WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma sheet responsible

  1. Responses of properties in the plasma sheet and at the geosynchronous orbit to interplanetary shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Li; LIU ZhenXing; ZUO PingBing; ZHANG LingQian; DUAN SuPing

    2009-01-01

    On July 22,2004,the WIND spacecraft detected a typical interplanetary shock. There was sustaining weak southward magnetic field in the preshock region and the southward field was suddenly enhanced across the shock front (i.e.,southward turning). When the shock impinged on the magnetosphere,the magnetospheric plasma convection was abruptly enhanced in the central plasma sheet,which was directly observed by both the TC-1 and Cluster spacecraft located in different regions. Simultaneously,the Cluster spacecraft observed that the dawn-to-dusk electric field was abruptly enhanced. The variations of the magnetic field observed by TC-1,Cluster,GOES-10 and GOES-12 that were distributed in different regions in the plasma sheet and at the geosynchronous orbit are obviously distinct. TC-1 observations showed that the magnetic intensity kept almost unchanged and the elevation angle decreased,but the Cluster spacecraft,which was also in the plasma sheet and was further from the equator,observed that the magnetic field was obviously enhanced. Simultaneously,GOES-12 located near the midnight observed that the magnetic intensity sharply increased and the elevation angle decreased,but GOES-10 located in the dawn side observed that the magnetic field was merely compressed with its three components all sharply increasing. Furthermore,the energetic proton and electron fluxes at nearly all channels observed by five LANL satellites located at different magnetic local times (MLTs) all showed impulsive enhancements due to the compression of the shock. The responses of the energetic particles were much evident on the dayside than those on the nightside. Especially the responses near the midnight were rather weak. In this paper,the possible reasonable physical explanation to above observations is also discussed. All the shock-induced responses are the joint effects of the solar wind dynamic pressure pulse and the magnetic field southward turning.

  2. Sheet Plasma Produced by Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙; 张厚先; 杨宣宗; 冯春华; 乔宾; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    A sheet plasma is produced by a hollow cathode discharge under an axial magnetic field.The plasma is about 40cm in length,4 cm in width and 1cm in thickness.The electron density is about 108cm-3.The hollow cathode is made to be shallow with a large opening,which is different from the ordinary deep hollow cathode.A Langmuir probe is used to detect the plasma.The electron density and the spatial distribution of the plasma change when voltage,pressure and the magnetic field vary.A peak and a data fluctuation at about 200 G-300 G are observed in the variation of electron density(or thickness of the sheet plasma)with the magnetic field.Our work will be helpful in characterizing the sheet plasma and will make the production of dense sheet plasma more controllable.

  3. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  4. Energetic electron spectra in Saturn's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2011-07-01

    The differential spectra of energetic electrons (27-400 keV) in Saturn's plasma sheet can be characterized by power law or kappa distributions. Using all available fluxes from 2005 to 2010, fits to these distributions reveal a striking and consistent pattern of radial dependence in Saturn's plasma sheet (∣z∣ constant throughout the Cassini mission. Inward of about 10 RS, the presence of the electron radiation belts and losses of lower-energy electrons to the gas and grain environment give rise to the very hard spectra in the inner magnetosphere, while the hard spectra in the outer magnetosphere may derive from auroral acceleration at high latitudes. The gradual softening of the spectra from 20 to 10 RS is explained by inward radial diffusion.

  5. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickeler, D.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2011-12-01

    To understand complex space plasma systems like the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, we need to have a good knowledge of the slowly evolving equilibrium state. The slow change of external constraints on the system (for example boundary conditions or other external parameters) lead in many cases to the formation of current sheets. These current sheets can trigger micro-instabilities, which cause resistivity on fluid scales. Consequently resistive instabilities like magnetic reconnection can occur and the systems evolves dynamically. Therefore such a picture of quasi-magneto-hydro-static changes can explain the quasy-static phase of many space plasma before an eruption occurs. Within this work we extend the theory by the inclusion of a nonlinear stationary plasma flows. Our analysis shows that stationary plasma flows with strong flow gradients (for example the solar wind magnetosphere coupling) can be responsible for the existence or generation of current sheets.

  6. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  7. High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Haerendel

    Full Text Available Equator-S frequently encountered, i.e. on 30% of the orbits between 1 March and 17 April 1998, strong variations of the magnetic field strength of typically 5–15-min duration outside about 9RE during the late-night/early-morning hours. Very high-plasma beta values were found, varying between 1 and 10 or more. Close conjunctions between Equator-S and Geotail revealed the spatial structure of these "plasma blobs" and their lifetime. They are typically 5–10° wide in longitude and have an antisymmetric plasma or magnetic pressure distribution with respect to the equator, while being altogether low-latitude phenomena 
    (≤ 15°. They drift slowly sunward, exchange plasma across the equator and have a lifetime of at least 15–30 min. While their spatial structure may be due to some sort of mirror instability, little is known about the origin of the high-beta plasma. It is speculated that the morningside boundary layer somewhat further tailward may be the source of this plasma. This would be consistent with the preference of the plasma blobs to occur during quiet conditions, although they are also found during substorm periods. The relation to auroral phenomena in the morningside oval is uncertain. The energy deposition may be mostly too weak to generate a visible signature. However, patchy aurora remains a candidate for more disturbed periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma convection; plasma sheet; plasma waves and instabilities

  8. The Dynamical Generation of Current Sheets in Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence profoundly affects particle transport and plasma heating in many astrophysical plasma environments, from galaxy clusters to the solar corona and solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere. Both fluid and kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence ubiquitously generate coherent structures, in the form of current sheets, at small scales, and the locations of these current sheets appear to be associated with enhanced rates of dissipation of the turbulent energy. Therefore, illuminating the origin and nature of these current sheets is critical to identifying the dominant physical mechanisms of dissipation, a primary aim at the forefront of plasma turbulence research. Here we present evidence from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations that strong nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfven waves, or strong Alfven wave collisions, are a natural mechanism for the generation of current sheets in plasma turbulence. Furthermore, we conceptually explain this current sheet development in terms of the nonlinear...

  9. New aspects of plasma sheet dynamics - MHD and kinetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wiechen

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a process of fundamental importance for the dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet. In this context, the development of thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet is a topic of special interest because they could be a possible cause of microscopic fluctuations acting as collective non-idealness from a macroscopic point of view. Simulations of the near-Earth plasma sheet including boundary perturbations due to localized inflow through the northern (or southern plasma sheet boundary show developing thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet about 810 RE tailwards of the Earth. This location is largely independent from the localization of the perturbation. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of the macroscopic non-ideal consequences of microscopic fluctuations. A new model is presented that allows the quantitative calculation of macroscopic non-idealness without considering details of microscopic instabilities or turbulence. This model is only based on the assumption of a strongly fluctuating, mixing dynamics on microscopic scales in phase space. The result of this approach is an expression for anomalous non-idealness formally similar to the Krook resistivity but now describing the macroscopic consequences of collective microscopic fluctuations, not of collisions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma sheet · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; magnetic reconnection

  10. Magnetic turbulence in the plasma sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Z; Nakamura, R; Runov, A; Zhang, T L; Eichelberger, H U; Treumann, R A; Georgescu, E; Balogh, A; Klecker, B; R`eme, H

    2004-01-01

    Small-scale magnetic turbulence observed by the Cluster spacecraft in the plasma sheet is investigated by means of a wavelet estimator suitable for detecting distinct scaling characteristics even in noisy measurements. The spectral estimators used for this purpose are affected by a frequency dependent bias. The variances of the wavelet coefficients, however, match the power-law shaped spectra, which makes the wavelet estimator essentially unbiased. These scaling characteristics of the magnetic field data appear to be essentially non-steady and intermittent. The scaling properties of bursty bulk flow (BBF) and non-BBF associated magnetic fluctuations are analysed with the aim of understanding processes of energy transfer between scales. Small-scale ($\\sim 0.08-0.3$ s) magnetic fluctuations having the same scaling index $\\alpha \\sim 2.6$ as the large-scale ($\\sim 0.7-5$ s) magnetic fluctuations occur during BBF-associated periods. During non-BBF associated periods the energy transfer to small scales is absent, ...

  11. Gyrophase bunched ions in the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhai, Hao; Gao, Zhuxiu; Huang, Chaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Gyrophase bunched ions were first detected in the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock in the early 1980s which is formed by the microphysical process associated with reflected solar wind ions at the bow shock. Inside the magnetosphere, the results of computer simulations demonstrated that nonlinear wave-particle interaction can also result in the gyrophase bunching of particles. However, to date direct observations barely exist regarding this issue occurred inside the magnetosphere. In this paper, we report for the first time an event of gyrophase bunched ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet. The nongyrotropic distributions of ions were closely accompanied with the electromagnetic waves at the oxygen cyclotron frequency. The phase of bunched ions and the phase of waves mainly have very narrow phase differences (helicity with respect to the propagation direction, which agrees with the characteristic of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The observation of O+ ions composition suggests that the oxygen band waves are excited due to the enhancements of the O+ ion density. This study suggests that the gyrophase bunching is a significant nonlinear effect that exists not only in the bow shock but also in the inner magnetosphere.

  12. The statistical studies of the inner boundary of plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of plasma sheet ions into the inner magnetosphere is very important to the inner magnetospheric dynamics since plasma sheet ions are one of the major particle sources of ring current during storm times. However, the direct observations of the inner boundary of the plasma sheet are fairly rare due to the limited number of satellites in near equatorial orbits outside 6.6 RE. In this paper, we used the ion data recorded by TC-1 from 2004 to 2006 to study the distribution of inner boundary of ion plasma sheet (IBIPS and for the first time show the observational distribution of IBIPS in the equatorial plane. The IBIPS has a dawn-dusk asymmetry, being farthest to the Earth in the 06:00 08:00 LT bin and closest to the Earth in the 18:00–20:00 LT bin. Besides, the IBIPS has also a day-night asymmetry, which may be due to the fact that the ions on the dayside are exposed more time to loss mechanisms on their drift paths. The radial distance of IBIPS decrease generally with the increase of Kp index. The mean radial distance of IBIPS is basically larger than 6.6 RE during quiet times and smaller than 6.6 RE during active times. When the strength of convection electric field increases, the inward shift of IBIPS is most significant on the night side (22:00–02:00 LT. For Kp ≤ 0+, only 16% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. For 2 ≤ Kp < 3+, however, 70% of IBIPSs penetrate inside the geosynchronous orbit. The IBIPS has weak correlations with the AE and Dst indexes. The average correlation coefficient between Ri and Kp is −0.58 while the correlation coefficient between Ri and AE/Dst is only −0.29/0.17. The correlation coefficients are local time dependent. Particularly, Ri and Kp are highly correlated (r=−0.72 in the night sector, meaning that the radial distance of IBIPS

  13. Thickness of Heliospheric Current and Plasma Sheets: Dependence on Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Smith, E. J.; Winterhalter, D.; McComas, D. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Smith, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    Heliospheric current sheets (HCS) are well defined structures that separate the interplanetary magnetic fields with inverse polarities. Surrounded by heliospheric plasma sheets (HPS), the current sheets stretch throughout the heliosphere. Interesting questions that still remain unanswered include how the thickness of these structures will change along the distance? And what determines the thickness of these structures? To answer these fundamental questions, we have carried out a study of the HCS and HPS using recent Ulysses data near 5 AU. When the results were compared with earlier studies at 1 AU using ISEE-3 data, they were surprising and unexplained. Although the plasma sheet grew thicker, the embedded current sheet grew thinner! Using data under the same (or very similar) circumstances, we have extended the analysis in two ways. First, the same current-plasma sheets studied at 5 AU have been identified at 1 AU using ACE data. Second, data obtained while Ulysses was en-route to Jupiter near 3 AU have been analyzed. This three-point investigation reveals the thickness variation along the distance and enables the examination of the controller of this variation.

  14. Magnetic configuration of the distant plasma sheet - ISEE 3 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Daly, P. W.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the IMF orientation and magnitude and substorm activity on the magnetic configuration of the central plasma sheet at 20-240 earth radii down the geomagnetic tail is investigated on the basis of ISEE-3 data. The results are presented graphically, and high-speed antisolar bulk flows threaded by southward magnetic fields are shown to be present in the distant plasma sheet after periods of substorm activity and southward IMF Bz. The effective dayside reconnection efficiency is estimated as 25 + or - 4 percent, in good agreement with theoretical models.

  15. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  16. Plasma-Jet Forming of Sheet Metal Shapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma-jet forming is a newly proposed flexible sheet metal forming process. A non-transferred arc plasma torch is used as a controllable heat source to produce internal stress in sheet metals, causing plastic deformation without the necessity of hard tooling. This method has potential for rapid prototyping of sheet metal parts by reducing development costs and lead times. A robotic system has been used to perform simple linear bends in several different alloys. In order to develop a controllable process and to improve the forming accuracy, the effects of various process parameters on the obtained shape changes and on the resulting structure and properties have been studied. The overall goal is to understand the roles of the forming parameters and their inter-relationship in optimizing the forming procedure-a high forming speed without damage to the material structure or properties.

  17. Geomagnetic activity effects on plasma sheet energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we use three years (2001, 2002, and 2004 of Cluster plasma sheet data to investigate what happens to localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the plasma sheet during times of high magnetospheric activity. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have studied the influence on Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs from variations in the geomagnetic disturbance level as expressed by the Kp, the AE, and the Dst indices. We find that the ECR occurrence frequency increases during higher magnetospheric activities, and that the ECRs become stronger. This is true both for CLRs and for CGRs, and the localized energy conversion therefore concerns energy conversion in both directions between the particles and the fields in the plasma sheet. A higher geomagnetic activity hence increases the general level of energy conversion in the plasma sheet. Moreover, we have shown that CLRs live longer during magnetically disturbed times, hence converting more electromagnetic energy. The CGR lifetime, on the other hand, seems to be unaffected by the geomagnetic activity level. The evidence for increased energy conversion during geomagnetically disturbed times is most clear for Kp and for AE, but there are also some indications that energy conversion increases during large negative Dst. This is consistent with the plasma sheet magnetically mapping to the auroral zone, and therefore being more tightly coupled to auroral activities and variations in the AE and Kp indices, than to variations in the ring current region as described by the Dst index.

  18. Comparison of plasma sheet ion composition with the IMF and solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.

    Plasma sheet energetic ion data (0.1- to 16 keV/e) obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 between 10 and 23 earth radii are compared with concurrent IMF and solar wind plasma data. The densities of H(+) and He(++) ions in the plasma sheet are found to be the highest, and the most nearly proportional to the solar wind density, when the IMF B(z) is not northward. The density of terrestrial O(+) ions increases strongly with increasing magnitude of the IMF, in apparent agreement with the notion that the IMF plays a fundamental role in the electric coupling between the solar wind and the ionosphere.

  19. On the nature of the plasma sheet boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hones, E.W. Jr. (Mission Research Corp., Los Alamos, NM (USA) Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The regions of the plasma sheet adjacent to the north and south lobes of the magnetotail have been described by many experimenters as locations of beams of energetic ions and fast-moving plasma directed primarily earthward and tailward along magnetic field lines. Measurements taken as satellites passed through one or the other of these boundary layers have frequently revealed near-earth mirroring of ions and a vertical segregation of velocities of both earthward-moving and mirroring ions with the fastest ions being found nearest the lobe-plasma sheet interface. These are features expected for particles from a distant tail source {bar E} {times} {bar B} drifting in a dawn-to-dusk electric field and are consistent with the source being a magnetic reconnection region. The plasma sheet boundary layers are thus understood as separatrix layers, bounded at their lobeward surfaces by the separatrices from the distant neutral line. This paper will review the observations that support this interpretation. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  20. 3-D Magnetospheric Field and Plasma Containing Thin Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Maezawa, K.; Wing, S.

    2002-05-01

    In this study we present fully-3D self-consistent solutions of the magnetosphere by using observation-based plasma pressure distributions and computational boundary conditions based on the T96 magnetospheric field model. The pressure profiles we use are either taken directly from observations (GEOTAIL pressure data in the plasma sheet and DMSP ionospheric pressure) or empirical (Spence-Kivelson formula for pressure on the midnight equatorial line). The 3-D solutions involve solving 2 coupled elliptic equations in a flux coordinate systems, with the magnetic field expressed by two Euler potentials and using appropriate boundary conditions for both the closed- and open-field regions derived from the empirical field model. We look into how the self-consistent magnetic field and current structures change under different external conditions, and we discuss the appearance of thin cross-tail current sheets during disturbed magnetospheric times.

  1. Singular Sheet Etching of Graphene with Oxygen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider Al-Mumen; Fubo Rao; Wen Li; Lixin Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a simple and controllable post-synthesis method for engineering the number of graphene layers based on oxygen plasma etching. Singular sheet etching (SSE) of graphene was achieved with the optimum process duration of 38 seconds. As a demonstration of this SSE process, monolayer graphene films were produced from bilayer graphenes. Experimental investigations verified that the oxygen plasma etching removes a single layer graphene sheet in an anisotropic fashion rather than anisotropic mode. In addition, etching via the oxygen plasma at the ground electrodes introduced fewer defects to the bottom graphene layer compared with the conventional oxygen reactive ion etching using the powered electrodes. Such defects can further be reduced with an effective annealing treatment in an argon environment at 900-1000◦C. These results demonstrate that our developed SSE method has enabled a microelectronics manufacturing compatible way for single sheet precision subtraction of graphene layers and a potential technique for producing large size graphenes with high yield from multilayer graphite materials.

  2. Analysis of radiation performances of plasma sheet antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Zhang, Zu-Fan; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    A novel concept of plasma sheet antennas is presented in this paper, and the radiation performances of plasma sheet antennas are investigated in detail. Firstly, a model of planar plasma antenna (PPA) fed by a microstrip line is developed, and its reflection coefficient is computed by the JE convolution finite-difference time-domain method and compared with that of the metallic patch antenna. It is found that the design of PPA can learn from the theory of the metallic patch antenna, and the impedance matching and reconstruction of resonant frequency can be expediently realized by adjusting the parameters of plasma. Then the PPA is mounted on a metallic cylindrical surface, and the reflection coefficient of the conformal plasma antenna (CPA) is also computed. At the same time, the influence of conformal cylinder radius on the reflection coefficient is also analyzed. Finally, the radiation pattern of a CPA is given, the results show that the pattern agrees well with the one of PPA in the main radiation direction, but its side lobe level has deteriorated significantly.

  3. Survey of Galileo Plasma Observations in Jupiter's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Wilson, Robert J.; Siler, Scott; Paterson, William R.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) Instrument on the Galileo spacecraft (orbiting Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003) measured properties of the ions that were trapped in the magnetic field. The PLS data provide a survey of the plasma properties between approx. 5 and 30 Jupiter radii [R(sub J)] in the equatorial region. We present plasma properties derived via two analysis methods: numerical moments and forward modeling. We find that the density decreases with radial distance by nearly 5 orders of magnitude from approx. 2 to 3000 cm(exp.-3) at 6R(sub j) to approx. 0.05cm(sub -3) at 30 R(sub j). The density profile did not show major changes from orbit to orbit, suggesting that the plasma production and transport remained constant within about a factor of 2. The radial profile of ion temperature increased with distance which implied that contrary to the concept of adiabatic cooling on expansion, the plasma heats up as it expands out from Io's orbit (where TI is approx.60-80 eV) at approx. 6R(sub j) to a few keV at 30R(sub j).There does not seem to be a long-term, systematic variation in ion temperature with either local time or longitude. This latter finding differs from earlier analysis of Galileo PLS data from a selection of orbits. Further examination of all data from all Galileo orbits suggests that System Ill variations are transitory on timescales of weeks, consistent with the modeling of Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations. The plasma flow is dominated by azimuthal flow that is between 80% and 100% of corotation out to 25 R(sub j).

  4. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle

  5. Distribution of energetic oxygen and hydrogen in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, E A; Haaland, S E; Daly, P W; Delcourt, D C; Luo, H; Kistler, L M; Dandouras, I

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distributions of different ion species are useful indicators for plasma sheet dynamics. In this statistical study based on 7 years of Cluster observations, we establish the spatial distributions of oxygen ions and protons at energies from 274 to 955 keV, depending on geomagnetic and solar wind (SW) conditions. Compared with protons, the distribution of energetic oxygen has stronger dawn-dusk asymmetry in response to changes in the geomagnetic activity. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is directed southward, the oxygen ions show significant acceleration in the tail plasma sheet. Changes in the SW dynamic pressure ($\\mathit{P}_{dyn}$) affect the oxygen and proton intensities in the same way. The energetic protons show significant intensity increases at the near-Earth duskside during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, enhanced SW $\\mathit{P}_{dyn}$, and southward IMF, implying there location of effective inductive acceleration mechanisms and a strong duskward drift due to the increase of t...

  6. Formation and evolution of flapping and ballooning waves in magnetospheric plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J. Z. G.; Hirose, A.

    2016-05-01

    By adopting Lembége & Pellat's 2D plasma-sheet model, we investigate the flankward flapping motion and Sunward ballooning propagation driven by an external source (e.g., magnetic reconnection) produced initially at the sheet center. Within the ideal MHD framework, we adopt the WKB approximation to obtain the Taylor-Goldstein equation of magnetic perturbations. Fourier spectral method and Runge-Kutta method are employed in numerical simulations, respectively, under the flapping and ballooning conditions. Studies expose that the magnetic shears in the sheet are responsible for the flapping waves, while the magnetic curvature and the plasma gradient are responsible for the ballooning waves. In addition, the flapping motion has three phases in its temporal development: fast damping phase, slow recovery phase, and quasi-stabilized phase; it is also characterized by two patterns in space: propagating wave pattern and standing wave pattern. Moreover, the ballooning modes are gradually damped toward the Earth, with a wavelength in a scale size of magnetic curvature or plasma inhomogeneity, only 1-7% of the flapping one; the envelops of the ballooning waves are similar to that of the observed bursty bulk flows moving toward the Earth.

  7. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  8. Cluster multi-point observations of the magnetotail plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Paul David

    This thesis presents observations of the terrestrial magnetotail plasma sheet made by the European Space Agency Cluster mission. The Cluster mission is composed of four identical spacecraft, the first such multi-spacecraft mission, and enables, for the first time, the disambiguation of time versus space phenomena. Using the data from 2003, when the spacecraft were at their smallest average separation to date, many small-scale processes, both microphysical and macrophysical, are investigated. In the first study presented, two small flux ropes, a possible signature of multiple X-line reconnection, are investigated. By the development and utilisation of various multi-spacecraft methods, the currents and magnetic forces internal and external to the flux ropes, as well as the internal structure of the flux ropes, are investigated. In addition, a theory of their early evolution is suggested. In the second study presented, various terms of the generalised Ohm's law for a plasma are determined, including, for the first time, the divergence of the full electron pressure tensor, during the passage past the spacecraft of an active reconnection X-line. It is found that the electric field contribution from the divergence of the electron pressure tensor is anti-correlated with the contribution from the Hall term in the direction normal to the neutral sheet. In addition, further signatures of reconnection are quantified, such as parallel electric field generation and Hall quadrupolar magnetic field and current systems. In the final study presented, the anti-correlation between the divergence of the electron pressure tensor and Hall terms is investigated further. It is found that the anti-correlation is general, appearing in the direction normal to the neutral sheet because of a cross tail current. In a simple magnetohydrostatic treatment, a force balance argument leads to the conclusion that the gradient of the anti-correlation is a function of the ratio of the electron to ion

  9. Casimir effects for a flat plasma sheet: I. Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    We study a fluid model of an infinitesimally thin plasma sheet occupying the xy plane, loosely imitating a single base plane from graphite. In terms of the fluid charge e/a{sup 2} and mass m/a{sup 2} per unit area, the crucial parameters are q nsce 2{pi}e{sup 2}/mc{sup 2}a{sup 2}, a Debye-type cutoff K{identical_to}{radical}(4{pi})/a on surface-parallel normal-mode wavenumbers k, and X nsce K/q. The cohesive energy {beta} per unit area is determined from the zero-point energies of the exact normal modes of the plasma coupled to the Maxwell field, namely TE and TM photon modes, plus bound modes decaying exponentially with vertical bar zvertical bar. Odd-parity modes (with E{sub x,y}(z = 0) = 0) are unaffected by the sheet except for their overall phases, and are irrelevant to {beta}, although the following paper shows that they are essential to the fields (e.g. to their vacuum expectation values), and to the stresses on the sheet. Realistically one has X >> 1, the result {beta} {approx} {Dirac_h}cq{sup 1/2}K{sup 5/2} is nonrelativistic, and it comes from the surface modes. By contrast, X << 1 (nearing the limit of perfect reflection) would entail {beta} {approx} -{Dirac_h}cqK{sup 2}log(1/X): contrary to folklore, the surface energy of perfect reflectors is divergent rather than zero. An appendix spells out the relation, for given k, between bound modes and photon phase-shifts. It is very different from Levinson's theorem for 1D potential theory: cursory analogies between TM and potential scattering are apt to mislead.

  10. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space and astrophysical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Strong gradients in plasma flows play a major role in space and astrophysical plasmas. A typical situation is that a static plasma equilibrium is surrounded by a plasma flow, which can lead to strong plasma flow gradients at the separatrices between field lines with different magnetic topologies, e.g., planetary magnetospheres, helmet streamers in the solar corona, or at the boundary between the heliosphere and interstellar medium. Within this work we make a first step to understand the influence of these flows towards the occurrence of current sheets in a stationary state situation. We concentrate here on incompressible plasma flows and 2-D equilibria, which allow us to find analytic solutions of the stationary magnetohydrodynamics equations (SMHD. First we solve the magnetohydrostatic (MHS equations with the help of a Grad-Shafranov equation and then we transform these static equilibria into a stationary state with plasma flow. We are in particular interested to study SMHD-equilibria with strong plasma flow gradients perpendicular to separatrices. We find that induced thin current sheets occur naturally in such situations. The strength of the induced currents depend on the Alfvén Mach number and its gradient, and on the magnetic field.

  11. Central Plasma Sheet Ion Properties as Inferred from Ionospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Simon; Newell, Patrick T.

    1998-01-01

    A method of inferring central plasma sheet (CPS) temperature, density, and pressure from ionospheric observations is developed. The advantage of this method over in situ measurements is that the CPS can be studied in its entirely, rather than only in fragments. As a result, for the first time, comprehensive two-dimensional equatorial maps of CPS pressure, density, and temperature within the isotropic plasma sheet are produced. These particle properties are calculated from data taken by the Special Sensor for Precipitating Particles, version 4 (SSJ4) particle instruments onboard DMSP F8, F9, F10, and F11 satellites during the entire year of 1992. Ion spectra occurring in conjunction with electron acceleration events are specifically excluded. Because of the variability of magnetotail stretching, the mapping to the plasma sheet is done using a modified Tsyganenko [1989] magnetic field model (T89) adjusted to agree with the actual magnetotail stretch at observation time. The latter is inferred with a high degree of accuracy (correlation coefficient -0.9) from the latitude of the DMSP b2i boundary (equivalent to the ion isotropy boundary). The results show that temperature, pressure, and density all exhibit dawn-dusk asymmetries unresolved with previous measurements. The ion temperature peaks near the midnight meridian. This peak, which has been associated with bursty bulk flow events, widens in the Y direction with increased activity. The temperature is higher at dusk than at dawn, and this asymmetry increases with decreasing distance from the Earth. In contrast, the density is higher at dawn than at dusk, and there appears to be a density enhancement in the low-latitude boundary layer regions which increases with decreasing magnetic activity. In the near-Earth regions, the pressure is higher at dusk than at dawn, but this asymmetry weakens with increasing distance from the Earth and may even reverse so that at distances X less than approx. 10 to -12 R(sub E

  12. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm² sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Udit Narayan; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ∼1 kA/cm(2) from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ∼200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  13. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, F., E-mail: menacata3@gmail.com; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: ante0226@gmail.com; Vasko, I. Y. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  14. Spatial variation of eddy-diffusion coefficients in the turbulent plasma sheet during substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stepanova

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Study of the plasma turbulence in the central plasma sheet was performed using the Interball-Tail satellite data. Fluctuations of the plasma bulk velocity in the plasma sheet were deduced from the measurements taken by the Corall instrument for different levels of geomagnetic activity and different locations inside the plasma sheet. The events that satisfied the following criteria were selected for analysis: number density 0.1–10 cm−3, ion temperature T≥0.3 keV, and average bulk velocity ≤100 km/s. It was found that the plasma sheet flow generally appears to be strongly turbulent, i.e. is dominated by fluctuations that are unpredictable. Corresponding eddy-diffusion coefficients in Y- and Z-direction in the GSM coordinate system were derived using the autocorrelation time and rms velocity. Statistical studies of variation of the eddy-diffusion coefficients with the location inside the plasma sheet showed a significant increase in these coefficients in the tailward direction. During substorms this dependence shows strong increase of eddy-diffusion in the central part of the plasma sheet at the distances of 10–30 Earth's radii. This effect is much stronger for Y-components of the eddy-diffusion coefficient, which could be related to the geometry of the plasma sheet, allowing more room for development of eddies in this direction.

  15. A statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind based on DSP explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Yan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available By using the data of two spacecraft, TC-1 and ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer, a statistical study on the correlations between plasma sheet and solar wind has been carried out. The results obtained show that the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re has an apparent driving relationship with the solar wind. It is found that (1 there is a positive correlation between the duskward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the duskward component of the geomagnetic field in the plasma sheet, with a proportionality constant of about 1.09. It indicates that the duskward component of the IMF can effectively penetrate into the near-Earth plasma sheet, and can be amplified by sunward convection in the corresponding region at geocentric distances of about 9~13.4 Re; (2 the increase in the density or the dynamic pressure of the solar wind will generally lead to the increase in the density of the plasma sheet; (3 the ion thermal pressure in the near-Earth plasma sheet is significantly controlled by the dynamic pressure of solar wind; (4 under the northward IMF condition, the ion temperature and ion thermal pressure in the plasma sheet decrease as the solar wind speed increases. This feature indicates that plasmas in the near-Earth plasma sheet can come from the magnetosheath through the LLBL. Northward IMF is one important condition for the transport of the cold plasmas of the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet through the LLBL, and fast solar wind will enhance such a transport process.

  16. THIN CURRENT SHEETS AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRON HEATING IN TURBULENT SPACE PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Canu, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, F-91128 (France); Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Sundkvist, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria (Italy); Sorriso-Valvo, L., E-mail: alexandros.chasapis@lpp.polytechnique.fr [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (<3), indicating that the former are dominant for energy dissipation. Current sheets corresponding to very high PVI (>5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  17. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  18. Seismic Response Analysis of Portal Water Injection Sheet Pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuanbin; GUO Haiyan; ZHANG Chunhui

    2007-01-01

    To further the study on the newly developed portal water injection sheet pile under static loads, in this paper, by adopting the nonlinear calculation module of FEM software ANSYS, a model for the interaction between the soil and the sheet piles is set up,and the seismic response analysis for this type of space-retaining structure is performed. The effects of the embedded depth and the distance between the front pile and the back pile on the dynamic characteristics of the portal water injection sheet pile are studied.

  19. Ion Beams in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.; Runov, A.; Zhou, X.

    2015-12-01

    We explore characteristics of energetic particles in the plasma sheet boundary layer associated with dipolarization events, based on simulations and observations. The simulations use the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection and flow bursts as basis for test particle tracing. They are complemented by self-consistent fully electrodynamic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The test particle simulations confirm that crescent shaped earthward flowing ion velocity distributions with strong perpendicular anisotropy can be generated as a consequence of near tail reconnection, associated with earthward flows and propagating magnetic field dipolarization fronts. Both PIC and test particle simulations show that the ion distribution in the outflow region close to the reconnection site also consist of a beam superposed on an undisturbed population; this beam, however, does not show strong perpendicular anisotropy. This suggests that the crescent shape is created by quasi-adiabatic deformation from ion motion along the magnetic field toward higher field strength. The simulation results compare favorably with ``Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms" (THEMIS) observations.

  20. Response of the ice sheets to fluctuating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgeholm Mikkelsen, Troels; Grinsted, Aslak; Ditlevsen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting the future sea level relies on accurate modeling of the response of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to changing tempera- tures. Using coupled climate and ice sheet models long time forecasting is often made computationally feasible by running the ice sheet model in off-line mode, such that the temperature and precipitation fields govern- ing the mass balance of the ice sheets are taken to be constant over time. As the temperature and precipitation fluctuates, the asymmetry in the typical time scales for accumulation and ablation would result in a bias in the resulting mass balance of the ice sheet. We show that the steady state of the ice sheet is biased toward larger size of the ice sheet, if the short time scale fluctuations in temperature are not taken into account. This could potentially imply that the critical global temperature increase for ice sheet collapse is overestimated, thus the risk of collapse in a given climate change scenario underestimated. Our results highlight the need to consider the variability and not only the mean of the forcing of the mass balance of the ice sheet. We estimate that the effect of temperature variability on surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet in recent ensemble forecasting should be adjusted downward by as much as 10 percent of the present day observed value, if assuming a 2 degree warming. We are thus closer to a potential tipping point, than previously anticipated. Many predicted scenarios of the future climate show an increased variability in temperature over much of the Earth. In light of the findings presented here, it is important to gauge the extent to which this increased variability will further influence climate change.

  1. Thin Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Sundkvist, D.; Greco, A.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Canu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  2. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  3. Bi-directional electrons in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shiokawa

    Full Text Available We have studied the occurrence characteristics of bi-directional electron pitch angle anisotropy (enhanced flux in field-aligned directions, F^ /F|| > 1.5 at energies of 0.1–30 keV using plasma and magnetic field data from the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near-Earth plasma sheet. The occurrence rate increases in the tailward direction from XGSM = - 9 RE to - 19 RE . The occurrence rate is also enhanced in the midnight sector, and furthermore, whenever the elevation angle of the magnetic field is large while the magnetic field intensity is small, B ~ 15 nT. From these facts, we conclude that the bi-directional electrons in the central plasma sheet are produced mainly in the vicinity of the neutral sheet and that the contribution from ionospheric electrons is minor. A high occurrence is also found after earthward high-speed ion flows, suggesting Fermi-type field-aligned electron acceleration in the neutral sheet. Occurrence characteristics of bi-directional electrons in the plasma sheet boundary layer are also discussed.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; magnetotail; plasma sheet

  4. Study of the turbulence in the central plasma sheet using the CLUSTER satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, M.; Arancibia Riveros, K.; Bosqued, J.; Antonova, E.

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies are shown that the turbulent processes in the space plasmas are very important. It includes the behavior of the plasma sheet plasma during geomagnetic substorms and storms. Study of the plasma turbulence in the central plasma sheet was made using the CLUSTER satellite mission data. For this studies we used the Cluster Ion Spectrometry experiment (CIS), and fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) data for studying fluctuations of the plasma bulk velocity and geomagnetic field fluctuations for different levels of geomagnetic activity and different locations inside the plasma sheet. Case studies for the orbits during quiet geomagnetic conditions, different phases of geomagnetic substroms and storms showed that the properties of plasma turbulence inside the sheet differ significantly for all afore mentioned cases. Variations in the probability distribution functions, flatness factors, local intermittency measure parameters, and eddy diffusion coefficients indicate that the turbulence increases significantly during substorm growth and expansion phases and decreases slowly to the initial level during the recovery phase. It became even stronger during the storm main phase.

  5. A Modified Porous Titanium Sheet Prepared by Plasma-Activated Sintering for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimichi Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a contamination-free porous titanium scaffold by a plasma-activated sintering within an originally developed TiN-coated graphite mold. The surface of porous titanium sheet with or without a coated graphite mold was characterized. The cell adhesion property of porous titanium sheet was also evaluated in this study. The peak of TiC was detected on the titanium sheet processed with the graphite mold without a TiN coating. Since the titanium fiber elements were directly in contact with the carbon graphite mold during processing, surface contamination was unavoidable event in this condition. The TiC peak was not detectable on the titanium sheet processed within the TiN-coated carbon graphite mold. This modified plasma-activated sintering with the TiN-coated graphite mold would be useful to fabricate a contamination-free titanium sheet. The number of adherent cells on the modified titanium sheet was greater than that of the bare titanium plate. Stress fiber formation and the extension of the cells were observed on the titanium sheets. This modified titanium sheet is expected to be a new tissue engineering material in orthopedic bone repair.

  6. Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in the Earth's plasma sheet. In total we have studied 151 ECRs within 660 h of plasma sheet data from the summer and fall of 2001 when Cluster was close to apogee at an altitude of about 15–20 RE. Cluster offers appropriate conditions for the investigation of energy conversion by the evaluation of the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J the current density. From the sign of the power density, we have identified more than three times as many Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs as Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. We also note that the CLRs appear to be stronger. To our knowledge, these are the first in situ observations confirming the general notion of the plasma sheet, on the average, behaving as a load. At the same time the plasma sheet appears to be highly structured, with energy conversion occurring in both directions between the fields and the particles. From our data we also find that the CLRs appear to be located closer to the neutral sheet, while CGRs prefer locations towards the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL. For both CLRs and CGRs, E and J in the GSM y (cross-tail direction dominate the total power density, even though the z contribution occasionally can be significant. The prevalence of the y-direction seems to be weaker for the CGRs, possibly related to a higher fluctuation level near the PSBL.

  7. Thermal Structure and Dynamics in Supra-arcade Downflows and Flare Plasma Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K.; Hanneman, W.; Freed, M.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    During a long duration solar flare, a hot plasma sheet is commonly formed above the flare loops. Often produced within this sheet are down-flowing voids referred to as supra-arcade downflows, thought to be the products of a patchy reconnection process. Models differ on the question of whether the downflows should be hotter than the surrounding plasma or not. We use imaging data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA to determine the thermal structure of the plasma sheet and downflows. We find that the temperatures of the plasma within the downflows are either roughly the same as or lower than the surrounding fan plasma. This result implies that a mechanism for forming the voids that involves a sunward directed hydrodynamic shock pattern combined with perpendicular magnetic shock is unlikely. Additionally, we use the high cadence AIA data to trace the velocity fields in these regions through the use of a local correlation tracking algorithm. Through these measurements, we can determine areas of diverging velocity fields, as well as velocity shear fields and correlate them with temperature changes in order to understand the heating mechanisms in the plasma sheet. This work is supported by under contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed-Martin to SAO, contract NNM07AB07C from NASA to SAO and NASA grant numbers NNX13AG54G and NNX14AD43G

  8. Survey of 0. 1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, W.; Shelley, E.G.

    1986-03-01

    A large statistical survey of the 0.1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition has been carried out using data obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE 1 between 10 and 23 R/sub E/ during 1978 and 1979. This survey includes more than 10 times the quantity of data used in earlier studies of the same topic and makes it possible to investigate in finer detail the relationship between the ion composition and the substorm activity. The larger data base also makes it possible for the first time to study the spatial distribution of the principal ion species. As found in previous studies, the ion composition has a large variance at any given value of the AE index, but a number of distinct trends emerge when the data are averaged at each activity level. During quiet conditions the plasma sheet is dominated by ions of solar origin (H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/), as found in earlier studies, and these ions are most numerous during extended periods of very low activity (AE< or approx. =30 ..gamma..). The quiet time density of these ions is particularly large in the flanks of the plasma sheet (GSM Yapprox. +- 10 R/sub E/), where it is about twice as large as it is near the central axis of the plasma sheet (Y = Z = 0). In contrast, the energy of these ions peaks near the central axis.

  9. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-01

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  10. Oxygen plasma-treated thermoresponsive polymer surfaces for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagamori, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    Although cell sheet tissue engineering is a potent and promising method for tissue engineering, an increase of mechanical strength of a cell sheet is needed for easy manipulation of it during transplantation or 3D tissue fabrication. Previously, we developed a cell sheet-polymer film complex that had enough mechanical strength that can be manipulated even by tweezers (Fujita et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 103(2): 370-377). We confirmed the polymer film involving a temperature sensitive polymer and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins could be removed by lowering temperature after transplantation, and its potential use in regenerative medicine was demonstrated. However, the use of ECM proteins conflicted with high stability in long-term storage and low cost. In the present study, to overcome these drawbacks, we employed the oxygen plasma treatment instead of using the ECM proteins. A cast and dried film of thermoresponsive poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) was fabricated and treated with high-intensity oxygen plasma. The cells became possible to adhere to the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, whereas could not to the inherent surface of bulk PNIPAAm without treatment. Characterizations of the treated surface revealed the surface had high stability. The surface roughness, wettability, and composition were changed, depending on the plasma intensity. Interestingly, although bulk PNIPAAm layer had thermoresponsiveness and dissolved below lower critical solution temperature (LCST), it was found that the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface lost its thermoresponsiveness and remained insoluble in water below LCST as a thin layer. Skeletal muscle C2C12 cells could be cultured on the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, a skeletal muscle cell sheet with the insoluble thin layer could be released in the medium, and thus the possibility of use of the cell sheet for transplantation was demonstrated.

  11. In Situ Observations of Ion Scale Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retino, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Greco, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Canu, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a statistical study of ion-scale current sheets in turbulent space plasma. The study was performed using in situ measurements from the Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. Intermittent structures were identified using the Partial Variance of Increments method. We studied the distribution of the identified structures as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high (>3) and low (3) structures that accounted for ~20% of the total. Those current sheets have high magnetic shear (>90 degrees) and were observed mostly in close proximity to the bow shock with their numbers reducing towards the magnetopause. Enhancement of the estimated electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  12. Plasma Sheet Actuator Driven by Repetitive Nanosecond Pulses with a Negative DC Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋慧敏; 张乔根; 李应红; 贾敏; 吴云; 梁华

    2012-01-01

    A type of electrical discharge called sliding discharge was developed to generate plasma aerodynamic actuation for flow control. A three-electrode plasma sheet actuator driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses with a negative DC component was used to generate sliding discharge, which can be called nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge. The phenomenology and behaviour of the plasma sheet actuator were investigated experimentally. Discharge morphology shows that the formation of nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is dependent on the peak value of the repetitive nanosecond pulses and negative DC component applied on the plasma sheet actuator. Compared to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), the extension of plasma in nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is quasi-diffusive, stable, longer and more intensive. Test results of particle image velocimetry demonstrate that the negative DC component applied to a third electrode could significantly modify the topology of the flow induced by nanosecond-pulse DBD. Body force induced by the nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge can be approximately in the order of mN. Both the maximum velocity and the body force induced by sliding discharge increase significantly as compared to single DBD. Therefore, nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is a preferable plasma aerodynamic actuation generation mode, which is very promising in the field of aerodynamics.

  13. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  14. On the plasma-based growth of ‘flowing’ graphene sheets at atmospheric pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, D.; Bundaleska, N.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, A.; Henriques, J.; Rego, A.; Ferraria, A.; Abrashev, M. V.; Dias, F. M.; Luhrs, C. C.; Phillips, J.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study on atmospheric pressure microwave plasma-based assembly of free standing graphene sheets is presented. The synthesis method is based on introducing a carbon-containing precursor (C2H5OH) through a microwave (2.45 GHz) argon plasma environment, where decomposition of ethanol molecules takes place and carbon atoms and molecules are created and then converted into solid carbon nuclei in the ‘colder’ nucleation zones. A theoretical model previously developed has been further updated and refined to map the particle and thermal fluxes in the plasma reactor. Considering the nucleation process as a delicate interplay between thermodynamic and kinetic factors, the model is based on a set of non-linear differential equations describing plasma thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. The model predictions were validated by experimental results. Optical emission spectroscopy was applied to detect the plasma emission related to carbon species from the ‘hot’ plasma zone. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques have been applied to analyze the synthesized nanostructures. The microstructural features of the solid carbon nuclei collected from the colder zones of plasma reactor vary according to their location. A part of the solid carbon was deposited on the discharge tube wall. The solid assembled from the main stream, which was gradually withdrawn from the hot plasma region in the outlet plasma stream directed to a filter, was composed by ‘flowing’ graphene sheets. The influence of additional hydrogen, Ar flow rate and microwave power on the concentration of obtained stable species and carbon-dicarbon was evaluated. The ratio of sp3/sp2 carbons in graphene sheets is presented. A correlation between changes in C2 and C number densities and sp3/sp2 ratio was found.

  15. Kink-like mode of a double gradient instability in a compressible plasma current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovinskiy, D.B.; Ivanova, V.V.; Erkaev, N.V.; Semenov, V.S.; Ivanov, I.B.; Biernat, H.K.; Zellinger, M.

    2011-01-01

    A linear MHD instability of the electric current sheet, characterized by a small normal magnetic field component, varying along the sheet, is investigated. The tangential magnetic field component is modeled by a hyperbolic function, describing Harris-like variations of the field across the sheet. For this problem, which is formulated in a 3D domain, the conventional compressible ideal MHD equations are applied. By assuming Fourier harmonics along the electric current, the linearized 3D equations are reduced to 2D ones. A finite difference numerical scheme is applied to examine the time evolution of small initial perturbations of the plasma parameters. This work is an extended numerical study of the so called “double gradient instability”, – a possible candidate for the explanation of flapping oscillations in the magnetotail current sheet, which has been analyzed previously in the framework of a simplified analytical approach for an incompressible plasma. The dispersion curve is obtained for the kink-like mode of the instability. It is shown that this curve demonstrates a quantitative agreement with the previous analytical result. The development of the instability is investigated also for various enhanced values of the normal magnetic field component. It is found that the characteristic values of the growth rate of the instability shows a linear dependence on the square root of the parameter, which scales uniformly the normal component of the magnetic field in the current sheet. PMID:22053125

  16. Evaluation of sheet mechanical response to laser welding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignani, B.; Daneri, A.; Toselli, G. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia `E. Clementel` - Area Energia e Innovazione; Vitali, R.; Zanotelli, G.L. [Hibbit, Karlsson and Sorensen, Milan (Italy); Bellei, M. [Industrialconsult, Milan (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    The simulation of the mechanical response of steel sheets, due to the heating during welding processes by a laser source beam, obtained by Abaqus standard code, is discussed. Different hypotheses for the material behaviour at temperatures greater than the fusion one have been tested and compared; in particular, some tests have been made taking the annealing effect into account by means of an user routine UMAT developed ad hoc. This work was presented at the 8th international Abaqus Users` conference at Paris, 31 May - 2 June 1995.

  17. Response of the Antarctic ice sheet to future greenhouse warming

    OpenAIRE

    Oerlemans, J.; Huybrechts, P.

    1990-01-01

    Possible future changes in land ice volume are mentioned frequently as an important aspect of the greenhouse problem. This paper deals with the response ofthe Antarctic ice sheet and presents a tentative projection of changes in global sea level for the next few hundred years, due to changes in its surface massbalance. We imposed a temperature scenario, in which surface air temperature rises to 4.2¡C in the year 2100 AD and is kept constant afterwards. As GCMstudies seem to indicate a higher ...

  18. A study of the formation and dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet using ion composition data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, O.W.

    1994-04-01

    Over two years of data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft, covering ion energies between 100 eV/e and about 16 keV/e, have been analyzed in an attempt to extract new information about three geophysical issues: (1) solar wind penetration of the Earth's magnetic tail; (2) relationship between plasma sheet and tail lobe ion composition; and (3) possible effects of heavy terrestrial ions on plasma sheet stability.

  19. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  20. A Statistical study of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability signatures using THEMIS spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisic, Mirjana; Panov, Evgeny; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We use THEMIS data from 2010-2012 tail seasons to collect observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Over seventy observations with closely located THEMIS probes P3-P5 reveal that BICI-like plasma sheet oscillations may appear at different magnetic local time. For these, we derive background plasma sheet parameters such as BZ, δBZ/δx and plasma beta, and investigate solar wind conditions. We also estimate the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations such as frequency and amplitude. Based on this, we search for a relation between the background plasma sheet parameters and the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations.

  1. Geotail observations of temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the dusk plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Nishino

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In search for clues towards the understanding of the cold plasma sheet formation under northward IMF, we study the temperature anisotropy of the two-component protons in the plasma sheet near the dusk low-latitude boundary observed by the Geotail spacecraft. The two-component protons result from mixing of the cold component from the solar wind and the hot component of the magnetospheric origin, and may be the most eloquent evidence for the transport process across the magnetopause. The cold component occasionally has a strong anisotropy in the dusk flank, and the sense of the anisotropy depends on the observed locations: the parallel temperature is enhanced in the tail flank while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. The hot component is nearly isotropic in the tail while the perpendicular temperature is enhanced on the dayside. We discuss possible mechanism that can lead to the observed temperature anisotropies.

  2. On the 3-dimensional structure of plasmoids. [in near-earth plasma sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, W. J.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that the IMF penetrates plasmoids causing them to be three- rather than two-dimensional is tested by comparing observations of By within plasmoids and related tail structures to upstream IMF By data. The magnetic topologies that result from the mergings of closed plasma sheet flux tubes and open tail lobe flux tubes at a near-earth neutral line, and merging near the tail flanks are described and studied. The particle signals and isotropic electron distributions are examined. It is observed that the IMF By penetrates plasmoids and that their structure is three-dimensional. In the three-dimensional model of plasmoids the reconnected plasma sheet field lines form a magnetic flux-ropelike structure. The three-dimensional model is utilized to analyze stagnant, slowly moving and earthward moving structures.

  3. Effect of the initial plasma parameters on the structure of the current sheets developing in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.; Bogdanov, S. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the initial plasma parameters on the structure of the plasma of the current sheets that form in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line is studied by holographic interferometry. The evolution of the plasma sheets that develop in an initial low-density plasma, where a gas is mainly ionized by a pulse current passing through the plasma and initiating the formation of a current sheet, has been comprehensively studied for the first time. At the early stage of evolution, the spatial structure of such a plasma sheet differs substantially from the classic current sheets forming in a dense plasma. Nevertheless, extended plasma sheets with similar parameters form eventually irrespective of the initial plasma density.

  4. Plasma sheet ion composition at various levels of geomagnetic and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1987-08-01

    The data obtained in the earth's plasma sheet by the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE-1 spacecraft are briefly reexamined. The data are shown in the form of statistically averaged bulk parameters for the four major ions H(+), He(2+), He(+), and O(+) to illustrate the apparent mixture of solar and terrestrial ions, a mixture that varies with geomagnetic and other conditions. Some major differences in the statistical properties of different ions, which may have a bearing on the physics of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, are highlighted.

  5. Sounding of the plasma sheet in the deep geomagnetic tail using energetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, P.W.; Wenzel, K.; Sanderson, T.R.

    1984-10-01

    Energetic ions (E>35 keV) at 90/sup 0/ to the magnetic field line are measured on ISEE-3 in the distant geomagnetic tail and are used as tracers of the particle density during two encounters with the plasma sheet at 210 and 128 earth radii from the earth. Because of the finite gyroradius (2400 km) of these (assumed) protons, different orientation about the magnetic field measure the intensity of different locations, allowing a separation of spatial from temporal variations. Density contour maps of the plasma hseet are constructed, demonstrating the wavy nature of this regime, as well as the existence of density layers within it.

  6. On the problem of Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer identification from plasma moments in Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Grigorenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of identification of the interface region between the lobe and the Plasma Sheet (PS – the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL – using ion moments and magnetic field data often arises in works devoted to statistical studies of various PSBL phenomena. Our experience in the identification of this region based on the analysis of ion velocity distribution functions demonstrated that plasma parameters, such as the ion density and bulk velocity, the plasma beta or the dynamic pressure vary widely depending on the state of magnetotail activity. For example, while field-aligned beams of accelerated ions are often observed propagating along the lobeward edge of the PSBL there are times when no signatures of these beams could be observed. In the last case, a spacecraft moving from the lobe region to the PS registers almost isotropic PS-like ion velocity distribution. Such events may be classified as observations of the outer PS region. In this paper, we attempt to identify ion parameter ranges or their combinations that result in a clear distinction between the lobe, the PSBL and the adjacent PS or the outer PS regions. For this we used 100 crossings of the lobe-PSBL-PS regions by Cluster spacecraft (s/c made in different periods of magnetotail activity. By eye inspection of the ion distribution functions we first identify and separate the lobe, the PSBL and the adjacent PS or outer PS regions and then perform a statistical study of plasma and magnetic field parameters in these regions. We found that the best results in the identification of the lobe-PSBL boundary are reached when one uses plasma moments, namely the ion bulk velocity and density calculated not for the entire energy range, but for the energies higher than 2 keV. In addition, we demonstrate that in many cases the plasma beta fails to correctly identify and separate the PSBL and the adjacent PS or the outer PS regions.

  7. Resonant scattering of plasma sheet electrons leading to diffuse auroral precipitation: 1. Evaluation for electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Chen, Lunjin; Li, Wen

    2011-04-01

    Using statistical wave power spectral profiles obtained from CRRES and the latitudinal distributions of wave propagation modeled by the HOTRAY code, a quantitative analysis has been performed on the scattering of plasma sheet electrons into the diffuse auroral zone by multiband electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions near L = 6 within the 0000-0600 MLT sector. The results show that ECH wave scattering of plasma sheet electrons varies from near the strong diffusion rate (timescale of an hour or less) during active times with peak wave amplitudes of an order of 1 mV/m to very weak scattering (on the timescale of >1 day) during quiet conditions with typical wave amplitudes of tenths of mV/m. However, for the low-energy (˜100 eV to below 2 keV) electron population mainly associated with the diffuse auroral emission, ECH waves are only responsible for rapid pitch angle diffusion (occasionally near the limit of strong diffusion) for a small portion of the electron population with pitch angles αeq 70°. Computations of the bounce-averaged coefficients of momentum diffusion and (pitch angle, momentum) mixed diffusion indicate that both mixed diffusion and energy diffusion of plasma sheet electrons due to ECH waves are very small compared to pitch angle diffusion and that ECH waves have little effect on local electron acceleration. Consequently, the multiple harmonic ECH emissions cannot play a dominant role in the occurrence of diffuse auroral precipitation near L = 6, and other wave-particle interaction mechanisms, such as whistler mode chorus-driven resonant scattering, are required to explain the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and the formation of the pancake distribution in the inner magnetosphere.

  8. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  9. Cluster and TC-1 observation of magnetic holes in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Sun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic holes with relatively small scale sizes, detected by Cluster and TC-1 in the magnetotail plasma sheet, are studied in this paper. It is found that these magnetic holes are spatial structures and they are not magnetic depressions generated by the flapping movement of the magnetotail current sheet. Most of the magnetic holes (93% were observed during intervals with Bz larger than Bx, i.e. they are more likely to occur in a dipolarized magnetic field topology. Our results also suggest that the occurrence of these magnetic holes might have a close relationship with the dipolarization process. The magnetic holes typically have a scale size comparable to the local proton Larmor radius and are accompanied by an electron energy flux enhancement at a 90° pitch angle, which is quite different from the previously observed isotropic electron distributions inside magnetic holes in the plasma sheet. It is also shown that most of the magnetic holes occur in marginally mirror-stable environments. Whether the plasma sheet magnetic holes are generated by the mirror instability related to ions or not, however, is unknown. Comparison of ratios, scale sizes and propagation direction of magnetic holes detected by Cluster and TC-1, suggests that magnetic holes observed in the vicinity of the TC-1 orbit (~7–12 RE are likely to be further developed than those observed by Cluster (~7–18 RE.

  10. Plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular backward wave oscillator driven by sheet electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hadap; J Mondal; K C Mittal; K P Maheshwari

    2011-03-01

    Performance of the backward wave oscillator (BWO) is greatly enhanced with the introduction of plasma. Linear theory of the dispersion relation and the growth rate have been derived and analysed numerically for plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular waveguide driven by sheet electron beam. To see the effect of plasma on the TM01 cold wave structure mode and on the generated frequency, the parameters used are: relativistic factor = 1.5 (i.e. / = 0.741), average waveguide height 0 = 1.445 cm, axial corrugation period 0 = 1.67 cm, and corrugation amplitude = 0.225 cm. The plasma density is varied from zero to 2 × 1012 cm-3. The presence of plasma tends to raise the TM01 mode cut-off frequency (14 GH at 2 × 1012 cm-3 plasma density) relative to the vacuum cut-off frequency (5 GH) which also causes a decrease in the group velocity everywhere, resulting in a flattening of the dispersion relation. With the introduction of plasma, an enhancement in absolute instability was observed.

  11. Ice Sheet Roughness Estimation Based on Impulse Responses Acquired in the Global Ice Sheet Mapping Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamsuwan, N.; Johnson, J. T.; Jezek, K. C.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    The Global Ice Sheet Mapping Orbiter (GISMO) mission was developed to address scientific needs to understand the polar ice subsurface structure. This NASA Instrument Incubator Program project is a collaboration between Ohio State University, the University of Kansas, Vexcel Corporation and NASA. The GISMO design utilizes an interferometric SAR (InSAR) strategy in which ice sheet reflected signals received by a dual-antenna system are used to produce an interference pattern. The resulting interferogram can be used to filter out surface clutter so as to reveal the signals scattered from the base of the ice sheet. These signals are further processed to produce 3D-images representing basal topography of the ice sheet. In the past three years, the GISMO airborne field campaigns that have been conducted provide a set of useful data for studying geophysical properties of the Greenland ice sheet. While topography information can be obtained using interferometric SAR processing techniques, ice sheet roughness statistics can also be derived by a relatively simple procedure that involves analyzing power levels and the shape of the radar impulse response waveforms. An electromagnetic scattering model describing GISMO impulse responses has previously been proposed and validated. This model suggested that rms-heights and correlation lengths of the upper surface profile can be determined from the peak power and the decay rate of the pulse return waveform, respectively. This presentation will demonstrate a procedure for estimating the roughness of ice surfaces by fitting the GISMO impulse response model to retrieved waveforms from selected GISMO flights. Furthermore, an extension of this procedure to estimate the scattering coefficient of the glacier bed will be addressed as well. Planned future applications involving the classification of glacier bed conditions based on the derived scattering coefficients will also be described.

  12. Three-dimensional particle simulation of plasma instabilities and collisionless reconnection in a current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Sato, Tetsuya [Theory and Computer Simulation Center, National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Generation of anomalous resistivity and dynamical development of collisionless reconnection in the vicinity of a magnetically neutral sheet are investigated by means of a three-dimensional particle simulation. For no external driving source, two different types of plasma instabilities are excited in the current layer. The lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) is observed to grow in the periphery of current layer in an early period, while a drift kink instability (DKI) is triggered at the neutral sheet in a late period as a result of the nonlinear deformation of the current sheet by the LHDI. A reconnection electric field grows at the neutral sheet in accordance with the excitation of the DKI. When an external driving field exists, the convective electric field penetrates into the current layer through the particle kinetic effect and collisionless reconnection is triggered by the convective electric field earlier than the DKI is excited. It is also found that the anisotropic ion distribution is formed through the anomalous ion heating by the DKI. (author)

  13. Alfven Waves in a Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer Associated with Near-Tail Magnetic Reconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhi-Gang; DENG Xiao-Hua; PANG Ye; LI Shi-You; WANG Jing-Fang

    2007-01-01

    We report observations from Geotail satellite showing that large Poynting fluxes associated with Alfven waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer(PSBL) occur in the vicinity of the near-tail reconnection region on 10 December 1996.During the period of large Poynting fluxex,Geotail also observed strong tailward plasma flws.These observations demonstrate the importance of near-tail reconnection process as the energy source of Alfven waves in the PSBL.Strong tailward(Earthward)plasma flows ought to be an important candidate in generating Alfven waves.Furthermore,the strong pertutbations not only of the magnetic field but also of the electric field observed in the PSBL indicate that the PSBL plays an important role in the generation and propagation of the energy flux associated with Alfven waves.

  14. Ion Plasma Responses to External Electromagnetic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2010-01-01

    The response of ion plasmas to external radiation fields is investigated in a quantum mechanical formalism.We focus on the total electric field within the plasma. For general bandpass signals three frequency regions can be distinguished in terms of the plasma frequency. For low frequencies, the exte

  15. Relative contributions of terrestrial and solar wind ions in the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    A major uncertainty concerning the origins of plasma sheet ions is due to the fact that terrestrial H(+) can have similar fluxes and energies as H(+) from the solar wind. The situation is especially ambiguous during magnetically quiet conditions (AE less than 60 gamma) when H(+) typically contributes more than 90 percent of the plasma sheet ion population. In this study that problem is examined using a large data set obtained by the ISEE-1 Plasma Composition Experiment. The data suggest that one component of the H(+) increases in energy with increasing activity, roughly in proportion to 1/4 the energy of the He(++), whereas the other H(+) component has about the same energy at all activity levels, as do the O(+) and the He(+). If it is assumed that the H(+) of solar wind origin on the average has about the same energy-per-nucleon as the He(++), which is presumably almost entirely from the solar wind, then the data imply that as much as 20-30 percent of the H(+) can be of terrestrial origin even during quiet conditions.

  16. Relative contributions of terrestrial and solar wind ions in the plasma sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    A major uncertainty concerning the origins of plasma sheet ions is due to the fact that terrestrial H(+) can have similar fluxes and energies as H(+) from the solar wind. The situation is especially ambiguous during magnetically quiet conditions (AE less than 60 gamma) when H(+) typically contributes more than 90 percent of the plasma sheet ion population. In this study that problem is examined using a large data set obtained by the ISEE-1 Plasma Composition Experiment. The data suggest that one component of the H(+) increases in energy with increasing activity, roughly in proportion to 1/4 the energy of the He(++), whereas the other H(+) component has about the same energy at all activity levels, as do the O(+) and the He(+). If it is assumed that the H(+) of solar wind origin on the average has about the same energy-per-nucleon as the He(++), which is presumably almost entirely from the solar wind, then the data imply that as much as 20-30 percent of the H(+) can be of terrestrial origin even during quiet conditions.

  17. Survey of 0.1- to 16-keV/e plasma sheet ion composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, W.; Shelley, E. G.

    1986-03-01

    An analysis is performed of all plasma sheet data collected in 1978-79 in order to discern statistical trends in the data. Attention is focused on the bulk parameters of 0.1-16 keV/e plasma sheet ions detected by the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 satellite. The data were collected at 10-23 earth radii, and are averaged for various levels of activity in the AE index. Solar H(+) and He(2+) ions dominate during quiet periods and possess energies similar to those of the solar wind when the quiet period lasts several hours. Increasing AE index values eventually lead to a replacement of the solar ions with terrestrial ions, particularly O(+), which can have an average energy density of 3-4 keV/e at every activity level. The solar ions, however, increase in energy as their density decreases. The O(+) density is highest near the local midnight and becomes the most numerous during highly disturbed conditions. Finally, the O(+) density was observed to increase by a factor of three over the monitoring period, possibly due to enhanced solar EUV radiation.

  18. Plasma sheet stretching accompanied by field aligned energetic ion fluxes observed by the MUADU instrument aboard TC-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Li; S.MCKENNA-LAWLOR; S.BARABASH; LIU ZhenXing; CAO JinBin; J.BALAZ; K.KUDELA; T.L.ZHANG; C.M.CARR

    2007-01-01

    The NUADU(NeUtral Atom Detector Unit)instrument aboard TC-2 recorded 4π solid angle images of charged particles(E>180 keV)spiraling around the magnetic field lines in the near-Earth plasma sheet (at~-7 RE,equatorial dawn-to-night side)during a geomagnetic storm(Dst=-219 nT)on August 24,2005.Energetic ion beam events characterized by symmetrical,ring-like,solid angle distributions around ambient magnetic field lines were observed during a 34-minute traversal of the plasma sheet by the TC-2 spacecraft.Also,observations during these multiple crossings of the plasma sheet were monitored by the magnetometer experiment(FGM)aboard the same spacecraft.During each crossing,a whistler-mode chorus enhancement was observed in the anisotropic area by the TC-2 low frequency electromagnetic wave detector(LFEW/TC-2)at a frequency just above that of the local lower hybrid wave.A comparison of the ion pitch angle distribution(PAD)map with the ambient magnetic field shows that an enhancement in the field aligned energetic ion flux was accompanied by tailward stretching of the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet.In contrast,the perpendicular ion-flux enhancement was accompanied by a signature indicating the corresponding shrinkage of the magnetic field lines in the plasma sheet.Since both parallel ion-flux and perpendicular ion-flux enhancements occurred intermittently,the data were interpreted to imply a dynamical,oscillatory process of the magnetic field line(stretching and shrinking)in the near-Earth plasma sheet,which might have acted to help establish an interaction region in this area which would support continuous aurora-substorm triggering during the ongoing magnetic storm.The whistler-mode chorus may have been produced due to ion gyro-resonance during particle pitch angle diffusion after the plasma sheet compression.

  19. Emergency Preparedness and Response: Information for Pregnant Women - Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alert Network (HAN) Responders Disaster Relief Volunteers Preventing Chain Saw Injuries During Tree Removal Electrical Safety and ... American Heart Association Have a kit of emergency supplies in your home; such as, clean towels, sheets, ...

  20. Piezoresistive Effect in Plasma-Doping of Graphene Sheet for High-Performance Flexible Pressure Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniff, M A S M; Hafiz, S M; Huang, N M; Rahman, S A; Wahid, K A A; Syono, M I; Azid, I A

    2017-05-03

    This paper presents a straightforward plasma treatment modification of graphene with an enhanced piezoresistive effect for the realization of a high-performance pressure sensor. The changes in the graphene in terms of its morphology, structure, chemical composition, and electrical properties after the NH3/Ar plasma treatment were investigated in detail. Through a sufficient plasma treatment condition, our studies demonstrated that plasma-treated graphene sheet exhibits a significant increase in sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to that of the unmodified graphene sheet. The plasma-doping introduced nitrogen (N) atoms inside the graphene structure and was found to play a significant role in enhancing the pressure sensing performance due to the tunneling behavior from the localized defects. The high sensitivity and good robustness demonstrated by the plasma-treated graphene sensor suggest a promising route for simple, low-cost, and ultrahigh resolution flexible sensors.

  1. A Theoretical Model of Pinching Current Sheet in Low-beta Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Takeshige, Satoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important physical process in various explosive phenomena in the universe. In the previous studies, it was found that fast re- connection takes place when the thickness of a current sheet becomes on the order of a microscopic length such as the ion larmor radius or the ion inertial length. In this study, we investigated the pinching process of a current sheet by the Lorentz force in a low-{\\beta} plasma using one-dimensional magnetohydrodynam- ics (MHD) simulations. It is known that there is an exact self-similar solution for this problem that neglects gas pressure. We compared the non-linear MHD dynamics with the analytic self-similar solution. From the MHD simulations, we found that with the gas pressure included the implosion process deviates from the analytic self-similar solution as t {\\rightarrow} t 0, where t 0 is the explosion time when the thickness of a current sheet of the analytic solution becomes 0. We also found a pair of MHD fast-mode shocks are generated and propaga...

  2. An exact collisionless equilibrium for the Force-Free Harris Sheet with low plasma beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanson, O., E-mail: oliver.allanson@st-andrews.ac.uk; Neukirch, T., E-mail: tn3@st-andrews.ac.uk; Wilson, F., E-mail: fw237@st-andrews.ac.uk; Troscheit, S., E-mail: s.troscheit@st-andrews.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    We present a first discussion and analysis of the physical properties of a new exact collisionless equilibrium for a one-dimensional nonlinear force-free magnetic field, namely, the force-free Harris sheet. The solution allows any value of the plasma beta, and crucially below unity, which previous nonlinear force-free collisionless equilibria could not. The distribution function involves infinite series of Hermite polynomials in the canonical momenta, of which the important mathematical properties of convergence and non-negativity have recently been proven. Plots of the distribution function are presented for the plasma beta modestly below unity, and we compare the shape of the distribution function in two of the velocity directions to a Maxwellian distribution.

  3. An exact collisionless equilibrium for the Force-Free Harris Sheet with low plasma beta

    CERN Document Server

    Allanson, O; Wilson, F; Troscheit, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a first discussion and analysis of the physical properties of a new exact collisionless equilibrium for a one-dimensional nonlinear force-free magnetic field, namely the Force-Free Harris Sheet. The solution allows any value of the plasma beta, and crucially below unity, which previous nonlinear force-free collisionless equilibria could not. The distribution function involves infinite series of Hermite Polynomials in the canonical momenta, of which the important mathematical properties of convergence and non-negativity have recently been proven. Plots of the distribution function are presented for the plasma beta modestly below unity, and we compare the shape of the distribution function in two of the velocity directions to a Maxwellian distribution.

  4. Cluster view of the plasma sheet boundary layer and bursty bulk flow connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. W. Lennartsson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The high-latitude boundaries of the plasma sheet (PSBL are dynamic latitude zones of recurring and transient (minutes to tens of minutes earthward and magnetic field-aligned bursts of plasma, each being more or less confined in longitude as well, whose ionic component is dominated by protons with flux, energies and density that are consistent with a central plasma sheet (CPS source at varying distance (varying rates of energy time dispersion, sometimes as close as the ~19 RE Cluster apogees, or closer still. The arguably most plausible source consists of so called "bursty bulk flows" (BBFs, i.e. proton bulk flow events with large, positive and bursty GSE vx. Known mainly from CPS observations made at GSE x>−30 RE, the BBF type events probably take place much further downtail as well. What makes the BBFs an especially plausible source are (1 their earthward bulk flow, which helps explain the lack of distinctive latitudinal PSBL energy dispersion, and (2 their association with a transient strong increase of the local tail Bz component ("local dipolarization". The enhanced Bz provides intermittent access to higher latitudes for the CPS plasma, resulting in local density reductions in the tail midplane, as illustrated here by proton data from the Cluster CIS CODIF instruments. Another sign of kinship between the PSBL bursts and the BBFs is their similar spatial fine structure. The PSBL bursts have prominent filaments aligned along the magnetic field with transverse flux gradients that are often characterized by local ~10 keV proton gyroradii scale size (or even smaller, as evidenced by Cluster measurements. The same kind of fine structure is also found during Cluster near-apogee traversals of the tail midplane, as illustrated here and implied by recently published statistics on BBFs obtained with Cluster multipoint observations at varying satellite

  5. Assessing the predictability of a coupled climate-ice sheet model system for the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalgeirsdottir, G.; Stendel, M.; Bueler, E.; Christensen, J. H.; Drews, M.; Mottram, R.

    2009-04-01

    The wild card for reliable sea level rise prediction is the contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet. There is an urgent need to determine the predictability of models that simulate the response of Greenland Ice Sheet to rising temperatures and the amount of freshwater flux that can be expected into the ocean. Modelling efforts have been limited by poorly known boundary and initial conditions, low resolution and lack of presentation of fast flowing ice streams. We address these limitations by building a model system consisting of a high resolution regional climate model (HIRHAM4), that has been run for the period 1950-2080 at 25 km, and Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM), which simulates spatially and temporally varying ice streams by combining the solutions of the Shallow Shelf and Shallow Ice Approximations. The surface mass balance is simulated with a positive-degree-day method. The important and poorly constrained model component is the past climate forcing, which serves the purpose of initializing the model by simulating the present ice sheet and observed rate of mass changes. Simulated gradients of mass loss due to warming trends of past decade and prediction for the future are presented as well as estimated sensitivities due to the various model component uncertainties.

  6. Computing the volume response of the Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet to warming scenarios to 2200

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrand, N.E.; Hindmarsh, R.C.A.; Arthern, R.J.; Williams, C.R.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, Eric; Ligtenberg, S.R.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Edwards, T.L.; Cook, A.J.; Simonsen, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution to sea level to 2200 from the grounded, mainland Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet (APIS) was calculated using an ice-sheet model initialized with a new technique computing ice fluxes based on observed surface velocities, altimetry and surface mass balance, and computing volume response

  7. Microfabrication of through holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets using a laser plasma EUV source (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Urai, Hikari; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a material used for cell culture substrates / bio-chips and micro total analysis systems / lab-on-chips due to its flexibility, chemical / thermo-dynamic stability, bio-compatibility, transparency and moldability. For further development, it is inevitable to develop a technique to fabricate precise three dimensional structures on micrometer-scale at high aspect ratio. In the previous works, we reported a technique for high-quality micromachining of PDMS without chemical modification, by means of photo direct machining using laser plasma EUV sources. In the present work, we have investigated fabrication of through holes. The EUV radiations around 10 nm were generated by irradiation of Ta targets with Nd:YAG laser light (10 ns, 500 mJ/pulse). The generated EUV radiations were focused using an ellipsoidal mirror. It has a narrower incident angle than those in the previous works in order to form a EUV beam with higher directivity, so that higher aspect structures can be fabricated. The focused EUV beam was incident on PDMS sheets with a thickness of 15 micrometers, through holes in a contact mask placed on top of them. Using a contact mask with holes with a diameter of three micrometers, complete through holes with a diameter of two micrometers are fabricated in the PDMS sheet. Using a contact mask with two micrometer holes, however, ablation holes almost reaches to the back side of the PDMS sheet. The fabricated structures can be explained in terms of geometrical optics. Thus, we have developed a technique for micromachining of PDMS sheets at high aspect ratios.

  8. Collective dynamics of bursty particle precipitation initiating in the inner and outer plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Donovan, E.; Klimas, A. J.; Spanswick, E.

    2009-02-01

    Using multiscale spatiotemporal analysis of bursty precipitation events in the nighttime aurora as seen by the POLAR UVI instrument, we report a set of new statistical signatures of high- and low-latitude auroral activity, signaling a strongly non-uniform distribution of dissipation mechanism in the plasma sheet. We show that small-scale electron emission events that initiate in the equatorward portion of the nighttime auroral oval (scaling mode A1) have systematically steeper power-law slopes of energy, power, area, and lifetime probability distributions compared to the events that initiate at higher latitudes (mode B). The low-latitude group of events also contain a small but energetically important subpopulation of substorm-scale disturbances (mode A2) described by anomalously low distribution exponents characteristic of barely stable thermodynamic systems that are prone to large-scale sporadic reorganization. The high latitude events (mode organized critical (SOC) behavior. The low- and high latitude events have distinct inter-trigger time statistics, and are characterized by significantly different MLT distributions. Based on these results we conjecture that the inner and outer portions of the plasma sheet are associated with two (or more) mechanisms of collective dynamics that may represent an interplay between current disruption and magnetic reconnection scenarios of bursty energy conversion in the magnetotail.

  9. Multiple harmonic ULF waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer observed by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Kahlstorf, C. R. G.; Posch, J. L.; Keiling, A.; Walsh, A. P.; Denton, R. E.; Broughton, M. C.; Owen, C. J.; FornaçOn, K.-H.; RèMe, H.

    2010-12-01

    The passage of the Cluster satellites in a polar orbit through Earth's magnetotail has provided numerous observations of harmonically related Pc 1-2 ULF wave events, with the fundamental near the local proton cyclotron frequency Ωcp. Broughton et al. (2008) reported observations by Cluster of three such events in the plasma sheet boundary layer, and used the wave telescope technique to determine that their wave vectors k were nearly perpendicular to B. This paper reports the results of a search for such waves throughout the 2003 Cluster tail passage. During the 4 month period of July-October 2003, 35 multiple-harmonic wave events were observed, all in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). From the first observed event (22 July) to the last (28 October), 13 of Cluster's 42 tail passes had at least one event. The wave events were rather evenly distributed from XGSE = -7 RE out to the Cluster apogee distance of -18 RE, with one event observed at -4 RE. ZGSE for these events ranged from -10 to -3 RE and +3 to +7 RE (i.e., there were no events for ∣Z∣ elevated fluxes of counterstreaming ions with energies ranging from ˜3 to 30 keV, and elevated fluxes of electrons with energies ranging from 0.25 to ˜5 keV. Analysis of plasma parameters suggests that although waves occurred only when the ion beta exceeded 0.1 (somewhat larger than typical for the PSBL), ion particle pressure may be of more physical importance in controlling wave occurrence. Electron distributions were more isotropic in pitch angles than the ion distributions, but some evidence of counterstreaming electrons was detected in 83% of the events. The ions also showed clear signatures of shell-like or ring-like distributions; i.e., with reduced fluxes below the energy of maximum flux. The suprathermal ion fluxes were asymmetric in all events studied, with more ions streaming earthward (for events both north and south of the central plasma sheet). Good agreement between the observed frequency of the

  10. Initial rigid response and softening transition of highly stretchable kirigami sheet materials

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Midori

    2016-01-01

    We study, experimentally and theoretically, the mechanical response of sheet materials on which line cracks or cuts are arranged in a simple pattern. Such sheet materials, often called kirigami (the Japanese words, kiri and gami, stand for cut and paper, respectively), demonstrate a unique mechanical response promising for various engineering applications such as stretchable batteries: kirigami sheets possess a mechanical regime in which sheets are highly stretchable and very soft compared with the original sheets without line cracks, by virtue of out-of-plane deformation. However, this regime starts after a transition from an initial stiff regime governed by in-plane deformation. In other words, the softness of the kirigami structure emerges as a result of a transition from the two-dimensional to three-dimensional deformation, i.e., from stretching to bending. We clarify the physical origins of the transition and mechanical regimes, which are revealed to be governed by simple scaling laws. The results could ...

  11. Restructured graphene sheets embedded carbon film by oxygen plasma etching and its tribological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Meiling [Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Yang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Fan, Xue [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxygen plasma etching was developed to improve tribological properties of GSEC film. • Etching restructured 3 nm top layer with smaller crystallite size and higher sp{sup 3} fraction. • The etched film had smoother surface, enhanced mechanical properties, longer wear life. • High electrical conductivity and strong magnetism were retained after etching. - Abstract: An oxygen plasma etching technique was introduced for improving the tribological properties of the graphene sheets embedded carbon (GSEC) film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma processing system. The nanostructural changing in the film caused by oxygen plasma etching was examined by transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showing that the 3 nm thick top surface layer was restructured with smaller graphene nanocrystallite size as well as higher sp{sup 3} bond fraction. The surface roughness, mechanical behavior and tribological properties of the original GSEC and oxygen plasma treated GSEC films were compared. The results indicated that after the oxygen plasma treatment, the average roughness decreased from 20.8 ± 1.1 nm to 1.9 ± 0.1 nm, the hardness increased from 2.3 ± 0.1 GPa to 2.9 ± 0.1 GPa, the nanoscratch depth decreased from 64.5 ± 5.4 nm to 9.9 ± 0.9 nm, and the wear life increased from 930 ± 390 cycles to more than 15,000 frictional cycles. The origin of the improved tribological behavior was ascribed to the 3 nm thick graphene nanocrystallite film. This finding can be expected for wide applications in nanoscale surface engineering.

  12. Optimized H{sup -} extraction in an argon-magnesium seeded magnetized sheet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguera, Virginia R. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)], E-mail: virginia.noguera@gmail.com; Blantocas, Gene Q. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); West Visayas State University, Lapaz, Iloilo City 5000 (Philippines); Ramos, Henry J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)

    2008-06-15

    The enhancement and optimization of H{sup -} extraction through argon and magnesium seeding of hydrogen discharges in a magnetized sheet plasma source are reported. The paper first presents the modification of the production chamber into a hexapole multicusp configuration resulting in decreased power requirements, improved plasma confinement and longer filament lifetime. By this, a wider choice of discharge currents for sustained quiescent plasmas is made possible. Second, the method of adding argon to the hydrogen plasma similar to the scheme in Abate and Ramos [Y. Abate, H. Ramos, Rev. Sci. Instr. 71 (10) (2000) 3689] was performed to find the optimum conditions for H{sup -} formation and extraction. Using an E x B probe, H{sup -} yields were investigated at varied argon-hydrogen admixtures, different discharge currents and spatial points relative to the core plasma. The optimum H{sup -} current density extracted at 3.0 cm from the plasma core using 3.0 A plasma current with 10% argon seeding increased by a factor of 2.42 (0.63 A/m{sup 2}) compared to the measurement of Abate and Ramos [Y. Abate, H. Ramos, Rev. Sci. Instr. 71 (10) (2000) 3689]. Third, the argon-hydrogen plasma at the extraction chamber is seeded with magnesium. Mg disk with an effective area of 22 cm{sup 2} is placed at the extraction region's anode biased 175 V with respect to the cathode. With Mg seeding, the optimum H{sup -} current density at the same site and discharge conditions increased by 4.9 times (3.09 A/m{sup 2}). The enhancement effects were analyzed vis-a-vis information gathered from the usual Langmuir probe (electron temperature and density), electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and the ensuing dissociative attachment (DA) reaction rates at different spatial points for various plasma discharges and gas ratios. Investigations on the changes in the effective electron temperature and electron density indicate that the enhancement is due to increased density of low

  13. Conformation-variable PDI@β-sheet nanohelices show stimulus-responsive supramolecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Damei; Tang, Ailing; Zhan, Chuanlang; Yao, Jiannian

    2013-05-28

    A tripeptide-perylene diimide (PDI) conjugate self-assembles into PDI@β-sheet nanohelices, whose local conformations are sensitive to the external stimuli of concentration, heating and ultrasound, showing stimulus-responsive supramolecular chirality.

  14. Anisotropic Equilibrium and Ballooning Mode Analysis in the Tail Plasma Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Young

    This thesis is a theoretical study about the Earth's tail plasma sheet with regard to two aspects: the equilibrium structure for the anisotropic pressure, and the ideal-MHD ballooning stability. By adopting a stretched magnetotail model where ion motions are generally nonadiabatic, and assuming that the anisotropy resides only in the electron pressure tensor, it is shown that the magnetic field lines with rm p_| > p_| are less stretched than the isotropic cases. As the parallel pressure p_| exceeds the perpendicular pressure p_| approaching the conventional marginal firehose limit, rm p_| = p{_ |} + B^2/ mu_0, the magnetic field lines are more and more stretched. It is also shown that the current density is highly enhanced at the same limit, a situation that might be subject to a microscopic instability. However, we also emphasize that such an enhancement in the current density is heavily localized near the z = 0 plane, and thus it is unclear if such a microscopic instability can significantly alter the global configuration of the tail. It is further argued, in terms of the radius of the field curvature versus the particle's gyroradius, that the conventional adiabatic description of electrons may become questionable, very close to the conventional marginal firehose limit. To study the ideal-MHD ballooning mode, we first adopt a hard ionospheric boundary condition where the perturbation is required to vanish at the ionospheric foot points. For such a hard boundary condition, an "untypical" magnetic field configuration is found to be unstable to a ballooning mode that is antisymmetric about the equatorial plane while most of the "typical" tail plasma-sheet configurations are stable against the ideal-MHD ballooning mode. The unstable magnetic field model, however, does not look like the average observation-based model, but rather resembles some of the characteristics of the steady-state magnetic field models by Hau (1989, 1991). In addition, a physical argument is

  15. Plasma response to transient high voltage pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kar; S Mukherjee

    2013-07-01

    This review reports on plasma response to transient high voltage pulses in a low pressure unmagnetized plasma. Mainly, the experiments are reviewed, when a disc electrode (metallic and dielectric) is biased pulsed negative or positive. The main aim is to review the electron loss in plasmas and particle balance during the negative pulse electrode biasing, when the applied pulse width is less than the ion plasma period. Though the applied pulse width is less than the ion plasma period, ion rarefaction waves are excited. The solitary electron holes are reviewed for positive pulsed bias to the electrode. Also the excitation of waves (solitary electron and ion holes) is reviewed for a metallic electrode covered by a dielectric material. The wave excitation during and after the pulse withdrawal, excitation and propagation characteristics of various electrostatic plasma waves are reviewed here.

  16. Influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V., E-mail: galya-ostr@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G., E-mail: annfrank@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium plasma in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations with X-type singular lines is studied by the methods of holographic interferometry and magnetic measurements. Significant differences in the structures of plasma and current sheets formed at close parameters of the initial plasma and similar configurations of the initial magnetic fields are revealed.

  17. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  18. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Mist

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability suggests that this figure is consistent with the amount of momentum flux transfer produced by this mechanism. We also consider the possibility that these flows are solely driven by transferring magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. We find that there is sufficient mass observed on these field lines for this to be the sole driving mechanism for only 27% of the observed slow flows.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail boundary layers; plasma convection; plasma sheet

  19. A computational model for He{sup +} ions in a magnetized sheet plasma: comparative analysis between model and experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blantocas, Gene Q. [West Visayas State Univ., Lapaz, Iloilo City (Philippines); Ramos, Henry J. [Univ. of the Phillippines, College of Science, National Inst. of Physics, Deliman Quezon City (Philippines); Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Dept. of Engineering, Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    An E x B probe was used to extract He{sup +} ions from a magnetized steady sheet plasma. Plasma parameters T{sub e}, n{sub e} and extracted He{sup +} ion current were analyzed vis-a-vis a modified Saha population density equation of the collisional-radiative model. Numerical calculations show that at low discharge currents and in the hot electron region of the sheet plasma, relative densities of He{sup +} ions show some degree of correlation with ion current profiles established experimentally using the E x B probe. Both experimental and computational results indicate a division of the plasma into two distinct regions each with different formation mechanisms of He{sup +} ions. (author)

  20. Origin of low proton-to-electron temperature ratio in the Earth's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.; Ganushkina, N. Yu.; Lavraud, B.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the proton-to-electron temperature ratio (Tp/Te) in the plasma sheet (PS) of the Earth's magnetotail using 5 years of Cluster observations (2001-2005). The PS intervals are searched within a region defined with -19 GSM) under the condition |BX| ≤ 10 nT. One hundred sixty PS crossings are identified. We find an average value of 6.0. However, in many PS intervals Tp/Te varies over a wide range from a few units to several tens of units. In 86 PS intervals the Tp/Te decreases below 3.5. Generally, the decreases of Tp/Te are due to some increase of Te while Tp either decreases or remains unchanged. In the majority of these intervals the Tp/Te drops are observed during magnetotail dipolarizations. A superposed epoch analysis applied to these events shows that the minimum value of Tp/Te is observed after the dipolarization onset during the "turbulent phase" of dipolarization, when a number of transient BZ pulses are reduced, but the value of BZ is still large and an intensification of wave activity is observed. The Tp/Te drops, and associated increases of Te often coincide either with bursts of broadband electrostatic emissions, which may include electron cyclotron harmonics, or with broadband electromagnetic emission in a frequency range from proton plasma frequency (fpp) up to the electron gyrofrequency (fce). These findings show that the wave activity developing in the current sheet after dipolarization onset may play a role in the additional electron heating and the associated Tp/Te decrease.

  1. Long-term variations in the plasma sheet ion composition and substorm occurrence over 23 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, Masahito

    2016-12-01

    The Geotail satellite has been operating for almost two solar cycles (~23 years) since its launch in July 1992. The satellite carries the energetic particle and ion composition (EPIC) instrument that measures the energetic ion flux (9.4-212 keV/e) and enables the investigation of long-term variations of the ion composition in the plasma sheet for solar cycles 22-24. From the statistical analysis of the EPIC data, we find that (1) the plasma ion mass ( M) is approximately 1.1 amu during the solar minimum, whereas it increases to 1.5-2.7 amu during the solar maximum; (2) the increases in M seem to have two components: a raising of the baseline levels (~1.5 amu) and a large transient enhancement (~1.8-2.7 amu); (3) the baseline level change of M correlates well with the Mg II index, which is a good proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or far ultraviolet (FUV) irradiance; and (4) the large transient enhancement of M is caused by strong magnetic storms. We also study the long-term variations of substorm occurrences in 1992-2015 that are evaluated with the number of Pi2 pulsations detected at the Kakioka observatory. The results suggest no clear correlation between the substorm occurrence and the Mg II index. Instead, when the substorms are classified into externally triggered events and non-triggered events, the number of the non-triggered events and the Mg II index are negatively correlated. We interpret these results that the increase in the solar EUV/FUV radiation enhances the supply of ionospheric ions (He+ and O+ ions) into the plasma sheet to increase M, and the large M may suppress spontaneous plasma instabilities initiating substorms and decrease the number of the non-triggered substorms. The present analysis using the unprecedentedly long-term dataset covering ~23 years provides additional observational evidence that heavy ions work to prevent the occurrence of substorms.

  2. Substorm effects on the plasma sheet on composition on March 22, 1979 (CDAW 6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISSE 1, covering the energy range 0.1--16 keV/e, show that a dramatic change took place in the plasma sheet ion composition in conjunction with the magnetic substorm activity on March 22, 1979. Beginning about 1124 UT the ion population at the ISEE 1 location changed from what appeared to be predominantly ions from the solar wind to a mixture of comparable numbers of solar wind and terrestrial ions. ISEE 1 was inbound in the predawn sector during this time, and the plasma composition experiment provided data from Rapprox. =21 R/sub E/ and LTapprox. =0130, down to Rapprox. =3 R/sub E/ and LTapprox. =0530. Prior to the substorm activity about 90--95% of the ion density was due to H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/ ions, which appeared to be mostly of solar wind origin. The H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/ components, each approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, had a temperature ratio T(He/sup + +/)/T(H/sup +/)approx. =4 and a density ratio n(He/sup + +/)/n(H/sup +/)approx. =1.5--3%. Both values are consistent with measurements made concurrently in the solar wind by the plasma experiment on ISSE 3. The remaining 5--10% of the density was due mainly to O/sup +/ and He/sup +/ ions of ionospheric origin. All four ion populations had broad energy spectra with mean energies of several keV/e.

  3. The evaluation of surface and adhesive bonding properties for cold rolled steel sheet for automotive treated by Ar/O{sub 2} atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Joo; Lee, Sang Kon; Kim Byung Min [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun Whan [Sungwoo Hitech Technical Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Cold rolled steel sheet for automotive was treated by Ar/O{sub 2} atmospheric pressure plasma to improve the adhesive bonding strength. Through the contact angle test and calculation of surface free energy for cold rolled steel sheet, the changes of surface properties were investigated before and after plasma treatment. The contact angle was decreased and surface free energy was increased after plasma treatment. And the change of surface roughness and morphology were observed by AFM(Atomic Force Microscope). The surface roughness of steel sheet was slightly changed. Based on Taguchi method, single lap shear test was performed to investigate the effect of experimental parameter such as plasma power, treatment time and flow rate of O{sub 2} gas. Results shows that the bonding strength of steel sheet treated in Ar/O{sub 2} atmospheric pressure plasma was improved about 20% compared with untreated sheet.

  4. Plasmoid ejection and secondary current sheet generation from magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Wang, Shou-Jun; Lu, Quan-Ming; Huang, Can; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Lin, Xiao-Xuan; Li, Yu-Tong; Wei, Hui-Gang; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Shao-En; Ding, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; He, Xian-Tu; Yu, M Y; Liu, C S; Wang, Shui; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Gang; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2012-05-25

    Reconnection of the self-generated magnetic fields in laser-plasma interaction was first investigated experimentally by Nilson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 255001 (2006)] by shining two laser pulses a distance apart on a solid target layer. An elongated current sheet (CS) was observed in the plasma between the two laser spots. In order to more closely model magnetotail reconnection, here two side-by-side thin target layers, instead of a single one, are used. It is found that at one end of the elongated CS a fanlike electron outflow region including three well-collimated electron jets appears. The (>1 MeV) tail of the jet energy distribution exhibits a power-law scaling. The enhanced electron acceleration is attributed to the intense inductive electric field in the narrow electron dominated reconnection region, as well as additional acceleration as they are trapped inside the rapidly moving plasmoid formed in and ejected from the CS. The ejection also induces a secondary CS.

  5. CO2 laser-micro plasma arc hybrid welding for galvanized steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. H. KIM; Y. N. AHN; J. H. KIM

    2011-01-01

    A laser lap welding process for zinc-coated steel has a well-known unsolved problem-porosity formation. The boiling temperature of coated zinc is lower than the melting temperature of the base metal. which is steel. In the autogenous laser welding,the zinc vapor generates from the lapped surfaces expels the molten pool and the expulsion causes numerous weld defects, such as spatters and blow holes on the weld surface and porosity inside the welds. The laser-arc hybrid welding was suggested as an alternative method for the laser lap welding because the arc can preheat or post-heat the weldment according to the arrangement of the laser beam and the arc. CO2 laser-micro plasma hybrid welding was applied to the lap welding of zinc-coated steel with zero-gap.The relationships among the weld quality and process parameters of the laser-arc arrangement, and the laser-arc interspacing distance and arc current were investigated using a full-factorial experimental design. The effect of laser-arc arrangement is dominant because the leading plasma arc partially melts the upper steel sheets and vaporizes or oxidizes the coated zinc on the lapped surfaces.Compared with the result from the laser-TIG hybrid welding, the heat input from arc can be reduced by 40%.

  6. Fractal Structure of the Heliospheric Plasma Sheet at the Earth's Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. V. Eselevich; V. G. Eselevich

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the data from the Wind and IMP-8 spacecraft revealed that a slow solar wind,flowing in the heliospheric plasma sheet, represents a set of magnetic tubes with plasma of increased density(N > 10cm-3 at the Earth's orbit). They have a fine structure at several spatial scales (fractality), from2°-3° (at the Earth's orbit, it is equivalent to 3.6-5.4 h, or(5.4-8.0) × 106 km) to the minimum about0.025°, i.e. the angular siz.e of the nested tubes is changed nearly by two orders of magnitude. The magnetic tubes at each observed spatial scale are diamagnetic, i.e. their surface sustains a flow of diamagnetic (or drift)current that decreases the magnetic field within the tube itself and increases it outside the tube. Furthermore,the value of β = 8π[N(Te + Tp)]/B2 within the tube exceeds the value of β outside the tube. In many cases total pressure P = N(Te + Tp) + B2/8π is almost constant within and outside the tubes at any one of the aforementioned scales.

  7. Multiple harmonic ULF waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer: Instability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Keiling, A.; Walsh, A. P.; Gary, S. P.; DéCréAu, P. M. E.; Cattell, C. A.; RèMe, H.

    2010-12-01

    Multiple-harmonic electromagnetic waves in the ULF band have occasionally been observed in Earth's magnetosphere, both near the magnetic equator in the outer plasmasphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) in Earth's magnetotail. Observations by the Cluster spacecraft of multiple-harmonic electromagnetic waves with fundamental frequency near the local proton cyclotron frequency, Ωcp, were recently reported in the plasma sheet boundary layer by Broughton et al. (2008). A companion paper surveys the entire magnetotail passage of Cluster during 2003, and reports 35 such events, all in the PSBL, and all associated with elevated fluxes of counterstreaming ions and electrons. In this study we use observed pitch angle distributions of ions and electrons during a wave event observed by Cluster on 9 September 2003 to perform an instability analysis. We use a semiautomatic procedure for developing model distributions composed of bi-Maxwellian components that minimizes the difference between modeled and observed distribution functions. Analysis of wave instability using the WHAMP electromagnetic plasma wave dispersion code and these model distributions reveals an instability near Ωcp and its harmonics. The observed and model ion distributions exhibit both beam-like and ring-like features which might lead to instability. Further instability analysis with simple beam-like and ring-like model distribution functions indicates that the instability is due to the ring-like feature. Our analysis indicates that this instability persists over an enormous range in the effective ion beta (based on a best fit for the observed distribution function using a single Maxwellian distribution), β', but that the character of the instability changes with β'. For β' of order unity (for instance, the observed case with β' ˜ 0.4), the instability is predominantly electromagnetic; the fluctuating magnetic field has components in both the perpendicular and parallel directions, but the

  8. Ion shell distributions as free energy source for plasma waves on auroral field lines mapping to plasma sheet boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion shell distributions are hollow spherical shells in velocity space that can be formed by many processes and occur in several regions of geospace. They are interesting because they have free energy that can, in principle, be transmitted to ions and electrons. Recently, a technique has been developed to estimate the original free energy available in shell distributions from in-situ data, where some of the energy has already been lost (or consumed. We report a systematic survey of three years of data from the Polar satellite. We present an estimate of the free energy available from ion shell distributions on auroral field lines sampled by the Polar satellite below 6 RE geocentric radius. At these altitudes the type of ion shells that we are especially interested in is most common on auroral field lines close to the polar cap (i.e. field lines mapping to the plasma sheet boundary layer, PSBL. Our analysis shows that ion shell distributions that have lost some of their free energy are commonly found not only in the PSBL, but also on auroral field lines mapping to the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, especially in the evening sector auroral field lines. We suggest that the PSBL ion shell distributions are formed during the so-called Velocity Dispersed Ion Signatures (VDIS events. Furthermore, we find that the partly consumed shells often occur in association with enhanced wave activity and middle-energy electron anisotropies. The maximum downward ion energy flux associated with a shell distribution is often 10mWm-2 and sometimes exceeds 40mWm-2 when mapped to the ionosphere and thus may be enough to power many auroral processes. Earlier simulation studies have shown that ion shell distributions can excite ion Bernstein waves which, in turn, energise electrons in the parallel direction. It is possible that ion shell distributions are the link between the X-line and the auroral wave activity and electron

  9. Controllable formation of graphene and graphene oxide sheets using photo-catalytic reduction and oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostovari, Fatemeh; Abdi, Yaser; Ghasemi, Foad

    2012-12-01

    Au/SiO2/Si interdigital electrodes with thickness of 1 μm were created on silicon substrate. Graphene oxide (GO) sheets hanging from these electrodes were obtained by spin coating of chemically synthesized GO dispersed in water. We used UV-light-induced photo-catalytic activity of titanium oxide nanoparticles to reduce the GO layer. Effects of the photo-induced chemical reduction on the conductivity of the GO were investigated. Also, low power DC plasma was used for oxidation of the sheets. Oxygen bombardment leads to sheets with low electrical conductivity. Measurements show that graphene and GO sheets with the controlled electrical conductivity were obtained by these processes. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy were used to study the morphology of the TiO2/GO and graphene structures. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering analysis were used to verify the structural characteristics of the prepared sheets. Analysis showed a gradual increase in the number of C-O bonds on the surface of the graphene layer as a result of increasing the time of plasma bombardment. Based on the Raman spectroscopy, the photo-catalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the number of C-O bonds.

  10. The response of a tensioned flexible sheet immersed in parallel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Morris-Thomas, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the fluid-elastic response of a cantilevered flexible sheet in the presence of uniform airflow. The leading edge of the sheet is clamped, while at the trailing edge, in-plane tension is applied to provide additional rigidity to the sheet's small but finite bending stiffness. We outline a series of experiments performed in a wind tunnel with the purpose of examining fluid-elastic instabilities. In particular, we examine the role of in-plane tension induced rigidity and how it influences static divergence and convected wave instabilities. The flow is characterised by Reynolds numbers of order $10^5$-$10^6$ and we specifically examine a sheet with an aspect ratio of $L/l=1.33$. A unique aspect of this present work, is the direct measurement of the sheet's three-dimensional displacement through an optical tracking method with a grid of passive markers placed on the sheet surface. We show the evolution of the sheet surface from stability, through to divergence, and then finally into flutter. Th...

  11. New types of coating systems for steel sheets by high-rate evaporation in combination with plasma processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, B.; Metzner, C. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Elektronenstrahl und Plasmatechnik (FEP), Dresden (Germany); Ehlers, K.D. [Salzgitter AG Stahl und Technologie (Germany); Schuhmacher, B. [Dortmunder Oberflaechencentrum GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Flossdorf, F.J.; Steinbeck, G. [Verein Deutscher Eisenhuettenleute (VDEh), Duesseldorf (Germany); Steffen, R. [Stahlwerke Bremen GmbH (Germany); Hagler, J. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz (Austria)

    2002-03-01

    High-rate evaporation in combination with plasma processes is a promising approach to obtain new types of steel sheet coating with improved corrosion resistance and application properties. To estimate the potential for the application of PVD-coatings (physical vapour deposition) different coating systems for steel sheet as well as for hot-dip or electro-galvanized steel sheet were designed. The samples were produced on a laboratory scale using PVD processes with very high deposition rates (in the order of 1 {mu}m s{sup -1}) as well as high-power plasma processes for the pre-treatment. The relationship between the composition, microstructure and properties of the coating systems, in particular concerning corrosion protection, abrasion during forming, phosphating and paint adhesion, were studied. It was found that the corrosion resistance of galvanized steel sheets can be considerably improved by vapour deposition of metal or inorganic films with a thickness of several hundred nanometers. Investigations on vapour deposition of titanium and stainless steel coatings on steel sheets, for applications in a severely corrosive environment, showed that the corrosion resistance in relation to the coating thickness can be significantly enhanced by means of plasma activation during the vapour deposition process. Finally, an outlook on possible industrial applications including an estimation of the process costs will be presented. For certain coating systems the results look promising. Consequently, these particular coating systems will be investigated in more detail by means of using a large-scale in-line deposition plant for metallic strips and sheets. (orig.)

  12. Greenland Ice Sheet response to mid-Pliocene summer Arctic sea ice-free conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S. J.; DeConto, R.; Pollard, D.

    2011-12-01

    A critical uncertainty in future predictions of climate and sea level is the response of the cryosphere. Proxy reconstructions for the mid-Pliocene Arctic Ocean (~ 3 Ma) are indicative of summer Arctic ice-free conditions and higher than modern sea surface temperatures, conditions that are analogous to projections for the end of the 21st century. We implement available mid-Pliocene boundary conditions into a fully-coupled Global Circulation Model with interactive vegetation. We use a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet-shelf model to simulate the equilibrated response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to the combined effect of reduced sea ice conditions and increased sea surface temperatures during the mid-Pliocene Warm Period. Reductions in Arctic sea ice are shown to enhance ocean/land-to-atmosphere fluxes, increasing heat and moisture transport in the high latitudes. In particular, changes in the North Atlantic exert a strong influence on the storm track and seasonal temperatures and precipitation over Greenland. Despite increased precipitation, warmer temperatures generally reduce snow mass balance. As a result, an initial present-day ice sheet forced by Pliocene climate undergoes rapid melting, limiting the ice sheet to the only highest elevations in South and East Greenland. Once the ice sheet is lost, local surface characteristics and associated feedbacks dominates Greenland climate, precluding the regrowth of the ice sheet. Depending on the initial state of the ice sheet, the equilibrated ice sheet loss is equivalent to between 5.8 to 6.4 m of sea level. We assess the sensitivity of the GIS to Pliocene forcing and internal feedbacks, adding to the understanding of land-ice sea-ice hysteresis in a world warmer than today.

  13. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of the Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alex; Uritsky, Vadim; Baker, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data reviewed in our other presentation at this meeting (V. Uritsky, A. Klimas) show that bright night-side high-latitude UV emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality (SOC) that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques, and more, that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. Here, we report new results showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. Further, we find a strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  14. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of Earth's Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data show that bright night-side high-latitude W emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. These analyses will be reviewed. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques (and more) that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. New results will be presented showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. A strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions will be demonstrated. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  15. Shock wave interaction with a thermal layer produced by a plasma sheet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteeva, E.; Znamenskaya, I.; Orlov, D.; Sysoev, N.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores the phenomena associated with pulsed discharge energy deposition in the near-surface gas layer in front of a shock wave from the flow control perspective. The energy is deposited in 200 ns by a high-current distributed sliding discharge of a ‘plasma sheet’ type. The discharge, covering an area of 100× 30 mm2, is mounted on the top or bottom wall of a shock tube channel. In order to analyse the time scales of the pulsed discharge effect on an unsteady supersonic flow, we consider the propagation of a planar shock wave along the discharge surface area 50–500 μs after the discharge pulse. The processes in the discharge chamber are visualized experimentally using the shadowgraph method and modelled numerically using 2D/3D CFD simulations. The interaction between the planar shock wave and the discharge-induced thermal layer results in the formation of a lambda-shock configuration and the generation of vorticity in the flow behind the shock front. We determine the amount and spatial distribution of the electric energy rapidly transforming into heat by comparing the calculated flow patterns and the experimental shadow images. It is shown that the uniformity of the discharge energy distribution strongly affects the resulting flow dynamics. Regions of turbulent mixing in the near-surface gas are detected when the discharge energy is deposited non-uniformly along the plasma sheet. They account for the increase in the cooling rate of the discharge-induced thermal layer and significantly influence its interaction with an incident shock wave.

  16. Modeling the effect of doping on the catalyst-assisted growth and field emission properties of plasma-grown graphene sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi-110042 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical model describing the effect of doping on the plasma-assisted catalytic growth of graphene sheet has been developed. The model accounts the charging rate of the graphene sheet, kinetics of all the plasma species, including the doping species, and the growth rate of graphene nuclei and graphene sheet due to surface diffusion, and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. Using the model, it is observed that nitrogen and boron doping can strongly influence the growth and field emission properties of the graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation indicate that nitrogen doping results in reduced thickness and shortened height of the graphene sheet; however, boron doping increases the thickness and height of the graphene sheet. The time evolutions of the charge on the graphene sheet and hydrocarbon number density for nitrogen and boron doped graphene sheet have also been examined. The field emission properties of the graphene sheet have been proposed on the basis of the results obtained. It is concluded that nitrogen doped graphene sheet exhibits better field emission characteristics as compared to undoped and boron doped graphene sheet. The results of the present investigation are consistent with the existing experimental observations.

  17. The sea level response to ice sheet freshwater forcing in the Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slangen, Aimée B. A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of a realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing on sea-level change in the fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) showing not only the effect on the ocean density and dynamics, but also the gravitational response to mass redistribution between ice sheets and the ocean. We compare the ‘standard’ model simulation (NO-FW) to a simulation with a more realistic ice sheet freshwater forcing (FW) for two different forcing scenario’s (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5) for 1850-2100. The effect on the global mean thermosteric sea-level change is small compared to the total thermosteric change, but on a regional scale the ocean steric/dynamic change shows larger differences in the Southern Ocean, the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (locally over 0.1 m). The gravitational fingerprints of the net sea-level contributions of the ice sheets are computed separately, showing a regional pattern with a magnitude that is similar to the difference between the NO-FW and FW simulations of the ocean steric/dynamic pattern. Our results demonstrate the importance of ice sheet mass loss for regional sea-level projections in light of the projected increasing contribution of ice sheets to future sea-level rise.

  18. A feature of negative hydrogen ion production in the Uramoto-type sheet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimbo, Kouichi [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1997-02-01

    It seems that negative hydrogen ions H{sup -} are formed directly from atomic hydrogens H. When the chamber was biased more negative against the anode potential at constant are power, forming a much deeper electrostatic well in the Uramoto-type sheet plasma negative ion source, more negative hydrogen ion currents were extracted. The chamber potential V{sub B} was biased down to -100V in the 150V discharge. The negative ion current J{sup -} was evaluated by the JAERI-probe measurement. J{sup -} increases linearly with the chamber current I{sub B}. The largest J{sup -} value was obtained at absolute value of |V{sub prob,f}|=15V and absolute value of |V{sub B}|=100V; the discharge was not operated for absolute value of |V{sub B}|>100V. We speculate the following collisional (three-body) electron attachment to H as a possible production process for H{sup -}; e+e+H{yields}e+H{sup -}. This process may explain the linear increase of J{sup -} with absolute value of |V{sub prob,f}|. (S.Y.)

  19. Study of kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) in plasma - sheet-boundary- layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Nidhi; Varma, P; Tiwari, M S, E-mail: tiwarims@rediffmail.co, E-mail: poornimavarma@yahoo.co, E-mail: nidhiphy.shukla@gmail.co [Department of Physics and Electronics, Dr. H. S. Gour University, Sagar (M.P.), 470003 (India)

    2010-02-01

    The effect of parallel electric field with general loss-cone distribution function on the dispersion relation and damping rate/growth rate of the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) is evaluated by kinetic approach. The generation of KAW by the combined effect of parallel electric field and loss-cone distribution indices (J) at a particular range of k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} (k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} <1 and k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} >1) is noticed, where k{sub p}erpendicular is perpendicular wave number and {rho}{sub i} is the ion-gyro radius. Thus the propagation of KAW and loss of the Poynting flux from plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) to the ionosphere can be explained on the basis of present investigation. It is found that the present study also shows that the loss-cone distribution index is an important parameter to study KAW in the PSBL.

  20. Field-aligned currents observed by MMS in the near-Earth plasma sheet during large-scale substorm dipolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Giles, Barbara; Le Contel, Olivier; Stawarz, Julia; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During substorms significant energy conversion has been reported to take place at the sharp dipolarization front in the flow braking region where the probability of observing bursty bulk flows (BBFs) significantly drops. On 10 August 2016, MMS traversed the pre-midnight near-Earth plasma sheet when dipolarization disturbances were detected in an extended nightside local time region by Cluster, Geotail, GOES 13, 14 and 15, and the Van Allen Probes. In an expanding plasma sheet during the dipolarization, MMS detected sub-ion scale field-aligned current layers that are propagating both Earthward (equatorward) as well as tailward (outward). These multi-scale multi-point observations enable a unique investigation of both the meso-scale evolution of the disturbances and the detailed kinetic structures of the fronts and boundaries relevant to the dipolarizations.

  1. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz in...

  2. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmh...

  3. Plasma arc brazing - a low energy joining technology for steel sheets; Plasmalichtbogenloeten - eine energiearme Fuegetechnik fuer Feinblechwerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaifi, B.; Draugelates, U.; Helmich, A.; Ouaissa, B. [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Mild and high strength steel sheets are comparatively difficult to weld. The heat input in the case of conventional welding processes is too high, so that plasma brazing is an attractive alternative and complementary joining process. One characteristic of the process is the independent input of energy and filler material. In addition, the process is practically spatter-free. Plasma brazing reduces joint and panel distortion and is tolerant to surface contamination and metallic surface coatings. The brazed seams are aesthetic in appearance and clear good mechanical properties. (orig.)

  4. SIX SIGMA OPTIMIZATION IN SHEET METAL FORMING BASED ON DUAL RESPONSE SURFACE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuqiang; CUI Zhenshan; ZHANG Dongjuan; RUAN Xueyu; CHEN Jun

    2006-01-01

    Iterations in optimization and numerical simulation for the sheet metal forming process may lead to extensive computation. In addition, uncertainties in materials or processing parameters may have great influence on the design quality. A six sigma optimization method is proposed, by combining the dual response surface method (DRSM) and six sigma philosophy, to save computation cost and improve reliability and robustness of parts. Using this method, statistical technology,including the design of experiment and analysis of variance, approximate model and six sigma philosophy are integrated together to achieve improved quality. Two sheet metal forming processes are provided as examples to illustrate the proposed method.

  5. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The magnetospheric electron precipitation along the upward field-aligned currents without the potential difference causes diffuse aurora, and the magnetospheric electrons accelerated by a field-aligned potential difference cause the intense and bright type of aurora, namely discrete aurora. In this study, we are trying to find out when and where the aurora can be caused with or without electron acceleration. We statistically investigate electron density, temperature, thermal current, and conductivity in the plasma sheet using the data from the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) onboard the THEMIS-D satellite launched in 2007. According to Knight (Planet. Space Sci., 1973) and Lyons (JGR, 1980), the thermal current, jth(∝ nT^(1/2) where n is electron density and T is electron temperature in the plasma sheet), represents the upper limit to field aligned current that can be carried by magnetospheric electrons without field-aligned potential difference. The conductivity, K(∝ nT^(-1/2)), represents the efficiency of the upward field-aligned current (j) that the field-aligned potential difference (V) can produce (j=KV). Therefore, estimating jth and K in the plasma sheet is important in understanding the ability of plasma sheet electrons to carry the field-aligned current which is driven by various magnetospheric processes such as flow shear and azimuthal pressure gradient. Similar study was done by Shiokawa et al. (2000) based on the auroral electron data obtained by the DMSP satellites above the auroral oval and the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near Earth plasma sheet at 10-18 Re on February-June 1985 and March-June 1986 during the solar minimum. The purpose of our study is to examine auroral electrons with pitch angle information inside 12 Re where Shiokawa et al. (2000) did not investigate well. For preliminary result, we found that in the dawn side inner magnetosphere (source of the region 2 current), electrons can make sufficient thermal current without field

  6. Energetic electron bursts in the plasma sheet and their relation with BBFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, A. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Dunlop, M.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2014-11-01

    We studied energetic electron bursts (EEBs) (40-250 keV) in the plasma sheet (PS) and their relation to bursty bulk flows (BBFs) using the data recorded by Cluster from 2001 to 2009. The EEBs in the PS can be classified into four types. Three types of EEBs are dispersionless, including EEBs accompanied with BBFs (V > 250 km/s) but without dipolarization front (DF); EEBs accompanied with both dipolarization front (DF) and BBF; and EEBs accompanied with DF and fast flow with V EEB, i.e., EEBs not accompanied with BBFs and DFs, is dispersed. The energetic electrons (40-130 keV) can be easily transported earthward by BBFs due to the strong dawn-dusk electric field embedded in BBFs. The DFs in BBFs can produce energetic electrons (40 to 250 keV). For the EEBs with DF and BBFs, the superposed epoch analyses show that the increase of energetic electron flux has two phases: gradual increase phase before DF and rapid increase phase concurrent with DF. In the PS around x = -18 RE, 60%-70% of EEBs are accompanied with BBFs, indicating that although hitherto there have been various acceleration mechanisms of energetic electrons, most of the energetic electrons in the PS are related with magnetic reconnection, and they are produced either directly by magnetic reconnection or indirectly by the DFs within BBFs. In the BBF's braking region of -12 RE EEBs are accompanied with BBFs. The corresponding ratio between EEBs and BBFs shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry.

  7. ISEE 3 observations during a plasma sheet encounter at 140 earth radii - Evidence for enhancement of reconnection at the distant neutral line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Terasawa, T.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    A plasma sheet encounter of the ISEE-3 spacecraft in the distant tail at 140 earth radii on March 20, 1983 is studied using magnetic field, energetic particle, and plasma electron data sets. The H-component magnetograms from auroral magnetometer stations, intensity-time profiles, high resolution magnetic field measurements, and electron and proton angular distributions are analyzed. The dynamics of the plasma sheet displayed by the strong tailward and earthward directed ion beams, large northward and southward magnetic fields excursions, and short tailward and earthward plasma flows are described.

  8. Theoretical analysis of transverse impact response in double layer graphene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Natsuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In designing future nanoscale devices or nanostructures as new element in structural mechanics, it is very important to predict the responses for these elements against various mechanical loading conditions. In this letter, an analytical solution of the impact response in double layer graphene sheets (DLGSs is presented using a continuum mechanics theory. In this analytical model, the DLGSs are considered as a layer stack of two individual graphene sheet (GS bound together by van der Waals (vdW forces. The influence of impact velocity and mass on the impact response are predicted by using numerical simulation. The result shows that impact response of GSs subjected to nanomass has exceedingly short times with picoseconds order.

  9. Role of magnetic field fluctuations in the Evolution of the kappa Distribution Functions in the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Cristobal; Antonova, Elizaveta; Stepanova, Marina; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The evolution with the distance to Earth of ion and electron distribution functions in the plasma sheet, approximated by kappa distributions, was studied by Stepanova and Antonova (2015, JGRA 120). Using THEMIS data for 5 events of satellite alignments along the tail, covering between 5 and 30 Earth radii, they found that the kappa parameter increases tailwards, for both ions and electrons. In this work we analyse the magnetic fluctuations present in THEMIS data for the same 5 events. The aim is to explore the hypothesis proposed by Navarro et al. (2014, PRL 112), for solar wind plasmas, that the observed magnetic fluctuations could be closely related to spontaneous fluctuations in the plasma, if this can be described by stable distributions. Here we present our first results on the correlation between the spectral properties of the magnetic fluctuations and the observed parameters of the kappa distributions for different distances from Earth.

  10. The Dynamic Response Analysis of Auto Body Sheets to Node Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D vehicle body model was built using UG NX6.0, then it was imported into the Workbench of Finite Elment Analyis Software ANSYS V12.1. In the Workbench, the modal analysis and harmonic response analysis of auto body sheets with 4 kinds of node load environment are implemented. Meanwhile the harmonic response analysis of engine’s single sine vibration is obtained in stimulation processing based on the modal calculation. Then the rule of influence on the auto body sheets to node load environment was explored further. Node load environment increased the resonance amplitude of harmonic response analysis. What’s more, the resonance amplitude increased as the increasing of node loads, which would increase the probability of vehicle structure failure.

  11. Local Mechanical Stimulation of Mardin-Darby Canine Kidney Cell Sheets on Temperature-Responsive Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Akaike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective motion of cell sheets plays a role not only in development and repair, but also in devastating diseases such as cancer. However, unlike single-cell motility, collective motion of cell sheets involves complex cell-cell communication during migration; therefore, its mechanism is largely unknown. To elucidate propagation of signaling transduced by cell-cell interaction, we designed a hydrogel substrate that can cause local mechanical stretching of cell sheets. Poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAAm hydrogel is a temperature-responsive polymer gel whose volume changes isotropically in response to temperature changes below 37 °C. We designed a combined hydrogel substrate consisting of collagen-immobilized PNIPAAm as the local stimulation side and polyacrylamide (PAAm as the non-stimulation side to assess propagation of mechanical transduction. Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells adhered to the collagen-immobilized PNIPAAm gel increased it area and were flattened as the gel swelled with temperature decrease. E-cadherin in these cells became undetectable in some domains, and actin stress fibers were more clearly observed at the cell base. In contrast, E-cadherin in cells adhered to the collagen-immobilized PAAm side was equally stained as that in cells adhered to the collagen-immobilized PAAm side even after temperature decrease. ERK1/2 MAPK activation of cells on the non-stimulated substrate occurred after partial stretching of the cell sheet suggesting the propagation of signaling. These results indicate that a change in the balance of mechanical tension induced by partial stretching of cell sheets leads to activation and propagation of the cell signaling.

  12. Low sheet resistance titanium nitride films by low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using design of experiments methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Micheal, E-mail: micheal.burke@tyndall.ie; Blake, Alan; Povey, Ian M.; Schmidt, Michael; Petkov, Nikolay; Carolan, Patrick; Quinn, Aidan J., E-mail: aidan.quinn@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-05-15

    A design of experiments methodology was used to optimize the sheet resistance of titanium nitride (TiN) films produced by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor in a N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma at low temperature (250 °C). At fixed chamber pressure (300 mTorr) and plasma power (300 W), the plasma duration and N{sub 2} flow rate were the most significant factors. The lowest sheet resistance values (163 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film) were obtained using plasma durations ∼40 s, N{sub 2} flow rates >60 standard cubic centimeters per minute, and purge times ∼60 s. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy data revealed reduced levels of carbon contaminants in the TiN films with lowest sheet resistance (163 Ω/sq.), compared to films with higher sheet resistance (400–600 Ω/sq.) while transmission electron microscopy data showed a higher density of nanocrystallites in the low-resistance films. Further significant reductions in sheet resistance, from 163 Ω/sq. to 70 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film (corresponding resistivity ∼145 μΩ·cm), were achieved by addition of a postcycle Ar/N{sub 2} plasma step in the PE-ALD process.

  13. Process optimization of rolling for zincked sheet technology using response surface methodology and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liang-Bo; Chen, Fang

    2017-07-01

    Numerical simulation and intelligent optimization technology were adopted for rolling and extrusion of zincked sheet. By response surface methodology (RSM), genetic algorithm (GA) and data processing technology, an efficient optimization of process parameters for rolling of zincked sheet was investigated. The influence trend of roller gap, rolling speed and friction factor effects on reduction rate and plate shortening rate were analyzed firstly. Then a predictive response surface model for comprehensive quality index of part was created using RSM. Simulated and predicted values were compared. Through genetic algorithm method, the optimal process parameters for the forming of rolling were solved. They were verified and the optimum process parameters of rolling were obtained. It is feasible and effective.

  14. Multifluid MHD simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere: Dynamics of mass- and momentum-loading, and seasonal variation of the plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Arridge, C. S.; Jackman, C. M.; Smith, H. T.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's magnetosphere is driven externally, by the solar wind, and internally, by the planet's strong magnetic field, rapid rotation rate, and the addition of new plasma created from Saturn's neutral cloud. Externally, the alignment of the rotational and magnetic dipole axes, combined with Saturn's substantial inclination to its plane of orbit result in substantial curvature of the plasma sheet during solstice. Internally, new water group ions are produced in the inner regions of the magnetosphere from photoionization and electron-impact ionization of the water vapor and OH cloud sourced from Enceladus and other icy bodies in Saturn's planetary system. In addition to this, charge-exchange collisions between the relatively fast-moving water group ions and the slower neutrals results in a net loss of momentum from the plasma. In order to study these phenomena, we have made significant modifications to the Saturn multifluid model. This model has been previously used to investigate the external triggering of plasmoids and the interchange process using a fixed internal source rate. In order to improve the fidelity of the model, we have incorporated a physical source of mass- and momentum-loading by including an empirical representation of Saturn's neutral cloud and modifying the multifluid MHD equations to include mass- and momentum-loading terms. Collision cross-sections between ions, electrons, and neutrals are calculated as functions of closure velocity and energy at each grid point and time step, enabling us to simulate the spatially and temporally varying plasma-neutral interactions. In addition to this, by altering the angle of incidence of the solar wind relative to Saturn's rotational axis and applying a realistic latitudinally- and seasonally-varying ionospheric conductivity, we are also able to study seasonal effects on Saturn's magnetosphere. We use the updated multifluid simulation to investigate the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere, focusing specifically

  15. Evolution and structure of the plasma of current sheets forming in two-dimensional magnetic fields with a null line at low initial gas ionization and their interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Frank, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    An analysis of the experimental data obtained by holographic interferometry in our work [1] makes it possible to explain most of the observed specific features of the structure and evolution of the plasma sheets developing in a two-dimensional magnetic field with a null line in a plasma with a low initial degree of ionization (≈10-4). The following two processes are shown to play a key role here: additional gas ionization in an electric field and the peculiarities of plasma dynamics in a current sheet expanding in time.

  16. Latitude-energy structure of multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS data in plasma sheet boundary layer and boundary plasma sheet below 6 RE radial distance: basic properties and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Peterson

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity dispersed ion signatures (VDIS occurring at the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL are a well reported feature. Theory has, however, predicted the existence of multiple ion beamlets, similar to VDIS, in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, i.e. at latitudes below the PSBL. In this study we show evidence for the multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS ion data and basic properties of the ion beamlets will be presented. Statistics of the occurrence frequency of ion multiple beamlets show that they are most common in the midnight MLT sector and for altitudes above 4 RE, while at low altitude (≤3 RE, single beamlets at PSBL (VDIS are more common. Distribution functions of ion beamlets in velocity space have recently been shown to correspond to 3-dimensional hollow spheres, containing a large amount of free energy. We also study correlation with ~100 Hz waves and electron anisotropies and consider the possibility that ion beamlets correspond to stable auroral arcs.

  17. 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy processed by LBW/SPF and its load response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy will be used in flying vehicles as heat resisting and shielding structure due to its lightweight, high strength and stiffness. The 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy processed by LBW/SPF (laser beam welding/superplastic forming) technology exhibited good configuration and uniform thickness distribution. The LBW parameters for 3-sheet structure were as follows: Pulse frequency was 32 Hz, impulse duration 3 ms, peak power per pulse 4500 W, and welding speed 180 mm/min. The SPF parameters were as follows: Temperature T=965 ℃, forming pressure P=4.2 MPa, and forming time t=130 min. The microstructure in weld fusion zone was consti- tuted of austenite dendritics and Laves phase precipitated in interdendritics. After the SPF process, austenite dendritics in the weld fusion became coarser and most of Laves phases were dissolved and turned into δ precipitated phase, but a few of Laves phases were still reserved. And Nb concentration in dendritics increased to 5.42% compared to 2.82% in as-weld condition. Weld metal Vickers-hardness increased from 331.63 in as-weld condition to 391.74 in post-SPF condition which was closed to the base material Vickers-hardness of post-SPF. Grain size of base material grew slightly and an amount of precipitated phase appeared in the base material undergoing SPF process. The tensile test results of base material showed that tensile strength increased obviously and the ductility decreased slightly after SPF process. Load response test results indicated that the 3-sheet structure possessed good resistance to compression and bending load. Accordingly, the LBW/SPF technology is an appropriate forming technique for the 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy.

  18. 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy processed by LBW/SPF and its load response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU FengSeng; ZHANG KaiFeng

    2009-01-01

    The 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy will be used in flying vehicles as heat resisting and shielding structure due to its lightweight,high strength and stiffness.The 3-sheet structure of Inconel 718 superalloy processed by LBW/SPF(laser beam welding/superplastic forming)technology exhibited good configuration and uniform thickness distribution.The LBW parameters for 3-sheet structure were as follows:Pulse frequency was 32 Hz,impulse duration 3 ms,peak power per pulse 4500 W,and welding speed 180 mm/min.The SPF parameters were as follows:Temperature T=965℃,forming pressure P=-4.2 MPa,and forming time t=130 min.The microstructure in weld fusion zone was constituted of austenite dendritics and Laves phase precipitated in interdendritics.After the SPF process,austenite dendritics in the weld fusion became coarser and most of Laves phases were dissolved and turned into δprecipitated phase,but a few of Laves phases were still reserved.And Nb concentration in dendritics increased to 5.42% compared to 2.82% in as-weld condition.Weld metal Vickers-hardness increased from 331.63 in as-weld condition to 391.74 in post-SPF condition which was closed to the base material Vickers-hardness of post-SPF.Grain size of base material grew slightly and an amount of precipitated phase appeared in the base material undergoing SPF process.The tensile test results of base material showed that tensile strength increased obviously and the ductility decreased slightly after SPF process.Load response test results indicated that the 3-sheet structure possessed good resistance to compression and bending load.Accordingly,the LBW/SPF technology is an appropriate forming technique for the 3-sheet structure of inconel 718 superalloy.

  19. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C. J.

    2002-05-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability suggests that this figure is consistent with the amount of momentum flux transfer produced by this mechanism. We also consider the possibility that these flows are solely driven by transferring magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. We find that there is sufficient mass observed on these field lines for this to be the sole driving mechanism for only 27% of the observed slow flows.

  20. Resonant scattering of central plasma sheet protons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant proton loss timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xing; Ni, Binbin; Liang, Jun; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Shi, Run; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Fu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    This is a companion study to Liang et al. (2014) which reported a "reversed" energy-latitude dispersion pattern of ion precipitation in that the lower energy ion precipitation extends to lower latitudes than the higher-energy ion precipitation. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the central plasma sheet (CPS) have been suggested to account for this reversed-type ion precipitation. To further investigate the association, we perform a comprehensive study of pitch angle diffusion rates induced by EMIC wave and the resultant proton loss timescales at L = 8-12 around the midnight. Comparing the proton scattering rates in the Earth's dipole field and a more realistic quiet time geomagnetic field constructed from the Tsyganenko 2001 (T01) model, we find that use of a realistic, nondipolar magnetic field model not only decreases the minimum resonant energies of CPS protons but also considerably decreases the limit of strong diffusion and changes the proton pitch angle diffusion rates. Adoption of the T01 model increases EMIC wave diffusion rates at > ~ 60° equatorial pitch angles but decreases them at small equatorial pitch angles. Pitch angle scattering coefficients of 1-10 keV protons due to H+ band EMIC waves can exceed the strong diffusion rate for both geomagnetic field models. While He+ and O+ band EMIC waves can only scatter tens of keV protons efficiently to cause a fully filled loss cone at L > 10, in the T01 magnetic field they can also cause efficient scattering of ~ keV protons in the strong diffusion limit at L > 10. The resultant proton loss timescales by EMIC waves with a nominal amplitude of 0.2 nT vary from a few hours to several days, depending on the wave band and L shell. Overall, the results demonstrate that H+ band EMIC waves, once present, can act as a major contributor to the scattering loss of a few keV protons at lower L shells in the CPS, accounting for the reversed energy-latitude dispersion pattern of proton precipitation at low

  1. Effects of solar wind ultralow-frequency fluctuations on plasma sheet electron temperature: Regression analysis with support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Yue, Chao; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether ultralow-frequency (ULF) fluctuations from 0.5 to 8.3 mHz in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can affect the plasma sheet electron temperature (Te) near geosynchronous distances, we use a support vector regression machine technique to decouple the effects from different solar wind parameters and their ULF fluctuation power. Te in this region varies from 0.1 to 10 keV with a median of 1.3 keV. We find that when the solar wind ULF power is weak, Te increases with increasing southward IMF Bz and solar wind speed, while it varies weakly with solar wind density. As the ULF power becomes stronger during weak IMF Bz ( 0) or northward IMF, Te becomes significantly enhanced, by a factor of up to 10. We also find that mesoscale disturbances in a time scale of a few to tens of minutes as indicated by AE during substorm expansion and recovery phases are more enhanced when the ULF power is stronger. The effect of ULF powers may be explained by stronger inward radial diffusion resulting from stronger mesoscale disturbances under higher ULF powers, which can bring high-energy plasma sheet electrons further toward geosynchronous distance. This effect of ULF powers is particularly important during weak southward IMF or northward IMF when convection electric drift is weak.

  2. Multi-instrument observations of the ionospheric counterpart of a bursty bulk flow in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On 07 September 2001 the Cluster spacecraft observed a "bursty bulk flow" event in the near-Earth central plasma sheet. This paper presents a detailed study of the coincident ground-based observations and attempts to place them within a simple physical framework. The event in question occurs at ~22:30 UT, some 10min after a southward turning of the IMF. IMAGE and SAMNET magnetometer measurements of the ground magnetic field reveal perturbations of a few tens of nT and small amplitude Pi2 pulsations. CUTLASS radar observations of ionospheric plasma convection show enhanced flows out of the polar cap near midnight, accompanied by an elevated transpolar voltage. Optical data from the IMAGE satellite also show that there is a transient, localised ~1 kR brightening in the UV aurora. These observations are consistent with the earthward transport of plasma in the tail, but also indicate the absence of a typical "large-scale" substorm current wedge. An analysis of the field-aligned current system implied by the radar measurements does suggest the existence of a small-scale current "wedgelet", but one which lacks the global scale and high conductivities observed during substorm expansions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheremagnetosphere interactions; plasma convection

  3. Modelling the Isotopic Response to Antarctic Ice Sheet Change During the Last Interglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Max; Sime, Louise; Singarayer, Joy; Tindall, Julia; Valdes, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Ice sheet changes can exert major control over spatial water isotope variations in Antarctic surface snow. Consequently a significant mass loss or gain of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) would be expected to cause changes in the water isotope record across Antarctic ice core sites. Analysis of sea level indicators for the last interglacial (LIG), around 125 to 128 ka, suggest a global sea level peak 6 to 9 m higher than present. Recent NEEM Greenland ice core results imply that Greenland likely provided a modest ~2m contribution towards this global sea level rise. This implies that a WAIS contribution is necessary to explain the LIG sea level maxima. In addition, Antarctic ice core records suggest that Antarctic air temperatures during the LIG were up to 6°C warmer than present. Climate models have been unable to recreate such warmth when only orbital and greenhouse gas forcing are considered. Thus changes to the Antarctic ice sheet and ocean circulation may be required to reconcile model simulations with ice core data. Here we model the isotopic response to differing WAIS deglaciation scenarios, freshwater hosing, and sea ice configurations using a fully coupled General Circulation Model (GCM) to help interpret Antarctic ice core records over the LIG. This approach can help isolate the contribution of individual processes and feedbacks to final isotopic signals recorded in Antarctic ice cores.

  4. Thermal and mechanical response of steel sheets welded by laser process: Preanalysis made by ABAQUS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignani, B.; Daneri, A.; Giambuzzi, S.; Toselli, G. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia `E. Clementel` - Area Energetica

    1994-11-01

    In this work, the conclusive report on the activity, developed in the frame of the european project EUREKA-FASP (EU353), concerning the numerical simulation of the thermal and mechanical response of steel sheets, welded by a laser welding process, is presented. This type of welding process is of interest in the shipyard field. ABAQUS code, in its implicit version, has been used. Besides the description of the studies concerning more directly the laser welding, simulations of traditional welding processes, executed in order to single out particular aspects and calculation strategies to be utilized for the simulation of the process object of the study made, are presented and discussed.

  5. Thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogels as temporary substrate for cell sheet biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Lina; Cochis, Andrea; Carletta, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; Farè, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Methylcellulose (MC), a water-soluble polymer derived from cellulose, was investigated as a possible temporary substrate having thermo-responsive properties favorable for cell culturing. MC-based hydrogels were prepared by a dispersion technique, mixing MC powder (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 % w/v) with selected salts (sodium sulphate, Na2SO4), sodium phosphate, calcium chloride, or phosphate buffered saline, to evaluate the influence of different compositions on the thermo-responsive behavior. The inversion test was used to determine the gelation temperatures of the different hydrogel compositions; thermo-mechanical properties and thermo-reversibility of the MC hydrogels were investigated by rheological analysis. Gelation temperatures and rheological behavior depended on the MC concentration and type and concentration of salt used in hydrogel preparation. In vitro cytotoxicity tests, performed using L929 mouse fibroblasts, showed no toxic release from all the tested hydrogels. Among the investigated compositions, the hydrogel composed of 8 % w/v MC with 0.05 M Na2SO4 had a thermo-reversibility temperature at 37 °C. For that reason, this formulation was thus considered to verify the possibility of inducing in vitro spontaneous detachment of cells previously seeded on the hydrogel surface. A continuous cell layer (cell sheet) was allowed to grow and then detached from the hydrogel surface without the use of enzymes, thanks to the thermo-responsive behavior of the MC hydrogel. Immunofluorescence observation confirmed that the detached cell sheet was composed of closely interacting cells.

  6. Observation of a planetward ion beam in the plasma sheet boundary layer at Saturn following tail reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present an interval of data from 2006 when the Cassini spacecraft was located 32 RS (1 RS = 60268km) downtail, at a local time of 22:00 hrs and a latitude of 13.8°. The interval in question displayed a range of dynamic behaviour, including a southward turning of the tail magnetic field, indicative of a dipolarization, and an energetic, fast, planetward beam of ions. Preliminary interpretation of this event suggests that it represents a reconnection-driven ion beam in Saturn's magnetotail plasma sheet boundary layer. This event is explored using several of the Cassini instruments to build up a picture of the reconfiguration of the tail in terms of local and global effects.

  7. Relationship between FAC at plasma sheet boundary layers and AE index during storms from August to October,2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUNLOP; M

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the previous single (dual) satellite observation, the four ClusterII satellites make it possible to directly compute the continuous field-aligned current (FAC) density according to the magnetic data from them and to enable the investigation of the relationship between the FAC and geomagnetic activity. This paper analyzes the observation data when the Cluster satellites crossed the plasma sheet bound- ary layer (PSBL) in the magnetotail during the two magnetic storms in August to October 2001. According to the data, during the magnetic storms the relationship between the variations of FAC and AE index turned out to be: 1) FAC was obviously increasing during the storms; 2) FAC density was approximately negatively corre- lated with AE index from the sudden commencement to the early main phase of the storm; 3) they were approximately positively correlated during the late main phase and early recovery phase; 4) they were no apparent correlation during the late re- covery phase.

  8. Response of Pinus sylvestris roots to sheet-erosion exposure: an anatomical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiales, J. M.; Bodoque, J. M.; Ballesteros, J. A.; Diez-Herrero, A.

    2008-03-01

    Anatomical changes of exposed tree roots are valuable tools to date erosion events, but the responses of diverse species under different types of erosion need still to be studied in detail. In this paper we analyze the histological changes that occur in roots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) subjected to continuous denudation. A descriptive and quantitative study was conducted in the Senda Schmidt, a popular trail located on the northern slope of the Sierra de Guadarrama (Central Iberian System, Spain). Measurement of significant parameters allowed the moment of exposure of the roots to be identified. These parameters were: a) width of the growth ring; b) number of cells per ring; c) percentage of latewood and d) diameter of cellular light in earlywood. A one-way analysis ANOVA was also carried out in order to establish statistically significant differences between homogeneous groups of measurements in pre-exposed and exposed roots. Based on these analyses, Scots pine roots show a remarkable anatomical response to sheet-erosion exposure. Increased growth in the ring is accompanied by a slight reduction of the cell lumina of the earlywood tracheids. At the end of the ring, several rows of thick-walled tracheids define latewood tissue and visible annual borders very clearly. Furthermore, resin ducts often appear in tangential rows, increasing resin density in the tissue. All of these indicators made it possible to determine with precision the first year of exposure and to estimate precisely sheet erosion rates.

  9. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  10. Nanoshaping field emitters from glassy carbon sheets: a new functionality induced by H-plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, S; Orlanducci, S; Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Terranova, M L

    2016-09-14

    This paper reports on the morphological and electrical characterization at the nanometer scale and the investigation of the field emission characteristics of glassy carbon (GC) plates which underwent H-induced physical/chemical processes occurring in a dual-mode MW-RF plasma reactor. Plasma treatment produced on the GC surface arrays of vertically aligned conically shaped nanostructures, with density and height depending on the plasma characteristics. Two kinds of samples obtained under two different bias regimes have been deeply analyzed using an AFM apparatus equipped with tools for electric forces and surface potential measurements. The features of electron emission via the Field Emission (FE) mechanism have been correlated with the morphology and the structure at the nanoscale of the treated glassy carbon samples. The measured current density and the characteristics of the emission, which follow the Fowler-Nordheim law, indicate that the plasma-based methodology utilized for the engineering of the GC surfaces is able to turn conventional GC plates into efficient emission devices. The outstanding properties of GC suggest the use of such nanostructured materials for the assembling of cold cathodes to be used in a harsh environment and under extreme P/T conditions.

  11. Leveraging Cloud Technology to Provide a Responsive, Reliable and Scalable Backend for the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory Using the Ice Sheet System Model and Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, G. L.; Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Cheng, D. L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory(VISL) is a Cryosphere outreach effort byscientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory(JPL) in Pasadena, CA, Earth and SpaceResearch(ESR) in Seattle, WA, and the University of California at Irvine (UCI), with the goal of providing interactive lessons for K-12 and college level students,while conforming to STEM guidelines. At the core of VISL is the Ice Sheet System Model(ISSM), an open-source project developed jointlyat JPL and UCI whose main purpose is to model the evolution of the polar ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. By using ISSM, VISL students have access tostate-of-the-art modeling software that is being used to conduct scientificresearch by users all over the world. However, providing this functionality isby no means simple. The modeling of ice sheets in response to sea and atmospheric temperatures, among many other possible parameters, requiressignificant computational resources. Furthermore, this service needs to beresponsive and capable of handling burst requests produced by classrooms ofstudents. Cloud computing providers represent a burgeoning industry. With majorinvestments by tech giants like Amazon, Google and Microsoft, it has never beeneasier or more affordable to deploy computational elements on-demand. This isexactly what VISL needs and ISSM is capable of. Moreover, this is a promisingalternative to investing in expensive and rapidly devaluing hardware.

  12. Optimization of pneumatic sheet extrusion of whole wheat flour poory dough using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, K Venkatesh; Sudha, M L; Ravi, R; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-07-01

    Pneumatic extrusion of whole wheat flour dough is a challenge in the preparation of Poory. In the present study, the pneumatic extrusion process variables (pneumatic pressure, rate of extrusion) and quality of deep fried product (oil uptake, frying time, puffed height) was evaluated to get Poory of maximum overall sensory quality, minimum shear and minimum oil uptake. These parameters depend on the moisture content of wheat dough. Response surface methodology was demonstrated to be an efficient tool for the optimization of process parameters of pneumatic extrusion. The results indicated that extrusion pressure ranging from 3 ~ 6 × 10(5) Pa for the whole wheat flour dough with added moisture of 56 ~ 60 % was found to give a uniform rate of extruded sheet. It was observed that submerged frying time for the extruded dough sheet was in the range of 35 ~ 40 s, with the temperature of the vegetable oil to be in the range of 180 ~ 185 °C. Oil uptake during frying was about 12 ± 1 % and the textural shear force was found to be 9.9 N with an overall sensory score of 7.2 ± 0.5 on nine point scale. The experimental errors for all attributes were non-significant (p > 0.05) and thus optimum variables predicted by the model are found suitable.

  13. Observations of energetic electrons /E no less than about 200 keV/ in the earth's magnetotail - Plasma sheet and fireball observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Stone, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    An earlier paper by the authors (1976) has reported on energetic electron anisotropies observed in conjunction with the acceleration regions identified by Frank et al., (1976). The present paper gives more detailed analyses of observations in the distant plasma sheet, including specific features of intensities, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions of the very energetic electrons associated with intense plasma particle events, with energies ranging between 50 eV and 45 keV, detected with an electron/isotope spectrometer aboard the earth-orbiting spacecraft Imp 8. Two domains are considered: the plasma sheet and the regions near and within the localized magnetotail acceleration regions known as the fireball regions. The instrumentation used offered a number of observational advantages over many previous studies, including inherently low background, large geometric factors, excellent species identification, good angular distribution measurement capability, and availability of high resolution of differential intensities.

  14. Antarctic last interglacial isotope peak in response to sea ice retreat not ice-sheet collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Max D; Sime, Louise C; Singarayer, Joy S; Tindall, Julia C; Bunch, Pete; Valdes, Paul J

    2016-08-16

    Several studies have suggested that sea-level rise during the last interglacial implies retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). The prevalent hypothesis is that the retreat coincided with the peak Antarctic temperature and stable water isotope values from 128,000 years ago (128 ka); very early in the last interglacial. Here, by analysing climate model simulations of last interglacial WAIS loss featuring water isotopes, we show instead that the isotopic response to WAIS loss is in opposition to the isotopic evidence at 128 ka. Instead, a reduction in winter sea ice area of 65±7% fully explains the 128 ka ice core evidence. Our finding of a marked retreat of the sea ice at 128 ka demonstrates the sensitivity of Antarctic sea ice extent to climate warming.

  15. In Search of the Attributes Responsible for Sliver Formation in Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Itishree; Das, Prasun; Bhattacharjee, Debashish; Datta, Shubhabrata

    2016-06-01

    Surface quality is one of the most important characteristics of cold rolled (CR) steel sheets for its application in consumer goods industries. The actual cause of sliver formation is very difficult to determine, as it is revealed only after the final cold rolling of the steel. A thorough investigation on searching the root cause of sliver formation in CR steel is done here using several statistical tools towards mining the industrial data for extraction of knowledge. As the complex interactions between the variables make it difficult to identify the cause, it is seen that findings from different techniques differed to a certain extent. Still it is revealed that 21 variables could be short listed as major contributor for sliver formation, but those are found to be from all the areas of the processing. This leads to the conclusion that no particular process variable or particular processing could be held responsible for sliver formation.

  16. Sensitive response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to surface melt drainage over a soft bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougamont, M; Christoffersen, P; Hubbard, A L; Fitzpatrick, A A; Doyle, S H; Carter, S P

    2014-09-29

    The dynamic response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) depends on feedbacks between surface meltwater delivery to the subglacial environment and ice flow. Recent work has highlighted an important role of hydrological processes in regulating the ice flow, but models have so far overlooked the mechanical effect of soft basal sediment. Here we use a three-dimensional model to investigate hydrological controls on a GrIS soft-bedded region. Our results demonstrate that weakening and strengthening of subglacial sediment, associated with the seasonal delivery of surface meltwater to the bed, modulates ice flow consistent with observations. We propose that sedimentary control on ice flow is a viable alternative to existing models of evolving hydrological systems, and find a strong link between the annual flow stability, and the frequency of high meltwater discharge events. Consequently, the observed GrIS resilience to enhanced melt could be compromised if runoff variability increases further with future climate warming.

  17. O+ ion conic and plasma sheet dynamics observed by Van Allen Probe satellites during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Yang, J.; Foster, J.; Wygant, J.; Reeves, G.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-05-01

    The Van Allen Probe satellites were near apogee in the late evening local time sector during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm's main phase. About an hour after crossing the ring current's "nose structure" into the plasma sheet, the satellites encountered a quasiperiodic sequence of 0.08-3 keV O+ ions. Pitch angle distributions of this population consistently peaked nearly antiparallel to the local magnetic field. We interpret this population as O+ conics originating in the northern ionosphere. Sequences began as fairly steady state conic fluxes with energies in the ~ 80 to 100 eV range. Over about a half hour buildup phase, O+ energies peaked near 1 keV. During subsequent release phases lasting ~ 20 min, O+ energies returned to low-energy starting points. We argue these observations reflect repeated formations and dissolutions of downward, magnetically aligned electric fields (ɛ||) layers trapping O+ conics between mirror points within heating layers below and electrostatic barriers above. Nearly identical variations were observed at the locations of both satellites during 9 of these 13 conic cycles. Phase differences between cycles were observed at both spacecraft during the remaining events. Most "buildup" to "release" phase transitions coincided with AL index minima. However, in situ magnetometer measurements indicate only weak dipolarizations of tail-like magnetic fields. The lack of field-aligned reflected O+ and tail-like magnetic fields suggest that both ionospheres may be active. However, Southern Hemisphere origin conics cannot be observed since they would be isotropized and accelerated during neutral sheet crossings.

  18. Monosaccharide-responsive phenylboronate-polyol cell scaffolds for cell sheet and tissue engineering applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachamalla Maheedhar Reddy

    Full Text Available Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery.

  19. Late Pliocene to Pleistocene sensitivity of the Greenland Ice Sheet in response to external forcing and internal feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Sebastian J.; DeConto, Robert M. [University of Massachusetts, Department of Geosciences, Amherst, MA (United States); Pollard, David [Pennsylvania State University, Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The timing and nature of ice sheet variations on Greenland over the last {proportional_to}5 million years remain largely uncertain. Here, we use a coupled climate-vegetation-ice sheet model to determine the climatic sensitivity of Greenland to combined sets of external forcings and internal feedbacks operating on glacial-interglacial timescales. In particular, we assess the role of atmospheric pCO{sub 2}, orbital forcing, and vegetation dynamics in modifying thresholds for the onset of glaciation in late Pliocene and Pleistocene. The response of circum-Arctic vegetation to declining levels of pCO{sub 2} (from 400 to 200 ppmv) and decreasing summer insolation includes a shift from boreal forest to tundra biomes, with implications for the surface energy balance. The expansion of tundra amplifies summer surface cooling and heat loss from the ground, leading to an expanded summer snow cover over Greenland. Atmospheric and land surface fields respond to forcing most prominently in late spring-summer and are more sensitive at lower Pleistocene-like levels of pCO{sub 2}. We find cold boreal summer orbits produce favorable conditions for ice sheet growth, however simulated ice sheet extents are highly dependent on both background pCO{sub 2} levels and land-surface characteristics. As a result, late Pliocene ice sheet configurations on Greenland differ considerably from late Pleistocene, with smaller ice caps on high elevations of southern and eastern Greenland, even when orbital forcing is favorable for ice sheet growth. (orig.)

  20. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  1. Tail reconnection region versus auroral activity inferred from conjugate ARTEMIS plasma sheet flow and auroral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Xing, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E. F.; Mende, S. B.; Bonnell, J. W.; Auster, U.

    2013-09-01

    sheet flow bursts have been suggested to correspond to different types of auroral activity, such as poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs), ensuing auroral streamers, and substorms. The flow-aurora association leads to the important question of identifying the magnetotail source region for the flow bursts and how this region depends on magnetic activity. The present study uses the ARTEMIS spacecraft coordinated with conjugate ground-based auroral imager observations to identify flow bursts beyond 45 RE downtail and corresponding auroral forms. We find that quiet-time flows are directed dominantly earthward with a one-to-one correspondence with PBIs. Flow bursts during the substorm recovery phase and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) periods are also directed earthward, and these flows are associated with a series of PBIs/streamers lasting for tens of minutes with similar durations to that of the series of earthward flows. Presubstorm onset flows are also earthward and associated with PBIs/streamers. The earthward flows during those magnetic conditions suggest that the flow bursts, which lead to PBIs and streamers, originate from further downtail of ARTEMIS, possibly from the distant-tail neutral line (DNL) or tailward-retreated near-Earth neutral line (NENL) rather than from the nominal NENL location in the midtail. We find that tailward flows are limited primarily to the substorm expansion phase. They continue throughout the period of auroral poleward expansion, indicating that the expansion-phase flows originate from the NENL and that NENL activity is closely related to the auroral expansion of the substorm expansion phase.

  2. Observation of an Extremely Large-Density Heliospheric Plasma Sheet Compressed by an Interplanetary Shock at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Lepping, R. P.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Socker, Dennis; Wu, S. T.

    2017-08-01

    At 11:46 UT on 9 September 2011, the Wind spacecraft encountered an interplanetary (IP) fast-forward shock. The shock was followed almost immediately by a short-duration (˜ 35 minutes) extremely dense pulse (with a peak ˜ 94 cm-3). The pulse induced an extremely large positive impulse (SYM-H = 74 nT and Dst = 48 nT) on the ground. A close examination of other in situ parameters from Wind shows that the density pulse was associated with i) a spike in the plasma β (ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure), ii) multiple sign changes in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field (B_{φ}), iii) a depressed magnetic field magnitude, iv) a small radial component of the magnetic field, and v) a large (> 90°) change in the suprathermal (˜ 255 eV) electron pitch angle across the density pulse. We conclude that the density pulse is associated with the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS). The thickness of the HPS is estimated to be {˜} 8.2×105 km. The HPS density peak is about five times the value of a medium-sized density peak inside the HPS (˜ 18 cm-3) at 1 AU. Our global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation results (Wu et al. in J. Geophys. Res. 212, 1839, 2016) suggest that the extremely large density pulse may be the result of the compression of the HPS by an IP shock crossing or an interaction between an interplanetary shock and a corotating interaction region.

  3. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 13: Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geral I. McDonald; Philip D. Tanimoto; Thomas M. Rice; David E. Hall; Jane E. Stewart; Paul J. Zambino; Jonalea R. Tonn; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim

    2005-01-01

    The Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART) is a Web-based tool that estimates Armillaria root disease risk in dry forests of the Western United States. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does and does not do, and tells the user how to obtain the model.

  4. Mechanical response of a living human epidermal keratinocyte sheet as measured in a composite diaphragm inflation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, John C; Shannon, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Sheets of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) were reconstituted in vitro on tensed but highly compliant, freestanding polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes, 5.0 mm in diameter and 10 mum thick. NHEK-PDMS composite diaphragm (CD) specimens were then subjected to cyclical axisymmetric inflation tests to investigate epithelial sheet rheology under conditions of physiologically severe deformations (~50% nominal polar biaxial strains). Because the compliance of the specially formulated PDMS membrane was greater than that of the attached cell layer, the finite load-deformation behavior (mechanical response) of the living NHEK sheet was inferred from differences between the mechanical behavior of the CD specimen and the response of the underlying PDMS membrane measured prior to cell culture. In these composite diaphragm inflation (CDI) experiments, interconnected NHEKs exhibited rheological behaviors that were suggestive of a viscoelastic-plastic stress response. Remarkably, specimens returned to quiescent culture following a sequence of inflation tests recovered at least 80% of their original ability to store elastic strain energy, evidence of biological adaptation and recovery or restitutio ad integrum. Unlike methodologies that assay the morphological or biochemical response of cultured cells to an applied mechanostimulus, CDI experiments can be used to probe the load-bearing functions of desmosomes and adherens junctions within a living epithelial sheet, as well as to assess the rheological behaviors of the intermediate filament and microfilament networks that these cell-cell junctions serve to interconnect.

  5. Comparative analysis of the processing accuracy of high strength metal sheets by AWJ, laser and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, M. C.; Schnakovszky, C.; Herghelegiu, E.; Tampu, N. C.; Zichil, V.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental tests were carried out on two high-strength steel materials (Ramor 400 and Ramor 550). Quantification of the dimensional accuracy was achieved by measuring the deviations from some geometric parameters of part (two lengths and two radii). It was found that in case of Ramor 400 steel, at the jet inlet, the deviations from the part radii are quite small for all the three analysed processes. Instead for the linear dimensions, the deviations are small only in case of laser cutting. At the jet outlet, the deviations raised in small amount compared to those obtained at the jet inlet for both materials as well as for all the three processes. Related to Ramor 550 steel, at the jet inlet the deviations from the part radii are very small in case of AWJ and laser cutting but larger in case of plasma cutting. At the jet outlet, the deviations from the part radii are very small for all processes; in case of linear dimensions, there was obtained very small deviations only in the case of laser processing, the other two processes leading to very large deviations.

  6. What can adjoint modelling tell about the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in basal sliding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Jonathan; Rutt, Ian; Murray, Tavi; Utke, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Studying the future behaviour of the Greenland Ice Sheet is important considering the ice sheet has a sea-level equivalent of 7 metres and the rate of mass loss from it is increasing (Velicogna, 2009). Examining the modelled response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in forcing parameters can give insight into how it will behave in the future. The response of the ice sheet to specific changes in forcing parameters is referred to as the sensitivity. Being able to obtain model sensitivities in as little computation time as possible would be useful for examining the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Adjoint models allow sensitivities to be obtained more efficiently than the conventional way, when considering spatially varying parameters. Conventionally, such sensitivities are obtained by perturbing a parameter at every grid point in turn and calculating the sensitivity at every grid point. Adjoint sensitivities, though, are calculated in a single step. This reduces the computational cost when obtaining sensitivities over large model domains. The adjoint method also has the advantage that it gives the exact value of the model sensitivity, rather than a finite difference approximation to it. We present the adjoint of a finite difference, shallow ice, thermomechanical ice sheet model with basal sliding, applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet. This adjoint model is obtained using the OpenAD automatic differentiation tool (Utke, 2006), which is open source. The adjoint model is validated by comparing adjoint and forward model sensitivities over 100 years. This work builds on the work of Heimbach (2009). We use the adjoint model to examine the sensitivity of the model to changes in basal sliding. About half the mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet occurs from surface runoff and half from dynamic mass loss (Broeke, 2009). Melt-water from Greenland Ice Sheet supra-glacial lakes can percolate to the bed through moulins. The melt-water that reaches the bed can then

  7. Rorschach test: Italian calibration update about statistical frequencies of responses and location sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caruson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The remarkable importance of a calibration of a test lies in the formalization of useful statistical norms. In particular, the determination of these norms is of key importance for the Rorschach Test because of it allows objectifying the estimates of the interpretations’ formal qualities, and help to characterize responses consistent with the common perception. The aim of this work is to communicate the new results provided by a study conducted  on Rorschach protocols related to a sample of “non-clinical” subjects. The expert team in Psychodiagnostic of CIFRIC (Italian Center for training, research and clinic in medicine and psychology has carried out the following work identifying the rate at which the details of each card are interpreted by normative sample. The data obtained are systematized in new Location sheets, which refers to the next edition of the "Updated Manual of Locations and Coding of Responses to Rorschach Test".             Considering the Rorschach Test one of the more effective means for the acquaintance of the personality, it appears therefore fundamental to provide the professional, who uses it, with the possibility of accessing updated statistical data that reflect the population of reference, in order to deduce from them reliable and objectively valid indications.

  8. pTC-1 observation of ion high-speed flow reversal in the near-Earth plasma sheet during substorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.; RME; I.; DANDOURAS; C.; M.; CARR

    2008-01-01

    Based on measurements of FGM and HIA on board TC-1 at its apogee on Septem-ber 14, 2004, we analyzed the ion high-speed flows in the near-Earth plasma sheet observed during the substorm expansion phase. Strong tailward high-speed flows (Vx ~ -350 km/s) were first seen at about X ~ -13.2 RE in near-Earth magnetotail, one minute later the flows reversed from tailward to earthward. The reversal process occurred quickly after the substorm expansion onset. The near-Earth magnetotail plasma sheet was one of key regions for substorm onset. Our analysis showed that the ion flow reversal from tailward to earthward was likely to be in close relation with the substorm expansion initiation and might play an important role in trigger-ing the substorm expansion onset.

  9. Using PEACE Data from the four CLUSTER Spacecraft to Measure Compressibility, Vorticity, and the Taylor Microscale in the Magnetosheath and Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Parks, George; Gurgiolo, C.; Fazakerley, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    We present determinations of compressibility and vorticity in the magnetosheath and plasma sheet using moments from the four PEACE thermal electron instruments on CLUSTER. The methodology used assumes a linear variation of the moments throughout the volume defined by the four satellites, which allows spatially independent estimates of the divergence, curl, and gradient. Once the vorticity has been computed, it is possible to estimate directly the Taylor microscale. We have shown previously that the technique works well in the solar wind. Because the background flow speed in the magnetosheath and plasma sheet is usually less than the Alfven speed, the Taylor frozen-in-flow approximation cannot be used. Consequently, this four spacecraft approach is the only viable method for obtaining the wave number properties of the ambient fluctuations. Our results using electron velocity moments will be compared with previous work using magnetometer data from the FGM experiment on Cluster.

  10. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 1. Boundary structure and motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amata

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study plasma transport at a thin magnetopause (MP, described hereafter as a thin current sheet (TCS, observed by Cluster at the southern cusp on 13 February 2001 around 20:01 UT. The Cluster observations generally agree with the predictions of the Gas Dynamic Convection Field (GDCF model in the magnetosheath (MSH up to the MSH boundary layer, where significant differences are seen. We find for the MP a normal roughly along the GSE x-axis, which implies a clear departure from the local average MP normal, a ~90 km thickness and an outward speed of 35 km/s. Two populations are identified in the MSH boundary layer: the first one roughly perpendicular to the MSH magnetic field, which we interpret as the "incident" MSH plasma, the second one mostly parallel to B. Just after the MP crossing a velocity jet is observed with a peak speed of 240 km/s, perpendicular to B, with MA=3 and β>10 (peak value 23. The magnetic field clock angle rotates by 70° across the MP. Ex is the main electric field component on both sides of the MP, displaying a bipolar signature, positive on the MSH side and negative on the opposite side, corresponding to a ~300 V electric potential jump across the TCS. The E×B velocity generally coincides with the perpendicular velocity measured by CIS; however, in the speed jet a difference between the two is observed, which suggests the need for an extra flow source. We propose that the MP TCS can act locally as an obstacle for low-energy ions (<350 eV, being transparent for ions with larger gyroradius. As a result, the penetration of plasma by finite gyroradius is considered as a possible source for the jet. The role of reconnection is briefly discussed. The electrodynamics of the TCS along with mass and momentum transfer across it are further discussed in the companion paper by Savin et al. (2006.

  11. On the response of the Greenland ice sheet to greenhouse climate change

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Numerical computations are performed with the three-dimensional polythermal ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS in order to investigate the possible impact of a greenhouse-gas-induced climate change on the Greenland ice sheet. The assumed increase of the mean annual air temperature above the ice covers a range from ΔT = 1℃ to 12℃, and several parameterizations for the snowfall and the surface melting are considered. The simulated shrinking of the ice sheet is a smooth function of the temperature rise, ...

  12. Studying the Important Relationship Between Earth's Plasma Sheet and the Outer Radiation Belt Electrons Using Newly Calibrated and Corrected Themis-Sst Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruce, P. R.; Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Larson, D. E.; Shprits, Y.; Huang, C.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Most recently, the solid-state telescope (SST) data from the THEMIS mission, which consisted of 5 spacecraft in highly elliptic, equatorial orbits that have traversed the outer radiation belt and sampled the plasma sheet for more than 4 years, have been characterized, calibrated, and decontaminated. Here, we present a brief introduction on this corrected dataset and go into detail on the valuable resource it provides to address science questions concerning the important relationship between ~1 keV-10's keV electrons in the plasma sheet and 100's keV-MeV electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt. We demonstrate this by presenting preliminary results on: studying phase space density (PSD) radial gradients for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants from the radiation belt into the plasma sheet, examining pitch angle distributions near the boundary between these two regions, and studying the boundary region itself around the last closed drift shell and the role of magnetopause shadowing losses. We examine the dependence of PSD radial gradients on the first and second invariants to test previous results [e.g., Turner et al., GRL, 2008; Kim et al., JGR, 2010] that reveal mostly positive radial gradients for lower energy electrons (10's - couple hundred keV) but negative gradients for relativistic electrons beyond geosynchronous orbit. This directly relates to the current theory that lower energy electrons have a source in the plasma sheet and are introduced to the ring current and radiation belt via substorm injections and enhanced convection, and these particles then generate the waves necessary to accelerate a fraction of this seed population to relativistic energies, providing a source of the outer radiation belt. Next, we take advantage of the pitch angle resolved differential energy fluxes to examine variations in pitch angle distributions to establish the role that Shabansky drift orbits, which break electrons' second adiabatic invariant, play on outer belt

  13. Experimental study of nonlinear interaction of plasma flow with charged thin current sheets: 2. Hall dynamics, mass and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding with the analysis of Amata et al. (2005, we suggest that the general feature for the local transport at a thin magnetopause (MP consists of the penetration of ions from the magnetosheath with gyroradius larger than the MP width, and that, in crossing it, the transverse potential difference at the thin current sheet (TCS is acquired by these ions, providing a field-particle energy exchange without parallel electric fields. It is suggested that a part of the surface charge is self-consistently produced by deflection of ions in the course of inertial drift in the non-uniform electric field at MP. Consideration of the partial moments of ions with different energies demonstrates that the protons having gyroradii of roughly the same size or larger than the MP width carry fluxes normal to MP that are about 20% of the total flow in the plasma jet under MP. This is close to the excess of the ion transverse velocity over the cross-field drift speed in the plasma flow just inside MP (Amata et al., 2005, which conforms to the contribution of the finite-gyroradius inflow across MP. A linkage through the TCS between different plasmas results from the momentum conservation of the higher-energy ions. If the finite-gyroradius penetration occurs along the MP over ~1.5 RE from the observation site, then it can completely account for the formation of the jet under the MP. To provide the downstream acceleration of the flow near the MP via the cross-field drift, the weak magnetic field is suggested to rotate from its nearly parallel direction to the unperturbed flow toward being almost perpendicular to the accelerated flow near the MP. We discuss a deceleration of the higher-energy ions in the MP normal direction due to the interaction with finite-scale electric field bursts in the magnetosheath flow frame, equivalent to collisions, providing a charge separation. These effective collisions, with a nonlinear frequency proxy of the order of the proton

  14. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    Increased mass losses from the Greenland ice sheet and inferred contributions to sea-level rise have heightened the need for hydrologic observations of meltwater exiting the ice sheet. We explore whether temporal variations in ice-sheet surface hydrology can be linked to the development of a down...... area. We conclude that remote sensing of sediment plume behavior offers a novel tool for detecting the presence, timing and interannual variability of meltwater release from the ice sheet....... of a downstream sediment plume in Kangerlussuaq Fjord by comparing: (1) plume area and suspended sediment concentration from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data; (2) ice-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3......) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...

  15. Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Hannes; Sasgen, Ingo; Pollard, David; Klemann, Volker

    2016-04-01

    for asthenosphere viscosities of 3x10^20 Pa s or higher. References Gomez, N., Pollard, D., Mitrovica, J. X., Huybers, P., & Clark, P. U. (2012). Evolution of a coupled marine ice sheet-sea level model. J. Geophys. Res. 117(F1). Konrad, H., Sasgen, I., Pollard, D. & Klemann, V. (2015). Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat in a warming climate. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 432, 2015.

  16. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 03: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: More ways to catch and hold people's attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Other fact sheets discuss the different types of information that are useful in explaining to property owners the importance of taking personal responsibility for fuels management on their land. However, for some property owners, new information is not enough-they may need more information in order to understand that change is necessary. This fact sheet discusses ways...

  17. Antarctic ice-sheet response to atmospheric CO2 and insolation in the Middle Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schulz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Foraminiferal oxygen isotopes from deep-sea sediment cores suggest that a rapid expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet took place in the Middle Miocene around 13.9 million years ago. The origin for this transition is still not understood satisfactorily. One possible cause is a drop in the partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2 in combination with orbital forcing. A complication is the large uncertainty in the magnitude and timing of the reconstructed pCO2 variability and additionally the low temporal resolution of the available pCO2 records in the Middle Miocene. We used an ice sheet-climate model of reduced complexity to assess variations in Antarctic ice sheet volume induced by pCO2 and insolation forcing in the Middle Miocene. The ice-sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 was tested for several scenarios with constant pCO2 forcing or a regular decrease in pCO2. This showed that small, ephemeral ice sheets existed under relatively high atmospheric CO2 conditions (between 640–900 ppm, whereas more stable, large ice sheets occurred when pCO2 was less than ~600 ppm. The main result of this study is that the pCO2-level must have declined just before or during the period of oxygen-isotope increase, thereby crossing a pCO2 glaciation threshold of around 615 ppm. After the decline, the exact timing of the Antarctic ice-sheet expansion depends also on the relative minimum in summer insolation at approximately 13.89 million years ago. Although the mechanisms described appear to be robust, the exact values of the pCO2 thresholds are likely to be model-dependent.

  18. Optimization Of Pulsed Current Parameters To Minimize Pitting Corrosion İn Pulsed Current Micro Plasma Arc Welded Aısı 304l Sheets Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondapalli Siva Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steel sheets have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of components, which require high temperature resistance and corrosion resistance, such as metal bellows used in expansion joints in aircraft, aerospace and petroleum industry. In case of single pass welding of thinner sections of this alloy, Pulsed Current Micro Plasma Arc Welding (PCMPAW was found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. This paper highlights the development of empirical mathematical equations using multiple regression analysis, correlating various process parameters to pitting corrosion rates in PCMPAW of AISI 304L sheets in 1 Normal HCl. The experiments were conducted based on a five factor, five level central composite rotatable design matrix. A Genetic Algorithm (GA was developed to optimize the process parameters for minimizing the pitting corrosion rates.

  19. PLASMA MODEL-ONE MODEL OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RESPONSE OF MATTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Du; J. Gong; C. Sun; A.L. Ji; R.F. Huang; L.S. Wen

    2001-01-01

    The prerequisite and mode of electromagnetic response of nano metal/dielectric filmsto electromagnetic wave field were suggested. With the carrier density and the re-flectance, transmittance of the film, the plasma frequency and the dependence of ab-sorptance on the frequency of electromagnetic wave field were calculated respectively.The calculated results accorded with the experimental ones, which proved the plasmaresonance is one mode of electromagnetic response.

  20. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  1. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Krystyna; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2013-12-06

    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants' desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet, future research implications should

  2. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Basal drainage system response to increasing surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, T; Harper, J; Humphrey, N

    2013-08-16

    Surface meltwater reaching the bed of the Greenland ice sheet imparts a fundamental control on basal motion. Sliding speed depends on ice/bed coupling, dictated by the configuration and pressure of the hydrologic drainage system. In situ observations in a four-site transect containing 23 boreholes drilled to Greenland's bed reveal basal water pressures unfavorable to water-draining conduit development extending inland beneath deep ice. This finding is supported by numerical analysis based on realistic ice sheet geometry. Slow meltback of ice walls limits conduit growth, inhibiting their capacity to transport increased discharge. Key aspects of current conceptual models for Greenland basal hydrology, derived primarily from the study of mountain glaciers, appear to be limited to a portion of the ablation zone near the ice sheet margin.

  4. Toroidal modeling of plasma response to RMP fields in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, N.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D.; Zhong, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic numerical study is carried out, computing the resistive plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for ITER plasmas, utilizing the toroidal code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681). A number of factors are taken into account, including the variation of the plasma scenarios (from 15 MA Q = 10 inductive scenario to the 9 MA Q = 5 steady state scenario), the variation of the toroidal spectrum of the applied fields (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, with n being the toroidal mode number), the amplitude and phase variation of the currents in three rows of the RMP coils as designed for ITER, and finally a special case of mixed toroidal spectrum between the n = 3 and n = 4 RMP fields. Two-dimensional parameter scans, for the edge safety factor and the coil phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils, yield ‘optimal’ curves that maximize a set of figures of merit, that are defined in this work to measure the plasma response. Other two-dimensional scans of the relative coil current phasing among three rows of coils, at fixed coil currents amplitude, reveal a single optimum for each coil configuration with a given n number, for the 15 MA ITER inductive plasma. On the other hand, scanning of the coil current amplitude, at fixed coil phasing, shows either synergy or cancellation effect, for the field contributions between the off-middle rows and the middle row of the RMP coils. Finally, the mixed toroidal spectrum, by combining the n = 3 and the n = 4 RMP field, results in a substantial local reduction of the amplitude of the plasma surface displacement.

  5. Plasma response based RMP coil geometry optimization for an ITER plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yueqiang; Liu, Yue; Yang, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Based on an ITER 15MA Q  =  10 inductive scenario, a systematic numerical investigation is carried out in order to understand the effect of varying the geometry of the magnetic coils, used for controlling the edge localized modes in tokamaks, on the plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields produced by these coils. Toroidal computations show that both of the plasma response based figures of merit—one is the pitch resonant radial field component near the plasma edge and the other is the plasma displacement near the X-point of the separatrix—consistently yield the same prediction for the optimal coil geometry. With a couple of exceptions, the presently designed poloidal location of the ITER upper and lower rows of RMP coils is close to the optimum, according to the plasma response based criteria. This holds for different coil current configurations with n  =  2, 3, 4, as well as different coil phasing between the upper and lower rows. The coils poloidal width from the present design, on the other hand, is sub-optimal for the upper and lower rows. Modelling also finds that the plasma response amplitude sharply decreases by moving the middle row RMP coils of ITER from the designed radial location (just inside the inner vacuum vessel) outwards (outside the outer vacuum vessel). The decay rate is sensitively affected by the middle row coils’ poloidal coverage for low-n (n  =  1, 2) RMP fields, but not for high-n (n  =  4) fields.

  6. Response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to a climatic warming: a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1982-01-01

    It is generally believed that the increasing C02 content of the atmosphere will lead to a substantial climatic warming in the polar regions. In this study the effect of consequent changes in the ice accumulation rate over the Antarctic Ice Sheet is investigated by means of a numerical ice flow model

  7. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  8. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  9. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Prado FERRAZ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces.

  10. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Emanuela Prado; Sverzut, Alexander Tadeu; Freitas, Gileade Pereira; Sá, Juliana Carvalho; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio Mateus; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces.

  11. Elemental Quantitative Distribution and Statistical Analysis on Cross Section of Stainless Steel Sheet by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-hua LUO; Hai-zhou WANG

    2015-01-01

    An innovative application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) technique in illustrating elemental distributions on stainless steel sheets was presented. The technique proved to be a systematic and accurate ap-proach in producing visual images or maps of elemental distributions at cross-sectional surface of a stainless steel sheet. Two stain-less steel sheets served as research objects: 3 mm×1 300 mm hot-rolled stainless steel plate and 1 mm×1 260 mm cold-rolled plate. The cross-sectional surfaces of the two samples at 1/4 position along the width direction were scanned (raster area-44 mm2 and 11 mm2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 213 nm, diameter of laser crater 100 μm, and laser power 1.6 mJ) in a laser abla-tion chamber. The laser ablation system was coupled to a quadrupole ICP-MS, which made the detection of ion intensities of27Al+, 44Ca+,47Ti+,55Mn+ and56Fe+ within an area of interest possible. One-dimensional (1D) content line distribution maps and two-dimensional (2D) contour maps for speciifc positions or areas were plotted to indicate the element distribution of a target area with high accuracy. Statistic method was used to analyze the acquired data by calculating median contents, maximum segregation, sta-tistic segregation and content-frequency distribution.

  12. An efficient regional energy-moisture balance model for simulation of the Greenland Ice Sheet response to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Robinson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the response of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS to climate change on long (centennial to multi-millennial time scales, a regional energy-moisture balance model has been developed. This model simulates seasonal variations of temperature and precipitation over Greenland and explicitly accounts for elevation and albedo feedbacks. From these fields, the annual mean surface temperature and surface mass balance can be determined and used to force an ice sheet model. The melt component of the surface mass balance is computed here using both a positive degree day approach and a more physically-based alternative that includes insolation and albedo explicitly. As a validation of the climate model, we first simulated temperature and precipitation over Greenland for the prescribed, present-day topography. Our simulated climatology compares well to observations and does not differ significantly from that of a simple parameterization used in many previous simulations. Furthermore, the calculated surface mass balance using both melt schemes falls within the range of recent regional climate model results. For a prescribed, ice-free state, the differences in simulated climatology between the regional energy-moisture balance model and the simple parameterization become significant, with our model showing much stronger summer warming. When coupled to a three-dimensional ice sheet model and initialized with present-day conditions, the two melt schemes both allow realistic simulations of the present-day GIS.

  13. Investigation of the longitudinal magnetic field effect on dynamic response of viscoelastic graphene sheet based on sinusoidal shear deformation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arani, A. Ghorbanpour; Jalaei, M. H.

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of a longitudinal magnetic field on the dynamic response of single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) resting on viscoelastic foundation based on the nonlocal sinusoidal shear deformation theory. The present model is capable of capturing both small scale effect and transverse shear deformation effects of nanoplate, and does not require shear correction factors. The material properties of graphene sheet are assumed orthotropic viscoelastic using Kelvin-Voigt model. Utilizing Hamilton's principle governing equations of motion are derived and solved analytically. The parametric study is conducted, focusing on the remarkable effects of the magnetic field, structural damping, stiffness and damping coefficient of the foundation, nonlocal parameter, aspect ratio and length to thickness ratio on the dynamic response of the SLGS. Results indicate that the longitudinal magnetic field exerted on the SLGS decreases the amplitude of dynamic response. In addition, it is observed that the magnetic field effect on the dynamic response is more distinguished as the nonlocal parameter increases while by increasing the foundation and structural damping coefficients, this effect diminishes. The results of this study can be used in design and manufacturing of nanomechanical devices in the presence of magnetic field as a parametric controller.

  14. Investigation of the longitudinal magnetic field effect on dynamic response of viscoelastic graphene sheet based on sinusoidal shear deformation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arani, A. Ghorbanpour, E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience & Nanotechnology University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalaei, M.H. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of a longitudinal magnetic field on the dynamic response of single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) resting on viscoelastic foundation based on the nonlocal sinusoidal shear deformation theory. The present model is capable of capturing both small scale effect and transverse shear deformation effects of nanoplate, and does not require shear correction factors. The material properties of graphene sheet are assumed orthotropic viscoelastic using Kelvin-Voigt model. Utilizing Hamilton's principle governing equations of motion are derived and solved analytically. The parametric study is conducted, focusing on the remarkable effects of the magnetic field, structural damping, stiffness and damping coefficient of the foundation, nonlocal parameter, aspect ratio and length to thickness ratio on the dynamic response of the SLGS. Results indicate that the longitudinal magnetic field exerted on the SLGS decreases the amplitude of dynamic response. In addition, it is observed that the magnetic field effect on the dynamic response is more distinguished as the nonlocal parameter increases while by increasing the foundation and structural damping coefficients, this effect diminishes. The results of this study can be used in design and manufacturing of nanomechanical devices in the presence of magnetic field as a parametric controller.

  15. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    of a downstream sediment plume in Kangerlussuaq Fjord by comparing: (1) plume area and suspended sediment concentration from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data; (2) ice-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3......) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...... the estuary is free of landfast sea ice. A seasonal hysteresis between melt extent and plume area suggests late-season exhaustion in sediment supply. Analysis of plume sensitivity to supraglacial events is less conclusive, with 69% of melt pulses and 38% of lake drainage events triggering an increase in plume...

  16. Firn densification in a Late Noachian “icy highlands” Mars: Implications for ice sheet evolution and thermal response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, James P.; Head, James W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent modeling of a thicker early CO2 martian atmosphere and Late Noachian climate predicts that for pressures beyond a fraction of a bar, atmosphere-surface thermal coupling occurs, resulting in adiabatic cooling of high areas across Mars. This promotes the transport of water ice from relatively warmer low-lying areas to the highlands, where deposition and accumulation of water ice result in an "icy highlands" Late Noachian Mars. Deposits will remain stable in the highlands under nominal Late Noachian conditions, but the potential exists for punctuated heating by both top-down (e.g. impacts, volcanism) and bottom-up (e.g. elevated geothermal heat flux) processes. Important in understanding melt generation from these processes is the state of the accumulated snow and ice. Through modeling of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" framework we assess: (1) the nature of snow accumulation and the physical growth and evolution of the predicted ice deposits, and (2) the implications for the thermal properties of the ice sheets and the response to heating events. Analysis of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" context indicates that: (1) the upper layers of the ice sheet will be more vulnerable to melting from top-down heating processes because they are comprised of the least dense and least thermally conductive ice, and (2) even with a low thermal conductivity firn layer, basal melting is only likely to occur through a combination of top-down and bottom-up heating. This is because at the nominal mean annual surface temperatures and estimated effective thermal conductivities, the predicted ice sheet thicknesses do not produce enough basal warming to initiate melting for plausible geothermal heat fluxes. Variations in spin-axis/orbital parameters alone are not predicted to cause widespread ablation (melting and sublimation) of the icy highlands ice sheets.

  17. Kissing reduces allergic skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-11-01

    The effect of kissing on allergen-induced skin wheal responses and plasma neurotrophin levels were studied in 30 normal subjects, 30 patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), and 30 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). All of the patients with AR or AD are allergic to house dust mite (HDM) and Japanese cedar pollen (JCP). They are all Japanese and they do not kiss habitually. The subject kissed freely during 30 min with their lover or spouse alone in a room with closed doors while listening to soft music. Before and after kissing, skin prick tests were performed using commercial HDM allergen, JCP allergen, as well as histamine and control solution, and wheal responses were measured. Simultaneously, plasma levels of neurotrophin, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and -4 (NT-4) were measured. Kissing significantly reduced wheal responses induced by HDM and JCP, but not by histamine, and decreased plasma levels of NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 in patients with AR or AD, while it failed to do so in normal subjects. These finding indicate that kissing have some implication in the study of neuroimmunology in allergic patients.

  18. Nonlinear Simulation of Plasma Response to the NSTX Error Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslau, J. A.; Park, J. K.; Boozer, A. H.; Park, W.

    2008-11-01

    In order to better understand the effects of the time-varying error field in NSTX on rotation braking, which impedes RWM stabilization, we model the plasma response to an applied low-n external field perturbation using the resistive MHD model in the M3D code. As an initial benchmark, we apply an m=2, n=1 perturbation to the flux at the boundary of a non-rotating model equilibrium and compare the resulting steady-state island sizes with those predicted by the ideal linear code IPEC. For sufficiently small perturbations, the codes agree; for larger perturbations, the nonlinear correction yields an upper limit on the island width beyond which stochasticity sets in. We also present results of scaling studies showing the effects of finite resistivity on island size in NSTX, and of time-dependent studies of the interaction between these islands and plasma rotation. The M3D-C1 code is also being evaluated as a tool for this analysis; first results will be shown. J.E. Menard, et al., Nucl. Fus. 47, S645 (2007). W. Park, et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999). J.K. Park, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 052110 (2007). S.C. Jardin, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 226, 2146 (2007).

  19. An invention of thermo-responsive polymer surface, yielding cell sheet based regenerative therapies in cardiology and ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Invention: In vitro cell culture methodologies provide a conducive environment for the cells taken out of their native environment to grow and proliferate in a non-physiological environment, the culture dish. Research experiments have been focusing on various criteria for assessing how far it is possible to recapitulate the native extra-cellular environment in vitro. Scaffolds, culture media, growth factors and cell surface modified culture dishes are some of the components that provide a conducive environment for in vitro cell culture. Cells that are grown in culture dishes using conventional methodologies are usually detached using enzymatic treatment with Trypsin, Collagenase etc [1], to be transplanted when it comes to a clinical or experimental application. Such enzymes used in separating the cells may have some damaging effects to the cell membranes which might impair the cell function [1]. However, cells if can be grown as a monolayer and be harvested as a contiguous cell sheet, it is considered suitable for transplantation in certain specific applications. In addition to that, if enzymatic digestion which has some detrimental effects on the detached cells could be avoided, that is an added advantage. The work by Prof. Okano and team from the Tokyo Women's Medical University, Japan, on thermo-responsive polymer surfaces has yielded a solution which has both the advantages viz., detachability of cells grown as a monolayer in the form of a cell sheet, that too without the use of enzymes. Their research into biomaterials for more than two decades has yielded a thermo-responsive polymer, the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm [1] coated culture dish for cell sheet engineering. In their technology, PIPAAm is polymerized and grafted to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS dishes. Cells have been found to grow confluent on PIPAAm-TCPS at 37 °C. Once confluent as a monolayer, by merely reducing the temperature of the PIPAAm-TCPS to 20 °C, it

  20. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  1. South Greenland Ice-Sheet Response to the Mid-Pliocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. E.; Mathias, A.; Hatfield, R. G.; Winsor, K.; Stoner, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    The last time atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration approached present day levels was likely during the mid-Pliocene climate optimum 3.3-3.0 Ma. Estimates of sea level from the mid-Pliocene optimum vary widely and contain a significant component of glacial isostasy and dynamic topography, precluding a firm estimate of global ice volume. Here we present new data constraining the southern Greenland ice sheet (GIS) across the mid-Pliocene optimum from IODP Site U1307 located on the Eirik Ridge south of Greenland. Magnetic susceptibility dramatically decreases at ~3.3 Ma, recovering at ~3.05 Ma. Magnetic parameters on silt-size grains (Mrs/Ms) show this decrease likely reflects the loss of silt sourced from the Precambrian terranes of south Greenland, which would suggest the loss of the south GIS. The sand fraction reflects the degree of iceberg rafting with increases at an ~40 ka period. Planktic oxygen isotopes decrease during iceberg rafting events to values lower than the Holocene. An extended interval of low sand occurs from ~3.3 Ma to ~3.2 Ma, which suggests cessation of iceberg rafting. Planktic oxygen isotopes increase during this interval. Assuming a relatively warm climate, this increase could reflect the incursion of high 18-O subtropical waters into the Labrador Sea. The return of iceberg rafted sediments after ~3.2 Ma suggests the regrowth of the GIS with marine-terminating margins. Our new preliminary record points to a GIS collapse during the mid-Pliocene climatic optimum, but that ice-free conditions only lasted for ~100 ka before the return of a volatile ice sheet for the remainder of the mid-Pliocene climatic optimum.

  2. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 02: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: Types of information to encourage proactive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Fuels management responsibilities may include providing local property owners with the information for taking responsibility for reducing fuels on their land. This fact sheet discusses three different types of information that may be useful in programs to engage property owners in fuel reduction activities.

  3. Immobilization of β-galactosidase onto functionalized graphene nano-sheets using response surface methodology and its analytical applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kishore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-Galactosidase is a vital enzyme with diverse application in molecular biology and industries. It was covalently attached onto functionalized graphene nano-sheets for various analytical applications based on lactose reduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design of experiment was used for determination of optimal immobilization conditions, which resulted in 84.2% immobilization efficiency. Native and immobilized functionalized graphene was characterized with the help of transmission and scanning electron microscopy, followed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Functionalized graphene sheets decorated with islands of immobilized enzyme were evidently visualized under both transmission and scanning electron microscopy after immobilization. FTIR spectra provided insight on various chemical interactions and bonding, involved during and after immobilization. Optimum temperature and energy of activation (E(a remains unchanged whereas optimum pH and K(m were changed after immobilization. Increased thermal stability of enzyme was observed after conjugating the enzyme with functionalized graphene. SIGNIFICANCE: Immobilized β-galactosidase showed excellent reusability with a retention of more than 92% enzymatic activity after 10 reuses and an ideal performance at broad ranges of industrial environment.

  4. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  5. Cell sheet engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yamato

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed ‘cell sheet engineering’ in order to avoid the limitations of tissue reconstruction using biodegradable scaffolds or single cell suspension injection. Our concept is tissue reconstruction, not from single cells, but from cell sheets. Cell sheets are prepared using temperature-responsive culture dishes. Temperature-responsive polymers are covalently grafted onto the dishes, allowing various types of cells to adhere and proliferate at 37°C. The cells spontaneously detach when the temperature is reduced below 32°C without the need for proteolytic enzymes. The confluent cells are noninvasively harvested as single, contiguous cell sheets with intact cell-cell junctions and deposited extracellular matrix (ECM. We have used these harvested cell sheets for various tissue reconstructions, including ocular surfaces, periodontal ligaments, cardiac patches, and bladder augmentation.

  6. Ice-dynamic projections of the Greenland ice sheet in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Fürst

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing global warming will have a strong impact on the Greenland ice sheet in the coming centuries. During the last decade (2000–2010, both increased melt-water runoff and enhanced ice discharge from calving glaciers have contributed 0.6 ± 0.1 mm yr−1 to global sea-level rise, with a relative contribution of 60 and 40% respectively. Here we use a higher-order ice flow model, spun up to present day, to simulate future ice volume changes driven by both atmospheric and oceanic temperature changes. For these projections, the flow model accounts for runoff-induced basal lubrication and ocean warming-induced discharge increase at the marine margins. For a suite of 10 atmosphere and ocean general circulation models and four representative concentration pathway scenarios, the projected sea-level rise between 2000 and 2100 lies in the range of +1.4 to +16.6 cm. For two low emission scenarios, the projections are conducted up to 2300. Ice loss rates are found to abate for the most favourable scenario where the warming peaks in this century, allowing the ice sheet to maintain a geometry close to the present-day state. For the other moderate scenario, loss rates remain at a constant level over 300 years. In any scenario, volume loss is predominantly caused by increased surface melting as the contribution from enhanced ice discharge decreases over time and is self-limited by thinning and retreat of the marine margin, reducing the ice–ocean contact area. As confirmed by other studies, we find that the effect of enhanced basal lubrication on the volume evolution is negligible on centennial timescales. Our projections show that the observed rates of volume change over the last decades cannot simply be extrapolated over the 21st century on account of a different balance of processes causing ice loss over time. Our results also indicate that the largest source of uncertainty arises from the surface mass balance and the underlying climate change

  7. ELM control with RMP: plasma response models and the role of edge peeling response

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yueqiang; Kirk, A; Li, Li; Loarte, A; Ryan, D A; Sun, Youwen; Suttrop, W; Yang, Xu; Zhou, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have extensively been demonstrated as a plausible technique for mitigating or suppressing large edge localized modes (ELMs). Associated with this is a substantial amount of theory and modelling efforts during recent years. Various models describing the plasma response to the RMP fields have been proposed in the literature, and are briefly reviewed in this work. Despite their simplicity, linear response models can provide alternative criteria, than the vacuum field based criteria, for guiding the choice of the coil configurations to achieve the best control of ELMs. The role of the edge peeling response to the RMP fields is illustrated as a key indicator for the ELM mitigation in low collisionality plasmas, in various tokamak devices.

  8. ELM control with RMP: plasma response models and the role of edge peeling response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ham, C. J.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D. A.; Sun, Youwen; Suttrop, W.; Yang, Xu; Zhou, Lina

    2016-11-01

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have extensively been demonstrated as a plausible technique for mitigating or suppressing large edge localized modes (ELMs). Associated with this is a substantial amount of theory and modelling efforts during recent years. Various models describing the plasma response to the RMP fields have been proposed in the literature, and are briefly reviewed in this work. Despite their simplicity, linear response models can provide alternative criteria, than the vacuum field based criteria, for guiding the choice of the coil configurations to achieve the best control of ELMs. The role of the edge peeling response to the RMP fields is illustrated as a key indicator for the ELM mitigation in low collisionality plasmas, in various tokamak devices.

  9. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 response to downhill running in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, M C; Allen, D L; Byrnes, W C

    2014-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is a proteolytic enzyme capable of degrading proteins of the muscle extracellular matrix. Systemic levels of MMP-9 or its inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), have the potential to serve as blood markers of exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to determine if an eccentrically-dominated task, downhill running (DHR), produces changes in plasma MMP-9 or TIMP-1 and examine the relationship between MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels and indirect indicators of muscle damage. Subjects were sedentary (SED, n=12) or had a history of concentrically-biased training (CON, n=9). MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were measured before (Pre-Ex), immediately after (Post-Ex), and 1-, 2-, 4-, and 7-days post-DHR (-10°), and compared to discomfort ratings, creatine kinase activity and strength loss. At 1-day Post-Ex, discomfort increased (5.6 ± 7.8 to 45.5 ± 19.9 mm; 0-100 mm scale), strength decreased (-6.9 ± 1.6%) and CK increased (162.9 ± 177.2%). MMP-9 was modestly but significantly increased at Post-Ex in both CONC and SED (32.7 ± 33.6%) and at 4-days in SED (66.9 ± 88.1%), Individual responses were variable, however. There were no correlations between MMPs and discomfort ratings, plasma CK or strength. While plasma MMP-9 changes may be detectable in the systemic circulation after DHR, they are small and do not correspond to other markers of damage. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Plasma heating in a post eruption Current Sheet: a case study based on ultraviolet, soft, and hard X-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Susino, Roberto; Krucker, Säm

    2013-01-01

    Off-limb observations of the solar corona after Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) often show strong, compact, and persistent UV sources behind the eruption. They are primarily observed by the SOHO/UVCS instrument in the "hot" Fe XVIII {\\lambda}974 {\\AA} line and are usually interpreted as a signature of plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection in the post-CME Current Sheet (CS). Nevertheless, the physical process itself and the altitude of the main energy release are currently not fully understood. In this work, we studied the evolution of plasma heating after the CME of 2004 July 28 by comparing UV spectra acquired by UVCS with soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR)images of the post-flare loops taken by GOES/SXI and RHESSI. The X-ray data show a long-lasting extended source that is rising upwards, toward the high-temperature source detected by UVCS. UVCS data show the presence of significant non-thermal broadening in the CS (signature of turbulent motions) and a strong density gradient across the CS region. T...

  11. Regional hydroclimate response to freshwater fluxes from the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet during the Last Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschitiello, F.; Dokken, T. M.; Pausata, F. S. R.; Smittenberg, R.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2015-12-01

    Resolving the effects of freshwater forcing during the last glacial-interglacial transition, the Last Termination, is critical to our comprehension of rapid climate change. In particular, the role of Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) and freshwater from the eastern seaboard of the North Atlantic has been entirely disregarded in the context of the abrupt regional hydroclimate shifts that characterized this period. Here we infer freshwater input variations from the FIS to the Nordic Seas based on two accurately dated hydroclimate reconstructions from lake sediment records from Southern Sweden and one SST reconstruction from the Nordic Seas. The records indicate a number of abrupt freshwater discharges into the Nordic Seas at the start of the Bølling interstadial and during the Allerød interstadial. We observe that these intervals of enhanced FIS freshwater outflow correspond to different modalities of hydroclimate regime shifts in Greenland. Using a set of climate model simulations, we show that the dominant Greenland hydroclimate state can be influenced by the degree of FIS freshwater recirculation in the Nordic Seas, which redirects the excess of sea ice partitioned into the Barents Sea towards the eastern Greenland Current. The tradeoff between buildup and recirculation of sea ice in the Nordic Seas generate large-scale sea-level pressure anomalies that may explain the sign and magnitude of the isotopic and temperature changes inferred from Greenland and North European reconstructions. We conclude that air-sea interactions in the North Atlantic are more sensitive to Fennoscandian freshwater forcing than previously thought. These results could help to solve the problematic relationship between origin, timing and magnitude of freshwater perturbations and abrupt deglacial changes in North Atlantic Ocean circulation in numerical simulations.

  12. Plasma arginine vasopressin response to water load during labour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhi, S. (West Indies Univ., Mona (Jamaica). Dept. of Child Health); Parshad, O. (West Indies Univ., Mona (Jamaica). Dept. of Physiology)

    1985-02-01

    To find out whether plasma vasopressin (Psub(AVP)) response to a water load during pregnancy is inappropriately high, as had been speculated, we measured Psub(AVP)by radioimmunoassay in 30 women at the time of delivery. Ten women had received infusion of aqueous glucose solution during labour for hydration (GW group); another ten received infusion of glucose solution as a vehicle for oxytocin (IOT group), and ten women did not receive any intrapartum intravenous fluid therapy (controls). Serum sodium and osmolality were also determined in all the subjects. Psub(AVP) levels were significantly lower in GW (0.70 +- 0.4 pg/ml) and OT groups (0.7 +- 0.6 pg/ml) (P < 0.05). Significant negative correlation was seen between the amount of glucose solution infused and levels of Psub(AVP) (r = -0.66; P < 0.01), while a significant positive correlation was seen between Psub(AVP) and serum sodium (r = 0.61; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that during labour, the physiological relationship between serum osmolality and Psub(AVP) in intact, and the infusion of a water load in the form of aqueous glucose solution is attended by an expected lowering of Psub(AVP). We infer that inappropriate ADH response is not the cause of water retention and hyponatremia often seen in women receiving aqueous glucose solution during labor.

  13. Plasma response to a varying degree of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M; Thomas, Edward; Amatucci, William E; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2013-10-04

    We report experimental evidence of a seamless transition between three distinct modes in a magnetized plasma with a transverse sheared flow as the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the shear scale length (a measure of shear magnitude) is varied. This was achieved using a dual plasma configuration in a laboratory experiment, where a sheared flow oriented perpendicular to a background magnetic field is localized at the boundary of the plasmas. This confirms the basic theory that plasma is unstable to transverse velocity shear in a broad frequency and wavelength range. The experiment characterizes the compression or relaxation of boundary layers often generated in a variety of laboratory and space plasma processes.

  14. STUDIES ON SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION AND ECOMATERIAL SHEET DEGRADATION OF BASALT FIBERS BY PLASMA TREATMENTS AND WOOD FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangjian Wang; Yajie Guo; Deku Shang; linna Hu; Zhenhua Guo; Kailiang Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Plasma surface modification (Argon: Hydrogen =0.6:0.4) of basalt fibers was investigated and the element contents of basalt and wood fibers were determined by X-ray energy dispersion spectroscope (EDS).Configuration of basalt fibers was described by means of confocal Laser Raman microRaman spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. And the morphology of fiber surface was studied with scanning electron microscope(SEM). The modified samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The results showed that the roughness of basalt fibers was increased with the increase of exposure time of plasma. At the same time the wettability and surface characteristics such as active groups of NH2, OH were improved as well. Basaltfibers were of good chemical stability, better mechanism intension and thermo-stability etc. They mainly consist of [SiO4]4-,[Si2O6]4-, [Si2O5]2-. Further experiments demostrated that they were degraded into edaphic matrix after use.Therefore, they were environmentally friendly.

  15. STUDIES ON SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION AND ECOMATERIAL SHEET DEGRADATION OF BASALT FIBERS BY PLASMA TREATMENTS AND WOOD FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuangjianWang; YajieGuo; DekuShang; linnaHu; ZhenhuaGuo; KailiangZhang

    2004-01-01

    plasma surtace modification (Argon: Hydrogen=0.6:0.4) of basalt fibers was mvestigated and the element contents of basalt and wood fibers were determined by X-ray energy dispersion spectroscope (EDS). configuration of basalt fibers was described by means of confocal Laser Raman microRaman spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. And the morphology of fiber surface was studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The modified samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The results showed that the roughness of basalt fibers was increased with the increase of exposure time of plasma. At the same time the wettability and surface characteristics such as active groups of NH2, OH were improved as well. Basalt fibers were of good chemical stability, better mechanism intension and thermo-stability etc. They mainly consist of [SiO4]4-, [Si2O6]4-,[Si2O5]2-. Further experiments demostrated that they were degraded into edaphic matrix after use. Therefore, they were environmentally friendly.

  16. Century-scale simulations of the response of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet to a warming climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornford, S. L.; Martin, D. F.; Payne, A. J.; Ng, E. G.; Le Brocq, A. M.; Gladstone, R. M.; Edwards, T. L.; Shannon, S. R.; Agosta, C.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Hellmer, H. H.; Krinner, G.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Timmermann, R.; Vaughan, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    We use the BISICLES adaptive mesh ice sheet model to carry out one, two, and three century simulations of the fast-flowing ice streams of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, deploying sub-kilometer resolution around the grounding line since coarser resolution results in substantial underestimation of the

  17. Effects of resistivity on linear plasma responses to resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyung; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun

    2016-09-01

    Numerical studies are made of the effects of resistivity on linear plasma responses to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in tokamaks based on a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. From a local two-field model, it is suggested that the ratio of the poloidal electron advection to the resistivity diffusion rate α m can be a figure of merit parameter in linear RMP penetration physics. The shielding efficiency is governed by α m , and when α m ≳ 1 , RMPs are effectively shielded. Global simulations using a four-field model [Hazeltine and Meiss, Phys. Rep. 121, 1 (1985)] show that there exists an effective threshold of the perpendicular electron flow ( Ve , ⊥ c ) beyond which RMPs cannot penetrate. Resistivity is found to determine Ve , ⊥ c which increases as resistivity becomes higher, making RMP penetration easier. At low resistivity, small Ve , ⊥ c renders the RMP penetration sensitive to ion collisionality and the change in q95. The kink response is observed to be closely related to the residual level of RMPs at rational surfaces and can be also strongly affected by resistivity.

  18. Electromagnetic response of quark–gluon plasma in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Zakharov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the electromagnetic response of the quark–gluon plasma in AA-collisions at RHIC and LHC energies for a realistic space–time evolution of the plasma fireball. We demonstrate that for a realistic electric conductivity the electromagnetic response of the plasma is in a quantum regime when the induced electric current does not generate a classical electromagnetic field, and can only lead to a rare emission of single photons.

  19. Discrepancy between plasma C-peptide and insulin response to oral and intravenous glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, S; Kehlet, H; Hilsted, J;

    1983-01-01

    Plasma insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide responses to 25 g glucose orally and intravenously administered were measured in 10 healthy males. Plasma insulin response was higher during the oral load in accordance with the "incretin" concept. However, the actual amount of insulin secreted, as measur...... partially to a lower hepatic extraction of insulin....

  20. Plasma thymus and activation-regulated chemokine as an early response marker in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plattel, Wouter J.; van den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia; van der Graaf, Anne-Marijn; Pruim, Jan; Vos, Hans; Hepkema, Bouke; Diepstra, Arjan; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma thymus and activation-regulated chemokine is a potential biomarker for classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. To define its value as a marker to monitor treatment response, we correlated serial plasma thymus and activation-regulated chemokine levels with clinical response in newly diagnose

  1. Impact of resistive MHD plasma response on perturbation field sidebands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, D. M.; Evans, T. E.; Moyer, R. A.; Lyons, B. C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Park, G.-Y.

    2016-07-01

    Single fluid linear simulations of a KSTAR RMP ELM suppressed discharge with the M3D-C1 resistive magnetohydrodynamic code have been performed for the first time. The simulations show that the application of the n  =  1 perturbation using the KSTAR in-vessel control coils (IVCC), which apply modest levels of n  =  3 sidebands (~20% of the n  =  1), leads to levels of n  =  3 sideband that are comparable to the n  =  1 when plasma response is included. This is due to the reduced level of screening of the rational-surface-resonant n  =  3 component relative to the rational-surface-resonant n  =  1 component. The n  =  3 sidebands could play a similar role in ELM suppression on KSTAR as the toroidal sidebands (n  =  1, 2, 4) in DIII-D n  =  3 ELM suppression with missing I-coil segments (Paz Soldan et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073013). This result may help to explain the uniqueness of ELM suppression with n  =  1 perturbations in KSTAR since the effective perturbation is a mixed n  =  1/n  =  3 perturbation similar to n  =  3 ELM suppression in DIII-D.

  2. Osteoblast response to oxygen functionalised plasma polymer surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, J M

    2001-01-01

    Thin organic films with oxygen-carbon functionalities were deposited from plasmas containing vapour of the small organic compounds: allyI alcohol, methyl vinyl ketone and acrylic acid with octadiene. Characterisation of the deposits was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with chemical derivatisation, and this showed that plasma polymers retained high levels of original monomer functionality when the plasmas were sustained at low power for a given monomer vapour flow rate. High levels of attachment of rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were observed on surfaces that had high concentrations of hydroxyl and carbonyl functionalities and intermediate concentrations of carboxyl functionality. Cells did not attach to the octadiene plasma polymer. Cell attachment to carboxyl and methyl functionalised self-assembled monolayers increased with increasing concentration of surface carboxyl groups. Adsorption of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin to acrylic acid/octadiene plasma c...

  3. Evolution of the large-scale atmospheric circulation in response to changing ice sheets over the last glacial cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Löfverström

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present modelling results of the atmospheric circulation at the cold periods of marine isotope stage 5b (MIS 5b, MIS 4 and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, as well as the interglacial. The palaeosimulations are forced by ice-sheet reconstructions consistent with geological evidence and by appropriate insolation and greenhouse gas concentrations. The results suggest that the large-scale atmospheric winter circulation remained largely similar to the interglacial for a significant part of the glacial cycle. The proposed explanation is that the ice sheets were located in areas where their interaction with the mean flow is limited. However, the LGM Laurentide Ice Sheet induces a much larger planetary wave that leads to a zonalisation of the Atlantic jet. In summer, the ice-sheet topography dynamically induces warm temperatures in Alaska and central Asia that inhibits the expansion of the ice sheets into these regions. The warm temperatures may also serve as an explanation for westward propagation of the Eurasian Ice Sheet from MIS 4 to the LGM.

  4. Effect of pulsed current micro plasma arc welding process parameters on fusion zone grain size and ultimate tensile strength of Inconel 625 sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kondapalli Siva Prasad; Chalamalasetti Srinivasa Rao; Damera Nageswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on developing mathematical models to predict grain size and ultimate tensile strength of pulsed current micro plasma arc welded Inconel 625 nickel alloy.Four factors,five levels,central composite rotatable design matrix is used to optimize the number of experiments.The mathematical models have been developed by response surface method.The adequacy of the models is checked by analysis of variance technique.By using the developed mathematical models,grain size and ultimate tensile strength of the joints can be predicted with 99%0 confidence level.Contour plots are drawn to study the interaction effect of pulsed current micro plasma arc welding parameters on fusion zone grain size and ultimate tensile strength of Inconel 625 weld ioints.

  5. Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets are available in both English and Spanish and can be downloaded for free. Currently available ... Antiviral Medications to Treat or Prevent Influenza (the Flu) PDF | Espanol PDF Apremilast (Otezla®) PDF | Espanol PDF ...

  6. The miRNA Plasma Signature in Response to Acute Aerobic Exercise and Endurance Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Rinnov, Anders

    2014-01-01

    the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training...

  7. Blunted autonomic response to volume expansion in formerly preeclamptic women with low plasma volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam, I.; Courtar, D.A.; Janssen, B.J.; Aardenburg, R.; Peeters, L.L.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that low plasma volume in normotensive formerly preeclamptic women reflects reduced venous storage capacity. To test this hypothesis, we compared circulatory and autonomic responses to acute volume loading between women with low and those with normal plasma volume. METHODS:

  8. Germination of Chenopodium Album in Response to Microwave Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo(z)ena (S)ER(A); Vitězslav STRA(NA)K; Michal (S)ER(Y); Milan TICH(Y); Petr (S)PATENKA

    2008-01-01

    The seeds of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.) were stimulated by low-pressure discharge. The tested seeds were exposed to plasma discharge for different time durations (from 6 minutes to 48 minutes). Germination tests were performed under specified laboratory conditions during seven days in five identical and completely independent experiments. Significant differences between the control and plasma-treated seeds were observed. The treated seeds showed structural changes on the surface of the seat coat. They germinated faster and their sprout accretion on the first day of seed germination was longer. Germination rate for the untreated seeds was 15% while it increased approximately three times (max 55%) for seeds treated by plasma from 12 minutes to 48 minutes.

  9. Germination of Chenopodium Album in Response to Microwave Plasma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Será, Bozena; Stranák, Vitezslav; Serý, Michal; Tichý, Milan; Spatenka, Petr

    2008-08-01

    The seeds of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.) were stimulated by low-pressure discharge. The tested seeds were exposed to plasma discharge for different time durations (from 6 minutes to 48 minutes). Germination tests were performed under specified laboratory conditions during seven days in five identical and completely independent experiments. Significant differences between the control and plasma-treated seeds were observed. The treated seeds showed structural changes on the surface of the seat coat. They germinated faster and their sprout accretion on the first day of seed germination was longer. Germination rate for the untreated seeds was 15% while it increased approximately three times (max 55%) for seeds treated by plasma from 12 minutes to 48 minutes.

  10. Hypervolemia and plasma vasopressin response during water immersion in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Morse, J. T.; Barnes, P. R.; Silver, J.; Keil, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Immersion studies were performed on seven mildly dehydrated male subjects to examine the effect of suppression of plasma vasopressin (PVP) on diuresis in water immersion. The water was kept at close to 34.5 C and the subjects remained in the water for 4 hr after sitting for 2 hr. Na and K levels in the serum and urine were analyzed, as were osmolality, red blood cell count, renin activity, total protein, albumin amounts, hematocrit, and hemoglobin. Plasma volume was monitored from samples drawn at specified intervals during immersion. The plasma volume increased significantly 30 min after immersion, but no PVP was observed. The dehydration induced elevated serum osmotic concentrations. It is concluded that the hydration condition before immersion and the volume of fluid intake during immersion affects the hemodilution during immersion.

  11. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  12. Relationship between labile plasma iron, liver iron concentration and cardiac response in a deferasirox monotherapy trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John C.; Glynos, Tara; Thompson, Alexis; Giardina, Patricia; Harmatz, Paul; Kang, Barinder P.; Paley, Carole; Coates, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The US04 trial was a multicenter, open-label, single arm trial of deferasirox monotherapy (30–40 mg/kg/day) for 18 months. Cardiac iron response was bimodal with improvements observed in patients with mild to moderate initial somatic iron stores; relationship of cardiac response to labile plasma iron is now presented. Labile plasma iron was measured at baseline, six months, and 12 months. In patients having a favorable cardiac response at 18 months, initial labile plasma iron was elevated in only 31% of patients at baseline and no patient at six or 12 months. Cardiac non-responders had elevated labile plasma iron in 50% of patients at baseline, 50% patients at six months, and 38% of patients at 12 months. Risk of abnormal labile plasma iron and cardiac response increased with initial liver iron concentration. Persistently increased labile plasma iron predicts cardiac non-response to deferasirox but labile plasma iron suppression does not guarantee favorable cardiac outcome. Study registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00447694). PMID:21393329

  13. Plasma biochemical variables in response to 42-km kayak and canoe races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutoslawska, G; Sendecki, W

    1990-12-01

    Some plasma biochemical parameters were examined one day prior, immediately after and 18 h after 42-km canoe and kayak races. The increases in plasma glycerol, lactate, ammonia and uric acid as well as the elevation in plasma CK, LDH and transaminase activities confirm the changes induced by different prolonged efforts. However some differences between canoeists and kayakers were indicated for ammonia and urea plasma concentration after the race, lactate elimination and increase in CK and transaminase activities. The influence of body posture and the impact of the static component during effort are discussed as a reason for observed disparity in response to prolonged races.

  14. Effect of hydration on plasma volume and endocrine responses to water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. H.; Keil, L. C.; Wade, C. A.; Silver, J. E.; Geelen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of hydration status on early endocrine responses and on osmotic and intravascular volume changes during immersion was determined in humans undergoing successive periods of dehydration, immersion, rehydration, and immersion. Immersion caused an isotonic expansion of plasma volume, as well as suppression of plasma renin activity and aldosterone, which all occurred independently of hydration status. On the other hand, the concentration of plasma vasopressin (PVP) was found to decrease during dehydrated immersion, but not during rehydrated immersion. It is concluded that plasma tonicity is not a factor influencing PVP suppression during water immersion.

  15. Plasma vanillylmandelic acid level as an index of psychological stress response in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M; Hata, A; Niwa, S; Hiramatsu, K; Honda, H; Nakagome, K; Iwanami, A

    1996-06-26

    The relationships between psychological stress responses and plasma levels of vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) were investigated in normal volunteers. Two questionnaires were used to measure stress: the Psychological Stress Response Scale (PSRS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Plasma levels of VMA--but not MHPG, HVA, and 5-HIAA--showed significant positive correlations with PSRS emotional and cognitive-behavioral stress and STAI state anxiety. Significant positive correlations were also found between plasma levels of VMA and MHPG and psychological stress responses measured repeatedly in a longitudinal study of an Olympic swimmer. Plasma VMA measurements, which reflect the level of activity of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system, may provide a useful biochemical index of psychological stress responses in normal subjects.

  16. Nanotribological response of a plasma nitrided bio-steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Aniruddha; Chakraborty, Himel; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Ghosh, Jiten; Sreemany, Monjoy; Bysakh, Sandip; Rane, Ramkrishna; Joseph, Alphonsa; Jhala, Ghanshyam; Mukherjee, Subroto; Das, Mitun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop K

    2017-01-01

    AISI 316L is a well known biocompatible, austenitic stainless steel (SS). It is thus a bio-steel. Considering its importance as a bio-prosthesis material here we report the plasma nitriding of AISI 316L (SS) followed by its microstructural and nanotribological characterization. Plasma nitriding of the SS samples was carried out in a plasma reactor with a hot wall vacuum chamber. For ease of comparison these plasma nitrided samples were termed as SSPN. The experimental results confirmed the formations of an embedded nitrided metal layer zone (ENMLZ) and an interface zone (IZ) between the ENMLZ and the unnitrided bulk metallic layer zone (BMLZ) in the SSPN sample. These ENMLZ and IZ in the SSPN sample were richer in iron nitride (FeN) chromium nitride (CrN) along with the austenite phase. The results from nanoindentation, microscratch, nanoscratch and sliding wear studies confirmed that the static contact deformation resistance, the microwear, nanowear and sliding wear resistance of the SSPN samples were much better than those of the SS samples. These results were explained in terms of structure-property correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Response of the Atlantic Ocean circulation to Greenland Ice Sheet melting in a strongly-eddying ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.; Maltrud, M.E.; Hecht, M.W.; Dijkstra, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073504467; Kliphuis, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to high-latitude freshwater input is one of the key uncertainties in the climate system. Considering the importance of the AMOC for global heat transports, and the vulnerability of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to global

  18. The anemia of chronic renal failure in sheep. Response to erythropoietin-rich plasma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbach, J W; Mladenovic, J; Garcia, J F; Wahl, P W; Adamson, J W

    1984-01-01

    The hypoproliferative anemia in chronic renal failure has been assumed to be the result of decreased erythropoietin (Ep) production by the damaged kidney and of the shortening of erythrocyte survival. However, many in vitro studies suggest that erythropoietic inhibitors in uremic plasma may contribute to the anemia. To determine the in vivo relevance of uremic inhibitors, increasing amounts of Ep as Ep-rich plasma were infused into six uremic sheep, and their erythropoietic responses were compared with those of nine normal sheep receiving similar amounts of Ep-rich plasma. Three sheep were studied in both normal and uremic states. Ep-rich plasma was obtained from phenylhydrazine- and phlebotomy-induced anemic sheep. Stable uremia was created by subtotal nephrectomy. Erythropoiesis was quantitated by reticulocyte response, ferrokinetics (plasma iron turnover and marrow transit time), and by hemoglobin C synthesis. Ep-rich plasma stimulated erythropoiesis similarly in uremic and normal sheep, regardless of the degree of uremia. Nondialyzed uremic sheep responded as well as dialyzed animals. The anemia was corrected in the uremic dialyzed animals. The anemia was corrected in the uremic sheep after 15-40 daily infusions of Ep-rich plasma, the total dosage depending on the severity of the anemia. Polycythemia was induced when the infusions were continued. Reticulocytes, plasma iron turnover, and erythrocyte mass changes increased as the amount of Ep-rich plasma was increased. These dose-response effects, coupled with the identical erythropoietic response in normal and uremic sheep given the same amount of Ep-rich plasma, imply that there are no physiologically significant erythropoietic inhibitors in uremia. PMID:6746902

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Experimental optimisation of the gas-assisted laser cutting of thick steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, Anatolii M.; Shulyat'ev, Viktor B.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the experimental optimisation of the oxygen-assisted CO2 laser cutting of low-carbon sheet steel 5 to 25 mm in thickness. It is shown that the cut edge roughness is minimal when the energy input per unit volume of the material removed and the incident beam power per unit sheet thickness remain constant at ~20 J mm-3 and ~200 W mm-1, respectively, over the entire range of sheet thicknesses examined. The corresponding Péclet number is Pe = 0.5. These results can be used to determine the optimal beam power and cutting speed for a particular sheet thickness. At sufficiently large thicknesses, the conditions that ensure the minimum roughness can be written in the form of relations between nondimensional parameters.

  20. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niranjan, Ram, E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in; Rout, R. K., E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in; Srivastava, R., E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Chakravarthy, Y. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Patel, N. N. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Alex, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  1. Taste responsiveness to sweeteners is resistant to elevations in plasma leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, John I; Elson, Amanda E T; Kalik, Salina; Sosa, Yvett; Patterson, Christa M; Myers, Martin G; Munger, Steven D

    2015-05-01

    There is uncertainty about the relationship between plasma leptin and sweet taste in mice. Whereas 2 studies have reported that elevations in plasma leptin diminish responsiveness to sweeteners, another found that they enhanced responsiveness to sucrose. We evaluated the impact of plasma leptin on sweet taste in C57BL/6J (B6) and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Although mice expressed the long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) selectively in Type 2 taste cells, leptin failed to activate a critical leptin-signaling protein, STAT3, in taste cells. Similarly, we did not observe any impact of intraperitoneal (i.p.) leptin treatment on chorda tympani nerve responses to sweeteners in B6 or ob/ob mice. Finally, there was no effect of leptin treatment on initial licking responses to several sucrose concentrations in B6 mice. We confirmed that basal plasma leptin levels did not exceed 10ng/mL, regardless of time of day, physiological state, or body weight, suggesting that taste cell LepRb were not desensitized to leptin in our studies. Furthermore, i.p. leptin injections produced plasma leptin levels that exceeded those previously reported to exert taste effects. We conclude that any effect of plasma leptin on taste responsiveness to sweeteners is subtle and manifests itself only under specific experimental conditions.

  2. Safety advice sheets

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    You never know when you might be faced with questions such as: when/how should I dispose of a gas canister? Where can I find an inspection report? How should I handle/store/dispose of a chemical substance…?   The SI section of the DGS/SEE Group is primarily responsible for safety inspections, evaluating the safety conditions of equipment items, premises and facilities. On top of this core task, it also regularly issues “Safety Advice Sheets” on various topics, designed to be of assistance to users but also to recall and reinforce safety rules and procedures. These clear and concise sheets, complete with illustrations, are easy to display in the appropriate areas. The following safety advice sheets have been issued so far: Other sheets will be published shortly. Suggestions are welcome and should be sent to the SI section of the DGS/SEE Group. Please send enquiries to general-safety-visits.service@cern.ch.

  3. Insights into Spatial Sensitivities of Ice Mass Response to Environmental Change from the SeaRISE Ice Sheet Modeling Project I: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Sophie; Bindschadler, Robert A.; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Aschwanden, Andy; Bueler, Ed; Choi, Hyengu; Fastook, Jim; Granzow, Glen; Greve, Ralf; Gutowski, Gail; Herzfeld, Ute; Jacskon, Charles; Johnson, Jesse; Khroulev, Constantine; Larour, Eric; Levermann, Anders; Lipscomb, William H.; Martin, Maria A.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Parizek, Byron R; Pollard, David; Price, Stephen F.; Seroussi, Helene; Walker, Ryan; Wang, Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric, oceanic, and subglacial forcing scenarios from the Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) project are applied to six three-dimensional thermomechanical ice-sheet models to assess Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity over a 500 year timescale and to inform future modeling and field studies. Results indicate (i) growth with warming, except within low-latitude basins (where inland thickening is outpaced by marginal thinning); (ii) mass loss with enhanced sliding (with basins dominated by high driving stresses affected more than basins with low-surface-slope streaming ice); and (iii) mass loss with enhanced ice shelf melting (with changes in West Antarctica dominating the signal due to its marine setting and extensive ice shelves; cf. minimal impact in the Terre Adelie, George V, Oates, and Victoria Land region of East Antarctica). Ice loss due to dynamic changes associated with enhanced sliding and/or sub-shelf melting exceeds the gain due to increased precipitation. Furthermore, differences in results between and within basins as well as the controlling impact of sub-shelf melting on ice dynamics highlight the need for improved understanding of basal conditions, grounding-zone processes, ocean-ice interactions, and the numerical representation of all three.

  4. Computational Study of Plasma Response to a Variable Electric Multipole Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    A computational study is presented of the behavior of a low temperature, quasi-neutral plasma in a three-dimensional, time-varying electric multipole field. A 3-D particle- in-cell (PIC) plasma code is used to simulate the process. The simulations study the effect of the plasma species' mass difference on the plasma response, with the multipole field frequency being chosen, for example, to interact strongly with light particles but negligibly with heavy ones. The effect of focusing the light species to the center of the multipole structure is examined, with space charge neutralized by the presence of the heavy species. The dependence of plasma density on driving field parameters and geometry (order of multipole, shape of equipotential surfaces) is studied, as well as the behavior of the plasma near gyroresonance in the presence of a background magnetic field. The formation and dependences of the RF plasma sheath are studied, as the sheath responds to variation of the plasma and external field characteristics. The results of the computer modeling study are to inform an initial experimental design and study of the same effects. Supported by NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Physics and Engineering Award PHY-1619615.

  5. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  6. Modelling of plasma response to 3D external magnetic field perturbations in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Sun, Youwen; Liu, Yueqiang; Gu, Shuai; Liu, Yue; Wang, Huihui; Zhou, Lina; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-11-01

    Sustained mitigation and/or suppression of type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) has been achieved in EAST high-confinement plasmas, utilizing the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields produced by two rows of magnetic coils located just inside the vacuum vessel. Systematic toroidal modelling of the plasma response to these RMP fields with various coil configurations (with dominant toroidal mode number n  = 1, 2, 3, 4) in EAST is, for the first time, carried out by using the MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681), with results reported here. In particular, the plasma response is computed with varying coil phasing (the toroidal phase difference of the coil currents) between the upper and lower rows of coils, from 0 to 360°. Four figures of merit, constructed based on the MARS-F computations, are used to determine the optimal coil phasing. The modelled results, taking into account the plasma response, agree well with the experimental observations in terms of the coil phasing for both the mitigated and the suppressed ELM cases in EAST experiments. This study provides a crucial confirmation of the role of the plasma edge peeling response in ELM control, complementing similar studies carried out for other tokamak devices.

  7. Comparison of the CREATE-L plasma response model with experiments on TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, P.; Lister, J.B. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Villone, F. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATA, Univ. die Cassino, Cassino (Italy); Albanese, R. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATA, DIEMA, Univ. di Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been performed on the TCV tokamak to evaluate the response of Ohmic, L-Mode, limited and diverted plasmas to changes in the poloidal field coil voltages. The resulting closed loop plasma responses have been compared with the CREATE-L linearized MHD equilibrium model of TCV. The simulated responses show excellent agreement with the experiments in both the time and frequency domains. Tests with models derived using different assumptions indicate that the underlying physical assumptions of the nominal model are appropriate. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  8. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoul Nada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi, and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun to 35% (ileum at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum or IgM (duodenum plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses

  9. The anemia of chronic renal failure in sheep. Response to erythropoietin-rich plasma in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Eschbach, J W; Mladenovic, J; Garcia, J F; Wahl, P W; Adamson, J W

    1984-01-01

    The hypoproliferative anemia in chronic renal failure has been assumed to be the result of decreased erythropoietin (Ep) production by the damaged kidney and of the shortening of erythrocyte survival. However, many in vitro studies suggest that erythropoietic inhibitors in uremic plasma may contribute to the anemia. To determine the in vivo relevance of uremic inhibitors, increasing amounts of Ep as Ep-rich plasma were infused into six uremic sheep, and their erythropoietic responses were com...

  10. Redox Stimulation of Human THP-1 Monocytes in Response to Cold Physical Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In plasma medicine, cold physical plasma delivers a delicate mixture of reactive components to cells and tissues. Recent studies suggested a beneficial role of cold plasma in wound healing. Yet, the biological processes related to the redox modulation via plasma are not fully understood. We here used the monocytic cell line THP-1 as a model to test their response to cold plasma in vitro. Intriguingly, short term plasma treatment stimulated cell growth. Longer exposure only modestly compromised cell viability but apparently supported the growth of cells that were enlarged in size and that showed enhanced metabolic activity. A significantly increased mitochondrial content in plasma treated cells supported this notion. On THP-1 cell proteome level, we identified an increase of protein translation with key regulatory proteins being involved in redox regulation (hypoxia inducible factor 2α, differentiation (retinoic acid signaling and interferon inducible factors, and cell growth (Yin Yang 1. Regulation of inflammation is a key element in many chronic diseases, and we found a significantly increased expression of the anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 and of the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8. Together, these results foster the view that cold physical plasma modulates the redox balance and inflammatory processes in wound related cells.

  11. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-07-16

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization of the flame in a V-shape or an M-shape geometry, over a central stainless steel rod. The plasma is produced by short pulses of 10-ns duration, 8-kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. Plasma forcing is produced by positive or negative steps of plasma. The step response of the flame is investigated through heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations, to facilitate comparisons with flame response to acoustic perturbations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera equipped with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. First, the results show that the flame does not respond to each single plasma pulse, but is affected only by the average plasma power, confirming the step nature of the forcing. The temporal evolutions of HRR are analyzed and the flame transfer functions are determined. A forcing mechanism, as a local increase in the reactivity of the fluid close to the rod, is proposed and compared with numerical simulations. Experiments and numerical simulations are in good qualitative agreement. © 2016.

  12. Modelling plasma response to RMP fields in ASDEX Upgrade with varying edge safety factor and triangularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kirk, A.; Wang, N.; Liang, Y.; Ryan, D.; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; Zhong, F. C.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-12-01

    Toroidal computations are performed using the MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681), in order to understand correlations between the plasma response and the observed mitigation of the edge localized modes (ELM) using resonant magnetic perturbation fields in ASDEX Upgrade. In particular, systematic numerical scans of the edge safety factor reveal that the amplitude of the resonant poloidal harmonic of the response radial magnetic field near the plasma edge, as well as the plasma radial displacement near the X-point, can serve as good indicators for predicting the optimal toroidal phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils in ASDEX Upgrade. The optimal coil phasing scales roughly linearly with the edge safety factor {{q}95} , for various choices of the toroidal mode number n  =  1-4 of the coil configuration. The optimal coil phasing is also predicted to vary with the upper triangularity of the plasma shape in ASDEX Upgrade. Furthermore, multiple resonance effects of the plasma response, with continuously varying {{q}95} , are computationally observed and investigated.

  13. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  14. Optimization of applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations using multimodal plasma response on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Evans, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma response to proposed 3D coil geometries in the DIII-D tokamak is investigated using the linear MHD plasma response code MARS-F. An extensive examination of low- and high-field side coil arrangements shows the potential to optimize the coupling between imposed non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations and the total plasma response by varying the toroidal and poloidal spectral content of the applied field. Previous work has shown that n=2 and n=3 perturbations can suppress edge-localized modes (ELMs) in cases where the applied field's coupling to resonant surfaces is enhanced by amplifying marginally-stable kink modes. This research is extended to higher n-number configurations of 2 to 3 rows with up to 12 coils each in order to advance the physical understanding and optimization of both the resonant and non-resonant responses. Both in- and ex-vessel configurations are considered. The plasma braking torque is also analyzed, and coil geometries with favorable plasma coupling characteristics are discussed. Work supported by GA internal funds.

  15. Differential plasma catecholamine and neuropeptide Y responses to acute stress in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Konarska, M.; McCarty, R.

    1988-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a vasoconstrictor present in the sympatho-adrenomedullary system and may be co-released with norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) during sympathetic activation. The authors studied plasma NPY-immunoreactivity (-ir, radioimmunoassay) and catecholamine (radioenzymatic) responses during two acute stress paradigms that differ in character, intensity, and duration. The intermittent stress of footshock evoked intensity-dependent immediate increments in plasma NE and EPI, and a delayed NPY-ir response. Prolonged immobilization caused greater increases in plasma NE and EPI levels and no changes in plasma NPY-ir until the end of the stress session. Plasma NPY-ir responses correlated with those of NE but not with EPI suggesting a sympathetic origin for the release of the peptide. Relatively greater NPY-ir responses to footshock than to immobilization may be consistent with a preferential release of the peptide by a bursting but not continuous mode of sympathetic activation. However, it may also be due to a differential activation of the sympathetic nerves and adrenal medulla by these two stress situations.

  16. NR4.00002: Response of a laminar M-shaped premixed flame to plasma forcing

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the response of a lean methane-air flame to non-thermal plasma forcing. The set-up consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube of 7-mm inlet diameter. The equivalence ratio is 0.9 and the flame is stabilized in an M-shape morphology over a central stainless steel rod and the quartz tube. The plasma is produced by nanosecond pulses of 10 kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. The plasma forcing is produced by bursts of plasma pulses of 1 s duration. The response of the flame is investigated through the heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. The results show that, even though the plasma is located in the combustion area, the flame is not responding to each single plasma pulse, but is affected by the discharge burst. The plasma forcing can then be considered as a step of forcing: the beginning of a positive step corresponding to the first plasma pulse, and the beginning of a negative step corresponding to the end of the last pulse of the burst. The effects of both positive and negative steps were investigated. The response of the flame is then analyzed and viable mechanisms are discussed.

  17. On seismic dynamic response of sheet pile wharf based on ABAQUS%基于ABAQUS的板桩码头地震动力响应研究*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋建平; 刘春林; 蒋宏鸣; 史旦达

    2013-01-01

      Based on the implicit module and the FEM-IEM coupling model of ABAQUS, we study the dynamic response of the single anchor sheet pile wharf under the seismic load. It is found that the peak acceleration has a great effect upon the sheet pile bending moment, shear force and tension force of tension bar with the same seismic wave in different peak accelerations. Comparing with the data of static analysis, the sheet pile’s maximum bending moment grows by 40%and the tension force of tension bar by 10%to 50%as the seismic peak acceleration increases by 0.1g, but the growing rate of tension force of tension bar tends to be stable at the end. Under the seismic load, the maximum tension force of tension bar closes to the maximum shear force per unit width on the sheet pile. This paper makes a study on the impact of seismic peak acceleration upon the range of plastic zone between sheet pile bottom and anchorage wall. The results show that seismic ground motion imposes an important effect on the sheet pile wharf in comparison with static load, thus it provides references for design of the sheet pile wharf under the influence of earthquake.%  基于ABAQUS软件的隐式模块和有限元-无限元方法对单锚板桩码头进行了地震动响应研究。研究发现,在相同地震波不同加速度峰值情况下,峰值加速度对板桩码头的板桩弯矩、剪力和拉杆拉力有重要影响,与静力分析时的情况相比较,地震加速度峰值每增大0.1g,板桩最大弯矩相应增大约40%,拉杆拉力增大约10%~50%,但拉杆拉力增幅在后期逐渐趋于稳定;地震作用下,拉杆最大拉力与板桩墙最大剪力(单宽)基本相等;地震加速度峰值对板桩墙底与锚碇之间塑性区开展范围也有一定的影响。结果表明,与静载相比,地震对板桩码头的影响不容忽视。研究结果可为板桩码头考虑地震影响的设计提供参考。

  18. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely-used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important ...

  19. Cardiac and plasma lipid profiles in response to acute hypoxia in neonatal and young adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raff Hershel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological and biochemical responses to acute hypoxia have not been fully characterized in neonates. Fatty acids and lipids play an important role in most aspects of cardiac function. Methods We performed comprehensive lipid profiling analysis to survey the changes that occur in heart tissue and plasma of neonatal and young adult rats exposed to hypoxia for 2 h, and following 2 h of recovery from hypoxia. Results Cardiac and plasma concentrations of short-chain acylcarnitines, and most plasma long-chain fatty acids, were decreased in hypoxic neonates. Following recovery from hypoxia, concentrations of propionylcarnitine, palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine were increased in neonatal hearts, while oleylcarnitine and linoleylcarnitine concentrations were increased in neonatal plasma. The concentrations of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain acylcarnitines were increased in the hearts and plasma of hypoxic young adult rats; these metabolites returned to baseline values following recovery from hypoxia. Conclusion There are differential effects of acute hypoxia on cardiac and plasma lipid profiles with maturation from the neonate to the young adult rat. Changes to neonatal cardiac and plasma lipid profiles during hypoxia likely allowed for greater metabolic and physiologic flexibility and increased chances for survival. Persistent alterations in the neonatal cardiac lipid profile following recovery from hypoxia may play a role in the development of rhythm disturbances.

  20. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sugiharto Sugiharto; Mette SHedemann; Charlotte Lauridsen

    2014-01-01

    Background:The processes of weaning and exposure to pathogenic bacteria induce stress responses, which may alter the metabolism. In this study, we investigated the changes in plasma metabolites and immune responses in piglets in response to the stress induced by weaning and Escherichia coli challenge. Results:Fecal dry matter decreased (P=0.003) and nearly half (44.4%) the piglets developed diarrhea on day 2 and 3 postweaning. The concentration of plasma immunoglobulin A was higher (P<0.001) on day 11 postweaning than on day 0 or 4 postweaning. The levels of white blood cells increased continuously (P<0.001) from day 0 to day 11 postweaning. Differences in the percentages of neutrophils (P=0.029) and lymphocytes (P=0.022) were seen, but the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio did not differ in the period after weaning. A clear separation of the metabolomic profile data for day 0 and day 4 postweaning was observed with a principal components analysis (PCA) scores plot, and the data for day 11 were located between those for day 0 and day 4 postweaning. The plasma levels of proline, taurine, and carnitine were higher, whereas those of betaine, creatine, L-arginine and acetylcarnitine were lower on day 4 postweaning than on day 0. Levels of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine were either higher or lower after weaning, depending on the chain lengths or characters of these metabolites. Conclusions:Our results show a clear separation in the plasma metabolomic profiles of piglets that corresponded to the fecal responses to stress on the piglets induced by weaning or exposure to a pathogen (E. coli). These plasma metabolite profiles suggest that the challenges induced proinflammatory responses in the piglets, resulting in postweaning diarrhea, which was associated with higher concentrations of IgA in the plasma.

  1. Progressive reduction in NE Atlantic intermediate water ventilation prior to Heinrich events: Response to NW European ice sheet instabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, V. L.; Hall, I. R.; Zahn, R.; Scourse, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    We present high-resolution benthic δ13C records from intermediate water depth core site MD01-2461 (1153 m water depth), from the Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic, spanning 43 to 8 kyr B.P. At an average proxy time step of 160 ± 56 years this core provides information on the linkage between records from the Portuguese Margin and high-latitude North Atlantic basin, allowing additional insights into North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) variability during millennial-scale climatic events of the last glacial. Together, these records document both discrete and progressive reductions in Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water (GNAIW) formation preceding Heinrich (H) events 1, 2, and 4, recorded through the apparent interchange of glacial northern and southern-sourced intermediate water signatures along the European Margin. Close coupling of NW European ice sheet (NWEIS) instability and GNAIW formation is observed through transient advances of SCW along the European margin concurrent with pulses of ice-rafted debris and meltwater release into the NE Atlantic between 27 and 16 kyr B.P., when the NWEIS was at maximum extent and proximal to Last Glacial Maximum convection zones in the open North Atlantic. It is such NWEIS instability and meltwater forcing that may have triggered reduced North Atlantic THC prior to collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet at H1 and H2. Precursory reduction in GNAIW formation prior to H4 may also be inferred. However, limited NWEIS ice volume prior to H4 and convection occurring in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea require that if a meltwater trigger is invoked, as appears to be the case at H1 and H2, the source of meltwater prior to H4 is elsewhere, likely higher-latitude ice sheets. Clarification of the sequencing and likely mechanisms of precursory decrease of the North Atlantic THC support theories of H event initiation relating to ice shelf growth during cold periods associated with reduced North Atlantic THC and subsequent ablation

  2. Influence of carbohydrate supplementation on plasma cytokine and neutrophil degranulation responses to high intensity intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Nicolette C; Gleeson, Michael; Nicholas, Ceri W; Ali, Ajmol

    2002-06-01

    Ingesting carbohydrate (CHO) beverages during prolonged, continuous heavy exercise results in smaller changes in the plasma concentrations of several cytokines and attenuates a decline in neutrophil function. In contrast, ingesting CHO during prolonged intermittent exercise appears to have negligible influence on these responses, probably due to the overall moderate intensity of these intermittent exercise protocols. Therefore, we examine the effect of CHO ingestion on plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophil degranulation responses to high-intensity intermittent running. Six trained male soccer players performed 2 exercise trials, 7 days apart, in a randomized, counterbalanced design. On each occasion, they completed six 15-min periods of intermittent running consisting of maximal sprinting interspersed with less intense periods of running and walking. Subjects consumed either CHO or artificially sweetened placebo (PLA) beverages immediately before and at 15-min intervals during the exercise. At 30 min post-exercise, CHO versus PLA was associated with a higher plasma glucose concentration (p exercise, LPS-stimulated elastase release per neutrophil fell 31% below baseline values on the PLA trial (p = .06) compared with 17% on the CHO trial (p = .30). Plasma TNF-alpha concentration increased following the exercise (main effect of time, p attenuates changes in plasma IL-6 concentration, neutrophil trafficking, and LPS-stimulated neutrophil degranulation in response to intermittent exercise that involves bouts of very high intensity exercise.

  3. Drift modes of a quasi-two-dimensional current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Malova, Kh. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Stability of a plasma configuration consisting of a thin one-dimensional current sheet embedded into a two-dimensional background current sheet is studied. Drift modes developing in plasma as unstable waves along the current direction are considered. Dispersion relations for kink and sausage perturbation modes are obtained depending on the ratio of parameters of thin and background current sheets. It is shown that the existence of the background sheet results in a decrease in the instability growth rates and a significant increase in the perturbation wavelengths. The role of drift modes in the excitation of oscillations observed in the current sheet of the Earth's magnetotail is discussed.

  4. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  5. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  6. Plasma glucose, insulin and catecholamine responses to a Wingate test in physically active women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Sophie; Berthon, Phanélie; Zouhal, Hassane; Moussa, Elie; Catheline, Michel; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette

    2004-01-01

    The influence of gender on the glucose response to exercise remains contradictory. Moreover, to our knowledge, the glucoregulatory responses to anaerobic sprint exercise have only been studied in male subjects. Hence, the aim of the present study was to compare glucoregulatory metabolic (glucose and lactate) and hormonal (insulin, catecholamines and estradiol only in women) responses to a 30-s Wingate test, in physically active students. Eight women [19.8 (0.7) years] and eight men [22.0 (0.6) years] participated in a 30-s Wingate test on a bicycle ergometer. Plasma glucose, insulin, and catecholamine concentrations were determined at rest, at the end of both the warm-up and the exercise period and during the recovery (5, 10, 20, and 30 min). Results showed that the plasma glucose increase in response to a 30-s Wingate test was significantly higher in women than in men [0.99 (0.15) versus 0.33 (0.20) mmol l(-1) respectively, Pwomen than in men [14.7 (2.9) versus 2.3 (1.9) pmol l(-1) respectively, P<0.05]. However, there was no gender difference concerning the catecholamine response. The study indicates a gender-related difference in post-exercise plasma glucose and insulin responses after a supramaximal exercise.

  7. Circulating FGF23 levels in response to acute changes in plasma Ca(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Eva; Mace, Maria L; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Olgaard, Klaus; Lewin, Ewa

    2014-07-01

    The regulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) synthesis and secretion is still incompletely understood. FGF23 is an important regulator of renal phosphate excretion and has regulatory effects on the calciotropic hormones calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis are closely interrelated, and it is therefore likely that Ca is involved in FGF23 regulation. It has recently been reported that dietary Ca influenced FGF23 levels, with high Ca increasing FGF23. The mechanism remains to be clarified. It remains unknown whether acute changes in plasma Ca influence FGF23 levels and whether a close relationship, similar that known for Ca and PTH, exists between Ca and FGF23. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine whether acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia regulate FGF23 levels in the rat. Acute hypercalcemia was induced by an intravenous Ca infusion and hypocalcemia by infusion of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) in normal and acutely parathyroidectomized rats. Intact plasma FGF23 and intact plasma PTH and plasma Ca(2+) and phosphate were measured. Acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia resulted as expected in adequate PTH secretory responses. Plasma FGF23 levels remained stable at all plasma Ca(2+) levels; acute parathyroidectomy did not affect FGF23 secretion. In conclusion, Ca is not a regulator of acute changes in FGF23 secretion.

  8. Effect of hydration on plasma vasopressin, renin, and aldosterone responses to head-up tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. H.; Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Wade, C. A.; Hill, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    If plasma vasopressin (PVP), plasma renin (PRA), and plasma aldosterone (PA) responses to change in posture are mediated only by alterations in intrathoracic baroreceptor activity hydration status should have minimal influence on these responses. To test this hypothesis, six male subjects underwent 45 min of 70 deg head-up tilt (HUT) following 26 h dehydration, and again, 105 min later, following rehydration. Compared with preceding supine hydrated control values, PVP, PRA, and PA increased (p less than 0.001) during dehydrated HUT, but only PVP and PRA increased during rehydrated HUT (p less than 0.001). The dissociation during rehydrated HUT of PRA and PA may have been related more to the reduction (p less than 0.001) in plasma potassium concentration than to the accompanying decrease (p less than 0.001) in plasma osmolality and sodium concentration. Although increases in PVP and PRA during HUT were attenuated (p less than 0.01) following rehydration, this attenuation was associated with the absence of symptoms of overt hypotension following rehydration. However, since rehydration did not abolish the increases in PVP and PRA induced by HUT, it is concluded that the present observations support the concept of intrathoracic baroreceptor involvement in the regulation of vasopressin secretion and renin release.

  9. Plasma Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    N M Vijay

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental base of plasma antenna is the use of an ionized medium as a conductor. The plasma antenna is a radiofrequency antenna formed by a plasma columns, Filaments or sheets, which are excited by a surface wave. The relevance of this device is how rapidly it can be turned on and off, only applying an electrical pulse. Besides its wide carrier frequency, the great directivity and controllable antenna shape. Otherwise a disadvantage is that it needs energy to be ionized....

  10. Substrate-free gas-phase synthesis of graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Albert; Radmilovic, Velimir; Lee, Zonghoon; Phillips, Jonathan; Frenklach, Michael

    2008-07-01

    We present a novel method for synthesizing graphene sheets in the gas phase using a substrate-free, atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor. Graphene sheets were synthesized by passing liquid ethanol droplets into an argon plasma. The graphene sheets were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electron diffraction. We prove that graphene can be created without three-dimensional materials or substrates and demonstrate a possible avenue to the large-scale synthesis of graphene.

  11. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acheva, A; Georgieva, R; Rupova, I; Boteva, R [Laboratory Molecular Radiobiology and Epidemiology, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, 132 Kliment Ohridski blvd, Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Lyng, F [Radiation and Environmental Science Center, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin st, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: anjin_a@mail.bg

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  12. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheva, A.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.; Lyng, F.

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  13. Plasma nesfatin-1 and glucoregulatory hormone responses to two different anaerobic exercise sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari-Niaki, Abbass; Kraemer, Robert R; Soltani, Raheleh

    2010-11-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently discovered anorectic protein derived from posttranslational processing of the nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2) gene. It is expressed in adipose tissue and is also found in plasma. Nesfatin-1 expression is significantly affected by nutritional status and its actions may be involved in the inhibition of the orexigenic effect of ghrelin. Although the effects of physical exercise on several anorectic and orexigenic hormones have been reported, no studies have investigated its effects upon circulating concentrations of nesfatin-1. We investigated the effects of acute strenuous interval exercise and circuit exercise on nesfatin and other hormones affected by metabolic stress. Fourteen provincial and national level young male-kickboxing volunteers participated [age 20.71 ± 2.6 years, height 176.6 ± 2.8 cm, body weight 67.2 ± 3.3 kg, and body mass index (BMI) 21.56 ± 1.42 kg/m(2)]. After an overnight fast, responses to a running-based anaerobic sprint test (RAST; 7 sets of 6 × 35 m every 10 s with 1 min rest in between sets) and a non-combat kickboxing session (NCKB; 7 sets of 6 techniques, 20 s per technique with 1 min rest in between sets) were determined. Venous blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 45 as well as 95 min following the exercises. Plasma GH, insulin, glucose and lactate concentrations significantly increased immediately following the RAST and NCKB protocols, however, plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations were not significantly altered. Higher plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations occurred in response to the RAST compared with the NCKB protocols. Although the exercise protocols elicited metabolic stress that significantly altered circulating glucoregulatory hormones, plasma glucose and lactate, there was no significant change in plasma nesfatin-1. A lack of nesfatin-1 response to the exercise protocols may be partially due to the fasting condition.

  14. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area ​Other Fact Sheets What is structural biology? Structural biology is the study of how biological ...

  15. Plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and response to ketamine in treatment-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, C N; Murrough, J W; Iosifescu, D V; Chang, L C; Al Jurdi, R K; Foulkes, A; Iqbal, S; Mahoney, J J; De La Garza, R; Charney, D S; Newton, T F; Mathew, S J

    2014-02-01

    Ketamine produces rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant depression (TRD), but the magnitude of response varies considerably between individual patients. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been investigated as a biomarker of treatment response in depression and has been implicated in the mechanism of action of ketamine. We evaluated plasma BDNF and associations with symptoms in 22 patients with TRD enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of ketamine compared to an anaesthetic control (midazolam). Ketamine significantly increased plasma BDNF levels in responders compared to non-responders 240 min post-infusion, and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were negatively correlated with BDNF (r=-0.701, p = 0.008). Plasma BDNF levels at 240 min post-infusion were highly negatively associated with MADRS scores at 240 min (r = -0.897, p=.002), 24 h (r = -0.791, p = 0.038), 48 h (r = -0.944, p = 0.001) and 72 h (r = -0.977, p = 0.010). No associations with BDNF were found for patients receiving midazolam. These data support plasma BDNF as a peripheral biomarker relevant to ketamine antidepressant response.

  16. Analysis of propagation prop erties of electromagnetic waves through large planar plasma sheets%电磁波在大面积等离子体片中传播特性的分析∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏俊明; 徐跃民; 孙越强; 霍文青; 孙海龙; 白伟华; 柳聪亮; 孟祥广

    2015-01-01

    Large planar plasma sheets, generated by a linear hollow cathode in pulse discharge mode under magnetic con-finement, can be used in the field of plasma antenna, plasma stealth, and simulation of a plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth’s atmosphere. Firstly, to investigate the propagation prop-erties of electromagnetic waves at different frequencies and polarization, the transverse field transfer matrix method is introduced. Secondly, the measured electron density temporal and spatial distribution and the transverse field transfer matrix method are utilized to calculate the reflection, transmission and absorption of electromagnetic waves by large planar plasma sheets with different currents. Finally, 1 GHz (less than the critical cut-off frequency) electromagnetic waves and 4 GHz (greater than the critical frequency) electromagnetic waves are chosen to investigate the evolution of propagation properties during the pulsed discharge period. Results show that both the reflection and absorption of the electromagnetic waves are greater for their polarization direction parallel to that of magnetic field, and their frequencies lower than the critical cut-off frequency, and as the discharge currents rise, the reflection increases while the absorption decreases. However both the reflection and absorption of the electromagnetic waves with their polarization direction perpendicular to the magnetic field direction and their frequency greater than the critical cut-off frequency become less, and as the discharge currents rise, both the reflection and absorption will increase. For the electromagnetic waves with their polarization direction perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, there is an upper hybrid resonance absorption band near the upper hybrid resonance frequencies, in which the absorption is significant but the absorption peak value is not affected by the discharge current. The propagation characteristics of the

  17. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change: volume II, part I. Response of the West Antarctic ice sheet to CO/sub 2/-induced climatic warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, C.

    1982-04-01

    The paper proposes a research plan to deal with the question of what the response of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet would be to a rise in global temperatures caused by an anthropogenic CO/sub 2/ buildup in the atmosphere. The plan is designed to answer the following questions: (1) how fast is the ice mass changing now, and why; (2) how will the boundary conditions that affect the ice sheet respond to an atmospheric temperature change and how are those boundary conditions changing now; (3) what will be the response of the ice sheet to changes in boundary conditions; and (4) what can be learned by analogy with what has happened in the past. (ACR)

  18. Metallurgical response of an AISI 4140 steel to different plasma nitriding gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adão Felipe Oliveira Skonieski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a surface modification process that uses glow discharge to diffuse nitrogen atoms into the metallic matrix of different materials. Among the many possible parameters of the process, the gas mixture composition plays an important role, as it impacts directly the formed layer's microstructure. In this work an AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrided under five different gas compositions. The plasma nitriding samples were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness test, X-ray diffraction and GDOES. The results showed that there are significant microstructural and morphological differences on the formed layers depending on the quantity of nitrogen and methane added to the plasma nitriding atmosphere. Thicknesses of 10, 5 and 2.5 µm were obtained when the nitrogen content of the gas mixtures were varied. The possibility to obtain a compound layer formed mainly by γ'-Fe4N nitrides was also shown. For all studied plasma nitriding conditions, the presence of a compound layer was recognized as being the responsible to hinder the decarburization on the steel surface. The highest value of surface hardness - 1277HV - were measured in the sample which were nitrided with 3vol.% of CH4.

  19. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Huijsmans, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon, F-13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pamela, S. [IIFS-PIIM. Aix Marseille Université - CNRS, 13397 Marseille Cedex20 (France); Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hoelzl, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Cahyna, P. [Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  20. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Hoelzl, M.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  1. Comparative investigation of ELM control based on toroidal modelling of plasma response to RMP fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2016-10-01

    The type-I edge localized mode (ELM), bursting at low frequency and with large amplitude, can channel a substantial amount of the plasma thermal energy into the surrounding plasma-facing components in tokamak devices operating at the high-confinement mode, potentially causing severe material damages. Learning effective ways of controlling this instability is thus an urgent issue in fusion research, in particular in view of the next generation large devices such as ITER and DEMO. Among other means, externally applied, three-dimensional resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have been experimentally demonstrated to be successful in mitigating or suppressing the type-I ELM, in multiple existing devices. In this work, we shall report results of a comparative study of ELM control using RMPs. Comparison is made between the modelled plasma response to the 3D external fields and the observed change of the ELM behaviour on multiple devices, including MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, EAST, DIII-D, JET, and KSTAR. We show that toroidal modelling of the plasma response, based on linear and quasi-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, provides essential insights that are useful in interpreting and guiding the ELM control experiments. In particular, linear toroidal modelling results, using the MARS-F code, reveal the crucial role of the edge localized peeling-tearing mode response during ELM mitigation/suppression on all these devices. Such response often leads to strong peaking of the plasma surface displacement near the region of weak equilibrium poloidal field (e.g. the X-point), and this provides an alternative practical criterion for ELM control, as opposed to the vacuum field based Chirikov criteria. Quasi-linear modelling using MARS-Q provides quantitative interpretation of the side effects due to the ELM control coils, on the plasma toroidal momentum and particle confinements. The particular role of the momentum and particle fluxes, associated with the neoclassical toroidal

  2. Longitudinal singular response of dusty plasma medium in weak and strong coupling limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Tiwari, Sanat; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar - 382428 (India)

    2012-01-15

    The longitudinal response of a dusty plasma medium in both weak and strong coupling limits has been investigated in detail using analytic as well as numerical techniques. In particular, studies on singular response of the medium have been specifically investigated here. A proper Galilean invariant form of the generalized hydrodynamic fluid model has been adopted for the description of the dusty plasma medium. For weak non-linear response, analytic reductive perturbative approach has been adopted. It is well known that in the weak coupling regime for the dusty plasma medium, such an analysis leads to the Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV) equation and predicts the existence of localized smooth soliton solutions. We show that the strongly coupled dust fluid with the correct Galilean invariant form does not follow the KdV paradigm. Instead, it reduces to the form of Hunter-Saxton equation, which does not permit soliton solutions. The system in this case displays singular response with both conservative as well as dissipative attributes. At arbitrary high amplitudes, the existence and spontaneous formation of sharply peaked cusp structures in both weak and strong coupling regimes has been demonstrated numerically.

  3. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  4. Salivary but not plasma cortisone tracks the plasma cortisol response to exercise: effect of time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corral, P; Schurman, R C; Kinza, S S; Fitzgerald, M J; Kordick, C A; Rusch, J L; Nadolski, J B

    2016-03-01

    The cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, and CBG responses to exercise in the AM and PM have not been described. This study examined the response of these glucocorticoids and CBG to intense exercise in 12 endurance-trained men in plasma (Pl) and saliva (Sa). Each subject completed treadmill exercise in the morning and evening. Paired blood and Sa samples were obtained at rest before and after exercise. Significant time effect existed for Pl-cortisol and Sa-cortisol from baseline in the AM and PM (p cortisone and CBG significantly increased in the PM (p cortisone, Sa-cortisone was significantly higher in the AM compared to the PM, increasing in the AM and PM (All p cortisone (r = 0.81, p cortisone (~90 %) and corticosterone (~200 %) in the AM and PM, whereas exercise increases CBG in the PM, but not in the AM; (2) vigorous exercise increases Sa-cortisone; (3) Sa-cortisone and cortisol are equally strongly correlated to Pl-cortisol, suggesting a significant role for Sa-cortisone as a novel marker of free cortisol during exercise.

  5. Second-harmonic plasma response in diffusion-controlled surface-wave-sustained discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoev, L.

    2008-05-01

    The formation of nonlinear plasma response at the second harmonic frequency in diffusion controlled surface-wave-sustained discharges is studied theoretically. The study is aimed at estimating theoretically the ratio of the squared amplitudes of the wave field of fundamental frequency and of the resulting - from the nonlinear effects - electric field at the second harmonic frequency. The model presented is intended for further use in discharge diagnostics.

  6. Plasma cortisol responses to stress in lactating and nonlactating female rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestripieri, Dario; Hoffman, Christy L; Fulks, Richelle; Gerald, Melissa S

    2008-01-01

    Lactating female rats without their pups exhibit lower HPA responsiveness to stress than nonlactating females. However, responsiveness to stress is similar when lactating females are tested with their pups and the stressor involves a potential threat to the offspring. This study constitutes the first comparison of stress responsiveness in lactating and nonlactating female nonhuman primates. Subjects were 53 multiparous female free-ranging rhesus macaques. Approximately half of the females were lactating and half were nonpregnant/nonlactating. Blood samples were obtained after capture and after overnight housing in an individual cage. Lactating females were tested with their infants. Lactating females had significantly higher plasma cortisol levels than nonlactating females on both days. Having or not having an infant was also a better predictor of plasma cortisol levels among all females than their age, dominance rank, group of origin, time of day at which the sample was obtained, and time elapsed since beginning of the sampling procedure or since anesthesia. Plasma cortisol levels of lactating females were not significantly correlated with post-partum stage or with the cortisol levels of their infants. Capture, handling, and individual housing in a cage are powerful psychological stressors for free-ranging primates. We suggest that the higher plasma cortisol levels exhibited by lactating females reflect greater responsiveness to stress associated with perception of risks to infants. Hyporesponsiveness to stress may not be a general characteristic of lactation in all mammalian species, but a short-term effect of infant suckling that is most apparent with stressors unrelated to the offspring.

  7. Plasma free hemoglobin and microcirculatory response to fresh or old blood transfusions in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Damiani

    Full Text Available Free hemoglobin (fHb may induce vasoconstriction by scavenging nitric oxide. It may increase in older blood units due to storage lesions. This study evaluated whether old red blood cell transfusion increases plasma fHb in sepsis and how the microvascular response may be affected.This is a secondary analysis of a randomized study. Twenty adult septic patients received either fresh or old (15 days storage, respectively RBC transfusions. fHb was measured in RBC units and in the plasma before and 1 hour after transfusion. Simultaneously, the sublingual microcirculation was assessed with sidestream-dark field imaging. The perfused boundary region was calculated as an index of glycocalyx damage. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2 and Hb index (THI were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy and a vascular occlusion test was performed.Similar fHb levels were found in the supernatant of fresh and old RBC units. Despite this, plasma fHb increased in the old RBC group after transfusion (from 0.125 [0.098-0.219] mg/mL to 0.238 [0.163-0.369] mg/mL, p = 0.006. The sublingual microcirculation was unaltered in both groups, while THI increased. The change in plasma fHb was inversely correlated with the changes in total vessel density (r = -0.57 [95% confidence interval -0.82, -0.16], p = 0.008, De Backer score (r = -0.63 [95% confidence interval -0.84, -0.25], p = 0.003 and THI (r = -0.72 [95% confidence interval -0.88, -0.39], p = 0.0003.Old RBC transfusion was associated with an increase in plasma fHb in septic patients. Increasing plasma fHb levels were associated with decreased microvascular density.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01584999.

  8. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H and 8 normotensive (N subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively. They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity. Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP. Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05, although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1 and lower TBARS (P<0.01 and FRAP (P<0.05 levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors, present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response.

  9. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    In order to produce passenger vehicles with improved fuel economy and increased passenger safety, car manufacturers are in need of steels with enhanced strength levels and good formability. Recently, promising combinations of strength and ductility have been reported for several, so-called third generation advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels are increasingly being recognized as a promising third generation AHSS candidate. Early Q research used conventional TRIP steel chemistries and richer alloying strategies have been explored in more recent studies. However, systematic investigations of the effects of alloying elements on tensile properties and retained austenite fractions of Q&P steels are sparse. The objective of the present research was to investigate the alloying effects of carbon, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, copper and nickel on tensile properties and microstructural evolution of Q&P heat treated sheet steels. Seven alloys were investigated with 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si (wt pct) and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys used to study carbon effects, a 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy to study manganese effects, 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo and 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloys to study molybdenum and aluminum effects and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu-1.5Ni alloys to study copper and nickel effects. Increasing alloy carbon content was observed to mainly increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1865 MPa without significantly affecting total elongation (TE) levels. Increasing alloy carbon content also increased the resulting retained austenite (RA) fractions up to 22 vol pct. Measured maximum RA fractions were significantly lower than the predicted maximum RA levels in the 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys, likely resulting from transition carbide formation. Increasing alloy manganese content increased UTS, TE and RA levels, and decreased yield strength (YS) and austenite carbon content (Cgamma) levels

  10. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  11. Plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and aldosterone responses to angiotensin II and corticotropin in diabetic patients with hyporeninemic and normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, R; Kigoshi, T; Uchida, K; Morimoto, S

    1989-07-01

    To examine the nature of adrenal abnormalities in diabetic patients with hyporeninemic and normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism, responses of plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone to angiotension II infusions and ACTH injection were investigated in 8 diabetic patients with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and 9 diabetic patients with normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism compared to 11 control subjects. In both the patients with hyporeninemic and normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism, plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone were low, whereas plasma cortisol and plasma corticosterone were within normal ranges. Percent increments of plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone above their baseline levels after angiotensin II infusions were low or somewhat low in the patients with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and low in the patients with normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism. Percent increments of plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone above their baseline levels after ACTH injection were similar in three groups. These results suggest that in diabetic patients with isolated hypoaldosteronism, the adrenal abnormality, regardless of whether it is primary or secondary, is mainly due to impaired adrenal responsiveness to angiotension II and atrophy and the zona glomerulosa.

  12. Using NMR metabolomics to identify responses of an environmental estrogen in blood plasma of fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, Linda M. [Department of Physiology/Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Box 434, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Foerlin, Lars [Department of Zoology/Zoophysiology, Goeteborg University, Box 463, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Karlsson, Goeran [Swedish NMR Centre at Goeteborg University, Box 465, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha [Institute of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Larsson, D.G. Joakim [Department of Physiology/Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Box 434, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden)]. E-mail: joakim.larsson@fysiologi.gu.se

    2006-07-20

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics in combination with multivariate data analysis may become valuable tools to study environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other chemicals in aquatic organisms. To explore the usefulness of this approach in fish, we have used {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics to compare blood plasma and plasma lipid extracts from rainbow trout exposed to the synthetic contraceptive estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE{sub 2}) with plasma from control fish. The plasma metabolite profile was affected in fish exposed to 10 ng/L but not 0.87 ng/L of EE{sub 2}, which was in agreement with an induced vitellogenin synthesis in the high dose group only, as measured by ELISA. The main affected metabolites were vitellogenin, alanine, phospholipids and cholesterol. The responses identified by this discovery-driven method could be put in context with previous knowledge of the effects of estrogens on fish. This adds confidence to the approach of using NMR metabolomics to identify environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants.

  13. Real-time Numerical Solution for the Plasma Response Matrix for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Real-time analysis of plasma stability is essential to any active feedback control system that performs ideal MHD disruption avoidance. Due to singularities and poor numerical conditioning endemic to ideal MHD models of tokamak plasmas, current state-of-the-art codes require serial operation, and are as yet inoperable on the sub- O (1s) timescale required by ITER's MHD evolution time. In this work, low-toroidal-n ideal MHD modes are found in near real-time as solutions to a well-posed boundary value problem. Using a modified parallel shooting technique and linear methods to subdue numerical instability, such modes are integrated with parallelization across spatial and ``temporal'' parts, via a Riccati approach. The resulting state transition matrix is shown to yield the desired plasma response matrix, which describes how magnetic perturbations may be employed to maintain plasma stability. Such an algorithm may be helpful in designing a control system to achieve ITER's high-performance operational objectives. Sponsored by US DOE under DE-SC0015878 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. IP-10 measured by Dry Plasma Spots as biomarker for therapy responses in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonby, Kristian; Ruhwald, Morten; Kvale, Dag; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has huge impact on human morbidity and mortality and biomarkers to support rapid TB diagnosis and ensure treatment initiation and cure are needed, especially in regions with high prevalence of multi-drug resistant TB. Soluble interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10) analyzed from dry plasma spots (DPS) has potential as an immunodiagnostic marker in TB infection. We analyzed IP-10 levels in plasma directly and extracted from DPS in parallel by ELISA from 34 clinically well characterized patients with TB disease before and throughout 24 weeks of effective anti-TB chemotherapy. We detected a significant decline of IP-10 levels in both plasma and DPS already after two weeks of therapy with good correlation between the tests. This was observed both in pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. In conclusion, plasma IP-10 may serve as an early biomarker for anti-TB chemotherapy responses and the IP-10 DPS method has potential to be developed into a point-of care test for use in resource-limited settings. Further studies must be performed to validate the use of IP-10 DPS in TB high endemic countries. PMID:25783975

  15. Energy spectra of plasma sheet ions and electrons from about 50 eV/e to about 1 MeV during plamsa temperature transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.; Eastman, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    ISEE-1 charged-particle measurements obtained during eight plasma temperature transitions (PTTs) in 1978-1979 are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail, comparing the ion and electron differential energy spectra with the predictions of theoretical models. PTTs are defined as approximately 1-h periods of low bulk plasma velocity and steadily increasing or decreasing thermal energy. A Maxwellian distribution is found to be inadequate in describing the PTT energy spectra, but velocity-exponential and kappa distributions are both successful, the latter especially at higher energies. The power-law index kappa varies from PTT to PTT, but the high-energy spectral index and overall shape of the distribution remain constant during a PTT; both spatial and temporal effects are observed.

  16. Corticotropin-releasing hormone in the teleost stress response: rapid appearance of the peptide in plasma of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepels, P.P.L.M.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Balm, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    High concentrations (up to 600 pg/ml) of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were detected in plasma of the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) when screening peripheral tissues of tilapia exposed to stress. Notably, the plasma CRH response to stressors in tilapia is much more pronounce

  17. Corticotropin-releasing hormone in the teleost stress response: rapid appearance of the peptide in plasma of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepels, P.P.L.M.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Balm, P.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    High concentrations (tip to 600 pg/ml) of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were detected in plasma of the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) when screening peripheral tissues of tilapia exposed to stress. Notably, the plasma CRH response to stressors in tilapia is much more pronounc

  18. Plasma proteins as indices of response to nutritional therapy in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, D M; Frasier, P; Guevara, J; Foulkes, M

    1985-07-01

    The use of plasma albumin (ALB), transferrin (TFN), prealbumin (TBPA), retinol-binding protein (RBP), triceps skin fold (TSF), and midarm muscle circumference (MAMC) as determinants of response to nutritional therapy (TPN) was investigated in 40 cancer patients during preoperative TPN. Thirty-one patients received 90% or more of their anabolic caloric requirement (Harris-Benedict equation) by means of TPN. During this study period (average 11.1 +/- 4.7 days) nutritional assessments were completed before TPN and on the last day of TPN before surgery. Average weight loss based on usual body wt (UBW) and ideal body wt (IBW) was 19 +/- 11% and 9 +/- 15%, respectively (not significant, NS). Weight loss (UBW) correlated with ALB (P less than 0.001), TBPA (P less than 0.005) and RBP (P less than 0.02) but did not correlate with TFN (P less than 0.06), TSF, and MAMC. Weight loss (IBW) correlated with TSF (P less than 0.01) and MAMC (P less than 0.03) but did not correlate with plasma protein (PP). During TPN the average percent increases for PP were 0.1% (ALB, NS), 20% (TFN, NS), 60% (TBPA, P less than 0.02), and 116% (RBP, P less than 0.005). These results suggest that plasma TBPA and RBP are significant parameters of response to short-term nutritional therapy in cancer patients.

  19. Response of plasma cortisol and progesterone after ACTH challenge in ovariectomized lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Chikako; Nakao, Toshihiko

    2005-02-01

    Shortened and weakened estrous expressions could be one of the causes of poor heat detection rate. Non-specific acute stresses are assumed to depress expression of estrus by an increase of plasma progesterone which may originate from the adrenal cortex. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the adrenal cortex can secrete significant amounts of progesterone in response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in lactating cows. Four cows had estrus synchronized and were ovariectomized in the luteal phase. The cows were given 25 IU ACTH through an indwelling catheter 5 h after catheterization. Blood samples were collected at an interval of 30 min. In 3 of the 4 cows, plasma progesterone concentrations increased significantly 0.5-1.5 h after the first ACTH challenge with a mean peak value of 4.2 +/- 0.4 (S.D.) ng/ml. A similar response was also observed after the second ACTH challenge. Peak plasma progesterone concentrations in the 3 cows after first ACTH challenge were comparable with the progesterone values in the luteal phase of each cow. The results suggest that lactating cows have the capability to secrete a significant amount of progesterone from the adrenal cortex.

  20. Dose-response plasma appearance of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Marmet, Cynthia; Giuffrida, Francesca; Lepage, Mélissa; Barron, Denis; Beaumont, Maurice; Williamson, Gary; Dionisi, Fabiola

    2014-02-01

    Coffee contains phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acids (CGAs). Even though coffee intake has been associated with some health benefits in epidemiological studies, the bioavailability of coffee phenolics is not fully understood. We performed a dose-response study measuring plasma bioavailability of phenolics after drinking three increasing, but still nutritionally relevant doses of instant pure soluble coffee. The study design was a one treatment (coffee) three-dose randomized cross-over design, with a washout period of 2 wks between visits. CGAs, phenolic acids, and late-appearing metabolites all increased with increasing ingested dose. Hence, the sum of area under the curve was significantly higher for the medium to low dose, and high to medium dose, by 2.23- and 2.38-fold, respectively. CGAs were not well absorbed in their intact form, regardless of the dose. CGA and phenolic acids appeared rapidly in plasma, indicating an early absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Late-appearing metabolites were the most abundant, regardless of the dose. This study confirmed previous findings about coffee bioavailability but also showed that coffee phenolics appear in a positive dose-response manner in plasma when drank at nutritionally relevant doses. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part I: Theory and description of model capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffray, A. René; Federici, Gianfranco

    1997-04-01

    RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case.

  2. AI applications in sheet metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises chapters on research work done around the globe in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) applications in sheet metal forming. The first chapter offers an introduction to various AI techniques and sheet metal forming, while subsequent chapters describe traditional procedures/methods used in various sheet metal forming processes, and focus on the automation of those processes by means of AI techniques, such as KBS, ANN, GA, CBR, etc. Feature recognition and the manufacturability assessment of sheet metal parts, process planning, strip-layout design, selecting the type and size of die components, die modeling, and predicting die life are some of the most important aspects of sheet metal work. Traditionally, these activities are highly experience-based, tedious and time consuming. In response, researchers in several countries have applied various AI techniques to automate these activities, which are covered in this book. This book will be useful for engineers working in sheet metal industri...

  3. Heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) impingement onto the magnetosphere as a cause of relativistic electron dropouts (REDs) via coherent EMIC wave scattering with possible consequences for climate change mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Hajra, R.; Tanimori, T.; Takada, A.; Bhanu, R.; Mannucci, A. J.; Lakhina, G. S.; Kozyra, J. U.; Shiokawa, K.; Lee, L. C.; Echer, E.; Reddy, R. V.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2016-10-01

    A new scenario is presented for the cause of magnetospheric relativistic electron decreases (REDs) and potential effects in the atmosphere and on climate. High-density solar wind heliospheric plasmasheet (HPS) events impinge onto the magnetosphere, compressing it along with remnant noon-sector outer-zone magnetospheric 10-100 keV protons. The betatron accelerated protons generate coherent electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves through a temperature anisotropy (T⊥/T|| > 1) instability. The waves in turn interact with relativistic electrons and cause the rapid loss of these particles to a small region of the atmosphere. A peak total energy deposition of 3 × 1020 ergs is derived for the precipitating electrons. Maximum energy deposition and creation of electron-ion pairs at 30-50 km and at Wilcox et al. (1973) noted a correlation between solar wind heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings and high atmospheric vorticity centers at 300 mb altitude. Tinsley et al. has constructed a global circuit model which depends on particle precipitation into the atmosphere. Other possible scenarios potentially affecting weather/climate change are also discussed.

  4. Behavioral and plasma monoamine responses to high-speed railway noise stress in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Di

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have reported that railway noise causes stress responses. To evaluate the effects of high-speed railway (HSR noise on behaviors and plasma monoamines. Institute of cancer research mice were exposed to previously recorded HSR noise for 53 days. The noise was arranged according to the HSR′s 24-h traffic number and adjusted to a day-night equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure level (Ldn of 70 dB (A. The open field test (OFT and the light/dark box test were applied to observe mice behaviors. High performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection was performed to determine the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE, dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance using SPSS 16.0. After 53 days of noise exposure, center time and the frequency of line crossing of the exposed mice decreased significantly in the OFT compared with the control group. Meanwhile, transitions and the time spent in the lit compartment of the exposed group decreased significantly in the light/dark box test. After 40 days of HSR noise exposure, the concentrations of plasma DA of the exposed group were significantly higher than those of the control group, while the plasma NE and 5-HT concentrations showed no significant difference between the two groups. The behavioral tests indicate that 70 dB (A HSR noise can result in anxiety-like behaviors in mice. The physiological results show that plasma DA is more sensitive to HSR noise compared with NE and 5-HT.

  5. Reconnection in thin current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco; Pucci, Fulvia; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely believed that reconnection is the underlying mechanism of many explosive processes observed both in nature and laboratory, but the question of reconnection speed and initial trigger have remained mysterious. How is fast magnetic energy release triggered in high Lundquist (S) and Reynolds (R) number plasmas?It has been shown that a tearing mode instability can grow on an ideal timescale, i.e., independent from the the Lundquist number, once the current sheet thickness becomes thin enough, or rather the inverse aspect ratio a/L reaches a scale a/L~S-1/3. As such, the latter provides a natural, critical threshold for current sheets that can be formed in nature before they disrupt in a few Alfvén time units. Here we discuss the transition to fast reconnection extended to simple viscous and kinetic models and we propose a possible scenario for the transition to explosive reconnection in high-Lundquist number plasmas, that we support with fully nonlinear numerical MHD simulations of a collapsing current sheet.

  6. The miRNA plasma signature in response to acute aerobic exercise and endurance training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Nielsen

    Full Text Available MiRNAs are potent intracellular posttranscriptional regulators and are also selectively secreted into the circulation in a cell-specific fashion. Global changes in miRNA expression in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training have been reported. Therefore, our aim was to establish the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training. Global miRNA (742 miRNAs measurements were performed as a screening to identify detectable miRNAs in plasma. Using customized qPCR panels we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs detected in the screening procedure (188 miRNAs. We demonstrate a dynamic regulation of circulating miRNA (ci-miRNA levels following 0 hour (miR-106a, miR-221, miR-30b, miR-151-5p, let-7i, miR-146, miR-652 and miR-151-3p, 1 hour (miR-338-3p, miR-330-3p, miR-223, miR-139-5p and miR-143 and 3 hours (miR-1 after an acute exercise bout (P<0.00032. Where ci-miRNAs were all downregulated immediately after an acute exercise bout (0 hour the 1 and 3 hour post exercise timepoints were followed by upregulations. In response to chronic training, we identified seven ci-miRNAs with decreased levels in plasma (miR-342-3p, let-7d, miR-766, miR-25, miR-148a, miR-185 and miR-21 and two miRNAs that were present at higher levels after the training period (miR-103 and miR-107 (P<0.00032. In conclusion, acute exercise and chronic endurance training, likely through specific mechanisms unique to each stimulus, robustly modify the miRNA signature of human plasma.

  7. Influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training on the plasma cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dean E; Johnson, Michael A; McPhilimey, Martin J; Williams, Neil C; Gonzalez, Javier T; Barnett, Yvonne A; Sharpe, Graham R

    2014-04-15

    The influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation (MSVV) is unknown. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of (1) passive rest and (2) MSVV, whereby participants undertook volitional hyperpnea at rest that mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns commensurate with heavy cycling exercise. Plasma cytokines remained unchanged during passive rest. There was a main effect of time (P ventilation and increases in plasma IL-6 concentration. In conclusion, increases in plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations during MSVV were not due to diaphragm fatigue or DNA damage in PBMC. Increases in plasma IL-6 concentration during MSVV are attenuated following IMT, and the plasma IL-6 response is dependent upon the level of respiratory muscle work and minute ventilation.

  8. Altered apolipoprotein A-V expression during the acute phase response is independent of plasma triglyceride levels in mice and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, S.; Schomburg, L.; Renko, K.; Tolle, M.; van der Giet, M.; Tietge, U.J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are altered during the acute phase response (APR). Plasma levels of the recently discovered apolipoprotein AN (apoA-V) are inversely associated with plasma TG. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of apoA-V plasma levels and hepatic apoA-V expression

  9. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  10. Trauma Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Physical Trauma Fact Sheet Physical Trauma Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area ... of physical trauma. Credit: iStock. What is physical trauma? Physical trauma is a serious injury to the ...

  11. Diabetes Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes by losing weight. Related information Fitness and nutrition Heart disease and stroke Obesity and weight loss fact sheet Physical activity fact sheet Pregnancy The javascript used in this widget is not ...

  12. Regulation of germinal center responses, memory B cells and plasma cell formation-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Lynn M; Tarlinton, David M

    2016-04-01

    Progress in understanding humoral immunity has been accelerated by the powerful experimental approaches of genetics, genomics and imaging. Excellent reviews of these advances appeared in 2015 in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cell and T cell lineages in the chicken. Here we provide a contemporary model of B cell differentiation, highlighting recent publications illuminating germinal center (GC), memory B cell and antibody-secreting plasma cell biology. The important contributions of CD4T cells to antibody responses have been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere.

  13. Quantum Effects in Plasma Dielectric Response: Plasmons and Shielding in Normal Systems and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    A brief review of quantum plasma theory and phenomenology in solid-state plasmas is presented here, with attention to dynamic and nonlocal features of dielectric response. Focussing on the random-phase approximation, we discuss the RPA screening and dielectric functions in three, two, and one dimensions corresponding to bulk, quantum well, and quantum wire plasmas, respectively, taking care to distinguish quantum effects from classical ones mandated by the correspondence principle. In particular, we exhibit plasmon dispersion, damping, and static shielding in these various dimensionalities. We also review Landau-quantized magnetoplasma phenomenology, with emphasis on de Haas-van Alphen oscillatory features in intermediate strength magnetic fields and the quantum strong field limit in which only the lowest Landau eigenstate is populated. Graphene is an exceptionally device-friendly material, with a massless relativistic Dirac energy spectrum for electrons and holes. We exhibit its RPA dynamic, nonlocal dielectric function in detail, discussing Graphene plasmons and electromagnetic modes in the THz range, self-energy, fast particle energy loss spectroscopy, atom/van der Waals interaction, and static shielding of impurity scatterers limiting dc transport in Graphene.

  14. Enhancement of photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2 induced by plasma doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sungjin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Guo, L Jay; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-05-27

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides hold promise for making ultrathin-film photovoltaic devices with a combination of excellent photovoltaic performance, superior flexibility, long lifetime, and low manufacturing cost. Engineering the proper band structures of such layered materials is essential to realize such potential. Here, we present a plasma-assisted doping approach for significantly improving the photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2. In this work, we fabricated and characterized photovoltaic devices with a vertically stacked indium tin oxide electrode/multilayer MoS2/metal electrode structure. Utilizing a plasma-induced p-doping approach, we are able to form p-n junctions in MoS2 layers that facilitate the collection of photogenerated carriers, enhance the photovoltages, and decrease reverse dark currents. Using plasma-assisted doping processes, we have demonstrated MoS2-based photovoltaic devices exhibiting very high short-circuit photocurrent density values up to 20.9 mA/cm(2) and reasonably good power-conversion efficiencies up to 2.8% under AM1.5G illumination, as well as high external quantum efficiencies. We believe that this work provides important scientific insights for leveraging the optoelectronic properties of emerging atomically layered two-dimensional materials for photovoltaic and other optoelectronic applications.

  15. Existence of three-dimensional ideal-magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loizu, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Hudson, S. R.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Lazerson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We consider the linear and nonlinear ideal plasma response to a boundary perturbation in a screw pinch. We demonstrate that three-dimensional, ideal-MHD equilibria with continuously nested flux-surfaces and with discontinuous rotational-transform across the resonant rational-surfaces are well defined and can be computed both perturbatively and using fully nonlinear equilibrium calculations. This rescues the possibility of constructing MHD equilibria with current sheets and continuous, smooth pressure profiles. The results predict that, even if the plasma acts as a perfectly conducting fluid, a resonant magnetic perturbation can penetrate all the way into the center of a tokamak without being shielded at the resonant surface.

  16. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear plasma response models for non-axisymmetric perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lao, L. L.; Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Izzo, V. A. [University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Lazarus, E. A.; Hirshman, S. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Park, J.-K.; Lazerson, S.; Reiman, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Cooper, W. A. [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turco, F. [Columbia University, 116th St and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    With the installation of non-axisymmetric coil systems on major tokamaks for the purpose of studying the prospects of ELM-free operation, understanding the plasma response to the applied fields is a crucial issue. Application of different response models, using standard tools, to DIII-D discharges with applied non-axisymmetric fields from internal coils, is shown to yield qualitatively different results. The plasma response can be treated as an initial value problem, following the system dynamically from an initial unperturbed state, or from a nearby perturbed equilibrium approach, and using both linear and nonlinear models [A. D. Turnbull, Nucl. Fusion 52, 054016 (2012)]. Criteria are discussed under which each of the approaches can yield a valid response. In the DIII-D cases studied, these criteria show a breakdown in the linear theory despite the small 10{sup −3} relative magnitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations in this case. For nonlinear dynamical evolution simulations to reach a saturated nonlinear steady state, appropriate damping mechanisms need to be provided for each normal mode comprising the response. Other issues arise in the technical construction of perturbed flux surfaces from a displacement and from the presence of near nullspace normal modes. For the nearby equilibrium approach, in the absence of a full 3D equilibrium reconstruction with a controlled comparison, constraints relating the 2D system profiles to the final profiles in the 3D system also need to be imposed to assure accessibility. The magnetic helicity profile has been proposed as an appropriate input to a 3D equilibrium calculation and tests of this show the anticipated qualitative behavior.

  17. Analysis of the thermal response of plasma facing components during a runaway electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert Cameron

    The generation of runaway electrons during a thermal plasma disruption is a concern for the safe and economical operation of a tokamak power system. Runaway electrons have high energy, 10--300 MeV, and may potentially cause extensive damage to plasma facing components through large temperature increases, melting of metallic components, surface erosion, and possible burnout of coolant tubes. The EPQ code system was developed to simulate the thermal response of plasma facing components to a runaway electron impact. The EPQ code system consists of several parts: UNIX scripts which control the operation of an electron-photon monte carlo code to calculate the interaction of the runaway electrons with the plasma facing materials; a finite difference code to calculate the thermal response, melting, and surface erosion of the materials using the modified heat conduction equation; a code to process, scale, transform, and convert the electron monte carlo data to volumetric heating rates for use in the thermal code; and several minor and auxiliary codes for the manipulation and post-processing of the data. The electron-photon monte carlo code used was the Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS) code, developed and maintained by the National Research Center of Canada. The other codes were written in C++ for this study. The thermal code, called QTTN, solves the two-dimensional cylindrical modified heat conduction equation using the Quickest third-order accurate and stable explicit finite difference method and is capable of tracking melting or surface erosion. The EPQ code system was validated using a series of analytical solutions and simulations of experiments. QTTN and EPQ was verified and validated as able to calculate the temperature distribution, phase change, and surface erosion successfully. EPQ was then employed in a parametric study to simulate a typical runaway electron disruption impact on the FIRE design's plasma facing components. The results of the FIRE parametric study

  18. Plasma kallikrein enhances platelet aggregation response by subthreshold doses of ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaiano, Tatiana F; Andrade, Sheila S; de Oliveira, Cleide; Silva, Mariana C C; Buri, Marcus V; Juliano, Maria A; Girão, Manoel J B C; Sampaio, Misako U; Schmaier, Alvin H; Wlodawer, Alexander; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2017-04-01

    Human plasma kallikrein (huPK) potentiates platelet responses to subthreshold doses of ADP, although huPK itself, does not induce platelet aggregation. In the present investigation, we observe that huPK pretreatment of platelets potentiates ADP-induced platelet activation by prior proteolysis of the G-protein-coupled receptor PAR-1. The potentiation of ADP-induced platelet activation by huPK is mediated by the integrin αIIbβ3 through interactions with the KGD/KGE sequence motif in huPK. Integrin αIIbβ3 is a cofactor for huPK binding to platelets to support PAR-1 hydrolysis that contributes to activation of the ADP signaling pathway. This activation pathway leads to phosphorylation of Src, AktS(473), ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK, and to Ca(2+) release. The effect of huPK is blocked by specific antagonists of PAR-1 (SCH 19197) and αIIbβ3 (abciximab) and by synthetic peptides comprising the KGD and KGE sequence motifs of huPK. Further, recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor, rBbKI, also blocks this entire mechanism. These results suggest a new function for huPK. Formation of plasma kallikrein lowers the threshold for ADP-induced platelet activation. The present observations are consistent with the notion that plasma kallikrein promotes vascular disease and thrombosis in the intravascular compartment and its inhibition may ameliorate cardiovascular disease and thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites predict the response to sulpiride or fluvoxamine in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, N; Yoshimura, R; Shinkai, K; Nakamura, J

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between the changes in plasma catecholamine metabolites obtained from depressed patients before and after administration of sulpiride, a benzamide compound, or fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and between clinical responses to treatment with each of these drugs. Responders to sulpiride had significantly lower plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels before administration of sulpiride than did non-responders or controls (responders: 4.5 +/- 3.1 ng/ml, non-responders: 11.1 +/- 5.9 ng/ml, controls: 10.9 +/- 5.3 ng/ml). Positive relationships were observed between changes in pHVA levels and improvement rates in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D). In contrast, responders to fluvoxamine had significantly higher plasma free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG) levels before administration of fluvoxamine than did non-responders or controls (responders: 8.5 +/- 1.8 ng/ml, non-responders: 5.9 +/- 2.I ng/ml, controls: 5.2 +/- 2.9 ng/ml). Negative relationships were observed between changes in pMHPG levels and improvement rates in Ham-D. These results suggest that lower pretreatment pHVA levels and higher pretreatment levels of pMHPG might be predictors of response to sulpiride and fluvoxamine, respectively, and that sulpiride might produce a functional increase in the dopaminergic system, resulting in improvement in some depressive symptoms; fluvoxamine, on the other hand, might produce a functional decrease in the noradrenergic system via serotonergic neurons, resulting in improvement of those symptoms.

  20. Non-linear modeling of the plasma response to RMPs in ASDEX Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Orain, F; Viezzer, E; Dunne, M; Becoulet, M; Cahyna, P; Huijsmans, G T A; Morales, J; Willensdorfer, M; Suttrop, W; Kirk, A; Pamela, S; Strumberger, E; Guenter, S; Lessig, A

    2016-01-01

    The plasma response to Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in ASDEX Upgrade is modeled with the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, using input profiles that match those of the experiments as closely as possible. The RMP configuration for which Edge Localized Modes are best mitigated in experiments is related to the largest edge kink response observed near the X-point in modeling. On the edge resonant surfaces q = m=n, the coupling between the m + 2 kink component and the m resonant component is found to induce the amplification of the resonant magnetic perturbation. The ergodicity and the 3D-displacement near the X-point induced by the resonant ampli?cation can only partly explain the density pumpout observed in experiments.

  1. The biological response of cells to nanosecond pulsed electric fields is dependent on plasma membrane cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Jody C; Tarango, Melissa; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-11-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated nanopore formation in cell membranes following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We observed differences in sensitivity to nsPEF in both acute membrane injury and 24h lethality across multiple cells lines. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the biological response of cells to nsPEF is dependent on the physical properties of the plasma membrane (PM), including regional cholesterol content. Results presented in this paper show that depletion of membrane cholesterol disrupts the PM and increases the permeability of cells to small molecules, including propidium iodide and calcium occurring after fewer nsPEF. Additionally, cholesterol depletion concurrently decreases the "dose" of nsPEF required to induce lethality. In summary, the results of the current study suggest that the PM cholesterol composition is an important determinant in the cellular response to nsPEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-linear modeling of the plasma response to RMPs in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, F.; Hölzl, M.; Viezzer, E.; Dunne, M.; Bécoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Morales, J.; Willensdorfer, M.; Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Pamela, S.; Günter, S.; Lackner, K.; Strumberger, E.; Lessig, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    The plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in ASDEX Upgrade is modeled with the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, using input profiles that match those of the experiments as closely as possible. The RMP configuration for which edge localized modes are best mitigated in experiments is related to the largest edge kink response observed near the X-point in modeling. On the edge resonant surfaces q  =  m/n, the coupling between the kink component (m  >  nq) and the m resonant component is found to induce the amplification of the resonant magnetic perturbation. The ergodicity and the 3D-displacement near the X-point induced by the resonant amplification can only partly explain the density pumpout observed in experiments.

  3. Response of perennial woody plants to seed treatment by electromagnetic field and low-temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildaziene, Vida; Pauzaite, Giedre; Malakauskiene, Asta; Zukiene, Rasa; Nauciene, Zita; Filatova, Irina; Azharonok, Viktor; Lyushkevich, Veronika

    2016-08-30

    Radiofrequency (5.28 MHz) electromagnetic radiation and low-temperature plasma were applied as short-term (2-15 min) seed treatments to two perennial woody plant species, including Smirnov's rhododendron (Rhododendron smirnowii Trautv.) and black mulberry (Morus nigra L.). Potential effects were evaluated using germination indices and morphometry. The results suggest that treatment with electromagnetic field stimulated germination of freshly harvested R. smirnowii seeds (increased germination percentage up to 70%), but reduced germination of fresh M. nigra seeds (by 24%). Treatment with low-temperature plasma negatively affected germination for R. smirnowii, and positively for M. nigra. The treatment-induced changes in germination depended on seed dormancy state. Longer-term observations revealed that the effects persisted for more than a year; however, even negative effects on germination came out as positive effects on plant morphometric traits over time. Treatments characterized as distressful based on changes in germination and seedling length increased growth of R. smirnowii after 13 months. Specific changes included stem and root branching, as well as increased leaf count and surface area. These findings imply that longer-term patterns of response to seed stressors may be complex, and therefore, commonly used stressor-effects estimates, such as germination rate or seedling morphology, may be insufficient for qualifying stress response. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Plasma Exosomes as Markers of Therapeutic Response in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sook eHong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Exosomes isolated from the plasma of newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients have elevated protein and TGF-β1 contents and inhibit natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity. A potential role of exosomes in predicting responses to chemotherapy (CT was evaluated in AML patients undergoing treatment. Experimental Design: Plasma was obtained from AML patients at diagnosis (n=16; post induction CT (n=9; during consolidation CT (n=10; in long-term remission (LTCR, n=5; and from healthy volunteers (n=7. Exosomes were isolated by exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation. The exosomal protein, soluble TGFβ-1 levels (ELISA and the TGF-β1 profiles (western blots were compared among patients’ cohorts. The results were correlated with the patients’ cytogenetic profile, percentage of leukemic blast and outcome. Results: At diagnosis, protein and TGF-β1 levels were higher (pConclusions: Changes in exosomal protein and/or TGF-β1 content may reflect responses to CT. The exosomal TGF-β1 profile suggests the presence of residual disease in patients considered to have achieved complete remission.

  5. Acute phase response of selenium status and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood plasma before and after total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defi, Irma Ruslina; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Nakazawa, Minato; Shinya, Yanagisawa; Sato, Naoki; Wada, Naoki; Shirakura, Kenji; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Several studies show the consistent results of the decrease in plasma or serum selenium (Se) after surgery, and the change is suggested to be a negative acute phase response of Se to the surgical inflammation. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which is included in the acute phase response proteins, is a selenoenzyme. However, previous studies failed to show any changes in GPx activity before and after surgery. In the present study, we investigated the Se- and selenoenzyme responses that accompany the acute inflammatory reactions during and following major surgery. Patients who underwent elective total knee arthroplasty surgery due to knee osteoarthritis at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Gunma University Hospital in Japan were studied. The plasma Se concentration was determined, and the activity of plasma GPx was measured. C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and white blood cell (WBC) count were also analysed. Increases in the inflammatory biomarkers of CRP and WBC showed inflammatory reactions with the surgery. A significant increase in plasma GPx activity (p production of other series of acute phase proteins, the present results suggest that there is a redistribution of plasma Se to GPx that occurs as an acute phase response, and the source of Se for GPx could be, at least partly, from albumin.

  6. Analysis and Interpretation of the Plasma Dynamic Response to Additional Heating Power using different Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manini, A

    2002-07-01

    development of this work, the Electron Cyclotron Emission system (ECE) of ASDEX Upgrade is crucial since it allows local measurements of the electron temperature with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The analysis and interpretation of perturbative MECH discharges for power deposition localisation using different diagnostics, such as ECE and SXR measurements, are presented. The most important problem is related to the phase locking between the MECH and the sawtooth activity of the plasma, which disturbs both ECE and SXR measurements. Several techniques have been adopted to circumvent this difficulty. In particular, the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and the Generalised Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD) have been tested in both TCV and ASDEX Upgrade discharges. However, both methods are incapable of treating the problem correctly, which leads to potential misinterpretation of the results. A new method based on system identification using the SVD (SI-SVD) is developed and applied. This method, within reasonable limits induced by the assumption of linearity, is capable of simultaneously separating the MECH from the sawtooth contributions to both ECE electron temperature measurements and SXR emission measurements. Such a method is in particular applied to a NBI heated ASDEX Upgrade discharge in which MECH is added in order to analyse electron heat transport in a mostly ion-heated plasma. Since the NBI heating is also partly modulated with short pulses, which coincide with the sawtooth crashes to improve their stability, both the MECH and the NBI deposition profiles are determined. Moreover, treating the signals with the SI-SVD procedure enables a study of the plasma dynamic response also at higher MECH harmonic numbers. The procedure is then used to analyse MECH discharges in TCV using different diagnostics. The profiles determined using the ECE and soft X-ray measurements are compared and interpreted, demonstrating in particular that line integrated soft X

  7. Seasonal effects on plasma cortisol concentrations in the Bedouin buck: circadian studies and response to ACTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, N; Mormede, P; Foury, A; Khammar, F; Amirat, Z

    2017-03-01

    Our work aims at the exploration of cortisol secretion in the Bedouin goat, native to the Algerian Sahara desert, to understand the mechanisms of adaptation to extreme hot climates. In the present study, diurnal and seasonal variations of cortisol concentrations were measured in basal conditions, as well as the response to ACTH stimulation tests across seasons in bucks. The plasma concentrations of cortisol showed no diurnal cycle but a large variation across seasons. The highest levels occurred in summer and winter when the environmental conditions are at their extreme levels. The rectal temperature showed nychthemeral and seasonal variations, and BW was also different across seasons with highest values in summer and lowest in winter. The results obtained after administration of two doses (2 or 10 μg/kg BW) of synthetic ACTH to three different age groups (kids, adults and elderly animals) showed a strong increase in plasma cortisol concentrations under all conditions with maximum levels achieved between 15 and 120 min. The analysis of the area under the cortisol curve showed no significant difference between the responses to the two doses of ACTH and between age groups, but showed seasonal variations with the lowest response in autumn than in other seasons. We conclude that season significantly affects secretion of cortisol in both basal state and under ACTH stimulation. However, the variation of adrenal reactivity to ACTH is not sufficient to explain seasonal differences, and in particular the summer peak in basal circulating cortisol concentrations. Further research should focus on the respective contribution of environmental factors (such as day length, temperature, humidity) and the mechanisms involved in cortisol regulation.

  8. An investigation of plasma and salivary oxytocin responses in breast- and formula-feeding mothers of infants

    OpenAIRE

    Grewen, Karen M.; DAVENPORT, RUSSELL E.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2010-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a peptide increasingly studied in relation to human social interactions, affiliation, and clinical disorders. Studies are constrained by use of invasive blood draws and would benefit from a reliable salivary OT assay. Our goals were to examine feasibility of salivary OT measurement, compare salivary to plasma OT responses in 12 breast- and 8 formula-feeding mothers, and assess the degree of correlation between plasma and salivary OT. Using a commercial EIA kit, we measured OT...

  9. Association between plasma antibody response and protection in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss immersion vaccinated against Yersinia ruckeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Martin Kristian; Nylén, Jørgen; Holten-Andersen, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    in Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers a high degree of protection to the fish. The immune mechanisms responsible for protection may comprise both cellular and humoral elements but the role of specific immunoglobulins in this system has been questioned and not previously described. The present study....... A significant increase in titers was recorded in vaccinated fish, which also showed a reduced bacteremia during challenge. In vitro plasma studies showed a significantly increased bactericidal effect of fresh plasma from vaccinated fish indicating that plasma proteins may play a role in protection of vaccinated...

  10. 浅水岸壁条件下脉冲荷载引起的粘弹性浮冰层位移响应%Displacement response of viscoelastic floating ice sheet subjected to impulse load under different bank conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿飞飞; 张志宏; 胡明勇; 刘巨斌

    2015-01-01

    建立脉冲荷载作用下粘弹性浮冰层位移响应理论模型,在将浅水岸壁简化为缓坡、陡坡岸壁两种情况下,基于 Fourier,Laplace,Hankel 变换结合方法对该理论模型积分、数值计算。通过与均匀水深计算结果比较,验证理论模型及计算方法的正确性。分析脉冲荷载作用下水深、冰厚、岸壁斜度等参数对浮冰层位移响应影响。结果表明,水深增加时冰层位移响应幅值随之增加,但增加趋势变缓;冰层厚度减小时其位移响应幅值呈非线性大幅增长;岸壁斜度增加时冰层位移响应幅值增加,振动频率加快。浅水岸壁的存在及斜度增加可引起冰-水系统振动能量累积,使脉冲荷载能激励更大冰层变形响应。%A theoretical model for displacement response of viscoelastic floating ice sheet subjected to impulse load was established,and it was solved by Fourier,Laplace and Hankel integrated transform method under both the gentle and steep bank conditions.By comparing with the computational result under the uniform water depth assumption,the established theoretical model and calculation method were validated.The influences of depth of water,thickness of ice sheet,slope of bank on the displacement response of floating ice sheet under impulse load were analyzed.These calculated results show that when the water depth increases,the amplitude of displacement response of ice sheet increases simultaneously,but the variation trend slows down gradually.When the thickness of ice sheet decreases,the amplitude of displacement response of ice sheet will grow with a sharp and nonlinear performance.When the slope of bank increases, the amplitude and vibration frequency of displacement response of ice sheet will increase.Due to the existence of bank and increase of slope,the vibration energy will accumulate in ice and water system,which can excite greater deformation response of ice sheet.

  11. Analysis and Interpretation of the Plasma Dynamic Response to Additional Heating Power using different Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manini, A

    2002-07-01

    development of this work, the Electron Cyclotron Emission system (ECE) of ASDEX Upgrade is crucial since it allows local measurements of the electron temperature with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The analysis and interpretation of perturbative MECH discharges for power deposition localisation using different diagnostics, such as ECE and SXR measurements, are presented. The most important problem is related to the phase locking between the MECH and the sawtooth activity of the plasma, which disturbs both ECE and SXR measurements. Several techniques have been adopted to circumvent this difficulty. In particular, the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and the Generalised Singular Value Decomposition (GSVD) have been tested in both TCV and ASDEX Upgrade discharges. However, both methods are incapable of treating the problem correctly, which leads to potential misinterpretation of the results. A new method based on system identification using the SVD (SI-SVD) is developed and applied. This method, within reasonable limits induced by the assumption of linearity, is capable of simultaneously separating the MECH from the sawtooth contributions to both ECE electron temperature measurements and SXR emission measurements. Such a method is in particular applied to a NBI heated ASDEX Upgrade discharge in which MECH is added in order to analyse electron heat transport in a mostly ion-heated plasma. Since the NBI heating is also partly modulated with short pulses, which coincide with the sawtooth crashes to improve their stability, both the MECH and the NBI deposition profiles are determined. Moreover, treating the signals with the SI-SVD procedure enables a study of the plasma dynamic response also at higher MECH harmonic numbers. The procedure is then used to analyse MECH discharges in TCV using different diagnostics. The profiles determined using the ECE and soft X-ray measurements are compared and interpreted, demonstrating in particular that line integrated soft X

  12. Plasma glucose response and glycemic indices in pigs fed diets differing in in vitro hydrolysis indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuberti, G; Gallo, A; Masoero, F

    2012-07-01

    Different dietary starch sources can have a great impact in determining starch digestion potential, thus influencing the postprandial blood glucose response. Our objectives were to define: (i) the incremental plasma glucose response in pigs fed diets containing various sources of starch differing in in vitro digestion patterns, (ii) the in vivo glycemic index (GI) values for the same diets, (iii) the possible relationship between in vitro and in vivo data. Diets, formulated with 70% of starch from five heterogeneous sources, were characterized in depth by using two distinct in vitro evaluations. The first one was based on the Englyst-assay for nutritional classification of starch fractions, whereas the second one was based on a time-course multi-enzymatic assay up to 180 min from which the hydrolysis indices (HIs) were calculated and used as a link between the physicochemical properties of starch from diets and the in vivo responses. For the in vivo study, five jugular-catheterized pigs (35.3 ± 1.1 kg body weight) were fed one of the five diets for 6-day periods in a 5 × 5 Latin square design. On day 5, blood was collected for 8 h postprandially for evaluating glucose appearance. On day 6, blood was collected for 3 h postprandially for the estimation of the GI. Starchy diets differed for rapidly digestible starch (from 8.6% to 79.8% of total starch (TS)) and resistant starch contents (from 72.5% to 4.5% of TS). Wide between-diets variations were recorded for all the kinetic parameters and for the HI calculated from the in vitro digestion curves (P < 0.05). On the basis of the obtained HI, diets contained starch with a very low to a very high in vitro digestion potential (ranging from 26.7% to 100.0%; P < 0.05). The glucose response differed among diets (P < 0.05), with marked differences between 15 and 120 min postprandial. Overall, the ranking of incremental glucose appearance among diets agreed with their in vitro HI classification: high HI diets increased

  13. Ice sheet hydrology - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter; Naeslund, Jens-Ove [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Rodhe, Lars [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    This report summarizes the theoretical knowledge on water flow in and beneath glaciers and ice sheets and how these theories are applied in models to simulate the hydrology of ice sheets. The purpose is to present the state of knowledge and, perhaps more importantly, identify the gaps in our understanding of ice sheet hydrology. Many general concepts in hydrology and hydraulics are applicable to water flow in glaciers. However, the unique situation of having the liquid phase flowing in conduits of the solid phase of the same material, water, is not a commonly occurring phenomena. This situation means that the heat exchange between the phases and the resulting phase changes also have to be accounted for in the analysis. The fact that the solidus in the pressure-temperature dependent phase diagram of water has a negative slope provides further complications. Ice can thus melt or freeze from both temperature and pressure variations or variations in both. In order to provide details of the current understanding of water flow in conjunction with deforming ice and to provide understanding for the development of ideas and models, emphasis has been put on the mathematical treatments, which are reproduced in detail. Qualitative results corroborating theory or, perhaps more often, questioning the simplifications made in theory, are also given. The overarching problem with our knowledge of glacier hydrology is the gap between the local theories of processes and the general flow of water in glaciers and ice sheets. Water is often channelized in non-stationary conduits through the ice, features which due to their minute size relative to the size of glaciers and ice sheets are difficult to incorporate in spatially larger models. Since the dynamic response of ice sheets to global warming is becoming a key issue in, e.g. sea-level change studies, the problems of the coupling between the hydrology of an ice sheet and its dynamics is steadily gaining interest. New work is emerging

  14. Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of fast-electron transport with hydrodynamic plasma response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Ridgers, C P; Evans, R G, E-mail: rj.kingham@imperial.ac.u [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    We report on kinetic simulations of the transport of laser-produced relativistic electron beams (REB) through solid-density plasma, including the hydrodynamic response of the plasma. We consider REBs with parameters relevant to fast-ignition of compressed inertial confinement fusion capsules. We show that over the 10-20ps timescales required for fast-ignition, thermal pressure (from Ohmic heating) can significantly modify the density which in turn strongly affects the propagation of injected fast-electrons; it allows them to re-collimate into a narrow, intense beam under conditions where they initially undergo beam-hollowing. Similar static-density calculations do not show re-collimation. The re-collimation effect is attributed to PdV cooling in the pressure-induced density-channel, which in turn suppresses defocusing magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients. These simulations have been carried out using the new 2D-3V Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code FIDO running in hybrid mode.

  15. Ionospheric Plasma Response to M w 8.3 Chile Illapel Earthquake on September 16, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C. D.; Shrivastava, Mahesh N.; Seemala, Gopi K.; González, Gabriel; Baez, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The lithosphere and the atmosphere/ionosphere continuously exchange energy through various coupling mechanisms. In particular, the earth surface displacement caused by earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis can manifest as ionospheric plasma perturbations. We investigate the coseismic induced ionospheric total electron content (TEC) perturbations following the M w 8.3 Illapel thrust earthquake that occurred on September 16, 2015. The continuous global positioning system (GPS) data at 48 sites from Centro Sismológico Nacional and International GNSS Service GPS networks have been used in this study. The nearest GPS site recorded the ionospheric response 10 min after the occurrence of this earthquake. The maximum vertical coseismic induced TEC amplitude is ~1.4 TECU, and the perturbations are pronounced in the northern region of the epicenter and confined to less than ~1500 km radius. The average horizontal acoustic wave velocity has been determined as ~1260 m/s. We also observed acoustic resonance recorded by PRN 12 at 4.3 mHz corresponding to the first overtone of acoustic mode and lasting for about 30 min. In this study, we present characteristics of GPS derived ionospheric plasma perturbations following Illapel earthquake.

  16. Muscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hody, S; Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Wang, F; Croisier, J-L

    2013-08-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized lengthening contractions has been well described, the reasons underlying this phenomenon have not yet been understood. Therefore, this study investigated a possible correlation of the changes in muscle damage indirect markers after an eccentric exercise with the decline in muscle performance during the exercise. Twenty-seven healthy untrained male subjects performed three sets of 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. The muscular work was recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer to assess muscle fatigue by means of various fatigue indices. Plasma CK activity, muscle soreness, and stiffness were measured before (pre) and one day after (post) exercise. The eccentric exercise bout induced significant changes of the three muscle damage indirect markers. Large inter-subject variability was observed for all criteria measured. More interestingly, the log (CK(post) /CK(pre)) and muscle stiffness appeared to be closely correlated with the relative work decrease (r = 0.84, r(2)  = 0.70 and r = 0.75, r(2)  = 0.56, respectively). This is the first study to propose that the muscle fatigue profile during maximal eccentric protocol could predict the magnitude of the symptoms associated with muscle damage in humans.

  17. Renal responses to plasma volume expansion and hyperosmolality in fasting seal pups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2002-01-01

    Renal responses were quantified in northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups during their postweaning fast to examine their excretory capabilities. Pups were infused with either isotonic (0.9%; n = 8; Iso) or hypertonic (16.7%; n = 7; Hyper) saline via an indwelling catheter such that each pup received 3 mmol NaCl/kg. Diuresis after the infusions was similar in magnitude between the two treatments. Osmotic clearance increased by 37% in Iso and 252% in Hyper. Free water clearance was reduced 3.4-fold in Hyper but was not significantly altered in Iso. Glomerular filtration rate increased 71% in the 24-h period after Hyper, but no net change occurred during the same time after Iso. Natriuresis increased 3.6-fold in Iso and 5.3-fold in Hyper. Iso decreased plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) and cortisol acutely, whereas Hyper increased plasma and excreted AVP and cortisol. Iso was accompanied by the retention of water and electrolytes, whereas the Hyper load was excreted within 24 h. Natriuresis is attributed to increased filtration and is independent of an increase in atrial natriuretic peptide and decreases in ANG II and aldosterone. Fasting pups appear to have well-developed kidneys capable of both extreme conservation and excretion of Na(+).

  18. Ice flow Modelling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Tangaa

    simulations of the Greenland ice sheet using ice sheet models offers the possibility of deriving reconstructions of past ice sheet topography, flow and extent, consistent with the dynamics of ice flow and the imposed climate forcing. The large-scale response of the ice sheet modelled by such approaches can...... core derived temperature and precipitation histories have a long history of being used in studies of the past evolution of the Greenland ice sheet, acting as climatic forcing of the ice sheet models. However, the conversion from the isotopic records to past temperatures remain challenging, owing...... to both uncertain processes and depositional histories. Using five different temperature reconstructions derived from isotope records of Greenlandic ice cores, the influence of the paleo records on the simulated ice sheet was investigated using a high-resolution, large-scale ice sheet model (PISM...

  19. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-10-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time.

  20. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Plasma Membrane-associated Proteins in Response to Chitooligosaccharide Elicitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chen; Qun Li; Zuhua He

    2007-01-01

    Chitooligomers or chitooligosaccharides (COS) are elicitors that bind to the plasma membrane (PM) and elicit various defense responses. However, the PM-bound proteins involved in elicitor-mediated plant defense responses still remain widely unknown. In order to get more information about PM proteins involved in rice defense responses, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells elicited by COS. A total of 14 up- or down-regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 h and 24 h after COS incubation. Of them, eight protein spots were successfully identified by MS (mass spectrography) and predicted to be associated to the PM and function in plant defense, including a putative PKN/PRK1 protein kinase, a putative pyruvate kinase isozyme G, a putative zinc finger protein, a putative MAR-binding protein MFP1, and a putative calcium-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, a COS-induced pM5-like protein was identified for the first time in plants, which is a trans-membrane nodal modulator in transforming growth factor-β(TGFβ) signaling in vertebrates. We also identified two members of a rice polyprotein family, which were up-regulated by COS. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice basal defense.

  2. Fluctuation dynamics in reconnecting current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki; Klinger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a highly localized current sheet forms at the boundary between opposed magnetic fields. Its steep perpendicular gradients and fast parallel drifts can give rise to a range of instabilities which can contribute to the overall reconnection dynamics. In two complementary laboratory reconnection experiments, MRX (PPPL, Princeton) and VINETA.II (IPP, Greifswald, Germany), magnetic fluctuations are observed within the current sheet. Despite the large differences in geometries (toroidal vs. linear), plasma parameters (high vs. low beta) and magnetic configuration (low vs. high magnetic guide field), similar broadband fluctuation characteristics are observed in both experiments. These are identified as Whistler-like fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range that propagate along the current sheet in the electron drift direction. They are intrinsic to the localized current sheet and largely independent of the slower reconnection dynamics. This contribution characterizes these magnetic fluctuations within the wide parameter range accessible by both experiments. Specifically, the fluctuation spectra and wave dispersion are characterized with respect to the magnetic topology and plasma parameters of the reconnecting current sheet.

  3. Local structure of the magnetotail current sheet: 2001 Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Runov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty rapid crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by the Cluster spacecraft during July-October 2001 at a geocentric distance of 19 RE are examined in detail to address the structure of the current sheet. We use four-point magnetic field measurements to estimate electric current density; the current sheet spatial scale is estimated by integration of the translation velocity calculated from the magnetic field temporal and spatial derivatives. The local normal-related coordinate system for each case is defined by the combining Minimum Variance Analysis (MVA and the curlometer technique. Numerical parameters characterizing the plasma sheet conditions for these crossings are provided to facilitate future comparisons with theoretical models. Three types of current sheet distributions are distinguished: center-peaked (type I, bifurcated (type II and asymmetric (type III sheets. Comparison to plasma parameter distributions show that practically all cases display non-Harris-type behavior, i.e. interior current peaks are embedded into a thicker plasma sheet. The asymmetric sheets with an off-equatorial current density peak most likely have a transient nature. The ion contribution to the electric current rarely agrees with the current computed using the curlometer technique, indicating that either the electron contribution to the current is strong and variable, or the current density is spatially or temporally structured.

  4. Inflammatory response in chronic degenerative endometritis mares treated with platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reghini, Maria Fernanda S; Ramires Neto, Carlos; Segabinazzi, Lorenzo G; Castro Chaves, Maria Manoela B; Dell'Aqua, Camila de Paula F; Bussiere, Maria Clara C; Dell'Aqua, José Antonio; Papa, Frederico O; Alvarenga, Marco Antonio

    2016-07-15

    Degenerative changes of the endometrium are directly related to age and fertility in mares. Chronic degenerative endometritis (CDE) is correlated with uterine fluid retention and reduced ability to clear uterine inflammation. Recent research in the areas of equine surgery and sports medicine has shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment acts as an immunomodulator of the inflammatory response. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if the uterine infusion of PRP could modulate the local inflammatory response and modify the intrauterine NO concentrations after artificial insemination (AI) in both normal mares and those with CDE. Thirteen mares with endometrium classified as grade III on the histology (mares with CDE) and eight mares with endometrial histological classification I or II-a normal mares were selected to investigate the effect of PRP therapy. The mares were inseminated with fresh semen in two consecutive cycles in a crossover study design. Thereby, each mare served as its own control and the treatment was performed with intrauterine PRP infusion four hours after AI. The percentage of neutrophils in uterine cytology (CIT, %), uterine fluid accumulation observed on ultrasonography (FLU, mm) and nitric oxide concentration of uterine fluid (NO, μM) were analyzed before and 24 hours after AI. The results reported that mares with CDE (CIT, 68.3 ± 3.27, FLU, 10.7 ± 1.61) have a higher (P inflammatory response after AI than normal mares (CIT, 24.4 ± 3.56, FLU, 0), but NO concentrations did not differ (P > 0.05) between categories of mares. In treated cycles with PRP, the intrauterine inflammatory response decrease (P inflammatory response to semen in mares with CDE but did not reduce NO concentrations in intrauterine fluid.

  5. Relationship between plasma concentrations of the l-enantiomer of methadone and response to methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meini, Milo; Moncini, Marco; Daini, Laura; Giarratana, Tania; Scaramelli, Daniela; Chericoni, Silvio; Stefanelli, Fabio; Rucci, Paola

    2015-08-05

    This study evaluated the relationship between the plasma concentration of l-methadone and response to methadone in real-world patients, in order to identify a minimum plasma concentration above which methadone treatment is effective. Ninety-four patients with opioid dependence under maintenance methadone treatment were consecutively recruited. Response was defined as negative urine analyses in the three weeks prior to the blood sampling. The percentage of participants with a plasma l-methadone concentration between 100 and 250 ng/ml was 54.2% among those with a methadone dosage ≥60 mg/day. Plasma l-methadone concentrations were significantly higher in patients with negative urine analyses compared with those with positive urine analyses (median 93 vs. 77 ng/ml, Mann-Whitney test, Pmethadone concentrations of 200 ng/ml no heroin use was reported and urine analyses were negative. Moreover, above concentrations of 250 ng/ml craving was absent. Examination of demographic correlates of treatment outcome indicated that older age, a stable job and being married were protective against the use of heroin. Mean plasma l-methadone concentration was significantly lower in patients who used cannabis compared with those who did not use cannabis, after adjusting for methadone dosage. In conclusion our results identify specific cut-offs for plasma l-methadone concentrations about which therapeutic response is observed and provide new evidence that therapeutic response is associated with patient׳s demographic characteristics. This underscores the need to monitor plasma methadone concentrations as part of Drug Addiction Services routine practice, in order to provide an objective framework for changing the methadone dosage.

  6. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 01: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: Building a successful program to engage property owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    In the course of work as a land manager, you will no doubt be involved in developing programs to achieve various objectives, including the improvement of fuels management on private lands. This fact sheet describes six steps that will help you plan and conduct a successful program.

  7. Radiating Current Sheets in the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    An MHD model of a Hydrogen plasma with flow, an energy equation, NLTE ionization and radiative cooling, and an Ohm's law with anisotropic electrical conduction and thermoelectric effects is used to self-consistently generate atmospheric layers over a $50$ km height range. A subset of these solutions contain current sheets, and have properties similar to those of the lower and middle chromosphere. The magnetic field profiles are found to be close to Harris sheet profiles, with maximum field strengths $\\sim 25-150$ G. The radiative flux $F_R$ emitted by individual sheets is $\\sim 4.9 \\times 10^5 - 4.5 \\times 10^6$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$, to be compared with the observed chromospheric emission rate of $\\sim 10^7$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$. Essentially all emission is from regions with thicknesses $\\sim 0.5 - 13$ km containing the neutral sheet. About half of $F_R$ comes from sub-regions with thicknesses 10 times smaller. A resolution $\\lesssim 5-130$ m is needed to resolve the properties of the sheets. The sheets...

  8. Energy-dispersed ions in the plasma sheet boundary layer and associated phenomena: Ion heating, electron acceleration, Alfvén waves, broadband waves, perpendicular electric field spikes, and auroral emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent Cluster studies reported properties of multiple energy-dispersed ion structures in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL that showed substructure with several well separated ion beamlets, covering energies from 3 keV up to 100 keV (Keiling et al., 2004a, b. Here we report observations from two PSBL crossings, which show a number of identified one-to-one correlations between this beamlet substructure and several plasma-field characteristics: (a bimodal ion conics (<1 keV, (b field-aligned electron flow (<1 keV, (c perpendicular electric field spikes (~20 mV/m, (d broadband electrostatic ELF wave packets (<12.5 Hz, and (e enhanced broadband electromagnetic waves (<4 kHz. The one-to-one correlations strongly suggest that these phenomena were energetically driven by the ion beamlets, also noting that the energy flux of the ion beamlets was 1–2 orders of magnitude larger than, for example, the energy flux of the ion outflow. In addition, several more loosely associated correspondences were observed within the extended region containing the beamlets: (f electrostatic waves (BEN (up to 4 kHz, (g traveling and standing ULF Alfvén waves, (h field-aligned currents (FAC, and (i auroral emissions on conjugate magnetic field lines. Possible generation scenarios for these phenomena are discussed. In conclusion, it is argued that the free energy of magnetotail ion beamlets drove a variety of phenomena and that the spatial fine structure of the beamlets dictated the locations of where some of these phenomena occurred. This emphasizes the notion that PSBL ion beams are important for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. However, it is also shown that the dissipation of electromagnetic energy flux (at altitudes below Cluster of the simultaneously occurring Alfvén waves and FAC was larger (FAC being the largest than the dissipation of beam kinetic energy flux, and thus these two energy carriers contributed more to the energy transport on PSBL field lines

  9. An investigation of plasma and salivary oxytocin responses in breast- and formula-feeding mothers of infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewen, Karen M; Davenport, Russell E; Light, Kathleen C

    2010-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a peptide increasingly studied in relation to human social interactions, affiliation, and clinical disorders. Studies are constrained by use of invasive blood draws and would benefit from a reliable salivary OT assay. Our goals were to examine feasibility of salivary OT measurement, compare salivary to plasma OT responses in 12 breast- and 8 formula-feeding mothers, and assess the degree of correlation between plasma and salivary OT. Using a commercial EIA kit, we measured OT in 5 saliva and 7 plasma samples in a protocol designed to elicit changes in OT (Rest, Infant Interaction, Stress, Feeding). Breast-feeders had higher OT levels than formula-feeders across all conditions in plasma (+36%) and saliva (+23%). OT levels and ranges were similar in saliva and plasma, with slightly greater variance in saliva. Concurrently sampled plasma and salivary OT were correlated at end of Baseline Rest (r=+.59, p=.022) and Post-Stress Recovery (r=+.59, p=.025). These data suggest that salivary OT assay is feasible, and will be of value where plasma samples are not possible. Validation with larger samples is needed.

  10. Reduction in plasma cell proliferation after initial therapy in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma measures treatment response and predicts improved survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jeremy T; Chee, Cheng E; Lust, John A; Greipp, Philip R; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2011-09-08

    Standard myeloma treatment response criteria are determined principally by changes in the monoclonal protein. Reduction in the size of the proliferative component of malignant plasma cells may be an additional metric of assessing response to therapy. We retrospectively analyzed 176 patients with newly diagnosed myeloma with a measurable plasma cell labeling index (PCLI) at diagnosis and repeat measurement 4 months after initiation of therapy. PCLI response was defined as a ≥ 60% reduction. Baseline PCLI is an independent prognostic factor; therefore, we categorized patients into 3 groups: PCLI ≥ 3% (high), ≥ 1% (intermediate), and compared with 29 months in nonresponders (P = .02). Improved median overall survival with PCLI response occurred in the high initial PCLI group (28 vs 7 months; P = .003) and intermediate group (64 vs 24 months; P = .002). The application of PCLI response and serum M-spike response together provided further prognostic information. On multivariate analysis, the prognostic value of PCLI response was independent of β(2)-microglobulin, elevated creatinine, serum M-spike response, and baseline PCLI. We conclude that a significant reduction in plasma cell proliferation in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma is an important predictor of survival.

  11. Effects of Adiposity on Plasma Lipid Response to Reductions in Dietary Saturated Fatty Acids and Cholesterol1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Michael R.; Green, Michael H.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary SFA and cholesterol are major targets for reducing plasma total and LDL cholesterol as a strategy to decrease cardiovascular disease risk. However, many studies show that excess adiposity attenuates the expected lipid and lipoprotein response to a plasma cholesterol–lowering diet. Diets low in SFA and cholesterol are less effective in improving the lipid profile in obese individuals and in patients with metabolic syndrome. In contrast, lean persons are more responsive to reductions in dietary SFA and cholesterol. Multiple mechanisms likely contribute to the altered plasma lipid responses to dietary changes in individuals with excess adiposity. The greater rate of hepatic cholesterol synthesis in obese individuals suppresses the expression of hepatic LDL receptors (LDLR), thereby reducing hepatic LDL uptake. Insulin resistance develops as a result of adipose-tissue induced inflammation, causing significant changes in enzymes necessary for normal lipid metabolism. In addition, the LDLR-mediated uptake in obesity is attenuated by alterations in neuroendocrine regulation of hormonal secretions (e.g. growth hormone, thyroid hormone, and cortisol) as well as the unique gut microbiota, the latter of which appears to affect lipid absorption. Reducing adipose tissue mass, especially from the abdominal region, is an effective strategy to improve the lipid response to dietary interventions by reducing inflammation, enhancing insulin sensitivity, and improving LDLR binding. Thus, normalizing adipose tissue mass is an important goal for maximizing the diet response to a plasma cholesterol–lowering diet. PMID:22332058

  12. Thin current sheets in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkinen, T.I. (Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Baker, D.N.; Owen, C.J. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Gosling, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Murphy, N. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1993-11-19

    The ISEE-3 magnetic field and plasma electron data from Jan-March 1983 have been searched to study thin current sheets in the deep tail region. 33 events were selected where the spacecraft crossed through the current sheet from lobe to lobe within 15 minutes. The average thickness of the observed current sheets was 2.45R[sub E], and in 24 cases the current sheet was thinner than 3.0R[sub E]; 6 very thin current sheets (thickness [lambda] < 0.5R[sub E]) were found. The electron data show that the very thin current sheets are associated with considerable temperature anisotropy. On average, the electron gradient current was [approximately]17% of the total current, whereas the current arising from the electron temperature anisotropy varied between 8-45% of the total current determined from the lobe field magnitude. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  13. History of the Greenland Ice Sheet: paleoclimatic insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John Thomas; Brigham-Grette, Julia;

    2010-01-01

    -sheet changes. In contrast, there are no documented major ice-sheet changes that occurred independent of temperature changes. Moreover, snowfall has increased when the climate warmed, but the ice sheet lost mass nonetheless; increased accumulation in the ice sheet's center has not been sufficient to counteract......Paleoclimatic records show that the Greenland Ice Sheet consistently has lost mass in response to warming, and grown in response to cooling. Such changes have occurred even at times of slow or zero sea-level change, so changing sea level cannot have been the cause of at least some of the ice...... increased melting and flow near the edges. Most documented forcings and ice-sheet responses spanned periods of several thousand years, but limited data also show rapid response to rapid forcings. In particular, regions near the ice margin have responded within decades. However, major changes of central...

  14. History of the Greenland Ice Sheet: paleoclimatic insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John Thomas; Brigham-Grette, Julia

    2010-01-01

    increased melting and flow near the edges. Most documented forcings and ice-sheet responses spanned periods of several thousand years, but limited data also show rapid response to rapid forcings. In particular, regions near the ice margin have responded within decades. However, major changes of central......Paleoclimatic records show that the Greenland Ice Sheet consistently has lost mass in response to warming, and grown in response to cooling. Such changes have occurred even at times of slow or zero sea-level change, so changing sea level cannot have been the cause of at least some of the ice......-sheet changes. In contrast, there are no documented major ice-sheet changes that occurred independent of temperature changes. Moreover, snowfall has increased when the climate warmed, but the ice sheet lost mass nonetheless; increased accumulation in the ice sheet's center has not been sufficient to counteract...

  15. Sea-level response to melting of Antarctic ice shelves on multi-centennial timescales with the fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet model (f.ETISh v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The magnitude of the Antarctic ice sheet's contribution to global sea-level rise is dominated by the potential of its marine sectors to become unstable and collapse as a response to ocean (and atmospheric) forcing. This paper presents Antarctic sea-level response to sudden atmospheric and oceanic forcings on multi-centennial timescales with the newly developed fast Elementary Thermomechanical Ice Sheet (f.ETISh) model. The f.ETISh model is a vertically integrated hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf model with vertically integrated thermomechanical coupling, making the model two-dimensional. Its marine boundary is represented by two different flux conditions, coherent with power-law basal sliding and Coulomb basal friction. The model has been compared to existing benchmarks. Modelled Antarctic ice sheet response to forcing is dominated by sub-ice shelf melt and the sensitivity is highly dependent on basal conditions at the grounding line. Coulomb friction in the grounding-line transition zone leads to significantly higher mass loss in both West and East Antarctica on centennial timescales, leading to 1.5 m sea-level rise after 500 years for a limited melt scenario of 10 m a-1 under freely floating ice shelves, up to 6 m for a 50 m a-1 scenario. The higher sensitivity is attributed to higher ice fluxes at the grounding line due to vanishing effective pressure. Removing the ice shelves altogether results in a disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet and (partially) marine basins in East Antarctica. After 500 years, this leads to a 5 m and a 16 m sea-level rise for the power-law basal sliding and Coulomb friction conditions at the grounding line, respectively. The latter value agrees with simulations by DeConto and Pollard (2016) over a similar period (but with different forcing and including processes of hydrofracturing and cliff failure). The chosen parametrizations make model results largely independent of spatial resolution so that f.ETISh can potentially be

  16. Thermoforming of foam sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; Pronk, Ruud M.

    1997-01-01

    Thermoforming is a widely used process for the manufacture of foam sheet products. Polystyrene foam food trays for instance can be produced by first heating the thermoplastic foam sheet, causing the gas contained to build up pressure and expand, after which a vacuum pressure can be applied to draw t

  17. Response of the magnetic field and plasmas at the geosynchronous orbit to interplanetary shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Chao; ZONG QiuGang; WANG YongFu

    2009-01-01

    Interplanetary shock can greatly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere,causing the temporal and spatial changes of the magnetic field and plasmas at the geosynchronous orbit.In this paper,we use the magnetic field data of GOES satellites from 1997 to 2007 and the plasma data of MPA on the LANL satellites from 1997 to 2004 to study the properties of magnetic field and plasma (0.03-45 keV) at the geosynchronous orbit (6.6 R_E) within 3 hours before and after the arrival of shock front at the geosynchronous orbit through both case study and superposed epoch analysis.It is found that following the arrival of shock front at the geosynchronous orbit,the magnetic field magnitude,as well as GSM B_z component increases significantly on the dayside (8-16 LT),while the By component has almost no change before and after shock impacts.In response to the interplanetary shock,the proton becomes much denser with a peak number density of 1.2 cm~(-3),compared to the typical number density of 0.7 cm~(-3).The proton temperature increases sharply,predominantly on the dusk and night side.The electron,density increases dramatically on the night side with a peak number density of 2.0 cm~(-3).The inferred ionospheric O~+ density after the interplanetary shock impact reaches the maximum value of 1.2 cm~(-3) on the dusk side and exhibits the clear dawn-dusk asymmetry.The peak of the anisotropy of proton's temperature is located at the noon sector,and the anisotropy decreases towards the dawn and dusk side.The minimum of temperature anisotropy is on the night side.It is suggested that the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave and whistler wave can be stimulated by the proton and electron temperature anisotropy respectively.The computed electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave (EMIC) intense on the day side (8-16 LT) with a frequency value of 0.8 Hz,and the wave intensity decreases towards the dawn and dusk side,the minimum value can be found on the night side.The computed electron

  18. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  19. Ingestion of protein hydrolysate and amino acid-carbohydrate mixtures increases postexercise plasma insulin responses in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.J.C. van; Kruijshoop, M.; Verhagen, H.; Saris, W.H.M.; Wagenmakers, A.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    To optimize the postexercise insulin response and to increase plasma amino acid availability, we studied postexercise insulin levels after the ingestion of carbohydrate and wheat protein hydrolysate with and without free leucine and phenylalanine. After an overnight fast, eight male cyclists visited

  20. Plasma response measurements of external magnetic perturbations using electron cyclotron emission and comparisons to 3D ideal MHD equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Denk, S. S.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Vanovac, B.; Brida, D.; Cavedon, M.; Classen, I.; Dunne, M.; Fietz, S.; Fischer, R.; Kirk, A.; Laggner, F. M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Odstrcil, T.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; Zohm, H.; Luhmann, I. C.; ASDEX Upgrade team,; EUROfusion MST1 Team,

    2016-01-01

    The plasma response from an external n = 2 magnetic perturbation field in ASDEX Upgrade has been measured using mainly electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics and a rigid rotating field. To interpret ECE and ECE-imaging (ECE-I) measurements accurately, forward modeling of the radiation

  1. Changes in plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists in response to adrenaline infusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Ostrowski, K.; Ullum, H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of adrenaline in the response of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonists (ra) to extreme physiological conditions such as trauma and exercise, we examined the concentrations in the plasma of these cytokines during an adrenaline infusion. Given the fact th...

  2. Ingestion of protein hydrolysate and amino acid-carbohydrate mixtures increases postexercise plasma insulin responses in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.J.C. van; Kruijshoop, M.; Verhagen, H.; Saris, W.H.M.; Wagenmakers, A.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    To optimize the postexercise insulin response and to increase plasma amino acid availability, we studied postexercise insulin levels after the ingestion of carbohydrate and wheat protein hydrolysate with and without free leucine and phenylalanine. After an overnight fast, eight male cyclists visited

  3. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part II: Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Gianfranco; Raffray, A. René

    1997-04-01

    The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the variuos ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness.

  4. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  5. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Mayo, E-mail: yokoyama@plasma.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: kohei@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Sato, Takehiko, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN

  6. Plasma C-type natriuretic peptide as a predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    Full Text Available POTS is a global public-health disease, but predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with POTS is lacking. This study was designed to investigate predictive value of plasma C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP in the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS in children. Totally 34 children with POTS and 27 healthy children were included in the study. The head-up test or head-up tilt test was used to check heart rate and blood pressure from supine to upright in subjects. A double antibody (competitive sandwich immunoluminometric assay was used to detect plasma CNP. Metoprolol was used to treat children with POTS. The difference in plasma concentrations of CNP between responders and non-responders was compared. An ROC curve was used to analyze plasma CNP to predict efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children. Plasma CNP in children with POTS was significantly higher than that of healthy children [(51.9 ± 31.4 vs. (25.1 ± 19.1 pg/ml, P 32.55 pg/ml yielded a sensitivity of 95.8% and specificity of 70% in predicting therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS children. Plasma CNP might serve as a useful predictor for the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children.

  7. Long-term heat stress induces the inflammatory response in dairy cows revealed by plasma proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Shengguo; Cheng, Jianbo; Yang, Yongxin; Zhang, Yangdong; Yang, Hongjian; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-03-04

    In this work we employed a comparative proteomic approach to evaluate seasonal heat stress and investigate proteomic alterations in plasma of dairy cows. Twelve lactating Holstein dairy cows were used and the treatments were: heat stress (n = 6) in hot summer (at the beginning of the moderate heat stress) and no heat stress (n = 6) in spring natural ambient environment, respectively. Subsequently, heat stress treatment lasted 23 days (at the end of the moderate heat stress) to investigate the alterations of plasma proteins, which might be employed as long-term moderate heat stress response in dairy cows. Changes in plasma proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry. Analysis of the properties of the identified proteins revealed that the alterations of plasma proteins were related to inflammation in long-term moderate heat stress. Furthermore, the increase in plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) directly demonstrated that long-term moderate heat stress caused an inflammatory response in dairy cows.

  8. Bacterial-killing effect of atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma jet and oral mucosa response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dexi; Xiong, Zilan; Du, Tianfeng; Zhou, Xincai; Cao, Yingguang; Lu, Xinpei

    2011-12-01

    showed the obvious P.g. biofilms were formed at 10 days, and most of the bacteria in groups A and C were alive under a laser scanning confocal microscope, but the bacteria in the group B were almost all dead. In animal experiment, no ulcers, anabrosis and oral mucositis were found in both the 1-day and 5-day groups. The average mucous membrane irritation index was -0.83 and -0.67 in the 1-day and 5-day groups, respectively, suggesting that no intense mucosal membrane irritation responses occurred. It was concluded that APNPs could effectively kill P.g. in the biofilms and did not cause any pathological changes in the normal mucosa, suggesting that the plasma jet (APNPs) may be applied to oral diseases as a novel sterilization device in the future.

  9. Criticality and turbulence in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic current sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J; Uritsky, Vadim M

    2017-02-01

    Scaling properties of a two-dimensional (2d) plasma physical current-sheet simulation model involving a full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with current-dependent resistivity are investigated. The current sheet supports a spatial magnetic field reversal that is forced through loading of magnetic flux containing plasma at boundaries of the simulation domain. A balance is reached between loading and annihilation of the magnetic flux through reconnection at the current sheet; the transport of magnetic flux from boundaries to current sheet is realized in the form of spatiotemporal avalanches exhibiting power-law statistics of lifetimes and sizes. We identify this dynamics as self-organized criticality (SOC) by verifying an extended set of scaling laws related to both global and local properties of the current sheet (critical susceptibility, finite-size scaling of probability distributions, geometric exponents). The critical exponents obtained from this analysis suggest that the model operates in a slowly driven SOC state similar to the mean-field state of the directed stochastic sandpile model. We also investigate multiscale correlations in the velocity field and find them numerically indistinguishable from certain intermittent turbulence (IT) theories. The results provide clues on physical conditions for SOC behavior in a broad class of plasma systems with propagating instabilities, and suggest that SOC and IT may coexist in driven current sheets which occur ubiquitously in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  10. Criticality and turbulence in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2017-02-01

    Scaling properties of a two-dimensional (2d) plasma physical current-sheet simulation model involving a full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with current-dependent resistivity are investigated. The current sheet supports a spatial magnetic field reversal that is forced through loading of magnetic flux containing plasma at boundaries of the simulation domain. A balance is reached between loading and annihilation of the magnetic flux through reconnection at the current sheet; the transport of magnetic flux from boundaries to current sheet is realized in the form of spatiotemporal avalanches exhibiting power-law statistics of lifetimes and sizes. We identify this dynamics as self-organized criticality (SOC) by verifying an extended set of scaling laws related to both global and local properties of the current sheet (critical susceptibility, finite-size scaling of probability distributions, geometric exponents). The critical exponents obtained from this analysis suggest that the model operates in a slowly driven SOC state similar to the mean-field state of the directed stochastic sandpile model. We also investigate multiscale correlations in the velocity field and find them numerically indistinguishable from certain intermittent turbulence (IT) theories. The results provide clues on physical conditions for SOC behavior in a broad class of plasma systems with propagating instabilities, and suggest that SOC and IT may coexist in driven current sheets which occur ubiquitously in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  11. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  12. Detection and characterization of differences in plasma corticoid response to treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkinson, R W; Thatcher, W W; Wilcox, C J; Gwazdauskas, F C; Head, H H

    1976-04-01

    Ten experiments involving 3013 observations and 103 animals were studied to characterize variation associated with bovine plasma corticoid concentrations (ng/ml). Total corticoids, corticosterone, or cortisol were measured by competitve protein binding assay. Animals were noncystic or cystic, and measurements were made to establish basal concentrations or to estimate response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone injection. Data were analyzed by least squares with the nested model: treatment regimen, animal in treatment, sample in animal in treatment, and sampling time to the highest order of regression (up to seventh) which was statistically significant (P less than .05). Estimates of error variances ranged from .31 for basal cortisol in cystic animals to 233.27 for total corticoids in noncystic, stimulated animals. Coefficients of variation among experiments ranged from 33 to 87% with mean 61%. In most analyses, estimates of experimental error were large indicating need for careful attention to experimental design to insure efficient least-cost experimentation. Use of the power function for nested analysis of variance to accomplish this is demonstrated.

  13. Energy loss of ions in a magnetized plasma: conformity between linear response and binary collision treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nersisyan, H B; Zwicknagel, G; Toepffer, C

    2003-02-01

    The energy loss of a heavy ion moving in a magnetized electron plasma is considered within the linear response (LR) and binary collision (BC) treatments with the purpose to look for a connection between these two models. These two complementary approaches yield close results if no magnetic field is present, but there develop discrepancies with growing magnetic field at ion velocities that are lower than, or comparable with, the thermal velocity of the electrons. We show that this is a peculiarity of the Coulomb interaction which requires cutoff procedures to account for its singularity at the origin and its infinite range. The cutoff procedures in the LR and BC treatments are different as the order of integrations in velocity and in ordinary (Fourier) spaces is reversed in both treatments. While BC involves a velocity average of Coulomb logarithms, there appear in LR Coulomb logarithms of velocity averaged cutoffs. The discrepancies between LR and BC vanish, except for small contributions of collective modes, for smoothened potentials that require no cutoffs. This is shown explicitly with the help of an improved BC in which the velocity transfer is treated up to second order in the interaction in Fourier space.

  14. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  15. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  16. High grain diets perturb rumen and plasma metabolites and induce inflammatory responses in early lactation dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Ametaj

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Immediately after parturition dairy cows are fed diets containing high proportions of grain which are associated with high incidence of metabolic disorders. However, the reason behind these effects is not clear. The goal of this study was to investigate metabolic and immune responses of early postpartum dairy cows to feeding increasing proportions of barley grain in the diet. Rumen endotoxin content increased several fold and rumen fluid pH was lower in cows fed the highest amount of barley grain. Results indicate that feeding high proportions of barley grain in early lactation dairy cows was associated with induction of an acute phase response and changes in multiple plasma metabolites. Further research is warranted to understand the mechanism(s by which feeding of barley grain causes disturbances in plasma metabolites and stimulates an inflammatory response in dairy cows.

  17. Fasting modifies Aroclor 1254 impact on plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate responses to a handling disturbance in Arctic charr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, E.H.; Vijayan, M.M.; Aluru, N.; Maule, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and nutritional status on responses to handling disturbance were investigated in the Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). The fish were orally contaminated with Aroclor 1254 and held either with or without food for 5 months before they were subjected to a 10-min handling disturbance. Food-deprived fish were given 0, 1, 10 or 100 mg PCB kg-1 and the fed fish 0 or 100 mg PCB kg-1. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were measured at 0 (pre-handling), 1, 3, 6 and 23 h after the handling disturbance. Food-deprived control fish had elevated plasma cortisol levels compared with fed fish before handling. These basal cortisol levels were suppressed by PCB in food-deprived fish, and elevated by PCB in fed fish. The immediate cortisol and glucose responses to handling disturbance were suppressed by PCB in a dose-dependent way in food-deprived fish. Although these responses were also lowered by PCB in the fed fish, the effect was much less pronounced than in food-deprived fish. There were only minor effects on plasma lactate responses. Our findings suggest that the stress responses of the Arctic charr are compromised by PCB and that the long-term fasting, typical of high-latitude fish, makes these species particularly sensitive to organochlorines such as PCB. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  19. Application of Response Surface Methodolody to Prediction of Dilution in Plasma Transferred Arc Hardfacing of Stainless Steel on Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Balasubramanian; A K Lakshminarayanan; R Varahamoorthy; S Babu

    2009-01-01

    The application of.response surface methodology was highlighted to predict and optimize the percentage of dilution of iron-based hardfaced surface produced by the PTA (plasma transferred arc welding) process.The experiments were conducted based on five-factor five-level central composite rotatable design with full replication technique and a mathematical model was developed using response surface methodology.Furthermore,the response surface methodology was also used to optimize the process parameters that yielded the lowest percentage of dilution.

  20. Acute post-exercise oxygen uptake, hormone and plasma metabolite response in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, S; Codecasa, F; Cornacchia, M; Maestrini, S; Salvadori, A; Fanari, P; Brunani, A; Malatesta, D

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to compare oxygen uptake (  VO2), hormone and plasma metabolite responses during the 30 min after submaximal incremental exercise (Incr) performed at the same relative/absolute exercise intensity and duration in lean (L) and obese (O) men. Eight L and 8 O men (BMI: 22.9 ± 0.4; 37.2 ± 1.8 kg · m(-2)) completed Incr and were then seated for 30 min.   VO2 was monitored during the first 10 min and from the 25-30(th) minutes of recovery. Blood samples were drawn for the determination of hormone (catecholamines, insulin) and plasma metabolite (NEFA, glycerol) concentrations. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) magnitude during the first 10 min was similar in O and in L (3.5 ± 0.4; 3.4 ± 0.3 liters, respectively, p=0.86). When normalized to percent change (  VO2END=100%), %   VO2END during recovery was significantly higher from 90-120 s in O than in L (p ≤ 0.04). There were no significant differences in catecholamines (p ≥ 0.24), whereas insulin was significantly higher in O than in L during recovery (p=0.01). The time-course of glycerol was similar from 10-30 min of recovery (-42% for L; -41% for O, p=0.85), whereas significantly different patterns of NEFA were found from 10-30 min of recovery between groups (-18% for L; +8% for O, p=0.03). Despite similar EPOC, a difference in   VO2 modulation between groups was observed, likely due to faster initial rates of   VO2 decline in L than in O. The different patterns of NEFA between groups may suggest a lower NEFA reesterification during recovery in O, which was not involved in the rapid EPOC component. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. HRSA Data Fact Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Data Fact Sheets provide summary data about HRSA’s activities in each Congressional District, County, State,...

  2. Pharmacogenomics Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incorporate genomic results into medical care. Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on September 28, 2017 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook ...

  3. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have expiration dates that should be checked before purchase. Also, over time your mask can get old ... Respirator Fact Sheet [PDF - 706 KB] Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A- ...

  4. Changes in plasma IL4, TNF-α and CRP in response to regular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Objective: To determine effects of passive smoking on plasma IL4, TNFá, and CRP in ... Plasma CRP, IL4 and TNFá were measured using commercially available ELISA kits. ..... with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1996;153:530- ... Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness, and Atopy.

  5. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  6. 2013 social balance sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Pierrette Heuse

    2014-01-01

    The transposition into national law of Directive 2013/34/EU on the annual financial statements of companies, expected by no later than July 2015, could alter the statistical obligations on small firms in connection with the filing of their annual accounts. In any case, the social balance sheet can no longer form an integral part of their accounts. Nevertheless, it contains original information whose usefulness is highlighted, on the basis of the social balance sheets for 2012, by examining th...

  7. Plasma C-type natriuretic peptide as a predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Han, Zhenhui; Li, Hongxia; Chen, Selena Ying; Li, Xueying; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yuli; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    POTS is a global public-health disease, but predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with POTS is lacking. This study was designed to investigate predictive value of plasma C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) in children. Totally 34 children with POTS and 27 healthy children were included in the study. The head-up test or head-up tilt test was used to check heart rate and blood pressure from supine to upright in subjects. A double antibody (competitive) sandwich immunoluminometric assay was used to detect plasma CNP. Metoprolol was used to treat children with POTS. The difference in plasma concentrations of CNP between responders and non-responders was compared. An ROC curve was used to analyze plasma CNP to predict efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children. Plasma CNP in children with POTS was significantly higher than that of healthy children [(51.9 ± 31.4) vs. (25.1 ± 19.1) pg/ml, P metoprolol was significantly higher than non-responders [(59.1 ± 33.5) vs. (34.8 ± 16.7) pg/ml, P = 0.037] before treatment. The ROC curve showed that area under the curve was 0.821 (95% CI 0.642-0.999). The cut-off value of plasma CNP > 32.55 pg/ml yielded a sensitivity of 95.8% and specificity of 70% in predicting therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS children. Plasma CNP might serve as a useful predictor for the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children.

  8. Electron-scale sheets of whistlers close to the magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stenberg

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Whistler emissions close to the magnetopause on the magnetospheric side are investigated using the four Cluster spacecraft. The waves are found to be generated in thin (electron-scale sheets moving with the plasma drift velocity. A feature in the electron data coincides with the waves; hot magnetospheric electrons disappear for a few satellite spins. This produces or enhances a temperature anisotropy, which is found to be responsible for the generation of the whistler mode waves. The high energy electrons are thought to be lost through the magnetopause and we suggest that the field lines, on which the waves are generated, are directly connected to a reconnection diffusion region at the magnetopause.

  9. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature.

  10. D-Dimer Plasma Levels Parallel the Clinical Response to Omalizumab in Patients with Severe Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asero, Riccardo; Marzano, Angelo V; Ferrucci, Silvia; Cugno, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is very effective in the majority of patients with severe chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), but its mechanism of action is still unclear. In CSU the coagulation cascade is activated with an intensity that parallels the disease severity, and elevated plasma D-dimer levels are associated with a poor response to both antihistamines and cyclosporin. We measured D-dimer plasma levels before and after the first administration of omalizumab in 32 patients with severe CSU. A number of clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded, including the urticaria activity score, presence of angioedema, disease duration, C-reactive protein, anti-nuclear, and anti-thyroid antibodies. Baseline D-dimer levels were elevated in 19 (59%) cases. Omalizumab induced a complete response in 25 patients (78%), in most cases already after the first administration. At baseline, 14/25 responders had increased D-dimer plasma levels versus 5/7 non-responders. All responders showed a dramatic decrease of D-dimer plasma levels after the first administration of the drug (from 1,024 ± 248 [mean ± SE] to 251 ± 30 ng/mL; p = 0.003). In contrast, non-responders did not show any reduction in D-dimer levels after omalizumab administration (from 787 ± 206 to 1,230 ± 429 ng/mL; p = ns). In conclusion, plasma levels of D-dimer are frequently elevated in patients with severe CSU before omalizumab administration and decrease according to the clinical response of the disease to the drug, suggesting a possible effect of omalizumab on coagulation activation and fibrin degradation in a subset of CSU patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Source of dietary protein influences kinetics of plasma gut regulatory peptide concentration in response to feeding in preruminant calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Huërou-Luron, I; Gestin, M; Le Dréan, G; Romé, V; Bernard, C; Chayvialle, J A; Guilloteau, P

    1998-03-01

    The kinetics of the peripheral plasma concentrations of eight gut regulatory peptides were examined in response to feeding in preruminant calves. Two experiments were carried out in animals fed milk substitutes either based on milk protein (control diet) or in which casein had been replaced by hydrolyzed fish (fish diet in experiment 1) or whey (whey diet in experiment 2) protein concentrate. In contrast to the control diet, the latter two did not coagulate within the abomasum. No variation was observed in plasma concentrations of gut regulatory peptides during 1-1.4 hr before the morning meal regardless of the nature of the dietary protein. With the control diet, the meal was followed by an increase in cholecystokinin, gastrin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide and a fall in secretin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and motilin, whereas no significant change was observed for somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide. The replacement of casein by protein substitutes did not greatly modify the pattern of plasma responses to feeding, but the prefeeding and postfeeding levels were highly affected. We conclude that the most important characteristic influencing plasma gut peptide concentrations is the ability of dietary protein to clot in the abomasum, consequently determining the pattern of gastric emptying, and that variations appear depending on the origin of protein substitutes in relation to the duodenal content and mainly to the digesta pH.

  12. Different responses in postprandial plasma ghrelin and GH levels induced by concentrate or timothy hay feeding in wethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Hasegawa, S; Touno, E; Otani, Y; Haga, S; Itoh, F; Katoh, K; Obara, Y

    2008-05-01

    Ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) play a key role in regulating energy balance, metabolic hormone secretion and food intake. Ghrelin and GH responses to dietary compositions have not yet been fully clarified, although there may be significant relationships between dietary compositions and ghrelin and GH responses. In the present study, therefore, we assessed whether dietary compositions influence postprandial plasma ghrelin and GH levels in wethers. Four wethers were respectively fed concentrate (C) or timothy hay (R) for 14 days. The levels of total digestive nutrients (TDN) and crude protein (CP) were adjusted to be at the same level. The basal ghrelin in both groups was rapidly and significantly decreased after feeding. Although the decline of ghrelin levels in C was greater and shorter than that in R, no significant difference was observed in the area under the curve (AUC) or in the incremental area. The plasma GH levels were also rapidly and significantly decreased after feeding in both groups and a significant difference was observed between the two groups for AUC of GH. Interestingly, the circadian changes in the plasma ghrelin levels were close to those in the GH levels in C, but this was not the case in R. These data suggest that dietary compositions influence postprandial plasma ghrelin and GH levels, and that these differences may be caused by several factors, including nutrients and ruminal fermentation.

  13. Heparanase Levels Are Elevated in the Plasma of Pediatric Cancer Patients and Correlate with Response to Anticancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay Shafat

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate (HS side chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, the major proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix (ECM and cell surfaces. Heparanase upregulation was documented in an increasing number of primary human tumors, correlating with reduced postoperative survival rate and enhanced tumor angiogenesis. The purpose of the current study was to determine heparanase levels in blood samples collected from pediatric cancer patients using an ELISA method. Heparanase levels were elevated four-fold in the plasma of cancer patients compared with healthy controls (664 ± 143 vs 163 ± 18 pg/ml, respectively. Evaluating plasma samples following anticancer therapy revealed reduced heparanase levels (664 ± 143 vs 429 ± 82 pg/ml, differences that are statistically highly significant (P = .0048. Of the 55 patients with complete remission (CR or very good partial remission (VGPR at restaging, 41 (74.5% had lower heparanase amounts, whereas 14 patients (25.5% had similar or higher amounts of plasma heparanase. All nine patients with stable or advancing disease had similar or elevated levels of heparanase on restaging. The results show that heparanase levels are elevated in the plasma of pediatric cancer patients and closely correlate with treatment responsiveness, indicating that heparanase levels can be used to diagnose and monitor patient's response to anticancer treatment.

  14. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  15. On the radial force balance in the quiet time magnetotail current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2016-05-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions spacecraft observations of the quite magnetotail current sheet within the r∈[9,35]RE region (r is the radial distance from Earth and RE is Earth's radius), we investigate the thermal plasma pressure distribution along the magnetotail. Taking advantage of flapping motions of an ensemble of current sheets at various distances, we estimate the current density magnitude jy (in GSM coordinates). Comparing the tension force jyBz (Bz is the magnetic field component) with the radial gradient of the plasma pressure demonstrates that this gradient is only a small fraction, ˜10-15%, of the Ampere force exerted on the cross-tail current, in the r > 15RE region. We also estimate the contribution of the electron temperature anisotropy to the pressure balance: in the r > 15RE region the corresponding force can balance only 10-15% of the observed tension force jyBz. Thus, we conclude that about 70% of the tension force is not balanced by the combination of isotropic radial pressure gradient or the electron anisotropy. We discuss mechanisms that could be responsible for balancing the magnetotail current sheet.

  16. Reactive Atom Plasma Processing of Slumped Glass Wedges Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Reactive Atom Plasma (RAPTM) process will be evaluated as a rapid and practical method for fabricating precision wedges in glass sheets. The glass sheets are to...

  17. Method to determine factors contributing to thermoplastic sheet shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensch, Greg J.; Frye, Brad A.

    A test method is presented for the determination of shrinkage behavior in vacuum-formed thermoplastic resin sheeting, as presently simulated for various resin lots, sheet-gage thicknesses, sheet orientations, and mold profiles. The thermoforming machine and vacuum-forming mold characteristics are discussed. It is established that the four variable factors exert statistically significant effects on the shrinkage response of three Declar resin lots, but that these are of no real practical significance for either engineering or manufacturing operations.

  18. Greenland ice sheet motion insensitive to exceptional meltwater forcing

    OpenAIRE

    Tedstone, Andrew J.; P. W. Nienow; A. J. Sole; D. W. F. Mair; Cowton, Tom; I. D. Bartholomew; King, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Changes to the dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet can be forced by various mechanisms including surface-melt-induced ice acceleration and oceanic forcing of marine-terminating glaciers. We use observations of ice motion to examine the surface melt-induced dynamic response of a land-terminating outlet glacier in south-west Greenland to the exceptional melting observed in 2012. During summer, meltwater generated on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface accesses the ice sheet bed, lubricating ...

  19. Histological response to platelet-rich plasma added to polypropylene mesh implemented in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubini Ávila

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The platelet-rich plasma (PRP is part of a set of biotechnologies, providing some growth factors that promote repair of different tissues. The polypropylene meshes (PPM are applied in the correction of abdominal defects, pelvic floor and urinary incontinence, however, they induce many significant complications, as a result of an inappropriate inflammatory response. Purpose: To investigate the changes caused by PRP associated with the implantation of PPM in the abdomen of female rabbits, in the production of collagen I and III and the inflammatory infiltrate (ININ. Materials and Methods: We performed implant meshes with and without PRP in adult rabbits (n=30 and euthanasia at 7, 30 and 90 days. Two plates were prepared from each animal and analyzed in five different fields. The ININ was evaluated by quantification of inflammatory cells using hematoxylin-eosin and the collagen by Sirius red method. The results were analyzed applying the Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, Junckheere and Friedmann tests. Results: There was a significant difference in the number of inflammatory cells between the groups with and without PRP (p=0.01 at 90 days. There was increased production of collagen I, III and total with the use of PRP, at seven days. Conclusion: The PPM coating with PRP was associated with increased ININ at the implant area, and an increasing trend during the process of tissue repair. The PPM coated with PRP was related to increased concentration of collagen I, collagen III and the concentration of total collagen increased after seven days of implantation.

  20. Circulating Plasma microRNAs can differentiate Human Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Stefano; Kern, Florian; Cohen, Jonathan; Drage, Stephen; Newbury, Sarah F; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-06-20

    Systemic inflammation in humans may be triggered by infection, termed sepsis, or non-infective processes, termed non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). MicroRNAs regulate cellular processes including inflammation and may be detected in blood. We aimed to establish definitive proof-of-principle that circulating microRNAs are differentially affected during sepsis and non-infective SIRS. Critically ill patients with severe (n = 21) or non-severe (n = 8) intra-abdominal sepsis; severe (n = 23) or non-severe (n = 21) non-infective SIRS; or no SIRS (n = 16) were studied. Next-generation sequencing and qRT-PCR were used to measure plasma microRNAs. Detectable blood miRNAs (n = 116) were generally up-regulated in SIRS compared to no-SIRS patients. Levels of these 'circulating inflammation-related microRNAs' (CIR-miRNAs) were 2.64 (IQR: 2.10-3.29) and 1.52 (IQR: 1.15-1.92) fold higher for non-infective SIRS and sepsis respectively (p SIRS. Six CIR-miRNAs (miR-30d-5p, miR-30a-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-191-5p) provided good-to-excellent discrimination of severe sepsis from severe SIRS (0.742-0.917 AUC of ROC curves). CIR-miRNA levels inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and others). Thus, among critically ill patients, sepsis and non-infective SIRS are associated with substantial, differential changes in CIR-miRNAs. CIR-miRNAs may be regulators of inflammation and warrant thorough evaluation as diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  1. Response to criticism of electrostatic attraction of like-charged macroparticles inside plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    We respond to criticism of the electrostatic attraction of the like-charged macroparticles inside plasma. The possibility of mutual attraction of like-charged macroparticles placed into the electroneutral plasma of ions and electrons is proven herein, provided that the volume charge, compensating the macroparticles' charge so that the system of charged particles is completely electroneutral, is placed into the same plasma. Only repulsive forces work in the absence of the compensation charge between the macroparticles. To prove this, we calculated the interaction force on the basis of the Maxwell tension tensor, and the Helmholtz free energy calculation with its subsequent analysis on the existence of extrema.

  2. The Role of the Plasma Membrane in the Response of Plant Roots to Aluminum Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Sung-Ju; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    Al3+, the predominant form of solubilized aluminum at pH values below 5.0, has been shown to exert a profound inhibitory effect on root elongation. Al is known to accumulate at the root apex. The plasma membrane represents the first potential target for Al toxicity, due to its pronounced binding to phospholipids. Al appears to alter both the structure and functions of the plasma membrane, and a great deal of research has been conducted concerning the interactions between Al and the plasma mem...

  3. Measurements of the vacuum-plasma response in EXTRAP T2R using generic closed-loop subspace system identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J., E-mail: erik.olofsson@ee.kth.se [School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden); Brunsell, Per R.; Drake, James R. [School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unstable plasma response safely measured using special signal processing techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction-capable MIMO models obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Computational statistics employed to show physical content of these models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multifold cross-validation applied for the supervised learning problem. - Abstract: A multibatch formulation of a multi-input multi-output closed-loop subspace system identification method is employed for the purpose of obtaining control-relevant models of the vacuum-plasma response in the magnetic confinement fusion experiment EXTRAP T2R. The accuracy of the estimate of the plant dynamics is estimated by computing bootstrap replication statistics of the dataset. It is seen that the thus identified models exhibit both predictive capabilities and physical spectral properties.

  4. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ-, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    possible that soft beds through their ability to deform and be eroded can yield quasi-stable patterns of drainage pathways that with either erosion of critical sills or filling of temporary basins may reorganize itself periodically on time scales much shorter than the reorganization of the driving stresses for ice flow. In areas where the surface generated water (melt and rain), the basally generated fluxes dwarf the influx from the surface and hence the drainage system in such areas will be dominated by surface fluxes and variations therein. Since surface fluxes have a strong seasonal variation with no influx during winter, areas experiencing surface influx will also be subject to large seasonal variations in both flux and pressure. In addition, during the melt season, fluxes and also pressures will also vary on diurnal as well as longer time frames in response to variations in air temperature that drives melt and occurrence of precipitation events. The emerging picture of glacier drainage consists of different types of models applicable to different regimes found beneath an ice sheet (with our without surface influx, ice streams, subglacial lakes). It is not, however, clear how these systems are coupled, or even if they are. This makes it inherently difficult to assess what can be expected beneath a given sector of an ice sheet without some detailed understanding of the underlying geology (geothermal fluxes), geomorphology (possible water routing) and ice properties (cold -temperate base and ice thickness)

  5. Predicting Zonal Flows -- A Comprehensive Reynolds-Stress Response-Functional from First-Principles-Plasma-Turbulence Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Guertler, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence driven zonal flows play an important role in fusion devices since they improve plasma confinement by limiting the level of anomalous transport. Current theories mostly focus on flow excitation but do not self-consistently describe the nearly stationary zonal flow turbulence equilibrium state. First-principles two-fluid turbulence studies are used to construct a Reynolds stress response functional from observations in turbulent states. This permits, for the first time, a reliable charting of zonal flow turbulence equilibria.

  6. Effect of rotation zero-crossing on single-fluid plasma response to three-dimensional magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, B. C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Wingen, A.

    2017-04-01

    In order to understand the effect of rotation on the response of a plasma to three-dimensional magnetic perturbations, we perform a systematic scan of the zero-crossing of the rotation profile in a DIII-D ITER-similar shape equilibrium using linear, time-independent modeling with the M3D-C1 extended magnetohydrodynamics code. We confirm that the local resonant magnetic field generally increases as the rotation decreases at a rational surface. Multiple peaks in the resonant field are observed near rational surfaces, however, and the maximum resonant field does not always correspond to zero rotation at the surface. Furthermore, we show that non-resonant current can be driven at zero-crossings not aligned with rational surfaces if there is sufficient shear in the rotation profile there, leading to amplification of near-resonant Fourier harmonics of the perturbed magnetic field and a decrease in the far-off-resonant harmonics. The quasilinear electromagnetic torque induced by this non-resonant plasma response provides drive to flatten the rotation, possibly allowing for increased transport in the pedestal by the destabilization of turbulent modes. In addition, this torque acts to drive the rotation zero-crossing to dynamically stable points near rational surfaces, which would allow for increased resonant penetration. By one or both of these mechanisms, this torque may play an important role in bifurcations into suppression of edge-localized modes. Finally, we discuss how these changes to the plasma response could be detected by tokamak diagnostics. In particular, we show that the changes to the resonant field discussed here have a significant impact on the external perturbed magnetic field, which should be observable by magnetic sensors on the high-field side of tokamaks but not on the low-field side. In addition, TRIP3D-MAFOT simulations show that none of the changes to the plasma response described here substantially affects the divertor footprint structure.

  7. Number-conserving linear response study of low-velocity ion stopping in a collisional magnetized classical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nersisyan Hrachya B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity stopping power of ions in a magnetized collisional plasma is studied through the linear response theory. The collisions are taken into account through a number-conserving relaxation time approximation. One of the major objectives of this study is to compare and contrast our theoretical results with those obtained through a diffusion coefficient formulation based on Dufty-Berkovsky relation.

  8. PLASMA AND LUNG MACROPHAGE CAROTENOID RESPONSIVENESS TO SUPPLEMENTATION AND OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE:: To examine the effect of ozone exposure and vegetable juice supplementation on plasma and lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids. DESIGN:: A randomized trial. SETTING:: Subjects were exposed to ambient air prior to antioxidant supplementation and to ozone after...

  9. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Emil Aputsiaq Flindt; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2017-01-01

    The present study determined the blood plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of the perch Perca fluviatilis at different salinities (0, 10 and 15) and temperatures (5, 10 and 20° C). Blood plasma osmolality increased with salinity at all temperatures. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) increased...... beneficial during cold periods (winter). It is suggested, therefore, that the seasonal migrations of P. fluviatilis between brackish and fresh water is to select an environment that is optimal for metabolism and aerobic scope....

  10. Plasma CRH response to water immersion-restraint stress in rats bearing a hypothalamic knife cut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, T; Iyota, K; Takao, T; Suemaru, S; Numata, Y; Hashimoto, K

    1994-08-01

    We reported earlier that the plasma level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) remained high 120 min after the onset of such strong sustained stress as ether-laparotomy or water immersion-restraint, which reflected the persistent secretion of CRH from the hypothalamic median eminence (ME). We investigated the change in plasma CRH during water immersion-restraint stress in rats bearing an anterolateral cut around the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) which cuts the CRH neurons from the PVN to the ME. Concentrations of CRH in the hypothalamus, extrahypothalamic tissues and peripheral blood were measured by radioimmunoassay. Plasma ACTH was measured with an immunoradiometric assay kit. Plasma baseline ACTH and CRH concentrations did not differ significantly in the sham vs. cut groups. At 120 min after the onset of stress, plasma ACTH concentrations were definitely higher in both groups. In the cut group, plasma CRH at 120 min after stress did not differ significantly from the baseline level, whereas plasma CRH at 120 min was definitely higher in the sham group. Baseline CRH concentrations in the ME did not differ greatly in the two groups. CRH concentrations in the ME of both groups had decreased appreciably 120 min after the onset of stress as compared with baseline CRH, and the CRH decrease was greater in the cut group than in the sham group. CRH in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) and adrenal gland of both groups showed no significant change at 120 min, compared with the control. These findings confirm that the continuous CRH increase in plasma during sustained stress is derived mainly from the hypothalamus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Northern Hemisphere millennial-scale ice discharges as a response to oceanic forcing simulated with a hybrid ice-sheet/ice-shelf model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Solas, J.; Montoya, M.; Robinson, A. J.; Banderas-Carreño, R.; Ritz, C.; Ganopolski, A.

    2012-04-01

    Marine and continental records and ice core data have revealed the existence of pronounced millennial time-scale climate variability during the last glacial cycle. Greenland ice core records show abrupt transitions known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events within decades from cold (stadial) to relatively warm (interstadial) conditions, followed by slow cooling that lasts several centuries and more rapid cooling through stadial conditions. Two types of explanation have been suggested: periodic external forcing and internal oscillations in the climate system, for which ocean circulation is the main candidate. On the other hand, six periods of extreme cooling registered in the Northern Hemisphere, known as Heinrich events, have been found to be coeval with increased deposition of ice-rafted debris, which is interpreted as enhanced discharge of icebergs into the North Atlantic Ocean. Recently, the coupled effects between ocean circulation and ice-sheets dynamics have been suggested to play a major role in triggering Heinrich events. This interpretation of Heinrich events responding to changes in the oceanic patterns (or at least not being purely internal and spontaneous manifestations of ice sheets), allows the possibility to provide an explicit relationship between DO events and the periodic iceberg surges. Here this hypothesis is reassessed within a more realistic modeling framework by forcing a 3D state-of-the-art ice-sheet model with the output of abrupt climate change simulations carried out with a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. These show the main expected characteristics of such events: an abrupt warming of the North Atlantic and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) intensification followed by a progressive cooling and AMOC reduction, as well as a more drastic fall into a stadial condition. Interestingly, stadial periods are characterized by the occurrence of subsurface oceanic warming of up to 3 K in regions where deep water

  12. Experimental Characterization of a Plasma Deflagration Accelerator for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Thomas; Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed deflagration accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on the both the properties of the plasma jet and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Detailed measurements of the thermodynamic plasma state variables within the jet are presented using a quadruple Langmuir probe operating in current-saturation mode. This data in conjunction with spectroscopic measurements of H α Stark broadening via a fast-framing, intensified CCD camera provide spatial and temporal measurements of how the plasma density and temperature scale as a function of input energy. Using these measurements, estimates for the energy flux associated with the deflagration accelerator are found to be completely tunable over a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 30 GW m-2. The plasma-material interface is investigated using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume under variable conditions. Visualizations of resulting shock structures are achieved through Schlieren cinematography and energy transfer dynamics are discussed by presenting temperature measurements of exposed materials. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program in addition to the National Defense Science Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  13. Fibroblastic response and surface characterization of O(2)-plasma-treated thermoplastic polyetherurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicht, Henning; Haugen, Håvard J; Sabetrasekh, Roya; Wintermantel, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Injection-molded samples of thermoplastic polyetherurethane (TPU) were treated with low-temperature oxygen plasma for different processing times in order to enhance cellular attachment for a gastric implant. Its effects were investigated by contact angle measurement, surface topography, cytotoxicity and cell colonization tests. No significant changes were found in the surface roughness of plasma treatment with plasma treatment time of less than 5 min. Longer treatment showed significantly higher surface roughness. It seems that there was a link between the changes in contact angle and enhanced cell growth on the treated surface, although only for the range up to plasma treatment times of 3 min. Prolonged treatment times did not cause any major changes in the water contact angle, but strongly improved the number of growing cells on the surface. Plasma treatment for 3-7 min led to a twofold increase in the number of cells compared to untreated samples and did not significantly alter the WST-1 nor worsened the lactate dehydrogenase activity compared to the control. Thus, it appears that O(2) plasma treatment is a suitable surface modification method for a gastric implant made of TPU in order to improve surface cell attachment where 3-7 min is the recommended treatment time.

  14. Glucose kinetics, plasma metabolites, and endocrine responses during experimental ketosis in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, R R; deBoer, G; Mills, S E; Russell, R W; Beitz, D C; Young, J W

    1984-10-01

    Phlorizin and 1,3-butanediol were used to determine effects of glucosuria and ketonemia on concentrations of metabolites in blood plasma and on kinetics of glucose metabolism. Four steers received four treatments (control; control plus dietary 1,3-butanediol; control plus phlorizin injections; and control plus phlorizin and 1,3-butanediol) in a Latin square design. Treatments lasted 14 days. All steers received a 30% grain, 70% forage ration in equal meals every 2 h. Metabolite concentrations in blood plasma and urine and glucose kinetics were measured on each of the last 3 days of each treatment period. Phlorizin caused glucosuria; decreased plasma glucose, glucose total entry rate, and glucose recycling; and increased plasma free fatty acids and glucose irreversible loss. Glucose pool size was increased by 1,3-butanediol. Phlorizin plus 1,3-butanediol caused glucosuria and ketonuria; decreased plasma glucose; and increased blood ketone bodies, plasma free fatty acids, glucose irreversible loss, and glucose pool size. Growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon were not affected by treatment. Physiological perturbations in these steers were characteristic of some of those in ketotic cows.

  15. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings.

  16. The importance of plasma membrane coenzyme Q in aging and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Plácido; Villalba, José Manuel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2007-06-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is the limit to interact with the environment. This position implies receiving stress signals that affects its components such as phospholipids. Inserted inside these components is coenzyme Q that is a redox compound acting as antioxidant. Coenzyme Q is reduced by diverse dehydrogenase enzymes mainly NADH-cytochrome b(5) reductase and NAD(P)H:quinone reductase 1. Reduced coenzyme Q can prevent lipid peroxidation chain reaction by itself or by reducing other antioxidants such as alpha-tocopherol and ascorbate. The group formed by antioxidants and the enzymes able to reduce coenzyme Q constitutes a plasma membrane redox system that is regulated by conditions that induce oxidative stress. Growth factor removal, ethidium bromide-induced rho degrees cells, and vitamin E deficiency are some of the conditions where both coenzyme Q and its reductases are increased in the plasma membrane. This antioxidant system in the plasma membrane has been observed to participate in the healthy aging induced by calorie restriction. Furthermore, coenzyme Q regulates the release of ceramide from sphingomyelin, which is concentrated in the plasma membrane. This results from the non-competitive inhibition of the neutral sphingomyelinase by coenzyme Q particularly by its reduced form. Coenzyme Q in the plasma membrane is then the center of a complex antioxidant system preventing the accumulation of oxidative damage and regulating the externally initiated ceramide signaling pathway.

  17. Microbe-dependent CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells mediate robust early-phase intestinal IgA responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Gohda, Masashi; Hashimoto, Eri; Ishikawa, Izumi; Higuchi, Morio; Suzuki, Yuji; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Panea, Casandra; Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Sumiya, Risa; Aayam, Lamichhane; Wake, Taichi; Tajiri, So; Kurashima, Yosuke; Shikata, Shiori; Akira, Shizuo; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal plasma cells predominantly produce immunoglobulin (Ig) A, however, their functional diversity remains poorly characterized. Here we show that murine intestinal IgA plasma cells can be newly classified into two populations on the basis of CD11b expression, which cannot be discriminated by currently known criteria such as general plasma cell markers, B cell origin and T cell dependence. CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells require the lymphoid structure of Peyer’s patches, produce more IgA than CD11b− IgA+ plasma cells, proliferate vigorously, and require microbial stimulation and IL-10 for their development and maintenance. These features allow CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells to mediate early-phase antigen-specific intestinal IgA responses induced by oral immunization with protein antigen. These findings reveal the functional diversity of IgA+ plasma cells in the murine intestine. PMID:23612313

  18. Current sheets at three-dimensional magnetic nulls: Effect of compressibility

    CERN Document Server

    Pontin, D I; Galsgaard, K

    2007-01-01

    The nature of current sheet formation in the vicinity of three-dimensional magnetic null points is investigated. The particular focus is upon the effect of the compressibility of the plasma on the qualitative and quantitative properties of the current sheet. It is found that as the incompressible limit is approached, the collapse of the null point is suppressed, and instead an approximately planar current sheet aligned to the fan plane is present. Both the peak current and peak reconnection rate are reduced. The results imply that previous analytical solutions for steady-state reconnection at fan current sheets are dynamically accessible, while spine current sheet solutions are not.

  19. Effects of coupled dose and rhythm manipulation of plasma cortisol levels on leukocyte transcriptional response to endotoxin challenge in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Sleight, Kirsten; Nguyen, Tung T; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-01

    Severe traumas are associated with hypercortisolemia due to both disruption of cortisol secretion rhythm and increase in its total concentration. Understanding the effects of altered cortisol levels and rhythms on immune function is of great clinical interest, to prevent conditions such as sepsis from complicating the recovery. This in vivo study assesses the responses of circulating leukocytes to coupled dose and rhythm manipulation of cortisol, preceding an immune challenge induced by endotoxin administration. Through continuous infusion, plasma cortisol concentration was increased to and kept constant at a level associated with major physiologic stress. In response, transcriptional programming of leukocytes was altered to display a priming response before endotoxin exposure. Enhanced expression of a number of receptors and signaling proteins, as well as lowered protein translation and mitochondrial function indicated a sensitization against potential infectious threats. Despite these changes, response to endotoxin followed very similar patterns in both cortisol and saline pre-treated groups except one cluster including probe sets associated with major players regulating inflammatory response. In sum, altered dose and rhythm of plasma cortisol levels engendered priming of circulating leukocytes when preceded an immune challenge. This transcriptional program change associated with stimulated surveillance function and suppressed energy-intensive processes, emphasized permissive actions of cortisol on immune function.

  20. Hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by liquid precursor plasma spraying: controlled dense and porous microstructures and osteoblastic cell responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yi; Song Lei; Liu Xiaoguang; Xiao Yanfeng; Wu Yao; Chen Jiyong; Wu Fang; Gu Zhongwei, E-mail: fangwu0808@yahoo.co, E-mail: fwu@scu.edu.c [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Hydroxyapatite coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by a novel plasma spraying process, the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. X-ray diffraction results showed that the coatings obtained by the LPPS process were mainly composed of hydroxyapatite. The LPPS process also showed excellent control on the coating microstructure, and both nearly fully dense and highly porous hydroxyapatite coatings were obtained by simply adjusting the solid content of the hydroxyapatite liquid precursor. Scanning electron microscope observations indicated that the porous hydroxyapatite coatings had pore size in the range of 10-200 {mu}m and an average porosity of 48.26 {+-} 0.10%. The osteoblastic cell responses to the dense and porous hydroxyapatite coatings were evaluated with human osteoblastic cell MG-63, in respect of the cell morphology, proliferation and differentiation, with the hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process as control. The cell experiment results indicated that the heat-treated LPPS coatings with a porous structure showed the best cell proliferation and differentiation among all the hydroxyapatite coatings. Our results suggest that the LPPS process is a promising plasma spraying technique for fabricating hydroxyapatite coatings with a controllable microstructure, which has great potential in bone repair and replacement applications.

  1. Impact of the genetic background on the composition of the chicken plasma MiRNome in response to a stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Endale Ahanda

    Full Text Available Circulating extra-cellular microRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as promising minimally invasive markers in human medicine. We evaluated miRNAs isolated from total plasma as biomarker candidates of a response to an abiotic stress (feed deprivation in a livestock species. Two chicken lines selected for high (R+ and low (R- residual feed intake were chosen as an experimental model because of their extreme divergence in feed intake and energy metabolism. Adult R+ and R- cocks were sampled after 16 hours of feed deprivation and again four hours after re-feeding. More than 292 million sequence reads were generated by small RNA-seq of total plasma RNA. A total of 649 mature miRNAs were identified; after quality filtering, 148 miRNAs were retained for further analyses. We identified 23 and 19 differentially abundant miRNAs between feeding conditions and between lines respectively, with only two miRNAs identified in both comparisons. We validated a panel of six differentially abundant miRNAs by RT-qPCR on a larger number of plasma samples and checked their response to feed deprivation in liver. Finally, we evaluated the conservation and tissue distribution of differentially abundant miRNAs in plasma across a variety of red jungle fowl tissues. We show that the chicken plasma miRNome reacts promptly to the alteration of the animal physiological condition driven by a feed deprivation stress. The plasma content of stress-responsive miRNAs is strongly influenced by the genetic background, with differences reflecting the phenotypic divergence acquired through long-term selection, as evidenced by the profiles of conserved miRNAs with a regulatory role in energy metabolism (gga-miR-204, gga-miR-let-7f-5p and gga-miR-122-5p. These results reinforce the emerging view in human medicine that even small genetic differences can have a considerable impact on the resolution of biomarker studies, and provide support for the emerging interest in miRNAs as potential novel and

  2. West antarctic ice sheet collapse: Chimera or clear danger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alley, R.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); MacAyeal, D.R. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The specter of a west antarctic collapse has been with us for 25 years. Recently, certain official assessments concerned primarily with the future response to projected global warming have concluded that Antarctica will not cause much sea-level rise within the planning horizon of a century or so. At the same time startling new results on ice sheet (in)stability have been emerging, pointing to less stability then previously believed. Some recent results are reviewed briefly: Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic show basally lubricated surges of the Laurentide ice sheet; the west antarctic ice sheet collapsed recently; the modern west antarctic ice sheet is changing rapidly locally; the bed of ice stream B is exceptionally well lubricated by water and water-saturated soft sediments; the modern ice sheet is thinning slowly on average; a model west antarctic ice sheet undergoes rapid collapses long after forcing and probably related to penetration of warmth to the bed. 23 refs.

  3. Interactions between ice sheets, climate and the solid Earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J. van den

    2007-01-01

    The melting of ice sheets in response to increasing temperatures is an important contribution to present day sea level rise. To predict the amount of sea level rise and to assess its impact on populated coastal regions, an increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice sheets is ess

  4. Plasma levels of beta-endorphin and serotonin in response to specific spinal based exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sokunbi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercises as the primary mode of treatment for low back disorders aim to achieve pain reduction, improvement in functional abilityand quality of life of for low back disorder sufferers. However the bio-chemical events associated with the use of these exercises in terms of theireffects on pain relieving neuropeptides have not been well established. Thisstudy was carried out to investigate the effects of spinal stabilisation, backextension and treadmill walking exercises on plasma levels of serotonin andbeta-endorphin.Twenty volunteers (10 males and 10 females without low back pain participated in the study. They were randomly allocated either to one of theexercise groups, where participants carried out one of the spinal stabilisation, back extension and treadmill walkingexercises or the control (no exercise group. The main outcome measures used in this study were plasma levels of serotonin and beta-endorphin measured with Enzyme linked immuno absorbent assay (ELISA technique.The results of this study showed that spinal stabilisation and treadmill walking exercises produced significantincrease in plasma serotonin levels (P < 0.05 however there were no significant changes in the plasma levels of beta-endorphin in all the exercise groups (P > 0.05.It could be that biochemical effects associated with stabilisation and treadmill walking exercises therefore mayinvolve production of serotonin and its release into the plasma.

  5. Influence of water/O₂ plasma treatment on cellular responses of PCL and PET surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu Şaşmazel, Hilal; Aday, Sezin; Manolache, Sorin; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2011-01-01

    In this study, low pressure water/O₂ plasma treatment was performed in order to obtain COOH functionalities on the surface of poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) membranes as well as non-woven polyester fabric (NWPF) discs. The plasma treatments were performed in a cylindrical, capacitively coupled RF-plasma-reactor and then following steps were performed: in situ (oxalyl chloride vapors) gas/solid reaction to convert -OH functionalities into -COCl groups; and hydrolysis under open laboratory conditions using air moisture for final-COOH functionalities. COOH and OH functionalities on modified surfaces were detected quantitatively by using fluorescent labeling technique and an UVX 300G sensor. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) was used to evaluate the relative surface atomic compositions and the carbon and oxygen linkages located in non-equivalent atomic positions of untreated and modified surfaces. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis showed that nanoscale features of the PCL surfaces are dramatically changed during the surface treatments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicated the changes in the relatively smooth appearance of the untreated NWPF discs after the plasma treatment. Periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts were used in cell culture studies. Cell culture results showed that plasma treated PCL membranes and NWPF discs were favorable for the PDL cell spreading, growth and viability due to the presence of functional groups and/or nanotopographies on their surfaces.

  6. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  7. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known...... as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events would add to our knowledge of the climatic system and – hopefully – enable better forecasts. Likewise, to forecast possible future sea level rise it is crucial to correctly model the large ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. This project is divided into two parts...

  8. Relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in stationary incompressible MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic configurations with strong localized current concentrations and vortices play an important role in the dissipation of energy in space and astrophysical plasma. Within this work we investigate the relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in incompressible, stationary equilibria. For this approach it is helpful that the similar mathematical structure of magnetohydrostatics and stationary incompressible hydrodynamics allows us to transform static equilibria into stationary ones. The main control function for such a transformation is the profile of the Alfvén-Mach number MA, which is always constant along magnetic field lines, but can change from one field line to another. In the case of a global constant MA, vortices and electric current concentrations are parallel. More interesting is the nonlinear case, where MA varies perpendicular to the field lines. This is a typical situation at boundary layers like the magnetopause, heliopause, the solar wind flowing around helmet streamers and at the boundary of solar coronal holes. The corresponding current and vortex sheets show in some cases also an alignment, but not in every case. For special density distributions in 2-D, it is possible to have current but no vortex sheets. In 2-D, vortex sheets of field aligned-flows can also exist without strong current sheets, taking the limit of small Alfvén Mach numbers into account. The current sheet can vanish if the Alfvén Mach number is (almost constant and the density gradient is large across some boundary layer. It should be emphasized that the used theory is not only valid for small Alfvén Mach numbers MA << 1, but also for MA ≲ 1. Connection to other theoretical approaches and observations and physical effects in space plasmas are presented. Differences in the various aspects of theoretical investigations of current sheets and vortex

  9. Non-oriented electrical sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissonneau, Pierre

    1984-02-01

    After placing the economic and technological importance of non-oriented magnetic sheets on the same level as that of grain-oriented sheets, the recent stages in the history of non-oriented sheets are recalled. The progress made in the knowledge of the physics of magnetism now allows the functions of the principal properties of non-oriented sheets to be analyzed. Current production of non-oriented sheets is marked by an evolution towards a split of the market between top-grade sheets, which could still be improved significantly, and lower grades, for which the cost of production continues to be practically the only determining factor.

  10. A combination of CO2 laser and plasma surface modification of poly(etheretherketone) to enhance osteoblast response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Wang, Zhecun; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-07-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK tends to hinder its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, we demonstrate a dual modification method, which combines the laser and plasma surface treatment to combine advantages of both chemical states and microstructures for osteoblasts responses. While the plasma treatment introduces surface carboxyl groups (sbnd COOH) onto PEEK surface, the laser treatment constructs microstructures over the PEEK surface. Our results indicated that sbnd COOH as well as microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure are constructed on PEEK surface and plasma treatment has no apparent effect on the morphology of microstructures produced by laser micromachining. Unexpectedly, the superior mechanical properties of PEEK were maintained irrespective of the treatment used. Compared to native PEEK and single treated PEEK, dual modified PEEK is more favorable for pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Moreover, cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblasts responses to dual treated PEEK surface, which gives beneficial information of its potential use in orthopedic or dental implants.

  11. Response of cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase to plasma viscosity modulation in acute isovolemic hemodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyanatt Kanokwiroon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is generally expressed in endocardial cells, vascular endothelial cells and ventricular myocytes. However, there is no experimental study elucidating the relationship between cardiac eNOS expression and elevated plasma viscosity in low oxygen delivery pathological conditions such as hemorrhagic shock-resuscitation and hemodilution. This study tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma viscosity increases cardiac eNOS expression in a hemodilution model, leading to positive effects on cardiac performance. Materials and Methods: Two groups of golden Syrian hamster underwent an acute isovolemic hemodilution where 40% of blood volume was exchanged with 2% (low-viscogenic plasma expander [LVPE] or 6% (high-viscogenic plasma expander [HVPE] of dextran 2000 kDa. In control group, experiment was performed without hemodilution. All groups were performed in awake condition. Experimental parameters, i.e., mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, heart rate, hematocrit, blood gas content and viscosity, were measured. The eNOS expression was evaluated by eNOS Western blot analysis. Results: After hemodilution, MAP decreased to 72% and 93% of baseline in the LVPE and HVPE, respectively. Furthermore, pO 2 in the LVPE group increased highest among the groups. Plasma viscosity in the HVPE group was significantly higher than that in control and LVPE groups. The expression of eNOS in the HVPE group showed higher intensity compared to other groups, especially compared with the control group. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that cardiac eNOS has responded to plasma viscosity modulation with HVPE and LVPE. This particularly supports the previous studies that revealed the positive effects on cardiac function in animals hemodiluted with HVPE.

  12. Renewable Energy Project Development Assistance (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Tribes selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  13. Association between plasma antibody response and protection in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss immersion vaccinated against Yersinia ruckeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Raida

    Full Text Available A key hallmark of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the generation of antigen-specific antibodies from B cells. Fish are the most primitive gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates possessing an adaptive immune system. Vaccination of rainbow trout against enteric redmouth disease (ERM by immersion in Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers a high degree of protection to the fish. The immune mechanisms responsible for protection may comprise both cellular and humoral elements but the role of specific immunoglobulins in this system has been questioned and not previously described. The present study demonstrates significant increase in plasma antibody titers following immersion vaccination and significantly reduced mortality during Y. ruckeri challenge.Rainbow trout were immersion-vaccinated, using either a commercial ERM vaccine (AquaVac™ ERM vet or an experimental Y. ruckeri bacterin. Half of the trout vaccinated with AquaVac™ ERM vet received an oral booster (AquaVac™ ERM Oral vet. Sub-groups of the fish from each group were subsequently exposed to 1 x 10⁹ CFU Y. ruckeri/ml either eight or twenty-six weeks post vaccination (wpv. All vaccinated groups showed 0% mortality when challenged, which was highly significant compared to the non-vaccinated controls (40 and 28% mortality eight and twenty-six weeks post vaccination (wpv, respectively (P<0.0001. Plasma samples from all groups of vaccinated fish were taken 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 26 wpv. and Y. ruckeri specific IgM antibody levels were measured with ELISA. A significant increase in titers was recorded in vaccinated fish, which also showed a reduced bacteremia during challenge. In vitro plasma studies showed a significantly increased bactericidal effect of fresh plasma from vaccinated fish indicating that plasma proteins may play a role in protection of vaccinated rainbow trout.

  14. Plasma cytokine response, lipid peroxidation and NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle following maximum progressive swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Cleto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine lipid peroxidation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle and the plasma cytokine profile following maximum progressive swimming. Adult male Swiss mice (N = 15 adapted to the aquatic environment were randomly divided into three groups: immediately after exercise (EX1, 3 h after exercise (EX2 and control. Animals from the exercising groups swam until exhaustion, with an initial workload of 2% of body mass attached to the tail. Control mice did not perform any exercise but were kept immersed in water for 20 min. Maximum swimming led to reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in skeletal muscle, as indicated by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS levels (4062.67 ±1487.10 vs 19,072.48 ± 8738.16 nmol malondialdehyde (MDA/mg protein, control vs EX1. Exercise also promoted NF-κB activation in soleus muscle. Cytokine secretion following exercise was marked by increased plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 levels were reduced following exercise and remained reduced 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05. Plasma levels of other cytokines investigated, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin-12 (IL-12, were not altered by exercise. The present findings showed that maximum swimming, as well as other exercise models, led to lipid peroxidation and NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle and increased plasma IL-6 levels. The plasma cytokine response was also marked by reduced IL-10 levels. These results were attributed to exercise type and intensity.

  15. Testosterone manipulation postcastration does not alter cloacal gland growth differences in male quail selected for divergent plasma corticosterone stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, J M; Satterlee, D G; Roberts, M L; Buchanan, K L; Evans, M R; Marin, R H

    2010-12-01

    Japanese quail selected for reduced (low-stress, LS) rather than exaggerated (high-stress, HS) plasma corticosterone response to brief restraint have consistently shown greater cloacal gland (CG) development, an androgen-dependent trait. In this study, the effects of testosterone implants on levels of plasma testosterone and CG development in castrated LS and HS quail were determined. Stress-line males were castrated and randomly allocated to 1 of 3 testosterone treatments: the empty testosterone (ET), low testosterone (LT), or high testosterone (HT) implant group. Cloacal gland volume was determined at 4 weekly intervals that represented ranges of 1 to 9 d, 8 to 17 d, 15 to 24 d, and 22 to 31 d after castration and testosterone implantation. Levels of plasma testosterone were also assessed at the end of the study. Development of the CG was affected by quail line (LS > HS), testosterone treatment (HT > LT > ET), and time of measurement (1 to 9 d quail, but not in ET-treated quail). However, even though HT implant treatments induced higher CG development than did LT treatments beyond the first interval of CG volume measurement, and despite the finding of greater CG volumes in LS than HS quail during the last 2 measurement intervals within each of the LT and HT groups, no interaction was observed between testosterone implant dosages and quail stress line on CG volume. Thus, by the end of the study, regardless of testosterone dose, CG volume was consistently greater in LS quail than in their HS counterparts. In addition, although, as expected, the testosterone implant treatment significantly altered levels of plasma testosterone (HT > LT > ET), neither quail line nor its interaction with testosterone treatment affected plasma testosterone. The present findings suggest that the often-observed depressed CG development in the HS line may be independent of testosterone effects.

  16. Background diet and fat type alters plasma lipoprotein response but not aortic cholesterol accumulation in F1B golden syrian hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary modification alters plasma lipoprotein profiles and atherosclerotic lesion progression in humans and some animal models. Variability in response to diet induced atherosclerosis has been reported in hamsters. Assessed was the interaction between background diet composition and dietary fat typ...

  17. Plasma microRNA profile as a predictor of early virological response to interferon treatment in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Chen, Cuncun; Wu, Min; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Jiming; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Zhanqin; Wu, Jingdi; Wang, Jiefei; Chen, Xiaorong; Huang, Tao; Chen, Lixiang; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) and pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) treatment of chronic hepatitis B leads to a sustained virological response in a limited proportion of patients and has considerable side effects. To find novel markers associated with prognosis of IFN therapy, we investigated whether a pretreatment plasma microRNA profile could be used to predict early virological response to IFN. We performed microRNA microarray analysis of plasma samples from 94 patients with chronic hepatitis B who received IFN therapy. The microRNA profiles from 13 liver biopsy samples were also measured. The OneR feature ranking and incremental feature selection method were used to rank and optimize the number of features in the model. Support vector machine prediction engine and jack-knife cross-validation were used to generate and evaluate the prediction model. The optimized model consisting of 11 microRNAs yielded a 74.2% overall accuracy in the training group and was independently confirmed in the test group (71.4% accuracy). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses confirmed its independent association with early virological response (OR=7.35; P=2.12×10(-5)). Combining the microRNA profile with the alanine aminotransferase level improved the overall accuracy from 73.4% to 77.3%. Co-transfection of an HBV replicative construct with microRNA mimics revealed that let-7f, miR-939 and miR-638 were functionally associated with the HBV life cycle. The 11 microRNA signatures in plasma, together with basic clinical variables, might provide an accurate method to assist in medication decisions and improve the overall sustained response to IFN treatment.

  18. Plasma Renin Activity Predicts Blood Pressure Responses to β-Blocker and Thiazide Diuretic as Monotherapy and Add-On Therapy for Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T.; Schwartz, Gary L.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Gums, John G.; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Johnson, Julie A.; Bailey, Kent R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Age and race categories or renin profiling have been recommended to predict blood pressure responses to monotherapy with a β-blocker or thiazide diuretic. Whether these or other characteristics predict blood pressure responses when the drugs are administered as add-on therapy is uncertain. METHODS We evaluated predictors of blood pressure response in 363 men and women ≤65 years of age with primary hypertension (152 blacks, 211 whites), 86 of whom (24%) were untreated and 277 of whom (76%) were withdrawn from previous antihypertensive drugs before randomization to either atenolol followed by addition of hydrochlorothiazide (N = 180) or hydrochlorothiazide followed by addition of atenolol (N = 183). Responses were determined by home blood pressure averages before and after each drug administration. Race, age, plasma renin activity, and other characteristics including pretreatment blood pressure levels were incorporated into linear regression models to quantify their contributions to prediction of blood pressure responses. RESULTS Plasma renin activity and pretreatment blood pressure level consistently contributed to prediction of systolic and diastolic responses to each drug administered as mono- and as add-on therapy. Higher plasma renin activity was consistently associated with greater blood pressure responses to atenolol and lesser responses to hydrochlorothiazide. The predictive effects of plasma renin activity were statistically independent of race, age, and other characteristics. CONCLUSIONS Plasma renin activity and pretreatment blood pressure level predict blood pressure responses to atenolol and hydrochlorothiazide administered as mono- and as add-on therapy in men and women ≤65 years of age. PMID:20725057

  19. Ground-Based Radar Detection of the Inner Boundary of the Ion Plasma Sheet and its Response to the Changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    T. Jayachandran1, J. W. MacDougall2, D. R. Moorcroft2, and E. F. Donovan3 1Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick Fredericton , New...ES) Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick Fredericton , New Brunswick, Canada 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  20. Production (information sheets)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    Documentation sheets: Geo energy 2 Integrated System Approach Petroleum Production (ISAPP) The value of smartness 4 Reservoir permeability estimation from production data 6 Coupled modeling for reservoir application 8 Toward an integrated near-wellbore model 10 TNO conceptual framework for "E&P Unce

  1. Burns Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Answers page . Share Print E-mail House Image Highlight Header Learn More Highlight Body Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on April 06, 2016 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  2. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  3. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  4. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  5. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10-30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Glucose-stimulated insulin response in pregnant sheep following acute suppression of plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriskandarajah Nadarajah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA concentrations in non-pregnant animals have been reported to decrease pancreatic responsiveness. As ovine gestation advances, maternal insulin concentrations fall and NEFA concentrations increase. Experiments were designed to examine if the pregnancy-associated rise in NEFA concentration is associated with a reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose in vivo. We investigated the possible relationship of NEFA concentrations in regulating maternal insulin concentrations during ovine pregnancy at three physiological states, non-pregnant, non-lactating (NPNL, 105 and 135 days gestational age (dGA, term 147+/- 3 days. Methods The plasma concentrations of insulin, growth hormone (GH and ovine placental lactogen (oPL were determined by double antibody radioimmunoassay. Insulin responsiveness to glucose was measured using bolus injection and hyperglycaemic clamp techniques in 15 non-pregnant, non-lactating ewes and in nine pregnant ewes at 105 dGA and near term at 135 dGA. Plasma samples were also collected for hormone determination. In addition to bolus injection glucose and insulin Area Under Curve calculations, the Mean Plasma Glucose Increment, Glucose Infusion Rate and Mean Plasma Insulin Increment and Area Under Curve were determined for the hyperglycaemic clamp procedures. Statistical analysis of data was conducted with Students t-tests, repeated measures ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA. Results Maternal growth hormone, placental lactogen and NEFA concentrations increased, while basal glucose and insulin concentrations declined with advancing gestation. At 135 dGA following bolus glucose injections, peak insulin concentrations and insulin area under curve (AUC profiles were significantly reduced in pregnant ewes compared with NPNL control ewes (p Conclusions Results suggest that despite an acute suppression of circulating NEFA concentrations during pregnancy, the associated steroids and hormones

  7. A combination of CO{sub 2} laser and plasma surface modification of poly(etheretherketone) to enhance osteoblast response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Zhecun [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • COOH and microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure were constructed on PEEK surface by a combination of CO{sub 2} laser and plasma treatment. • The mechanical properties of PEEK are maintained after single or dual surface treatment. • Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation were improved remarkably on dual treated PEEK surface. • Cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. - Abstract: Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK tends to hinder its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, we demonstrate a dual modification method, which combines the laser and plasma surface treatment to combine advantages of both chemical states and microstructures for osteoblasts responses. While the plasma treatment introduces surface carboxyl groups (−COOH) onto PEEK surface, the laser treatment constructs microstructures over the PEEK surface. Our results indicated that −COOH as well as microgrooves containing micropores or microcraters structure are constructed on PEEK surface and plasma treatment has no apparent effect on the morphology of microstructures produced by laser micromachining. Unexpectedly, the superior mechanical properties of PEEK were maintained irrespective of the treatment used. Compared to native PEEK and single treated PEEK, dual modified PEEK is more favorable for pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Moreover, cell pseudopodia protrude into the micropores or microcraters, in favor of forming firmer bone-implant integration. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblasts responses to dual treated PEEK surface, which

  8. Residual stress in plasma sprayed ceramic turbine tip and gas path seal specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Mullen, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The residual stresses in a ceramic sheet material used for turbine blade tip gas path seals, were estimated. These stresses result from the plasma spraying process which leaves the surface of the sheet in tension. To determine the properties of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 sheet material, its load deflection characteristics were measured. Estimates of the mechanical properties for sheet materials were found to differ from those reported for plasma sprayed bulk materials.

  9. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H. [Center for Human Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E. [Center for Human Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  10. Plasma cortisol stress response in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus influences susceptibility to Edwardeseilla ictaluri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortisol is a primary stress hormone in fish as its plasma variations correlate with the occurrence of various stressful situations. Past studies have demonstrated that fish subjected to handling stress or poor water quality had a reduced ability to resist pathogens. Channel catfish fingerlings th...

  11. Physiological and transcriptional response of Bacillus cereus treated with low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims - This study was conducted to investigate the inactivation kinetics of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells upon exposure to low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma and to reveal the mode of inactivation by transcriptome profiling. Methods and Results - Exponentially growing B. cereus cells were

  12. Plasma norepinephrine, blood pressure and heart rate response to graded change in body position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, V; Kem, D C

    1985-12-01

    In this study, 44 human subjects underwent either an orthostatic postural change (supine to stand, n = 17) or a graded change in body position (head-up) on a tilt-table (n = 27). No significant changes in systolic blood pressure or mean blood pressure were observed during either maneuver; significant increases, under both conditions, were observed in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations after orthostatic position change increased significantly (supine 181 +/- 14 (S.E.M.) pg X ml-1; stand, 472 +/- 35 pg X ml-1, p less than 0.01). Plasma norepinephrine concentrations during graded postural change increased proportionately with increasing degrees of tilt (r = 0.76, p less than 0.01). A significant correlation between plasma norepinephrine and heart rate was observed during both positional change maneuvers (graded tilt-table, r = 0.80, p less than 0.01; orthostatic, r = 0.50, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that the degree of sympathetic nervous system activity for blood pressure regulation during graded postural change is appropriately reflected by plasma norepinephrine concentrations.

  13. Responses of Plasma Acetate Metabolism to Hop (Humulus lupulus L. in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Al-Mamun, Kunio Goto, Sota Chiba, Hiroaki Sano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An isotope dilution method using [1-13C]sodium (Na acetate was conducted to determine the effect of feeding hop (Humulus lupulus L. residues on plasma acetate metabolism in six adult crossbred sheep. The sheep were fed 63 g/kg BW0.75/d of either mixed hay (MH-diet of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L. and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L. at a 60:40 ratio or MH-diet and hop-residues (Hop-diet at 85:15 ratio with a crossover design for each of 3 week period. The isotope dilution method using single injection of [1-13C]Na acetate was performed thrice; before feeding (BF, 2 h after feeding (2F and 4 h after feeding (4F, on the 21st day of each dietary treatment. Plasma acetate concentration tended to increase (P= 0.06 and turnover rate was numerically higher (P= 0.16 for MH-diet than Hop-diet. Plasma glucose, NEFA, VFA and lactic acid concentrations were similar between dietary treatments. In both the diets, although plasma concentration of acetate did not change, turnover rate increased significantly (P= 0.02 2F than BF. Hop-residues did not show any negative impacts on acetate metabolism as well as physiology of animals in the present experimental conditions, hence thereby it could be used as an alternative to MH-diet for rearing sheep.

  14. Analysis of inflammatory response in human plasma samples by an automated multicapillary electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anders; Hansson, Lars-Olof

    2004-01-01

    A new automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis instrument with a new high-resolution (HR) buffer (Capillarys with HR buffer) for analysis of human plasma proteins was evaluated. Albumin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG and IgM were determined nephelometrically in 200 patient plasma samples. The same samples were then analyzed on the Capillarys system (Sebia, Paris, France). The albumin concentration from the nephelometric determination was used for quantification of the individual peaks in the capillary electrophoresis (CE) electropherogram. There was strong linear correlation between the nephelometric and electrophoretic determination of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (R(2) = 0.906), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (R(2) =0.894) and haptoglobin (R(2) = 0.913). There was also good correlation between the two determinations of gamma-globulins (R(2) = 0.883), while the correlation was weaker for fibrinogen (R(2) = 0.377). The Capillarys instrument is a reliable system for plasma protein analysis, combining the advantages of full automation, good analytical performance and high throughput. The HR buffer in combination with albumin quantification allows the simultaneous quantification of inflammatory markers in plasma samples without the need for nephelometric determination of these proteins.

  15. Plasma catecholamine, corticosterone and glucose responses to repeated stress in rats : Effect of interstressor interval length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; Koopmans, S.J.; Slangen, J L; Van der Gugten, J

    1990-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A), corticosterone (CS) and glucose concentrations were determined in blood frequently sampled via a cardiac catheter from freely behaving rats exposed to five successive trials of water-immersion stress (WIS) with an interval between successive trials (interst

  16. Phenylketonuria : Plasma phenylalanine responses to different distributions of the daily phenylalanine allowance over the day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanSpronsen, FJ; vanDijk, T; Smit, GPA; vanRijn, M; Reijngoud, DJ; Berger, R; Heymans, HSA

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To achieve smooth control of plasma phenylalanine concentrations in phenylketonuric patients, it is advocated to divide the daily intake of natural protein and amino acid supplements equally over the meals. However, this may be quite an encumbrance for the patient. We, therefore, investig

  17. History of the Greenland Ice Sheet: paleoclimatic insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John T.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Clarke, G.K.C.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Funder, S.; Marshall, S.J.; Miller, G.H.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Muhs, D.R.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Polyak, L.; White, J.W.C.

    2010-01-01

    Paleoclimatic records show that the GreenlandIce Sheet consistently has lost mass in response to warming, and grown in response to cooling. Such changes have occurred even at times of slow or zero sea-level change, so changing sea level cannot have been the cause of at least some of the ice-sheet changes. In contrast, there are no documented major ice-sheet changes that occurred independent of temperature changes. Moreover, snowfall has increased when the climate warmed, but the ice sheet lost mass nonetheless; increased accumulation in the ice sheet's center has not been sufficient to counteract increased melting and flow near the edges. Most documented forcings and ice-sheet responses spanned periods of several thousand years, but limited data also show rapid response to rapid forcings. In particular, regions near the ice margin have responded within decades. However, major changes of central regions of the ice sheet are thought to require centuries to millennia. The paleoclimatic record does not yet strongly constrain how rapidly a major shrinkage or nearly complete loss of the ice sheet could occur. The evidence suggests nearly total ice-sheet loss may result from warming of more than a few degrees above mean 20th century values, but this threshold is poorly defined (perhaps as little as 2 °C or more than 7 °C). Paleoclimatic records are sufficiently sketchy that the ice sheet may have grown temporarily in response to warming, or changes may have been induced by factors other than temperature, without having been recorded.

  18. Formation and Reconnection of Three-Dimensional Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun s corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to apply directly the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of 2D reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet- Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection

  19. Response of Plasmodium falciparum to cotrimoxazole therapy: relationship with plasma drug concentrations and dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf F; Rønn, Anita M; Alifrangis, Michael;

    2005-01-01

    , MSP-1, MSP-2, and glutamate-rich protein before treatment and upon recrudescence showed that all recurring parasites were recrudescences. The plasma levels of TRM, AcSMX, and SMX indicated adequate drug absorption in all patients. This suggests parasite resistance as a cause of treatment failure...... treatment and at days 3, 7, and 14 or upon recrudescence to ascertain drug absorption. Forty patients (89%) had an adequate clinical response, one patient (2%) had an early treatment failure response, while four patients (8%) showed late treatment failure responses. Genotyping of merozoite surface protein 1....... The presence of dhfr Ile 51 and Asn 108 alone or coupled with dhps Ala-436 among parasites that were cleared after treatment indicates that these alleles alone are insufficient to cause in vivo resistance. However, the presence of the triple mutant dhfr (Ile-51/Arg-59/Asn-108) with the dhps Gly-437 genotype...

  20. Reproductive organ and vascular specific promoter of the rice plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase mediates environmental stress responses in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Md Kamrul Huda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase is a transport protein in the plasma membrane of cells and helps in removal of calcium (Ca(2+ from the cell, hence regulating Ca(2+ level within cells. Though plant Ca(2+ATPases have been shown to be involved in plant stress responses but their promoter regions have not been well studied. RESULTS: The 1478 bp promoter sequence of rice plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase contains cis-acting elements responsive to stresses and plant hormones. To identify the functional region, serial deletions of the promoter were fused with the GUS sequence and four constructs were obtained. These were differentially activated under NaCl, PEG cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments. We demonstrated that the rice plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase promoter is responsible for vascular-specific and multiple stress-inducible gene expression. Only full-length promoter showed specific GUS expression under stress conditions in floral parts. High GUS activity was observed in roots with all the promoter constructs. The -1478 to -886 bp flanking region responded well upon treatment with salt and drought. Only the full-length promoter presented cold-induced GUS expression in leaves, while in shoots slight expression was observed for -1210 and -886 bp flanking region. The -1210 bp deletion significantly responded to exogenous methyl viologen and abscisic acid induction. The -1210 and -886 bp flanking region resulted in increased GUS activity in leaves under methyl jasmonate treatments, whereas in shoots the -886 bp and -519 bp deletion gave higher expression. Salicylic acid failed to induce GUS activities in leaves for all the constructs. CONCLUSIONS: The rice plasma membrane Ca(2+ATPase promoter is a reproductive organ-specific as well as vascular-specific. This promoter contains drought, salt, cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate related cis-elements, which regulated gene expression. Overall, the

  1. Numerical analysis of the current sheet near a magnetic null line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brushlinskii, K.V.; Zaborov, A.M.; Syrovatskii, S.I.

    1980-03-01

    A mathematical model is constructed for the two-dimensional MHD plasma flow near a magnetic null line in a perturbing electric field. A numerical study is also carried out. This type of flow is the key element of the reconnection of magnetic lines of force and is being studied in connection with the mechanism for solar flares, the magnetospheres of planes, and certain questions in thermonuclear fusion. The results show that during this flow a nearly steady-state current sheet forms with a characteristic two-dimensional configuration. The sheet has four outgrowths corresponding to slow MHD shock waves. The geometric shape of the sheet and the maximum current in it are determined primarily by the plasma conductivity. The dependence of the sheet properties on the gas pressure is very weak. The thermal conditions in the flow, which are related to the heat conduction and radiation, strongly affect the plasma density distribution on the current sheet.

  2. Current sheets at three-dimensional magnetic nulls: Effect of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontin, D. I.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Galsgaard, K.

    2007-05-01

    The nature of current sheet formation in the vicinity of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic null points is investigated. The particular focus is upon the effect of the compressibility of the plasma on the qualitative and quantitative properties of the current sheet. An initially potential 3D null is subjected to shearing perturbations, as in a previous paper [Pontin et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 052106 (2007)]. It is found that as the incompressible limit is approached, the collapse of the null point is suppressed and an approximately planar current sheet aligned to the fan plane is present instead. This is the case regardless of whether the spine or fan of the null is sheared. Both the peak current and peak reconnection rate are reduced. The results have a bearing on previous analytical solutions for steady-state reconnection in incompressible plasmas, implying that fan current sheet solutions are dynamically accessible, while spine current sheet solutions are not.

  3. Polymer microlenses for quantifying cell sheet mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelard-Garnier, Guillaume; Zimberlin, Jessica A; Sikora, Christian B; Wadsworth, Patricia; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between individual cells and their substrate have been studied extensively over the past decade; however, understanding how these interactions change as cells interact with neighboring cells in the development of a cell sheet, or early stage tissue, is less developed. We use a recently developed experimental technique for quantifying the mechanics of confluent cell sheets. Living cells are cultured on a thin film of polystyrene [PS], which is attached to a patterned substrate of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) [PDMS] microwells. As cells attach to the substrate and begin to form a sheet, they apply sufficient contractile force to buckle the PS film over individual microwells to form a microlens array. The curvature for each microlens is measured by confocal microscopy and can be related to the strain and stress applied by the cell sheet using simple mechanical analysis for the buckling of thin films. We demonstrate that this technique can provide insight into the important materials properties and length scales that govern cell sheet responses, especially the role of stiffness of the substrate. We show that intercellular forces can lead to significantly different behaviors than the ones observed for individual cells, where focal adhesion is the relevant parameter.

  4. Ice Sheet Thermomety Using Wideband Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, K. C.; Johnson, J.; Durand, M. T.; Aksoy, M.; Tsang, L.; Wang, T.; Tan, S.; Macelloni, G.; Brogioni, M.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    There are good correlations between L-band brightness temperature data from the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission and the thickness and surface temperature of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. These data along with independent, radiative-transfer modeling-studies suggest that it is possible to estimate the internal, physical temperatures of ice sheets to some, perhaps great, depth. Such a measurement is necessary to improve ice sheet models which rely on temperature-dependent deformation rates within the body of the ice sheet. In this paper we review our most recent modeling which now includes the effect of layering in near surface firn. We go on to compare L-band satellite data with modeled brightness temperatures at several sites in Greenland and Antarctica where physical temperature has been measured. We show the brightness temperature response over the band 0.5 to 2 GHz including the influence of basal-water on the low frequency range of this band. We conclude by summarizing our current design of an ultra-wide-band radiometer intended to make ice sheet thermometry measurements. We plan to deploy the airborne instrument in Greenland in two years' time.

  5. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  6. Critical speed of a sharp response for floating ice sheet subjected to moving load with uniform speed%匀速移动载荷激励浮冰层大幅响应的临界速度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志宏; 鹿飞飞; 丁志勇; 李宇辰

    2016-01-01

    从弹性薄板振动微分方程和势流理论出发,基于二维傅里叶积分变换方法,建立了匀速移动载荷作用于弹性浮冰层的位移响应和临界速度的理论计算模型。通过数值计算获得了浮冰层的位移响应和移动载荷的临界速度,分析了水深、冰厚、载荷强度、载荷半径等因素对位移响应和临界速度的影响。计算结果表明:基于奇点法和能量法获得的临界速度具有很好的一致性;冰层的位移变形随载荷速度的增加先增后减,在临界速度时达到最大;水深的增加导致临界速度和位移变形增加,冰层厚度的增加导致临界速度增加,但位移变形减小;移动载荷强度的增大或载荷半径的减小虽然使冰层的位移变形增加,但对临界速度的影响很小。%Based on the differential equation of thin elastic vibrating plate and the potential flow theo‐ry ,the theoretical models about the critical speed and the displacement response of floating ice sheet subjected to moving load with uniform speed were established by applying the two‐dimensional Fourier transform method .T he displacement response of floating ice sheet and the critical speed of moving load were solved by numerical method .The influences of the depth of water ,the thickness of ice sheet ,the strength and the radius of load on displacement response and critical speed were analyzed . A good agreement exists between critical speeds acquired by singularity method and energy method . Vertical displacement deflection increases ,reaches its maximum value at critical speed ,and then de‐creases with the increasing speed of moving load .The increase of depth results in increasing critical speed and vertical displacement deflection ,the increase of thickness of ice sheet causes increasing criti‐cal speed but decreasing vertical displacement deflection .The increasing strength or decreasing the ra‐dius of moving load makes the

  7. Response to Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf cavity warming in a coupled ocean-ice sheet model - Part 1: The ocean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Ralph; Goeller, Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    The Regional Antarctic ice and Global Ocean (RAnGO) model has been developed to study the interaction between the world ocean and the Antarctic ice sheet. The coupled model is based on a global implementation of the Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) with a mesh refinement in the Southern Ocean, particularly in its marginal seas and in the sub-ice-shelf cavities. The cryosphere is represented by a regional setup of the ice flow model RIMBAY comprising the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf and the grounded ice in its catchment area up to the ice divides. At the base of the RIMBAY ice shelf, melt rates from FESOM's ice-shelf component are supplied. RIMBAY returns ice thickness and the position of the grounding line. The ocean model uses a pre-computed mesh to allow for an easy adjustment of the model domain to a varying cavity geometry. RAnGO simulations with a 20th-century climate forcing yield realistic basal melt rates and a quasi-stable grounding line position close to the presently observed state. In a centennial-scale warm-water-inflow scenario, the model suggests a substantial thinning of the ice shelf and a local retreat of the grounding line. The potentially negative feedback from ice-shelf thinning through a rising in situ freezing temperature is more than outweighed by the increasing water column thickness in the deepest parts of the cavity. Compared to a control simulation with fixed ice-shelf geometry, the coupled model thus yields a slightly stronger increase in ice-shelf basal melt rates.

  8. Low Back Pain Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low Back Pain Fact Sheet You are here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Low Back Pain Fact Sheet What ... reduction among workers using lumbar support belts, many companies that have ... training and ergonomic awareness programs. The reported injury reduction ...

  9. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  10. Nonlinear coupling of lower hybrid waves to the kinetic low-frequency plasma response in the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.

    A hybrid kinetic-fluid model is developed which is relevant to lower hybrid spikelets observed in the topside auroral ionosphere [Vago et al., 1992; Eriksson et al., 1994]. In contrast to previous fluid models [Shapiro et al., 1995; Tam and Chang, 1995; Seyler, 1994; Shapiro et al., 1993] our linear low frequency plasma response is magnetized and kinetic. Fluid theory is used to incorporate the nonlinear wave coupling. Performing a linear stability analysis, we calculate the growth rate for the modulational instability, driven by a lower hybrid wave pump. We find that both the magnetic and kinetic effects inhibit the modulational instability.

  11. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    challenge. Results Fecal dry matter decreased (P = 0.003) and nearly half (44.4%) the piglets developed diarrhea on day 2 and 3 postweaning. The concentration of plasma immunoglobulin A was higher (P blood cells increased...... continuously (P Differences in the percentages of neutrophils (P = 0.029) and lymphocytes (P = 0.022) were seen, but the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio did not differ in the period after weaning. A clear separation of the metabolomic profile data for day 0 and day 4...... postweaning was observed with a principal components analysis (PCA) scores plot, and the data for day 11 were located between those for day 0 and day 4 postweaning. The plasma levels of proline, taurine, and carnitine were higher, whereas those of betaine, creatine, L-arginine and acetylcarnitine were lower...

  12. Magnetotail Current Sheet Thinning and Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in Global Modeling of Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotail current sheet thinning and magnetic reconnection are key elements of magnetospheric substorms. We utilized the global MHD model BATS-R-US with Adaptive Mesh Refinement developed at the University of Michigan to investigate the formation and dynamic evolution of the magnetotail thin current sheet. The BATSRUS adaptive grid structure allows resolving magnetotail regions with increased current density up to ion kinetic scales. We investigated dynamics of magnetotail current sheet thinning in response to southwards IMF turning. Gradual slow current sheet thinning during the early growth phase become exponentially fast during the last few minutes prior to nightside reconnection onset. The later stage of current sheet thinning is accompanied by earthward flows and rapid suppression of normal magnetic field component $B-z$. Current sheet thinning set the stage for near-earth magnetic reconnection. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is non-gyrotropic effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. One of the major challenges in global MHD modeling of the magnetotail magnetic reconnection is to reproduce fast reconnection rates typically observed in smallscale kinetic simulations. Bursts of fast reconnection cause fast magnetic field reconfiguration typical for magnetospheric substorms. To incorporate nongyritropic effects in diffusion regions we developed an algorithm to search for magnetotail reconnection sites, specifically where the magnetic field components perpendicular to the local current direction approaches zero and form an X-type configuration. Spatial scales of the diffusion region and magnitude of the reconnection electric field are calculated self-consistently using MHD plasma and field parameters in the vicinity of the reconnection site. The location of the reconnection sites and spatial scales of the diffusion region are updated

  13. Body weight, concentration of plasma leptin and serum testosterone of ratsin response to feeding of chitosan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Hao Sun; Zhi Fang Liu; Shu Ran Wang; Chao Xu Wang; Kun Wu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of chitosan on rat body weight, concetration of plasma leptin and serumtestosterone.METHODS Five groups of rats were respectively given access to basic diet, high fat diet and high fat dietwith different doses of chitosan (1.5%,3.0% and 6.0% of chitosan in high fat diet respectively) for 7 wk.All rats were weighed once a week. By the end of wk 7, the animals were sacrificed and their blood sampleswere taken, the concentration of plasma leptin and serum testosterone were determined by RIA Kit method.RESULTS At the end of wk7, the average body weight of rats treated with high-fat diet was 67.3 gheavier than that with the basic diet, however, the average body weight of rats treated with high doses of chitosan in high-fat diet was 56.3 g lighter than that with high-fat diet (P < 0.01). In addition, plasma leptinconcentration in rats treated with high fat diet was significantly different from those with basic diet(P<0.01); plasma leptin concentration in rats treated with high dose of chitosan in high-fat diet wassignificantly lower than those with high-fat diet (P<0.01), but was significantly higher than those withbasic diet (P<0.05). Serum testosterone level in rats treated with high-fat diet was significantly lower thanthose with basic diet (P<0.01). Serum testosterone levels in rats administrated high dose of chitosan inhigh-fat diet were sighificantly lower than those with high-fat diet (P<0.01).CONCLUSION Chitosan prevents the increase of rat body weight induced by high-fat diet, and lowersplasma leptin and serum testosterone in rats.

  14. Mars plasma system response to ICME transients at different phases of the solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Lester, Mark; Hall, Benjamin E. S.; Witasse, Olivier; Mays, M. Leila; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Andrews, David G.; Cartacci, Marco; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Milan, Stephen E.; Ambrosi, Richard M.; Odstrcil, Dusan; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Imber, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    We assess the reaction of the full Martian plasma system after the impact of different Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICME) at Mars at different levels of solar activity and phases of the solar cycle 23/24. The Mars' plasma system behaviour is characterised from the surface of the planet to the bow shock position, which is the most external boundary where the solar wind directly interacts with the Martian system. Events at the extreme phases of the solar cycle will be given special attention, i.e. low and high solar activity periods, since variations in the maximum of the thermal pressure of the ionosphere are a key factor in order to create a significant/weak plasma obstacle to compete with the solar wind. The strength of this obstacle is ultimately controlled by the long-term EUV flux modulations. Likewise, the effect of such ICMEs on the plasma boundaries and induced magnetic fields within the ionosphere will be analysed in detail. The study uses data from TIMED, GOES and STEREOs observatories at 1 AU to monitor the solar irradiance and the propagation of such space weather transits. At Mars, long-term data come from Mars Express and Mars Odyssey missions since both spacecraft have been working from more than 12 years. The MAVEN and MSL missions provide supplementary data. Solar wind propagation modelling is used through the WSA-ENLIL+Cone model, as well as several numerical simulations of the ionosphere of Mars for such scenarios are made through the numerical/fluid TRANSMARS model.

  15. Early Growth Response-1 Plays a Non-redundant Role in the Differentiation of B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Eunkyeong; Paik, Doo-Jin; Youn, Jeehee

    2015-06-01

    Early growth response (Egr)-1 is a Cys2-His2-type zincfinger transcription factor. It has been shown to induce survival and proliferation of immature and mature B cells, respectively, but its role in the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells remains unclear. To examine the effects of Egr-1 deficiency on the activation of B cells, naive B cells from Egr1 (-/-) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates were activated to proliferate and differentiate, and then assayed by FACS. Proportions of cells undergoing proliferation and apoptosis did not differ between Egr1 (-/-) and WT mice. However, Egr1 (-/-) B cells gave rise to fewer plasma cells than WT B cells. Consistently, Egr1 (-/-) mice produced significantly lower titer of antigen-specific IgG than their WT littermates upon immunization. Our results demonstrate that Egr-1 participates in the differentiation program of B cells into plasma cells, while it is dispensable for the proliferation and survival of mature B cells.

  16. A rapid UPLC-MS/MS assay for eicosanoids in human plasma: Application to evaluate niacin responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tricia M; Poloyac, Samuel M; Anderson, Kacey B; Waddell, Brooke L; Messamore, Erik; Yao, Jeffrey K

    2017-01-18

    A rapid and sensitive method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed to simultaneously quantify hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (HETE), dihydroxyeicosatrienoic (DiHETrE), epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET), and prostaglandin metabolites of arachidonic acid in human plasma. Sample preparation consisted of solid phase extraction with Oasis HLB (30mg) cartridges for all metabolites. Separation of HETEs, EETs, and DiHETrEs was achieved on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18, 1.7µm (100×2.1mm) reversed-phase column (Waters Corp, Millford, MA) with negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection. A second injection of the same extracted sample allowed for separation and assessment of prostaglandin metabolites under optimized UPLC-MS/MS conditions. Additionally, the endogenous levels of these metabolites in five different matrices were determined in order to select the optimal matrix for assay development. Human serum albumin was shown to have the least amount of endogenous metabolites, a recovery efficiency of 79-100% and a matrix effect of 71 - 100%. Linear calibration curves ranging from 0.416 to 66.67ng/ml were validated. Inter-assay and intra-assay variance was less than 15% at most concentrations. This method was successfully applied to quantify metabolite levels in plasma samples of healthy control subjects receiving niacin administration to evaluate the association between niacin administration and eicosanoid plasma level response.

  17. The acute response of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a result of exercise in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Gunnar; Lira, Claudia Mallea; Johansson, Jon; Wisén, Anita; Wohlfart, Björn; Ekman, Rolf; Westrin, Asa

    2009-10-30

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophins are believed to play an important role in affective disorders. In this study we investigated plasma-BDNF response during an incremental exercise test in 18 patients suffering from moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) and 18 controls. The patients were not treated with antidepressants or neuroleptics. Possible associations between plasma plasma-BDNF levels, dexamethasone suppression test cortisol levels and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were also tested. No difference in basal BDNF levels between patients and controls was found. BDNF increased significantly during exercise in both male and female patients as well as in male controls, with no significant differences between the groups. BDNF levels declined after exercise, but after 60 min of rest BDNF levels showed tendencies to increase again in male patients. No correlation between BDNF and cortisol or MADRS scores was found. We conclude that unmedicated patients with moderate depression and normal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis do not have a disturbed peripheral BDNF release during exercise. The BDNF increase 60 min after interruption of exercise in male patients might indicate up-regulated BDNF synthesis, but this needs to be further investigated in future studies.

  18. Plasma Apolipoprotein-M (ApoM Response to a Circuit Resistance Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbass Ghanbari-Niaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein M (Apo-M is a human novel protein of apolipoprotein classes and highly expressed in liver and kidney tissues. ApoM is mainly associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and act as a chaperone for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, promotes mobilization of cellular cholesterol, formation of larger-size of pre β-HDL, and a new biomarker in sepsis. The level of apoM in plasma/serum is affected by several factors such as pregnancy, hyperglycemia, plasma leptin concentration, obesity, diabetes, insulin concentration and physical exercise. It has been shown that the level of plasma ApoM was significantly lower in strenuous exercise group when compared with the non-exercise group. In the present study a reduction was observed after the 4 weeks of circuit resistance training program. This reduction might be due to a decrease in ApoM expression in liver and kidney or an increase in ApoM clearance, degradation and excretion in urine.

  19. Surface plasmon resonance measurements of plasma antibody avidity during primary and secondary responses to anthrax protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Heather E; Stewart, Shelley M; Kepler, Thomas B; Sempowski, Gregory D; Alam, S Munir

    2014-02-01

    Establishment of humoral immunity against pathogens is dependent on events that occur in the germinal center and the subsequent induction of high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Quantitative assays that allow monitoring of affinity maturation and duration of antibody responses can provide useful information regarding the efficacy of vaccines and adjuvants. Using an anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and alum model antigen/adjuvant system, we describe a methodology for monitoring antigen-specific serum antibody concentration and avidity by surface plasmon resonance during primary and secondary immune responses. Our analyses showed that following a priming dose in mice, rPA-specific antibody concentration and avidity increases over time and reaches a maximal response in about six weeks, but gradually declines in the absence of antigenic boost. Germinal center reactions were observed early with maximal development achieved during the primary response, which coincided with peak antibody avidity responses to primary immunization. Boosting with antigen resulted in a rapid increase in rPA-specific antibody concentration and five-fold increase in avidity, which was not dependent on sustained GC development. The described methodology couples surface plasmon resonance-based plasma avidity measurements with germinal center analysis and provides a novel way to monitor humoral responses that can play a role in facilitating vaccine and adjuvant development.

  20. Rolling Up a Monolayer MoS2 Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianling; Wang, Guole; Li, Xiaomin; Lu, Xiaobo; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Hua; Chen, Wei; Du, Luojun; Liao, Mengzhou; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Peng; Zhu, Jianqi; Bai, Xuedong; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2016-07-01

    MoS2 nanoscrolls are formed by argon plasma treatment on monolayer MoS2 sheet. The nanoscale scroll formation is attributed to the partial removal of top sulfur layer in MoS2 during the argon plasma treatment process. This convenient, solvent-free, and high-yielding nanoscroll formation technique is also feasible for other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides.

  1. Dose-dependent response of plasma ghrelin and growth hormone concentrations to bovine ghrelin in Holstein heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThidarMyint, Hnin; Yoshida, Hiroko; Ito, Tetsuya; Kuwayama, Hideto

    2006-06-01

    The stimulatory effect of the novel gastric-derived hormone, ghrelin, on growth hormone (GH) secretion has been reported in domestic animals as well as in humans and rats. The octanoyl modification on the Ser3 residue of ghrelin appears to be essential for its endocrine activity. A major portion of circulatory ghrelin lacks acylation but possesses some biological activities other than GH stimulation; therefore, both types of acylated and des-acyl ghrelin are supposed to be important for energy homeostasis. The effects of pharmacological doses of rat and/or human ghrelin on GH secretion have been reported recently in ruminants; however, the physiological effect of exogenous bovine ghrelin on its own plasma level and on GH secretion is still unknown. Moreover, the RIA systems for the measurement of bovine active ghrelin and for bovine total ghrelin including acylated ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and all ghrelin peptides with an intact bovine C-terminal have not yet been validated. In this study, we established the RIA system for bovine ghrelin, and the dose-dependent effects of synthesized acylated bovine ghrelin(1-27) on plasma active and total ghrelin, GH, insulin and metabolites were measured in Holstein heifers. Six animals were intravenously injected with synthesized acylated bovine ghrelin (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0 microg/kg body weight (BW)) and plasma hormone concentrations were measured from serially collected samples. Bovine ghrelin RIA showed that the basal level of total ghrelin is approximately 16 times higher than that of active ghrelin in bovine plasma. Both forms of ghrelin were increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to bovine ghrelin injections, peak values were reached at 5 min after administration and returned to pre-injected values within 15 min. Plasma GH was responsive to all doses of bovine ghrelin in a dose-dependent manner, peaked as early as at 5-10 min after injection and returned to the basal value within 60 min. The GH area

  2. Dynamic of Current Sheets and Their Associated Particle Energization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makwan, Kirit [Univ. Chicago; Li, Xiaocan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhandrin, Vladimir [Univ. Washington; Daughton, William Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-08-19

    Magnetic reconnection in current sheets has relevance to Earth's magnetosphere, solar flares, high-energy astrophysics (pulsar wind nebula (e.g. Crab Nebula), gamma-ray bursts, black hole jets), and laboratory plasma/fusion. Data are shown for several cases with varying values of configuration energy Ec and β. Several conclusions were drawn: Depending on the “configuration energy”, the formation, shape, and lifetime of current sheets can vary. Plasma condition (configuration, β, driving, etc.) strongly affect the efficiency of particle acceleration. For low β and general “configuration energy”, particle heating is expected. For low β, large and long-lived current sheets, it is possible to produce highly non-thermal particles via collisionless plasmoid reconnection.

  3. Reducing slide sheet injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varcin-Coad, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    Slide sheets are often stated to be the cause of hand and forearm injuries. While there are many other possible reasons injuries to nursing staff, carer and client occur, the most important linking factors relating to musculoskeletal disorders and manual handling of people is the ongoing inappropriateness or lack of suitably designed and equipped work areas. As physiotherapist Lynn Varcin-Coad writes, staff are bearing the brunt of inefficiencies of design and lack of high order risk control.

  4. Reduction of plasma NEFA concentration by nicotinic acid enhances the response to insulin in feed-restricted Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, J A A; Pescara, J B; Grummer, R R

    2007-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the relationship between elevated plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration and insulin resistance in Holstein cows. Six nonlactating, nongestating, ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were blocked by body condition score and randomly assigned to a sequence of 2 treatments in a crossover design. Cows were offered legume and grass hay ad libitum supplemented with minerals and vitamins and were allowed free access to water and a trace mineralized salt block. Mobilization of body reserves was stimulated by withdrawing forage for 48 h before initiation of treatments. Treatments consisted of 11 hourly abomasal infusions of water (control) or nicotinic acid (NA; 6 mg/h per kg of body weight) as an antilipolytic agent. Infusions of NA decreased plasma NEFA concentration from 545 microEq/L to approximately 100 microEq/L within 2 h after initiation of treatments, and differences were maintained throughout infusions. Intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed 8 h after initiation of treatments and was followed by 3 h of blood sampling. The reduction of plasma NEFA concentration led to significantly greater glucose clearance rate (1.9 vs. 1.2%/min) and to decreased glucose half-life (37 vs. 58 min), time to reach basal concentration (81 vs. 114 min) and glucose response area under the curve during 180 min of sampling [6,942 vs. 10,085 (microIU/mL) x 180 min]. Enhanced glucose clearance was achieved when plasma NEFA was reduced by NA, despite lower insulin concentration (70.0 vs. 97.9 +/- 13.4 microIU/mL) and a tendency for smaller insulin response area under the curve during 180 min of sampling [7,646 vs. 12,104 +/- 2,587 (microIU/mL) x 180 min], reflecting an increased response to endogenous insulin. Based on literature, we do not expect NA to have altered glucose metabolism directly; therefore, this experiment demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between elevated NEFA and insulin resistance in Holstein cows.

  5. Plasma cytokines, chemokines and cellular immune responses in pre-school Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noone Cariosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with over one million deaths annually, particularly in children under five years. This study was the first to examine plasma cytokines, chemokines and cellular immune responses in pre-school Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum from four semi-urban villages near Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. Methods Blood was obtained from 231 children (aged 39–73 months who were classified according to mean P. falciparum density per μl of blood (uninfected (n = 89, low density (10,000, n = 22. IL-12p70, IL-10, Nitric oxide, IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17, IL-4 and TGF-β, C-C chemokine RANTES, MMP-8 and TIMP-1 were measured in plasma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained and examined markers of innate immune cells (CD14, CD36, CD56, CD54, CD11c AND HLA-DR. T-cell sub-populations (CD4, CD3 and γδTCR were intracellularly stained for IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF following polyclonal stimulation or stimulated with malaria parasites. Ascaris lumbricoides was endemic in these villages and all data were analysed taking into account the potential impact of bystander helminth infection. All data were analysed using SPSS 15 for windows and in all tests, p Results The level of P. falciparum parasitaemia was positively associated with plasma IL-10 and negatively associated with IL-12p70. The percentage of monocytes was significantly decreased in malaria-infected individuals while malaria parasitaemia was positively associated with increasing percentages of CD54+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cell populations. No association was observed in cytokine expression in mitogen-activated T-cell populations between groups and no malaria specific immune responses were detected. Although A. lumbricoides is endemic in these villages, an analysis of the data showed no impact of this helminth infection on P. falciparum parasitaemia or on immune responses associated with P. falciparum infection

  6. Plasma response measurements of external magnetic perturbations using electron cyclotron emission and comparisons to 3D ideal MHD equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Willensdorfer, M; Strumberger, E; Suttrop, W; Vanovac, B; Brida, D; Cavedon, M; Classen, I; Dunne, M; Fietz, S; Fischer, R; Kirk, A; Laggner, F M; Liu, Y Q; Odstrcil, T; Ryan, D A; Viezzer, E; Zohm, H; Luhmann, I C

    2016-01-01

    The plasma response from an external n = 2 magnetic perturbation field in ASDEX Upgrade has been measured using mainly electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics and a rigid rotating field. To interpret ECE and ECE-imaging (ECE-I) measurements accurately, forward modeling of the radiation transport has been combined with ray tracing. The measured data is compared to synthetic ECE data generated from a 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium calculated by VMEC. The measured amplitudes of the helical displacement in the midplane are in reasonable agreement with the one from the synthetic VMEC diagnostics. Both exceed the vacuum field calculations and indicate the presence of an amplified kink response at the edge. Although the calculated magnetic structure of this edge kink peaks at poloidal mode numbers larger than the resonant components |m| > |nq|, the displacement measured by ECE-I is almost resonant |m| ~ |nq|. This is expected from ideal MHD in the proximity of rational surfaces. VMEC and MARS-...

  7. Magnetic configurations of the tilted current sheets in magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the geometrical structures of tilted current sheet and tail flapping waves have been analysed based on multiple spacecraft measurements and some features of the tilted current sheets have been made clear for the first time. The geometrical features of the tilted current sheet revealed in this investigation are as follows: (1 The magnetic field lines (MFLs in the tilted current sheet are generally plane curves and the osculating planes in which the MFLs lie are about vertical to the equatorial plane, while the normal of the tilted current sheet leans severely to the dawn or dusk side. (2 The tilted current sheet may become very thin, the half thickness of its neutral sheet is generally much less than the minimum radius of the curvature of the MFLs. (3 In the neutral sheet, the field-aligned current density becomes very large and has a maximum value at the center of the current sheet. (4 In some cases, the current density is a bifurcated one, and the two humps of the current density often superpose two peaks in the gradient of magnetic strength, indicating that the magnetic gradient drift current is possibly responsible for the formation of the two humps of the current density in some tilted current sheets. Tilted current sheets often appear along with tail current sheet flapping waves. It is found that, in the tail flapping current sheets, the minimum curvature radius of the MFLs in the current sheet is rather large with values around 1 RE, while the neutral sheet may be very thin, with its half thickness being several tenths of RE. During the flapping waves, the current sheet is tilted substantially, and the maximum tilt angle is generally larger than 45°. The phase velocities of these flapping waves are several tens km/s, while their periods and wavelengths are several tens of minutes, and several earth radii, respectively. These tail flapping events generally last several hours and occur