coil voltages has been applied to the JT-60U tokamak. The required response was predicted with a high accuracy by a state-space model derived from first principles. The ab initio derivation of linearized plasma equilibrium response models is re-examined using an approach standard in analytical mechanics. A symmetric formulation is naturally obtained, removing a previous weakness in such models. RZIP, a rigid current distribution model, is re-derived using this approach and is compared with the new experimental plasma equilibrium response data obtained from Ohmic and neutral beam injection discharges in the JT-60U tokamak. In order to remove any bias from the comparison between modelled and measured plasma responses, the electromagnetic response model without plasma was first carefully tuned against experimental data, using a parametric approach, for which different cost functions for quantifying model agreement were explored. This approach additionally provides new indications of the accuracy to which various plasma parameters are known, and to the ordering of physical effects. Having taken these precautions when tuning the plasmaless model, an empirical estimate of the plasma self-inductance, the plasma resistance and its radial derivative could be established and compared with initial assumptions. Off-line tuning of the JT-60U controller is presented as an example of the improvements which might be obtained by using such a model of the plasma equilibrium response. (author)

  12. The Global and Local Climatic Response to the Collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, K. M.; Singh, H.; Steiger, N. J.; Frierson, D. M.; Steig, E. J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciologists have suggested that a relatively small external forcing may compromise the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). Further, there is compelling physical evidence that the WAIS has collapsed in the past, at times when the mean global temperature was only a few degrees warmer than it is today. In addition to a rapid increase in global sea level, the collapse of the WAIS could also affect the global circulation of the atmosphere. Ice sheets are some of the largest topographic features on Earth, causing large regional anomalies in albedo and radiative balance. Our work uses idealized aquaplanet models in tandem with a fully coupled ocean/atmosphere/sea-ice model (CCSM4) to compare the atmospheric, radiative, and oceanic response to a complete loss of the WAIS. Initial findings indicate that the loss of the WAIS leads to a weakening and equator-ward shift of the zonal winds, a development of strong zonal asymmetries in the meridional wind, and a northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. We aim to characterize how the local and global climate is affected by the presence of the WAIS, and how changes in the distribution of Southern Hemisphere ice may be represented in the proxy record.

  13. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Cao, Ronggen; Cheng, Yingchun; Ding, Fei; Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone

  14. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  15. NSTX plasma response to lithium coated divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Bell, M.G.; Allain, J.P.; Bell, R.E.; Ding, S.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, Rajesh; Majeski, R.; Maqueda, R.J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Mueller, D.; Nygren, R.E.; Paul, S.F.; Raman, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Schneider, H.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.A.; Taylor, C.N.; Timberlake, J.; Wampler, W.R.; Zakharov, L.E.; Zweben, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma-facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Z(eff) and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, < 0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  16. Ice dynamic response to two modes of surface lake drainage on the Greenland ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Alexander, Patrick; Willis, Ian C; Banwell, Alison F; Arnold, Neil S; Hoffman, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Supraglacial lake drainage on the Greenland ice sheet opens surface-to-bed connections, reduces basal friction, and temporarily increases ice flow velocities by up to an order of magnitude. Existing field-based observations of lake drainages and their impact on ice dynamics are limited, and focus on one specific draining mechanism. Here, we report and analyse global positioning system measurements of ice velocity and elevation made at five locations surrounding two lakes that drained by different mechanisms and produced different dynamic responses. For the lake that drained slowly (>24 h) by overtopping its basin, delivering water via a channel to a pre-existing moulin, speedup and uplift were less than half those associated with a lake that drained rapidly (∼2 h) through hydrofracturing and the creation of new moulins in the lake bottom. Our results suggest that the mode and associated rate of lake drainage govern the impact on ice dynamics. (letter)

  17. Optimization of the single point incremental forming process for titanium sheets by using response surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi Badreddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The single point incremental forming process is well-known to be perfectly suited for prototyping and small series. One of its fields of applicability is the medicine area for the forming of titanium prostheses or titanium medical implants. However this process is not yet very industrialized, mainly due its geometrical inaccuracy, its not homogeneous thickness distribution& Moreover considerable forces can occur. They must be controlled in order to preserve the tooling. In this paper, a numerical approach is proposed in order to minimize the maximum force achieved during the incremental forming of titanium sheets and to maximize the minimal thickness. A surface response methodology is used to find the optimal values of two input parameters of the process, the punch diameter and the vertical step size of the tool path.

  18. Effects of thermo-mechanical behavior and hinge geometry on folding response of shape memory polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailen, Russell W.; Dickey, Michael D.; Genzer, Jan; Zikry, Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) sheets patterned with black ink hinges change shape in response to external stimuli, such as absorbed thermal energy from an infrared (IR) light. The geometry of these hinges, including size, orientation, and location, and the applied thermal loads significantly influence the final folded shape of the sheet, but these variables have not been fully investigated. We perform a systematic study on SMP sheets to fundamentally understand the effects of single and double hinge geometries, hinge orientation and spacing, initial temperature, heat flux intensity, and pattern width on the folding behavior. We have developed thermo-viscoelastic finite element models to characterize and quantify the stresses, strains, and temperatures as they relate to SMP shape changes. Our predictions indicate that hinge orientation can be used to reduce the total bending angle, which is the angle traversed by the folding face of the sheet. Two parallel hinges increase the total bending angle, and heat conduction between the hinges affects the transient folding response. IR intensity and initial temperatures can also influence the transient folding behavior. These results can provide guidelines to optimize the transient folding response and the three-dimensional folded structure obtained from self-folding polymer origami sheets that can be applied for myriad applications.

  19. Direct measurement of the plasma response to electrostatic ion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfaty, M.; DeSouza-Machado, S.; Skiff, F.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma wave-wave and wave-particle interactions are studied in a linear magnetized plasma. The relatively quiet plasma is produced by an argon gas-discharge. The plasma density is n e ≅ 10 9 cm -3 and the electron/ion temperatures are T e ≅ 5eV and T i = 0.05eV. A grid and a four ring antenna, both mounted on a scanning carriage, are used to launch electrostatic ion waves in the plasma. Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements of both the linear and the nonlinear plasma response to the wave fields are presented. The Vlasov-Poisson equations are used to explain the measured zero, first and second order terms of the ion distribution function in the presence of wave fields. In addition to the broadening (heating) of the ion distribution as the authors increase the wave amplitudes, induced plasma flows are observed both along and across the magnetic field

  20. Plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine in various diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Nobuto; Hayakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Kohzo; Noto, Yutaka; Ohno, Taro

    1978-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of abnormal glucose metabolism in the secondary diabetes, we examined the dynamics of plasma glucagon levels in various diseases which may accompany glucose intolerance. Plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine were observed in 20 liver cirrhotics, 8 patients with chronic renal failure, 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 patients, with hyperthyroidism, 22 diabetics and 9 normal controls. Plasma glucagon levels were determined by the radioimmunoassay method of Unger using 125 I-glucagon and antiserum 30K which is specific for pancreatic glucagon. In the cirrhotics, the plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine were significantly higher than in normal controls. The patients whose BSP retention at 45 minutes were above 30% showed higher plasma glucagon responses than in the patients whose BSP retention at 45 minutes were below 30%, suggesting that the more severely the liver was damaged, the more the plasma glucagon levels were elevated. In the patients with chronic renal failure, the plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine were also significantly higher than in normal controls. These abnormal levels were not improved by a hemodialysis, although serum creatinine levels were fairly decreased. In the patients with chronic pancreatitis, the plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine were the same as those in normal controls. In the patients with hyperthyroidism the plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine seemed to be lower than normal controls. In the diabetics, the plasma glucagon responses to L-arginine were almost the same as in normal controls. However their glucagon levels seemed to be relatively high, considering the fact that diabetics had high blood glucose levels. (auth.)

  1. Plasma catecholamine responses to physiologic stimuli in normal human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, W M; Mujais, S K; Zinaman, M; Bravo, E L; Lindheimer, M D

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic response of the sympathoadrenal system was evaluated during and after pregnancy in 13 healthy women with a protocol that compared cardiovascular parameters and plasma catecholamine levels during the basal state, after postural maneuvers, and following isometric exercise. Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were similar during and after gestation when the women rested on their sides, but heart rate was greater in pregnancy. Ten minutes of supine recumbency produced minimal changes, but attenuation of the anticipated increases in heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels during standing and isometric exercise were observed during pregnancy. In contrast, alterations in plasma epinephrine appeared unaffected by gestation. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels were, as expected, greater during pregnancy; however, increments in response to upright posture were similar in pregnant and postpartum women. To the extent that circulating catecholamines may be considered indices of sympathoadrenal function, these data suggest that normal pregnancy alters cardiovascular and sympathetic nervous system responses to physiologic stimuli.

  2. Reply in response to comment by E. W. Hones. [concerning the paper, on hot tenuous plasmas, fireballs, and boundary layers in the earth's magnetotail by Frank, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, L. A.; Decoster, R. J.; Ackerson, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    Hones 1977 points out the marked disagreement between the plasma flow measurements reported by Frank et al. 1976 and those obtained with the LASL plasma analyzer. He suggests (1) that solar ultraviolet background rates may have been incorrectly accounted for in the computation of proton bulk flows in the magnetotail as reported by Frank et al. 1976 and (2) that bulk flows with substantial speeds, i.e., those speeds greater than 50 km per sec, are seldom encountered in the plasma sheet at geocentric radial distances approx. equal to 35 R sub E. It is demonstrated that such ultraviolet responses were carefully considered by Frank et al. 1976 and thus the conclusion is maintained that bulk flows greater than 50 km per sec frequently occur in the plasma sheet at these radial distances. Further, a direct comparison of the capabilities of the LASL plasma analyzer employed by Hones and of the LEPEDEA Frank et al., 1976 indicates that there are rather severe restrictions on which plasmas in the plasma sheet can be properly measured to gain proton temperatures, number densities and flow velocities with the LASL plasma analyzer.

  3. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 13: Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geral I. McDonald; Philip D. Tanimoto; Thomas M. Rice; David E. Hall; Jane E. Stewart; Paul J. Zambino; Jonalea R. Tonn; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim

    2005-01-01

    The Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART) is a Web-based tool that estimates Armillaria root disease risk in dry forests of the Western United States. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does and does not do, and tells the user how to obtain the model.

  4. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma

  5. Kinetic Alfven wave in the presence of kappa distribution function in plasma sheet boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, G., E-mail: geetphy9@gmail.com; Ahirwar, G. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain India (India); Shrivastava, J., E-mail: jayashrivastava2007@gmail.com [Dronacharya Group of Institutions, Greater Noida-India (India)

    2015-07-31

    The particle aspect approach is adopted to investigate the trajectories of charged particles in the electromagnetic field of kinetic Alfven wave. Expressions are found for the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in the presence of kappa distribution function. Kinetic effect of electrons and ions are included to study kinetic Alfven wave because both are important in the transition region. It is found that the ratio β of electron thermal energy density to magnetic field energy density and the ratio of ion to electron thermal temperature (T{sub i}/T{sub e}), and kappa distribution function affect the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in both cases(warm and cold electron limit).The treatment of kinetic Alfven wave instability is based on assumption that the plasma consist of resonant and non resonant particles. The resonant particles participate in an energy exchange process, whereas the non resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave.

  6. Clozapine response and plasma catecholamines and their metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A I; Alam, M Y; Sobieraj, J T; Pappalardo, K M; Waternaux, C; Salzman, C; Schatzberg, A F; Schildkraut, J J

    1993-02-01

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine has an unusual profile of clinical effects and a distinctive spectrum of pharmacological actions. Plasma measures of catecholamines and their metabolites have been used in the past to study the action of typical neuroleptics. We obtained longitudinal assessments of plasma measures of dopamine (pDA), norepinephrine (pNE), and their metabolites, homovanillic acid (pHVA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG), in eight treatment-resistant or treatment-intolerant schizophrenic patients who were treated with clozapine for 12 weeks following a prolonged drug-washout period. Our findings from the study of these eight patients suggest the following: Plasma levels of HVA and possibly NE derived from the neuroleptic-free baseline period may predict response to clozapine; plasma levels of HVA and MHPG decrease during the initial weeks of treatment in responders but not in nonresponders; and plasma levels of DA and NE increase in both responders and nonresponders to clozapine.

  7. Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Hannes; Sasgen, Ingo; Pollard, David; Klemann, Volker

    2016-04-01

    for asthenosphere viscosities of 3x10^20 Pa s or higher. References Gomez, N., Pollard, D., Mitrovica, J. X., Huybers, P., & Clark, P. U. (2012). Evolution of a coupled marine ice sheet-sea level model. J. Geophys. Res. 117(F1). Konrad, H., Sasgen, I., Pollard, D. & Klemann, V. (2015). Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat in a warming climate. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 432, 2015.

  8. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 2. Hall dynamics, mass and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding with the analysis of Amata et al. (2005, we suggest that the general feature for the local transport at a thin magnetopause (MP consists of the penetration of ions from the magnetosheath with gyroradius larger than the MP width, and that, in crossing it, the transverse potential difference at the thin current sheet (TCS is acquired by these ions, providing a field-particle energy exchange without parallel electric fields. It is suggested that a part of the surface charge is self-consistently produced by deflection of ions in the course of inertial drift in the non-uniform electric field at MP. Consideration of the partial moments of ions with different energies demonstrates that the protons having gyroradii of roughly the same size or larger than the MP width carry fluxes normal to MP that are about 20% of the total flow in the plasma jet under MP. This is close to the excess of the ion transverse velocity over the cross-field drift speed in the plasma flow just inside MP (Amata et al., 2005, which conforms to the contribution of the finite-gyroradius inflow across MP. A linkage through the TCS between different plasmas results from the momentum conservation of the higher-energy ions. If the finite-gyroradius penetration occurs along the MP over ~1.5 RE from the observation site, then it can completely account for the formation of the jet under the MP. To provide the downstream acceleration of the flow near the MP via the cross-field drift, the weak magnetic field is suggested to rotate from its nearly parallel direction to the unperturbed flow toward being almost perpendicular to the accelerated flow near the MP. We discuss a deceleration of the higher-energy ions in the MP normal direction due to the interaction with finite-scale electric field bursts in the magnetosheath flow frame, equivalent to collisions, providing a charge separation. These effective collisions, with a nonlinear frequency proxy of the order of the proton

  9. Instabilities responsible for magnetic turbulence in laboratory rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Lominadze, J.G.; Churikov, A.P.; Erokhin, N.N.; Pustovitov, V.D.; Konovalov, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Instabilities responsible for magnetic turbulence in laboratory rotating plasma are investigated. It is shown that the plasma compressibility gives a new driving mechanism in addition to the known Velikhov effect due to the negative rotation frequency gradient. This new mechanism is related to the perpendicular plasma pressure gradient, while the density gradient gives an additional drive depending also on the pressure gradient. It is shown that these new effects can manifest themselves even in the absence of the equilibrium magnetic field, which corresponds to nonmagnetic instabilities

  10. Comparing DINA code simulations with TCV experimental plasma equilibrium responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Lister, J.B.; Lukash, V.E.; Wainwright, J.P.

    2000-08-01

    The DINA non-linear time dependent simulation code has been validated against an extensive set of plasma equilibrium response experiments carried out on the TCV tokamak. Limited and diverted plasmas are found to be well modelled during the plasma current flat top. In some simulations the application of the PF coil voltage stimulation pulse sufficiently changed the plasma equilibrium that the vertical position feedback control loop became unstable. This behaviour was also found in the experimental work, and cannot be reproduced using linear time-independent models. A single null diverted plasma discharge was also simulated from start-up to shut-down and the results were found to accurately reproduce their experimental equivalents. The most significant difference noted was the penetration time of the poloidal flux, leading to a delayed onset of sawtoothing in the DINA simulation. The complete set of frequency stimulation experiments used to measure the open loop tokamak plasma equilibrium response was also simulated using DINA and the results were analysed in an identical fashion to the experimental data. The frequency response of the DINA simulations agrees with the experimental results. Comparisons with linear models are also discussed to identify areas of good and only occasionally less good agreement. (author)

  11. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 03: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: More ways to catch and hold people's attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Other fact sheets discuss the different types of information that are useful in explaining to property owners the importance of taking personal responsibility for fuels management on their land. However, for some property owners, new information is not enough-they may need more information in order to understand that change is necessary. This fact sheet discusses ways...

  12. 3D Printing of Thermo-Responsive Methylcellulose Hydrogels for Cell-Sheet Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cochis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A possible strategy in regenerative medicine is cell-sheet engineering (CSE, i.e., developing smart cell culture surfaces from which to obtain intact cell sheets (CS. The main goal of this study was to develop 3D printing via extrusion-based bioprinting of methylcellulose (MC-based hydrogels. Hydrogels were prepared by mixing MC powder in saline solutions (Na2SO4 and PBS. MC-based hydrogels were analyzed to investigate the rheological behavior and thus optimize the printing process parameters. Cells were tested in vitro on ring-shaped printed hydrogels; bulk MC hydrogels were used for comparison. In vitro tests used murine embryonic fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 and endothelial murine cells (MS1, and the resulting cell sheets were characterized analyzing cell viability and immunofluorescence. In terms of CS preparation, 3D printing proved to be an optimal approach to obtain ring-shaped CS. Cell orientation was observed for the ring-shaped CS and was confirmed by the degree of circularity of their nuclei: cell nuclei in ring-shaped CS were more elongated than those in sheets detached from bulk hydrogels. The 3D printing process appears adequate for the preparation of cell sheets of different shapes for the regeneration of complex tissues.

  13. 3D Printing of Thermo-Responsive Methylcellulose Hydrogels for Cell-Sheet Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochis, Andrea; Bonetti, Lorenzo; Sorrentino, Rita; Contessi Negrini, Nicola; Grassi, Federico; Leigheb, Massimiliano; Rimondini, Lia; Farè, Silvia

    2018-04-10

    A possible strategy in regenerative medicine is cell-sheet engineering (CSE), i.e., developing smart cell culture surfaces from which to obtain intact cell sheets (CS). The main goal of this study was to develop 3D printing via extrusion-based bioprinting of methylcellulose (MC)-based hydrogels. Hydrogels were prepared by mixing MC powder in saline solutions (Na₂SO₄ and PBS). MC-based hydrogels were analyzed to investigate the rheological behavior and thus optimize the printing process parameters. Cells were tested in vitro on ring-shaped printed hydrogels; bulk MC hydrogels were used for comparison. In vitro tests used murine embryonic fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) and endothelial murine cells (MS1), and the resulting cell sheets were characterized analyzing cell viability and immunofluorescence. In terms of CS preparation, 3D printing proved to be an optimal approach to obtain ring-shaped CS. Cell orientation was observed for the ring-shaped CS and was confirmed by the degree of circularity of their nuclei: cell nuclei in ring-shaped CS were more elongated than those in sheets detached from bulk hydrogels. The 3D printing process appears adequate for the preparation of cell sheets of different shapes for the regeneration of complex tissues.

  14. Plasma sheet pressure anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, G.S.; Hones, E.W. Jr; Bame, S.J.; Asbridge, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The ecliptic plane components of the pressure tensors for low-energy ( or =1.2 approximately 25% of the time. Due to the low energy density of the electrons, however, this anisotropy is not itself sufficient to balance the tension of the magnetic field

  15. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  16. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Krystyna; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2013-12-06

    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants' desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet, future research implications should

  17. The response of the southern Greenland ice sheet to the Holocene thermal maximum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Kjaer, Kurt H.; Lecavalier, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    contribution of 0.16 m sea-level equivalent from the entire Greenland ice sheet, with a centennial ice loss rate of as much as 100 Gt/yr for several millennia during the Holocene thermal maximum. Our results provide an estimate of the long-term rates of volume loss that can be expected in the future...

  18. A kinematic hardening constitutive model for the uniaxial cyclic stress-strain response of magnesium sheet alloys at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhitao; Chen, Wufan; Wang, Fenghua; Feng, Miaolin

    2017-11-01

    A kinematic hardening constitutive model is presented, in which a modified form of von Mises yield function is adopted, and the initial asymmetric tension and compression yield stresses of magnesium (Mg) alloys at room temperature (RT) are considered. The hardening behavior was classified into slip, twinning, and untwinning deformation modes, and these were described by two forms of back stress to capture the mechanical response of Mg sheet alloys under cyclic loading tests at RT. Experimental values were obtained for AZ31B-O and AZ31B sheet alloys under both tension-compression-tension (T-C-T) and compression-tension (C-T) loadings to calibrate the parameters of back stresses in the proposed model. The predicted parameters of back stresses in the twinning and untwinning modes were expressed as a cubic polynomial. The predicted curves based on these parameters showed good agreement with the tests.

  19. Sensing sheet: the response of full-bridge strain sensors to thermal variations for detecting and characterizing cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, S.-T.; Glisic, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sensing sheets based on large-area electronics consist of a dense array of unit strain sensors. This new technology has potential for becoming an effective and affordable monitoring tool that can identify, localize and quantify surface damage in structures. This research contributes to their development by investigating the response of full-bridge unit strain sensors to thermal variations. Overall, this investigation quantifies the effects of temperature on thin-film full-bridge strain sensors monitoring uncracked and cracked concrete. Additionally, an empirical formula is developed to estimate crack width given an observed strain change and a measured temperature change. This research led to the understanding of the behavior of full-bridge strain sensors installed on cracked concrete and exposed to temperature variations. It proves the concept of the sensing sheet and its suitability for application in environments with variable temperature.

  20. Edge Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric Fields in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Lao, L. L.; Buttery, R. J.; Evans, T. E.; Snyder, P. B.; Wade, M.R., E-mail: ferraro@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, San Diego (United States); Moyer, R. A.; Orlov, D. M. [University of California San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The application of non-axisymmetric fields is found to have significant effects on the transport and stability of H-mode tokamak plasmas. These effects include dramatic changes in rotation and particle transport, and may lead to the partial or complete suppression of edge-localized modes (ELMs) under some circumstances. The physical mechanism underlying these effects is presently not well understood, in large part because the response of the plasma to non- axisymmetric fields is significant and complex. Here, recent advances in modeling the plasma response to non-axisymmetric fields are discussed. Calculations using a resistive two-fluid model in diverted toroidal geometry confirm the special role of the perpendicular electron velocity in suppressing the formation of islands in the plasma. The possibility that islands form near the top of the pedestal, where the zero-crossing of the perpendicular electron velocity may coincide with a mode-rational surface, is explored, and the implications for ELM suppression are discussed. Modeling results are compared with empirical data. It is shown that numerical modeling is successful in reproducing some experimentally observed effects of applied non-axisymmetric fields on the edge temperature and density profiles. The numerical model self-consistently includes the plasma, separatrix, and scrape-off layer. Rotation and diamagnetic effects are also included self-consistently. Solutions are calculated using the M3D-C1 extended-MHD code. (and others)

  1. Measurement of the open loop plasma equilibrium response in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutlis, A.; Bandyopadhyay, I.; Lister, J.B.; Vyas, P.; Albanese, R.; Limebeer, D.J.N.; Villone, F.; Wainwright, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    A new technique and results are presented for the estimation of the open loop frequency response of the plasma on TCV. Voltages were applied to poloidal field coils and the resulting plasma current, position and shape related parameters were measured. The results are compared with the CREATE-L model, and good agreement is confirmed. The results are a significant advance on previous comparisons with closed loop data, which were limited by the role of feedback in the system. A simpler circuit equation model has also been developed in order to understand the reasons for the good agreement and identify which plasma properties are important in determining the response. The reasons for the good agreement with this model are discussed. An alternative modelling method has been developed, combining features of both the theoretical and experimental techniques. Its advantage is that it incorporates well defined knowledge of the electromagnetic properties of the tokamak with experimental data to derive plasma related parameters. This new model provides further insight into the plasma behaviour. (author)

  2. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    ) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...... the estuary is free of landfast sea ice. A seasonal hysteresis between melt extent and plume area suggests late-season exhaustion in sediment supply. Analysis of plume sensitivity to supraglacial events is less conclusive, with 69% of melt pulses and 38% of lake drainage events triggering an increase in plume...... area. We conclude that remote sensing of sediment plume behavior offers a novel tool for detecting the presence, timing and interannual variability of meltwater release from the ice sheet....

  4. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions...

  5. An efficient regional energy-moisture balance model for simulation of the Greenland Ice Sheet response to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Robinson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the response of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS to climate change on long (centennial to multi-millennial time scales, a regional energy-moisture balance model has been developed. This model simulates seasonal variations of temperature and precipitation over Greenland and explicitly accounts for elevation and albedo feedbacks. From these fields, the annual mean surface temperature and surface mass balance can be determined and used to force an ice sheet model. The melt component of the surface mass balance is computed here using both a positive degree day approach and a more physically-based alternative that includes insolation and albedo explicitly. As a validation of the climate model, we first simulated temperature and precipitation over Greenland for the prescribed, present-day topography. Our simulated climatology compares well to observations and does not differ significantly from that of a simple parameterization used in many previous simulations. Furthermore, the calculated surface mass balance using both melt schemes falls within the range of recent regional climate model results. For a prescribed, ice-free state, the differences in simulated climatology between the regional energy-moisture balance model and the simple parameterization become significant, with our model showing much stronger summer warming. When coupled to a three-dimensional ice sheet model and initialized with present-day conditions, the two melt schemes both allow realistic simulations of the present-day GIS.

  6. Relative spectral response calibration using Ti plasma lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, FEI; Congyuan, PAN; Qiang, ZENG; Qiuping, WANG; Xuewei, DU

    2018-04-01

    This work introduces the branching ratio (BR) method for determining relative spectral responses, which are needed routinely in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Neutral and singly ionized Ti lines in the 250–498 nm spectral range are investigated by measuring laser-induced micro plasma near a Ti plate and used to calculate the relative spectral response of an entire LIBS detection system. The results are compared with those of the conventional relative spectral response calibration method using a tungsten halogen lamp, and certain lines available for the BR method are selected. The study supports the common manner of using BRs to calibrate the detection system in LIBS setups.

  7. ULF hydromagnetic oscillations with the discrete spectrum as eigenmodes of MHD-resonator in the near-Earth part of the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mazur

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A new concept is proposed for the emergence of ULF geomagnetic oscillations with a discrete spectrum of frequencies (0.8, 1.3, 1.9, 2.6 ...mHz registered in the magnetosphere's midnight-morning sector. The concept relies on the assumption that these oscillations are MHD-resonator eigenmodes in the near-Earth plasma sheet. This magnetospheric area is where conditions are met for fast magnetosonic waves to be confined. The confinement is a result of the velocity values of fast magnetosonic waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet which differ greatly from those in the magnetotail lobes, leading to turning points forming in the tailward direction for the waves under study. To compute the eigenfrequency spectrum of such a resonator, we used a model magnetosphere with parabolic geometry. The fundamental harmonics of this resonator's eigenfrequencies are shown to be capable of being clustered into groups with average frequencies matching, with good accuracy, the frequencies of the observed oscillations. A possible explanation for the stability of the observed oscillation frequencies is that such a resonator might only form when the magnetosphere is in a certain unperturbed state.

  8. ULF hydromagnetic oscillations with the discrete spectrum as eigenmodes of MHD-resonator in the near-Earth part of the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mazur

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A new concept is proposed for the emergence of ULF geomagnetic oscillations with a discrete spectrum of frequencies (0.8, 1.3, 1.9, 2.6 ...mHz registered in the magnetosphere's midnight-morning sector. The concept relies on the assumption that these oscillations are MHD-resonator eigenmodes in the near-Earth plasma sheet. This magnetospheric area is where conditions are met for fast magnetosonic waves to be confined. The confinement is a result of the velocity values of fast magnetosonic waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet which differ greatly from those in the magnetotail lobes, leading to turning points forming in the tailward direction for the waves under study. To compute the eigenfrequency spectrum of such a resonator, we used a model magnetosphere with parabolic geometry. The fundamental harmonics of this resonator's eigenfrequencies are shown to be capable of being clustered into groups with average frequencies matching, with good accuracy, the frequencies of the observed oscillations. A possible explanation for the stability of the observed oscillation frequencies is that such a resonator might only form when the magnetosphere is in a certain unperturbed state.

  9. Several features of the earthward and tailward streaming of energetic protons (0.29--0.5 MeV) in the earth's plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of earthward and tailward streaming of energetic protons (0.29--0.50 MeV) in the magnetotial at downstream distances of 20 to 40 R/sub E/ are examined with approx.5.5-min averaged data from the APL/JHU Charged Particle Measurements Experiment on board the IMP 7 and IMP 8 spacecraft. On the basis of observations from September 1972 to May 1978 it is found that the occurrence frequency of energetic magnetospheric protons streaming either tailward or earthward with a front-to-back flux ratio of >2 is at least 23%. Tailward streaming is found to be prevalent in the postmidnight plasma sheet, while earthward streaming is more frequent in the premidnight sector. The particle spectrum is progressively harder from the dawn flank to the dusk flank of the plasma sheet and is generally harder for tailward streaming than for earthward streaming. It is suggested that the dawn-dusk reversal in the dominant streaming direction results from an underlying circulation pattern of energetic protons in the magnetotail, tailward in the postmidnight region and earthward in the premidnight region

  10. An invention of thermo-responsive polymer surface, yielding cell sheet based regenerative therapies in cardiology and ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Invention: In vitro cell culture methodologies provide a conducive environment for the cells taken out of their native environment to grow and proliferate in a non-physiological environment, the culture dish. Research experiments have been focusing on various criteria for assessing how far it is possible to recapitulate the native extra-cellular environment in vitro. Scaffolds, culture media, growth factors and cell surface modified culture dishes are some of the components that provide a conducive environment for in vitro cell culture. Cells that are grown in culture dishes using conventional methodologies are usually detached using enzymatic treatment with Trypsin, Collagenase etc [1], to be transplanted when it comes to a clinical or experimental application. Such enzymes used in separating the cells may have some damaging effects to the cell membranes which might impair the cell function [1]. However, cells if can be grown as a monolayer and be harvested as a contiguous cell sheet, it is considered suitable for transplantation in certain specific applications. In addition to that, if enzymatic digestion which has some detrimental effects on the detached cells could be avoided, that is an added advantage. The work by Prof. Okano and team from the Tokyo Women's Medical University, Japan, on thermo-responsive polymer surfaces has yielded a solution which has both the advantages viz., detachability of cells grown as a monolayer in the form of a cell sheet, that too without the use of enzymes. Their research into biomaterials for more than two decades has yielded a thermo-responsive polymer, the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm [1] coated culture dish for cell sheet engineering. In their technology, PIPAAm is polymerized and grafted to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS dishes. Cells have been found to grow confluent on PIPAAm-TCPS at 37 °C. Once confluent as a monolayer, by merely reducing the temperature of the PIPAAm-TCPS to 20 °C, it

  11. Nonlinear Plasma Response to Resonant Magnetic Perturbation in Rutherford Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Yan, Xingting; Huang, Wenlong

    2017-10-01

    Recently a common analytic relation for both the locked mode and the nonlinear plasma response in the Rutherford regime has been developed based on the steady-state solution to the coupled dynamic system of magnetic island evolution and torque balance equations. The analytic relation predicts the threshold and the island size for the full penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). It also rigorously proves a screening effect of the equilibrium toroidal flow. In this work, we test the theory by solving for the nonlinear plasma response to a single-helicity RMP of a circular-shaped limiter tokamak equilibrium with a constant toroidal flow, using the initial-value, full MHD simulation code NIMROD. Time evolution of the parallel flow or ``slip frequency'' profile and its asymptotic approach to steady state obtained from the NIMROD simulations qualitatively agree with the theory predictions. Further comparisons are carried out for the saturated island size, the threshold for full mode penetration, as well as the screening effects of equilibrium toroidal flow in order to understand the physics of nonlinear plasma response in the Rutherford regime. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grants 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and U.S. Department of Energy Grants DE-FG02-86ER53218 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  12. Dense sheet Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetsu, Miyamoto

    1999-01-01

    The steady state and quasi-steady processes of infinite- and finite-width sheet z-pinches are studied. The relations corresponding to the Bennett relation and Pease-Braginskii current of cylindrical fiber z-pinches depend on a geometrical factor in the sheet z-pinches. The finite-width sheet z-pinch is approximated by a segment of infinite-width sheet z-pinch, if it is wide enough, and corresponds to a number of (width/thickness) times fiber z-pinch plasmas of the diameter that equals the sheet thickness. If the sheet current equals this number times the fiber current, the plasma created in the sheet z-pinches is as dense as in the fiber z-pinches. The total energy of plasma and magnetic field per unit mass is approximately equal in both pinches. Quasi-static transient processes are different in several aspects from the fiber z-pinch. No radiation collapse occurs in the sheet z-pinch. The stability is improved in the sheet z-pinches. The fusion criterions and the experimental arrangements to produce the sheet z-pinches are also discussed. (author)

  13. Structural responses to plasma disruptions in toroidal shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Kazimi, M.S.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The induced pressures, stresses and strains in unrestrained axisymmetric toroidal shells are studied to scope the behavior of tokamak first walls during plasma disruptions. The modeling includes a circuit analog representation of the shell to solve for induced currents and pressures, and a separate quasi-static 1-D finite element solution for the mechanical response. This work demonstrates that the stresses in tokamkak first walls due to plasma disruption may be large, but to first order will not cause failure in the bulk structure. However, stress concentrations at structural supports and discontinuities together with resonant effects can result in large enhancements of the stresses, which could contribute to plastic deformation or failure when added to the already large steady state thermal and pressure loading of the first wall

  14. Collisionless current sheet equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukirch, T.; Wilson, F.; Allanson, O.

    2018-01-01

    Current sheets are important for the structure and dynamics of many plasma systems. In space and astrophysical plasmas they play a crucial role in activity processes, for example by facilitating the release of magnetic energy via processes such as magnetic reconnection. In this contribution we will focus on collisionless plasma systems. A sensible first step in any investigation of physical processes involving current sheets is to find appropriate equilibrium solutions. The theory of collisionless plasma equilibria is well established, but over the past few years there has been a renewed interest in finding equilibrium distribution functions for collisionless current sheets with particular properties, for example for cases where the current density is parallel to the magnetic field (force-free current sheets). This interest is due to a combination of scientific curiosity and potential applications to space and astrophysical plasmas. In this paper we will give an overview of some of the recent developments, discuss their potential applications and address a number of open questions.

  15. Quasi-adiabatic particle acceleration in a magnetic field reversals and the formation of the plasma sheet boundary layer in the earth's magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyi, L.M.; Vogin, D.V.; Buechner, J.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of regularity exist for the particle motion in the two-dimensional magnetic field reversals (MFR) with the strongly curves magnetic field lines - the usual adiabatic and another one which we called 'quasiadiabatic'. Here we consider the acceleration of MFR particles in stationary and homogeneous electric field induced by the motion of MFR through the ambient plasma (i.e. solar wind). Assuming that the time scale of acceleration is slow in comparison with the period of orbital motion we introduce the new longitudinal invariant I κ . This enables to describe the process of acceleration in a closed form and to obtain for the first time the laws governing the quasiadiabatic ion acceleration in the Earth's mangetotail. The similarities and differences in adiabatic and quasiadiabatic acceleration mechanisms are discussed. The obtained results give and important insights to the problem of the particle heating in hte Earth's magnetotail and to the formation of accelerated plasma streams along the edges of the plasma sheet. (author). 17 refs.; 7 figs

  16. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 02: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: Types of information to encourage proactive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Fuels management responsibilities may include providing local property owners with the information for taking responsibility for reducing fuels on their land. This fact sheet discusses three different types of information that may be useful in programs to engage property owners in fuel reduction activities.

  17. Ice-dynamic projections of the Greenland ice sheet in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Fürst

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing global warming will have a strong impact on the Greenland ice sheet in the coming centuries. During the last decade (2000–2010, both increased melt-water runoff and enhanced ice discharge from calving glaciers have contributed 0.6 ± 0.1 mm yr−1 to global sea-level rise, with a relative contribution of 60 and 40% respectively. Here we use a higher-order ice flow model, spun up to present day, to simulate future ice volume changes driven by both atmospheric and oceanic temperature changes. For these projections, the flow model accounts for runoff-induced basal lubrication and ocean warming-induced discharge increase at the marine margins. For a suite of 10 atmosphere and ocean general circulation models and four representative concentration pathway scenarios, the projected sea-level rise between 2000 and 2100 lies in the range of +1.4 to +16.6 cm. For two low emission scenarios, the projections are conducted up to 2300. Ice loss rates are found to abate for the most favourable scenario where the warming peaks in this century, allowing the ice sheet to maintain a geometry close to the present-day state. For the other moderate scenario, loss rates remain at a constant level over 300 years. In any scenario, volume loss is predominantly caused by increased surface melting as the contribution from enhanced ice discharge decreases over time and is self-limited by thinning and retreat of the marine margin, reducing the ice–ocean contact area. As confirmed by other studies, we find that the effect of enhanced basal lubrication on the volume evolution is negligible on centennial timescales. Our projections show that the observed rates of volume change over the last decades cannot simply be extrapolated over the 21st century on account of a different balance of processes causing ice loss over time. Our results also indicate that the largest source of uncertainty arises from the surface mass balance and the underlying climate change

  18. Effect of initial strain and material nonlinearity on the nonlinear static and dynamic response of graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Patel, B. P.

    2018-06-01

    Computationally efficient multiscale modelling based on Cauchy-Born rule in conjunction with finite element method is employed to study static and dynamic characteristics of graphene sheets, with/without considering initial strain, involving Green-Lagrange geometric and material nonlinearities. The strain energy density function at continuum level is established by coupling the deformation at continuum level to that at atomic level through Cauchy-Born rule. The atomic interactions between carbon atoms are modelled through Tersoff-Brenner potential. The governing equation of motion obtained using Hamilton's principle is solved through standard Newton-Raphson method for nonlinear static response and Newmark's time integration technique to obtain nonlinear transient response characteristics. Effect of initial strain on the linear free vibration frequencies, nonlinear static and dynamic response characteristics is investigated in detail. The present multiscale modelling based results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained through molecular mechanics simulation. Two different types of boundary constraints generally used in MM simulation are explored in detail and few interesting findings are brought out. The effect of initial strain is found to be greater in linear response when compared to that in nonlinear response.

  19. Measurement of OH free radical in magnetized sheet plasma crossed with vertical gas-flow by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takatori, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Kawamura, Kazutaka; Takayama, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrated the production of OH free radicals in an argon magnetized sheet plasma crossed with vertical gas-flow mixed with an oxygen gas O 2 and a hydrogen gas H 2 . The density and the rotational-vibrational temperature of the OH free radicals were measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The density of OH free radicals increases with increasing O 2 gas-flow, while the high energy part of the electron-energy-distribution-function f e (E) above 8 eV decreases. These results suggest the high energy part of f e (E) is contributed to the dissociation of O 2 and the production of OH free radicals. (author)

  20. Transient response of the 'multiple water-bag' plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Cheeseng

    1989-01-01

    A charge activates impulsively and then decays temporally within a MWB (multiple water-bag)-modelled warm plasma. The transient problem is formulated and asymptotically resolved for large time. The response potential comprises two characteristically distinct quantities W and W N : W is a superposition of spherically expanding, moderately attenuated Kelvin waves contributed by certain points on a subset of dispersion curves; W N is a superposition, associated with two other dispersion curves, of three spherical wavefunctions, one of which incorporates the Fresnel integrals. A transient state feature of the MWB discretization is the partitioning of the response field by growing (fast) fronts, (trailing) slow caustics and a j -surfaces, the fastest among these being an a N- surface (thermal front) which pushes back a quasi-static exterior. Contrary to expectations, there is no response jump across any of those growing partitions. Wavefunctions near the slow caustics possess Airy factors. A rest state ultimately develops behind the slowest slow caustic. An application is made to the fluid plasma. (author)

  1. Experiments on sheet metal shearing

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Within the sheet metal industry, different shear cutting technologies are commonly used in several processing steps, e.g. in cut to length lines, slitting lines, end cropping etc. Shearing has speed and cost advantages over competing cutting methods like laser and plasma cutting, but involves large forces on the equipment and large strains in the sheet material.Numerical models to predict forces and sheared edge geometry for different sheet metal grades and different shear parameter set-ups a...

  2. Energy balance and transient responses in wave driven plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rax, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    In a current-drive experiment with a RF power source, a certain amount of power is absorbed by resonant electrons. From the electrons, energy can flow through four channels: it can be converted into magnetic work when the electron interacts with an electric field, or it can be converted into heat when the electron collides the thermal plasma. In addition, there exists also the conversion of the low frequency RF energy into high frequency non thermal free-free or cyclotron radiation. Efficiencies of these conversions are considered together with the turn-on times of the associated responses

  3. Decontamination sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Emiko; Kanesaki, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The decontamination sheet of the present invention is formed by applying an adhesive on one surface of a polymer sheet and releasably appending a plurality of curing sheets. In addition, perforated lines are formed on the sheet, and a decontaminating agent is incorporated in the adhesive. This can reduce the number of curing operation steps when a plurality steps of operations for radiation decontamination equipments are performed, and further, the amount of wastes of the cured sheets, and operator's exposure are reduced, as well as an efficiency of the curing operation can be improved, and propagation of contamination can be prevented. (T.M.)

  4. Formation of a three-dimensional plasma boundary after decay of the plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lasnier, C. L.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R. A.; Reimerdes, H.; the DIII-D Team

    2014-01-01

    First time experimental evidence is presented for a direct link between the decay of a n = 3 plasma response and the formation of a three-dimensional (3D) plasma boundary. We inspect a lower single-null L-mode plasma which first reacts at sufficiently high rotation with an ideal resonant screening response to an external toroidal mode number n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbation field. Decay of this response due to reduced bulk plasma rotation changes the plasma state considerably. Signatures such as density pump out and a spin up of the edge rotation—which are usually connected to formation of a stochastic boundary—are detected. Coincident, striation of the divertor single ionized carbon emission and a 3D emission structure in double ionized carbon at the separatrix is seen. The striated C II pattern follows in this stage the perturbed magnetic footprint modelled without a plasma response (vacuum approach). This provides for the first time substantial experimental evidence, that a 3D plasma boundary with direct impact on the divertor particle flux pattern is formed as soon as the internal plasma response decays. The resulting divertor structure follows the vacuum modelled magnetic field topology. However, the inward extension of the perturbed boundary layer can still not directly be determined from these measurements.

  5. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  6. Fact Sheet: Roles and Responsibilities of One EPA Web Editors-in-Chief (EICs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skills and abilities expected of EICs include project management, communication, leadership, and problem solving. The EIC is responsible to serve as the lead for their web topic, and coordinate content development and maintenance.

  7. Quite time convection electric field properties derived from keV electron measurements at the inner edge of the plasma sheet by means of GEOS 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reme, H.; Kremser, G.; Bahnsen, A.; Jespersen, M.; Hultqvist, B.; Borg, H.; Holmgren, L.Aa.

    1981-04-01

    From an analysis of the local time distribution of the electron upper energy limit reached by the geostationary satellite GEOS 2 in cutting through the innermost part of the electron plasma sheet during fairly quite condition the following results have been obtained, among others: An electric field model given by E = -grad(AR 4 sinphi), with the dusk singular point of the forbidden region boundary at 1500, instead of at 1800 MLT, is in quite good agreement with the observations. This means that effects due to the shielding by the hot plasma of the inner magnetosphere from the convection electric field are quite strong in situations of low disturbance level. The quiet time convection electric field strength at 2100 MLT in the geostationary orbit obtained from this analysis varies in the range 0.15 - 0.3 keV/Rsub(e). Six hours earlier or later in the satellite orbit the convection field is 4 times stronger. Also when the convection field varies, some information about its magnitude can be obtained from the keV electron measurements. (author)

  8. Energized Oxygen : Speiser Current Sheet Bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. E.; Jahn, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    A single population of energized Oxygen (O+) is shown to produce a cross-tail bifurcated current sheet in 2.5D PIC simulations of the magnetotail without the influence of magnetic reconnection. Treatment of oxygen in simulations of space plasmas, specifically a magnetotail current sheet, has been limited to thermal energies despite observations of and mechanisms which explain energized ions. We performed simulations of a homogeneous oxygen background, that has been energized in a physically appropriate manner, to study the behavior of current sheets and magnetic reconnection, specifically their bifurcation. This work uses a 2.5D explicit Particle-In-a-Cell (PIC) code to investigate the dynamics of energized heavy ions as they stream Dawn-to-Dusk in the magnetotail current sheet. We present a simulation study dealing with the response of a current sheet system to energized oxygen ions. We establish a, well known and studied, 2-species GEM Challenge Harris current sheet as a starting point. This system is known to eventually evolve and produce magnetic reconnection upon thinning of the current sheet. We added a uniform distribution of thermal O+ to the background. This 3-species system is also known to eventually evolve and produce magnetic reconnection. We add one additional variable to the system by providing an initial duskward velocity to energize the O+. We also traced individual particle motion within the PIC simulation. Three main results are shown. First, energized dawn- dusk streaming ions are clearly seen to exhibit sustained Speiser motion. Second, a single population of heavy ions clearly produces a stable bifurcated current sheet. Third, magnetic reconnection is not required to produce the bifurcated current sheet. Finally a bifurcated current sheet is compatible with the Harris current sheet model. This work is the first step in a series of investigations aimed at studying the effects of energized heavy ions on magnetic reconnection. This work differs

  9. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 15: The Wildlife Habitat Response Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Pilliod

    2005-01-01

    The Wildlife Habitat Response Model (WHRM) is a Web-based computer tool for evaluating the potential effects of fuel-reduction projects on terrestrial wildlife habitats. It uses species-habitat associations in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), dry-type Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), lodgepole pine (Pinus...

  10. Response of fuzzy tungsten surfaces to pulsed plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R.P.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Miyamoto, M.; Nagata, M.; Sakuma, I.; Shoda, K.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Damage of fuzzy tungsten surfaces due to a transient plasma load is characterized in terms of mass loss, surface morphology, and optical properties. A single D pulsed (∼0.1–0.2 ms) plasma shot with surface absorbed energy density of ∼1.1 MJ m −2 leads to a mass loss of ∼80 μg, which cannot be explained by physical sputtering. Thus, macroscopic erosion processes such as droplets and dust release as well as arcing are thought to be responsible for the mass loss. In fact, scanning electron microscopy observations reveal the melting of the tips of fuzz and arc tracks. The optical reflectivity of the damaged (melted) surface is measured to be higher than that of an undamaged fuzzy surface (below ∼0.01%). Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the refractive index, n, and extinction coefficient, k, increase from n ≈ 1 and k ≈ 0 for an undamaged fuzzy surface with an increase in the degree of damage of fuzz

  11. On the possible eigenoscillations of neutral sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, W.A.; Costa, J.M. da; Aruquipa, E.G.; Sudano, J.P.

    1974-12-01

    A neutral sheet model with hyperbolic tangent equilibrium magnetic field and hyperbolic square secant density profiles is considered. It is shown that the equation for small oscillations takes the form of an eigenvalue oscillation problem. Computed eigenfrequencies of the geomagnetic neutral sheet were found to be in the range of the resonant frequencies of the geomagnetic plasma sheet computed by other authors

  12. A small graphene oxide sheet/polyvinylidene fluoride bilayer actuator with large and rapid responses to multiple stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guochuang; Zhang, Miao; Zhou, Qinqin; Chen, Hongwu; Gao, Tiantian; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2017-11-16

    A high-performance actuator should be able to deliver large-shape deformations, fast actuations and sensitive responses to multiple stimuli. Here, we report such an actuator constructed from one layer of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with a high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and another layer of small sheets of graphene oxide (SGO) with a negative CTE. The opposite deformations of both actuation layers make the SGO/PVDF bilayer actuator highly sensitive to the temperature stimulus with a large bending sensitivity of 1.5 cm -1 °C -1 . Upon irradiation with 60 mW cm -2 infrared light, this SGO/PVDF bilayer actuator displayed an extremely rapid tip displacement rate of 140 mm s -1 . Furthermore, this actuator can also sensitively respond to moisture because of its SGO layer, showing a curvature change from -22 to 13 cm -1 upon changing the relative humidity (RH) from 11% to 86%. This actuator can generate a contractile or relaxed stress 18 times that of mammalian skeletal muscle, under light irradiation or moisture with a response time as short as 1 s, being capable of lifting an object with a weight 80 times that of itself. Furthermore, it also showed excellent stability and repeatability.

  13. Effect of gas pressure on active screen plasma nitriding response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Akio; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Narita, Ryota; Nii, Hiroaki; Akamatsu, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 was active screen plasma nitrided using a 304 steel screen to investigate the effect of the gas pressure on the ASPN response. The sample was treated for 18 ks at 723 K in 25% N2 + 75% H2 gases. The gas pressure was changed to 100, 600 and 1200 Pa. The distance between screen and sample was also changed to 10, 30 and 50 mm. The nitrided samples were characterized by appearance observation, surface roughness, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. After nitriding, polygonal particles with a normal distribution were observed at the center and edges of all the ASPN-treated sample surfaces. Particles on the sample surfaces were finer with an increase in the gas pressure. The nitrided layer with a greater and homogeneous thickness was obtained at a low gas pressure of 100 Pa. (author)

  14. Kinetic theory of instabilities responsible for magnetic turbulence in laboratory rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Lominadze, J.G.; Churikov, A.P.; Pustovitov, V.D.; Erokhin, N.N.; Konovalov, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of instabilities responsible for magnetic turbulence in collisionless laboratory rotating plasma is investigated. It is shown that the standard mechanism of driving the magnetorotational instability (MRI), due to negative rotation frequency gradient, disappears in such a plasma. Instead of it, a new driving mechanism due to plasma pressure gradient is predicted

  15. The response of grounded ice to ocean temperature forcing in a coupled ice sheet-ice shelf-ocean cavity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D. N.; Little, C. M.; Sergienko, O. V.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2010-12-01

    Ice shelves provide a pathway for the heat content of the ocean to influence continental ice sheets. Changes in the rate or location of basal melting can alter their geometry and effect changes in stress conditions at the grounding line, leading to a grounded ice response. Recent observations of ice streams and ice shelves in the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica have been consistent with this story. On the other hand, ice dynamics in the grounding zone control flux into the shelf and thus ice shelf geometry, which has a strong influence on the circulation in the cavity beneath the shelf. Thus the coupling between the two systems, ocean and ice sheet-ice shelf, can be quite strong. We examine the response of the ice sheet-ice shelf-ocean cavity system to changes in ocean temperature using a recently developed coupled model. The coupled model consists a 3-D ocean model (GFDL's Generalized Ocean Layered Dynamics model, or GOLD) to a two-dimensional ice sheet-ice shelf model (Goldberg et al, 2009), and allows for changing cavity geometry and a migrating grounding line. Steady states of the coupled system are found even under considerable forcing. The ice shelf morphology and basal melt rate patterns of the steady states exhibit detailed structure, and furthermore seem to be unique and robust. The relationship between temperature forcing and area-averaged melt rate is influenced by the response of ice shelf morphology to thermal forcing, and is found to be sublinear in the range of forcing considered. However, results suggest that area-averaged melt rate is not the best predictor of overall system response, as grounding line stability depends on local aspects of the basal melt field. Goldberg, D N, D M Holland and C G Schoof, 2009. Grounding line movement and ice shelf buttressing in marine ice sheets, Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surfaces, 114, F04026.

  16. Sheet pinch devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.A.; Baker, W.R.; Ise, J. Jr.; Kunkel, W.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Stone, J.M.

    1958-01-01

    Three types of sheet-like discharges are being studied at Berkeley. The first of these, which has been given the name 'Triax', consists of a cylindrical plasma sleeve contained between two coaxial conducting cylinders A theoretical analysis of the stability of the cylindrical sheet plasma predicts the existence of a 'sausage-mode' instability which is, however, expected to grow more slowly than in the case of the unstabilized linear pinch (by the ratio of the radial dimensions). The second pinch device employs a disk shaped discharge with radial current guided between flat metal plates, this configuration being identical to that of the flat hydromagnetic capacitor without external magnetic field. A significant feature of these configurations is the absence of a plasma edge, i.e., there are no regions of sharply curved magnetic field lines anywhere in these discharges. The importance of this fact for stability is not yet fully investigated theoretically. As a third configuration a rectangular, flat pinch tube has been constructed, and the behaviour of a flat plasma sheet with edges is being studied experimentally

  17. Plasma arginine vasopressin response to water load during labour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhi, Sunit; Parshad, Omkar

    1985-01-01

    To find out whether plasma vasopressin (Psub(AVP)) response to a water load during pregnancy is inappropriately high, as had been speculated, we measured Psub(AVP)by radioimmunoassay in 30 women at the time of delivery. Ten women had received infusion of aqueous glucose solution during labour for hydration (GW group); another ten received infusion of glucose solution as a vehicle for oxytocin (IOT group), and ten women did not receive any intrapartum intravenous fluid therapy (controls). Serum sodium and osmolality were also determined in all the subjects. Psub(AVP) levels were significantly lower in GW (0.70 +- 0.4 pg/ml) and OT groups (0.7 +- 0.6 pg/ml) (P<0.05). Significant negative correlation was seen between the amount of glucose solution infused and levels of Psub(AVP) (r = -0.66; P<0.01), while a significant positive correlation was seen between Psub(AVP) and serum sodium (r = 0.61; P<0.01). These findings suggest that during labour, the physiological relationship between serum osmolality and Psub(AVP) in intact, and the infusion of a water load in the form of aqueous glucose solution is attended by an expected lowering of Psub(AVP). We infer that inappropriate ADH response is not the cause of water retention and hyponatremia often seen in women receiving aqueous glucose solution during labor. (author)

  18. Plasma arginine vasopressin response to water load during labour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhi, S. (West Indies Univ., Mona (Jamaica). Dept. of Child Health); Parshad, O. (West Indies Univ., Mona (Jamaica). Dept. of Physiology)

    1985-02-01

    To find out whether plasma vasopressin (Psub(AVP)) response to a water load during pregnancy is inappropriately high, as had been speculated, we measured Psub(AVP)by radioimmunoassay in 30 women at the time of delivery. Ten women had received infusion of aqueous glucose solution during labour for hydration (GW group); another ten received infusion of glucose solution as a vehicle for oxytocin (IOT group), and ten women did not receive any intrapartum intravenous fluid therapy (controls). Serum sodium and osmolality were also determined in all the subjects. Psub(AVP) levels were significantly lower in GW (0.70 +- 0.4 pg/ml) and OT groups (0.7 +- 0.6 pg/ml) (P < 0.05). Significant negative correlation was seen between the amount of glucose solution infused and levels of Psub(AVP) (r = -0.66; P < 0.01), while a significant positive correlation was seen between Psub(AVP) and serum sodium (r = 0.61; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that during labour, the physiological relationship between serum osmolality and Psub(AVP) in intact, and the infusion of a water load in the form of aqueous glucose solution is attended by an expected lowering of Psub(AVP). We infer that inappropriate ADH response is not the cause of water retention and hyponatremia often seen in women receiving aqueous glucose solution during labor.

  19. Haloperidol response and plasma catecholamines and their metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A I; Alam, M Y; Boshes, R A; Waternaux, C; Pappalardo, K M; Fitzgibbon, M E; Tsuang, M T; Schildkraut, J J

    1993-06-01

    Eleven acutely psychotic patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder underwent a 5-7 day drug-washout period (with lorazepam allowed) prior to participating in a 6-week controlled dose haloperidol trial. Patients were evaluated longitudinally with clinical ratings and with plasma measures of the catecholamines dopamine (pDA) and norepinephrine (pNE) and their metabolites, homovanillic acid (pHVA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG). All patients exhibited clinical improvement with haloperidol; the decrease in their Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores ranged from 32 to 89%. Measures of pHVA increased within the first week of treatment and returned to baseline by week 5. The pattern of change of pDA resembled that of pHVA. The pattern of change of pNE and pMHPG revealed a decrease over the course of treatment. The early increase and the subsequent decrease in pHVA were strongly correlated with improvement in positive symptoms on the BPRS. These data are consistent with previous reports on the change in pHVA and pMHPG during clinical response to haloperidol. The data on change of pDA and pNE further describe the nature of the biochemical response to this drug.

  20. Impact of the plasma response in three-dimensional edge plasma transport modelling for RMP ELM control scenarios at ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    The constrains used in magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modeling of the plasma response to external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have a profound impact on the three-dimensional (3-D) shape of the plasma boundary induced by RMP fields. In this contribution, the consequences of the plasma response on the actual 3D boundary structure and transport during RMP application at ITER are investigated. The 3D fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene is used for edge transport modeling. Plasma response modeling is conducted with the M3D-C1 code using a single fluid, non-linear and a two fluid, linear MHD constrain. These approaches are compared to results with an ideal MHD like plasma response. A 3D plasma boundary is formed for all cases consisting of magnetic finger structures at the X-point intersecting the divertor surface in a helical footprint pattern. The width of the helical footprint pattern is largely reduced compared to vacuum magnetic fields when using the ideal MHD like screening model. This yields increasing peak heat fluxes in contrast to a beneficial heat flux spreading seen with vacuum fields. The particle pump out as well as loss of thermal energy is reduced by a factor of two compared to vacuum fields. In contrast, the impact of the plasma response obtained from both MHD constrains in M3D-C1 is nearly negligible at the plasma boundary and only a small modification of the magnetic footprint topology is detected. Accordingly, heat and particle fluxes on the target plates as well as the edge transport characteristics are comparable to the vacuum solution. This span of modeling results with different plasma response models highlights the importance of thoroughly validating both, plasma response and 3D edge transport models for a robust extrapolation towards ITER. Supported by ITER Grant IO/CT/11/4300000497 and F4E Grant GRT-055 (PMS-PE) and by Start-Up Funds of the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

  1. Evolution of the large-scale atmospheric circulation in response to changing ice sheets over the last glacial cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Löfverström

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present modelling results of the atmospheric circulation at the cold periods of marine isotope stage 5b (MIS 5b, MIS 4 and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, as well as the interglacial. The palaeosimulations are forced by ice-sheet reconstructions consistent with geological evidence and by appropriate insolation and greenhouse gas concentrations. The results suggest that the large-scale atmospheric winter circulation remained largely similar to the interglacial for a significant part of the glacial cycle. The proposed explanation is that the ice sheets were located in areas where their interaction with the mean flow is limited. However, the LGM Laurentide Ice Sheet induces a much larger planetary wave that leads to a zonalisation of the Atlantic jet. In summer, the ice-sheet topography dynamically induces warm temperatures in Alaska and central Asia that inhibits the expansion of the ice sheets into these regions. The warm temperatures may also serve as an explanation for westward propagation of the Eurasian Ice Sheet from MIS 4 to the LGM.

  2. Plasma response on impurity injection in W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Brakel, R.; Elsner, A.; Grigull, P.; Hacker, H.; Burhenn, R.; Fiedler, S.; Giannone, L.; Goerner, C.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Herre, G.; Herrmann, A.; Hofmann, J.V.; Kuehner, G.; Naujoks, D.; Sardei, F.; Weller, A.; Wolf, R.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study impurity transport and radiation behavior nitrogen has been injected into the scrape-off plasma of limiter-dominated discharges by gas puffing or into natural magnetic islands at the plasma edge of separatrix-dominated discharges by a reciprocating erosion probe. Strong radiative plasma edge cooling with a reduction of the power flux to the limiter could be obtained. The accompanied degradation of the energy confinement and the observed decrease of the central electron temperature can partly be explained by the reduction of the effective heating power. At high plasma densities and sufficiently strong impurity injection phenomena well known from tokamaks, like plasma shrinking, plasma detachment from the limiters and MARFE's were transiently observed. (orig.)

  3. Plasma response on impurity injection in W7-AS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, D [Euratom Assoc., Berlin (Germany). Max-Planck-Inst. of Plasma Phys.; Brakel, R; Elsner, A; Grigull, P; Hacker, H; Burhenn, R; Fiedler, S; Giannone, L.; Goerner, C; Hartfuss, H J; Herre, G; Herrmann, A; Hofmann, J V; Kuehner, G; Naujoks, D; Sardei, F; Weller, A; Wolf, R

    1997-02-01

    In order to study impurity transport and radiation behavior nitrogen has been injected into the scrape-off plasma of limiter-dominated discharges by gas puffing or into natural magnetic islands at the plasma edge of separatrix-dominated discharges by a reciprocating erosion probe. Strong radiative plasma edge cooling with a reduction of the power flux to the limiter could be obtained. The accompanied degradation of the energy confinement and the observed decrease of the central electron temperature can partly be explained by the reduction of the effective heating power. At high plasma densities and sufficiently strong impurity injection phenomena well known from tokamaks, like plasma shrinking, plasma detachment from the limiters and MARFE`s were transiently observed. (orig.).

  4. Osteoblast response to oxygen functionalised plasma polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Jonathan M.

    2001-01-01

    Thin organic films with oxygen-carbon functionalities were deposited from plasmas containing vapour of the small organic compounds: allyI alcohol, methyl vinyl ketone and acrylic acid with octadiene. Characterisation of the deposits was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with chemical derivatisation, and this showed that plasma polymers retained high levels of original monomer functionality when the plasmas were sustained at low power for a given monomer vapour flow rate. High levels of attachment of rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were observed on surfaces that had high concentrations of hydroxyl and carbonyl functionalities and intermediate concentrations of carboxyl functionality. Cells did not attach to the octadiene plasma polymer. Cell attachment to carboxyl and methyl functionalised self-assembled monolayers increased with increasing concentration of surface carboxyl groups. Adsorption of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin to acrylic acid/octadiene plasma copolymers was studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays and by I 125 radiolabelling. Fibronectin adsorbed in largest amounts to surfaces with intermediate concentrations of carboxyl functionality. Spreading of ROS cells and rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) was characterised by computer image analysis. Cell spreading in media containing 10% serum, on a surface deposited from a plasma of 5 O/o acrylic acid was much greater than on the octadiene plasma polymer while most extensive cell spreading was observed on these surfaces when preadsorbed with fibronectin. Growth (proliferation) of BMSC was assessed over nine days and was found to be faster on an 50% acrylic acid plasma polymer than on tissue culture polystyrene or a hydrocarbon plasma polymer, though cell growth was fastest on fibronectin precoated substrates. Expression of cellular alkaline phosphatase, collagen and calcium reached similar levels on the 50% acrylic acid plasma polymer, tissue culture

  5. Osteoblast response to oxygen functionalised plasma polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Jonathan M

    2001-07-01

    Thin organic films with oxygen-carbon functionalities were deposited from plasmas containing vapour of the small organic compounds: allyI alcohol, methyl vinyl ketone and acrylic acid with octadiene. Characterisation of the deposits was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with chemical derivatisation, and this showed that plasma polymers retained high levels of original monomer functionality when the plasmas were sustained at low power for a given monomer vapour flow rate. High levels of attachment of rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were observed on surfaces that had high concentrations of hydroxyl and carbonyl functionalities and intermediate concentrations of carboxyl functionality. Cells did not attach to the octadiene plasma polymer. Cell attachment to carboxyl and methyl functionalised self-assembled monolayers increased with increasing concentration of surface carboxyl groups. Adsorption of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin to acrylic acid/octadiene plasma copolymers was studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays and by I{sup 125} radiolabelling. Fibronectin adsorbed in largest amounts to surfaces with intermediate concentrations of carboxyl functionality. Spreading of ROS cells and rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) was characterised by computer image analysis. Cell spreading in media containing 10% serum, on a surface deposited from a plasma of 5 O/o acrylic acid was much greater than on the octadiene plasma polymer while most extensive cell spreading was observed on these surfaces when preadsorbed with fibronectin. Growth (proliferation) of BMSC was assessed over nine days and was found to be faster on an 50% acrylic acid plasma polymer than on tissue culture polystyrene or a hydrocarbon plasma polymer, though cell growth was fastest on fibronectin precoated substrates. Expression of cellular alkaline phosphatase, collagen and calcium reached similar levels on the 50% acrylic acid plasma polymer, tissue

  6. Spatially Localized Particle Energization by Landau Damping in Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; McCubbin, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of particle energization through the removal of energy from turbulent fluctuations in heliospheric plasmas is a grand challenge problem in heliophysics. Under the weakly collisional conditions typical of heliospheric plasma, kinetic mechanisms must be responsible for this energization, but the nature of those mechanisms remains elusive. In recent years, the spatial localization of plasma heating near current sheets in the solar wind and numerical simulations has gained much attention. Here we show, using the innovative and new field-particle correlation technique, that the spatially localized particle energization occurring in a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation has the velocity space signature of Landau damping, suggesting that this well-known collisionless damping mechanism indeed actively leads to spatially localized heating in the vicinity of current sheets.

  7. Self-consistent modeling of plasma response to impurity spreading from intense localized source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltunov, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    Non-hydrogen impurities unavoidably exist in hot plasmas of present fusion devices. They enter it intrinsically, due to plasma interaction with the wall of vacuum vessel, as well as are seeded for various purposes deliberately. Normally, the spots where injected particles enter the plasma are much smaller than its total surface. Under such conditions one has to expect a significant modification of local plasma parameters through various physical mechanisms, which, in turn, affect the impurity spreading. Self-consistent modeling of interaction between impurity and plasma is, therefore, not possible with linear approaches. A model based on the fluid description of electrons, main and impurity ions, and taking into account the plasma quasi-neutrality, Coulomb collisions of background and impurity charged particles, radiation losses, particle transport to bounding surfaces, is elaborated in this work. To describe the impurity spreading and the plasma response self-consistently, fluid equations for the particle, momentum and energy balances of various plasma components are solved by reducing them to ordinary differential equations for the time evolution of several parameters characterizing the solution in principal details: the magnitudes of plasma density and plasma temperatures in the regions of impurity localization and the spatial scales of these regions. The results of calculations for plasma conditions typical in tokamak experiments with impurity injection are presented. A new mechanism for the condensation phenomenon and formation of cold dense plasma structures is proposed.

  8. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  9. Nonrigid, Linear Plasma Response Model Based on Perturbed Equilibria for Axisymmetric Tokamak Control Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, A.S.; Deranian, R.D.; Humphreys, D.A.; Leuer, J.A.; Walker, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak control design relies on an accurate linear model of the plasma response, which can often dominate the local field variations in regions under active feedback control. For example, when fluxes at selected points on the plasma boundary are regulated in DIII-D, the plasma response to a change in a coil current gives rise to a flux change which can be larger than and opposite to the flux change caused by the coil alone.In the past, rigid plasma models have been used for linear stability and shape control design. In a rigid model, the plasma current profile is considered fixed and moves rigidly in response to control coils to maintain radial and vertical force balance. In a nonrigid model, however, changes in the plasma shape and current profile are taken into account. Such models are expected to be important for future advanced tokamak control design. The present work describes development of a nonrigid plasma response model for high-accuracy multivariable control design and provides comparisons of model predictions against DIII-D experimental data. The linear perturbed plasma response model is calculated rapidly from an existing equilibrium solution

  10. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while establishing antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for plasma cell generation, however their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We have found that while IRF4 was essential for plasma cell survival, Blimp-1 was dispensable. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity, but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 function was restricted to the UPR, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating mTOR activity and plasma cell size. Thus, Blimp-1 is required for the unique physiological capacity of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody. PMID:26779600

  11. Response of the plasma to the size of an anode electrode biased near the plasma potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnat, E. V.; Laity, G. R.; Baalrud, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    As the size of a positively biased electrode increases, the nature of the interface formed between the electrode and the host plasma undergoes a transition from an electron-rich structure (electron sheath) to an intermediate structure containing both ion and electron rich regions (double layer) and ultimately forms an electron-depleted structure (ion sheath). In this study, measurements are performed to further test how the size of an electron-collecting electrode impacts the plasma discharge the electrode is immersed in. This is accomplished using a segmented disk electrode in which individual segments are individually biased to change the effective surface area of the anode. Measurements of bulk plasma parameters such as the collected current density, plasma potential, electron density, electron temperature and optical emission are made as both the size and the bias placed on the electrode are varied. Abrupt transitions in the plasma parameters resulting from changing the electrode surface area are identified in both argon and helium discharges and are compared to the interface transitions predicted by global current balance [S. D. Baalrud, N. Hershkowitz, and B. Longmier, Phys. Plasmas 14, 042109 (2007)]. While the size-dependent transitions in argon agree, the size-dependent transitions observed in helium systematically occur at lower electrode sizes than those nominally derived from prediction. The discrepancy in helium is anticipated to be caused by the finite size of the interface that increases the effective area offered to the plasma for electron loss to the electrode

  12. Response of the Atlantic Ocean circulation to Greenland Ice Sheet melting in a strongly-eddying ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.; Maltrud, M.E.; Hecht, M.W.; Dijkstra, H.A.; Kliphuis, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to high-latitude freshwater input is one of the key uncertainties in the climate system. Considering the importance of the AMOC for global heat transports, and the vulnerability of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to global

  13. Enhancement of gas sensor response of nanocrystalline zinc oxide for ammonia by plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Yue; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oxygen plasma treatment on nanocrystalline ZnO thin film based gas sensor was investigated. ZnO thin films were synthesized on alkali-free glass substrates by a sol–gel process. ZnO thin films were treated with oxygen plasma to change the number of vacancies/defects in ZnO. The effect of oxygen plasma on the structural, electrical, optical and gas sensing properties was investigated as a function of plasma treatment time. The results suggest that the microstructure and the surface morphology can be tuned by oxygen plasma treatment. The optical transmission in the visible range varies after the oxygen plasma treatment. Moreover, it is found that the oxygen plasma has significant impact on the electrical properties of ZnO thin films indicating a variation of resistivity. The oxygen plasma treated ZnO thin film exhibits an enhanced sensing response towards NH 3 in comparison with that of the as-deposited ZnO sensor. When compared with the as-deposited ZnO film, the sensing response was improved by 50% for the optimum oxygen plasma treatment time of 8 min. The selectivity of 8 min plasma treated ZnO sensor was also examined for an important industrial gas mixture of H 2 , CH 4 and NH 3 .

  14. Germination of Chenopodium Album in Response to Microwave Plasma Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, Bozena; Stranak, Vitezslav; Sery, Michal; Spatenka, Petr; Tichy, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The seeds of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.) were stimulated by low-pressure discharge. The tested seeds were exposed to plasma discharge for different time durations (from 6 minutes to 48 minutes). Germination tests were performed under specified laboratory conditions during seven days in five identical and completely independent experiments. Significant differences between the control and plasma-treated seeds were observed. The treated seeds showed structural changes on the surface of the seat coat. They germinated faster and their sprout accretion on the first day of seed germination was longer. Germination rate for the untreated seeds was 15% while it increased approximately three times (max 55%) for seeds treated by plasma from 12 minutes to 48 minutes.

  15. Haemorrheological response to plasma exchange in Raynaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, A J; O'Reilly, M J; Yates, C J; Cotton, L T; Flute, P T; Dormandy, J A

    1979-11-10

    Eight patients with Raynaud's syndrome were treated by weekly plasma exchange for four weeks using a Haemonetics Model 30 Blood Processor. The mean whole-blood viscosity at a shear rate of 0.77/s was significantly lower after treatment, and the mean index of red-cell deformability was significantly improved. In four patients studied serially the mean percentage fall in whole-blood viscosity after a single plasma exchange was 49% at 0.77/s but only 14% at 91/s. All patients noticed symptomatic improvement including healing of ischaemic digital ulcers. In six patients the number of digital arterial segments containing detectable blood flow was measured by directional Doppler; in all six the number increased. It is concluded that plasma exchange is an effective means of haemorrheological treatment and may be beneficial in patients with digital ischaemia.

  16. Color response and color transport in a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Using color kinetic theory, we discuss color conduction and color response in a quark-gluon plasma. Collective color oscillations and their damping rates are investigated. An instability of the thermal equilibrium state in high T QCD is discovered

  17. Color response and color transport in a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Using color kinetic theory, the authors discuss color conduction and color response in a quark-gluon plasma. Collective color oscillations and their damping rates are investigated. An instability of the thermal equilibrium state in high T QCD is discovered

  18. Disintegration of liquid sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Adel; Chigier, Norman

    1990-01-01

    The development, stability, and disintegration of liquid sheets issuing from a two-dimensional air-assisted nozzle is studied. Detailed measurements of mean drop size and velocity are made using a phase Doppler particle analyzer. Without air flow the liquid sheet converges toward the axis as a result of surface tension forces. With airflow a quasi-two-dimensional expanding spray is formed. The air flow causes small variations in sheet thickness to develop into major disturbances with the result that disruption starts before the formation of the main break-up region. In the two-dimensional variable geometry air-blast atomizer, it is shown that the air flow is responsible for the formation of large, ordered, and small chaotic 'cell' structures.

  19. Safety advice sheets

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    You never know when you might be faced with questions such as: when/how should I dispose of a gas canister? Where can I find an inspection report? How should I handle/store/dispose of a chemical substance…?   The SI section of the DGS/SEE Group is primarily responsible for safety inspections, evaluating the safety conditions of equipment items, premises and facilities. On top of this core task, it also regularly issues “Safety Advice Sheets” on various topics, designed to be of assistance to users but also to recall and reinforce safety rules and procedures. These clear and concise sheets, complete with illustrations, are easy to display in the appropriate areas. The following safety advice sheets have been issued so far: Other sheets will be published shortly. Suggestions are welcome and should be sent to the SI section of the DGS/SEE Group. Please send enquiries to general-safety-visits.service@cern.ch.

  20. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background The processes of weaning and exposure to pathogenic bacteria induce stress responses, which may alter the metabolism. In this study, we investigated the changes in plasma metabolites and immune responses in piglets in response to the stress induced by weaning and Escherichia coli chall...

  1. Insights into Spatial Sensitivities of Ice Mass Response to Environmental Change from the SeaRISE Ice Sheet Modeling Project I: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Sophie; Bindschadler, Robert A.; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Aschwanden, Andy; Bueler, Ed; Choi, Hyengu; Fastook, Jim; Granzow, Glen; Greve, Ralf; Gutowski, Gail; hide

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric, oceanic, and subglacial forcing scenarios from the Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) project are applied to six three-dimensional thermomechanical ice-sheet models to assess Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity over a 500 year timescale and to inform future modeling and field studies. Results indicate (i) growth with warming, except within low-latitude basins (where inland thickening is outpaced by marginal thinning); (ii) mass loss with enhanced sliding (with basins dominated by high driving stresses affected more than basins with low-surface-slope streaming ice); and (iii) mass loss with enhanced ice shelf melting (with changes in West Antarctica dominating the signal due to its marine setting and extensive ice shelves; cf. minimal impact in the Terre Adelie, George V, Oates, and Victoria Land region of East Antarctica). Ice loss due to dynamic changes associated with enhanced sliding and/or sub-shelf melting exceeds the gain due to increased precipitation. Furthermore, differences in results between and within basins as well as the controlling impact of sub-shelf melting on ice dynamics highlight the need for improved understanding of basal conditions, grounding-zone processes, ocean-ice interactions, and the numerical representation of all three.

  2. The separatrix response of diverted TCV plasmas compared to the CREATE-L model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, P.; Lister, J.B.; Villone, F.; Albanese, R.

    1997-11-01

    The response of Ohmic, single-null diverted, non-centred plasmas in TCV to poloidal field coil stimulation has been compared to the linear CREATE-L MHD equilibrium response model. The closed loop responses of directly measured quantities, reconstructed parameters, and the reconstructed plasma contour were all examined. Provided that the plasma position and shape perturbation were small enough for the linearity assumption to hold, the model-experiment agreement was good. For some stimulations the open loop vertical position instability growth rate changed significantly, illustrating the limitations of a linear model. A different model was developed with the assumption that the flux at the plasma boundary is frozen and was also compared with experimental results. It proved not to be as reliable as the CREATE-L model for some simulation parameters showing that the experiments were able to discriminate between different plasma response models. The closed loop response was also found to be sensitive to changes in the modelled plasma shape. It was not possible to invalidate the CREATE-L model despite the extensive range of responses excited by the experiments. (author) figs., tabs., 5 refs

  3. Importance of Plasma Response to Non-axisymmetric Perturbations in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Garofalo, Andrea M.; Schaffer, Michael J.; Hawryluk, Richard J.; Kaye, Stanley M.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Sabbagh, Steve A. and the NSTX Team

    2009-01-01

    Tokamaks are sensitive to deviations from axisymmetry as small as (delta)B/B 0 ∼ 10 -4 . These non-axisymmetric perturbations greatly modify plasma confinement and performance by either destroying magnetic surfaces with subsequent locking or deforming magnetic surfaces with associated non-ambipolar transport. The Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC) calculates ideal perturbed equilibria and provides important basis for understanding the sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to perturbations. IPEC calculations indicate that the ideal plasma response, or equivalently the effect by ideally perturbed plasma currents, is essential to explain locking experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and DIII-D. The ideal plasma response is also important for Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) in non-ambipolar transport. The consistency between NTV theory and magnetic braking experiments on NSTX and DIII-D can be improved when the variation in the field strength in IPEC is coupled with generalized NTV theory. These plasma response effects will be compared with the previous vacuum superpositions to illustrate the importance. However, plasma response based on ideal perturbed equilibria is still not sufficiently accurate to predict the details of NTV transport, and can be inconsistent when currents associated with a toroidal torque become comparable to ideal perturbed currents

  4. Operation Everest II. Plasma Lipid and Hormonal Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    ingestion of a hypocaloric diet , weight loss, and a decrement in maximal oxygen uptake. Also, fasting plasma TG accumulation was increased with a...in the hypobaric chamber, the subjects consumed an ad libitum diet . The menus, food preparation, and dietary data collection were supervised by a...approximately 3000 kcal/day distributed to provide 60% carbohydrate, 15% protein, and 25% fat in the diet . A variety of foods and non-alcoholic beverages were

  5. Multijunction grill response to ponderomotive effects at plasma periphery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtak, O.; Klima, R.; Petrzilka, V.A.

    1990-10-01

    A nonlinear coupling code taking account of ponderomotive force effects at the plasma periphery, was developed for a multijunction grill. With increasing RF power density the power reflection coefficient remains rather low at the frequency of 4.6 GHz this at the expense of deterioration of the power distribution among subsidiary waveguides. The ensuing danger of overloading the individual waveguides is expected to be still greater for lower frequencies. (author)

  6. Single clay sheets inside electrospun polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaohui

    2005-03-01

    Nanofibers were prepared from polymer solution with clay sheets by electrospinning. Plasma etching, as a well controlled process, was used to supply electrically excited gas molecules from a glow discharge. To reveal the structure and arrangement of clay layers in the polymer matrix, plasma etching was used to remove the polymer by controlled gasification to expose the clay sheets due to the difference in reactivity. The shape, flexibility, and orientation of clay sheets were studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Additional quantitative information on size distribution and degree of exfoliation of clay sheets were obtained by analyzing electron micrograph of sample after plasma etching. Samples in various forms including fiber, film and bulk, were thinned by plasma etching. Morphology and dispersion of inorganic fillers were studied by electron microscopy.

  7. Response of plasma rotation to resonant magnetic perturbations in J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Hu, Q. M.; Shi, Y. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Cheng, Z. F.; Yang, Z. J.; Pan, X. M.; Lee, S. G.; Tong, R. H.; Wei, Y. N.; Dong, Y. B.; J-TEXT Team

    2018-03-01

    The response of plasma toroidal rotation to the external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) has been investigated in Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) ohmic heating plasmas. For the J-TEXT’s plasmas without the application of RMP, the core toroidal rotation is in the counter-current direction while the edge rotation is near zero or slightly in the co-current direction. Both static RMP experiments and rotating RMP experiments have been applied to investigate the plasma toroidal rotation. The core toroidal rotation decreases to lower level with static RMP. At the same time, the edge rotation can spin to more than 20 km s-1 in co-current direction. On the other hand, the core plasma rotation can be slowed down or be accelerated with the rotating RMP. When the rotating RMP frequency is higher than mode frequency, the plasma rotation can be accelerated to the rotating RMP frequency. The plasma confinement is improved with high frequency rotating RMP. The plasma rotation is decelerated to the rotating RMP frequency when the rotating RMP frequency is lower than the mode frequency. The plasma confinement also degrades with low frequency rotating RMP.

  8. Proteome changes in rat plasma in response to sibutramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Won; Joo, Jeong In; Kim, Dong Hyun; Wang, Xia; Oh, Tae Seok; Choi, Duk Kwon; Yun, Jong Won

    2011-04-01

    Sibutramine is an anti-obesity agent that induces weight loss by selective inhibition of neuronal reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine; however, it is associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart attack and stroke. Here, we analyzed global protein expression patterns in plasma of control and sibutramine-treated rats using proteomic analysis for a better understanding of the two conflicting functions of this drug, appetite regulation, and cardiovascular risk. The control (n=6) and sibutramine-treated groups (n=6) were injected by vehicle and sibutramine, respectively, and 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF/MS were performed. Compared to control rats, sibutramine-administered rats gained approximately 18% less body weight and consumed about 13% less food. Plasma leptin and insulin levels also showed a significant decrease in sibutramine-treated rats. As a result of proteomic analysis, 23 differentially regulated proteins were discovered and were reconfirmed by immunoblot analysis. Changed proteins were classified into appetite regulation and cardiovascular risk, according to their regulation pattern. Because the differential levels of proteins that have been well recognized as predictors of CVD risk were not well matched with the results of our proteomic analysis, this study does not conclusively prove that sibutramine has an effect on CVD risk. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparison of the CREATE-L plasma response model with TCV limited discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villone, F.; Vyas, P.; Lister, J.B.; Albanese, R.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to evaluate the response of Ohmic-, L-Mode, limited, vertically unstable plasmas to changes in all the poloidal field coil voltages. The resulting closed loop plasma responses have been compared with the CREATE-L linearised MHD equilibrium model of TCV. All the responses in both the time domain and the frequency domain show excellent agreement both for directly measured quantities and for derived parameters which can be used as feedback variables. No modifications to the CREATE-L model were made to achieve this quality of agreement, indicating that the underlaying physical assumptions are appropriate. (author) 20 figs., 6 tabs., 16 refs

  10. Comparison of the CREATE-L plasma response model with TCV limited discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villone, F.; Vyas, P.; Lister, J.B.; Albanese, R.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to evaluate the response of ohmic, L mode, limited, vertically unstable plasmas to changes in all the poloidal field coil voltages. The resulting closed loop plasma responses have been compared with the CREATE-L linearized MHD equilibrium model of the TCV tokamak. All the responses in both the time domain and the frequency domain show excellent agreement both for directly measured quantities and for derived parameters. No modifications to the CREATE-L model were made to achieve this quality of agreement, indicating that the underlying physical assumptions are appropriate. (author). 17 refs, 20 figs

  11. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Luca Delzanno, Gian

    2014-01-01

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here, we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important application of dust particles in a tokamak plasma

  12. Plasma turbulence. Structure formation, selection rule, dynamic response and dynamics transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Sanae I.

    2010-01-01

    The five-year project of Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research entitled general research on the structure formation and selection rule in plasma turbulence had brought many outcomes. Based on these outcomes, the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) program entitled general research on dynamic response and dynamic transport in plasma turbulence has started. In the present paper, the state-of-the-art of the research activities on the structure formation, selection rule and dynamics in plasma turbulence are reviewed with reference to outcomes of these projects. (author)

  13. Dielectric response of a relativistic degenerate electron plasma in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delsante, A.E.; Frankel, N.E.

    1979-01-01

    The longitudinal dielectric response of a relativistic ultradegenerate electron plasma in a strong magnetic field is obtained via a relativistic generalization of the Hartree self-consistent field method. Dispersion relations and damping conditions for plasma oscillations both parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are obtained. Detailed results for the zero-field case, and applications to white dwarf stars and pulsars are given

  14. 'Non-local' response of RTP ohmic plasmas to peripheral perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, P.; Gorini, G.; Mantica, P.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Kloe, J. de; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    A 'non-local' response of the plasma core triggered by peripheral plasma perturbations other than laser ablation is found in the RTP tokamak. Oblique pellet injection (OPI) has been used to induce fast cooling of the peripheral plasma. In response, an inward cold pulse (T e drop) and a slightly delayed core T e rise are observed. A somewhat similar 'non-local' response is observed when the peripheral plasma is heated by modulated electron cyclotron heating or by fast current ramps, i.e. the core temperature drops in response to the peripheral heating. The plasma conditions for the occurrence of the 'non-local' response have been investigated. The core T e rise following OPI is associated with the formation of a large temperature gradient in the region 1 e rise is largest at low electron density and for large pellet deposition radii. Above a critical density the T e rise disappears and only the (weaker) drop in core T e is observed. Time dependent transport simulations show that the propagation of the inward cold pulse is consistent with local transport, while the core T e rise is a slower phenomenon requiring a large transient drop of χ e in the region 1 < q < 2. (author)

  15. Redox Stimulation of Human THP-1 Monocytes in Response to Cold Physical Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In plasma medicine, cold physical plasma delivers a delicate mixture of reactive components to cells and tissues. Recent studies suggested a beneficial role of cold plasma in wound healing. Yet, the biological processes related to the redox modulation via plasma are not fully understood. We here used the monocytic cell line THP-1 as a model to test their response to cold plasma in vitro. Intriguingly, short term plasma treatment stimulated cell growth. Longer exposure only modestly compromised cell viability but apparently supported the growth of cells that were enlarged in size and that showed enhanced metabolic activity. A significantly increased mitochondrial content in plasma treated cells supported this notion. On THP-1 cell proteome level, we identified an increase of protein translation with key regulatory proteins being involved in redox regulation (hypoxia inducible factor 2α, differentiation (retinoic acid signaling and interferon inducible factors, and cell growth (Yin Yang 1. Regulation of inflammation is a key element in many chronic diseases, and we found a significantly increased expression of the anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 and of the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8. Together, these results foster the view that cold physical plasma modulates the redox balance and inflammatory processes in wound related cells.

  16. Redox Stimulation of Human THP-1 Monocytes in Response to Cold Physical Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeschus, Sander; Schmidt, Anke; Bethge, Lydia; Masur, Kai; von Woedtke, Thomas; Hasse, Sybille; Wende, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    In plasma medicine, cold physical plasma delivers a delicate mixture of reactive components to cells and tissues. Recent studies suggested a beneficial role of cold plasma in wound healing. Yet, the biological processes related to the redox modulation via plasma are not fully understood. We here used the monocytic cell line THP-1 as a model to test their response to cold plasma in vitro. Intriguingly, short term plasma treatment stimulated cell growth. Longer exposure only modestly compromised cell viability but apparently supported the growth of cells that were enlarged in size and that showed enhanced metabolic activity. A significantly increased mitochondrial content in plasma treated cells supported this notion. On THP-1 cell proteome level, we identified an increase of protein translation with key regulatory proteins being involved in redox regulation (hypoxia inducible factor 2α), differentiation (retinoic acid signaling and interferon inducible factors), and cell growth (Yin Yang 1). Regulation of inflammation is a key element in many chronic diseases, and we found a significantly increased expression of the anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) and of the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). Together, these results foster the view that cold physical plasma modulates the redox balance and inflammatory processes in wound related cells.

  17. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-07-16

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization of the flame in a V-shape or an M-shape geometry, over a central stainless steel rod. The plasma is produced by short pulses of 10-ns duration, 8-kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. Plasma forcing is produced by positive or negative steps of plasma. The step response of the flame is investigated through heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations, to facilitate comparisons with flame response to acoustic perturbations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera equipped with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. First, the results show that the flame does not respond to each single plasma pulse, but is affected only by the average plasma power, confirming the step nature of the forcing. The temporal evolutions of HRR are analyzed and the flame transfer functions are determined. A forcing mechanism, as a local increase in the reactivity of the fluid close to the rod, is proposed and compared with numerical simulations. Experiments and numerical simulations are in good qualitative agreement. © 2016.

  18. Large-scale glacitectonic deformation in response to active ice sheet retreat across Dogger Bank (southern central North Sea) during the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Emrys; Cotterill, Carol; Johnson, Kirstin; Crombie, Kirstin; James, Leo; Carr, Simon; Ruiter, Astrid

    2018-01-01

    High resolution seismic data from the Dogger Bank in the central southern North Sea has revealed that the Dogger Bank Formation records a complex history of sedimentation and penecontemporaneous, large-scale, ice-marginal to proglacial glacitectonic deformation. These processes led to the development of a large thrust-block moraine complex which is buried beneath a thin sequence of Holocene sediments. This buried glacitectonic landsystem comprises a series of elongate, arcuate moraine ridges (200 m up to > 15 km across; over 40-50 km long) separated by low-lying ice marginal to proglacial sedimentary basins and/or meltwater channels, preserving the shape of the margin of this former ice sheet. The moraines are composed of highly deformed (folded and thrust) Dogger Bank Formation with the lower boundary of the deformed sequence (up to 40-50 m thick) being marked by a laterally extensive décollement. The ice-distal parts of the thrust moraine complex are interpreted as a "forward" propagating imbricate thrust stack developed in response to S/SE-directed ice-push. The more complex folding and thrusting within the more ice-proximal parts of the thrust-block moraines record the accretion of thrust slices of highly deformed sediment as the ice repeatedly reoccupied this ice marginal position. Consequently, the internal structure of the Dogger Bank thrust-moraine complexes can be directly related to ice sheet dynamics, recording the former positions of a highly dynamic, oscillating Weichselian ice sheet margin as it retreated northwards at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum.

  19. NR4.00002: Response of a laminar M-shaped premixed flame to plasma forcing

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the response of a lean methane-air flame to non-thermal plasma forcing. The set-up consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube of 7-mm inlet diameter. The equivalence ratio is 0.9 and the flame is stabilized in an M-shape morphology over a central stainless steel rod and the quartz tube. The plasma is produced by nanosecond pulses of 10 kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. The plasma forcing is produced by bursts of plasma pulses of 1 s duration. The response of the flame is investigated through the heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. The results show that, even though the plasma is located in the combustion area, the flame is not responding to each single plasma pulse, but is affected by the discharge burst. The plasma forcing can then be considered as a step of forcing: the beginning of a positive step corresponding to the first plasma pulse, and the beginning of a negative step corresponding to the end of the last pulse of the burst. The effects of both positive and negative steps were investigated. The response of the flame is then analyzed and viable mechanisms are discussed.

  20. A direct indication of plasma potential diagnostic with fast time response and high accuracy based on a differential emissive probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.E.; Hershkowitz; Intrator, T.

    1985-01-01

    The floating potential of the emissive probe has been used to directly measure the plasma potential. The authors have recently presented another method for directly indicating the plasma potential with a differential emissive probe. In this paper they describe the effects of probe size, plasma density and plasma potential fluctuation on plasma potential measurements and give methods for reducing errors. A control system with fast time response (α 20 μs) and high accuracy (the order of the probe temperature T/sub w//e) for maintaining a differential emissive probe at plasma potential has been developed. It can be operated in pulsed discharge plasma to measure plasma potential dynamic characteristics. A solid state optical coupler is employed to improve circuit performance. This system was tested experimentally by measuring the plasma potential in an argon plasma device an on the Phaedrus tandem mirror

  1. A direct indication of plasma potential diagnostic with fast time response and high accuracy based on a differential emissive probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.E.; Hershkowitz, N.; Intrator, T.

    1985-01-01

    The floating potential of the emissive probe has been used to directly measure the plasma potential. The authors have recently presented another method for directly indicating the plasma potential with a differential emissive probe. In this paper they describe the effects of probe size, plasma density and plasma potential fluctuation on plasma potential measurements and give methods for reducing errors. A control system with fast time response (≅ 20 μs) and high accuracy (the order of the probe temperature T/sub w//e) for maintaining a differential emissive probe at plasma potential has been developed. It can be operated in pulsed discharge plasma to measure plasma potential dynamic characteristics. A solid state optical coupler is employed to improve circuit performance. This system was tested experimentally by measuring the plasma potential in an argon plasma device and on the Phaedrus tandem mirror

  2. The Role of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase in Plant Responses to Aluminum Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is a key factor limiting plant growth and crop production on acid soils. Increasing the plant Al-detoxification capacity and/or breeding Al-resistant cultivars are a cost-effective strategy to support crop growth on acidic soils. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase plays a central role in all plant physiological processes. Changes in the activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase through regulating the expression and phosphorylation of this enzyme are also involved in many plant responses to Al toxicity. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase mediated H+ influx may be associated with the maintenance of cytosolic pH and the plasma membrane gradients as well as Al-induced citrate efflux mediated by a H+-ATPase-coupled MATE co-transport system. In particular, modulating the activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPase through application of its activators (e.g., magnesium or IAA or using transgenics has effectively enhanced plant resistance to Al stress in several species. In this review, we critically assess the available knowledge on the role of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in plant responses to Al stress, incorporating physiological and molecular aspects.

  3. VEGF-121 plasma level as biomarker for response to anti-angiogenetic therapy in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Maurizio; de Pascalis, Ivana; D'Alessandris, Quintino Giorgio; Fiorentino, Vincenzo; Pierconti, Francesco; Marei, Hany El-Sayed; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi Maria

    2018-05-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms, particularly the diffusible VEGF-121, could play a major role in the response of recurrent glioblastoma (GB) to anti-angiogenetic treatment with bevacizumab. We hypothesized that circulating VEGF-121 may reduce the amount of bevacizumab available to target the heavier isoforms of VEGF, which are the most clinically relevant. We assessed the plasma level of VEGF-121 in a brain xenograft model, in human healthy controls, and in patients suffering from recurrent GB before and after bevacizumab treatment. Data were matched with patients' clinical outcome. In athymic rats with U87MG brain xenografts, the level of plasma VEGF-121 relates with tumor volume and it significantly decreases after iv infusion of bevacizumab. Patients with recurrent GB show higher plasma VEGF-121 than healthy controls (p = 0.0002) and treatment with bevacizumab remarkably reduced the expression of VEGF-121 in plasma of these patients (p = 0.0002). Higher plasma level of VEGF-121 was significantly associated to worse PFS and OS (p = 0.0295 and p = 0.0246, respectively). Quantitative analysis of VEGF-121 isoform in the plasma of patients with recurrent GB could be a promising predictor of response to anti-angiogenetic treatment.

  4. Plasma protein carbonyl responses to anaerobic exercise in female cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E Afzalpour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single bouts of aerobic exercise may leads to oxidative stress due to the use of oxygen for metabolism and the generation of reactive oxygen. In athletes, oxidative stress can lead to several deleterious performance effects, such as muscular oxidative damage, muscle soreness, loss of skeletal muscle force production and/or inflammation. However, little is known regarding the severity and duration of oxidative stress arising from intensive anaerobic modes of exercise in aerobically-trained athletes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single bout of intensive anaerobic exercise on plasma protein carbonyl (PC in aerobically-trained women. Aerobically-trained, provincial female cyclists [n = 18, age: 24.2±2.7 years; stature: 163.6±4.6 cm; body mass: 53.4±4.2 kg] were randomly assigned into either a non-exercising control (CON; n = 9 or experimental (EXP; n = 9 group that underwent a 30-second anaerobic (Wingate cycle ergometer exercise session. Blood sampling took place before exercise, immediately after the exercise (IE, and 24 hours following the exercise (24HR bout. In the EXP, results indicated significant (P ≤ 0.05 differences in PC levels between the pre-test and IE (0.010±0.0124 to 0.0149±0.0420 mmol/milt; P = 0.010, and IE and 24HR (0.0149±0.0420 to 0.0111±0.0183 mmol/milt; P = 0.013. No significant differences were observed between pre-test and 24HR (0.010±0.0124 to 0.0111±0.0183 mmol/milt; P = 0.371. These results indicate that oxidative protein damage, as indicated by PC levels, rises immediately with the onset of anaerobic exercise, but returns to resting levels within 24 hours following exercise in aerobically-trained women.

  5. Dielectric response of particle-antiparticle plasmas in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, N.E.; Hines, K.C.; Kowalenko, V.

    1982-01-01

    We have considered the longitudinal dielectric response of an ultra-degenerate relativistic plasma composed of electrons and positrons. We have used the relativistic Hartree self-consistent field method to investigate the dispersion relations and damping parameters of such a plasma in the presence of a magnetic field. These properties must be studied in the various regimes appropriate for a relativistic plasma as detailed by Tsytovich and Jancovici. Although it is hoped that this work will yield new insight into certain astrophysical phenomena (such as pulsars), it is interesting to note that laboratory electron-positron plasmas may be a thing of the immediate future as a result of suggested new experiments using an intense relativistic electron beam. (author)

  6. Circulating FGF23 levels in response to acute changes in plasma Ca(2+)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, E; Mace, M.L.; Hofman-Bang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) synthesis and secretion is still incompletely understood. FGF23 is an important regulator of renal phosphate excretion and has regulatory effects on the calciotropic hormones calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate...... FGF23 levels and whether a close relationship, similar that known for Ca and PTH, exists between Ca and FGF23. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine whether acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia regulate FGF23 levels in the rat. Acute hypercalcemia was induced by an intravenous Ca infusion...... and hypocalcemia by infusion of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) in normal and acutely parathyroidectomized rats. Intact plasma FGF23 and intact plasma PTH and plasma Ca(2+) and phosphate were measured. Acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia resulted as expected in adequate PTH secretory responses. Plasma FGF...

  7. Electromagnetic loads and structural response of the CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] vacuum vessel to plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, S.L.; Listvinsky, G.; Lee, M.Y.; Bailey, C.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the electromagnetic loads produced by a variety of plasma disruptions, and the resulting structural effects on the compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) vacuum vessel (VV), have been performed to help optimize the VV design. A series of stationary and moving plasmas, with disruption rates from 0.7--10.0 MA/ms, have been analyzed using the EMPRES code to compute eddy currents and electromagnetic pressures, and the NASTRAN code to evaluate the structural response of the vacuum vessel. Key factors contributing to the magnitude of EM forces and resulting stresses on the vessel have been found to include disruption rate, and direction and synchronization of plasma motion with the onset of plasma current decay. As a result of these analyses, a number of design changes have been made, and design margins for the present 1.75 meter design have been improved over the original CIT configuration. 1 ref., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Chlamydia - CDC Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... sheet Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) – CDC fact sheet Gonorrhea – CDC fact sheet STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis ( ...

  9. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  10. Quantitative changes in adipocyte plasma membrane in response to nutritional manipulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.S.; Masoro, E.J.; Yu, B.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of changes in adipocyte size and the effects of nutritional manipulations on the quantity of plasma membrane per adipocyte were investigated. A method for estimating the quantity of plasma membrane was developed based on the specific labeling of adipocyte plasma membrane protein with the nonpermeable labeling agent 125I-labeled diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid. By studying rats (ranging in age from 50 to 125 days) fed a standard laboratory chow or a low fat diet or a high fat diet, a wide range of mean fat cell sizes was obtained. It was found that as the volume of the fat cell increased, the amount of plasma membrane increased in a linear fashion and that this linear relationship had the same slope whether the size of the adipocyte increased slowly with age or rapidly in response to a high fat diet. In contrast, fasting for up to 3 days caused a marked decrease in the mean volume of the adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted from the linear relationship between adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted form the linear relationship between adipocyte volume and amount of plasma membrane per cell obtained with fed rats, i.e., adipocytes from fasted rats contain more plasma membrane per cell than do fat cells of the same size from fed rats. Neither feeding a high fat diet nor fasting caused detectable changes in the protein and lipid composition of the adipocyte plasma membrane

  11. A study of eukaryotic response mechanisms to atmospheric pressure cold plasma by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae single gene mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hongqing; Wang Ruixue; Sun Peng; Wu Haiyan; Liu Qi; Li Fangting; Fang Jing; Zhang Jue; Zhu Weidong

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of eukaryotic cell response to cold plasma are studied. A series of single gene mutants of eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae are used to compare their sensitivity to plasma treatment with the wild type. We examined 12 mutants in the oxidative stress pathway and the cell cycle pathway, in which 8 are found to be hypersensitive to plasma processing. The mutated genes' roles in the two pathways are analyzed to understand the biological response mechanisms of plasma treatment. The results demonstrate that genes from both pathways are needed for the eukaryotic cells to survive the complex plasma treatment.

  12. Ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the blowout regime of laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, K I; Rozmus, W; Bychenkov, V Yu; Naseri, N; Capjack, C E; Brantov, A V

    2010-11-05

    The ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the so called bubble or blowout regime of a laser-plasma accelerator is discussed. In response to the strong fields of the accelerated electrons the ions form a central filament along the laser axis that can be compressed to densities 2 orders of magnitude higher than the initial particle density. A theory of the filament formation and a model of ion self-compression are proposed. It is also shown that in the case of a sharp rear plasma-vacuum interface the ions can be accelerated by a combination of three basic mechanisms. The long time ion evolution that results from the strong electrostatic fields of an electron bunch provides a unique diagnostic of laser-plasma accelerators.

  13. The molecular mechanisms of plant plasma membrane intrinsic proteins trafficking and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Ji-long; Feng, Xiu-xiu; Li, Hong-jie; Zhang, Gen-fa

    2017-04-20

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are plant channel proteins located on the plasma membrane. PIPs transfer water, CO 2 and small uncharged solutes through the plasma membrane. PIPs have high selectivity to substrates, suggestive of a central role in maintaining cellular water balance. The expression, activity and localization of PIPs are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and also affected by environmental factors. Numerous studies indicate that the expression patterns and localizations of PIPs can change in response to abiotic stresses. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of PIP trafficking, transcriptional and post-translational regulations, and abiotic stress responses. Moreover, we also discuss the current research trends and future directions on PIPs.

  14. GASN sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    This document gathers around 50 detailed sheets which describe and present various aspects, data and information related to the nuclear sector or, more generally to energy. The following items are addressed: natural and artificial radioactive environment, evolution of energy needs in the world, radioactive wastes, which energy for France tomorrow, the consequences in France of the Chernobyl accident, ammunitions containing depleted uranium, processing and recycling of used nuclear fuel, transport of radioactive materials, seismic risk for the basic nuclear installations, radon, the precautionary principle, the issue of low doses, the EPR, the greenhouse effect, the Oklo nuclear reactors, ITER on the way towards fusion reactors, simulation and nuclear deterrence, crisis management in the nuclear field, does nuclear research put a break on the development of renewable energies by monopolizing funding, nuclear safety and security, the plutonium, generation IV reactors, comparison of different modes of electricity production, medical exposure to ionizing radiations, the control of nuclear activities, food preservation by ionization, photovoltaic solar collectors, the Polonium 210, the dismantling of nuclear installations, wind energy, desalination and nuclear reactors, from non-communication to transparency about nuclear safety, the Jules Horowitz reactor, CO 2 capture and storage, hydrogen, solar energy, the radium, the subcontractors of maintenance of the nuclear fleet, biomass, internal radio-contamination, epidemiological studies, submarine nuclear propulsion, sea energy, the Three Mile Island accident, the Chernobyl accident, the Fukushima accident, the nuclear after Fukushima

  15. NR4.00002: Response of a laminar M-shaped premixed flame to plasma forcing

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Moeck, Jonas P.; Cha, Min; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    We report on the response of a lean methane-air flame to non-thermal plasma forcing. The set-up consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube of 7-mm inlet diameter. The equivalence ratio is 0.9 and the flame is stabilized

  16. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Moeck, Jonas P.; Roberts, William L.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization

  17. Role of Plasma Fibronectin in the Foreign Body Response to Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Bridges, Amanda W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Tate, Ciara C.; Babensee, Julia E.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.; García, Andrés J.

    2007-01-01

    Host responses to biomaterials control the biological performance of implanted medical devices. Upon implantation, synthetic materials adsorb biomolecules which trigger an inflammatory cascade comprising coagulation, leukocyte recruitment/adhesion, and foreign body reaction. The foreign body reaction and ensuing fibrous encapsulation severely limit the in vivo performance of numerous biomedical devices. While it is well established that plasma fibrinogen and secreted cytokines modulate leukoc...

  18. High-Speed imaging of the plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations in HBT-EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Sarah M; Levesque, Jeffrey P; Mauel, Michael E; Navratil, Gerald A

    2015-01-01

    A Phantom v7.3 fast digital camera was used to study visible light fluctuations in the High Beta Tokamak–Extended Pulse (HBT–EP). This video data is the first to be used to analyze and understand the behavior of long wavelength kink perturbations in a wall-stabilized tokamak. The light was mostly comprised of Dα 656 nm light. Profiles of the plasma light at the midplane were hollow with a radial scale length of approximately 4 cm at the plasma edge. The fast camera was also used to measure the plasma’s response to applied helical magnetic perturbations. The programmed toroidal phase angle of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) was directly inferred from the resulting images of the plasma response. The plasma response and the intensity of the RMP were compared under different conditions. The resulting amplitude correlations are consistent with previous measurements of the static response using an array of magnetic sensors. (paper)

  19. Beryllium layer response to ITER-like ELM plasma pulses in QSPA-Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Klimov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Material migration in ITER is expected to move beryllium (Be eroded from the first wall primarily to the tungsten (W divertor region and to magnetically shadowed areas of the wall itself. This paper is concerned with experimental study of Be layer response to ELM-like plasma pulses using the new QSPA-Be plasma gun (SRC RF TRINITI. The Be layers (1→50µm thick are deposited on special castellated Be and W targets supplied by the ITER Organization using the Thermionic Vacuum Arc technique. Transient deuterium plasma pulses with duration ∼0.5ms were selected to provide absorbed energy densities on the plasma stream axis for a 30° target inclination of 0.2 and 0.5MJm−2, the first well below and the second near the Be melting point. This latter value is close to the prescribed maximum energy density for controlled ELMs on ITER. At 0.2MJm−2 on W, all Be layer thicknesses tested retain their integrity up to the maximum pulse number, except at local defects (flakes, holes and cracks and on tile edges. At 0.5MJm−2 on W, Be layer melting and melt layer agglomeration are the main damage processes, they happen immediately in the first plasma impact. Melt layer movement was observed only near plasma facing edges. No significant melt splashing is observed in spite of high plasma pressure (higher than expected in ITER. Be layer of 10µm thick on Be target has higher resistance to plasma irradiation than 1 and 55µm, and retain their integrity up to the maximum pulse number at 0.2MJm−2. For 1µm and 55µm thick on Be target significant Be layer losses were observed at 0.2MJm−2.

  20. IAEA consultants' meeting on thermal response of plasma facing materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1990-07-01

    The present Summary Report contains brief proceedings and the main conclusions and recommendations of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on ''Thermal Response of Plasma Facing Materials and Components'', which was organized by the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit and held on June 11-13, 1990, in Vienna, Austria. The Report also includes a categorization and assessment of currently studied plasma facing materials, a classification scheme of material properties data, required in fusion reactor design, and a survey of the urgently needed material properties data. (author)

  1. Circuit Model Simulations for Ionospheric Plasma Response to High Potential System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang-Jae Rhee

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available When a deployed probe is biased by a high positive potential during a space experiment, the payload is induced to a negative voltage in order to balance the total current in the whole system. The return currents are due to the responding ions and secondary electrons on the payload surface. In order to understand the current collection mechanism, the process was simulated with a combination of resistor, inductor, and capacitor in SPICE program which was equivalent to the background plasma sheath. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from SPEAR-3 (Space Power Experiment Aboard Rocket-3. The return current curve in the simulation was compatible to the experimental result, and the simulation helped to predict the transient plasma response to a high voltage during the plasma sheath formation.

  2. The polarization response function and the dielectric permittivity of a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnavi, G.; Gratton, F.

    1984-01-01

    We give a simple direct derivation of the polarization response function h for linear electrostatic excitations of a plasma (without magnetic field) considering the effect of a percussion on the electrons. The physical meaning of the procedure is discussed, thus bringing into light basic facts of the plasma dielectric behavior. The result h = ω 2 /sub p/ fo(x/t) (where f/sub o/ is the electron distribution function in velocity space and ω /sub p/ the plasma frequency) is obtained without passing through the Vlasov-Poisson equations as in the standard theory. We show that the equivalence between the present method and the classic Landau analysis rests on properties of the Fourier transform applied on velocity space

  3. White House Unveils America's College Promise Proposal: Tuition-Free Community College for Responsible Students. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White House, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In January, 2015, the President unveiled the America's College Promise proposal, which would make two years of community college free for responsible students, letting students earn the first half of a bachelor's degree and earn skills needed in the workforce at no cost. This proposal will require everyone to do their part: community colleges must…

  4. The gaseous plasmonic response of a one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of striated plasma layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Righetti, F.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present simulations of the response of a one-dimensional striated plasma slab to incident electromagnetic waves that span regions both above and below the plasma frequency, ωp. Photonic bandgap modes are present throughout these regions, and volume and surface plasmon modes facilitate the response below ωp, where the dielectric constant, ɛp frequency, there is a feature for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization that is associated with the emergence of new dispersion branches. Also for TM polarization, a very low frequency mode emerges outside of the light line. Both these features are plasmonic and are attributed to the excitation of symmetric and asymmetric surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the plasma-dielectric interface of the multi-layer plasma slabs. The features seen in the bandgap maps near ωp reveal the possible presence of Fano resonances between the symmetric branch of the SPP and the Bragg resonance as a narrow stop band (anti-node) is superimposed on the otherwise broad transmission band seen for transverse-electric polarization. We provide renderings that allow the visualization of where the transmission bands are and compute the transmittance and reflectance to facilitate the design and interpretation of experiments. The transmission bands associated with photonic bandgap modes above the plasma frequency are rather broad. The plasmonic modes, i.e., those associated with ɛp ≤ 0, can be quite narrow and are tuned by varying the plasma density, affording an opportunity for the application of these structures as ultra-narrow tunable microwave transmission filters.

  5. Physical Modeling of the Processes Responsible for the Mid-Latitude Storm Enhanced Plasma Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Maruyama, N.; Fedrizzi, M.; Codrescu, M.; Heelis, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    Certain magnetic local time sectors at mid latitudes see substantial increases in plasma density in the early phases of a geomagnetic storm. The St. Patrick's Day storms of 2013 and 2015 were no exception, both producing large increases of total electron content at mid latitudes. There are theories for the build up of the storm enhanced density (SED), but can current theoretical ionosphere-thermosphere coupled models actually reproduce the response for an actual event? Not only is it necessary for the physical model to contain the appropriate physics, they also have to be forced by the correct drivers. The SED requires mid-latitude zonal transport to provide plasma stagnation in sunlight to provide the production. The theory also requires a poleward drift perpendicular to the magnetic field to elevate the plasma out of the body of the thermosphere to regions of substantially less loss rate. It is also suggested that equatorward winds are necessary to further elevate the plasma to regions of reduced loss. However, those same winds are also likely to transport molecular nitrogen rich neutral gas equatorward, potentially canceling out the benefits of the neutral circulation. Observations of mid-latitude zonal plasma flow are first analyzed to see if this first necessary ingredient is substantiated. The drift observations are then used to tune the driver to determine if, with the appropriate electric field driver, the latest physical models can reproduce the substantial plasma build up. If it can, the simulation can also be used to assess the contribution of the equatorward meridional wind; are they an asset to the plasma build up, or does the enhanced molecular species they carry counteract their benefit.

  6. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Huijsmans, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon, F-13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pamela, S. [IIFS-PIIM. Aix Marseille Université - CNRS, 13397 Marseille Cedex20 (France); Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hoelzl, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Cahyna, P. [Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  7. Metallurgical response of an AISI 4140 steel to different plasma nitriding gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adão Felipe Oliveira Skonieski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a surface modification process that uses glow discharge to diffuse nitrogen atoms into the metallic matrix of different materials. Among the many possible parameters of the process, the gas mixture composition plays an important role, as it impacts directly the formed layer's microstructure. In this work an AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrided under five different gas compositions. The plasma nitriding samples were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness test, X-ray diffraction and GDOES. The results showed that there are significant microstructural and morphological differences on the formed layers depending on the quantity of nitrogen and methane added to the plasma nitriding atmosphere. Thicknesses of 10, 5 and 2.5 µm were obtained when the nitrogen content of the gas mixtures were varied. The possibility to obtain a compound layer formed mainly by γ'-Fe4N nitrides was also shown. For all studied plasma nitriding conditions, the presence of a compound layer was recognized as being the responsible to hinder the decarburization on the steel surface. The highest value of surface hardness - 1277HV - were measured in the sample which were nitrided with 3vol.% of CH4.

  8. Comparative investigation of ELM control based on toroidal modelling of plasma response to RMP fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2016-10-01

    The type-I edge localized mode (ELM), bursting at low frequency and with large amplitude, can channel a substantial amount of the plasma thermal energy into the surrounding plasma-facing components in tokamak devices operating at the high-confinement mode, potentially causing severe material damages. Learning effective ways of controlling this instability is thus an urgent issue in fusion research, in particular in view of the next generation large devices such as ITER and DEMO. Among other means, externally applied, three-dimensional resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have been experimentally demonstrated to be successful in mitigating or suppressing the type-I ELM, in multiple existing devices. In this work, we shall report results of a comparative study of ELM control using RMPs. Comparison is made between the modelled plasma response to the 3D external fields and the observed change of the ELM behaviour on multiple devices, including MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, EAST, DIII-D, JET, and KSTAR. We show that toroidal modelling of the plasma response, based on linear and quasi-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, provides essential insights that are useful in interpreting and guiding the ELM control experiments. In particular, linear toroidal modelling results, using the MARS-F code, reveal the crucial role of the edge localized peeling-tearing mode response during ELM mitigation/suppression on all these devices. Such response often leads to strong peaking of the plasma surface displacement near the region of weak equilibrium poloidal field (e.g. the X-point), and this provides an alternative practical criterion for ELM control, as opposed to the vacuum field based Chirikov criteria. Quasi-linear modelling using MARS-Q provides quantitative interpretation of the side effects due to the ELM control coils, on the plasma toroidal momentum and particle confinements. The particular role of the momentum and particle fluxes, associated with the neoclassical toroidal

  9. Acute phase response and plasma carotenoid concentrations in older women: findings from the nun study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosalis, M G; Snowdon, D A; Tully, C L; Gross, M D

    1996-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated whether the acute phase response was associated with suppressed circulating levels of antioxidants in a population of 85 Catholic sisters (nuns) ages 77-99 y. Fasting blood was drawn to determine the presence of an acute phase response, as defined by an elevation in the serum concentration of C-reactive protein. Serum concentrations of albumin, thyroxine-binding prealbumin, zinc, copper, and fibrinogen were determined as were plasma concentrations of carotenoids and alpha tocopherol. Results showed that the presence of an acute phase response was associated with (1) an expected significant decrease in the serum concentrations of albumin (p < 0.001) and thyroxine-binding prealbumin (p < 0.001); (2) an expected significant increase in copper (p < 0.001) and fibrinogen (p = 0.003); and (3) a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of lycopene (p = 0.03), alpha carotene (p = 0.02), beta carotene (p = 0.02), and total carotenoids (p = 0.01). The acute phase response was associated with decreased plasma levels of the antioxidants lycopene, alpha carotene, and beta carotene. This decrease in circulating antioxidants may further compromise antioxidant status and increase oxidative stress and damage in elders.

  10. Genetic modulation of plasma NPY stress response is suppressed in substance abuse: association with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Hong, Kwangik Adam; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hauger, Richard L; Goldman, David; Sinha, Rajita

    2012-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in stress regulation. Genetic variations predict plasma NPY and neural correlates of emotion and stress. We examined whether the functional NPY haplotype modulates stress-induced NPY and anxiety responses, and if plasma NPY stress responses are associated with substance dependence outcomes. Thirty-seven treatment-engaged, abstinent substance dependent (SD) patients and 28 healthy controls (HCs) characterized on NPY diplotypes (HH: high expression; HLLL: intermediate/low expression) were exposed to stress, alcohol/drug cues and neutral relaxing cues, using individualized guided imagery, in a 3-session laboratory experiment. Plasma NPY, heart rate and anxiety were assessed. Patients were prospectively followed for 90-days post-treatment to assess relapse outcomes. HH individuals showed significantly lower stress-induced NPY with greater heart rate and anxiety ratings, while the HLLL group showed the reverse pattern of NPY, anxiety and heart rate responses. This differential genetic modulation of NPY stress response was suppressed in the SD group, who showed no stress-related increases in NPY and higher heart rate and greater anxiety, regardless of diplotype. Lower NPY predicted subsequent higher number of days and greater amounts of post-treatment drug use. These preliminary findings are the first to document chronic drug abuse influences on NPY diplotype expression where NPY diplotype modulation of stress-related plasma NPY, heart rate and anxiety responses was absent in the substance abuse sample. The finding that lower stress-related NPY is predictive of greater relapse severity provides support for therapeutic development of neuropeptide Y targets in the treatment of substance use disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION MODELING OF THE CURRENT SHEET IN A SIMULATED SOLAR ERUPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Chengcai; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Lin Jun; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.

    2013-01-01

    The current sheet that extends from the top of flare loops and connects to an associated flux rope is a common structure in models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). To understand the observational properties of CME current sheets, we generated predictions from a flare/CME model to be compared with observations. We use a simulation of a large-scale CME current sheet previously reported by Reeves et al. This simulation includes ohmic and coronal heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling in the energy equation. Using the results of this simulation, we perform time-dependent ionization calculations of the flow in a CME current sheet and construct two-dimensional spatial distributions of ionic charge states for multiple chemical elements. We use the filter responses from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the predicted intensities of emission lines to compute the count rates for each of the AIA bands. The results show differences in the emission line intensities between equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionization. The current sheet plasma is underionized at low heights and overionized at large heights. At low heights in the current sheet, the intensities of the AIA 94 Å and 131 Å channels are lower for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization. At large heights, these intensities are higher for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization inside the current sheet. The assumption of ionization equilibrium would lead to a significant underestimate of the temperature low in the current sheet and overestimate at larger heights. We also calculate the intensities of ultraviolet lines and predict emission features to be compared with events from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, including a low-intensity region around the current sheet corresponding to this model

  12. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  13. Interplay of single particle and collective response in molecular dynamics simulation of dusty plasma system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Srimanta; Das, Amita; Kumar, Sandeep; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    2018-04-01

    The collective response of the plasma medium is well known and has been explored extensively in the context of dusty plasma medium. On the other hand, the individual particle response associated with the collisional character giving rise to the dissipative phenomena has not been explored adequately. In this paper, two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of dust particles interacting via Yukawa potential has been considered. It has been shown that disturbances induced in a dust crystal elicit both collective and single particle responses. Generation of a few particles moving at speeds considerably higher than acoustic and/or shock speed (excited by the external disturbance) is observed. This is an indication of a single particle response. Furthermore, as these individual energetic particles propagate, the dust crystal is observed to crack along their path. Initially when the energy is high, these particles generate secondary energetic particles by the collisional scattering process. However, ultimately as these particles slow down they excite a collective response in the dust medium at secondary locations in a region which is undisturbed by the primary external disturbance. The condition when the cracking of the crystal stops and collective excitations get initiated has been identified quantitatively. The trailing collective primary disturbances would thus often encounter a disturbed medium with secondary and tertiary collective perturbations, thereby suffering significant modification in its propagation. It is thus clear that there is an interesting interplay (other than mere dissipation) between the single particle and collective response which governs the dynamics of any disturbance introduced in the medium.

  14. Atmospheric plasma processes for microbial inactivation: food applications and stress response in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Gozzi, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis is focused on cold atmospheric plasma treatments (GP) for microbial inactivation in food applications. In fact GP represents a promising emerging technology alternative to the traditional methods for the decontamination of foods. The objectives of this work were to evaluate: - the effects of GP treatments on microbial inactivation in model systems and in real foods; - the stress response in L. monocytogenes following exposure to different GP treatments. As far as t...

  15. Response of cast austenitic stainless steel to low temperature plasma carburizing.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yong

    2008-01-01

    The response of a cast 316 type austenitic stainless steel to the novel low temperature plasma carburizing process has been investigated in this work. The cast steel has a dendritic structure with a mix of austenite, ferrite and carbide phases. The results show that such a complex structure responds well to the carburizing process, and the inter-dendrite regions containing ferrite and carbides can be transformed to expanded austenite to form a continuous and uniform layer supersat...

  16. Poloidal structure of the plasma response to n = 1 Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, L.; Bettini, P.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Giannone, L.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Suttrop, W.; Teschke, M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Ryan, D.; Eurofusion Mst1 Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-10-01

    The hybrid scenario, a candidate for high-beta steady-state tokamak operations, becomes highly sensitive to 3D magnetic field near the no-wall limit. A predictive understanding of the plasma response to 3D fields near ideal MHD limits in terms of validated MHD stability codes is therefore important in order to safely operate future devices. Slowly rotating (5 - 10 Hz) n = 1 external magnetic fields have been applied in hybrid discharges in ASDEX Upgrade for an experimental characterization: the global n = 1 kink response has been measured by means of SXR and complete poloidal arrays of bθ probes located at different toroidal angles and compared to predictions of MHD codes such as MARS-F and V3FIT-VMEC. A Least-Squares Spectral Analysis approach has been developed together with a Monte Carlo technique to extract the small plasma response and its confidence interval from the noisy magnetic signals. MARS-F correctly reproduces the poloidal structure of the n = 1 measurements: for example, the dependence of the dominant poloidal mode number at the plasma edge from q95 is the same as in the experiment. Similar comparisons with V3FIT-VMEC and will be presented. See author list of ``H. Meyer et al. 2017 Nucl. Fusion 57 102014''.

  17. Investigation of the energy transport mechanism in the TCA tokamak by studying the plasma dynamical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudok de Wit, Th.; Duval, B.P.; Joye, B.; Lister, J.B.; Moret, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The energy transport mechanisms that govern the electron temperature behaviour of a tokamak remain very badly understood and up to now no proper model has been proposed that can explain experimental observations such as profile consistency or the influence of the density profile. One approach to this problem, extensively used on TCA, is to study the dynamical response of the plasma due to externally imposed modifications of parameters which have an influence on the plasma energy content. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature will closely depend on the type and the characteristics of the implied mechanisms. Thus a detailed measurement of the dynamical response would reveal experimentally the dominant properties that would have to be taken into account in the elaboration of a model of the transport processes. Most of the results presented here were obtained by analysing the electron temperature response inferred from soft X-ray emissivity during modification of the plasma density due to either gas puffing, laser impurity ablation or alfven wave heating on TCA (a = 0.18 m, R = 0.61 m, B Φ = 1.52 T). 4 refs., 3 figs

  18. Quantitative trait loci for magnitude of the plasma cortisol response to confinement in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillet, E; Krieg, F; Dechamp, N; Hervet, C; Bérard, A; Le Roy, P; Guyomard, R; Prunet, P; Pottinger, T G

    2014-04-01

    Better understanding of the mechanisms underlying interindividual variation in stress responses and their links with production traits is a key issue for sustainable animal breeding. In this study, we searched for quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the magnitude of the plasma cortisol stress response and compared them to body size traits in five F2 full-sib families issued from two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for high or low post-confinement plasma cortisol level. Approximately 1000 F2 individuals were individually tagged and exposed to two successive acute confinement challenges (1 month interval). Post-stress plasma cortisol concentrations were determined for each fish. A medium density genome scan was carried out (268 markers, overall marker spacing less than 10 cM). QTL detection was performed using qtlmap software, based on an interval mapping method (http://www.inra.fr/qtlmap). Overall, QTL of medium individual effects on cortisol responsiveness (confinement stressor are distinct traits sharing only part of their genetic control. Chromosomal location of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) makes it a good potential candidate gene for one of the QTL. Finally, comparison of body size traits QTL (weight, length and body conformation) with cortisol-associated QTL did not support evidence for negative genetic relationships between the two types of traits. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  19. Plasma free hemoglobin and microcirculatory response to fresh or old blood transfusions in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Damiani

    Full Text Available Free hemoglobin (fHb may induce vasoconstriction by scavenging nitric oxide. It may increase in older blood units due to storage lesions. This study evaluated whether old red blood cell transfusion increases plasma fHb in sepsis and how the microvascular response may be affected.This is a secondary analysis of a randomized study. Twenty adult septic patients received either fresh or old (15 days storage, respectively RBC transfusions. fHb was measured in RBC units and in the plasma before and 1 hour after transfusion. Simultaneously, the sublingual microcirculation was assessed with sidestream-dark field imaging. The perfused boundary region was calculated as an index of glycocalyx damage. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2 and Hb index (THI were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy and a vascular occlusion test was performed.Similar fHb levels were found in the supernatant of fresh and old RBC units. Despite this, plasma fHb increased in the old RBC group after transfusion (from 0.125 [0.098-0.219] mg/mL to 0.238 [0.163-0.369] mg/mL, p = 0.006. The sublingual microcirculation was unaltered in both groups, while THI increased. The change in plasma fHb was inversely correlated with the changes in total vessel density (r = -0.57 [95% confidence interval -0.82, -0.16], p = 0.008, De Backer score (r = -0.63 [95% confidence interval -0.84, -0.25], p = 0.003 and THI (r = -0.72 [95% confidence interval -0.88, -0.39], p = 0.0003.Old RBC transfusion was associated with an increase in plasma fHb in septic patients. Increasing plasma fHb levels were associated with decreased microvascular density.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01584999.

  20. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H and 8 normotensive (N subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively. They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity. Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP. Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05, although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1 and lower TBARS (P<0.01 and FRAP (P<0.05 levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors, present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response.

  1. Gel chromatography of immunoextracted plasma calcitonin in response to the calcium clamp in healthy males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucht, E.; Toerring, O.; Sjoeberg, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) in human plasma. Antibodies against synthetic human calcitonin (hCT) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were raised in rabbits and were directed against the carboxy terminal part of CT. The detection limit of the assay was 8 pg/ml. In 7 males the iCT response to a calcium-clamp was studied. Blood was collected at 0,30 and 60 min after the start of the calcium infusion. iCT was measured directly in plasma and in extracts obtained after purification of plasma iCT by means of immobilized CT antiboides. There was a good correlation between iCT in plasma samples and extracts, r = 0.993, n = 14 (P< 0.001). Dilution curves of extracts and plasma were parallel with the hCT standard curves. Gel chromatography of the extracts on Sephadex G-50 and G-75 disclosed heterogeneity of iCT in normal plasma during basal conditions as well as during calcium stimulation. Thirty min after the start of the calcium clamp all molecular forms, most likely constituting monomeric and dimeric CT and larger forms, were increased, while after 60 min iCT seemed to constitute predominantly forms larger than monomeric TCY. Basal levels of unextracted iCT in healthy males (n = 44, 37 +/- 10 years) were 15 +/- 9 pg-equivalents/ml (mean +/- SD), which was higher than in females (n = 40, 32 +/- 9 years) 11 +/- 4 pg-equivalents/ml (P < 0.05). (author)

  2. Investigating the Response and Expansion of Plasma Plumes in a Mesosonic Plasma Using the Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoegy, W. R.; Krause, L. Habash; Minow, J. I.; Coffey, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    To study the complex interactions between the space environment surrounding the International Space Station (ISS) and the ISS space vehicle, we are exploring a specialized suite of plasma sensors, manipulated by the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to probe the near-ISS mesosonic plasma ionosphere moving past the ISS. It is proposed that SASSI consists of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Thermal Ion Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TICHS), Thermal Electron Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TECHS), Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillations (CARLO), the Collimated PhotoElectron Gun (CPEG), and the University of Michigan Advanced Langmuir Probe (ALP). There are multiple expected applications for SASSI. Here, we will discuss the study of fundamental plasma physics questions associated with how an emitted plasma plume (such as from the ISS Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU)) responds and expands in a mesosonic magnetoplasma as well as emit and collect current. The ISS PCU Xe plasma plume drifts through the ionosphere and across the Earth's magnetic field, resulting in complex dynamics. This is of practical and theoretical interest pertaining to contamination concerns (e.g. energetic ion scattering) and the ability to collect and emit current between the spacecraft and the ambient plasma ionosphere. This impacts, for example, predictions of electrodynamic tether current performance using plasma contactors as well as decisions about placing high-energy electric propulsion thrusters on ISS. We will discuss the required measurements and connection to proposed instruments for this study.

  3. Improved break-in-slope analysis of the plasma energy response in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, E A; Eester, D van

    2008-01-01

    The break-in-slope method is a simple-although powerful-data analysis technique that is commonly used to determine the power absorption profiles of the plasma species during auxiliary heating experiments in tokamaks. It is based on the study of the energy response of the particles to sudden changes in the external power applied to the plasma. Even though some experimental conditions are favorable for the straightforward application of the break-in-slope analysis in its most simple form (linear fit of the experimental temperature signals), most situations require the retention of additional terms in the linearized energy conservation equation for a successful use of this technique. In this paper, important corrections necessary to extend the applicability of the traditional break-in-slope technique will be presented: (i) the numerical determination of the break-in-slope instants in the plasma energy response allowing the study of indirect (collisional) heating scenarios; (ii) the inclusion of the density variations due to the external power step based on fast density measurements; (iii) the exponential representation of the plasma energy evolution after the power break, describing the saturation of the experimental signals in slow modulation or single power step experiments; (iv) a first assessment of the influence of the change in the radiated power on the break-in-slope results. As will be shown, these corrections are particularly important in low absorption scenarios and in single power step studies, where the change in the external power cannot be considered 'non-perturbative' and the standard break-in-slope analysis usually leads to integrated power levels well below the actual power injected into the plasma

  4. AI applications in sheet metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises chapters on research work done around the globe in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) applications in sheet metal forming. The first chapter offers an introduction to various AI techniques and sheet metal forming, while subsequent chapters describe traditional procedures/methods used in various sheet metal forming processes, and focus on the automation of those processes by means of AI techniques, such as KBS, ANN, GA, CBR, etc. Feature recognition and the manufacturability assessment of sheet metal parts, process planning, strip-layout design, selecting the type and size of die components, die modeling, and predicting die life are some of the most important aspects of sheet metal work. Traditionally, these activities are highly experience-based, tedious and time consuming. In response, researchers in several countries have applied various AI techniques to automate these activities, which are covered in this book. This book will be useful for engineers working in sheet metal industri...

  5. Photoconductive Detectors with Fast Temporal Response for Laser Produced Plasma Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. J. May; C. Halvorson; T. Perry; F. Weber; P. Young; C. Silbernagel

    2008-01-01

    Processes during laser plasma experiments typically have time scales that are less than 100 ps. The measurement of these processes requires X-ray detectors with fast temporal resolution. We have measured the temporal responses and linearity of several different X-ray sensitive Photoconductive Detectors (PCDs). The active elements of the detectors investigated include both diamond (natural and synthetic) and GaAs crystals. The typical time responses of the GaAs PCDs are approximately 60 ps, respectively. Some characterizations using X-ray light from a synchrotron light source are presented

  6. Application of plasma focus device to compression of toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1980-01-01

    A new concept of compressing a toroidal plasma using a plasma focus device is considered. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined merely by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to a sheet plasma in a focus device because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An initiation senario of plasma-linear is also proposed with a possible application of this concepts to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e., burning plasma vortex. (author)

  7. Using NMR metabolomics to identify responses of an environmental estrogen in blood plasma of fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelsson, Linda M.; Foerlin, Lars; Karlsson, Goeran; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Larsson, D.G. Joakim

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics in combination with multivariate data analysis may become valuable tools to study environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other chemicals in aquatic organisms. To explore the usefulness of this approach in fish, we have used 1 H NMR metabolomics to compare blood plasma and plasma lipid extracts from rainbow trout exposed to the synthetic contraceptive estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE 2 ) with plasma from control fish. The plasma metabolite profile was affected in fish exposed to 10 ng/L but not 0.87 ng/L of EE 2 , which was in agreement with an induced vitellogenin synthesis in the high dose group only, as measured by ELISA. The main affected metabolites were vitellogenin, alanine, phospholipids and cholesterol. The responses identified by this discovery-driven method could be put in context with previous knowledge of the effects of estrogens on fish. This adds confidence to the approach of using NMR metabolomics to identify environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants

  8. Linear and Nonlinear Response of a Rotating Tokamak Plasma to a Resonant Error-Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-10-01

    An in-depth investigation of the effect of a resonant error-field on a rotating, quasi-cylindrical, tokamak plasma is preformed within the context of resistive-MHD theory. General expressions for the response of the plasma at the rational surface to the error-field are derived in both the linear and nonlinear regimes, and the extents of these regimes mapped out in parameter space. Torque-balance equations are also obtained in both regimes. These equations are used to determine the steady-state plasma rotation at the rational surface in the presence of the error-field. It is found that, provided the intrinsic plasma rotation is sufficiently large, the torque-balance equations possess dynamically stable low-rotation and high-rotation solution branches, separated by a forbidden band of dynamically unstable solutions. Moreover, bifurcations between the two stable solution branches are triggered as the amplitude of the error-field is varied. A low- to high-rotation bifurcation is invariably associated with a significant reduction in the width of the magnetic island chain driven at the rational surface, and vice versa. General expressions for the bifurcation thresholds are derived, and their domains of validity mapped out in parameter space. This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  9. IP-10 measured by Dry Plasma Spots as biomarker for therapy responses in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonby, Kristian; Ruhwald, Morten; Kvale, Dag; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma

    2015-03-18

    Tuberculosis (TB) has huge impact on human morbidity and mortality and biomarkers to support rapid TB diagnosis and ensure treatment initiation and cure are needed, especially in regions with high prevalence of multi-drug resistant TB. Soluble interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10) analyzed from dry plasma spots (DPS) has potential as an immunodiagnostic marker in TB infection. We analyzed IP-10 levels in plasma directly and extracted from DPS in parallel by ELISA from 34 clinically well characterized patients with TB disease before and throughout 24 weeks of effective anti-TB chemotherapy. We detected a significant decline of IP-10 levels in both plasma and DPS already after two weeks of therapy with good correlation between the tests. This was observed both in pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. In conclusion, plasma IP-10 may serve as an early biomarker for anti-TB chemotherapy responses and the IP-10 DPS method has potential to be developed into a point-of care test for use in resource-limited settings. Further studies must be performed to validate the use of IP-10 DPS in TB high endemic countries.

  10. Determination of GABA and vigabatrin in human plasma by a rapid and simple HPLC method: correlation between clinical response to vigabatrin and increase in plasma GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, W; Fassbender, C P; Gram, L; Gramer, M; Hörstermann, D; Zahner, B; Stefan, H

    1993-03-01

    The novel antiepileptic drug vigabatrin (Sabril) acts by inhibiting degradation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), increasing the GABA concentrations in the brain. Because the GABA degrading enzyme GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T) is also present in peripheral tissues, including blood platelets, measurement of plasma GABA levels might be a useful indication of the pharmacological response to vigabatrin during therapeutic monitoring. However, because of the very low concentrations of GABA in plasma, the few methods available for plasma GABA analysis are time-consuming, difficult to perform and/or not selective enough because of potential interference with other plasma constituents. In the present study, a rapid, selective and sensitive amino acid analysis HPLC method has been developed for plasma GABA determination with fluorescence detection, using o-phthaldialdehyde as a precolumn derivatizing agent. By employing a 3 microns particle size reversed-phase column and a multi-step gradient system of two solvents, the very low endogenous concentration of GABA in human plasma could be reproducibly quantitated without interference of other endogenous compounds. Incubation of human plasma samples with GABA degrading enzyme(s) resulted in an almost total loss of the GABA peak, thus demonstrating the specificity of the method for GABA analysis. In addition to GABA and other endogenous amino acids, the HPLC method could be used to quantitate plasma levels of vigabatrin. Thus, this improved HPLC amino acid assay might be used to examine whether concomitant monitoring of plasma GABA and vigabatrin is useful for clinical purposes. This was examined in 20 epileptic patients undergoing chronic treatment with vigabatrin. The average plasma GABA level of these 20 patients did not differ significantly from non-epileptic controls. However, when epileptic patients were subdivided according to their clinical response to vigabatrin, vigabatrin responders

  11. Measurement of tokamak error fields using plasma response and its applicability to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E.J.; Buttery, R.J.; Chu, M.S.; Garofalo, A.M.; La Haye, R.J.; Schaffer, M.J.; Casper, T.A.; Gribov, Y.; Hanson, J.M.; Reimerdes, H.; Volpe, F.A.

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear response of a low-beta tokamak plasma to non-axisymmetric fields offers an alternative to direct measurement of the non-axisymmetric part of the vacuum magnetic fields, often termed ‘error fields’. Possible approaches are discussed for determination of error fields and the required current in non-axisymmetric correction coils, with an emphasis on two relatively new methods: measurement of the torque balance on a saturated magnetic island, and measurement of the braking of plasma rotation in the absence of an island. The former is well suited to ohmically heated discharges, while the latter is more appropriate for discharges with a modest amount of neutral beam heating to drive rotation. Both can potentially provide continuous measurements during a discharge, subject to the limitation of a minimum averaging time. The applicability of these methods to ITER is discussed, and an estimate is made of their uncertainties in light of the specifications of ITER's diagnostic systems. The use of plasma response-based techniques in normal ITER operational scenarios may allow identification of the error field contributions by individual central solenoid coils, but identification of the individual contributions by the outer poloidal field coils or other sources is less likely to be feasible. (paper)

  12. The effect of interlaminar graphene nano-sheets reinforced e-glass fiber/ epoxy on low velocity impact response of a composite plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maharma, A. Y.; Sendur, P.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we compare the inter-laminar effect of graphene nano-sheets (GNSs) and CNTs on the single and multiple dynamic impact response of E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite (GFEP). In the comparisons, raw GFEP composite is used as baseline for quantifying the improvement on the dynamic impact response. For that purpose, finite element based models are developed for GNSs on GFEP, graphene coating on glass fibers, inter-laminar composite of CNTs reinforced polyester at 7.5 vol%, and combinations of all these reinforcements. Comparisons are made on three metrics: (i) total deformation, (ii) the contact force, and (iii) internal energy of the composite plate. The improvement on axial modulus (E1) of GFEP reinforced with one layer of GNS (0.5 wt%) without polyester at lamination sequence of [0]8 is 29.4%, which is very close to the improvement of 31% on storage modulus for multi-layer graphene with 0.5 wt% reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite at room temperature. Using three GNSs (1.5 wt%) reinforced polyester composite as interlaminar layer results in an improvement of 57.1% on E1 of GFEP composite. The simulation results reveal that the interlaminar three GNSs/polyester composite at mid-plane of GFEP laminated composite can significantly improve the dynamic impact resistance of GFEP structure compared to the other aforementioned structural reinforcements. Reinforcing GFEP composite with three layers of GNSs/polyester composite at mid-plane results in an average of 35% improvement on the dynamic impact resistance for healthy and damaged composite plate under low velocity impacts of single and multiple steel projectiles. This model can find application in various areas including structural health monitoring, fire retardant composite, and manufacturing of high strength and lightweight mechanical parts such as gas tank, aircraft wings and wind turbine blades.

  13. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part I: Theory and description of model capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffray, A. René; Federici, Gianfranco

    1997-04-01

    RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case.

  14. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Pt. I. Theory and description of model capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Federici, G.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., p.101-30, 1997. RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case. (orig.)

  15. Thermal responses of tokamak reactor first walls during cyclic plasma burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Charak, I.

    1978-01-01

    The CINDA-3G computer code has been adapted to analyze the thermal responses and operating limitations of two fusion reactor first-wall concepts under normal cyclic operation. A component of an LMFBR computer code has been modified and adapted to analyze the ablative behavior of first-walls after a plasma disruption. The first-wall design concepts considered are a forced-circulation water-cooled stainless steel panel with and without a monolithic graphite liner. The thermal gradients in the metal wall and liner have been determined for several burn-cycle scenarios and the extent of surface ablation that results from a plasma disruption has been determined for stainless steel and graphite first surfaces

  16. Thermal responses of tokamak reactor first walls during cyclic plasma burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Charak, I.

    1977-01-01

    The CINDA-3G computer code has been adapted to analyze the thermal responses and operating limitations of two fusion reactor first-wall concepts under normal cyclic operation. A component of an LMFBR computer has been modified and adapted to analyze the ablative behavior of first-walls after a plasma disruption. The first-wall design concepts considered are a forced-circulation water-cooled stainless steel panel with and without a monolithic graphite liner. The thermal gradients in the metal wall and liner have been determined for several burn-cycle scenarios and the extent of surface ablation that results from a plasma disruption has been determined for stainless steel and graphite first surfaces

  17. Fields of an ultrashort tightly focused radially polarized laser pulse in a linear response plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Yousef I.

    2017-10-01

    Analytical expressions for the fields of a radially polarized, ultrashort, and tightly focused laser pulse propagating in a linear-response plasma are derived and discussed. The fields are obtained from solving the inhomogeneous wave equations for the vector and scalar potentials, linked by the Lorenz gauge, in a plasma background. First, the scalar potential is eliminated using the gauge condition, then the vector potential is synthesized from Fourier components of an initial uniform distribution of wavenumbers, and the inverse Fourier transformation is carried out term-by-term in a truncated series (finite sum). The zeroth-order term in, for example, the axial electric field component is shown to model a pulse much better than its widely used paraxial approximation counterpart. Some of the propagation characteristics of the fields are discussed and all fields are shown to have manifested the expected limits for propagation in a vacuum.

  18. An investigation of transient pressures and plasma properties in a pinched plasma column. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, E. K.; York, T. M.

    1971-01-01

    The transient pinched plasma column generated in a linear Z-pinch was studied experimentally and analytically. The plasma column was investigated experimentally with several plasma diagnostics; they were: a rapid response pressure transducer, a magnetic field probe, a voltage probe, and discharge luminosity. Axial pressure profiles on the discharge chamber axis were used to identify three characteristic regions of plasma column behavior: (1) strong axial pressure asymmetry noted early in plasma column lifetime, (2) followed by plasma heating in which there is a rapid rise in static pressure, and (3) a slight decrease static pressure before plasma column breakup. Plasma column lifetime was approximately 5 microseconds. The axial pressure asymmetry was attributed to nonsimultaneous pinching of the imploding current sheet along the discharge chamber axis. The rapid heating could be attributed in part to viscous effects introduced by radial gradients in the axial streaming velocity.

  19. Discrepant fibrinolytic response in plasma and whole blood during experimental endotoxemia in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisse R Ostrowski

    Full Text Available Sepsis induces early activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis followed by late fibrinolytic shutdown and progressive endothelial damage. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the functional hemostatic response in whole blood and plasma during experimental human endotoxemia by the platelet function analyzer, Multiplate and by standard and modified thrombelastography (TEG.Prospective physiologic study of nine healthy male volunteers undergoing endotoxemia by means of a 4-hour infusion of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.5 ng/kg/hour, with blood sampled at baseline and at 4 h and 6 h. Physiological and standard biochemical data and coagulation tests, TEG (whole blood: TEG, heparinase-TEG, Functional Fibrinogen; plasma: TEG±tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA and Multiplate (TRAPtest, ADPtest, ASPItest, COLtest were recorded. Mixed models with Tukey post hoc tests and correlations were applied.Endotoxemia induced acute SIRS with increased HR, temperature, WBC, CRP and procalcitonin and decreased blood pressure. It also induced a hemostatic response with platelet consumption and reduced APTT while INR increased (all p<0.05. Platelet aggregation decreased (all tests, p<0.05, whereas TEG whole blood clot firmness increased (G, p = 0.05. Furthermore, during endotoxemia (4 h, whole blood fibrinolysis increased (clot lysis time (CLT, p<0.001 and Functional Fibrinogen clot strength decreased (p = 0.049. After endotoxemia (6 h, whole blood fibrinolysis was reduced (CLT, p<0.05. In contrast to findings in whole blood, the plasma fibrin clot became progressively more resistant towards tPA-induced fibrinolysis at both 4 h and 6 h (p<0.001.Endotoxemia induced a hemostatic response with reduced primary but enhanced secondary hemostasis, enhanced early fibrinolysis and fibrinogen consumption followed by downregulation of fibrinolysis, with a discrepant fibrinolytic response in plasma and whole blood. The finding that blood cells are

  20. Existence of three-dimensional ideal-magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loizu, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Hudson, S. R.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Lazerson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We consider the linear and nonlinear ideal plasma response to a boundary perturbation in a screw pinch. We demonstrate that three-dimensional, ideal-MHD equilibria with continuously nested flux-surfaces and with discontinuous rotational-transform across the resonant rational-surfaces are well defined and can be computed both perturbatively and using fully nonlinear equilibrium calculations. This rescues the possibility of constructing MHD equilibria with current sheets and continuous, smooth pressure profiles. The results predict that, even if the plasma acts as a perfectly conducting fluid, a resonant magnetic perturbation can penetrate all the way into the center of a tokamak without being shielded at the resonant surface.

  1. Effect of test meals of varying dietary fiber content on plasma insulin and glucose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J G; Coffman, K P; Reid, R L; Krall, J M; Albrink, M J

    1981-03-01

    To assess the effect of dietary fiber on glucose tolerance four different meals of varying fiber content but identical protein fat and carbohydrate content were fed to eight healthy men aged 22 to 45. Each meal provided 75 g of carbohydrate as liquid glucose formula, as brown rice, pinto beans, or All Bran. The mean plasma glucose and insulin responses were highest following the formula, and least for All Bran and pinto beans. Rice produced nearly as great a rise in insulin and glucose as did the formula. The rank of each meal by content of neutral detergent fiber was nearly the inverse of the rank by magnitude of the insulin response evoked, fiber content being greatest in All Bran (18 g) and pinto beans (16.2 g), low in rice (2.8 g) and absent from the formula. It was concluded that dietary fiber dampened the insulin response to a high carbohydrate meal.

  2. Plasma homovanillic acid and treatment response in a large group of schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W H; Hwu, H G; Chen, T Y; Lin, S K; Lung, F W; Chen, H; Lin, W L; Hu, W H; Lin, H N; Chien, C P

    1993-10-01

    Plasma levels of homovanillic acid (pHVA), a metabolite of dopamine, were measured in ninety-five Chinese schizophrenic patients free of neuroleptics for at least four weeks. These patients were treated with classical antipsychotics for six weeks. Pretreatment pHVA was positively correlated with the subsequent clinical response (r = 0.408, p or = 50%, n = 47) had higher pretreatment pHVA levels than poor responders (BPRS improvement pHVA level was associated with a more consistent clinical response to the subsequent treatment. Using a pHVA level of 12 ng/ml as a demarcation point, 72% of patients (34 of 47) who had pHVA > or = 12 responded whereas 65% (31 of 48) who had pHVA levels may predict a better clinical response to antipsychotics. Based upon the pHVA findings, two hypothetical subtypes of schizophrenia are proposed.

  3. Blood pressure and plasma catecholamine responses to various challenges during exercise-recovery in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péronnet, F; Massicotte, D; Paquet, J E; Brisson, G; de Champlain, J

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 2 h cycle exercise (50% VO2max) on heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), and on plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations, during the recovery period in seven normotensive subjects. Measurements were made at rest in supine (20 min) and standing (10 min) positions, during isometric exercise (hand-grip, 3 min, 25% maximal voluntary, contraction), in response to a mild psychosocial challenge (Stroop conflicting color word task) and during a 5-min period of light exercise (42 +/- 3% VO2max). Data were compared to measurements taken on another occasion under similar experimental conditions, without a previous exercise bout (control). The results showed HR to be slightly elevated in all conditions following the exercise bout. However, diastolic and systolic BP during the recovery period following exercise were not significantly different from the values observed in the control situation. Plasma NE concentrations in supine position and in response to the various physiological and/or psychosocial challenges were similar in the control situation and during the recovery period following exercise. On the other hand plasma E (nmol.1-1) was about 50% lower at rest (0.11 +/- 0.03 vs 0.23 +/- 0.04) as well as in response to hand-grip (0.21 +/- 0.04 vs 0.41 +/- 0.20) and the Stroop-test (0.21 +/- 0.05 vs 0.41 +/- 0.15) following the exercise bout.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Photooptical response of the blood plasma to the low-intensity red light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mints, R.I.; Skopinov, S.A.; Yakovleva, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    Photooptical response to low-intensity red light by irradiation of the whole blood as well as of its pigmentless plasma part is investigated. It is shown by the example of blood irradiation that the mechanism of action of low-intensity red light on the blood is not directly related to pigmented molecular complexes. The conclusion is made, that the effect of low-intensity red light on living organisms includes mechanism not utilizing light absorption by a specialized molecule-photoreceptor as a primary photophysical act

  5. Enhancement of photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2 induced by plasma doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sungjin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Guo, L Jay; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-05-27

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides hold promise for making ultrathin-film photovoltaic devices with a combination of excellent photovoltaic performance, superior flexibility, long lifetime, and low manufacturing cost. Engineering the proper band structures of such layered materials is essential to realize such potential. Here, we present a plasma-assisted doping approach for significantly improving the photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2. In this work, we fabricated and characterized photovoltaic devices with a vertically stacked indium tin oxide electrode/multilayer MoS2/metal electrode structure. Utilizing a plasma-induced p-doping approach, we are able to form p-n junctions in MoS2 layers that facilitate the collection of photogenerated carriers, enhance the photovoltages, and decrease reverse dark currents. Using plasma-assisted doping processes, we have demonstrated MoS2-based photovoltaic devices exhibiting very high short-circuit photocurrent density values up to 20.9 mA/cm(2) and reasonably good power-conversion efficiencies up to 2.8% under AM1.5G illumination, as well as high external quantum efficiencies. We believe that this work provides important scientific insights for leveraging the optoelectronic properties of emerging atomically layered two-dimensional materials for photovoltaic and other optoelectronic applications.

  6. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Tri Nugroho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31. doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31

  7. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7115

  8. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear plasma response models for non-axisymmetric perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lao, L. L.; Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Izzo, V. A. [University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Lazarus, E. A.; Hirshman, S. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Park, J.-K.; Lazerson, S.; Reiman, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Cooper, W. A. [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turco, F. [Columbia University, 116th St and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    With the installation of non-axisymmetric coil systems on major tokamaks for the purpose of studying the prospects of ELM-free operation, understanding the plasma response to the applied fields is a crucial issue. Application of different response models, using standard tools, to DIII-D discharges with applied non-axisymmetric fields from internal coils, is shown to yield qualitatively different results. The plasma response can be treated as an initial value problem, following the system dynamically from an initial unperturbed state, or from a nearby perturbed equilibrium approach, and using both linear and nonlinear models [A. D. Turnbull, Nucl. Fusion 52, 054016 (2012)]. Criteria are discussed under which each of the approaches can yield a valid response. In the DIII-D cases studied, these criteria show a breakdown in the linear theory despite the small 10{sup −3} relative magnitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations in this case. For nonlinear dynamical evolution simulations to reach a saturated nonlinear steady state, appropriate damping mechanisms need to be provided for each normal mode comprising the response. Other issues arise in the technical construction of perturbed flux surfaces from a displacement and from the presence of near nullspace normal modes. For the nearby equilibrium approach, in the absence of a full 3D equilibrium reconstruction with a controlled comparison, constraints relating the 2D system profiles to the final profiles in the 3D system also need to be imposed to assure accessibility. The magnetic helicity profile has been proposed as an appropriate input to a 3D equilibrium calculation and tests of this show the anticipated qualitative behavior.

  9. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Mayo; Johkura, Kohei; Sato, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H 2 O 2 -added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H 2 O 2 . As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H 2 O 2 -medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H 2 O 2 -medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H 2 O 2 -medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN and FOS, were detected and notably elevated in

  10. Plasma kallikrein enhances platelet aggregation response by subthreshold doses of ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaiano, Tatiana F; Andrade, Sheila S; de Oliveira, Cleide; Silva, Mariana C C; Buri, Marcus V; Juliano, Maria A; Girão, Manoel J B C; Sampaio, Misako U; Schmaier, Alvin H; Wlodawer, Alexander; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2017-04-01

    Human plasma kallikrein (huPK) potentiates platelet responses to subthreshold doses of ADP, although huPK itself, does not induce platelet aggregation. In the present investigation, we observe that huPK pretreatment of platelets potentiates ADP-induced platelet activation by prior proteolysis of the G-protein-coupled receptor PAR-1. The potentiation of ADP-induced platelet activation by huPK is mediated by the integrin α IIb β 3 through interactions with the KGD/KGE sequence motif in huPK. Integrin α IIb β 3 is a cofactor for huPK binding to platelets to support PAR-1 hydrolysis that contributes to activation of the ADP signaling pathway. This activation pathway leads to phosphorylation of Src, AktS 473 , ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK, and to Ca 2+ release. The effect of huPK is blocked by specific antagonists of PAR-1 (SCH 19197) and α IIb β 3 (abciximab) and by synthetic peptides comprising the KGD and KGE sequence motifs of huPK. Further, recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor, rBbKI, also blocks this entire mechanism. These results suggest a new function for huPK. Formation of plasma kallikrein lowers the threshold for ADP-induced platelet activation. The present observations are consistent with the notion that plasma kallikrein promotes vascular disease and thrombosis in the intravascular compartment and its inhibition may ameliorate cardiovascular disease and thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Radiation dominated relativistic current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroschek, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic Current Sheets (RCS) feature plasma instabilities considered as potential key to magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation in Poynting flux dominated plasma flows. We show in a series of kinetic plasma simulations that the physical nature of non-linear RCS evolution changes in the presence of incoherent radiation losses: In the ultra-relativistic regime (i.e. magnetization parameter sigma = 104 defined as the ratio of magnetic to plasma rest frame energy density) the combination of non-linear RCS dynamics and synchrotron emission introduces a temperature anisotropy triggering the growth of the Relativistic Tearing Mode (RTM). As direct consequence the RTM prevails over the Relativistic Drift Kink (RDK) Mode as competitive RCS instability. This is in contrast to the previously studied situation of weakly relativistic RCS (sigma ∼ 1) where the RDK is dominant and most of the plasma is thermalized. The simulations witness the typical life cycle of ultra-relativistic RCS evolving from a violent radiation induced collapse towards a radiation quiescent state in rather classical Sweet-Parker topology. Such a transition towards Sweet-Parker configuration in the late non-linear evolution has immediate consequences for the efficiency of magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation. Ceasing dissipation rates directly affect our present understanding of non-linear RCS evolution in conventional striped wind scenarios. (author)

  12. Electron energization in the geomagnetic tail current sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    Electron motion in the distant tail current sheet is evaluated and found to violate the guiding center approximation at energies > or approx. =100 eV. Most electrons within the energy range approx.10 -1 -10 2 keV that enter the current sheet become trapped within the magnetic field reversal region. These electrons then convect earthward and gain energy from the cross-tail electric field. If the energy spectrum of electrons entering the current sheet is similar to that of electrons from the boundary layer surrounding the magnetotail, the energy gain from the electric field produces electron energy spectra comparable to those observed in the earth's plasma sheet. Thus current sheet interactions can be a significant source of particles and energy for plasma sheet electrons as well as for plasma sheet ions. A small fraction of electrons within the current sheet has its pitch angles scattered so as to be ejected from the current sheet within the atmospheric loss cone. These electrons can account for the electron precipitation near the high-latitude boundary of energetic electrons, which is approximately isotropic in pitch angle up to at least several hundred keV. Current sheet interaction should cause approximately isotropic auroral precipitation up to several hundred keV energies, which extends to significantly lower latitudes for ions than for electrons in agreement with low-altitude satellite observations. Electron precipitation associated with diffuse aurora generally has a transition at 1-10 keV to anisotropic pitch angle distributions. Such electron precipitation cannot be explained by current sheet interactions, but it can be explained by pitch angle diffusion driven by plasma turbulence

  13. Plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA declines in response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockett, Penny E; Khanal, Januka; Sitaula, Alina; Oglesby, Christopher; Meachum, William A; Castracane, V Daniel; Kraemer, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Increased plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cf-mDNA), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) produced by cellular injury, contributes to neutrophil activation/inflammation in trauma patients and arises in cancer and autoimmunity. To further understand relationships between cf-mDNA released by tissue injury, inflammation, and health benefits of exercise, we examined cf-mDNA response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise. Seven healthy moderately trained young men (age = 22.4 ± 1.2) completed a treadmill exercise trial for 90 min at 60% VO2 max and a resting control trial. Blood was sampled immediately prior to exercise (0 min = baseline), during (+18, +54 min), immediately after (+90 min), and after recovery (R40). Plasma was analyzed for cf-mDNA, IL-6, and lactate. A significant difference in cf-mDNA response was observed between exercise and control trials, with cf-mDNA levels reduced during exercise at +54 and +90 (with or without plasma volume shift correction). Declines in cf-mDNA were accompanied by increased lactate and followed by an increase in IL-6, suggesting a temporal association with muscle stress and inflammatory processes. Our novel finding of cf-mDNA decline with prolonged moderate treadmill exercise provides evidence for increased clearance from or reduced release of cf-mDNA into the blood with prolonged exercise. These studies contrast with previous investigations involving exhaustive short-term treadmill exercise, in which no change in cf-mDNA levels were reported, and contribute to our understanding of differences between exercise- and trauma-induced inflammation. We propose that transient declines in cf-mDNA may induce health benefits, by reducing systemic inflammation. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  14. Plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites predict the response to sulpiride or fluvoxamine in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, N; Yoshimura, R; Shinkai, K; Nakamura, J

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between the changes in plasma catecholamine metabolites obtained from depressed patients before and after administration of sulpiride, a benzamide compound, or fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and between clinical responses to treatment with each of these drugs. Responders to sulpiride had significantly lower plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels before administration of sulpiride than did non-responders or controls (responders: 4.5 +/- 3.1 ng/ml, non-responders: 11.1 +/- 5.9 ng/ml, controls: 10.9 +/- 5.3 ng/ml). Positive relationships were observed between changes in pHVA levels and improvement rates in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D). In contrast, responders to fluvoxamine had significantly higher plasma free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG) levels before administration of fluvoxamine than did non-responders or controls (responders: 8.5 +/- 1.8 ng/ml, non-responders: 5.9 +/- 2.I ng/ml, controls: 5.2 +/- 2.9 ng/ml). Negative relationships were observed between changes in pMHPG levels and improvement rates in Ham-D. These results suggest that lower pretreatment pHVA levels and higher pretreatment levels of pMHPG might be predictors of response to sulpiride and fluvoxamine, respectively, and that sulpiride might produce a functional increase in the dopaminergic system, resulting in improvement in some depressive symptoms; fluvoxamine, on the other hand, might produce a functional decrease in the noradrenergic system via serotonergic neurons, resulting in improvement of those symptoms.

  15. Modelling of Plasma Response to Resonant Magnetic Perturbations and its Influence on Divertor Strike Points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahyna, P.; Peterka, M.; Panek, R., E-mail: cahyna@ipp.cas.cz [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Liu, Y.; Kirk, A.; Harrison, J.; Thornton, A.; Chapman, I. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nardon, E. [Association Euratom/CEA, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Schmitz, O. [Forschung Zentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) for edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation in tokamaks can be modified by the plasma response and indeed strong screening of the applied perturbation is in some cases predicted by simulations. In this contribution we investigate what effect would such screening have on the spiralling patterns (footprints) which may appear at the divertor when RMPs are applied. We use two theoretical tools for investigation of the impact of plasma response on footprints: a simple model of the assumed screening currents, which can be used to translate the screening predicted by MHD codes in a simplified geometry into the real geometry, and the MHD code MARS-F. The former consistently predicts that footprints are significantly reduced when complete screening of the resonant perturbation modes (like it is the case in ideal MHD) is assumed. This result is supported by the result of MARS-F in ideal mode for the case of the MAST tokamak. To predict observed patterns of fluxes it is necessary to take into account the deformation of the scrape-off layer, and for this we developed an approximative method based on the Melnikov integral. If the screening of perturbations indeed reduces the footprints, it would provide us with an important tool to evaluate the amount of screening in experiments, as the footprints can be easily observed. We thus present a comparison between predictions and experimental data, especially for the MAST tokamak, where a significant amount of data has been collected. (author)

  16. Role of plasma fibronectin in the foreign body response to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselowsky, Benjamin G; Bridges, Amanda W; Burns, Kellie L; Tate, Ciara C; Babensee, Julia E; LaPlaca, Michelle C; García, Andrés J

    2007-09-01

    Host responses to biomaterials control the biological performance of implanted medical devices. Upon implantation, synthetic materials adsorb biomolecules, which trigger an inflammatory cascade comprising coagulation, leukocyte recruitment/adhesion, and foreign body reaction. The foreign body reaction and ensuing fibrous encapsulation severely limit the in vivo performance of numerous biomedical devices. While it is well established that plasma fibrinogen and secreted cytokines modulate leukocyte recruitment and maturation into foreign body giant cells, mediators of chronic inflammation and fibrous encapsulation of implanted biomaterials remain poorly understood. Using plasma fibronectin (pFN) conditional knock-out mice, we demonstrate that pFN modulates the foreign body response to polyethylene terephthalate disks implanted subcutaneously. Fibrous collagenous capsules were two-fold thicker in mice depleted of pFN compared to controls. In contrast, deletion of pFN did not alter acute leukocyte recruitment to the biomaterial, indicating that pFN modulates chronic fibrotic responses. The number of foreign body giant cells associated with the implant was three times higher in the absence of pFN while macrophage numbers were not different, suggesting that pFN regulates the formation of biomaterial-associated foreign body giant cells. Interestingly, cellular FN (cFN) was present in the capsules of both normal and pFN-depleted mice, suggesting that cFN could not compensate for the loss of pFN. These results implicate pFN in the host response to implanted materials and identify a potential target for therapeutic intervention to enhance the biological performance of biomedical devices.

  17. Ice sheet hydrology - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter; Naeslund, Jens-Ove [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Rodhe, Lars [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    This report summarizes the theoretical knowledge on water flow in and beneath glaciers and ice sheets and how these theories are applied in models to simulate the hydrology of ice sheets. The purpose is to present the state of knowledge and, perhaps more importantly, identify the gaps in our understanding of ice sheet hydrology. Many general concepts in hydrology and hydraulics are applicable to water flow in glaciers. However, the unique situation of having the liquid phase flowing in conduits of the solid phase of the same material, water, is not a commonly occurring phenomena. This situation means that the heat exchange between the phases and the resulting phase changes also have to be accounted for in the analysis. The fact that the solidus in the pressure-temperature dependent phase diagram of water has a negative slope provides further complications. Ice can thus melt or freeze from both temperature and pressure variations or variations in both. In order to provide details of the current understanding of water flow in conjunction with deforming ice and to provide understanding for the development of ideas and models, emphasis has been put on the mathematical treatments, which are reproduced in detail. Qualitative results corroborating theory or, perhaps more often, questioning the simplifications made in theory, are also given. The overarching problem with our knowledge of glacier hydrology is the gap between the local theories of processes and the general flow of water in glaciers and ice sheets. Water is often channelized in non-stationary conduits through the ice, features which due to their minute size relative to the size of glaciers and ice sheets are difficult to incorporate in spatially larger models. Since the dynamic response of ice sheets to global warming is becoming a key issue in, e.g. sea-level change studies, the problems of the coupling between the hydrology of an ice sheet and its dynamics is steadily gaining interest. New work is emerging

  18. Ice sheet hydrology - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Peter; Naeslund, Jens-Ove; Rodhe, Lars

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes the theoretical knowledge on water flow in and beneath glaciers and ice sheets and how these theories are applied in models to simulate the hydrology of ice sheets. The purpose is to present the state of knowledge and, perhaps more importantly, identify the gaps in our understanding of ice sheet hydrology. Many general concepts in hydrology and hydraulics are applicable to water flow in glaciers. However, the unique situation of having the liquid phase flowing in conduits of the solid phase of the same material, water, is not a commonly occurring phenomena. This situation means that the heat exchange between the phases and the resulting phase changes also have to be accounted for in the analysis. The fact that the solidus in the pressure-temperature dependent phase diagram of water has a negative slope provides further complications. Ice can thus melt or freeze from both temperature and pressure variations or variations in both. In order to provide details of the current understanding of water flow in conjunction with deforming ice and to provide understanding for the development of ideas and models, emphasis has been put on the mathematical treatments, which are reproduced in detail. Qualitative results corroborating theory or, perhaps more often, questioning the simplifications made in theory, are also given. The overarching problem with our knowledge of glacier hydrology is the gap between the local theories of processes and the general flow of water in glaciers and ice sheets. Water is often channelized in non-stationary conduits through the ice, features which due to their minute size relative to the size of glaciers and ice sheets are difficult to incorporate in spatially larger models. Since the dynamic response of ice sheets to global warming is becoming a key issue in, e.g. sea-level change studies, the problems of the coupling between the hydrology of an ice sheet and its dynamics is steadily gaining interest. New work is emerging

  19. Relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in stationary incompressible MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic configurations with strong localized current concentrations and vortices play an important role in the dissipation of energy in space and astrophysical plasma. Within this work we investigate the relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in incompressible, stationary equilibria. For this approach it is helpful that the similar mathematical structure of magnetohydrostatics and stationary incompressible hydrodynamics allows us to transform static equilibria into stationary ones. The main control function for such a transformation is the profile of the Alfvén-Mach number MA, which is always constant along magnetic field lines, but can change from one field line to another. In the case of a global constant MA, vortices and electric current concentrations are parallel. More interesting is the nonlinear case, where MA varies perpendicular to the field lines. This is a typical situation at boundary layers like the magnetopause, heliopause, the solar wind flowing around helmet streamers and at the boundary of solar coronal holes. The corresponding current and vortex sheets show in some cases also an alignment, but not in every case. For special density distributions in 2-D, it is possible to have current but no vortex sheets. In 2-D, vortex sheets of field aligned-flows can also exist without strong current sheets, taking the limit of small Alfvén Mach numbers into account. The current sheet can vanish if the Alfvén Mach number is (almost constant and the density gradient is large across some boundary layer. It should be emphasized that the used theory is not only valid for small Alfvén Mach numbers MA MA ≲ 1. Connection to other theoretical approaches and observations and physical effects in space plasmas are presented. Differences in the various aspects of theoretical investigations of current sheets and vortex sheets are given.

  20. Dietary Animal Plasma Proteins Improve the Intestinal Immune Response in Senescent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Lluïsa; Garcia-Just, Alba; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Moretó, Miquel; Pérez-Bosque, Anna

    2017-12-11

    Increased life expectancy has promoted research on healthy aging. Aging is accompanied by increased non-specific immune activation (inflammaging) which favors the appearance of several disorders. Here, we study whether dietary supplementation with spray-dried animal plasma (SDP), which has been shown to reduce the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in rodents challenged by S. aureus enterotoxin B (SEB), and can also prevent the effects of aging on immune system homeostasis. We first characterized GALT in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAMP8) at different ages (compared to mice resistant to accelerated senescence; SAMR1). Second, we analyzed the SDP effects on GALT response to an SEB challenge in SAMP8 mice. In GALT characterization, aging increased the cell number and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches (all, p < 0.05), as well as the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α in intestinal mucosa (both, p < 0.05). With respect to GALT response to the SEB challenge, young mice showed increased expression of intestinal IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as lymphocyte recruitment and activation (all, p < 0.05). However, the immune response of senescent mice to the SEB challenge was weak, since SEB did not change cell recruitment or the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes. Mice supplemented with SDP showed improved capacity to respond to the SEB challenge, similar to the response of the young mice. These results indicate that senescent mice have an impaired mucosal immune response characterized by unspecific GALT activation and a weak specific immune response. SDP supplementation reduces non-specific basal immune activation, allowing for the generation of specific responses.

  1. Dietary Animal Plasma Proteins Improve the Intestinal Immune Response in Senescent Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluïsa Miró

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased life expectancy has promoted research on healthy aging. Aging is accompanied by increased non-specific immune activation (inflammaging which favors the appearance of several disorders. Here, we study whether dietary supplementation with spray-dried animal plasma (SDP, which has been shown to reduce the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT in rodents challenged by S. aureus enterotoxin B (SEB, and can also prevent the effects of aging on immune system homeostasis. We first characterized GALT in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAMP8 at different ages (compared to mice resistant to accelerated senescence; SAMR1. Second, we analyzed the SDP effects on GALT response to an SEB challenge in SAMP8 mice. In GALT characterization, aging increased the cell number and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches (all, p < 0.05, as well as the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α in intestinal mucosa (both, p < 0.05. With respect to GALT response to the SEB challenge, young mice showed increased expression of intestinal IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as lymphocyte recruitment and activation (all, p < 0.05. However, the immune response of senescent mice to the SEB challenge was weak, since SEB did not change cell recruitment or the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes. Mice supplemented with SDP showed improved capacity to respond to the SEB challenge, similar to the response of the young mice. These results indicate that senescent mice have an impaired mucosal immune response characterized by unspecific GALT activation and a weak specific immune response. SDP supplementation reduces non-specific basal immune activation, allowing for the generation of specific responses.

  2. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 01: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: Building a successful program to engage property owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    In the course of work as a land manager, you will no doubt be involved in developing programs to achieve various objectives, including the improvement of fuels management on private lands. This fact sheet describes six steps that will help you plan and conduct a successful program.

  3. Numerical simulation of plasma response to externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicheng, LI; Zhonghe, JIANG; Jian, LV; Xiang, LI; Bo, RAO; Yonghua, DING

    2018-05-01

    Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of an equilibrium on the J-TEXT tokamak with applied resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are performed with NIMROD (non-ideal MHD with rotation, open discussion). Numerical simulation of plasma response to RMPs has been developed to investigate magnetic topology, plasma density and rotation profile. The results indicate that the pure applied RMPs can stimulate 2/1 mode as well as 3/1 mode by the toroidal mode coupling, and finally change density profile by particle transport. At the same time, plasma rotation plays an important role during the entire evolution process.

  4. The effects of testosterone on immune function in quail selected for divergent plasma corticosterone response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mark L; Buchanan, Katherine L; Evans, Matthew R; Marin, Raul H; Satterlee, Daniel G

    2009-10-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis (ICHH) suggests that the male sex hormone testosterone has a dual effect; it controls the development and expression of male sexually selected signals, and it suppresses the immune system. Therefore only high quality males are able to fully express secondary sexual traits because only they can tolerate the immunosuppressive qualities of testosterone. A modified version of the ICHH suggests that testosterone causes immunosuppression indirectly by increasing the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT). Lines of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) selected for divergent responses in levels of plasma CORT were used to test these hypotheses. Within each CORT response line (as well as in a control stock) we manipulated levels of testosterone in castrated quail by treatment with zero (sham), low or high testosterone implants, before testing the birds' humoral immunity and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced immune response, as well as body condition. The PHA-induced response was not significantly affected by CORT selected line, testosterone treatment or their interaction. There was, however, a significant effect of CORT line on humoral immunity in that the control birds exhibited the greatest antibody production, but there was no significant effect of testosterone manipulation on humoral immunity. The males in the sham implant treatment group had significantly greater mass than the males in the high testosterone group, suggesting a negative effect of high testosterone on general body condition. We discuss these results in the context of current hypotheses in the field of sexual selection.

  5. Analysis and Interpretation of the Plasma Dynamic Response to Additional Heating Power using different Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manini, A.

    2002-07-01

    development of this work, the Electron Cyclotron Emission system (ECE) of ASDEX Upgrade is crucial since it allows local measurements of the electron temperature with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The analysis and interpretation of perturbative MECH discharges for power deposition localisation using different diagnostics, such as ECE and SXR measurements, are presented. The most important problem is related to the phase locking between the MECH and the sawtooth activity of the plasma, which disturbs both ECE and SXR measurements. Several techniques have been adopted to circumvent this difficulty. In particular, the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and the Generalised Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD) have been tested in both TCV and ASDEX Upgrade discharges. However, both methods are incapable of treating the problem correctly, which leads to potential misinterpretation of the results. A new method based on system identification using the SVD (SI-SVD) is developed and applied. This method, within reasonable limits induced by the assumption of linearity, is capable of simultaneously separating the MECH from the sawtooth contributions to both ECE electron temperature measurements and SXR emission measurements. Such a method is in particular applied to a NBI heated ASDEX Upgrade discharge in which MECH is added in order to analyse electron heat transport in a mostly ion-heated plasma. Since the NBI heating is also partly modulated with short pulses, which coincide with the sawtooth crashes to improve their stability, both the MECH and the NBI deposition profiles are determined. Moreover, treating the signals with the SI-SVD procedure enables a study of the plasma dynamic response also at higher MECH harmonic numbers. The procedure is then used to analyse MECH discharges in TCV using different diagnostics. The profiles determined using the ECE and soft X-ray measurements are compared and interpreted, demonstrating in particular that line integrated soft X

  6. An investication into geomagnetic and atmospheric response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Magadan, Khabarovsk, Wakkanai, Akita, Kokubunji, Okinawa and Manila. The study shows that the present storm is double step, and the leading single magnetospheric process that was responsible for both the first and second Dst decrease is the enhancement of the plasma sheet. An enhanced solar wind density drove, ...

  7. Thermal response of plasma sprayed tungsten coating to high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Yang, L.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Xu, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the thermal response of tungsten coating on carbon and copper substrates by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) or inert gas plasma spray (IPS), annealing and cyclic heat load experiments of these coatings were conducted. It is indicated that the multi-layered tungsten and rhenium interface of VPS-W/CFC failed to act as a diffusion barrier at elevated temperature and tungsten carbides were developed after 1 h incubation time when annealing temperature was higher than 1600 deg. C. IPS-W/Cu and W/C without an intermediate bonding layer were failed by the detachment of the tungsten coating at 900 and 1200 deg. C annealing for several hours, respectively. Cyclic heat load of electron beam with 35 MW/m 2 and 3-s pulse duration indicated that IPS-W/Cu samples failed with local detachment of the tungsten coating within 200 cycles and IPS-W/C showed local cracks by 300 cycles, but VPS-W/CFC withstood 1000 cycles without visible damages. However, crack creation and propagation in VPS-W/CFC were also observed under higher heat load

  8. The thermal response of the first wall of a fusion reactor blanket to plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.Th.

    1983-09-01

    Major plasma disruptions in Tokamak power reactors are potentially dangerous because high thermal overloading of the first wall may occur, resulting in melting and evaporation. The present uncertainties of the disruption characteristics, in particular the space and time dependence of the energy deposition, lead to a wide variation in the prospective surface energy loads. The thermal response of a first wall of aluminium, stainless steel and of graphite subjected to disruption energy loads up to 1000 J cm -2 has been analysed including the effects of melting and surface evaporation, vapour recondensation, vapour shielding, and the moving of the surface boundary caused by the evaporation. A special calculation model has been developed for this purpose. The main results are the following: by values of local transient energy depositions over 1500 J cm -2 bare stainless steel walls are damaged severely. Further calculations are needed to estimate the endurance limit of several candidate first wall materials. Applications of coatings on surfaces need special attention. For the reference INTOR disruption (approx. 100 J cm -2 ) evaporation is not significant. The effect of vapour shielding on evaporation has been found to be significant. The effect on melting is less pronounced. In a complete analysis the stability and dynamic behaviour of the melted layer under electromagnetic forces should be included. Also a reliable set of plasma disruption characteristics should be gathered

  9. Attenuation of acute plasma cortisol response in calves following intravenous sodium salicylate administration prior to castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, J F; Gehring, R; Bettenhausen, A C; Lubbers, B V; Toerber, S E; Thomson, D U; Kukanich, B; Apley, M D

    2007-08-01

    Pain associated with castration in cattle is an animal welfare concern in beef production. This study examined the effect of oral aspirin and intravenous (i.v.) sodium salicylate on acute plasma cortisol response following surgical castration. Twenty bulls, randomly assigned to the following groups, (i) uncastrated, untreated controls, (ii) castrated, untreated controls, (iii) 50 mg/kg sodium salicylate i.v. precastration and (iv) 50 mg/kg aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) per os precastration, were blood sampled at 3, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 min and 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h postcastration. Samples were analyzed by competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay for cortisol and salicylate, respectively. Data were analyzed using noncompartmental analysis, a simple cosine model, anova and t-tests. Intravenous salicylate V(d(ss)) was 0.18 L/kg, Cl(B) was 3.36 mL/min/kg and t(1/2 lambda) was 0.63 h. Plasma salicylate concentrations above 25 microg/mL coincided with significant attenuation in peak cortisol concentrations (P = 0.029). Peak salicylate concentrations following oral aspirin administration was castrated groups was significantly higher than uncastrated controls (P = 0.018). These findings have implications for designing drug regimens to provide analgesia during routine animal husbandry procedures.

  10. Enhanced osteoblast responses to poly ether ether ketone surface modified by water plasma immersion ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heying; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) offers a set of characteristics superior for human implants; however, its application is limited by the bio-inert surface property. In this work, PEEK surface was modified using single step plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment with a gas mixture of water vapor as a plasma resource and argon as an ionization assistant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the modified PEEK surface. The water contact angle and zeta-potential of the surfaces were also measured. Osteoblast precursor cells MC3T3-E1 and rat bone mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the PEEK samples to evaluate their cytocompatibility. The obtained results show that the hydroxyl groups as well as a "ravined structure" are constructed on water PIII modified PEEK. Compared with pristine PEEK, the water PIII treated PEEK is more favorable for osteoblast adhesion, spreading and proliferation, besides, early osteogenic differentiation indicated by the alkaline phosphatase activity is also up-regulated. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblast responses to the PEEK surface modified by water PIII, which gives positive information in terms of future biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Energy-dispersed ions in the plasma sheet boundary layer and associated phenomena: Ion heating, electron acceleration, Alfvén waves, broadband waves, perpendicular electric field spikes, and auroral emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent Cluster studies reported properties of multiple energy-dispersed ion structures in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL that showed substructure with several well separated ion beamlets, covering energies from 3 keV up to 100 keV (Keiling et al., 2004a, b. Here we report observations from two PSBL crossings, which show a number of identified one-to-one correlations between this beamlet substructure and several plasma-field characteristics: (a bimodal ion conics (<1 keV, (b field-aligned electron flow (<1 keV, (c perpendicular electric field spikes (~20 mV/m, (d broadband electrostatic ELF wave packets (<12.5 Hz, and (e enhanced broadband electromagnetic waves (<4 kHz. The one-to-one correlations strongly suggest that these phenomena were energetically driven by the ion beamlets, also noting that the energy flux of the ion beamlets was 1–2 orders of magnitude larger than, for example, the energy flux of the ion outflow. In addition, several more loosely associated correspondences were observed within the extended region containing the beamlets: (f electrostatic waves (BEN (up to 4 kHz, (g traveling and standing ULF Alfvén waves, (h field-aligned currents (FAC, and (i auroral emissions on conjugate magnetic field lines. Possible generation scenarios for these phenomena are discussed. In conclusion, it is argued that the free energy of magnetotail ion beamlets drove a variety of phenomena and that the spatial fine structure of the beamlets dictated the locations of where some of these phenomena occurred. This emphasizes the notion that PSBL ion beams are important for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. However, it is also shown that the dissipation of electromagnetic energy flux (at altitudes below Cluster of the simultaneously occurring Alfvén waves and FAC was larger (FAC being the largest than the dissipation of beam kinetic energy flux, and thus these two energy carriers contributed more to the energy transport on PSBL field lines

  12. Unconjugated oestetrol in plasma in response to an intravenous load of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHAS) in uncomplicated and complicated human pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Ove

    1978-01-01

    A non-chromatographic radioimmunoassay for estimation of unconjugated oestetrol in plasma from pregnant women is described. The antiserum has a high specificity to oestetrol. The technical procedure is simple and rapid. Only small amounts of plasma (0.2-0.4 ml) are needed for the analysis. The method has been applied to the measurement of oestetrol in plasma from pregnant women before and after an intravenous injection of 50 mg DHAS. In women with uncomplicated pregnancies a rise of plasma oestetrol was found 60 min after the injection. From 120 to 360 min there was a plateau level, at 600 min a decrease from this level was observed. No changes in the oestetrol response were found with advancing gestational age from the 33rd to the 40th week of pregnancy. A great spread in the individual responses were recorded. Patients with pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation had a tendency to a lower increase and patients with diabetes a tendency to a higher increase of plasma oestetrol after the DHAS administration. From the data obtained it is concluded that the increase of plasma oestetrol after an intraveneous injection of DHAS in most cases is secondary to the increase of plasma oestradiol. The results suggest that measurement of unconjugated oestetrol in plasma after an intravenous load of DHAS is no safe way to assess foetal wellbeing. In women with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) the simultaneous measurement of plasma oestradiol and oestetrol after an injection of DHAS indicates a possibility to distinguish placental from foetal causes of this syndrome. (author)

  13. Mobility Balance Sheet 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorritsma, P.; Derriks, H.; Francke, J.; Gordijn, H.; Groot, W.; Harms, L.; Van der Loop, H.; Peer, S.; Savelberg, F.; Wouters, P.

    2009-06-01

    The Mobility Balance Sheet provides an overview of the state of the art of mobility in the Netherlands. In addition to describing the development of mobility this report also provides explanations for the growth of passenger and freight transport. Moreover, the Mobility Balance Sheet also focuses on a topical theme: the effects of economic crises on mobility. [nl

  14. Sea-level response to melting of Antarctic ice shelves on multi-centennial timescales with the fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet model (f.ETISh v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The magnitude of the Antarctic ice sheet's contribution to global sea-level rise is dominated by the potential of its marine sectors to become unstable and collapse as a response to ocean (and atmospheric) forcing. This paper presents Antarctic sea-level response to sudden atmospheric and oceanic forcings on multi-centennial timescales with the newly developed fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet (f.ETISh) model. The f.ETISh model is a vertically integrated hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf model with vertically integrated thermomechanical coupling, making the model two-dimensional. Its marine boundary is represented by two different flux conditions, coherent with power-law basal sliding and Coulomb basal friction. The model has been compared to existing benchmarks. Modelled Antarctic ice sheet response to forcing is dominated by sub-ice shelf melt and the sensitivity is highly dependent on basal conditions at the grounding line. Coulomb friction in the grounding-line transition zone leads to significantly higher mass loss in both West and East Antarctica on centennial timescales, leading to 1.5 m sea-level rise after 500 years for a limited melt scenario of 10 m a-1 under freely floating ice shelves, up to 6 m for a 50 m a-1 scenario. The higher sensitivity is attributed to higher ice fluxes at the grounding line due to vanishing effective pressure. Removing the ice shelves altogether results in a disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet and (partially) marine basins in East Antarctica. After 500 years, this leads to a 5 m and a 16 m sea-level rise for the power-law basal sliding and Coulomb friction conditions at the grounding line, respectively. The latter value agrees with simulations by DeConto and Pollard (2016) over a similar period (but with different forcing and including processes of hydrofracturing and cliff failure). The chosen parametrizations make model results largely independent of spatial resolution so that f.ETISh can potentially be

  15. Plasma homovanillic acid levels in first-episode schizophrenia. Psychopathology and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreen, A R; Lieberman, J; Alvir, J; Mayerhoff, D; Loebel, A; Chakos, M; Amin, F; Cooper, T

    1994-02-01

    To examine plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels in first-episode schizophrenia, to compare pHVA levels in patients and controls, and to assess the association of pHVA levels with psychopathology and treatment response. Forty-one patients entered the study, and pHVA levels were measured at baseline and on a weekly basis for up to 6 weeks of open standardized neuroleptic treatment. Psychopathology was evaluated with the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impressions scale. Ten healthy controls were used for comparison of baseline pHVA levels. No differences were observed between patients and controls. Baseline pHVA level was not associated with psychopathology but was associated with time to reach remission. Baseline pHVA levels and week-1 pHVA levels were higher in responders than nonresponders. Regardless of responsiveness, female participants had higher pHVA levels than male participants throughout the study. The pattern of pHVA levels with treatment was similar in all patients with a short-term rise initially and then a decrease toward baseline values. These findings suggest that pHVA levels have prognostic significance for response and time to reach remission. Qualitative and quantitative differences between first-episode patients' pHVA levels and studies using a long-term, neuroleptic-exposed population suggest that changes occur with neuroleptic treatment or the progression of the illness.

  16. Uncertainties in the Antarctic Ice Sheet Contribution to Sea Level Rise: Exploration of Model Response to Errors in Climate Forcing, Boundary Conditions, and Internal Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, N.; Seroussi, H. L.; Boening, C.; Larour, E. Y.; Limonadi, D.; Schodlok, M.; Watkins, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory-University of California at Irvine Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) is a thermo-mechanical 2D/3D parallelized finite element software used to physically model the continental-scale flow of ice at high resolutions. Embedded into ISSM are uncertainty quantification (UQ) tools, based on the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) software. ISSM-DAKOTA offers various UQ methods for the investigation of how errors in model input impact uncertainty in simulation results. We utilize these tools to regionally sample model input and key parameters, based on specified bounds of uncertainty, and run a suite of continental-scale 100-year ISSM forward simulations of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Resulting diagnostics (e.g., spread in local mass flux and regional mass balance) inform our conclusion about which parameters and/or forcing has the greatest impact on century-scale model simulations of ice sheet evolution. The results allow us to prioritize the key datasets and measurements that are critical for the minimization of ice sheet model uncertainty. Overall, we find that Antartica's total sea level contribution is strongly affected by grounding line retreat, which is driven by the magnitude of ice shelf basal melt rates and by errors in bedrock topography. In addition, results suggest that after 100 years of simulation, Thwaites glacier is the most significant source of model uncertainty, and its drainage basin has the largest potential for future sea level contribution. This work is performed at and supported by the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Supercomputing time is also supported through a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere program.

  17. Changes in plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists in response to adrenaline infusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Ostrowski, K.; Ullum, H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of adrenaline in the response of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonists (ra) to extreme physiological conditions such as trauma and exercise, we examined the concentrations in the plasma of these cytokines during an adrenaline infusion. Given the fact...... that HIV infected patients have elevated levels of IL-6 in plasma, 12 HIV seropositive subjects and 6 HIV seronegative control subjects received a 1-h adrenaline infusion. Baseline concentrations of IL-6 and IL-1ra were higher in the HIV patients compared with the controls (P...), being most pronounced in the untreated subgroup of HIV infected patients (n = 6). The plasma concentration of adrenaline had increased 24-fold after 15 min of adrenaline infusion. The plasma concentration of IL-6 had increased by two- to threefold after 45 min of adrenaline infusion (P

  18. The response of the Tore Supra edge plasma to supersonic pulsed gas injection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Radomír; Gunn, J. P.; Bucalossi, J.; Ďuran, Ivan; Geraud, A.; Hron, Martin; Loarer, T.; Pégourié, B.; Stöckel, Jan; Tsitrone, E.

    337-339, č. 16 (2005), s. 530-534 ISSN 0022-3115. [Plasma Surface Interactions /16./. Portland, 24.5.2005-28.5.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/03/P062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Edge plasma * Gas injection and fuelling * probes * Plasma flow * Tore Supra Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.414, year: 2005

  19. Evolution of the MHD sheet pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaeus, W.H.; Montgomery, D.

    1979-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) problem of recurrent interest for both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas is the evolution of the unstable sheet pinch, a current sheet across which a dc magnetic field reverses sign. The evolution of such a sheet pinch is followed with a spectral-method, incompressible, two-dimensional, MHD turbulence code. Spectral diagnostics are employed, as are contour plots of vector potential (magnetic field lines), electric current density, and velocity stream function (velocity streamlines). The nonlinear effect which seems most important is seen to be current filamentation: the concentration of the current density onto sets of small measure near a mgnetic X point. A great deal of turbulence is apparent in the current distribution, which, for high Reynolds numbers, requires large spatial grids (greater than or equal to (64) 2 ). 11 figures, 1 table

  20. Cardio-respiratory and plasma lactate responses to exercise with low draught resistances in standardbred trotters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb-Vedi, M; Essén-Gustavsson, B; Lindholm, A

    1996-12-01

    Five Standardbred trotters performed treadmill exercise with incrementally increasing trotting velocities for 2 min intervals in three different tests until fatigue. Each test was performed with draught loads of either 10, 20 or 30 kilopond (kp). Each trotting interval was followed by 2 min periods at a walk without draught load. Recordings were made of heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), plasma lactate (PLA) and stride frequency (SF) at the end of each trotting interval. The HR increased to average values of 191 +/- 10,203 +/- 10 and 214 +/- 7 bpm and PLA increased to 3.8 +/- 0.7, 7.3 +/- 3.8 and 10.8 +/- 6.4 mmol/l at 9 m/s in the three tests, respectively. The HR response to exercise was significantly higher with increasing draught loads, and PLA was significantly higher with 30 kp compared to 10 kp draught resistance. The lowest respiratory rate was seen in the test with 30 kp loading. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) was measured in a separate test on a sloped treadmill with increasing velocities without draught load and averaged 70.4 +/- 9.11/min. Muscle biopsies were taken from the gluteus muscle. Individual variations were seen in VO2peak, muscle fibre composition and HR and PLA responses to exercise. In conclusion, at a certain velocity a small increase in draught resistance from 10 to 30 kp significantly increases both the HR and PLA responses. At comparable work intensities the horses differed in circulatory and metabolic responses to exercise.

  1. Carbon sheet pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, N.; Sagara, A.; Kawamura, T.; Motojima, O.; Ono, T.

    1993-07-01

    A new hydrogen pumping scheme has been proposed which controls recycling of the particles for significant improvement of the energy confinement in toroidal magnetic fusion devices. In this scheme, a part of the vacuum vessel surface near the divertor is covered with carbon sheets of a large surface area. Before discharge initiation, the sheets are baked up to 700 ∼ 1000degC to remove the previously trapped hydrogen atoms. After being cooled down to below ∼ 200degC, the unsaturated carbon sheets trap high energy charge exchange hydrogen atoms effectively during a discharge and overall pumping efficiency can be as high as ∼ 50 %. (author)

  2. Combined Analysis of Plasma Amphiregulin and Heregulin Predicts Response to Cetuximab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimio Yonesaka

    Full Text Available Amphiregulin, a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, is associated with the efficacy of cetuximab, an antibody against EGFR, as treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC. In contrast, the HER3 ligand heregulin correlates with cetuximab resistance. In this study, we evaluated how the combined levels of circulating amphiregulin and heregulin affect clinical outcomes in patients who receive cetuximab as therapy against advanced CRC.Plasma levels of amphiregulin and heregulin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 50 patients with CRC in a training cohort, and in 10 patients in a validation cohort. The combined expression was then assessed with clinical outcome after receiver operating characteristics analysis.Overall response rate was 26%, and median progression-free survival was 110 days in the training cohort. Patients with high amphiregulin and low heregulin had significantly higher objective response rate at 58% and significantly longer progression-free survival of 216 days. This result was confirmed in the validation cohort.A subgroup of CRC patients with high amphiregulin and low heregulin respond to cetuximab therapy better than other patients.

  3. Motion and shape of snowplough sheets in coaxial accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, N.F.; Mair, G.L.R.; Prinn, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    A long coaxial accelerator is filled with helium at initial gas pressure between 0.2 and 4 Torr. When connected to a large capacitor at < - 10 kV a discharge is started at one end; the central electrode has negative polarity. The velocity of the plasma sheet, the snowplough, and its shape have been derived from streak photographs for terminal currents between about 100 and 300 kA. The motion of the sheet has been analysed by balancing the electromagnetic driving force against the inertia of the mass of the gas swept up by a plane sheet taken to be impenetrable to gas atoms. The calculated positions and average sheet velocities, which involve simplifying assumptions, have been found to be in good agreement with observations at different positions and pressures. Also the shape of the sheet has been derived by allowing for the sheet's curvature in the linear momentum equation while net radial motions causing variations in profile have, at first, been excluded. The calculated shape of the sheet is very nearly that photographically observed. The axial velocity of a sheet element is evaluated under the assumption that the plasma is azimuthally uniform, free of spikes and that the vessel's wall does not affect the shape. (author)

  4. Analysis of plasma dynamic response to modulated electron cyclotron heating in TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, I.

    2008-01-01

    different types of modulating signals. This set-up was used to study simultaneous propagation of heat waves induced by MECH in non-sawtoothing plasmas, and in discharges with sawtooth activity. A new analysis method for the characterization of the plasma non-linear dynamic response to modulated heating was developed on the basis of Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) technique. This method applied to signals from different diagnostics, such as electron cyclotron emission and soft X-ray measurements, was extensively used to quantitatively characterize the effect of nonlinear phase coupling. In sawtooth free discharges a detailed analysis of the propagation of heat waves demonstrated that their phase coupling is solely related to properties of heat sources. It was demonstrated that if two heat waves are induced by non-coupled power sources (multi-beam MECH) then no phase coupling occurs. In the opposite case, when a source of perturbation (MECH) contains coupled harmonics, the corresponding heat waves demonstrate phase coupling. It was shown that these coupled heat waves loose their phase coherence while propagating in plasma. The dissipation of phase coupling is due to different phase velocities of heat waves and their diffusive damping. The new type of ECH power modulation accompanied with bicoherence analysis was proposed as a candidate for a reliable identification of EC power deposition location in a case of high frequency and low modulation depth MECH, including multi-beam heating. This type of MECH can be particularly important for real time control applications. In cases when MECH is applied to sawtoothing plasmas a direct experimental evidence of MECH-sawtooth non-linear phase coupling has been demonstrated using HOSA techniques, in particular bispectrum and bicoherence profiles. The detailed analysis presented here demonstrates a direct proof of periodic modification of sawtooth behavior by modulated ECH. It was shown that a simple diffusive model for the

  5. High exposure to nevirapine in plasma is associated with an improved virological response in HIV-1-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, A. I.; Weverling, G. J.; Lange, J. M.; Montaner, J. S.; Reiss, P.; Cooper, D. A.; Vella, S.; Hall, D.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore relationships between exposure to nevirapine and the virological response in HIV-1-infected individuals participating in the INCAS trial. METHODS: The elimination rate constant of plasma HIV-1 RNA (k) was calculated during the first 2 weeks of treatment with nevirapine,

  6. Response of testosterone and corticosterone plasma levels to the challenge of sibling competition : A study in common terns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braasch, Alexander; Becker, Peter H.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2014-01-01

    The hormonal response to social challenges has been widely studied, however, most work focused on adult behavior in a reproductive context although developing animals also encounter important social challenges early in life. We studied the relationship between acute sibling competition and plasma

  7. Pulsar current sheet C̆erenkov radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan

    2018-04-01

    Plasma-filled pulsar magnetospheres contain thin current sheets wherein the charged particles are accelerated by magnetic reconnections to travel at ultra-relativistic speeds. On the other hand, the plasma frequency of the more regular force-free regions of the magnetosphere rests almost precisely on the upper limit of radio frequencies, with the cyclotron frequency being far higher due to the strong magnetic field. This combination produces a peculiar situation, whereby radio-frequency waves can travel at subluminal speeds without becoming evanescent. The conditions are thus conducive to C̆erenkov radiation originating from current sheets, which could plausibly serve as a coherent radio emission mechanism. In this paper we aim to provide a portrait of the relevant processes involved, and show that this mechanism can possibly account for some of the most salient features of the observed radio signals.

  8. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Anesthesia Anesthesia Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area En español ... Version (464 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is anesthesia? Anesthesia is a medical treatment that prevents patients ...

  9. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Structural Biology Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area PDF Version (688 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is structural biology? Structural biology is the study of how biological ...

  10. Radiation protecting sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makiguchi, Hiroshi.

    1989-01-01

    As protection sheets used in radioactivity administration areas, a thermoplastic polyurethane composition sheet with a thickness of less 0.5 mm, solid content (ash) of less than 5% and a shore D hardness of less than 60 is used. A composite sheet with thickness of less than 0.5 mm laminated or coated with such a thermoplastic polyurethane composition as a surface layer and the thermoplastic polyurethane composition sheet applied with secondary fabrication are used. This can satisfy all of the required properties, such as draping property, abrasion resistance, high breaking strength, necking resistance, endurance strength, as well as chemical resistance and easy burnability in burning furnace. Further, by forming uneveness on the surface by means of embossing, etc. safety problems such as slippage during operation and walking can be overcome. (T.M.)

  11. Global ice sheet modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed

  12. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Pt. II. Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Raffray, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.85-100, 1997. The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the various ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness. (orig.)

  13. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part II: Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Gianfranco; Raffray, A. René

    1997-04-01

    The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the variuos ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness.

  14. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  15. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Mayo, E-mail: yokoyama@plasma.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: kohei@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Sato, Takehiko, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN

  16. Plasma C-type natriuretic peptide as a predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    Full Text Available POTS is a global public-health disease, but predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with POTS is lacking. This study was designed to investigate predictive value of plasma C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP in the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS in children. Totally 34 children with POTS and 27 healthy children were included in the study. The head-up test or head-up tilt test was used to check heart rate and blood pressure from supine to upright in subjects. A double antibody (competitive sandwich immunoluminometric assay was used to detect plasma CNP. Metoprolol was used to treat children with POTS. The difference in plasma concentrations of CNP between responders and non-responders was compared. An ROC curve was used to analyze plasma CNP to predict efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children. Plasma CNP in children with POTS was significantly higher than that of healthy children [(51.9 ± 31.4 vs. (25.1 ± 19.1 pg/ml, P 32.55 pg/ml yielded a sensitivity of 95.8% and specificity of 70% in predicting therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS children. Plasma CNP might serve as a useful predictor for the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children.

  17. Sea-level response to melting of Antarctic ice shelves on multi-centennial timescales with the fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet model (f.ETISh v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the Antarctic ice sheet's contribution to global sea-level rise is dominated by the potential of its marine sectors to become unstable and collapse as a response to ocean (and atmospheric forcing. This paper presents Antarctic sea-level response to sudden atmospheric and oceanic forcings on multi-centennial timescales with the newly developed fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet (f.ETISh model. The f.ETISh model is a vertically integrated hybrid ice sheet–ice shelf model with vertically integrated thermomechanical coupling, making the model two-dimensional. Its marine boundary is represented by two different flux conditions, coherent with power-law basal sliding and Coulomb basal friction. The model has been compared to existing benchmarks. Modelled Antarctic ice sheet response to forcing is dominated by sub-ice shelf melt and the sensitivity is highly dependent on basal conditions at the grounding line. Coulomb friction in the grounding-line transition zone leads to significantly higher mass loss in both West and East Antarctica on centennial timescales, leading to 1.5 m sea-level rise after 500 years for a limited melt scenario of 10 m a−1 under freely floating ice shelves, up to 6 m for a 50 m a−1 scenario. The higher sensitivity is attributed to higher ice fluxes at the grounding line due to vanishing effective pressure. Removing the ice shelves altogether results in a disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet and (partially marine basins in East Antarctica. After 500 years, this leads to a 5 m and a 16 m sea-level rise for the power-law basal sliding and Coulomb friction conditions at the grounding line, respectively. The latter value agrees with simulations by DeConto and Pollard (2016 over a similar period (but with different forcing and including processes of hydrofracturing and cliff failure. The chosen parametrizations make model results largely independent of spatial resolution so

  18. Long-term heat stress induces the inflammatory response in dairy cows revealed by plasma proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Shengguo; Cheng, Jianbo; Yang, Yongxin; Zhang, Yangdong; Yang, Hongjian; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-03-04

    In this work we employed a comparative proteomic approach to evaluate seasonal heat stress and investigate proteomic alterations in plasma of dairy cows. Twelve lactating Holstein dairy cows were used and the treatments were: heat stress (n = 6) in hot summer (at the beginning of the moderate heat stress) and no heat stress (n = 6) in spring natural ambient environment, respectively. Subsequently, heat stress treatment lasted 23 days (at the end of the moderate heat stress) to investigate the alterations of plasma proteins, which might be employed as long-term moderate heat stress response in dairy cows. Changes in plasma proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry. Analysis of the properties of the identified proteins revealed that the alterations of plasma proteins were related to inflammation in long-term moderate heat stress. Furthermore, the increase in plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) directly demonstrated that long-term moderate heat stress caused an inflammatory response in dairy cows. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Response to ''Comment on 'Acoustic solitons in inhomogenous pair-ion plasmas''' [Phys. Plasmas 18, 054701 (2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2011-01-01

    The quantity n p0 (0) is different from n p0 (x) and same is true for v p0 (0), v p0 (x). Taking these differences into account and considering the mathematical relation v p0 (x)= 1/n p0 (x), it can easily be shown that derivatives of these space dependent densities and velocities are linked through the relation ∂v p0 (x)/∂η=-1/n p0 2 (x)∂n p0 (x)/∂η. We show that constraint (1) of the comment can also be transformed to derivative transformation relation. This derivative transformation relation can be used in the derivation of the KdV like equation and our model is valid for inhomogenous pair ion plasma. We mathematically and physically prove that the objections in the comment are false and baseless.

  20. THE CONTAMINANT-ASSOCIATED STRESS RESPONSE AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PLASMA STRESS AND SEX STERIOD CONCENTRATIONS IN THE FLORIDA GAR, LEPISOSTEUS PLATYRHINCUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminants can alter the stress response. This study examined the stress response, defined by plasma cortisol concentration, and its relationship to plasma estradiol-17b and testosterone concentrations in adult gar collected from Lake Apopka, Orange Lake and Lake Woodruff NWR, ...

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigations of mechanisms responsible for plasma jets formation at PALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kálal, M.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2009), s. 415-427 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Laser-plasma interaction * laser produced-plasma jet * radiative cooling * target irradiation geometry * PALS laser * laser interferometry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.420, year: 2008

  2. Response of Jupiter's Aurora to Plasma Mass Loading Rate Monitored by the Hisaki Satellite During Volcanic Eruptions at Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Hiraki, Y.; Tao, C.; Tsuchiya, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Kita, H.; Badman, S. V.; Fukazawa, K.; Yoshikawa, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2018-03-01

    The production and transport of plasma mass are essential processes in the dynamics of planetary magnetospheres. At Jupiter, it is hypothesized that Io's volcanic plasma carried out of the plasma torus is transported radially outward in the rotating magnetosphere and is recurrently ejected as plasmoid via tail reconnection. The plasmoid ejection is likely associated with particle energization, radial plasma flow, and transient auroral emissions. However, it has not been demonstrated that plasmoid ejection is sensitive to mass loading because of the lack of simultaneous observations of both processes. We report the response of plasmoid ejection to mass loading during large volcanic eruptions at Io in 2015. Response of the transient aurora to the mass loading rate was investigated based on a combination of Hisaki satellite monitoring and a newly developed analytic model. We found that the transient aurora frequently recurred at a 2-6 day period in response to a mass loading increase from 0.3 to 0.5 t/s. In general, the recurrence of the transient aurora was not significantly correlated with the solar wind, although there was an exceptional event with a maximum emission power of 10 TW after the solar wind shock arrival. The recurrence of plasmoid ejection requires the precondition that an amount comparable to the total mass of magnetosphere, 1.5 Mt, is accumulated in the magnetosphere. A plasmoid mass of more than 0.1 Mt is necessary in case that the plasmoid ejection is the only process for mass release.

  3. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-10-05

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  4. Osteoblastic cell response to spark plasma-sintered zirconia/titanium cermets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Elisa; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Gutierrez-Gonzalez, Carlos F; Fernandez, Adolfo; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic/metal composites, cermets, arise from the idea to combine the dissimilar properties in the pure materials. This work aims to study the biocompatibility of new micro-nanostructured 3 Y-TZP/Ti materials with 25, 50 and 75 vol.% Ti, which have been successfully obtained by spark slasma sintering technology, as well as to correlate their surface properties (roughness, wettability and chemical composition) with the osteoblastic cell response. All samples had isotropic and slightly waved microstructure, with sub-micrometric average roughness. Composites with 75 vol.% Ti had the highest surface hydrophilicity. Surface chemical composition of the cermets correlated well with the relative amounts used for their fabrication. A cell viability rate over 80% dismissed any cytotoxicity risk due to manufacturing. Cell adhesion and early differentiation were significantly enhanced on materials containing the nanostructured 3 Y-TZP phase. Proliferation and differentiation of SaOS-2 were significantly improved in their late-stage on the composite with 75 vol.% Ti that, from the osseointegration standpoint, is presented as an excellent biomaterial for bone replacement. Thus, spark plasma sintering is consolidated as a suitable technology for manufacturing nanostructured biomaterials with enhanced bioactivity. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Response of a core coherent density oscillation on electron cyclotron resonance heating in Heliotron J plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Lu, X. X.; Kenmochi, N.; Ida, K.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Kado, S.; Kokubu, D.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Otani, Y.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2018-01-01

    We report properties of a coherent density oscillation observed in the core region and its response to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in Heliotron J plasma. The measurement was performed using a multi-channel beam emission spectroscopy system. The density oscillation is observed in a radial region between the core and the half radius. The poloidal mode number is found to be 1 (or 2). By modulating the ECH power with 100 Hz, repetition of formation and deformation of a strong electron temperature gradient, which is likely ascribed to be an electron internal transport barrier, is realized. Amplitude and rotation frequency of the coherent density oscillation sitting at the strong electron temperature gradient location are modulated by the ECH, while the poloidal mode structure remains almost unchanged. The change in the rotation velocity in the laboratory frame is derived. Assuming that the change of the rotation velocity is given by the background E × B velocity, a possible time evolution of the radial electric field was deduced.

  6. Investigating the Response of Loop Plasma to Nanoflare Heating Using RADYN Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Testa, P.; Allred, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Gošić, Milan; Reale, Fabio

    2018-04-01

    We present the results of 1D hydrodynamic simulations of coronal loops that are subject to nanoflares, caused by either in situ thermal heating or nonthermal electron (NTE) beams. The synthesized intensity and Doppler shifts can be directly compared with Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations of rapid variability in the transition region (TR) of coronal loops, associated with transient coronal heating. We find that NTEs with high enough low-energy cutoff ({E}{{C}}) deposit energy in the lower TR and chromosphere, causing blueshifts (up to ∼20 km s‑1) in the IRIS Si IV lines, which thermal conduction cannot reproduce. The {E}{{C}} threshold value for the blueshifts depends on the total energy of the events (≈5 keV for 1024 erg, up to 15 keV for 1025 erg). The observed footpoint emission intensity and flows, combined with the simulations, can provide constraints on both the energy of the heating event and {E}{{C}}. The response of the loop plasma to nanoflares depends crucially on the electron density: significant Si IV intensity enhancements and flows are observed only for initially low-density loops (<109 cm‑3). This provides a possible explanation of the relative scarcity of observations of significant moss variability. While the TR response to single heating episodes can be clearly observed, the predicted coronal emission (AIA 94 Å) for single strands is below current detectability and can only be observed when several strands are heated closely in time. Finally, we show that the analysis of the IRIS Mg II chromospheric lines can help further constrain the properties of the heating mechanisms.

  7. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ-, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    possible that soft beds through their ability to deform and be eroded can yield quasi-stable patterns of drainage pathways that with either erosion of critical sills or filling of temporary basins may reorganize itself periodically on time scales much shorter than the reorganization of the driving stresses for ice flow. In areas where the surface generated water (melt and rain), the basally generated fluxes dwarf the influx from the surface and hence the drainage system in such areas will be dominated by surface fluxes and variations therein. Since surface fluxes have a strong seasonal variation with no influx during winter, areas experiencing surface influx will also be subject to large seasonal variations in both flux and pressure. In addition, during the melt season, fluxes and also pressures will also vary on diurnal as well as longer time frames in response to variations in air temperature that drives melt and occurrence of precipitation events. The emerging picture of glacier drainage consists of different types of models applicable to different regimes found beneath an ice sheet (with our without surface influx, ice streams, subglacial lakes). It is not, however, clear how these systems are coupled, or even if they are. This makes it inherently difficult to assess what can be expected beneath a given sector of an ice sheet without some detailed understanding of the underlying geology (geothermal fluxes), geomorphology (possible water routing) and ice properties (cold -temperate base and ice thickness)

  8. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Peter

    2010-11-01

    possible that soft beds through their ability to deform and be eroded can yield quasi-stable patterns of drainage pathways that with either erosion of critical sills or filling of temporary basins may reorganize itself periodically on time scales much shorter than the reorganization of the driving stresses for ice flow. In areas where the surface generated water (melt and rain), the basally generated fluxes dwarf the influx from the surface and hence the drainage system in such areas will be dominated by surface fluxes and variations therein. Since surface fluxes have a strong seasonal variation with no influx during winter, areas experiencing surface influx will also be subject to large seasonal variations in both flux and pressure. In addition, during the melt season, fluxes and also pressures will also vary on diurnal as well as longer time frames in response to variations in air temperature that drives melt and occurrence of precipitation events. The emerging picture of glacier drainage consists of different types of models applicable to different regimes found beneath an ice sheet (with our without surface influx, ice streams, subglacial lakes). It is not, however, clear how these systems are coupled, or even if they are. This makes it inherently difficult to assess what can be expected beneath a given sector of an ice sheet without some detailed understanding of the underlying geology (geothermal fluxes), geomorphology (possible water routing) and ice properties (cold -temperate base and ice thickness)

  9. Plasma response to sustainment with imposed-dynamo current drive in HIT-SI and HIT-SI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Penna, J. M.; Everson, C. J.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-07-01

    The helicity injected torus—steady inductive (HIT-SI) program studies efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel experimental method. Stable, high-beta spheromaks have been sustained using steady, inductive current drive. Externally induced loop voltage and magnetic flux are oscillated together so that helicity and power injection are always positive, sustaining the edge plasma current indefinitely. Imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) theory further shows that the entire plasma current is sustained. The method is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries with closed flux surfaces. Experimental studies of spheromak plasmas sustained with IDCD have shown stable magnetic profiles with evidence of pressure confinement. New measurements show coherent motion of a stable spheromak in response to the imposed perturbations. On the original device two helicity injectors were mounted on either side of the spheromak and the injected mode spectrum was predominantly n  =  1. Coherent, rigid motion indicates that the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n  =  1 energy indicates that the maximum q is maintained below 1 during sustainment. Results from the HIT-SI3 device are also presented. Three inductive helicity injectors are mounted on one side of the spheromak flux conserver. Varying the relative injector phasing changes the injected mode spectrum which includes n  =  2, 3, and higher modes.

  10. Beta-lipotropin is the major component of the plasma opioid response to surgical stress in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porro, C.A.; Facchinetti, F.; Bertellini, E.; Petraglia, F.; Stacca, R.; Barbieri, G.C.; Genazzani, A.R.

    1987-12-07

    There is growing experimental evidence that beta-endorphin immunoreactivity is raised by surgical stress in patients undergoing general anesthesia. As the assay methods employed to date did not allow to fully discriminate between beta-endorphin and its immediate precursor, beta-lipotropin, the authors have investigated in the present study plasma levels of these two peptides by separating them by chromatography on plasma extracts prior to radioimmunoassay. Beta-lipotropin, but not beta-endorphin, plasma levels were found to be significantly elevated during surgery in the general anesthesia group, while no change was found in either peptide concentration in the spinal one. Cortisol plasma levels also increased significantly 90 minutes after the beginning of surgery. Although the sampling time they adopted may have prevented them from detecting an early peak of beta-endorphin during the first 30 minutes of surgery, the major component of the pituitary opioid response to surgical stress appears to be related to beta-lipotropin. This is in agreement with results of experimental work on various kinds of stress in animals and humans and seems to rule out a role for plasma beta-endorphin in post-operative analgesia. 38 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  11. Variability of plasma and urine betaine in diabetes mellitus and its relationship to methionine load test responses: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lever Michael

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since betaine is an osmolyte and methyl donor, and abnormal betaine loss is common in diabetes mellitus (>20% patients, we investigated the relationship between betaine and the post-methionine load rise in homocysteine, in diabetes and control subjects. The post-methionine load test is reported to be both an independent vascular risk factor and a measure of betaine sufficiency. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 34 and control subjects (n = 17 were recruited. We measured baseline fasting plasma and 4-hour post-methionine load (L-methionine, 0.1 mg/kg body weight concentrations of homocysteine, betaine, and the betaine metabolite N,N-dimethylglycine. Baseline urine excretions of betaine, dimethylglycine and glucose were measured on morning urine samples as the ratio to urine creatinine. Statistical determinants of the post-methionine load increase in homocysteine were identified in multiple linear regression models. Results Plasma betaine concentrations and urinary betaine excretions were significantly (p p = 0.00014 and plasma dimethylglycine concentrations (p = 0.039 were also more variable. In diabetes, plasma betaine was a significant negative determinant (p  Conclusions Both high and low plasma betaine concentrations, and high and low urinary betaine excretions, are more prevalent in diabetes. The availability of betaine affects the response in the methionine load test. The benefits of increasing betaine intake should be investigated.

  12. Reproductive organ and vascular specific promoter of the rice plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase mediates environmental stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Kazi Md Kamrul; Banu, Mst Sufara Akhter; Pathi, Krishna Mohan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase is a transport protein in the plasma membrane of cells and helps in removal of calcium (Ca(2+)) from the cell, hence regulating Ca(2+) level within cells. Though plant Ca(2+)ATPases have been shown to be involved in plant stress responses but their promoter regions have not been well studied. The 1478 bp promoter sequence of rice plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase contains cis-acting elements responsive to stresses and plant hormones. To identify the functional region, serial deletions of the promoter were fused with the GUS sequence and four constructs were obtained. These were differentially activated under NaCl, PEG cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments. We demonstrated that the rice plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase promoter is responsible for vascular-specific and multiple stress-inducible gene expression. Only full-length promoter showed specific GUS expression under stress conditions in floral parts. High GUS activity was observed in roots with all the promoter constructs. The -1478 to -886 bp flanking region responded well upon treatment with salt and drought. Only the full-length promoter presented cold-induced GUS expression in leaves, while in shoots slight expression was observed for -1210 and -886 bp flanking region. The -1210 bp deletion significantly responded to exogenous methyl viologen and abscisic acid induction. The -1210 and -886 bp flanking region resulted in increased GUS activity in leaves under methyl jasmonate treatments, whereas in shoots the -886 bp and -519 bp deletion gave higher expression. Salicylic acid failed to induce GUS activities in leaves for all the constructs. The rice plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase promoter is a reproductive organ-specific as well as vascular-specific. This promoter contains drought, salt, cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate related cis-elements, which regulated gene expression. Overall, the tissue-specificity and inducible nature of this

  13. Thin current sheets observation by MMS during a near-Earth's magnetotail reconnection event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Varsani, A.; Nakamura, T.; Genestreti, K.; Plaschke, F.; Baumjohann, W.; Nagai, T.; Burch, J.; Cohen, I. J.; Ergun, R.; Fuselier, S. A.; Giles, B. L.; Le Contel, O.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Magnes, W.; Schwartz, S. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    During summer 2017, the four spacecraft of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission traversed the nightside magnetotail current sheet at an apogee of 25 RE. They detected a number of flow reversal events suggestive of the passage of the reconnection current sheet. Due to the mission's unprecedented high-time resolution and spatial separation well below the ion scales, structure of thin current sheets is well resolved both with plasma and field measurements. In this study we examine the detailed structure of thin current sheets during a flow reversal event from tailward flow to Earthward flow, when MMS crossed the center of the current sheet . We investigate the changes in the structure of the thin current sheet relative to the X-point based on multi-point analysis. We determine the motion and strength of the current sheet from curlometer calculations comparing these with currents obtained from the particle data. The observed structures of these current sheets are also compared with simulations.

  14. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  15. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known....... The first part concerns time series analysis of ice core data obtained from the Greenland Ice Sheet. We analyze parts of the time series where DO-events occur using the so-called transfer operator and compare the results with time series from a simple model capable of switching by either undergoing...

  16. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  17. Histological response to platelet-rich plasma added to polypropylene mesh implemented in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubini Ávila

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The platelet-rich plasma (PRP is part of a set of biotechnologies, providing some growth factors that promote repair of different tissues. The polypropylene meshes (PPM are applied in the correction of abdominal defects, pelvic floor and urinary incontinence, however, they induce many significant complications, as a result of an inappropriate inflammatory response. Purpose: To investigate the changes caused by PRP associated with the implantation of PPM in the abdomen of female rabbits, in the production of collagen I and III and the inflammatory infiltrate (ININ. Materials and Methods: We performed implant meshes with and without PRP in adult rabbits (n=30 and euthanasia at 7, 30 and 90 days. Two plates were prepared from each animal and analyzed in five different fields. The ININ was evaluated by quantification of inflammatory cells using hematoxylin-eosin and the collagen by Sirius red method. The results were analyzed applying the Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, Junckheere and Friedmann tests. Results: There was a significant difference in the number of inflammatory cells between the groups with and without PRP (p=0.01 at 90 days. There was increased production of collagen I, III and total with the use of PRP, at seven days. Conclusion: The PPM coating with PRP was associated with increased ININ at the implant area, and an increasing trend during the process of tissue repair. The PPM coated with PRP was related to increased concentration of collagen I, collagen III and the concentration of total collagen increased after seven days of implantation.

  18. Measurements of the vacuum-plasma response in EXTRAP T2R using generic closed-loop subspace system identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J., E-mail: erik.olofsson@ee.kth.se [School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden); Brunsell, Per R.; Drake, James R. [School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unstable plasma response safely measured using special signal processing techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction-capable MIMO models obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Computational statistics employed to show physical content of these models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multifold cross-validation applied for the supervised learning problem. - Abstract: A multibatch formulation of a multi-input multi-output closed-loop subspace system identification method is employed for the purpose of obtaining control-relevant models of the vacuum-plasma response in the magnetic confinement fusion experiment EXTRAP T2R. The accuracy of the estimate of the plant dynamics is estimated by computing bootstrap replication statistics of the dataset. It is seen that the thus identified models exhibit both predictive capabilities and physical spectral properties.

  19. Elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine in Gaucher disease: relation to phenotype, storage cell markers, and therapeutic response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Nick; van Dussen, Laura; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Overkleeft, Herman; Scheij, Saskia; Ghauharali, Karen; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Ferraz, Maria J.; Groener, Johanna E. M.; Maas, Mario; Wijburg, Frits A.; Speijer, Dave; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Mistry, Pramod K.; Boot, Rolf G.; Aerts, Johannes M.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, leads to prominent glucosylceramide accumulation in lysosomes of tissue macrophages (Gaucher cells). Here we show glucosylsphingosine, the deacylated form of glucosylceramide, to be markedly increased in plasma of

  20. PLASMA AND LUNG MACROPHAGE CAROTENOID RESPONSIVENESS TO SUPPLEMENTATION AND OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE:: To examine the effect of ozone exposure and vegetable juice supplementation on plasma and lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids. DESIGN:: A randomized trial. SETTING:: Subjects were exposed to ambient air prior to antioxidant supplementation and to ozone after...

  1. Interactions between ice sheets, climate and the solid Earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J. van den

    2007-01-01

    The melting of ice sheets in response to increasing temperatures is an important contribution to present day sea level rise. To predict the amount of sea level rise and to assess its impact on populated coastal regions, an increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice sheets is

  2. Plasma Amino Acid Responses After Consumption of Beverages with Varying Protein Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    saturated fat Protein Total earbohydT;ltes dietary fiber soluble fiber total sugar lactose sucrose other carbohydrates (maltodextrin. cocoa powder...provided by the manufacturer, 6 Plasma Amino Acids 7 coagulate for 30 min before being centrifuged for 10 min at 3,600 rpm. Resulting plasma and serum...Therefore, consumers should be aware that these products might not contain the specific protein sources being advertised. Acknowledgment The authors

  3. Sausage mode instability of thin current sheets as a cause of magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Büchner

    Full Text Available Observations have shown that, prior to substorm explosions, thin current sheets are formed in the plasma sheet of the Earth's magnetotail. This provokes the question, to what extent current-sheet thinning and substorm onsets are physically, maybe even causally, related. To answer this question, one has to understand the plasma stability of thin current sheets. Kinetic effects must be taken into account since particle scales are reached in the course of tail current-sheet thinning. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the stability of thin current sheets and about the most unstable mode of their decay. Our conclusions are based upon a non-local linear dispersion analysis of a cross-magnetic field instability of Harris-type current sheets. We found that a sausage-mode bulk current instability starts after a sheet has thinned down to the ion inertial length. We also present the results of three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC-code simulations carried out for mass ratios up to Mi / me=64. They verify the linearly predicted properties of the sausage mode decay of thin current sheets in the parameter range of interest.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms · Space plasma physics (magnetic reconnection

  4. Elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine in Gaucher disease: relation to phenotype, storage cell markers, and therapeutic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Nick; van Dussen, Laura; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Overkleeft, Herman; Scheij, Saskia; Ghauharali, Karen; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Ferraz, Maria J.; Groener, Johanna E. M.; Maas, Mario; Wijburg, Frits A.; Speijer, Dave; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Mistry, Pramod K.; Boot, Rolf G.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, leads to prominent glucosylceramide accumulation in lysosomes of tissue macrophages (Gaucher cells). Here we show glucosylsphingosine, the deacylated form of glucosylceramide, to be markedly increased in plasma of symptomatic nonneuronopathic (type 1) Gaucher patients (n = 64, median = 230.7nM, range 15.6-1035.2nM; normal (n = 28): median 1.3nM, range 0.8-2.7nM). The method developed for mass spectrometric quantification of plasma glucosylsphingosine is sensitive and robust. Plasma glucosylsphingosine levels correlate with established plasma markers of Gaucher cells, chitotriosidase (ρ = 0.66) and CCL18 (ρ = 0.40). Treatment of Gaucher disease patients by supplementing macrophages with mannose-receptor targeted recombinant glucocerebrosidase results in glucosylsphingosine reduction, similar to protein markers of Gaucher cells. Since macrophages prominently accumulate the lysoglycosphingolipid on glucocerebrosidase inactivation, Gaucher cells seem a major source of the elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine. Our findings show that plasma glucosylsphingosine can qualify as a biomarker for type 1 Gaucher disease, but that further investigations are warranted regarding its relationship with clinical manifestations of Gaucher disease. PMID:21868580

  5. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings.

  6. Early changes in plasma glucagon and growth hormone response to oral glucose in experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F; Moghetti, P; Castello, R; Negri, C; Bonora, E; Muggeo, M

    1996-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying deterioration of glucose tolerance associated with hyperthyroidism are not completely understood. Increases in glucagon and growth hormone (GH) secretion have been previously found in hyperthyroid subjects, and could play a crucial role in this phenomenon. However, studies have not yet established the time sequence of changes in plasma glucose on the one hand and glucagon and GH on the other. To assess the early effects of thyroid hormone excess on glucose tolerance and plasma concentrations of the main glucoregulatory hormones, 12 nondiabetic euthyroid subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after triiodothyronine ([T3] 120 micrograms/d) was administered for 10 days. Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, glucagon, and GH were determined at fasting and after the glucose load. T3 administration caused a marked increase in serum T3 (8.8 +/- 0.6 v 2.0 +/- 0.1 nmol/L), with clinical and biochemical signs of thyrotoxicosis. During the treatment, plasma glucose significantly increased both at fasting and after the glucose load (basal, 5.3 +/- 0.1 v 4.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/L, P hormone excess rapidly impairs glucose tolerance. Altered secretion of GH is an early event in thyrotoxicosis accompanying the onset of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma glucagon is appropriately suppressed by the increased plasma glucose levels. Thus, GH but not glucagon may contribute to the early hyperglycemic effect of thyrotoxicosis.

  7. Fibroblastic response and surface characterization of O2-plasma-treated thermoplastic polyetherurethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlicht, Henning; Wintermantel, Erich; Haugen, Haavard J; Sabetrasekh, Roya

    2010-01-01

    Injection-molded samples of thermoplastic polyetherurethane (TPU) were treated with low-temperature oxygen plasma for different processing times in order to enhance cellular attachment for a gastric implant. Its effects were investigated by contact angle measurement, surface topography, cytotoxicity and cell colonization tests. No significant changes were found in the surface roughness of plasma treatment with plasma treatment time of less than 5 min. Longer treatment showed significantly higher surface roughness. It seems that there was a link between the changes in contact angle and enhanced cell growth on the treated surface, although only for the range up to plasma treatment times of 3 min. Prolonged treatment times did not cause any major changes in the water contact angle, but strongly improved the number of growing cells on the surface. Plasma treatment for 3-7 min led to a twofold increase in the number of cells compared to untreated samples and did not significantly alter the WST-1 nor worsened the lactate dehydrogenase activity compared to the control. Thus, it appears that O 2 plasma treatment is a suitable surface modification method for a gastric implant made of TPU in order to improve surface cell attachment where 3-7 min is the recommended treatment time.

  8. Radiative response on massive noble gas injection for Runaway suppression in disruptive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The most direct way to avoid the formation of a relativistic electron beam under the influence of an electric field in a highly conducting plasma, is to increase the electron density to a value, where the retarding collisional force balances the accelerating one. In a disruptive tokamak plasma, rapid cooling induces a high electric field, which could easily violate the force balance and push electrons into the relativistic regime. Such relativistic electrons, the so-called runaways, accumulate many MeV's and can cause substantial damage when they hit the wall. This thesis is based on the principle of rapidly fueling the plasma for holding the force balance even under the influence of high electric fields typical for disruptions. The method of injecting high amounts of noble gas particles into the plasma from a close distance is put into practice in the ASDEX Upgrade fusion test facility. In the framework of this thesis, a multi-channel photometer system based on 144 AXUV detectors in a toroidal stereo measurement setup was built. It kept its promise to provide new insights into the transport mechanisms in a disruptive plasma under the influence of strong radiative interaction dynamics between injected matter and the hot plasma.

  9. Cholera Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cholera","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... that includes feedback at the local level and information-sharing at the global level. Cholera cases are ...

  10. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  11. NTPR Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    History Documents US Underground Nuclear Test History Reports NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports Enewetak Atoll Cleanup Documents TRAC About Who We Are Our Values History Locations Our Leadership Director Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current

  12. Production (information sheets)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    Documentation sheets: Geo energy 2 Integrated System Approach Petroleum Production (ISAPP) The value of smartness 4 Reservoir permeability estimation from production data 6 Coupled modeling for reservoir application 8 Toward an integrated near-wellbore model 10 TNO conceptual framework for "E&P

  13. Hibernia fact sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This fact sheet gives details of the Hibernia oil field including its location, discovery date, oil company's interests in the project, the recoverable reserves of the two reservoirs, the production system used, capital costs of the project, and overall targets for Canadian benefit. Significant dates for the Hibernia project are listed. (UK)

  14. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  15. Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Tribes selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  16. Rubella - Fact Sheet for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and 4 through 6 years Fact Sheet for Parents Color [2 pages] Español: Rubéola The best way ... according to the recommended schedule. Fact Sheets for Parents Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them Chickenpox ...

  17. Hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by liquid precursor plasma spraying: controlled dense and porous microstructures and osteoblastic cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yi; Song Lei; Liu Xiaoguang; Xiao Yanfeng; Wu Yao; Chen Jiyong; Wu Fang; Gu Zhongwei

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by a novel plasma spraying process, the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. X-ray diffraction results showed that the coatings obtained by the LPPS process were mainly composed of hydroxyapatite. The LPPS process also showed excellent control on the coating microstructure, and both nearly fully dense and highly porous hydroxyapatite coatings were obtained by simply adjusting the solid content of the hydroxyapatite liquid precursor. Scanning electron microscope observations indicated that the porous hydroxyapatite coatings had pore size in the range of 10-200 μm and an average porosity of 48.26 ± 0.10%. The osteoblastic cell responses to the dense and porous hydroxyapatite coatings were evaluated with human osteoblastic cell MG-63, in respect of the cell morphology, proliferation and differentiation, with the hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process as control. The cell experiment results indicated that the heat-treated LPPS coatings with a porous structure showed the best cell proliferation and differentiation among all the hydroxyapatite coatings. Our results suggest that the LPPS process is a promising plasma spraying technique for fabricating hydroxyapatite coatings with a controllable microstructure, which has great potential in bone repair and replacement applications.

  18. Effect of melatonin supplementation on plasma vasopressin response to different conditions in rats with hyperthyroidism induced by L-thyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogulkoc, Rasim; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim

    2010-04-09

    The present study was performed to determine how basal, isotonic, hypertonic and hypovolemic conditions affect fluid-electrolyte balance and plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels in rats with experimental hyperthyroidism supplemented with melatonin. The rats were divided into four groups of twenty-four subjects each kept under the following treatments during one month: (1) Controls; (2) treated with L-thyroxine; (3) treated with L-thyroxine and sham melatonin and (4) treated with L-thyroxine and melatonin. After this each group was further subdivided into subgroups that were subject to normal, isotonic, hypertonic and hypovolemic conditions. The plasma AVP, total triiodothyronine (TT(3)), total thyroxine (TT(4)) and melatonin levels were measured in plasma by means of a Phoenix Pharmaceutical RIA test kit. Hematocrit and osmolality levels were also determined. There were significant increases of total T3 and T4 levels in the L-thyroxine treated groups, p<0.001. The AVP levels were also increased in groups 2 and 3, but not so in the rats treated with melatonin (p<0.001), which also showed increased plasma melatonin levels (p<0.001). These results indicate that treatment with L-thyroxine increases stimulated and non-stimulated AVP release that are inhibited by melatonin supplementation. It was also shown that AVP response to hypertonic and hypovolemic conditions was not affected by L-thyroxine treatment and/or L-thyroxine+melatonin treatment. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Riccati solution for the ideal MHD plasma response with applications to real-time stability control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    Active feedback control of ideal MHD stability in a tokamak requires rapid plasma stability analysis. Toward this end, we reformulate the δW stability method with a Hamilton-Jacobi theory, elucidating analytical and numerical features of the generic tokamak ideal MHD stability problem. The plasma response matrix is demonstrated to be the solution of an ideal MHD matrix Riccati differential equation. Since Riccati equations are prevalent in the control theory literature, such a shift in perspective brings to bear a range of numerical methods that are well-suited to the robust, fast solution of control problems. We discuss the usefulness of Riccati techniques in solving the stiff ordinary differential equations often encountered in ideal MHD stability analyses—for example, in tokamak edge and stellarator physics. We demonstrate the applicability of such methods to an existing 2D ideal MHD stability code—DCON [A. H. Glasser, Phys. Plasmas 23, 072505 (2016)]—enabling its parallel operation in near real-time, with wall-clock time ≪1 s . Such speed may help enable active feedback ideal MHD stability control, especially in tokamak plasmas whose ideal MHD equilibria evolve with inductive timescale τ≳ 1s—as in ITER.

  20. Ground-Based Radar Detection of the Inner Boundary of the Ion Plasma Sheet and its Response to the Changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jayachandran, P. T; MacDougall, J. W; Moorcroft, D. R; Donovan, E. F

    2006-01-01

    ...-I). Wide area coverage made it possible to detect some of the proxies for the magnetospheric land marks and boundaries on a global scale and shed some light on the on the some of the fundamental problems...

  1. Neutral sheet crossings in the distant magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkila, W.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Smith, E.J.; Baker, D.N.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the magnetic field data from ISEE-3 in the distant magnetotail for 18 crossings of the cross-tail current sheet (or so-called natural sheet) to determine the direction of the normal component B/sub z/. The crossings occurred near the middle of the aberrated magnetotail (0 0.4 nT), consistent with closed field lines connected to the earth. In 3 cases B/sub z/ was very close to zero; in several instances there was structure in B/sub y/, suggesting localized currents with x or z directions. One may have been a magnetopause crossing. The strong preponderance of northward B/sub z/ favors a model of the magnetotail which is dominated by boundary layer plasma, flowing tailward on closed magnetic field lines, which requires the existence of an electric field in the sense from dusk to dawn. 37 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  2. FORMATION AND RECONNECTION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL CURRENT SHEETS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun's corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to directly apply the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of two-dimensional (2D) reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet-Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona.

  3. Measurements and modelling of plasma response field to RMP on the COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markovič, Tomáš; Liu, Y.Q.; Cahyna, Pavel; Pánek, Radomír; Peterka, Matěj; Aftanas, Milan; Bílková, Petra; Böhm, Petr; Imríšek, Martin; Háček, Pavel; Havlíček, Josef; Havránek, Aleš; Komm, Michael; Urban, Jakub; Weinzettl, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 9 (2016), č. článku 092010. ISSN 0029-5515. [Joint Meeting of the 597th Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Seminar / 7th International Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas. Greifswald, 10.09.2015-12.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-35260S; GA AV ČR(CZ) GA16-24724S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : RMP * magnetic measurements * MARS-F Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/9/092010/meta

  4. Hydrodynamic effects of eroded materials on response of plasma-facing component during a tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of plasma confinement causes surface and structural damage to plasma-facing materials (PFMs) and remains a major obstacle for tokamak reactors. The deposited plasma energy results in surface erosion and structural failure. The surface erosion consists of vaporization, spallation, and liquid splatter of metallic materials, while the structural damage includes large temperature increases in structural materials and at the interfaces between surface coatings and structural members. Comprehensive models (contained in the HEIGHTS computer simulation package) are being used self-consistently to evaluate material damage. Splashing mechanisms occur as a result of volume bubble boiling and liquid hydrodynamic instabilities and brittle destruction mechanisms of nonmelting materials. The effect of macroscopic erosion on total mass losses and lifetime is evaluated. The macroscopic erosion products may further protect PFMs from severe erosion (via the droplet-shielding effect) in a manner similar to that of the vapor shielding concept

  5. Response of cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase to plasma viscosity modulation in acute isovolemic hemodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyanatt Kanokwiroon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is generally expressed in endocardial cells, vascular endothelial cells and ventricular myocytes. However, there is no experimental study elucidating the relationship between cardiac eNOS expression and elevated plasma viscosity in low oxygen delivery pathological conditions such as hemorrhagic shock-resuscitation and hemodilution. This study tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma viscosity increases cardiac eNOS expression in a hemodilution model, leading to positive effects on cardiac performance. Materials and Methods: Two groups of golden Syrian hamster underwent an acute isovolemic hemodilution where 40% of blood volume was exchanged with 2% (low-viscogenic plasma expander [LVPE] or 6% (high-viscogenic plasma expander [HVPE] of dextran 2000 kDa. In control group, experiment was performed without hemodilution. All groups were performed in awake condition. Experimental parameters, i.e., mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, heart rate, hematocrit, blood gas content and viscosity, were measured. The eNOS expression was evaluated by eNOS Western blot analysis. Results: After hemodilution, MAP decreased to 72% and 93% of baseline in the LVPE and HVPE, respectively. Furthermore, pO 2 in the LVPE group increased highest among the groups. Plasma viscosity in the HVPE group was significantly higher than that in control and LVPE groups. The expression of eNOS in the HVPE group showed higher intensity compared to other groups, especially compared with the control group. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that cardiac eNOS has responded to plasma viscosity modulation with HVPE and LVPE. This particularly supports the previous studies that revealed the positive effects on cardiac function in animals hemodiluted with HVPE.

  6. Plasma and liver lipidomics response to an intervention of rimonabant in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiu Hu

    Full Text Available Lipids are known to play crucial roles in the development of life-style related risk factors such as obesity, dyslipoproteinemia, hypertension and diabetes. The first selective cannabinoid-1 receptor blocker rimonabant, an anorectic anti-obesity drug, was frequently used in conjunction with diet and exercise for patients with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2 with associated risk factors such as type II diabetes and dyslipidaemia in the past. Less is known about the impact of this drug on the regulation of lipid metabolism in plasma and liver in the early stage of obesity.We designed a four-week parallel controlled intervention on apolipoprotein E3 Leiden cholesteryl ester transfer protein (ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice with mild overweight and hypercholesterolemia. A liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometric approach was employed to investigate plasma and liver lipid responses to the rimonabant intervention. Rimonabant was found to induce a significant body weight loss (9.4%, p<0.05 and a significant plasma total cholesterol reduction (24%, p<0.05. Six plasma and three liver lipids in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP transgenic mice were detected to most significantly respond to rimonabant treatment. Distinct lipid patterns between the mice were observed for both plasma and liver samples in rimonabant treatment vs. non-treated controls. This study successfully applied, for the first time, systems biology based lipidomics approaches to evaluate treatment effects of rimonabant in the early stage of obesity.The effects of rimonabant on lipid metabolism and body weight reduction in the early stage obesity were shown to be moderate in ApoE*3Leiden.CETP mice on high-fat diet.

  7. Association between plasma antibody response and protection in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss immersion vaccinated against Yersinia ruckeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Raida

    Full Text Available A key hallmark of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the generation of antigen-specific antibodies from B cells. Fish are the most primitive gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates possessing an adaptive immune system. Vaccination of rainbow trout against enteric redmouth disease (ERM by immersion in Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers a high degree of protection to the fish. The immune mechanisms responsible for protection may comprise both cellular and humoral elements but the role of specific immunoglobulins in this system has been questioned and not previously described. The present study demonstrates significant increase in plasma antibody titers following immersion vaccination and significantly reduced mortality during Y. ruckeri challenge.Rainbow trout were immersion-vaccinated, using either a commercial ERM vaccine (AquaVac™ ERM vet or an experimental Y. ruckeri bacterin. Half of the trout vaccinated with AquaVac™ ERM vet received an oral booster (AquaVac™ ERM Oral vet. Sub-groups of the fish from each group were subsequently exposed to 1 x 10⁹ CFU Y. ruckeri/ml either eight or twenty-six weeks post vaccination (wpv. All vaccinated groups showed 0% mortality when challenged, which was highly significant compared to the non-vaccinated controls (40 and 28% mortality eight and twenty-six weeks post vaccination (wpv, respectively (P<0.0001. Plasma samples from all groups of vaccinated fish were taken 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 26 wpv. and Y. ruckeri specific IgM antibody levels were measured with ELISA. A significant increase in titers was recorded in vaccinated fish, which also showed a reduced bacteremia during challenge. In vitro plasma studies showed a significantly increased bactericidal effect of fresh plasma from vaccinated fish indicating that plasma proteins may play a role in protection of vaccinated rainbow trout.

  8. Film sheet cassette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A novel film sheet cassette is described for handling CAT photographic films under daylight conditions and facilitating their imaging. A detailed description of the design and operation of the cassette is given together with appropriate illustrations. The resulting cassette is a low-cost unit which is easily constructed and yet provides a sure light-tight seal for the interior contents of the cassette. The individual resilient fingers on the light-trap permit the ready removal of the slide plate for taking pictures. The stippled, non-electrostatic surface of the pressure plate ensures an air layer and free slidability of the film for removal and withdrawal of the film sheet. The advantage of the daylight system is that a darkroom need not be used for inserting and removing the film in and out of the cassette resulting in a considerable time saving. (U.K.)

  9. Analysis of SF and plasma cytokines provides insights into the mechanisms of inflammatory arthritis and may predict response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Helen L; Bucknall, Roger C; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2012-03-01

    Biologic drugs have revolutionized the care of RA, but are expensive and not universally effective. To further understand the inflammatory mechanisms underlying RA and identify potential biomarkers predicting response to therapy, we measured multiple cytokine concentrations in SF of patients with inflammatory arthritides (IAs) and, in a subset of patients with RA, correlated this with response to TNF-α inhibition. SF from 42 RA patients and 19 non-RA IA patients were analysed for 12 cytokines using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokines were also measured in the plasma of 16 RA patients before and following treatment with anti-TNF-α. Data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman's rank correlation and cluster analysis with the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's post-test analysis. RA SF contained significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, G-CSF, GM-CSF and TNF-α compared with other IA SF. RA patients who did not respond to anti-TNF therapy had elevated IL-6 in their SF pre-therapy (P < 0.05), whereas responders had elevated IL-2 and G-CSF (P < 0.05). Plasma cytokine concentrations were not significantly modulated by TNF inhibitors, with the exception of IL-6, which decreased after 12 weeks (P < 0.05). Cytokine profiles in RA SF vary with treatment and response to therapy. Cytokine concentrations are significantly lower in plasma than in SF and relatively unchanged by TNF inhibitor therapy. Concentrations of IL-6, IL-2 and G-CSF in SF may predict response to TNF inhibitors.

  10. Cell sheet technology and cell patterning for biofabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannachi, Imen Elloumi; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo [Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-06-01

    We have developed cell sheet technology as a modern method for the fabrication of functional tissue-like and organ-like structures. This technology allows for a sheet of interconnected cells and cells in full contact with their natural extracellular environment to be obtained. A cell sheet can be patterned and composed according to more than one cell type. The key technology of cell sheet engineering is that a fabricated cell sheet can be harvested and transplanted utilizing temperature-responsive surfaces. In this review, we summarize different aspects of cell sheet engineering and provide a survey of the application of cell sheets as a suitable material for biofabrication and clinics. Moreover, since cell micropatterning is a key tool for cell sheet engineering, in this review we focus on the introduction of our approaches to cell micropatterning and cell co-culture to the principles of automation and how they can be subjected to easy robotics programming. Finally, efforts towards making cell sheet technology suitable for biofabrication and robotic biofabrication are also summarized. (topical review)

  11. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  12. Information sheets on energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    These sheets, presented by the Cea, bring some information, in the energy domain, on the following topics: the world energy demand and the energy policy in France and in Europe, the part of the nuclear power in the energy of the future, the greenhouse gases emissions and the fight against the greenhouse effect, the carbon dioxide storage cost and the hydrogen economy. (A.L.B.)

  13. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

  14. A combination of CO2 laser and plasma surface modification of poly(etheretherketone) to enhance osteoblast response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Wang, Zhecun; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • COOH and microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure were constructed on PEEK surface by a combination of CO 2 laser and plasma treatment. • The mechanical properties of PEEK are maintained after single or dual surface treatment. • Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation were improved remarkably on dual treated PEEK surface. • Cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. - Abstract: Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK tends to hinder its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, we demonstrate a dual modification method, which combines the laser and plasma surface treatment to combine advantages of both chemical states and microstructures for osteoblasts responses. While the plasma treatment introduces surface carboxyl groups (−COOH) onto PEEK surface, the laser treatment constructs microstructures over the PEEK surface. Our results indicated that −COOH as well as microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure are constructed on PEEK surface and plasma treatment has no apparent effect on the morphology of microstructures produced by laser micromachining. Unexpectedly, the superior mechanical properties of PEEK were maintained irrespective of the treatment used. Compared to native PEEK and single treated PEEK, dual modified PEEK is more favorable for pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Moreover, cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblasts responses to dual treated PEEK surface, which gives

  15. Glucose-stimulated insulin response in pregnant sheep following acute suppression of plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriskandarajah Nadarajah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA concentrations in non-pregnant animals have been reported to decrease pancreatic responsiveness. As ovine gestation advances, maternal insulin concentrations fall and NEFA concentrations increase. Experiments were designed to examine if the pregnancy-associated rise in NEFA concentration is associated with a reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose in vivo. We investigated the possible relationship of NEFA concentrations in regulating maternal insulin concentrations during ovine pregnancy at three physiological states, non-pregnant, non-lactating (NPNL, 105 and 135 days gestational age (dGA, term 147+/- 3 days. Methods The plasma concentrations of insulin, growth hormone (GH and ovine placental lactogen (oPL were determined by double antibody radioimmunoassay. Insulin responsiveness to glucose was measured using bolus injection and hyperglycaemic clamp techniques in 15 non-pregnant, non-lactating ewes and in nine pregnant ewes at 105 dGA and near term at 135 dGA. Plasma samples were also collected for hormone determination. In addition to bolus injection glucose and insulin Area Under Curve calculations, the Mean Plasma Glucose Increment, Glucose Infusion Rate and Mean Plasma Insulin Increment and Area Under Curve were determined for the hyperglycaemic clamp procedures. Statistical analysis of data was conducted with Students t-tests, repeated measures ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA. Results Maternal growth hormone, placental lactogen and NEFA concentrations increased, while basal glucose and insulin concentrations declined with advancing gestation. At 135 dGA following bolus glucose injections, peak insulin concentrations and insulin area under curve (AUC profiles were significantly reduced in pregnant ewes compared with NPNL control ewes (p Conclusions Results suggest that despite an acute suppression of circulating NEFA concentrations during pregnancy, the associated steroids and hormones

  16. A combination of CO{sub 2} laser and plasma surface modification of poly(etheretherketone) to enhance osteoblast response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Zhecun [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • COOH and microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure were constructed on PEEK surface by a combination of CO{sub 2} laser and plasma treatment. • The mechanical properties of PEEK are maintained after single or dual surface treatment. • Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation were improved remarkably on dual treated PEEK surface. • Cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. - Abstract: Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK tends to hinder its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, we demonstrate a dual modification method, which combines the laser and plasma surface treatment to combine advantages of both chemical states and microstructures for osteoblasts responses. While the plasma treatment introduces surface carboxyl groups (−COOH) onto PEEK surface, the laser treatment constructs microstructures over the PEEK surface. Our results indicated that −COOH as well as microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure are constructed on PEEK surface and plasma treatment has no apparent effect on the morphology of microstructures produced by laser micromachining. Unexpectedly, the superior mechanical properties of PEEK were maintained irrespective of the treatment used. Compared to native PEEK and single treated PEEK, dual modified PEEK is more favorable for pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Moreover, cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblasts responses to dual treated PEEK surface, which

  17. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David; Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  18. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone responses to predictable and unpredictable noise stress in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Gugten, J; Slangen, J L; de Boer, S.F.

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and corticosterone (CS) increases were determined in individual rats subjected to either 20 regularly or irregularly scheduled white-noise stimulations (4 min, 100 dBA). Blood was frequently sampled during the first and twentieth noise exposure, and during a

  19. Plasma Oxytocin Immunoreactive Products and Response to Trust in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, EA; Lawson, EA; Metcalf, CA; Keshaviah, A; Zak, PJ; Pollack, MH; Simon, NM

    2013-01-01

    Background Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (GSAD) is characterized by excessive fear and avoidance of several types of social and performance situations. The pathophysiology is not well understood, but research in animals and humans has provided evidence that oxytocin helps regulate normal social affiliative behavior. Previous work in healthy male subjects demonstrated a rise in plasma oxytocin after receiving a high trust signal. To examine the oxytocin system in GSAD, we measured plasma oxytocin in GSAD patients and controls, before and after the social “Trust Game,” a neuroeconomic test examining trust behavior and reaction to trust using real monetary incentives. Methods Thirty-nine subjects with GSAD and 28 healthy controls provided three blood samples for oxytocin measurement before the Trust Game, and one sample after the game. Plasma estradiol was also measured at baseline. The Trust Game protocol version prioritized the sending of a signal of high cooperation and trust to all participants. All analyses controlled for gender and estradiol levels. Results Mean oxytocin levels post-Trust Game (p=0.025), and overall (area under the curve, p=0.011) were lower in GSAD patients compared to controls, after controlling for sex and estradiol. There was no significant change in oxytocin levels after the Game in either group. Conclusions We report low plasma oxytocin levels in patients with generalized social anxiety disorder during a pro-social laboratory task paradigm. Additional research will be important to further examine the relationship between oxytocin and social behavior in GSAD. PMID:22807189

  20. Plasma levels of beta-endorphin and serotonin in response to specific spinal based exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sokunbi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercises as the primary mode of treatment for low back disorders aim to achieve pain reduction, improvement in functional abilityand quality of life of for low back disorder sufferers. However the bio-chemical events associated with the use of these exercises in terms of theireffects on pain relieving neuropeptides have not been well established. Thisstudy was carried out to investigate the effects of spinal stabilisation, backextension and treadmill walking exercises on plasma levels of serotonin andbeta-endorphin.Twenty volunteers (10 males and 10 females without low back pain participated in the study. They were randomly allocated either to one of theexercise groups, where participants carried out one of the spinal stabilisation, back extension and treadmill walkingexercises or the control (no exercise group. The main outcome measures used in this study were plasma levels of serotonin and beta-endorphin measured with Enzyme linked immuno absorbent assay (ELISA technique.The results of this study showed that spinal stabilisation and treadmill walking exercises produced significantincrease in plasma serotonin levels (P 0.05.It could be that biochemical effects associated with stabilisation and treadmill walking exercises therefore mayinvolve production of serotonin and its release into the plasma.

  1. Plasma cortisol stress response in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus influences susceptibility to Edwardeseilla ictaluri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortisol is a primary stress hormone in fish as its plasma variations correlate with the occurrence of various stressful situations. Past studies have demonstrated that fish subjected to handling stress or poor water quality had a reduced ability to resist pathogens. Channel catfish fingerlings th...

  2. Effect of Pre-Aging Conditions on Bake-Hardening Response of Al-0.4 wt%Mg-1.2 wt%Si-0.1 wt%Mn Alloy Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-jin; Woo, Kee-do

    2011-01-01

    Pre-aging heat treatment after solution heat treatment (SHT) of Al-0.4 wt%Mg-1.2 wt%Si-0.1 wt%Mn alloy sheets for auto-bodies was carried out to investigate the effect of pre-aging and its conditions on the bake-hardening response. Mechanical properties were evaluated by a tensile and Vickers hardness test. Microstructural observation was also performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was revealed that pre-aging treatments play a great role in the bake-hardening response. In addition, it was found that the sphere-shaped nanosized clusters that can directly transit to the needle-shaped β” phase during the paint-bake process, not being dissolved into the matrix, are formed at 343 K. The result, reveals that the dominant factor of the bake-hardening response is the pre-aging temperature rather than the pre-aging time.

  3. Variations in riboflavin binding by human plasma: identification of immunoglobulins as the major proteins responsible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innis, W.S.; McCormick, D.B.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Riboflavin binding by plasma proteins from healthy human subjects was examined by equilibrium dialysis using a physiological concentration of [2-14C]riboflavin (0.04 microM). Binding ranged from 0.080 to 0.917 pmole of riboflavin/mg of protein (with a mean +/- SD of 0.274 +/- 0.206), which corresponded to 4.14 to 49.4 pmole/ml of plasma (15.5 +/- 11.0) (N = 34). Males and females yielded similar results. Upon fractionation of plasma by gel filtration, the major riboflavin-binding components eluted with albumin and gamma-globulins. Albumin was purified and found to bind riboflavin only very weakly (Kd = 3.8 to 10.4 mM), although FMN and photochemical degradation products (e.g., lumiflavine and lumichrome) were more tightly bound. Binding in the gamma-globulin fraction was attributed to IgG and IGA because the binding protein(s) and immunoglobulins copurified using various methods were removed by treatment of plasma with protein A-agarose, and were coincident upon immunoelectrophoresis followed by autoradiography to detect [2-14C]riboflavin. Differences among the plasma samples correlated with the binding recovered with the immunoglobulins. Binding was not directly related to the total IgG or IgA levels of subjects. Hence, it appears that the binding is due to a subfraction of these proteins. These findings suggest that riboflavin-binding immunoglobulins are a major cause of variations in riboflavin binding in human circulation, and may therefore affect the utilization of this micronutrient

  4. Reproductive organ and vascular specific promoter of the rice plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase mediates environmental stress responses in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Md Kamrul Huda

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase is a transport protein in the plasma membrane of cells and helps in removal of calcium (Ca(2+ from the cell, hence regulating Ca(2+ level within cells. Though plant Ca(2+ATPases have been shown to be involved in plant stress responses but their promoter regions have not been well studied.The 1478 bp promoter sequence of rice plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase contains cis-acting elements responsive to stresses and plant hormones. To identify the functional region, serial deletions of the promoter were fused with the GUS sequence and four constructs were obtained. These were differentially activated under NaCl, PEG cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments. We demonstrated that the rice plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase promoter is responsible for vascular-specific and multiple stress-inducible gene expression. Only full-length promoter showed specific GUS expression under stress conditions in floral parts. High GUS activity was observed in roots with all the promoter constructs. The -1478 to -886 bp flanking region responded well upon treatment with salt and drought. Only the full-length promoter presented cold-induced GUS expression in leaves, while in shoots slight expression was observed for -1210 and -886 bp flanking region. The -1210 bp deletion significantly responded to exogenous methyl viologen and abscisic acid induction. The -1210 and -886 bp flanking region resulted in increased GUS activity in leaves under methyl jasmonate treatments, whereas in shoots the -886 bp and -519 bp deletion gave higher expression. Salicylic acid failed to induce GUS activities in leaves for all the constructs.The rice plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase promoter is a reproductive organ-specific as well as vascular-specific. This promoter contains drought, salt, cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate related cis-elements, which regulated gene expression. Overall, the tissue-specificity and inducible

  5. On the energy release rate in a turbulent current sheet on the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardakov, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that turbulent current sheets on the Sun, realizing in the form of the Parker - Sweet flow, are in quasilinear regime of turbulence (or in the regime of instability threshold). The energy release rate in such sheets does not exceed 10 26 erg/s for typical plasma parameters in active regions

  6. Numerical investigation of space charge electric field for a sheet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One of the problems in scaling high power vacuum and plasma microwave sources to higher frequencies is the need to transport beams with higher space charge density, since the radio frequency circuit transverse dimensions tend to decrease with wavelength. The use of sheet electron beams can alleviate this difficulty ...

  7. Plasma Metabolomics Biosignature According to HIV Stage of Infection, Pace of Disease Progression, Viremia Level and Immunological Response to Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Scarpellini

    Full Text Available We evaluated plasma samples HIV-infected individuals with different phenotypic profile among five HIV-infected elite controllers and five rapid progressors after recent HIV infection and one year later and from 10 individuals subjected to antiretroviral therapy, five of whom were immunological non-responders (INR, before and after one year of antiretroviral treatment compared to 175 samples from HIV-negative patients. A targeted quantitative tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics approach was used in order to determine plasma metabolomics biosignature that may relate to HIV infection, pace of HIV disease progression, and immunological response to treatment.Twenty-five unique metabolites were identified, including five metabolites that could distinguish rapid progressors and INRs at baseline. Severe deregulation in acylcarnitine and sphingomyelin metabolism compatible with mitochondrial deficiencies was observed. β-oxidation and sphingosine-1-phosphate-phosphatase-1 activity were down-regulated, whereas acyl-alkyl-containing phosphatidylcholines and alkylglyceronephosphate synthase levels were elevated in INRs. Evidence that elite controllers harbor an inborn error of metabolism (late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency [MADD] was detected.Blood-based markers from metabolomics show a very high accuracy of discriminating HIV infection between varieties of controls and have the ability to predict rapid disease progression or poor antiretroviral immunological response. These metabolites can be used as biomarkers of HIV natural evolution or treatment response and provide insight into the mechanisms of the disease.

  8. Plasma Metabolomics Biosignature According to HIV Stage of Infection, Pace of Disease Progression, Viremia Level and Immunological Response to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, Bruno; Zanoni, Michelle; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia Araripe; Truong, Hong-Ha M; Janini, Luiz Mario Ramos; Segurado, Ismael Dale Cotrin; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated plasma samples HIV-infected individuals with different phenotypic profile among five HIV-infected elite controllers and five rapid progressors after recent HIV infection and one year later and from 10 individuals subjected to antiretroviral therapy, five of whom were immunological non-responders (INR), before and after one year of antiretroviral treatment compared to 175 samples from HIV-negative patients. A targeted quantitative tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics approach was used in order to determine plasma metabolomics biosignature that may relate to HIV infection, pace of HIV disease progression, and immunological response to treatment. Twenty-five unique metabolites were identified, including five metabolites that could distinguish rapid progressors and INRs at baseline. Severe deregulation in acylcarnitine and sphingomyelin metabolism compatible with mitochondrial deficiencies was observed. β-oxidation and sphingosine-1-phosphate-phosphatase-1 activity were down-regulated, whereas acyl-alkyl-containing phosphatidylcholines and alkylglyceronephosphate synthase levels were elevated in INRs. Evidence that elite controllers harbor an inborn error of metabolism (late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency [MADD]) was detected. Blood-based markers from metabolomics show a very high accuracy of discriminating HIV infection between varieties of controls and have the ability to predict rapid disease progression or poor antiretroviral immunological response. These metabolites can be used as biomarkers of HIV natural evolution or treatment response and provide insight into the mechanisms of the disease.

  9. Effect of dietary cholesterol and plant sterol consumption on plasma lipid responsiveness and cholesterol trafficking in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonse, Peter A S; Ramprasath, Vanu; Jones, Peter J H

    2017-01-01

    Dietary cholesterol and plant sterols differentially modulate cholesterol kinetics and circulating cholesterol. Understanding how healthy individuals with their inherent variabilities in cholesterol trafficking respond to such dietary sterols will aid in improving strategies for effective cholesterol lowering and alleviation of CVD risk. The objectives of this study were to assess plasma lipid responsiveness to dietary cholesterol v. plant sterol consumption, and to determine the response in rates of cholesterol absorption and synthesis to each sterol using stable isotope approaches in healthy individuals. A randomised, double-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial (n 49) with three treatment phases of 4-week duration were conducted in a Manitoba Hutterite population. During each phase, participants consumed one of the three treatments as a milkshake containing 600 mg/d dietary cholesterol, 2 g/d plant sterols or a control after breakfast meal. Plasma lipid profile was determined and cholesterol absorption and synthesis were measured by oral administration of [3, 4-13C] cholesterol and 2H-labelled water, respectively. Dietary cholesterol consumption increased total (0·16 (sem 0·06) mmol/l, P=0·0179) and HDL-cholesterol (0·08 (sem 0·03) mmol/l, P=0·0216) concentrations with no changes in cholesterol absorption or synthesis. Plant sterol consumption failed to reduce LDL-cholesterol concentrations despite showing a reduction (6 %, P=0·0004) in cholesterol absorption. An over-compensatory reciprocal increase in cholesterol synthesis (36 %, P=0·0026) corresponding to a small reduction in absorption was observed with plant sterol consumption, possibly resulting in reduced LDL-cholesterol lowering efficacy of plant sterols. These data suggest that inter-individual variability in cholesterol trafficking mechanisms may profoundly impact plasma lipid responses to dietary sterols in healthy individuals.

  10. Magnetic configurations of the tilted current sheets in magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the geometrical structures of tilted current sheet and tail flapping waves have been analysed based on multiple spacecraft measurements and some features of the tilted current sheets have been made clear for the first time. The geometrical features of the tilted current sheet revealed in this investigation are as follows: (1 The magnetic field lines (MFLs in the tilted current sheet are generally plane curves and the osculating planes in which the MFLs lie are about vertical to the equatorial plane, while the normal of the tilted current sheet leans severely to the dawn or dusk side. (2 The tilted current sheet may become very thin, the half thickness of its neutral sheet is generally much less than the minimum radius of the curvature of the MFLs. (3 In the neutral sheet, the field-aligned current density becomes very large and has a maximum value at the center of the current sheet. (4 In some cases, the current density is a bifurcated one, and the two humps of the current density often superpose two peaks in the gradient of magnetic strength, indicating that the magnetic gradient drift current is possibly responsible for the formation of the two humps of the current density in some tilted current sheets. Tilted current sheets often appear along with tail current sheet flapping waves. It is found that, in the tail flapping current sheets, the minimum curvature radius of the MFLs in the current sheet is rather large with values around 1 RE, while the neutral sheet may be very thin, with its half thickness being several tenths of RE. During the flapping waves, the current sheet is tilted substantially, and the maximum tilt angle is generally larger than 45°. The phase velocities of these flapping waves are several tens km/s, while their periods and wavelengths are several tens of minutes, and several earth radii, respectively. These tail flapping events generally last several hours and occur during quiet periods or periods of

  11. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone responses to predictable and unpredictable noise stress in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Gugten, J; Slangen, J L; de Boer, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and corticosterone (CS) increases were determined in individual rats subjected to either 20 regularly or irregularly scheduled white-noise stimulations (4 min, 100 dBA). Blood was frequently sampled during the first and twentieth noise exposure, and during a reexposure after 24 hr. During the sampling periods, behavioral activities of the rats were recorded. The initial noise-induced CS release was partially reduced following the regular noise present...

  12. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Hoelzl, M.; Cahyna, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 10 (2013), s. 102510-102510 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2341 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * edge localized mode * magnetohydrodynamics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.249, year: 2013 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/20/10/10.1063/1.4824820

  13. Toroidal modeling of plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation field penetration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, Y.Q.; Kirk, A.; Sun, Y.; Cahyna, Pavel; Chapman, I.T.; Denner, P.; Fishpool, G.; Garofalo, A.M.; Harrison, J.R.; Nardon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 12 (2012), s. 124013-124013 ISSN 0741-3335 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * resonant magnetic perturbation * neoclassical toroidal viscosity Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.369, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/54/12/124013/pdf/0741-3335_54_12_124013.pdf

  14. Predicted Hematologic and Plasma Volume Responses Following Rapid Ascent to Progressive Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Detection of unethical and illegal manipulation of erythrocyte volume by following changes in hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) in elite athletes is a...tolerance to environmental extremes [2,3] and such manipulation often results in acute plasma volume (PV) loss and elevated hemoglobin concentrations [3...bodies to detect "unfair practices" in athletes seeking to gain an edge in their performance through illegal manipulation of their erythrocyte

  15. Plasma-Activated Tropoelastin Functionalization of Zirconium for Improved Bone Cell Response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yeo, G. C.; Santos, M.; Kondyurin, A.; Lišková, Jana; Weiss, A. S.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2016), s. 662-676 ISSN 2373-9878 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-32497A; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : bone * plasma-activated coating * titanium * tropoelastin * zirconium Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2016

  16. Screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas within linear response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Wuensch, K.; Gregori, G.

    2010-01-01

    We employ a pseudopotential approach to investigate the screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas. Here, the effect of the tightly bound electrons is condensed into an effective potential between the (free) valence electrons and the ionic cores. Even for weak electron-ion coupling, the corresponding screening clouds show strong modifications from the Debye result for elements heavier than helium. Modifications of the theoretically predicted x-ray scattering signal and implications on measurements are discussed.

  17. Radioimmunoassay of plasma 18-hydroxy-11-deoxycorticosterone and its response to ACTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, C.N.; Lewis, P.S.; Horth, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for 18-OH-DOC in plasma was developed using an antiserum raised against the γ-lactone derivative. The steroids with the greatest degree of cross reaction were 18-OH-corticosterone-γ-lactone and aldosterone-γ-lactone which showed cross-reactivities of 1.96% and 0.47% respectively. These and other interfering steroids were eliminated by chromatography of the extracts on columns of Sephadex LH-20. The lowest limit of detection of 18-OH-DOC in 1 ml of plasma corresponded to 33 pmol -1 . The intra-assay precision was 9.7, 4.8 and 2.6% at 102.0, 316.1 and 1144.0 pmol l -1 respectively and the interassay precision was 15.3 and 5.4% at 71.3 and 404.7 pmol l -1 respectively. The concentration of 18-OH-DOC in ten normal subjects was 172.1 +- 39.1 pmol l -1 at 09.00 h, 100.9 +- 16.9 pmol l -1 at 12.00 h and 95.8 +-33.3 pmol l -1 at 16.30 h. Plasma 18-OH-DOC and cortisol levels were measured after various intravenous doses of ACTH in three patients with essential hypertension. Lower doses of ACTH caused considerably greater increases in 18-OH-DOC. These results confirm the ACTH dependency of 18-OH-DOC secretion. (author)

  18. Plasma amino acids and metabolic profiling of dairy cows in response to a bolus duodenal infusion of leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Hassan; von Soosten, Dirk; Meyer, Ulrich; Kluess, Jeannette; Dänicke, Sven; Saremi, Behnam; Sauerwein, Helga

    2017-01-01

    kynurenine pathway were identified as the most relevant for separating the treatment groups. These results suggest that Leu regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain AA, and other AA, apparently by stimulating their influx into the cells from the circulation. A single-dose duodenal infusion of Leu did not elicit an apparent insulin response, but affected multiple intermediary metabolic pathways including AA and energy metabolism by mechanisms yet to be elucidated.

  19. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.M.; Keppler, L.D.; Orlandi, E.W.; Baker, C.J.; Mischke, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K + /H + response characterized by specific plasma membrane K + efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca 2+ influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from 45 Ca 2+ uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K + /H + response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca 2+ influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La 3+ , Co 2+ , and Cd 2+ but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K + /H + response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca 2+ influx is required for the K + /H + and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

  20. Spatiotemporal response of plasma edge density and temperature to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, R; Fuchs, J C; McDermott, R; Rathgeber, S K; Suttrop, W; Wolfrum, E; Willensdorfer, M

    2012-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MPs) were successfully applied at ASDEX Upgrade to substantially reduce the plasma energy loss and peak divertor power load that occur concomitant with type-I edge localized modes (ELMs). The response of electron density edge profiles and temperature and pressure pedestal-top values to MPs are reported. ELM mitigation is observed above an edge density threshold and independent of the MPs being resonant or non-resonant with the edge safety factor. The edge electron collisionality appears not to be appropriate to separate mitigated from non-mitigated discharges for the present high-collisionality plasmas. No significant change in the position or gradient of the edge density profile could be observed for the transition into the ELM-mitigated phase, except from the effect of the three-dimensional MP field which leads to an apparent profile shift. An increase in the density and decrease in the temperature at the pedestal-top balance such that the pressure saturates at the value of the pre-mitigated phase. The plasma stored energy, the normalized plasma pressure, and the H-mode quality factor follow closely the evolution of the pedestal-top pressure and thus remain almost unaffected. The temporal evolution of the ion effective charge shows that the impurity content does not increase although flushing through type-I ELMs is missing. The type-I ELMs are replaced in the mitigated phase by small-scale and high-frequency edge perturbations. The effect of the small bursts on the density profile, which is correlated with a transient increase of the divertor thermoelectric current, is small compared with the effect of the type-I ELMs. The residual scatter of the profiles in the mitigated phase is small directly after the transition into the ELM-mitigated phase and increases again when the pressure saturates at the value of the pre-mitigated phase. (paper)

  1. Effects of electron pressure anisotropy on current sheet configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recent spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere have demonstrated that the magnetotail current sheet can be supported by currents of anisotropic electron population. Strong electron currents are responsible for the formation of very thin (intense) current sheets playing the crucial role in stability of the Earth's magnetotail. We explore the properties of such thin current sheets with hot isotropic ions and cold anisotropic electrons. Decoupling of the motions of ions and electrons results in the generation of a polarization electric field. The distribution of the corresponding scalar potential is derived from the electron pressure balance and the quasi-neutrality condition. We find that electron pressure anisotropy is partially balanced by a field-aligned component of this polarization electric field. We propose a 2D model that describes a thin current sheet supported by currents of anisotropic electrons embedded in an ion-dominated current sheet. Current density profiles in our model agree well with THEMIS observations in the Earth's magnetotail.

  2. Mountain building and the initiation of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anne Munck; Bonow, Johan; Langen, Peter Lang

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a new hypothesis about mountain building in Greenland on ice sheet initiation are investigated using an ice sheet model in combination with a climate model. According to this hypothesis, low-relief landscapes near sea level characterised Greenland in Miocene times until two phases...... superimposed by cold and warm excursions. The modelling results show that no ice initiates in the case of the low-lying and almost flat topography prior to the uplifts. However, the results demonstrate a significant ice sheet growth in response to the orographically induced increase in precipitation....... Under conditions that are colder than the present, the ice can overcome the Föhn effect, flow into the interior and form a coherent ice sheet. The results thus indicate that the Greenland Ice Sheet of today is a relict formed under colder conditions. The modelling results are consistent...

  3. Perforation of metal sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, Jens Erik

    simulation is focused on the sheet deformation. However, the effect on the tool and press is included. The process model is based on the upper bound analysis in order to predict the force progress and hole characteristics etc. Parameter analyses are divided into two groups, simulation and experimental tests......The main purposes of this project are:1. Development of a dynamic model for the piercing and performation process2. Analyses of the main parameters3. Establishing demands for process improvements4. Expansion of the existing parameter limitsThe literature survey describes the process influence...

  4. The relationship between acute changes in the systemic inflammatory response and plasma ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and lipid peroxidation after elective hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, F J S; Talwar, D; McMillan, D C

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) is a water soluble vitamin with many functions including antioxidative properties, haemostasis, hormone synthesis, collagen synthesis, carnitine synthesis, bile salt production and enhancing iron absorption. There is some evidence that there is a negative inverse relationship between plasma vitamin C concentration and the systemic inflammatory response as measured by C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of the present study was to examine, in the context of a longitudinal study, the change in plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid (AA) and Vitamin E (α-tocopherol, AT) and their relationship to free radical damage during the evolution of the systemic inflammatory response. Venous blood samples were obtained pre-operatively and at 1, 2, 3 and 90 days post-operatively from 11 patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. AA, AT, cholesterol, MDA (marker of free radical damage), CRP and albumin were measured in plasma. Plasma AA fell significantly by 74% (P < 0.01), AT fell by 36% (P < 0.01), cholesterol by 40% (P < 0.01), MDA by 38% (P < 0.01), albumin by 29% (P < 0.01) and CRP increased significantly by 160 fold (P < 0.01) during the systemic inflammatory response. The fall in plasma AA remained significant when adjusted for albumin (P < 0.01). Plasma AT adjusted for cholesterol did not change significantly during the study period. The fall in plasma MDA remained significant when adjusted for albumin (P 0.01). At 3 months post-operatively, all measurements (including AA) except albumin had returned to baseline values. Plasma AA levels are unlikely to be a reliable measurement of Vitamin C where there is evidence of a systemic inflammatory response. The decrease in plasma AA concentration is likely to be secondary to increased consumption, increased usage neutralising free radicals, increased utilisation in supporting AT regeneration and increased urinary excretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European

  5. Plasma cytokines, chemokines and cellular immune responses in pre-school Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noone Cariosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with over one million deaths annually, particularly in children under five years. This study was the first to examine plasma cytokines, chemokines and cellular immune responses in pre-school Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum from four semi-urban villages near Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. Methods Blood was obtained from 231 children (aged 39–73 months who were classified according to mean P. falciparum density per μl of blood (uninfected (n = 89, low density (10,000, n = 22. IL-12p70, IL-10, Nitric oxide, IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17, IL-4 and TGF-β, C-C chemokine RANTES, MMP-8 and TIMP-1 were measured in plasma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained and examined markers of innate immune cells (CD14, CD36, CD56, CD54, CD11c AND HLA-DR. T-cell sub-populations (CD4, CD3 and γδTCR were intracellularly stained for IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF following polyclonal stimulation or stimulated with malaria parasites. Ascaris lumbricoides was endemic in these villages and all data were analysed taking into account the potential impact of bystander helminth infection. All data were analysed using SPSS 15 for windows and in all tests, p Results The level of P. falciparum parasitaemia was positively associated with plasma IL-10 and negatively associated with IL-12p70. The percentage of monocytes was significantly decreased in malaria-infected individuals while malaria parasitaemia was positively associated with increasing percentages of CD54+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cell populations. No association was observed in cytokine expression in mitogen-activated T-cell populations between groups and no malaria specific immune responses were detected. Although A. lumbricoides is endemic in these villages, an analysis of the data showed no impact of this helminth infection on P. falciparum parasitaemia or on immune responses associated with P. falciparum infection

  6. Direct measurement of the plasma equilibrium response to poloidal field changes and H∞ controller tests in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.

    2001-01-01

    The control of ITER provides several challenges which can be met using existing techniques for the design of modern controllers. The specific case of the control of the Poloidal Field (PF) system has sollicited considerable interest. One feature of the design of such controllers is their dependence on a sufficiently accurate model of the full system under control. To this end, experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to validate one plasma equilibrium response model, the CREATE-L model. Using a new technique, the open loop response of TCV has been directly measured in the frequency domain. These experimental results compare well with the CREATE-L model. This model was subsequently used to design a PF system controller, using methods proposed during the ITER EDA and the first test on TCV has been successful. (author)

  7. Direct measurement of the plasma equilibrium response to poloidal field changes and H∞ controller tests in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.

    1999-01-01

    The control of ITER provides several challenges which can be met using existing techniques for the design of modern controllers. The specific case of the control of the Poloidal Field (PF) system has solicited considerable interest. One feature of the design of such controllers is their dependence on a sufficiently accurate model of the full system under control. To this end, experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to validate one plasma equilibrium response model, the CREATE-L model. Using a new technique, the open loop response of TCV has been directly measured in the frequency domain. These experimental results compare well with the CREATE-L model. This model was subsequently used to design a PF system controller, using methods proposed during the ITER EDA and the first test on TCV has been successful. (author)

  8. Non-LTE modeling of the radiative properties of high-Z plasma using linear response methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, Mark; Harte, Judy; Scott, Howard

    2017-10-01

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) atomic processes play a key role in the radiation flow and energetics in highly ionized high temperature plasma encountered in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysical applications. Modeling complex high-Z atomic systems, such as gold used in ICF hohlraums, is particularly challenging given the complexity and intractable number of atomic states involved. Practical considerations, i.e. speed and memory, in large radiation-hydrodynamic simulations further limit model complexity. We present here a methodology for utilizing tabulated NLTE radiative and EOS properties for use in our radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This approach uses tabulated data, previously calculated with complex atomic models, modified to include a general non-Planckian radiation field using a linear response methodology. This approach extends near-LTE response method to conditions far from LTE. Comparisons of this tabular method with in-line NLTE simulations of a laser heated 1-D hohlraum will be presented, which show good agreement in the time-evolution of the plasma conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Plasma concentration of prolactin, testosterone might be associated with brain response to visual erotic stimuli in healthy heterosexual males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Younghee; Jeong, Bumseok; Kim, Ji-Woong; Choi, Jeewook

    2009-09-01

    Many studies have showed that excess or lack of sexual hormones, such as prolactin and testosterone, induced the sexual dysfunction in humans. Little, however, is known about the role of sexual hormones showing normal range in, especially, the basal state unexposed to any sexual stimulation. We hypothesized sexual hormones in the basal state may affect sexual behavior. We investigated the association of the sexual hormones level in the basal hormonal state before visual sexual stimulation with the sexual response-related brain activity during the stimulation. Twelve heterosexual men were recorded the functional MRI signals of their brain activation elicited by passive viewing erotic (ERO), happy-faced (HA) couple, food and nature pictures. Both plasma prolacitn and testosterone concentrations were measured before functional MR scanning. A voxel wise regression analyses were performed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of sexual hormones in basal state and brain activity elicited by ERO minus HA, not food minus nature, contrast. The plasma concentration of prolactin in basal state showed positive association with the activity of the brain involving cognitive component of sexual behavior including the left middle frontal gyrus, paracingulate/superior frontal/anterior cingulate gyri, bilateral parietal lobule, right angular, bilateral precuneus and right cerebellum. Testosterone in basal state was positively associated with the brain activity of the bilateral supplementary motor area which related with motivational component of sexual behavior. Our results suggested sexual hormones in basal state may have their specific target regions or network associated with sexual response.

  10. LONG-LIVED BONE MARROW PLASMA CELLS DURING IMMUNE RESPONSE TO ALPHA (1→3 DEXTRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chernyshova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production kinetics and some functional properties of long-lived marrow plasma cells were studied in mice immunized with T-independent type 2 antigens. Alpha (1→3 dextran was used as an antigen for immunization. The mice were immunized by dextran, and the numbers of IgM antibody producing cells were determined by ELISPOT method. The cell phenotype was determined by cytofluorimetric technique. In the area of normal bone marrow lymphocytes ~4% of T and ~85% of B cells were detected. About 35% of the cells expressed a plasmocyte marker (CD138; 3% were CD138+IgM+, and about 6% of the lymphocytes were double-positive for CD138+IgA+. Among spleen lymphocytes, 50% of T and 47% of B cells were detected. About 1.5% lymphocytes were CD138+, and 0.5% were positive for CD138 and IgM. Time kinetics of antibody-producing cells in bone marrow and spleen was different. In spleen populations, the peak amounts of antibody-secreting cells have been shown on the day 4; the process abated by the day 28. Vice versa, the numbers of the antibody-producing cells in bone marrow started to increase on the day 4. The process reached its maximum on day 14, and after 28th day became stationary. The in vitro experiments have shown that supplementation of bone marrow cells from immune mice with dextran did not influence their functional activity. It was previously shown for cells responding to T-dependent antigens only. A specific marker for the long-lived plasma cells is still unknown. However, these cells possess a common CD138 marker specific for all plasma cells. A method for isolation of bone marrow CD138+ cells was developed. The CD138+ cells were of 87-97% purity, being enriched in long-lived bone marrow cells, and produced monospecific antibodies.

  11. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota Naoshi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  12. Restricting dietary sodium reduces plasma sodium response to exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenders, E E; Franken, C P G; Cotter, J D; Thornton, S N; Rehrer, N J

    2017-11-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia can be life-threatening. Excessive hypotonic fluid ingestion is the primary etiological factor but does not explain all variability. Possible effects of chronic sodium intake are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether dietary sodium affects plasma sodium concentration [Na + ] during exercise in the heat, when water intake nearly matches mass loss. Endurance-trained men (n = 9) participated in this crossover experiment. Each followed a low-sodium (lowNa) or high-sodium (highNa) diet for 9 days with 24-h fluid intakes and urine outputs measured before experimental trials (day 10). The trials were ≥2 week apart. Trials comprised 3 h (or if not possible to complete, to exhaustion) cycling (55% VO 2max ; 34 °C, 65% RH) with water intake approximating mass loss. Plasma [Na + ], hematocrit, sweat and urine [Na + ], heart rate, core temperature, and subjective perceptions were monitored. Urine [Na + ] was lower on lowNa 24 h prior to (31 ± 24, 76 ± 30 mmol/L, P = 0.027) and during trials (10 ± 10, 52 ± 32 mmol/L, P = 0.004). Body mass was lower on lowNa (79.6 ± 8.5, 80.5 ± 8.9, P = 0.03). Plasma [Na + ] was lower on lowNa before (137 ± 2, 140 ± 3, P = 0.007) and throughout exercise (P = 0.001). Sweat [Na + ] was unaffected by diet (54.5 ± 40, 54.5 ± 23 mmol/L, P = 0.99). Heart rate and core temperature were higher on lowNa (P ≤ 0.001). Despite decreased urinary sodium losses, plasma sodium was lower on lowNa, with decreased mass indicating (extracellular) water may have been less, explaining greater heart rate and core temperature. General population health recommendations to lower salt intake may not be appropriate for endurance athletes, particularly those training in the heat. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Structural response of a Tokamak first wall under electromagnetic forces caused by a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, Y.R.; Biggio, M.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Antonacci, P.; Vitali, R.

    1987-01-01

    The modern computerized techniques of CAD/FEM analysis are extensively applied for the numerical simulation of the electromagnetic-mechanical coupling induced in the last design configuration of NET first wall during a plasma disruption event. A picture of the impact of the electromagnetic forces on the structural behaviour of the outboard DN first wall is presented an an improvement of the FW structural section is proposed. In any case, additional investigations will be performed during the long process of structural behaviour optimization of the first wall reactor components

  14. Plasma apolipoprotein M responses to statin and fibrate administration in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappelle, Paul J W H; Ahnström, Josefin; Dikkeschei, Bert D

    2010-01-01

    by statin or fibrate administration in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: Fourteen type 2 diabetic patients participated in a placebo-controlled crossover study which included three 8-week treatment periods with simvastatin (40mg daily), bezafibrate (400mg daily), and their combination. Results: Apo.......02 to P treatment periods. Conclusions: This study suggests that, even though plasma apoM is lowered by statins, apoM metabolism is to a considerable extent independent of statin- and fibrate-affected pathways involved in cholesterol...

  15. Plasma growth hormone response to human growth hormone releasing factor in rats administered with chlorpromazine and antiserum against somatostatin. Effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Tonegawa, Y; Ihara, T; Hattori, M; Shibasaki, T; Ling, N

    1985-10-01

    The effect of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the plasma growth hormone (GH) response to synthetic human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was determined in conscious, freely moving rats pretreated with chlorpromazine and antiserum against somatostatin. Chlorpromazine plus somatostatin antiserum pretreated rats gave consistent response to GRF which was not observed in untreated rats. Chlorpromazine alone has no effect on GH secretion induced by GRF in rat pituitary monolayer culture. In rats made hypothyroid by thyroidectomy, both basal and peak plasma GH responses to a small (0.25 microgram/kg bw) and a moderate dose of GRF (1 microgram/kg bw) were significantly reduced as compared to controls. In rats made hyperthyroid by the administration of thyroxine, basal and peak plasma GH responses to a small but not to a moderate dose of GRF were significantly reduced as compared to controls. A reduced plasma GH response to a small dose of GRF was observed 8 days after the cessation of thyroxine administration. The pituitary GH reserve was markedly reduced in hypothyroid but not in hyperthyroid rats as compared to their respective controls. These results indicate that plasma GH response to GRF is reduced both in hypo- and hyperthyroidism. The mechanism involved in the phenomenon appears to be different between the two conditions.

  16. Controllable preparation of vertically standing graphene sheets and their wettability and supercapacitive properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hai-Tao; Zou Fei; Gao Ge; Yu Ning; Yao Zhao-Hui; Shen Cheng-Min

    2016-01-01

    Vertically standing graphene (VSG) sheets have been fabricated by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The lateral size of VSG nanosheets could be well controlled by varying the substrate temperature. The higher temperature usually gives rise to a smaller sheet size. The wettability of VSG films was tuned between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity by means of oxygen and hydrogen plasma treatment. The supercapacitor electrode made of VSG sheets exhibited an ideal double-layer-capacitor feature and the specific capacitance reached a value up to 9.62 F·m −2 . (rapid communication)

  17. Relationship between plasma matrix metalloproteinase levels, pulmonary function, bronchodilator response, and emphysema severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung; Hong, Yoonki; Lim, Myoung Nam; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic inflammation in the airway and lung. A protease-antiprotease imbalance has been suggested as a possible pathogenic mechanism for COPD. We evaluated the relationship between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels and COPD severity. Plasma levels of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-12 were measured in 57 COPD patients and 36 normal controls. The relationship between MMP levels and lung function, emphysema index, bronchial wall thickness, pulmonary artery pressure, and quality of life was examined using general linear regression analyses. There were significant associations of MMP-1 with bronchodilator reversibility and of MMP-8 and MMP-9 with lung function. Also, MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-9 levels were correlated with the emphysema index, independent of lung function. However, MMP-12 was not associated with lung function or emphysema severity. Associations between MMP levels and bronchial wall thickness, pulmonary artery pressure, and quality of life were not statistically significant. Plasma levels of MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-9 are associated with COPD severity and can be used as a biomarker to better understand the characteristics of COPD patients.

  18. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Emil Aputsiaq Flindt; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2017-01-01

    with salinity at 10 and 20° C. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope was lowest at salinity of 15 at 5° C, yet at 20° C, they were lowest at a salinity of 0. A cost of osmoregulation (SMR at a salinity of 0 and 15 compared with SMR at a salinity of 10) could only be detected at a salinity of 15 at 20...... of osmoregulation (28%) at a salinity of 15 at 20° C indicates that the cost of osmoregulation in P. fluviatilis increases with temperature under hyperosmotic conditions and a power analysis showed that the cost of osmoregulation could be lower than 12·5% under other environmental conditions. The effect of salinity......The present study determined the blood plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of the perch Perca fluviatilis at different salinities (0, 10 and 15) and temperatures (5, 10 and 20° C). Blood plasma osmolality increased with salinity at all temperatures. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) increased...

  19. Benefits of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in skin photodamage: clinical response and histological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Ley, B; Cuevast, J; Alonso-Castro, L; Calvo, M I; Ríos-Buceta, L; Orive, G; Anitua, E; Jaén, P

    2015-01-01

    Skin ageing is characterized by small and fine wrinkles, roughness, laxity, and pigmentation as a result of epidermal thinning, collagen degradation, dermal atrophy, and fewer fibroblasts. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) is an autologous plasma preparation enriched in proteins obtained from patient's own blood aimed at accelerating tissue repair and regeneration. To evaluate the benefits of PRGF in skin photodamage, 10 healthy volunteers were treated with three consecutive intradermal injections of PRGF in the facial area. Clinical outcomes and histological analysis were performed. A statistically significant increase in the epidermis and papillary dermis thickness was seen after PRGF treatment (p PRGF treatment, a reduction of the average area fraction of solar elastosis was observed in patients with clinical and histological signs of skin photodamage (p PRGF use was 0.75 (9/12) for the group of patients with signs of skin photodamage. Intradermal PRGF infiltration appears to be an effective treatment for the photodamaged skin. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Precisely Assembled Nanofiber Arrays as a Platform to Engineer Aligned Cell Sheets for Biofabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince Beachley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid cell sheet engineering approach was developed using ultra-thin nanofiber arrays to host the formation of composite nanofiber/cell sheets. It was found that confluent aligned cell sheets could grow on uniaxially-aligned and crisscrossed nanofiber arrays with extremely low fiber densities. The porosity of the nanofiber sheets was sufficient to allow aligned linear myotube formation from differentiated myoblasts on both sides of the nanofiber sheets, in spite of single-side cell seeding. The nanofiber content of the composite cell sheets is minimized to reduce the hindrance to cell migration, cell-cell contacts, mass transport, as well as the foreign body response or inflammatory response associated with the biomaterial. Even at extremely low densities, the nanofiber component significantly enhanced the stability and mechanical properties of the composite cell sheets. In addition, the aligned nanofiber arrays imparted excellent handling properties to the composite cell sheets, which allowed easy processing into more complex, thick 3D structures of higher hierarchy. Aligned nanofiber array-based composite cell sheet engineering combines several advantages of material-free cell sheet engineering and polymer scaffold-based cell sheet engineering; and it represents a new direction in aligned cell sheet engineering for a multitude of tissue engineering applications.

  1. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  2. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol response and proliferation of oxidative enzyme-activated human T lymphocytes: suppression by plasma lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akeson, A.L.; Scupham, D.W.; Harmony, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol (PI) response and DNA synthesis of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase (NAGO)-stimulated human T lymphocytes are suppressed by low density lipoproteins (LDL). To understand the mechanism of lymphocyte activation more fully, the PI response and DNA synthesis and suppression of these events by LDL in NAGO-stimulated T lymphocytes were characterized. Between 30 min and 6 hr after NAGO stimulation, there was an increase of 32 Pi incorporation into PI without increased incorporation into the phosphorylated forms of PI or into other phospholipids. DNA synthesis as determined by [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation depended on the lymphocyte-accessory monocyte ratio and total cell density. Optimal stimulation of the PI response and DNA synthesis occurred at the same concentration of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase. While the PI response was only partially suppressed by LDL with optimal suppression at 10 to 20 micrograms of protein/ml, DNA synthesis was completely suppressed although at much higher LDL concentrations, greater than 100 micrograms protein/ml. As monocyte numbers are increased, LDL suppression of DNA synthesis is decreased. The ability of NAGO to stimulate the PI response and DNA synthesis in a similar way, and the suppression of both events by LDL, suggests the PI response is important for lymphocyte activation and proliferation. Stimulation of human T lymphocytes by oxidative mitogens, neuraminidase, and galactose oxidase caused increased phosphatidylinositol metabolism and increased DNA synthesis. Both responses were suppressed by low density lipoproteins

  4. Association between Polymorphisms in the Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Cluster and the Plasma Triacylglycerol Response to an n-3 PUFA Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Hubert; Rudkowska, Iwona; Paradis, Ann-Marie; Thifault, Elisabeth; Garneau, Véronique; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been reported to have a variety of beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, a large inter-individual variability in the plasma lipid response to an omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation is observed in different studies. Genetic variations may influence plasma lipid responsiveness. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of a supplementation with n-3 PUFA on the plasma lipid profile in relation to the presence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene cluster. A total of 208 subjects from Quebec City area were supplemented with 3 g/day of n-3 PUFA, during six weeks. In a statistical model including the effect of the genotype, the supplementation and the genotype by supplementation interaction, SNP rs174546 was significantly associated (p = 0.02) with plasma triglyceride (TG) levels, pre- and post-supplementation. The n-3 supplementation had an independent effect on plasma TG levels and no significant genotype by supplementation interaction effects were observed. In summary, our data support the notion that the FADS gene cluster is a major determinant of plasma TG levels. SNP rs174546 may be an important SNP associated with plasma TG levels and FADS1 gene expression independently of a nutritional intervention with n-3 PUFA. PMID:23016130

  5. Plasma chemerin in young untrained men: association with cardio-metabolic traits and physical performance, and response to intensive interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouerghi, Nejmeddine; Fradj, Mohamed Kacem Ben; Khammassi, Marwa; Feki, Moncef; Kaabachi, Naziha; Bouassida, Anissa

    2017-02-01

    Chemerin is an adipose tissue-derived adipokine thought to decrease insulin sensitivity and increase cardiometabolic risk. This study aimed to assess the association of chemerin with cardiometabolic risk and physical performance and examine its response to high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Eighteen young men have been applied a HIIT program during 8 weeks. Plasma chemerin together with several cardiometabolic factors and physical performance indices were determined before and after the training program. Plasma chemerin and insulin were assessed using immunoenzymatic methods. The homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) index was calculated as an estimate of insulin resistance. Basal plasma chemerin was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.782, pHIIT program resulted in significant improvements in body composition, plasma lipids and insulin sensitivity. However, no significant change was detected for plasma chemerin in response to HIIT (134±50.7 ng/mL vs. 137±51.9 ng/mL, p=0.750). Basal plasma chemerin is associated with cardiometabolic health and physical performance in young men. Following HIIT, cardiometabolic health and physical performance had improved, but no significant change had occurred for plasma chemerin.

  6. Urinary and plasma oxytocin changes in response to MDMA or intranasal oxytocin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sunday M; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; de Wit, Harriet; Jacob, Suma

    2016-12-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has received increased experimental attention for its putative role in both normal social functioning and several psychiatric disorders that are partially characterized by social dysfunction (e.g., autism spectrum disorders: ASD). Many human experimental studies measure circulating plasma levels of OT in order to examine the relationship between the hormone and behavior. Urinary OT (uOT) assays offer a simple, easy, and non-invasive method to measure peripheral hormone levels, but the correspondence between uOT and plasma OT (pOT) levels is unclear. Here, we conducted two within-subjects, double-blind studies exploring changes in uOT and pOT levels following administration of two drugs: MDMA, an oxytocin-releasing drug (Study 1), and intranasal oxytocin (INOT: Study 1 and 2). In Study 1, 14 adult participants (2 females) were each administered either oral 1.5mg/kg MDMA or 40IU INOT across two different study sessions. In Study 2, 10 male participants (adolescents and young adults) diagnosed with ASD received either 40IU INOT or placebo across two different sessions. In both studies, blood and urine samples were collected before and after drug administration at each study session. For Study 1, 10 participants provided valid plasma and urine samples for the MDMA session, and 8 provided valid samples for the INOT session. For Study 2, all 10 participants provided valid samples for both INOT and placebo sessions. Pre- and post-administration levels of pOT and uOT were compared. Additionally, correlations between percent change from baseline uOT and pOT levels were examined. Study 1: Plasma OT and uOT levels significantly increased after administration of MDMA and INOT. Furthermore, uOT levels were positively correlated with pOT levels following administration of MDMA (r=0.57, p=0.042) but not INOT (r=0.51, p=0.097). Study 2: There was a significant increase in uOT levels after administration of INOT, but not after administration of

  7. Experimental observations of the tearing of an electron current sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gekelman, W.; Pfister, H.

    1988-01-01

    A neutral magnetic sheet, in which the current is carried mainly by the electrons, is set up in a laboratory plasma. By forcing the current through a thin slot, the ratio of the length to height t of the sheet may be varied; the current is observed to tear when tapprox. >30. The structure of the magnetic islands and their associated currents is fully three dimensional, although a linear two-dimensional theory gives a very good estimate of the tearing mode growth time. Tearing is accompanied by the generation of significant Hall currents, and magnetic disturbances are observed to propagate at the whistler wave speed

  8. Gene and metabolite time-course response to cigarette smoking in mouse lung and plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela A Miller

    Full Text Available Prolonged cigarette smoking (CS causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a prevalent serious condition that may persist or progress after smoking cessation. To provide insight into how CS triggers COPD, we investigated temporal patterns of lung transcriptome expression and systemic metabolome changes induced by chronic CS exposure and smoking cessation. Whole lung RNA-seq data was analyzed at transcript and exon levels from C57Bl/6 mice exposed to CS for 1- or 7 days, for 3-, 6-, or 9 months, or for 6 months followed by 3 months of cessation using age-matched littermate controls. We identified previously unreported dysregulation of pyrimidine metabolism and phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways and confirmed alterations in glutathione metabolism and circadian gene pathways. Almost all dysregulated pathways demonstrated reversibility upon smoking cessation, except the lysosome pathway. Chronic CS exposure was significantly linked with alterations in pathways encoding for energy, phagocytosis, and DNA repair and triggered differential expression of genes or exons previously unreported to associate with CS or COPD, including Lox, involved in matrix remodeling, Gp2, linked to goblet cells, and Slc22a12 and Agpat3, involved in purine and glycerolipid metabolism, respectively. CS-induced lung metabolic pathways changes were validated using metabolomic profiles of matched plasma samples, indicating that dynamic metabolic gene regulation caused by CS is reflected in the plasma metabolome. Using advanced technologies, our study uncovered novel pathways and genes altered by chronic CS exposure, including those involved in pyrimidine metabolism, phosphatidylinositol signaling and lysosome function, highlighting their potential importance in the pathogenesis or diagnosis of CS-associated conditions.

  9. Postprandial metabolomics: A pilot mass spectrometry and NMR study of the human plasma metabolome in response to a challenge meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimpour, Masoumeh; Surowiec, Izabella; Wu, Junfang; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Pinto, Rui; Trygg, Johan; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Nording, Malin L.

    2016-01-01

    The study of postprandial metabolism is relevant for understanding metabolic diseases and characterizing personal responses to diet. We combined three analytical platforms – gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) – to validate a multi-platform approach for characterizing individual variation in the postprandial state. We analyzed the postprandial plasma metabolome by introducing, at three occasions, meal challenges on a usual diet, and 1.5 years later, on a modified background diet. The postprandial response was stable over time and largely independent of the background diet as revealed by all three analytical platforms. Coverage of the metabolome between NMR and GC-MS included more polar metabolites detectable only by NMR and more hydrophobic compounds detected by GC-MS. The variability across three separate testing occasions among the identified metabolites was in the range of 1.1–86% for GC-MS and 0.9–42% for NMR in the fasting state at baseline. For the LC-MS analysis, the coefficients of variation of the detected compounds in the fasting state at baseline were in the range of 2–97% for the positive and 4–69% for the negative mode. Multivariate analysis (MVA) of metabolites detected with GC-MS revealed that for both background diets, levels of postprandial amino acids and sugars increased whereas those of fatty acids decreased at 0.5 h after the meal was consumed, reflecting the expected response to the challenge meal. MVA of NMR data revealed increasing postprandial levels of amino acids and other organic acids together with decreasing levels of acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutanoic acid, also independent of the background diet. Together these data show that the postprandial response to the same challenge meal was stable even though it was tested 1.5 years apart, and that it was largely independent of background diet. This work demonstrates the efficacy of a

  10. Postprandial metabolomics: A pilot mass spectrometry and NMR study of the human plasma metabolome in response to a challenge meal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimpour, Masoumeh; Surowiec, Izabella; Wu, Junfang [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Pinto, Rui [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Life Sciences (Sweden); Trygg, Johan [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Zivkovic, Angela M. [Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, CA 95616 (United States); Nording, Malin L., E-mail: malin.nording@umu.se [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden)

    2016-02-18

    The study of postprandial metabolism is relevant for understanding metabolic diseases and characterizing personal responses to diet. We combined three analytical platforms – gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) – to validate a multi-platform approach for characterizing individual variation in the postprandial state. We analyzed the postprandial plasma metabolome by introducing, at three occasions, meal challenges on a usual diet, and 1.5 years later, on a modified background diet. The postprandial response was stable over time and largely independent of the background diet as revealed by all three analytical platforms. Coverage of the metabolome between NMR and GC-MS included more polar metabolites detectable only by NMR and more hydrophobic compounds detected by GC-MS. The variability across three separate testing occasions among the identified metabolites was in the range of 1.1–86% for GC-MS and 0.9–42% for NMR in the fasting state at baseline. For the LC-MS analysis, the coefficients of variation of the detected compounds in the fasting state at baseline were in the range of 2–97% for the positive and 4–69% for the negative mode. Multivariate analysis (MVA) of metabolites detected with GC-MS revealed that for both background diets, levels of postprandial amino acids and sugars increased whereas those of fatty acids decreased at 0.5 h after the meal was consumed, reflecting the expected response to the challenge meal. MVA of NMR data revealed increasing postprandial levels of amino acids and other organic acids together with decreasing levels of acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutanoic acid, also independent of the background diet. Together these data show that the postprandial response to the same challenge meal was stable even though it was tested 1.5 years apart, and that it was largely independent of background diet. This work demonstrates the efficacy of a

  11. Analysis of 16 plasma vortex events in the geomagnetic tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Bame, S.J.; Russel, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of 16 plasma vortex occurrences in the magnetotail plasma sheet of Hones et al. (1983) is extended. We used two- and three-dimensional plasma measurements and three-dimensional magnetic field measurements to study phase relations, energy propagation, and polarization properties. The results point toward an interpretation as a slow strongly damped MHD eigenmode which is generated by tailward traveling perturbations at the low-latitude interface between plasma sheet and magnetosheath

  12. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-05-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the systems integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  13. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  14. Systems Integration Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Systems Integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The Systems Integration subprogram enables the widespread deployment of safe, reliable, and cost-effective solar energy technologies by addressing the associated technical and non-technical challenges. These include timely and cost-effective interconnection procedures, optimal system planning, accurate prediction of solar resources, monitoring and control of solar power, maintaining grid reliability and stability, and many more. To address the challenges associated with interconnecting and integrating hundreds of gigawatts of solar power onto the electricity grid, the Systems Integration program funds research, development, and demonstration projects in four broad, interrelated focus areas: grid performance and reliability, dispatchability, power electronics, and communications.

  15. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  16. Current sheet particle acceleration - theory and observations for the geomagnetic tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speiser, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    It has been found that the current sheet in the geomagnetic tail is a source of plasma and energetic particles for the magnetospheric ring current and radiation belts. It is also a seat for instabilities and magnetospheric substorms. Theoretical studies related to the geomagnetic tail are discussed, taking into account Dungey's (1953) original ideas concerning neutral point acceleration, and studies of particle motion in current sheets conducted by many authors. A description of observations concerning the geomagnetic tail is also provided, taking into account plasma sheet populations, and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Some remaining problems are partly related to the location and the behavior of the distant source, the nature of the relative (time-dependent) ionospheric versus solar wind contributions, and the role of the solar wind in the initiation of distant or near-earth neutral lines. 56 references

  17. Fasting plasma zeaxanthin response to Fructus barbarum L. (wolfberry; Kei Tze) in a food-based human supplementation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung Yuen; Chung, Wai Yuen; Szeto, Yim Tong; Benzie, Iris F F

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common disorder that causes irreversible loss of central vision. Increased intake of foods containing zeaxanthin may be effective in preventing AMD because the macula accumulates zeaxanthin and lutein, oxygenated carotenoids with antioxidant and blue light-absorbing properties. Lycium barbarum L. is a small red berry known as Fructus lycii and wolfberry in the West, and Kei Tze and Gou Qi Zi in Asia. Wolfberry is rich in zeaxanthin dipalmitate, and is valued in Chinese culture for being good for vision. The aim of this study, which was a single-blinded, placebo-controlled, human intervention trial of parallel design, was to provide data on how fasting plasma zeaxanthin concentration changes as a result of dietary supplementation with whole wolfberries. Fasting blood was collected from healthy, consenting subjects; fourteen subjects took 15 g/d wolfberry (estimated to contain almost 3 mg zeaxanthin) for 28 d. Repeat fasting blood was collected on day 29. Age- and sex-matched controls (n 13) took no wolfberry. Responses in the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. After supplementation, plasma zeaxanthin increased 2.5-fold: mean values on day 1 and 29 were 0.038 (sem 0.003) and 0.096 (sem 0.009) micromol/l (P0.05), respectively, for the control group. This human supplementation trial shows that zeaxanthin in whole wolfberries is bioavailable and that intake of a modest daily amount markedly increases fasting plasma zeaxanthin levels. These new data will support further study of dietary strategies to maintain macular pigment density.

  18. Settlement during vibratory sheet piling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, P.

    2007-01-01

    During vibratory sheet piling quite often the soil near the sheet pile wall will settle. In many cases this is not a problem. For situations with houses, pipelines, roads or railroads at relative short distance these settlements may not be acceptable. The purpose of the research described in this

  19. Distinct kinetics of memory B-cell and plasma-cell responses in peripheral blood following a blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice W Nduati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available B cell and plasma cell responses take place in lymphoid organs, but because of the inaccessibility of these organs, analyses of human responses are largely performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. To determine whether PBMC are a useful source of memory B cells and plasma cells in malaria, and whether they reflect Plasmodium-specific B cell responses in spleen or bone marrow, we have investigated these components of the humoral response in PBMC using a model of Plasmodium chabaudi blood-stage infections in C57BL/6 mice. We detected memory B cells, defined as isot