WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma reactor modelisation

  1. Modelling of the hydrogen effects on the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor; Modelisation des effets de l'hydrogene sur la morphogenese des nanostructures de silicium hydrogene dans un reacteur plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brulin, Q

    2006-01-15

    This work pursues the goal of understanding mechanisms related to the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor through modeling techniques. Current technologies are first reviewed with an aim to understand the purpose behind their development. Then follows a summary of the possible studies which are useful in this particular context. The various techniques which make it possible to simulate the trajectories of atoms by molecular dynamics are discussed. The quantum methods of calculation of the interaction potential between chemical species are then developed, reaching the conclusion that only semi-empirical quantum methods are sufficiently fast to be able to implement an algorithm of quantum molecular dynamics on a reasonable timescale. From the tools introduced, a reflection on the nature of molecular metastable energetic states is presented for the theoretical case of the self-organized growth of a linear chain of atoms. This model - which consists of propagating the growth of a chain by the successive addition of the atom which least increases the electronic energy of the chain - shows that the Fermi level is a parameter essential to self organization during growth. This model also shows that the structure formed is not necessarily a total minimum energy structure. From all these numerical tools, the molecular growth of clusters can be simulated by using parameters from magnetohydrodynamic calculation results of plasma reactor modeling (concentrations of the species, interval between chemical reactions, energy of impact of the reagents...). The formation of silicon-hydrogen clusters is thus simulated by the successive capture of silane molecules. The structures formed in simulation at the operating temperatures of the plasma reactor predict the formation of spherical clusters constituting an amorphous silicon core covered by hydrogen. These structures are thus not in a state of minimum energy, contrary to certain experimental

  2. New modelling method for fast reactor neutronic behaviours analysis; Nouvelles methodes de modelisation neutronique des reacteurs rapides de quatrieme Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P.

    2011-05-23

    Due to safety rules running on fourth generation reactors' core development, neutronics simulation tools have to be as accurate as never before. First part of this report enumerates every step of fast reactor's neutronics simulation implemented in current reference code: ECCO. Considering the field of fast reactors that meet criteria of fourth generation, ability of models to describe self-shielding phenomenon, to simulate neutrons leakage in a lattice of fuel assemblies and to produce representative macroscopic sections is evaluated. The second part of this thesis is dedicated to the simulation of fast reactors' core with steel reflector. These require the development of advanced methods of condensation and homogenization. Several methods are proposed and compared on a typical case: the ZONA2B core of MASURCA reactor. (author) [French] Les criteres de surete qui regissent le developpement de coeurs de reacteurs de quatrieme generation implique l'usage d'outils de calcul neutronique performants. Une premiere partie de la these reprend toutes les etapes de modelisation neutronique des reacteurs rapides actuellement d'usage dans le code de reference ECCO. La capacite des modeles a decrire le phenomene d'autoprotection, a representer les fuites neutroniques au niveau d'un reseau d'assemblages combustibles et a generer des sections macroscopiques representatives est appreciee sur le domaine des reacteurs rapides innovants respectant les criteres de quatrieme generation. La deuxieme partie de ce memoire se consacre a la modelisation des coeurs rapides avec reflecteur acier. Ces derniers necessitent le developpement de methodes avancees de condensation et d'homogenisation. Plusieurs methodes sont proposees et confrontees sur un probleme de modelisation typique: le coeur ZONA2B du reacteur maquette MASURCA

  3. Modelisation of synchrotron radiation losses in realistic tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albajar, F.; Johner, J.; Granata, G.

    2000-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation losses become significant in the power balance of high-temperature plasmas envisaged for next step tokamaks. Due to the complexity of the exact calculation, these losses are usually roughly estimated with expressions derived from a plasma description using simplifying assumptions on the geometry, radiation absorption, and density and temperature profiles. In the present article, the complete formulation of the transport of synchrotron radiation is performed for realistic conditions of toroidal plasma geometry with elongated cross-section, using an exact method for the calculation of the absorption coefficient, and for arbitrary shapes of density and temperature profiles. The effects of toroidicity and temperature profile on synchrotron radiation losses are analyzed in detail. In particular, when the electron temperature profile is almost flat in the plasma center, as for example in ITB confinement regimes, synchrotron losses are found to be much stronger than in the case where the profile is represented by its best generalized parabolic approximation, though both cases give approximately the same thermal energy contents. Such an effect is not included in present approximate expressions. Finally, we propose a seven-variable fit for the fast calculation of synchrotron radiation losses. This fit is derived from a large database, which has been generated using a code implementing the complete formulation and optimized for massively parallel computing. (author)

  4. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  5. Modelling and control of a tokamak plasma; Modelisation et commande d`un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremond, S

    1995-10-18

    Vertically elongated tokamak plasmas, while attractive as regards Lawson criteria, are intrinsically instable. It is found that the open-loop instability dynamics is characterised by the relative value of two dimensionless parameters: the coefficient of inductive coupling between the vessel and the coils, and the coil damping efficiency on the plasma displacement relative to that of the vessel. Applications to Tore Supra -where the instability is due to the iron core attraction- and DIII-D are given. A counter-effect of the vessel, which temporarily reverses the effect of coil control on the plasma displacement, is seen when the inductive coupling is higher than the damping ratio. Precise control of the plasma boundary is necessary if plasma-wall interaction and/or coupling to heating antennas are to be monitored. A positional drift, of a few mm/s, which had been observed in the Tore Supra tokamak, is explained and corrected. A linear plasma shape response model is then derived from magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium calculation, and proved to be in good agreement with experimental data. An optimal control law is derived, which minimizes an integral quadratic criteria on tracking errors and energy expenditure. This scheme avoids compensating coil currents, and could render local plasma shaping more precise. (authors). 123 refs., 77 figs., 6 tabs., 4 annexes.

  6. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1980-11-01

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment

  7. Research on plasma core reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, G.A.; Barton, D.M.; Helmick, H.H.; Bernard, W.; White, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with 1-m-diam by 1-m-long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17-cm-thick by 89-cm-diam beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF 6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials were measured. Finally, an 85,000-cm 3 aluminum canister in the central region was fueled with UF 6 gas and fission density distributions determined. These results will be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation

  8. Plasma spheroidization of nickel powders in a plasma reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and size of the particles are among critical parameters ... shape components, which helps to conserve scarce raw materials. There are several methods of producing rapidly solidi- ... spherical nickel powders using the d.c. plasma reactor is.

  9. Plasma Diagnostics in High Density Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daltrini, A. M.; Moshkalyov, S.; Monteiro, M. J. R.; Machida, M.; Kostryukov, A.; Besseler, E.; Biasotto, C.; Diniz, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Langmuir electric probes and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics were developed for applications in high density plasmas. These diagnostics were employed in two plasma sources: an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma and an RF driven inductively coupled plasma (ICP) plasma. Langmuir probes were tested using a number of probing dimensions, probe tip materials, circuits for probe bias and filters. Then, the results were compared with the optical spectroscopy measurements. With these diagnostics, analyses of various plasma processes were performed in both reactors. For example, it has been shown that species like NH radicals generated in gas phase can have critical impact on films deposited by ECR plasmas. In the ICP source, plasmas in atomic and molecular gases were shown to have different spatial distributions, likely due to nonlocal electron heating. The low-to-high density transitions in the ICP plasma were also studied. The role of metastables is shown to be significant in Ar plasmas, in contrast to plasmas with additions of molecular gases

  10. Modelisation of soluble aerosols behaviour in the atmosphere of a PWR nuclear reactor in case of accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.F.

    1984-07-01

    After a short description of soluble aerosols accidental production in a PWR, a calculation model is given for physical properties of a gaz and steam mixture in a given atmosphere. Then the equilibrium of a saline drop with steam is studied. From the MASON equation, a calculation model is given for kinetic of volume variation of a saline drop and also a sensitivity study showing the little influence of the boundary layer on the drop surface, of the drop settling and of the thermodynamic conditions of the containment. As a numerical application, this condensation/evaporation model, and a simplified one with faster numerical resolution, is introduced in the AEROSOLS codes of the CEA-DEMT. The AEROSOLS/A2 suppose a log-normal distribution of the suspended particles in the containment. This application shows the very large sensitivity of the condensation depending on the moisture ratio inside the reactor building, and its primary importance on the behaviour of the aerosols. It is also shown that the simplified model gives a very little difference compared with the detailed model, and that the computation time is much more lower [fr

  11. Modelling of heterogenous neutron leakages in a nuclear reactor; Modelisation des fuites heterogenes de neutrons dans un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohleber, X

    1997-11-17

    The TIBERE Model is a neutron leakage method based on B{sub 1} heterogeneous transport equation resolution. In this work, we have studied the influence of the reflection mode at the boundary of the assembly. In particular the White boundary condition has been implemented in the APOLLO2 neutron transport code. We have compared the two TIBERE kinds of boundary conditions (specular and white) with the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method in the modelling of some reactors. We have remarked the better capability of the TIBERE Model to compute voided assemblies. The white boundary condition is also able to compute a completely voided assembly and, besides, wins a factor 10 in CPU time in comparison with the specular boundary condition. These two heterogenous leakage formalisms have been tested on a partially voided experiment and have shown that the TIBERE Model can compute this kind of situation with a greater precision than the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method, and with a shorter computational time. (author)

  12. Plasma startup patterns in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Tone, Tatsuzo.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma startup patterns are studied from the viewpoint of net power loss represented by the total power loss less the α-particle heating power. The existence is shown of a critical temperature of plasma at which the net power loss becomes independent of plasma density. Observations are made which indicate that the net power loss decreases with lowering plasma density in the range below the critical temperature and vice versa, whether governed by empirical or trapped-ion scaling laws. A startup pattern is presented which minimizes the net power loss during startup, and which prescribes that: (1) The plasma density should be kept as low as possible until the plasma is heated up to the critical temperature; (2) thereafter, the plasma density should be increased to its steady state value while retaining the critical temperature; and (3) finally, with the density kept constant, the temperature should be further raised to its steady state value. The net power loss at critical temperature represents the lower limit of heating power required to bring the plasma to steady state in tokamak reactors. (author)

  13. Modelisation numerique d'un actionneur plasma de type decharge a barriere dielectrique par la methode de derive-diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jacques

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is a proposed device for active for control in order to improve the performances of aircraft and turbomachines. Essentially, these actuators are made of two electrodes separated by a layer of dielectric material and convert electricity directly into flow. Because of the high costs associated with experiences in realistic operating conditions, there is a need to develop a robust numerical model that can predict the plasma body force and the effects of various parameters on it. Indeed, this plasma body force can be affected by atmospheric conditions (temperature, pressure, and humidity), velocity of the neutral flow, applied voltage (amplitude, frequency, and waveform), and by the actuator geometry. In that respect, the purpose of this thesis is to implement a plasma model for DBD actuator that has the potential to consider the effects of these various parameters. In DBD actuator modelling, two types of approach are commonly proposed, low-order modelling (or phenomenological) and high-order modelling (or scientific). However a critical analysis, presented in this thesis, showed that phenomenological models are not robust enough to predict the plasma body force without artificial calibration for each specific case. Moreover, there are based on erroneous assumptions. Hence, the selected approach to model the plasma body force is a scientific drift-diffusion model with four chemical species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutrals). This model was chosen because it gives consistent numerical results comparatively with experimental data. Moreover, this model has great potential to include the effect of temperature, pressure, and humidity on the plasma body force and requires only a reasonable computational time. This model was independently implemented in C++ programming language and validated with several test cases. This model was later used to simulate the effect of the plasma body force on the laminar

  14. Towards self-consistent plasma modelisation in presence of neoclassical tearing mode and sawteeth: effects on transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, V.; Huynh, P.; Merle, A.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.; Contributors, JET; the EUROfusion-IM Team

    2017-12-01

    The neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) increase the effective heat and particle radial transport inside the plasma, leading to a flattening of the electron and ion temperature and density profiles at a given location depending on the safety factor q rational surface (Hegna and Callen 1997 Phys. Plasmas 4 2940). In burning plasma such as in ITER, this NTM-induced increased transport could reduce significantly the fusion performance and even lead to a disruption. Validating models describing the NTM-induced transport in present experiment is thus important to help quantifying this effect on future devices. In this work, we apply an NTM model to an integrated simulation of current, heat and particle transport on JET discharges using the European transport simulator. In this model, the heat and particle radial transport coefficients are modified by a Gaussian function locally centered at the NTM position and characterized by a full width proportional to the island size through a constant parameter adapted to obtain the best simulations of experimental profiles. In the simulation, the NTM model is turned on at the same time as the mode is triggered in the experiment. The island evolution is itself determined by the modified Rutherford equation, using self-consistent plasma parameters determined by the transport evolution. The achieved simulation reproduces the experimental measurements within the error bars, before and during the NTM. A small discrepancy is observed on the radial location of the island due to a shift of the position of the computed q = 3/2 surface compared to the experimental one. To explain such small shift (up to about 12% with respect to the position observed from the experimental electron temperature profiles), sensitivity studies of the NTM location as a function of the initialization parameters are presented. First results validate both the transport model and the transport modification calculated by the NTM model.

  15. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  16. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, S.; Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , HCN, and NH 3 ). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined

  17. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  18. Characterization and modelling of microwave multi dipole plasmas. Application to multi dipolar plasma assisted sputtering; Caracterization et modelisation des plasmas micro-onde multi-dipolaires. Application a la pulverisation assistee par plasma multi-dipolaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Tan Vinh [Universite Joseph Fourier/CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2006-07-01

    The scaling up of plasma processes in the low pressure range remains a question to be solved for their rise at the industrial level. One solution is the uniform distribution of elementary plasma sources where the plasma is produced via electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) coupling. These elementary plasma sources are made up of a cylindrical permanent magnet (magnetic dipole) set at the end of a coaxial microwave line. Although of simple concept, the optimisation of these dipolar plasma sources is in fact a complex problem. It requires the knowledge, on one hand, of the configurations of static magnetic fields and microwave electric fields, and, on the other hand, of the mechanisms of plasma production in the region of high intensity magnetic field (ECR condition), and of plasma diffusion. Therefore, the experimental characterisation of the operating ranges and plasma parameters has been performed by Langmuir probes and optical emission spectroscopy on different configurations of dipolar sources. At the same time, in a first analytical approach, calculations have been made on simple magnetic field configurations, motion and trajectory of electrons in these magnetic fields, and the acceleration of electrons by ECR coupling. Then, the results have been used for the validation of the numerical modelling of the electron trajectories by using a hybrid PIC (particle-in-cell) / MC (Monte Carlo) method. The experimental study has evidenced large operating domains, between 15 and 200 W of microwave power, and from 0.5 to 15 mTorr argon pressure. The analysis of plasma parameters has shown that the region of ECR coupling is localised near the equatorial plane of the magnet and dependent on magnet geometry. These characterizations, applied to a cylindrical reactor using 48 sources, have shown that densities between 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} could be achieved in the central part of the volume at a few mTorr argon pressures. The modelling of electron trajectories near

  19. Characterization and modeling of multi-dipolar microwave plasmas: application to multi-dipolar plasma assisted sputtering; Caracterisation et modelisation des plasmas micro-onde multi-dipolaires: application a la pulverisation assistee par plasma multi-dipolaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T.V

    2006-12-15

    The scaling up of plasma processes in the low pressure range remains a question to be solved for their rise at the industrial level. One solution is the uniform distribution of elementary plasma sources where the plasma is produced via electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) coupling. These elementary plasma sources are made up of a cylindrical permanent magnet (magnetic dipole) set at the end of a coaxial microwave line. Although of simple concept, the optimisation of these dipolar plasma sources is in fact a complex problem. It requires the knowledge, on one hand, of the configurations of static magnetic fields and microwave electric fields, and, on the other hand, of the mechanisms of plasma production in the region of high intensity magnetic field (ECR condition), and of plasma diffusion. Therefore, the experimental characterisation of the operating ranges and plasma parameters has been performed by Langmuir probes and optical emission spectroscopy on different configurations of dipolar sources. At the same time, in a first analytical approach, calculations have been made on simple magnetic field configurations, motion and trajectory of electrons in these magnetic fields, and the acceleration of electrons by ECR coupling. Then, the results have been used for the validation of the numerical modelling of the electron trajectories by using a hybrid PIC (particle-in-cell) / MC (Monte Carlo) method. The experimental study has evidenced large operating domains, between 15 and 200 W of microwave power, and from 0.5 to 15 mtorr argon pressure. The analysis of plasma parameters has shown that the region of ECR coupling is localised near the equatorial plane of the magnet and dependent on magnet geometry. These characterizations, applied to a cylindrical reactor using 48 sources, have shown that densities between 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} could be achieved in the central part of the volume at a few mtorr argon pressures. The modelling of electron trajectories near

  20. Shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.Y.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Dust particle contamination of wafers in reactive ion etching (RIE) plasma tools is a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. It is common to find that particles collected on surfaces or downstream of the etch chamber are agglomerates of smaller monodisperse spherical particles. The shapes of the agglomerates vary from compact, high fractal dimension structures to filamentary, low fractal dimension structures. These shapes are important with respect to the transport of particles in RIE tools under the influence electrostatic and ion drag forces, and the possible generation of polarization forces. A molecular dynamics simulation has been developed to investigate the shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors. We find that filamentary, low fractal dimension structures are generally produced by smaller (<100s nm) particles in low powered plasmas where the kinetic energy of primary particles is insufficient to overcome the larger Coulomb repulsion of a compact agglomerate. This is analogous to the diffusive regime in neutral agglomeration. Large particles in high powered plasmas generally produce compact agglomerates of high fractal dimension, analogous to ballistic agglomeration of neutrals. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  2. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantham, T.S.; Biancardi, F.R.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrail applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times

  3. Matching of dense plasma focus devices with fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Heindler, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential role of dense plasma focus devices as compact neutron sources for fissile fuel breeding in conjunction with existing fission reactors is considered. It is found that advanced plasma focus devices can be used effectively in conjunction with neutronically efficient fission reactors to constitute ''self-sufficient'' breeders. Correlations among the various parameters such as the power output and conversion ratio of the fission reactor with the neutron yield and capacitor bank energy of the dense plasma focus device are presented and discussed

  4. Critical plasma-materials issues for fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Bauer, W.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-materials interactions are a dominant driving force in the design of fusion power reactors. This paper presents a summary of plasma-materials interactions research. Emphasis is placed on critical aspects related to reactor design. Particular issues to be addressed are plasma edge characterization, hydrogen recycle, impurity introduction, and coating development. Typical wall fluxes in operating magnetically confined devices are summarized. Recent calculations of tritium inventory and first wall permeation, based on laboratory measurements of hydrogen recycling, are given for various reactor operating scenarios. Impurity introduction/wall erosion mechanisms considered include sputtering, chemical erosion, and evaporation (melting). Finally, the advanced material development for in-vessel components is discussed. (author)

  5. Numerical Modelling of Wood Gasification in Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirka, Ivan; Živný, Oldřich; Hrabovský, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2017), s. 947-965 ISSN 0272-4324 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma modelling * CFD * Thermal plasma reactor * Biomass * Gasification * Syngas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11090-017-9812-z

  6. Radioactive waste combustion / vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling; Combustion - vitrification de dechets radioactifs par plasma d'arc: modelisation de la thermique et de la dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, B

    2003-07-01

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and volume power... (author)

  7. Radioactive waste combustion-vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling; Combustion - vitrification de dechets radioactifs par plasma d'arc: modelisation de la thermique et de la dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, B

    2003-06-01

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and voluminal power... (author)

  8. Modeling of the equilibrium of a tokamak plasma; Modelisation de l'equilibre d'un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandgirard, V

    1999-12-01

    The simulation and the control of a plasma discharge in a tokamak require an efficient and accurate solving of the equilibrium because this equilibrium needs to be calculated again every microsecond to simulate discharges that can last up to 1000 seconds. The purpose of this thesis is to propose numerical methods in order to calculate these equilibrium with acceptable computer time and memory size. Chapter 1 deals with hydrodynamics equation and sets up the problem. Chapter 2 gives a method to take into account the boundary conditions. Chapter 3 is dedicated to the optimization of the inversion of the system matrix. This matrix being quasi-symmetric, the Woodbury method combined with Cholesky method has been used. This direct method has been compared with 2 iterative methods: GMRES (generalized minimal residual) and BCG (bi-conjugate gradient). The 2 last chapters study the control of the plasma equilibrium, this work is presented in the formalism of the optimized control of distributed systems and leads to non-linear equations of state and quadratic functionals that are solved numerically by a quadratic sequential method. This method is based on the replacement of the initial problem with a series of control problems involving linear equations of state. (A.C.)

  9. Systemic model for the aid for operating of the reactor Siloe; Modelisation systeme pour l`aide a l`exploitation du reacteur de recherche Siloe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, J.C.; Moulin, V.; Monge, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires; Baradel, C. [ITMI APTOR, 38 - Meylan (France)

    1995-12-31

    The Service of the Reactor Siloe (CEA/DRN/DRE/SRS), fully aware of the abilities and knowledge of his teams in the field of research reactor operating, has undertaken a project of knowledge engineering in this domain. The following aims have been defined: knowledge capitalization for the installation in order to insure its perenniality and valorization, elaboration of a project for the aid of the reactor operators. This article deals with the different actions by the SRS to reach the aims: realization of a technical model for the operation of the Siloe reactor, development of a knowledge-based system for the aid for operating. These actions based on a knowledge engineering methodology, SAGACE, and using industrial tools will lead to an amelioration of the security and the operating of the Siloe reactor. (authors). 13 refs., 7 figs.

  10. TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY OXIDES IN HF-PLASMA REACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhvalov , A.; Dresvin , S.; Levitskaya , T.; Paskalov , G.; Philippov , A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental studies of SiO2 NaBSi, MgO, W and some other materials treatment in induction type high-frequency plasma under atmospheric pressure are presented. Key study objective - optimization of plasma installation operating modes with maximum efficiency -0.6 -0.7 ; spheroidization extent -90-99%, size of treated particles 1-500 mkm. Diagnostics of thermophysical and gasodynamical plasma reactor specifications has been presented.

  11. Applying chemical engineering concepts to non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro AFFONSO, NOBREGA; Alain, GAUNAND; Vandad, ROHANI; François, CAUNEAU; Laurent, FULCHERI

    2018-06-01

    Process scale-up remains a considerable challenge for environmental applications of non-thermal plasmas. Undersanding the impact of reactor hydrodynamics in the performance of the process is a key step to overcome this challenge. In this work, we apply chemical engineering concepts to analyse the impact that different non-thermal plasma reactor configurations and regimes, such as laminar or plug flow, may have on the reactor performance. We do this in the particular context of the removal of pollutants by non-thermal plasmas, for which a simplified model is available. We generalise this model to different reactor configurations and, under certain hypotheses, we show that a reactor in the laminar regime may have a behaviour significantly different from one in the plug flow regime, often assumed in the non-thermal plasma literature. On the other hand, we show that a packed-bed reactor behaves very similarly to one in the plug flow regime. Beyond those results, the reader will find in this work a quick introduction to chemical reaction engineering concepts.

  12. Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Frye, J. G.; Riley, Brian J.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2011-04-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed an assessment of a Hybrid Plasma/Filter system as an alternative to conventional methods for collective protection. The key premise of the hybrid system is to couple a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor with reactive adsorption to provide a broader envelope of protection than can be provided through a single-solution approach. The first step uses highly reactive species (e.g. oxygen radicals, hydroxyl radicals, etc.) created in a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor to destroy the majority (~75% - 90%) of an incoming threat. Following the NTP reactor an O3 reactor/filter uses the O3 created in the NTP reactor to further destroy the remaining organic materials. This report summarizes the laboratory development of the Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter to protect against a ‘worst-case’ simulant, methyl bromide (CH3Br), and presents a preliminary engineering assessment of the technology to Joint Expeditionary Collective Protection performance specifications for chemical vapor air purification technologies.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Plasma in Arc and RF Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic-Markovic, B.; Markovic, Z.; Mohai, I.; Szepvolgyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results on studies of molecular spectra emitted in the initial stages of fullerene formation during the processing of graphite powder in induction RF reactor and evaporation of graphite electrodes in arc reactor are presented in this paper. It was found that C2 radicals were dominant molecular species in both plasmas. C2 radicals have an important role in the process of fullerene synthesis. The rotational-vibrational temperatures of C2 and CN species were calculated by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated ones. The results of optical emission study of C2 radicals generated in carbon arc plasma have shown that rotational temperature of C2 species depends on carbon concentration and current intensity significantly. The optical emission study of induction RF plasma and SEM analysis of graphite powder before and after plasma treatment have shown that evaporation of the processed graphite powder depends on feed rate and composition of gas phase significantly. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that in the plasma region CN radicals could be formed by the reaction of C2 species with atomic nitrogen at smaller loads. At larger feed rate of graphite powder, CN species were produced by surface reaction of the hot carbon particles with nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen in induction RF plasma reduces the fullerene yield significantly. The fullerene yield obtained in two different reactors was: 13% in arc reactor and 4.1% in induction RF reactor. However, the fullerene production rate was higher in induction RF reactor-6.4 g/h versus 1.7 g/h in arc reactor

  14. Plasma engineering innovations for the ORNL TNS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma β values up to 10 percent and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors

  15. Plasma engineering analysis of a small torsatron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacatski, J.T.; Houlberg, W.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    This study examines the plasma physics and reactor engineering feasibility of a small, medium aspect ratio, high-beta, l = 2, D-T torsatron power reactor, based on the magnetic configuration of the Advanced Toroidal Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Plasma analyses are performed to assess whether confinement in a small, average radius plasma is sufficient to yield an ignited or high-Q driven device. Much of the physics assessment focuses on an evaluation of the radial electric field created by the nonambipolar particle flux. Detailed transport simulations are done with both fixed and self-consistent evolution of the radial electric field. Basic reactor engineering considerations taken into account are neutron wall loading, maximum magnetic field at the helical coils, coil shield thickness, and tritium breeding blanket-shield thickness

  16. Plasma Reactors and Plasma Thrusters Modeling by Ar Complete Global Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Berenguer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete global model for argon was developed and adapted to plasma reactor and plasma thruster modeling. It takes into consideration ground level and excited Ar and Ar+ species and the reactor and thruster form factors. The electronic temperature, the species densities, and the ionization percentage, depending mainly on the pressure and the absorbed power, have been obtained and commented for various physical conditions.

  17. Calculation system for physical analysis of boiling water reactors; Modelisation des phenomenes physiques specifiques aux reacteurs a eau bouillante, notamment le couplage neutronique-thermohydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouveret, F

    2001-07-01

    Although Boiling Water Reactors generate a quarter of worldwide nuclear electricity, they have been only little studied in France. A certain interest now shows up for these reactors. So, the aim of the work presented here is to contribute to determine a core calculation methodology with CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) codes. Vapour production in the reactor core involves great differences in technological options from pressurised water reactor. We analyse main physical phenomena for BWR and offer solutions taking them into account. BWR fuel assembly heterogeneity causes steep thermal flux gradients. The two dimensional collision probability method with exact boundary conditions makes possible to calculate accurately the flux in BWR fuel assemblies using the APOLLO-2 lattice code but induces a very long calculation time. So, we determine a new methodology based on a two-level flux calculation. Void fraction variations in assemblies involve big spectrum changes that we have to consider in core calculation. We suggest to use a void history parameter to generate cross-sections libraries for core calculation. The core calculation code has also to calculate the depletion of main isotopes concentrations. A core calculation associating neutronics and thermal-hydraulic codes lays stress on points we still have to study out. The most important of them is to take into account the control blade in the different calculation stages. (author)

  18. Calculation system for physical analysis of boiling water reactors; Modelisation des phenomenes physiques specifiques aux reacteurs a eau bouillante, notamment le couplage neutronique-thermohydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouveret, F

    2001-07-01

    Although Boiling Water Reactors generate a quarter of worldwide nuclear electricity, they have been only little studied in France. A certain interest now shows up for these reactors. So, the aim of the work presented here is to contribute to determine a core calculation methodology with CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) codes. Vapour production in the reactor core involves great differences in technological options from pressurised water reactor. We analyse main physical phenomena for BWR and offer solutions taking them into account. BWR fuel assembly heterogeneity causes steep thermal flux gradients. The two dimensional collision probability method with exact boundary conditions makes possible to calculate accurately the flux in BWR fuel assemblies using the APOLLO-2 lattice code but induces a very long calculation time. So, we determine a new methodology based on a two-level flux calculation. Void fraction variations in assemblies involve big spectrum changes that we have to consider in core calculation. We suggest to use a void history parameter to generate cross-sections libraries for core calculation. The core calculation code has also to calculate the depletion of main isotopes concentrations. A core calculation associating neutronics and thermal-hydraulic codes lays stress on points we still have to study out. The most important of them is to take into account the control blade in the different calculation stages. (author)

  19. A plasma arc reactor for fullerene research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. T.; Dyer, P. L.; Dykes, J. W.; Klavins, P.; Anderson, P. E.; Liu, J. Z.; Shelton, R. N.

    1994-12-01

    A modified Krätschmer-Huffman reactor for the mass production of fullerenes is presented. Fullerene mass production is fundamental for the synthesis of higher and endohedral fullerenes. The reactor employs mechanisms for continuous graphite-rod feeding and in situ slag removal. Soot collects into a Soxhlet extraction thimble which serves as a fore-line vacuum pump filter, thereby easing fullerene separation from soot. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for yield determination is reported. This TGA method is faster and uses smaller samples than Soxhlet extraction methods which rely on aromatic solvents. Production of 10 g of soot per hour is readily achieved utilizing this reactor. Fullerene yields of 20% are attained routinely.

  20. Converting a Microwave Oven into a Plasma Reactor: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Law

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of domestic microwave ovens as plasma reactors for applications ranging from surface cleaning to pyrolysis and chemical synthesis. This review traces the developments from initial reports in the 1980s to today’s converted ovens that are used in proof-of-principle manufacture of carbon nanostructures and batch cleaning of ion implant ceramics. Information sources include the US and Korean patent office, peer-reviewed papers, and web references. It is shown that the microwave oven plasma can induce rapid heterogeneous reaction (solid to gas and liquid to gas/solid plus the much slower plasma-induced solid state reaction (metal oxide to metal nitride. A particular focus of this review is the passive and active nature of wire aerial electrodes, igniters, and thermal/chemical plasma catalyst in the generation of atmospheric plasma. In addition to the development of the microwave oven plasma, a further aspect evaluated is the development of methodologies for calibrating the plasma reactors with respect to microwave leakage, calorimetry, surface temperature, DUV-UV content, and plasma ion densities.

  1. Contribution to the modelling of gas-solid reactions and reactors; Contribution a la modelisation des reactions et des reacteurs gaz-solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patisson, F

    2005-09-15

    Gas-solid reactions control a great number of major industrial processes involving matter transformation. This dissertation aims at showing that mathematical modelling is a useful tool for both understanding phenomena and optimising processes. First, the physical processes associated with a gas-solid reaction are presented in detail for a single particle, together with the corresponding available kinetic grain models. A second part is devoted to the modelling of multiparticle reactors. Different approaches, notably for coupling grain models and reactor models, are illustrated through various case studies: coal pyrolysis in a rotary kiln, production of uranium tetrafluoride in a moving bed furnace, on-grate incineration of municipal solid wastes, thermogravimetric apparatus, nuclear fuel making, steel-making electric arc furnace. (author)

  2. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments in a technological irradiation reactor; Modelisation pluridisciplinaire d'experiences d'irradiation dans un reacteur d'irradiation technologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaccorsi, Th

    2007-09-15

    A Material Testing Reactor (MTR) makes it possible to irradiate material samples under intense neutron and photonic fluxes. These experiments are carried out in experimental devices localised in the reactor core or in periphery (reflector). Available physics simulation tools only treat, most of the time, one physics field in a very precise way. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments therefore require a sequential use of several calculation codes and data exchanges between these codes: this corresponds to problems coupling. In order to facilitate multi-physic simulations, this thesis sets up a data model based on data-processing objects, called Technological Entities. This data model is common to all of the physics fields. It permits defining the geometry of an irradiation device in a parametric way and to associate information about materials to it. Numerical simulations are encapsulated into interfaces providing the ability to call specific functionalities with the same command (to initialize data, to launch calculations, to post-treat, to get results,... ). Thus, once encapsulated, numerical simulations can be re-used for various studies. This data model is developed in a SALOME platform component. The first application case made it possible to perform neutronic simulations (OSIRIS reactor and RJH) coupled with fuel behavior simulations. In a next step, thermal hydraulics could also be taken into account. In addition to the improvement of the calculation accuracy due to the physical phenomena coupling, the time spent in the development phase of the simulation is largely reduced and the possibilities of uncertainty treatment are under consideration. (author)

  3. HAZARDOUS WASTE DECONTAMINATION WITH PLASMA REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of electrical energy in the form of plasma has been considered as a potentially efficient means of decontaminating hazardous waste, although to date only a few attempts have been made to do so. There are a number of relative advantages and some potential disadvantages to...

  4. Structural stability analysis considerations in fusion reactor plasma chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.J.; Cramer, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing a toroidal plasma chamber for the prevention of both static and dynamic buckling. Results of stability analyses performed for the doublet shaped plasma chamber of the General Atomic 3.8 meter radius TNS ignition test reactor are presented. Load conditions are the static external atmospheric pressure load and the dynamic plasma disruption pulse load. Methods for analysis of plasma chamber structures are presented for both types of load. Analysis for static buckling is based on idealizing the plasma chamber into standard structural shapes and applying classical cylinder and circular torus buckling equations. Results are verified using the Buckling of Shells of Revolution (BOSOR4) finite difference computer code. Analysis for the dynamic loading is based on a pulse buckling analysis method for circular cylinders

  5. Non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natrual gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shair, F.H.; Ravimohan, A.L.

    1974-01-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natural gas processing into ethane and ethylene comprising means of producing a non-equilibrium chemical plasma wherein selective conversion of the methane in natural gas to desired products of ethane and ethylene at a pre-determined ethane/ethylene ratio in the chemical process may be intimately controlled and optimized at a high electrical power efficiency rate by mixing with a recycling gas inert to the chemical process such as argon, helium, or hydrogen, reducing the residence time of the methane in the chemical plasma, selecting the gas pressure in the chemical plasma from a wide range of pressures, and utilizing pulsed electrical discharge producing the chemical plasma. (author)

  6. Low temperature plasma metallurgy. Reduction of metals in plasma reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eliáš, M.; Frgala, Z.; Kudrle, V.; Janča, J.; Brožek, Vlastimil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2004), s. 91-97 ISSN 1203-8407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasmachemistry reduction, tungsten, hydrogen plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.451, year: 2002

  7. Turbulent precipitation of uranium oxalate in a vortex reactor - experimental study and modelling; Precipitation turbulente d'oxalate d'uranium en reacteur vortex - etude experimentale et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer de Gelicourt, Y

    2004-03-15

    Industrial oxalic precipitation processed in an un-baffled magnetically stirred tank, the Vortex Reactor, has been studied with uranium simulating plutonium. Modelling precipitation requires a mixing model for the continuous liquid phase and the solution of population balance for the dispersed solid phase. Being chemical reaction influenced by the degree of mixing at molecular scale, that commercial CFD code does not resolve, a sub-grid scale model has been introduced: the finite mode probability density functions, and coupled with a model for the liquid energy spectrum. Evolution of the dispersed phase has been resolved by the quadrature method of moments, first used here with experimental nucleation and growth kinetics, and an aggregation kernel based on local shear rate. The promising abilities of this local approach, without any fitting constant, are strengthened by the similarity between experimental results and simulations. (author)

  8. Fueling moving ring field-reversed mirror reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felber, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of small fusion reactors is being studied jointly by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory General Atomic Company, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The objective is to investigate alternatives and then to develop a conceptual design for a small reactor that could produce useful, though not necessarily economical, energy by the late 1980s. Three methods of fueling a small moving ring field-reversed mirror are considered: injection of fuel pellets accelerated by laser ablation, injection of fuel pellets accelerated by deflagration-gun ablation, and direct injection of plasma by a deflagration gun. 13 refs

  9. Plasma driving system requirements for commercial tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.C.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma driving system for a tokamak reactor is composed of an ohmic heating (OH) coil, equilibrium field (EF) coil, and their respective power supplies. Conceptual designs of an Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and scoping studies of a Demonstration Power Reactor have shown that the driving system constitutes a significant part of the overall reactor cost. The capabilities of the driving system also set or help set important parameters of the burn cycle, such as the startup time, and the net power output. Previous detailed studies on driving system dynamics have helped to define the required characteristics for fast-pulsed superconducting magnets, homopolar generators, and very high power (GVA) power supplies for an EPR. This paper summarizes results for a single reactor configuration together with several design concepts for the driving system. Both the reactor configuration and the driving system concepts are natural extensions from the EPR. Thus, the new results presented in this paper can be compared with the previous EPR results to obtain a consistent picture of how the driving system requirements will evolve--for one particular design configuration

  10. Plasma driving system requirements for commercial tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.C.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The plasma driving system for a tokamak reactor is composed of an ohmic heating (OH) coil, equilibrium field (EF) coil, and their respective power supplies. Conceptual designs of an Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and scoping studies of a Demonstration Power Reactor have shown that the driving system constitutes a significant part of the overall reactor cost. The capabilities of the driving system also set or help set important parameters of the burn cycle, such as the startup time, and the net power output. Previous detailed studies on driving system dynamics have helped to define the required characteristics for fast-pulsed superconducting magnets, homopolar generators, and very high power (GVA) power supplies for an EPR. This paper summarizes results for a single reactor configuration together with several design concepts for the driving system. Both the reactor configuration and the driving system concepts are natural extensions from the EPR. Thus, the new results can be compared with the previous EPR results to obtain a consistent picture of how the driving system requirements will evolve--for one particular design configuration

  11. Development of a new plasma reactor for propene removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukacine, Linda; Tatibouët, Jean-Michel

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a new plasma reactor being applied to gas phase pollution abatement, involving a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) at atmospheric pressure. Propene was chosen as a model pollutant. The system can associate a SDBD with a volume dielectric barrier discharge (VDBD). A specific catalyst can be placed in post-plasma site in order to destroy the residual ozone after use it as a strong oxidant for total oxidation of propene and by-products formed by the plasma reactor. A comparative study has been established between the propene removal efficiency of these two plasma geometries. The results demonstrate that SDBD is a promising system for gas cleaning. The experiments show that ozone production depends on plasma system configuration and indicate the effectiveness of combining SDBD and VDBD. The NOx formation remains very low, whereas ozone formation is the highest for the SDBD. The influence of some materials on the propene removal and the ozone production were studied.

  12. Conception of divertorless tokamak reactor with turbulent plasma blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedospasov, A.V.; Tokar, M.Z.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the calculations presented here demonstrate that, with technically reasonable degree of the magnetic field stochastisation, the turbulent plasma blanket can take the place of a divertor. It performs the three main functions of the divertor: (a) the exhaust of the helium and unburned fuel; (b) weakening of the fast particle flux to the wall surface; and (c) essential reduction of the impurity content in the active zone of the reactor. Taking into account that plasma flows to the first wall along field lines, we may figuratively say that the first wall plays the role of a divertor in our conception. (orig.)

  13. LIB fusion. Plasma system and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1985-01-01

    Twelve Marx generators, whose total stored energy is 21MJ and diode voltage is 9MV or 4.1MV, supply the energy to diodes to extract proton beams. The combination of two types of diodes are used. One type of diode has the outer radius of 32.3cm and the inner radius of 30cm insulated by the radial magnetic field and extracts the rotating ring beam whose energy is 0.80MJ, pulse width is 40ns, propagation energy is 4.1MeV, mean rotation energy is 3.3MeV and electric current along the propagation direction is 1.4MA. The other type of diodes is the ordinal one, from which the proton beam of 0.52MJ, 40ns, 4.1MeV and 2.5MA is extracted and fills the inner hollow part of the rotating ring beam. The argon gas filling the reactor cavity with the number density of 10 22 /m 3 neutralizes the charge of proton beam during lns, but does not neutralize the current of the beam because the mean Larmor radius of electron in the argon gas is shorter than the electron mean free path. The proton beam pinches to the radius of 5.5mm by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the azimuthal direction and its propagation is stablized by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the propagation direction. The cryogenic hollow shell target of 6mm radius consists of three layers of Pb, Al and DT fuel

  14. Pulsed lower-hybrid wave penetration in reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Providing lower-hybrid power in short, intense (GW) pulses allows enhanced wave penetration in reactor-grade plasmas. We examine nonlinear absorption, ray propagation, and parametric instability of the intense pulses. We find that simultaneously achieving good penetration while avoiding parametric instabilities is possible, but imposes restrictions on the peak power density, pulse duration, and/or r.f. spot shape. In particular, power launched in narrow strips, elongated along the field direction, is desired

  15. Thermal energy and bootstrap current in fusion reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-01-01

    For DT fusion reactors with prescribed alpha particle heating power P α , plasma volume V and burn temperature i > ∼ 10 keV specific relations for the thermal energy content, bootstrap current, central plasma pressure and other quantities are derived. It is shown that imposing P α and V makes these relations independent of the magnitudes of the density and temperature, i.e. they only depend on P α , V and shape factors or profile parameters. For model density and temperature profiles analytic expressions for these shape factors and for the factor C bs in the bootstrap current formula I bs ∼ C bs (a/R) 1/2 β p I p are given. In the design of next-step devices and fusion reactors, the fusion power is a fixed quantity. Prescription of the alpha particle heating power and plasma volume results in specific relations which can be helpful for interpreting computer simulations and for the design of fusion reactors. (author) 5 refs

  16. Material Challenges For Plasma Facing Components in Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J; Pintsuk, G.; Rödig, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO2-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible materials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PFMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm-2; the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm-2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat sink materials as well as reliable fabrication processes for actively cooled plasma facing components. The technical solutions which are considered today are mainly based on the PFMs beryllium, carbon or tungsten joined to copper alloys or stainless steel heat sinks. In addition to the above mentioned quasi-stationary heat loads, short transient thermal pulses with deposited energy densities up to several tens of MJm-2 are a serious concern for next step tokamak devices. The most frequent events are so-called Edge Localized Modes (type I ELMs) and plasma disruptions

  17. Plasma behaviour in large reversed-field pinches and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Bodin, H.A.B.; Carolan, P.G.; Johnston, J.W.; Newton, A.A.; Roberts, K.V.; Robinson, D.C.; Watts, M.R.C.; Piotrowicz, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent analytic and numerical results on large reversed-field-pinch (RFP) systems and RFP reactors are presented. Predictions are made of the plasma behaviour in Eta Beta II, HBTXIA (under construction) and RFX (planned). The setting-up phase of an RFP is studied by using turbulence theory in transport equilibrium calculations, and estimates are made of the volt-seconds consumption for four different modes of field control. A prescription is given for a dynamo producing self-reversal which yields finite-β configurations. Residual instabilities of these equilibria may be resistive pressure-driven g-modes, and a new study of these modes that includes parallel viscosity indicates stability for anti β approximately 10%. The sustainment phase of the RFP is examined with tokamak scaling laws assumed for the energy confinement time. Temperatures in excess of 1keV are predicted for currents of 2MA in RFX. An operating cycle for a pulsed RFP reactor including gas puffing to reach ignition is proposed following a study of the energy replacement time for an Ohmically heated plasma. The scaling of the reactor parameters with minor radius is also investigated. (author)

  18. Scaling laws for particle growth in plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, D.S.; Keinigs, R.K.; Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    We quantify a model which incorporates observed features of contaminant particle growth in plasma processing reactors. According to the model, large open-quote open-quote predator close-quote close-quote particles grow by adsorbing smaller, typically neutral, open-quote open-quote prey close-quote close-quote protoparticles. The latter are supplied by an assumed constant mass injection of contaminant material. Scaling laws and quantitative predictions compare favorably with published experimental results. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Plasma engineering analyses of tokamak reactor operating space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive method is presented for analyzing the potential physics operating regime of fusion reactor plasmas with detailed transport codes. Application is made to the tokamak Fusion Engineering Device (FED). The relationships between driven and ignited operation and supplementary heating requirements are examined. The reference physics models give a finite range of density and temperature over which physics objectives can be reached. Uncertainties in the confinement scaling and differences in supplementary heating methods can expand or contract this operating regime even to the point of allowing ignition with the more optimistic models

  20. Dense Medium Plasma Water Purification Reactor (DMP WaPR), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Dense Medium Plasma Water Purification Reactor offers significant improvements over existing water purification technologies used in Advanced Life Support...

  1. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauchyn, V.; Khvedchyn, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Methods of low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing comprise: cementation, bituminization, curing in polymer matrices, combustion and pyrolysis. All these methods are limited in their application in the field of chemical, morphological, and aggregate composition of material to be processed. The thermal plasma method is one of the universal methods of RAW processing. The use of electric-arc plasma with mean temperatures 2000 - 8000 K can effectively carry out the destruction of organic compounds into atoms and ions with very high speeds and high degree of conversion. Destruction of complex substances without oxygen leads to a decrease of the volume of exhaust gases and dimension of gas cleaning system. This paper presents the plasma reactor for thermal processing of low and intermediate level radioactive waste of mixed morphology. The equipment realizes plasma-pyrolytic conversion of wastes and results in a conditioned product in a single stage. As a result, the volume of conditioned waste is significantly reduced (more than 10 times). Waste is converted into an environmentally friendly form that suits long-term storage. The leaching rate of macro-components from the vitrified compound is less than 1.10 -7 g/(cm 2 .day). (authors)

  2. Characterization of a capillary plasma reactor for carbon dioxide decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Aguru; Suzuki, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    The decomposition of carbon dioxide in a plasma reactor was investigated experimentally, using capillary discharge tubes with a diameter of 0.5 or 3.0 mm and a length of 25, 50, 75, 100 or 150 mm. The chemical composition of the reaction products and the current-voltage characteristics were measured over a pressure range of 3.33-120 Torr, and the CO 2 conversion rates and reduced electric fields were calculated. The results show that the influence of downscaling on the reduced electric fields can be well evaluated by adjusting both the current density, i, and the products of the pressure and the tube diameter, pd. However, the characteristics of CO 2 decomposition cannot be determined based on i and pd; they are better characterized by i and p. It can be deduced from our experimental results that the CO 2 conversion rate is predominated by the electron impact CO 2 dissociation and gas phase reverse reactions even in a capillary plasma reactor

  3. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  4. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  5. Relevance, Realization and stability of a cold layer at the plasma edge for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The workshop was dedicated to the realization and stability of a cold layer at the plasma edge for fusion reactors. The subjects of the communications presented were: impurity transport, and control, plasma boundary layers, power balance, radiation control and modifications, limiter discharges, tokamak density limit, Asdex divertor discharges, thermal stability of a radiating diverted plasma, plasma stability, auxiliary heating in Textor, detached plasma in Tore Supra, poloidal divertor tokamak, radiation cooling, neutral-particle transport, plasma scrape-off layer, edge turbulence

  6. Plasma position control in a tokamak reactor around ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carretta, U.; Minardi, E.; Bacelli, N.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma position control in a tokamak reactor in the phase approaching ignition is closely related to burn control. If ignited burn corresponds to a thermally unstable situation the plasma becomes sensitive to the thermal instability already in the phase when ignition is approached so that the trajectory in the position-pressure (R,p) space becomes effectively unpredictable. For example, schemes involving closed cycles around ignition can be unstable in the heating-cooling phases, and the deviations may be cumulative in time. Reliable plasma control in pressure-position (p, R) space is achieved by beforehand constraining the p, R trajectory rigidly with suitable feedback vertical field stabilization, which is to be established already below ignition. A scheme in which ignition is approached in a stable and automatic way by feedback stabilization on the vertical field is proposed and studied in detail. The values of the gain coefficient ensuring stabilization and the associated p and R excursions are discussed both analytically, with a 0-D approximation including non-linear effects, and numerically with a 1-D code in cylindrical geometry. Profile effects increase the excursions, in particular above ignition. (author)

  7. Novel Approach to Plasma Facing Materials in Nuclear Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livramento, V.; Correia, J. B.; Shohoji, N.; Osawa, E.; Nunes, D.; Carvalho, P. A.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Hanada, K.

    2008-01-01

    A novel material design in nuclear fusion reactors is proposed based on W-nDiamond nanostructured composites. Generally, a microstructure refined to the nanometer scale improves the mechanical strength due to modification of plasticity mechanisms. Moreover, highly specific grain-boundary area raises the number of sites for annihilation of radiation induced defects. However, the low thermal stability of fine-grained and nanostructured materials demands the presence of particles at the grain boundaries that can delay coarsening by a pinning effect. As a result, the concept of a composite is promising in the field of nanostructured materials. The hardness of diamond renders nanodiamond dispersions excellent reinforcing and stabilization candidates and, in addition, diamond has extremely high thermal conductivity. Consequently, W-nDiamond nanocomposites are promising candidates for thermally stable first-wall materials. The proposed design involves the production of W/W-nDiamond/W-Cu/Cu layered castellations. The W, W-nDiamond and W-Cu layers are produced by mechanical alloying followed by a consolidation route that combines hot rolling with spark plasma sintering (SPS). Layer welding is achieved by spark plasma sintering. The present work describes the mechanical alloying processsing and consolidation route used to produce W-nDiamond composites, as well as microstructural features and mechanical properties of the material produced Long term plasma exposure experiments are planned at ISTTOK and at FTU (Frascati)

  8. Plasma-arc reactor for production possibility of powdered nano-size materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzhiyski, V; Mihovsky, M; Gavrilova, R

    2011-01-01

    Nano-size materials of various chemical compositions find increasing application in life nowadays due to some of their unique properties. Plasma technologies are widely used in the production of a range of powdered nano-size materials (metals, alloys, oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, carbonitrides, etc.), that have relatively high melting temperatures. Until recently, the so-called RF-plasma generated in induction plasma torches was most frequently applied. The subject of this paper is the developments of a new type of plasma-arc reactor, operated with transferred arc system for production of disperse nano-size materials. The new characteristics of the PLASMALAB reactor are the method of feeding the charge, plasma arc control and anode design. The disperse charge is fed by a charge feeding system operating on gravity principle through a hollow cathode of an arc plasma torch situated along the axis of a water-cooled wall vertical tubular reactor. The powdered material is brought into the zone of a plasma space generated by the DC rotating transferred plasma arc. The arc is subjected to Auto-Electro-Magnetic Rotation (AEMR) by an inductor serially connected to the anode circuit. The anode is in the form of a water-cooled copper ring. It is mounted concentrically within the cylindrical reactor, with its lower part electrically insulated from it. The electric parameters of the arc in the reactor and the quantity of processed charge are maintained at a level permitting generation of a volumetric plasma discharge. This mode enables one to attain high mean mass temperature while the processed disperse material flows along the reactor axis through the plasma zone where the main physico-chemical processes take place. The product obtained leaves the reactor through the annular anode, from where it enters a cooling chamber for fixing the produced nano-structure. Experiments for AlN synthesis from aluminium power and nitrogen were carried out using the plasma reactor

  9. Acceleration of relativistic electrons in plasma reactors and non-linear spectra of cosmic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, S.A.; Lomadze, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A second approximation to the theory of turbulent plasma reactors in connection with the problem of interpretation of the non-linear spectra of cosmic radio sources has been investigated by the authors (Kaplan and Lomadze, 1977; Lomadze, 1977). The present paper discusses the basic results received for a Compton reactor with plasma waves of phase velocities smaller than the velocity of light, as well as for the synchrotron reactor. The distortion of the distribution function of relativistic electrons caused by their diffusion from the reactor is also presented as an example. (Auth.)

  10. Properties Influencing Plasma Discharges in Packed Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for CO2 removal and conversion of waste gases into higher value compounds. We report on results of a computational investigation of PBR-DBD properties using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM with a comparison to experiments. Dielectric beads (rods in 2D) were inserted between two coplanar electrodes, 1 cm apart filled by humid air. A step-pulse of -30 kV was applied to the top electrode. Material properties of the beads (dielectric constant, secondary emission coefficient) and gas properties (photoionization and photo-absorption cross-sections, temperature) were varied. We found that photoionization plays a critical role in the propagation of the discharge through the PBR, as it serves to seed charges in regions of high electric field. Increasing rates of photo-ionization enable increases in the discharge propagation velocity, ionization rates and production of radicals. A transition between DBD-like and arc-like discharges occurs as the radiation mean free path decreases. Increasing the dielectric constant of the beads increased electric fields in the gas, which translated to increased discharge propagation velocity and charge density until ɛ/ɛ0 100. Secondary electron emission coefficient and gas temperature have minimal impacts on the discharge propagation though the latter did affect the production of reactive species. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  11. Startup of reversed-field mirror reactors using coaxial plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Eddleman, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary calculations are given that indicate that a coaxial plasma gun might scale reasonably to reactor-grade operating conditions. Ongoing experiments and numerical simulations should shed some light on the validity of the described scaling laws

  12. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  13. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Mark J., E-mail: msowa@ultratech.com [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Building 2, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  14. A conceptual fusion reactor based on the high-plasma-density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.; Hoffman, M.; Werner, R.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual DT and DD fusion reactors are discussed based on magnetic confinement with the high-plasma-density Z-pinch. The reactor concepts have no ''first wall'', the fusion neutrons and plasma energy being absorbed directly into a surrounding lithium vortex blanket. Efficient systems with low re-circulated power are projected, based on a flow-through pinch cycle for which overall Q values can approach 10. The conceptual reactors are characterized by simplicity, small minimum size (100MW(e)) and by the potential for minimal radioactivity hazards. (author)

  15. Plasma engineering design of a compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given

  16. Dismantling of JPDR reactor internals by underwater plasma arc cutting technique using robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, M.

    1988-01-01

    The actual dismantling of JPDR started on December 4, 1986. As of now, equipment that surrounds the reactor has mostly been removed to provide working space in reactor containment prior to the dismantling of reactor internals. Some reactor internals have been successfully dismantled using the underwater arc cutting system with a robotic manipulator during the period of January to March 1988. The cutting system is composed of an underwater plasma arc cutting device and a robotic manipulator. The cut off reactor internals were core spray block, feedwater sparger and stabilizers for fuel upper grid tube. The plasma arc cutting device was developed to dismantle the reactor internals underwater. It mainly consists of a plasma torch, power and gas supply systems for the torch, and by-product treatment systems. It has the cutting ability of 130 mm thickness stainless steel underwater. The robotic manipulator has seven degrees of freedom of movement, enabling it to move in almost the same way as the arm of a human being. The arm of the robot is mounted on a supporting device which is suspended by three chains from the support structure set on a service floor. A plasma torch is griped by the robotic hand; its position to the structure to be cut is controlled from a remote control room, about 100 meters outside the reactor containment

  17. The Use of Multi-Reactor Cascade Plasma Electrolysis for Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, Nelson; Ibrahim; Zainah; Budikania, Trisutanti

    2018-03-01

    Plasma electrolysis is a method that can produce large amounts of hydroxyl radicals to degrade organic waste. The purpose of this study is to improve the effectiveness of Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) degradation by using multi-reactor cascade plasma electrolysis. The reactor which operated in circulation system, using 3 reactors series flow and 6 L of LAS with initial concentration of 100 ppm. The results show that the LAS degradation can be improved multi-reactor cascade plasma electrolysis. The greatest LAS degradation is achieved up to 81.91% with energy consumption of 2227.34 kJ/mmol that is obtained during 120 minutes by using 600 Volt, 0.03 M of KOH, and 0.5 cm of the anode depth.

  18. Study of hydroxylation of benzene and toluene using a micro-DBD plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, H; Ando, M; Kojima, H

    2005-01-01

    The hydroxylation behaviour of benzene and toluene were studied using a micro-plasma reactor, where an atmospheric non-thermal plasma was generated by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The results indicated that oxidation products primarily consisted of phenol and C 4 -compounds for benzene hydroxylation, whereas cresol, benzaldehyde, benzylalcohol and C 4 -compounds were detected for toluene hydroxylation. By taking into consideration the reaction mechanism in the plasma reactor, these products were classified into (1) oxidation of the aromatic ring and functional group on the ring and (2) cleavage of the aromatic ring or dissociation of the functional group on the ring

  19. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Cho, C.H.; Shin, D.H. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Y.C., E-mail: ychong@nfri.re.kr [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y.W. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Green Energy and Environments, Handong Global University, Heunghae-eup, Buk-gu, Pohang-city, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • We developed a microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). • We calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste. • The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased from 29% to 43% than conventional vortex reactor. - Abstract: Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF{sub 6}, NF{sub 3} by varying plasma power and N{sub 2} flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6 kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} was 99.99% at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6 kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF{sub 3} and 29% of SF{sub 6} abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor.

  20. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  1. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Von Goeler, S.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  2. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yongjun; Ding Jiandong; Lei Lecheng; Zhang Xingwang

    2014-01-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10 −9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10 −9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10 −2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10 −2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation

  3. Emission spectroscopy of argon ferrocene mixture jet in a low pressure plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, N.; Tak, A.K.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Shukla, A.; Meher, K.C.; Ghorui, S.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy is employed to measure the plasma temperature and species identification in a reactor used for studying homogenous nucleation and growth of iron nano particle. Reactor employs segmented non transferred plasma torch mounted on water cooled cylindrical chamber. The plasma jet passes through graphite nozzle and expands in low pressure reactor. Ferrocene is fed into the nozzle where it mixes with Argon plasma jet. A high resolution spectrograph (SHAMROCK 303i, resolution 0.06 nm) has been used to record the spectra over a wide range. Identification of different emission lines has been done using NIST database. Lines from (700 to 860nm) were considered for calculation of temperature. Spectra were recorded for different axial location, pressure and power. Temperature was calculated using Maxwell Boltzman plot method. Variation in temperature with pressure and location is presented and possible reasons for different behaviour are explored. (author)

  4. Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle Handling in Reactor Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Hill, K.W.

    1998-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) supershots and high-l(subscript) plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P(subscript B) greater than or equal to 30 MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both deuterium (D) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms

  5. Fueling, heating, and leaking of plasma in mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The principles of mirror machine confinement are reviewed with emphasis on the physical process of neutral beam injection and plasma end leakage. The characteristics of efficient neutral beam injectors and direct energy convertors for the plasma and leakage are described

  6. Development of time dependent safety analysis code for plasma anomaly events in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takuro; Okazaki, Takashi; Bartels, H.W.; Uckan, N.A.; Seki, Yasushi.

    1997-01-01

    A safety analysis code SAFALY has been developed to analyze plasma anomaly events in fusion reactors, e.g., a loss of plasma control. The code is a hybrid code comprising a zero-dimensional plasma dynamics and a one-dimensional thermal analysis of in-vessel components. The code evaluates the time evolution of plasma parameters and temperature distributions of in-vessel components. As the plasma-safety interface model, we proposed a robust plasma physics model taking into account updated data for safety assessment. For example, physics safety guidelines for beta limit, density limit and H-L mode confinement transition threshold power, etc. are provided in the model. The model of the in-vessel components are divided into twenty temperature regions in the poloidal direction taking account of radiative heat transfer between each surface of each region. This code can also describe the coolant behavior under hydraulic accidents with the results by hydraulics code and treat vaporization (sublimation) from plasma facing components (PFCs). Furthermore, the code includes the model of impurity transport form PFCs by using a transport probability and a time delay. Quantitative analysis based on the model is possible for a scenario of plasma passive shutdown. We examined the possibility of the code as a safety analysis code for plasma anomaly events in fusion reactors and had a prospect that it would contribute to the safety analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). (author)

  7. Modeling of polarization phenomena due to RF sheaths and electron beams in magnetized plasma; Modelisation de phenomenes de polarisation par des gaines rf et des faisceaux electroniques dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faudot, E

    2005-07-01

    This work investigates the problematic of hot spots induced by accelerated particle fluxes in tokamaks. It is shown that the polarization due to sheaths in the edge plasma in which an electron beam at a high level of energy is injected, can reach several hundreds volts and thus extend the deposition area. The notion of obstructed sheath is introduced and explains the acceleration of energy deposition by the decreasing of the sheath potential. Then, a 2-dimensional fluid modeling of flux tubes in front of ICRF antennae allows us to calculate the rectified potentials taking into account RF polarization currents transverse to magnetic field lines. The 2-dimensional fluid code designed validates the analytical results which show that the DC rectified potential is 50% greater with polarization currents than without. Finally, the simultaneous application of an electron beam and a RF potential reveals that the potentials due to each phenomenon are additives when RF potential is much greater than beam polarization. The density depletion of polarized flux tubes in 2-dimensional PIC (particles in cells) simulations is characterized but not yet explained. (author)

  8. Plasma-material interactions in current tokamaks and their implications for next step fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next step DT fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically in influence its operation, safety and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimetres from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma facing components. Controlling plasma-wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present day tokamaks, and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena stimulated an internationally co-ordinated effort in the part of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project (ITER), and significant progress has been made in better understanding these issues. The paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material inter actions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interaction are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation and (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modelling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution are presented. (author)

  9. Plasma-material interactions in current tokamaks and their implications for next-step fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several cm from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally co-ordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the engineering design activities of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor project (ITER) and significant progress has been made in better understanding these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/re-deposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modelling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution are presented. (orig.)

  10. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave rf energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected rf energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected rf energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range delta . The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width delta in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma

  11. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bers, A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave rf energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected rf energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected rf energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range delta . The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width delta in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma

  12. Titanium nitride plasma-chemical synthesis with titanium tetrachloride raw material in the DC plasma-arc reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, D. E.; Sinaiskiy, M. A.; Samokhin, A. V.; Alexeev, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of plasmochemical synthesis of titanium nitride is demonstrated in the paper. Results of the thermodynamic analysis of TiCl4 - H2 - N2 system are presented; key parameters of TiN synthesis process are calculated. The influence of parameters of plasma-chemical titanium nitride synthesis process in the reactor with an arc plasmatron on characteristics on the produced powders is experimentally investigated. Structure, chemical composition and morphology dependencies on plasma jet enthalpy, stoichiometric excess of hydrogen and nitrogen in a plasma jet are determined.

  13. Multi-scale interaction between magnetic islands and microturbulence in magnetized plasmas; Modelisation et simulation de l'interaction multi-echelle entre ilots magnetiques et la microturbulence dans les plasmas de fusion magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraglia, M.

    2009-10-15

    In a tokamak, it exists many kinds of instability at the origin of a damage of the confinement and worst of a lost of a confinement. This work presents a study of the dynamics of a magnetic island in presence of turbulence in magnetized plasmas. More precisely, the goal is to understand the multi-scales interaction between turbulence, generated by a pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature, and a magnetic island formed thanks to a tearing mode. Thanks to the derivation of a 2-dimensional slab model taking into account both tearing and interchange instabilities, theoretical and numerical linear studies show the pressure effect on the magnetic island linear formation and show interchange modes are stabilized in presence of a strong magnetic field. Then, a numerical nonlinear study is presented in order to understand how the interchange mechanism affects the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetic island. It is shown that the pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature affect strongly the nonlinear evolution of a magnetic island through dynamics bifurcations. The nature of these bifurcations should be characterized in function of the linear situation. Finally, the last part of this work is devoted to the study of the origin of the nonlinear poloidal rotation of the magnetic island. A model giving the different contributions to the rotation is derived. It is shown, thanks to the model and to the numerical studies, that the nonlinear rotation of the island is mainly governed by the ExB poloidal flow and/or by the nonlinear diamagnetic drift. (author)

  14. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic - DBD plasma reactor was designed and developed for co-generation of synthesis gas and C2+ hydrocarbons from methane. A hybrid Artificial Neural Network - Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA was developed to model, simulate and optimize the reactor. Effects of CH4/CO2 feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge voltage and reactor wall temperature on the performance of catalytic DBD plasma reactor was explored. The Pareto optimal solutions and corresponding optimal operating parameters ranges based on multi-objectives can be suggested for catalytic DBD plasma reactor owing to two cases, i.e. simultaneous maximization of CH4 conversion and C2+ selectivity, and H2 selectivity and H2/CO ratio. It can be concluded that the hybrid catalytic DBD plasma reactor is potential for co-generation of synthesis gas and higher hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide and showed better than the conventional fixed bed reactor with respect to CH4 conversion, C2+ yield and H2 selectivity for CO2 OCM process. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: I. Istadi, N.A.S. Amin. (2007. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 37-44.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/8][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  15. Development, diagnostic and applications of radio-frequency plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, N.

    2008-07-01

    In many areas of the industry, plasma processing of materials is a vital technology. Nonequilibrium plasmas proved to be able to produce chemically reactive species at a low gas temperature while maintaining highly uniform reaction rates over relatively large areas (Makabe and Petrovic 2006). At the same time nonequilibrium plasmas provide means for good and precise control of the properties of active particles that determine the surface modification. Plasma needle is one of the atmospheric pressure sources that can be used for treatment of the living matter which is highly sensitive when it comes to low pressure or high temperatures (above 40 C). Dependent on plasma conditions, several refined cell responses are induced in mammalian cells (Sladek et al. 2005). It appears that plasma treatment may find many biomedical applications. However, there are few data in the literature about plasma effects on plant cells and tissues. So far, only the effect of low pressure plasmas on seeds was investigated. It was shown that short duration pretreatments by non equilibrium low temperature air plasma were stimulative in light induced germination of Paulownia tomentosa seeds (Puac et al. 2005). As membranes of plants have different properties to those of animals and as they show a wide range of properties we have tried to survey some of the effects of typical plasma which is envisaged to be used in biotechnological applications on plant cells. In this paper we will make a comparison between two configurations of plasma needle that we have used in treatment of biological samples (Puac et al. 2006). Difference between these two configurations is in the additional copper ring that we have placed around glass tube at the tip of the needle. We will show some of the electrical characteristics of the plasma needle (with and without additional copper ring) and, also, plasma emission intensity obtained by using fast ICCD camera.

  16. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  17. Numerical modeling of disperse material evaporation in axisymmetric thermal plasma reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Predrag Lj.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical 3D Euler-Lagrangian stochastic-deterministic (LSD model of two-phase flow laden with solid particles was developed. The model includes the relevant physical effects, namely phase interaction, panicle dispersion by turbulence, lift forces, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, heat and mass transfer between phases, melting and evaporation of particles, vapour diffusion in the gas flow. It was applied to simulate the processes in thermal plasma reactors, designed for the production of the ceramic powders. Paper presents results of extensive numerical simulation provided (a to determine critical mechanism of interphase heat and mass transfer in plasma flows, (b to show relative influence of some plasma reactor parameters on solid precursor evaporation efficiency: 1 - inlet plasma temperature, 2 - inlet plasma velocity, 3 - particle initial diameter, 4 - particle injection angle a, and 5 - reactor wall temperature, (c to analyze the possibilities for high evaporation efficiency of different starting solid precursors (Si, Al, Ti, and B2O3 powder, and (d to compare different plasma reactor configurations in conjunction with disperse material evaporation efficiency.

  18. ORNL TNS Program: plasma engineering considerations and innovations for a medium field tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-12-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma anti β values up to 10%, and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors; some of the suggested innovations will be tested in upcoming experiments

  19. Safety analyses for transient behavior of plasma and in-vessel components during plasma abnormal events in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takuro; Okazaki, Takashi; Bartels, H.W.; Uckan, N.A.; Seki, Yasushi.

    1997-01-01

    Safety analyses on plasma abnormal events have been performed using a hybrid code of a plasma dynamics model and a heat transfer model of in-vessel components. Several abnormal events, e.g., increase in fueling rate, were selected for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and transient behavior of the plasma and the invessel components during the events was analyzed. The physics model for safety analysis was conservatively prepared. In most cases, the plasma is terminated by a disruption or it returns to the original operation point. When the energy confinement improves by a factor of 2.0 in the steady state, which is a hypothetical assumption under the present plasma data, the maximum fusion power reaches about 3.3 GW at about 3.6 s and the plasma is terminated due to a disruption. However, the results obtained in this study show the confinement boundary of ITER can be kept almost intact during the abnormal plasma transients, as long as the cooling system works normally. Several parametric studies are needed to comprehend the overpower transient including structure behavior, since many uncertainties are connected to the filed of the plasma physics. And, future work will need to discuss the burn control scenario considering confinement mode transition, system specifications, experimental plans and safety regulations, etc. to confirm the safety related to the plasma anomaly. (author)

  20. Comprehensive safety analysis code system for nuclear fusion reactors II: Thermal analysis during plasma disruptions for international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Maki, K.; Okazaki, T.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal characteristics of a fusion reactor [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Conceptual Design Activity] during plasma disruptions have been analyzed by using a comprehensive safety analysis code for nuclear fusion reactors. The erosion depth due to disruptions for the armor of the first wall depends on the current quench time of disruptions occurring in normal operation. If it is possible to extend the time up to ∼50 ms, the erosion depth is considerably reduced. On the other hand, the erosion depth of the divertor is ∼570 μm for only one disruption, which is determined only by the thermal flux during the thermal quench. This means that the divertor plate should be exchanged after about nine disruptions. Counter-measures are necessary for the divertor to relieve disruption influences. As other scenarios of disruptions, beta-limit disruptions and vertical displacement events were also investigated quantitatively. 13 refs., 5 figs

  1. Treatment of gaseous effluents by using surface discharge plasma in continuous reactors: Process modelling and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Assadi , Aymen ,; Bouzaza , Abdelkrim; Wolbert , Dominique

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In the present work, the oxidation of isovaleraldehyde, a typical pollutant of indoor air, is investigated by using two different plasma DBD reactors: cylindrical and planar reactor. The study of the influence of the specific energy shows that its increment is accompanied by an increase of the removal efficiency. In fact, when specific energy extends three times, the removal efficiency is increased from 5 to 40%. Moreover an increase of the specific energy induces a hi...

  2. Study of carbon dioxide gas treatment based on equations of kinetics in plasma discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, Mehdi

    2017-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) as the primary greenhouse gas, is the main pollutant that is warming earth. CO2 is widely emitted through the cars, planes, power plants and other human activities that involve the burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil). Thus, there is a need to develop some method to reduce CO2 emission. To this end, this study investigates the behavior of CO2 in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. The behavior of different species and their reaction rates are studied using a zero-dimensional model based on equations of kinetics inside plasma reactor. The results show that the plasma reactor has an effective reduction on the CO2 density inside the reactor. As a result of reduction in the temporal variations of reaction rate, the speed of chemical reactions for CO2 decreases and very low concentration of CO2 molecules inside the plasma reactor is generated. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental and simulation findings in the literature.

  3. Particle formation and its control in dual frequency plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Munsu; Cheong, Hee-Woon; Whang, Ki-Woong

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of a particle cloud in plasma etching reactors at the moment when radio frequency (RF) power changes, that is, turning off and transition steps, was observed using the laser-light-scattering method. Two types of reactors, dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the hybrid CCP/inductively coupled plasma (ICP), were set up for experiments. In the hybrid CCP/ICP reactor (hereafter ICP reactor), the position and shape of the cloud were strongly dependent on the RF frequency. The particle cloud becomes larger and approaches the electrode as the RF frequency increases. By turning the lower frequency power off later with a small delay time, the particle cloud is made to move away from the electrode. Maintaining lower frequency RF power only was also helpful to reduce the particle cloud size during this transition step. In the ICP reactor, a sufficient bias power is necessary to make a particle trap appear. A similar particle cloud to that in the CCP reactor was observed around the sheath region of the lower electrode. The authors can also use the low-frequency effect to move the particle cloud away from the substrate holder if two or more bias powers are applied to the substrate holder. The dependence of the particle behavior on the RF frequencies suggests that choosing the proper frequency at the right moment during RF power changes can reduce particle contamination effectively

  4. Effect of plasma physics on choices of first wall materials and structures for a thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Impurity ions adversely affect the behavior of present-day tokamaks, and control of impurities is expected to be a key element in determining the feasibility of thermonuclear fusion reactors. The plasma-surface interactions for tokamaks and several techniques for controlling impurities are described. The plasma-surface problem of next generation devices PLT, PDX, DIII and TFTR is expected to be similar to those encountered in a reactor. For these devices calculations indicate that most of the particle energy efflux will be in the 1 keV region. Ironically this energy region has not yet been investigated thoroughly by the surface physicists

  5. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  6. Some considerations on a plasma in the JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Yamato, H.; Maki, K.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of the plasma characteristics for the JAERI tokamak experimental fusion reactor is reported. In order to make the reactor compact, the self-sustaining condition has been removed. Stationary heating by 200 keV neutral deuteron beam to maintain the power balance is applied expecting the power amplification by the TCT effect. The main parameters determined are power output of 100 MW, toroidal field on axis of 6 T, aspect ratio of 4.5 and major radius of 6.75 m. The results of the plasma power balance, fueling by means of the gas blanket scheme, power stabilization with feedback and the start-up are presented

  7. The reactor plasma physics of tandem mirror startup and fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantrowitz, F.D.; Firestone, M.A.; Guebel, D.M.; Mau, T.K.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma behavior and the performance of plasma technologies are studied during the startup and fractional power operation of tandem mirrors. Five phases of machine operation are identified, some of which require plasma. The plasma phases include plasma initiation and heating, a standby phase with plasma at the density and temperature characteristics of full design performance in reactors, a deuterium-tritium fractional power operating phase in which the fusion plasma undergoes staged power increases to full power, and rated power operating phase. Plasma initiation and heating uses electron cyclotron resonance heating preionization of background gas in the plug and ion cyclotron resonance heating in the central cell. Operation of the radio-frequency systems, the neutral beams, and the direct converter are studied to determine constraints affecting plasma operation. Studies of fractional power operation, carried out using a quasi-steady-state analysis, show that the plasma Q value can be made remarkably insensitive to the level of fusion power by controlling the plasma radius. Copper insert coils used to increase the maximum choke field require considerable power and cause the recirculating power fraction to increase sharply as the fusion power is reduced. Moreover, when an efficient drift pumping scheme is used, achieved improvements in plasma Q by using high-field choke coils must be weighed against their power consumption and other technological difficulties

  8. Plasma features and alpha particle transport in low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang; Wang Shaojie

    1997-06-01

    The results of the experiment and theory from low-aspect ratio tokamak devices have proved that the MHD stability will be improved. Based on present plasma physics and extrapolation to reduced aspect ratio, the feature of physics of low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor is discussed primarily. Alpha particle confinement and loss in the self-justified low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor parameters and the effect of alpha particle confinement and loss for different aspect ratio are calculated. The results provide a reference for the feasible research of compact tokamak reactor. (9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  9. Voltage uniformity study in large-area reactors for RF plasma deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansonnens, L.; Pletzer, A.; Magni, D.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Schmitt, J.P.M. [Balzers Process Systems, Palaiseau (France)

    1996-09-01

    Non-uniform voltage distribution across the electrode area results in inhomogeneous thin-film RF plasma deposition in large area reactors. In this work, a two-dimensional analytic model for the calculation of the voltage distribution across the electrode area is presented. The results of this model are in good agreement with measurements performed without plasma at 13.56 MHz and 70 MHz in a large area reactor. The principal voltage inhomogeneities are caused by logarithmic singularities in the vicinity of RF connections and not by standing waves. These singularities are only described by a two-dimensional model and cannot be intuitively predicted by analogy to a one-dimensional case. Plasma light emission measurements and thickness homogeneity studies of a-Si:H films show that the plasma reproduces these voltage inhomogeneities. Improvement of the voltage uniformity is investigated by changing the number and position of the RF connections. (author) 13 figs., 20 refs.

  10. Modeling in fast dynamics of accidents in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors; Modelisation en dynamique rapide d'accidents dans le circuit primaire des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F

    2003-12-01

    Two kinds of accidents, liable to occur in the primary circuit of a Pressurized Water Reactor and involving fast dynamic phenomena, are analyzed. The Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is the accident used to define the current PWR. It consists in a large-size break located in a pipe of the primary circuit. A blowdown wave propagates through the circuit. The pressure differences between the different zones of the reactor induce high stresses in the structures of the lower head and may degrade the reactor core. The primary circuit starts emptying from the break opening. Pressure decreases very quickly, involving a large steaming. Two thermal-hydraulic simulations of the blowdown phase of a LOCA are computed with the Europlexus code. The primary circuit is represented by a pipe-model including the hydraulic peculiarities of the circuit. The main differences between both computations concern the kind of reactor, the break location and model, and the initialization of the accidental operation. Steam explosion is a hypothetical severe accident liable to happen after a core melting. The molten part of the core (called corium) falls in the lower part of the reactor. The interaction between the hot corium and the cold water remaining at the bottom of the vessel induces a massive and violent vaporization of water, similar to an explosive phenomenon. A shock wave propagates in the vessel. what can damage seriously the neighbouring structures or drill the vessel. This work presents a synthesis of in-vessel parametrical studies carried out with the Europlexus code, the linkage of the thermal-hydraulic code Mc3d dedicated to the pre-mixing phase with the Europlexus code dealing with the explosion, and finally a benchmark between the Cigalon and Europlexus codes relative to the Vulcano mock-up. (author)

  11. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Garcia, J.

    2009-01-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO 2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO 2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  12. Coatings and claddings for the reduction of plasma contamination and surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    For the successful operation of plasma devices and future fusion reactors it is necessary to control plasma impurity release and surface erosion. Effective methods to obtain such controls include the application of protective coatings to, and the use of clad materials for, certain first wall components. Major features of the development programs for coatings and claddings for fusion applications will be described together with an outline of the testing program. A discussion of some pertinent test results will be included

  13. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  14. Type II supernovae modelisation: neutrinos transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellor, P.

    1988-10-01

    A modelisation of neutrino transport in type II supernovae is presented. The first part is a description of hydrodynamics and radiative processes responsible of supernovae explosions. Macroscopic aspects of these are displayed in part two. Neutrino transport theory and usual numerical methods are also developed. A new technic of coherent scattering of neutrinos on nuclei or free nucleons is proposed in the frame work of the Lorentz bifluid approximation. This method deals with all numerical artifices (flux limiting schemes, closure relationship of Eddington moments) and allows a complete and consistent determination of the time-dependent neutrino distribution function for any value of the opacity, gradient of opacity and for all (relativistic) velocity fields of the diffusive medium. Part three is dedicated to microscopic phenomena (electronic capture, chimical composition, etc) which rule neutrinos emission-absorption mechanisms. The numerical treatments of those are presented, and some applications are useful for their parametrization. Finally, an extension of the method to inelastic scattering on light particules (electrons) is described in view to study neutrinos thermalization mechanism [fr

  15. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT (deuterium-tritium) fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D (Research and Development) avenues for their resolution are presented

  16. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  17. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A.A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnO x , CoO x . The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO 2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnO x and CoO x catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition. (author)

  18. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  19. Use of coaxial plasma guns to start up field-reversed-mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hartman, C.W.; Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for start-up of a field-reversed-mirror reactor is considered. The design is based on preliminary scaling laws and is compared to the design of the start-up gun used in the Beta II experiment

  20. Engineering solutions for components facing the plasma in experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, G.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the engineering problems related to the structures in front of the plasma of experimental Tokamak-type reactors is made. Attention is focused on the so-named ''first wall'', i.e. the wall side of the blanket segments facing the plasma, and on the collector plates of the impurity control system, in particular for the case of the single-null poloidal divertor. Even if the uncertainties related to the plasma-wall interaction are stil relevant, some engineering solutions which look manageable are identified and described. (orig.)

  1. Low temperature plasma near a tokamak reactor limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Singer, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Analytic and two-dimensional computational solutions for the plasma parameters near a toroidally symmetric limiter are illustrated for the projected parameters of a Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX). The temperature near the limiter plate is below 20 eV, except when the density 10 cm inside the limiter contact is 8 x 10 13 cm -3 or less and the thermal diffusivity in the edge region is 2 x 10 4 cm 2 /s or less. Extrapolation of recent experimental data suggests that neither of these conditions is likely to be met near ignition in TFCX, so a low plasma temperature near the limiter should be considered a likely possibility

  2. Pyrolysis treatment of waste tire powder in a capacitively coupled RF plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, L. [Department of Civil Engineering, Guangzhou University, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2009-03-15

    A capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma reactor was tested mainly for the purpose of solid waste treatment. It was found that using a RF input power between 1600 and 2000 W and a reactor pressure between 3000 and 8000 Pa (absolute pressure), a reactive plasma environment with a gas temperature between 1200 and 1800 K can be reached in this lab scale reactor. Under these conditions, pyrolysis of tire powder gave two product streams: a combustible gas and a pyrolytic char. The major components of the gas product are H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} The physical properties (surface area, porosity, and particle morphology) as well as chemical properties (elemental composition, heating value, and surface functional groups) of the pyrolytic char has also been examined. (author)

  3. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments in a technological irradiation reactor; Modelisation pluridisciplinaire d'experiences d'irradiation dans un reacteur d'irradiation technologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaccorsi, Th

    2007-09-15

    A Material Testing Reactor (MTR) makes it possible to irradiate material samples under intense neutron and photonic fluxes. These experiments are carried out in experimental devices localised in the reactor core or in periphery (reflector). Available physics simulation tools only treat, most of the time, one physics field in a very precise way. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments therefore require a sequential use of several calculation codes and data exchanges between these codes: this corresponds to problems coupling. In order to facilitate multi-physic simulations, this thesis sets up a data model based on data-processing objects, called Technological Entities. This data model is common to all of the physics fields. It permits defining the geometry of an irradiation device in a parametric way and to associate information about materials to it. Numerical simulations are encapsulated into interfaces providing the ability to call specific functionalities with the same command (to initialize data, to launch calculations, to post-treat, to get results,... ). Thus, once encapsulated, numerical simulations can be re-used for various studies. This data model is developed in a SALOME platform component. The first application case made it possible to perform neutronic simulations (OSIRIS reactor and RJH) coupled with fuel behavior simulations. In a next step, thermal hydraulics could also be taken into account. In addition to the improvement of the calculation accuracy due to the physical phenomena coupling, the time spent in the development phase of the simulation is largely reduced and the possibilities of uncertainty treatment are under consideration. (author)

  4. Analysis of a gas-liquid film plasma reactor for organic compound oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kevin [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Wang, Huijuan [School of Environmental and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Locke, Bruce R., E-mail: blocke@fsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Non-homogeneous filamentary plasma discharge formed along gas-liquid interface. • Hydrogen peroxide formed near interface favored over organic oxidation from liquid. • Post-plasma Fenton reactions lead to complete utilization of hydrogen peroxide. - Abstract: A pulsed electrical discharge plasma formed in a tubular reactor with flowing argon carrier gas and a liquid water film was analyzed using methylene blue as a liquid phase hydroxyl radical scavenger and simultaneous measurements of hydrogen peroxide formation. The effects of liquid flow rate, liquid conductivity, concentration of dye, and the addition of ferrous ion on dye decoloration and degradation were determined. Higher liquid flow rates and concentrations of dye resulted in less decoloration percentages and hydrogen peroxide formation due to initial liquid conductivity effects and lower residence times in the reactor. The highest decoloration energy yield of dye found in these studies was 5.2 g/kWh when using the higher liquid flow rate and adding the catalyst. The non-homogeneous nature of the plasma discharge favors the production of hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-liquid interface over the chemical oxidation of the organic in the bulk liquid phase and post-plasma reactions with the Fenton catalyst lead to complete utilization of the plasma-formed hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Spectra of heliumlike krypton from tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Bush, C.; Cohen, S.; Cummings, C.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Schivell, J.; Zarnstorff, M.; Smith, A.; Fraenkel, B.

    1993-04-01

    Krypton has been injected into ohmically-heated TFTR plasmas with peak electron temperatures of 6 key to study the effects of krypton on the plasma performance and to investigate the emitted krypton line radiation, which is of interest for future-generation tokamaks such as ITER, both as a diagnostic of the central ion temperature and for the control of energy release from the plasma by radiative cooling. The emitted radiation was monitored with a bolometer array, an X-ray pulse height analysis system, and a high-resolution Johann-type crystal spectrometer; and it was found to depend very sensitively on the electron temperature profile. Satellite spectra of heliumlike krypton, KrXXXV, near 0.95 Angstrom including lithiumlike, berylliumlike and boronlike features were recorded in second order Bragg reflection. Radiative cooling and reduced particle recycling at the plasma edge region were observed as a result of the krypton injection for all investigated discharges. The observations are in reasonable agreement with modeling calculations of the krypton ion charge state distribution including radial transport

  6. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Ramos, F.; Duran, M.; Hidalgo, M.; Cruz, A.; Martinez, J. C.; Martinez, R.; De la Cruz, S.; Flores, T.; Vidal, E.; Escobar, S.; Garduno, M.; Garcia, M.; Portillo, J.; Torres, C.; Estrada, N.; Velazquez, S.; Vasquez, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  7. Fusion performance analysis of plasmas with reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Synakowski, E.J.; Goeler, S. von; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A case for substantial loss of fast ions degrading the performance of tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] with reversed magnetic shear (RS) is presented. The principal evidence is obtained from an experiment with short (40 - 70 ms) tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium beam heated RS plasmas [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 924 (1999)]. Modeling of this experiment indicates that up to 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the beam - ion slowing down time. Critical parameters which connect modeling and experiment are: The total 14 MeV neutron emission, its radial profile, and the transverse stored energy. The fusion performance of some plasmas with internal transport barriers is further deteriorated by impurity accumulation in the plasma core. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  8. Mini-cavity plasma core reactors for dual-mode space nuclear power/propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, S.

    1976-01-01

    A mini-cavity plasma core reactor is investigated for potential use in a dual-mode space power and propulsion system. In the propulsive mode, hydrogen propellant is injected radially inward through the reactor solid regions and into the cavity. The propellant is heated by both solid driver fuel elements surrounding the cavity and uranium plasma before it is exhausted out the nozzle. The propellant only removes a fraction of the driver power, the remainder is transferred by a coolant fluid to a power conversion system, which incorporates a radiator for heat rejection. In the power generation mode, the plasma and propellant flows are shut off, and the driver elements supply thermal power to the power conversion system, which generates electricity for primary electric propulsion purposes

  9. Toroidal plasma reactor with low external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Petviashvili, V.I.; Tajima, T.; Gordin, V.A.; Tajima, T.

    1991-01-01

    A toroidal pinch configuration with safety factor q < 0.5 decreasing from the center to periphery without field reversal is proposed. This is capable of containing high pressure plasma with only small toroidal external magnetic field. Sufficient conditions for magnetohydrodynamic stability are fulfilled in this configuration. The stability is studied by constructing the Lyapunov functional and investigating its extrema both analytically and numerically. Comparison of the Lyapunov stability conditions with the conventional linear theory is carried out. Stable configurations are found with average β near 15%, with magnetic field associated mainly with plasma current. The β value calculated with the external magnetic field can be over 100%. Fast charged particles produced by fusion reactions are asymmetrically confined by the poloidal magnetic field (and due to the lack of strong toroidal field). They thus generate a current in the noncentral part of plasma to reinforce the poloidal field. This current drive can sustain the monotonic decrease of q with radius. 20 refs., 9 figs

  10. Reactor aspects of counterstreaming-ion tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1975-06-01

    Toroidal DT plasmas in which the D and T ions make up two distinct, quasi-thermal velocity distributions, oppositely displaced in velocity along the magnetic axis, are discussed. Such counterstreaming distributions can be set up by introducing all ions by tangential injection of neutral beams, and by removing ions from the plasma shortly after they have decelerated to an energy approximate to or less than 2T/sub e/ by Coulomb drag on the plasma electrons. A simple physical model for counterstreaming-ion operation is postulated, which allows one to deduce the ion velocity distributions and required energy and particle confinement times that are in good agreement with the results of previous Fokker-Planck calculations. The variations of fusion reactivity, power gain, and power density with injection energy and electron temperature are presented. The practical problems of implementing counter-streaming operation in a tokamak, such as charge-exchange losses, the prompt removal of cold ions, and the effect of impurities are discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Turbulent precipitation of uranium oxalate in a vortex reactor - experimental study and modelling; Precipitation turbulente d'oxalate d'uranium en reacteur vortex - etude experimentale et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer de Gelicourt, Y

    2004-03-15

    Industrial oxalic precipitation processed in an un-baffled magnetically stirred tank, the Vortex Reactor, has been studied with uranium simulating plutonium. Modelling precipitation requires a mixing model for the continuous liquid phase and the solution of population balance for the dispersed solid phase. Being chemical reaction influenced by the degree of mixing at molecular scale, that commercial CFD code does not resolve, a sub-grid scale model has been introduced: the finite mode probability density functions, and coupled with a model for the liquid energy spectrum. Evolution of the dispersed phase has been resolved by the quadrature method of moments, first used here with experimental nucleation and growth kinetics, and an aggregation kernel based on local shear rate. The promising abilities of this local approach, without any fitting constant, are strengthened by the similarity between experimental results and simulations. (author)

  12. A multi-agent design for a pressurized water reactor (P.W.R.) control system; Modelisation multi-agents pour la conduite d'un reacteur a eau sous pression (REP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimar-Lichtenberger, M. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-01-01

    This PhD work is in keeping with the complex industrial process control. The starting point is the analysis of control principles in a Pressurized Water Reactor (P.W.R). In order to cope with the limits of the present control procedures, a new control organisation by objectives and means is defined. This functional organisation is based on the state approach and is characterized by the parallel management of control functions to ensure the continuous control of the installation essential variables. With regard to this complex system problematic, we search the most adapted computer modeling. We show that a multi-agent system approach brings an interesting answer to manage the distribution and parallelism of control decisions and tasks. We present a synthetic study of multi-agent systems and their application fields.The choice of a multi-agent approach proceeds with the design of an agent model. This model gains experiences from other applications. This model is implemented in a computer environment which combines the mechanisms of an object language with Prolog. We propose in this frame a multi-agent modeling of the control system where each function is represented by an agent. The agents are structured in a hierarchical organisation and deal with different abstraction levers of the problem. Following a prototype process, the validation is realized by an implementation and by a coupling to a reactor simulator. The essential contributions of an agent approach turn on the mastery of the system complexity, the openness, the robustness and the potentialities of human-machine cooperation. (author)

  13. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor; Tratamiento de residuos toxicos con reactores de plasma centrifugo deslizante (PCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Ramos, F.; Duran, M.; Hidalgo, M.; Cruz, A.; Martinez, J. C.; Martinez, R.; De la Cruz, S.; Flores, T.; Vidal, E.; Escobar, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garduno, M.; Garcia, M.; Portillo, J.; Torres, C.; Estrada, N.; Velazquez, S.; Vasquez, C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho la Virgen, Metepec 52140, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  14. Nonthermal plasma reactors for the production of light hydrocarbon olefins from heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prieto

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, nonthermal plasma technology was applied in many different fields, focusing attention on the destruction of harmful compounds in the air. This paper deals with nonthermal plasma reactors for the conversion of heavy oil into light hydrocarbon olefins, to be employed as gasoline components or to be added in small amounts for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide compounds in the treatment of exhaust gas at power plants. For the process, the plate-plate nonthermal plasma reactor driven by AC high voltage was selected. The reactor was modeled as a function of parameter characteristics, using the methodology provided by the statistical experimental design. The parameters studied were gap distance between electrodes, carrier gas flow and applied power. Results indicate that the reactions occurring in the process of heavy oil conversion have an important selective behavior. The products obtained were C1-C4 hydrocarbons with ethylene as the main compound. Operating the parameters of the reactor within the established operative window of the system and close to the optimum conditions, efficiencies as high as 70 (mul/joule were obtained. These values validate the process as an in-situ method to produce light olefins for the treatment of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas from diesel engines.

  15. Calculation of gas-flow in plasma reactor for carbon partial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespala, Evgeny; Myshkin, Vyacheslav; Novoselov, Ivan; Pavliuk, Alexander; Makarevich, Semen; Bespala, Yuliya

    2018-03-01

    The paper discusses isotopic effects at carbon oxidation in low temperature non-equilibrium plasma at constant magnetic field. There is described routine of experiment and defined optimal parameters ensuring maximum enrichment factor at given electrophysical, gas-dynamic, and thermodymanical parameters. It has been demonstrated that at high-frequency generator capacity of 4 kW, supply frequency of 27 MHz and field density of 44 mT the concentration of paramagnetic heavy nuclei 13C in gaseous phase increases up to 1.78 % compared to 1.11 % for natural concentration. Authors explain isotopic effect decrease during plasmachemical separation induced by mixing gas flows enriched in different isotopes at the lack of product quench. With the help of modeling the motion of gas flows inside the plasma-chemical reactor based on numerical calculation of Navier-Stokes equation authors determine zones of gas mixing and cooling speed. To increase isotopic effects and proportion of 13C in gaseous phase it has been proposed to use quench in the form of Laval nozzle of refractory steel. The article represents results on calculation of optimal Laval Nozzle parameters for plasma-chemical reactor of chosen geometry of. There are also given dependences of quench time of products on pressure at the diffuser output and on critical section diameter. Authors determine the location of quench inside the plasma-chemical reactor in the paper.

  16. Experimental and numerical studies of microwave-plasma interaction in a MWPECVD reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massaro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with and proposes a simple and compact diagnostic method able to characterize the interaction between microwave and plasma without the necessity of using an external diagnostic tool. The interaction between 2.45 GHz microwave and plasma, in a typical ASTeX-type reactor, is investigated from experimental and numerical view points. The experiments are performed by considering plasmas of three different gas mixtures: H2, CH4-H2 and CH4-H2-N2. The two latter are used to deposit synthetic undoped and n-doped diamond films. The experimental setup equipped with a matching network enables the measurements of very low reflected power. The reflected powers show ripples due to the mismatching between wave and plasma impedance. Specifically, the three types of plasma exhibit reflected power values related to the variation of electron-neutral collision frequency among the species by changing the gas mixture. The different gas mixtures studied are also useful to test the sensitivity of the reflected power measurements to the change of plasma composition. By means of a numerical model, only the interaction of microwave and H2 plasma is examined allowing the estimation of plasma and matching network impedances and of reflected power that is found about eighteen times higher than that measured.

  17. Dynamic behavior of plasma-facing materials during plasma instabilities in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1997-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing and nearby components due to plasma instabilities remains a major obstacle to a successful tokamak concept. The high energy deposited on facing materials during plasma instabilities can cause severe erosion, plasma contamination, and structural failure of these components. Erosion damage can take various forms such as surface vaporization, spallation, and liquid ejection of metallic materials. Comprehensive thermodynamic and radiation hydrodynamic codes have been developed, integrated, and used to evaluate the extent of various damage to plasma-facing and nearby components. The eroded and splashed materials will be transported and then redeposited elsewhere on other plasma-facing components. Detailed physics of plasma/solid-liquid/vapor interaction in a strong magnetic field have been developed, optimized, and implemented in a self-consistent model. The plasma energy deposited in the evolving divertor debris is quickly and intensely reradiated, which may cause severe erosion and melting of other nearby components. Factors that influence and reduce vapor-shielding efficiency such as vapor diffusion and turbulence are also discussed and evaluated

  18. Highly radiative plasmas for local transport studies and power and particle handling in reactor regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.

    1999-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into TFTR supershots and high-l i plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P B ≥ 30 MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both D and DT plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in ITER. The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms. (author)

  19. Highly radiative plasmas for local transport studies and power and particle handling in reactor regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.

    2001-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into TFTR supershots and high-l i plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P B ≤30MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both D and DT plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in ITER. The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms. (author)

  20. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  1. Modelling of flow stabilization by the swirl of a peripheral flow as applied to plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchkov, E.P.; Lebedev, V.P.; Terekhov, V.I.; Shishkin, N.E.

    2000-01-01

    The gas-swirl stabilization of plasma jets is one of effective methods of its retention in the near-axial area of channels in generators of low-temperature plasma. Except the effect of gas-dynamic compression, the peripheral swirl allows to solve another urgent problem - to protect the reactor walls from the heat influence of the plasma jet. Swirl flows are also used for the flow structure formation and control of the heat and gas-dynamic characteristics of different power devices and apparatuses, using high-temperature working media: in swirl furnaces and burners, in aviation engines, etc. Investigations show that during swirl stabilization the gas-dynamic structure of the flow influences significantly the spatial stability of the plasma column and its characteristics

  2. Modeling of the thermal transfer inside a porous environment: application to nuclear reactors in accident situation; Modelisation du transfert thermique dans un milieu poreux: application aux reacteurs nucleaires en situation accidentelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiolo, P.R

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to simulate heat exchanges occurring by conduction, by convection and by radiating in a porous medium made up of opaque particles in a semi-transparent fluid. Usually the determination of the macroscopic equations is based on homogenization techniques, but in the case of a major accident, the complexity of the problem is so overwhelming that semi-empirical methods are used to determine macroscopic coefficients. The author develops a new method to determine these coefficients, this method is based on the calculation of different tensors: the equivalent conductivity tensor, the radiative conductivity tensor, the thermal conductivity tensor and the heat exchange coefficient (h{sub sf}) between the solid phase and the fluid one. The first chapter briefly describes energy, impulse and mass balances. In the case of the energy balance the solid phase is not supposed to be in thermal equilibrium with the liquid phase. The second chapter presents an application of the porous media method to a one-dimensional and stationary problem, this application to a simple problem gives an idea of the performance of the method. The model allowing the calculation of h{sub sf} is developed, it is a wide range model. The second chapter ends with the presentation of the model allowing the computing of the effective conductivity of fuel rods. A comparison between results given by this new method and other numeric calculations or experimental data coming from benchmarks is presented in the third chapter. This chapter ends with the simulation of a reactor core in accidental situation, 2 cases are presented: with and without the presence of water steam. (A.C.)

  3. Interactions between plasma and wall materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Moser, L.

    2016-11-01

    First mirrors of optical diagnostics in ITER were exposed in Magnum-PSI linear plasma device and JET-ILW tokamak. For JET-ILW the mirrors with a rhodium (Rh) or a molybdenum (Mo) coating exhibited a decrease of the reflectivity according the location in the torus and especially the amount of beryllium (Be) deposited on them. No delamination of the coated reflective film was observed. Under very harsh erosion conditions in Magnum-PSI, Rh thick coated mock ups, cooled or not, for a high flux exposure the films underwent delamination. Mo coating on water cooled mock up mirrors exhibited a high diffuse reflectivity after H 2 /Ar plasma exposure inducing an important decrease of the specular reflectivity and show important oxidation of the surface. Cleaning of mirrors was extensively studied during this period, with magnetic field in collaboration with the SPC Lausanne, or in term of repetitive cleaning till 34 cycles. Polycrystalline molybdenum mirror shows a high diffuse reflectivity after cleaning cycle and clearly demonstrate that they are not suitable for this purpose. Coated Rh or Mo mirrors like single crystal maintained good reflectivity. Test under magnetic field revealed the non-uniform erosion of the mirrors according the orientation between the field and the mirror. All these tests bring to a suitable schematic of the implementation of this technique in ITER and were deeply explained. The cleaning of the Be contaminated mirrors will be carried out using new parameters in December 2016. Investigations on formation of tungsten fuzz were carried out either in Basel using a new setup or in Pilot-PSI. These thickness measurements showed the fuzz growth is in square root dependence to time or fluence. From the results in Pilot-PSI, it has been shown that time was a critical parameter for the development of He-induced morphology changes and one needs to keep that factor in mind. (authors)

  4. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Na; Li Jie; Wu Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO 2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O 2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO 2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO 2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  5. Simulation of MHD instability effects on burning plasma transport with ITB in tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Yamada, I.; Taniguchi, S.; Oishi, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The high performance plasma behavior is required to realize economic and environmental-friendly fusion reactors compatible with conventional power plant systems. To improve plasma confinement, the formation of internal transport barrier (ITB) is anticipated, and its behavior is analyzed by the simulation code TOTAL (Toroidal Transport Linkage Analysis). This TOTAL code comprises a 2- or 3-dimensional equilibrium and 1-dimensional predictive transport code for both tokamak and helical systems. In the tokamak code TOTAL-T, the external current drive, bootstrap current, sawtooth oscillation, ballooning mode and neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) analyses are included. The steady-state burning plasma operation is achieved by the feedback control of pellet injection fuelling and external heating power control. The impurity dynamics of iron and tungsten is also included in this code. The NTM effects are evaluated using the modified Rutherford Model with the stabilization of the ECCD current drive. The excitation of m=2/n=1 NTM leads to the 20 % reduction in the central temperature in ITER-like reactors. Recently, the external non-resonant helical field application is analyzed and its stabilization properties are evaluated. The pellet injection effects on ITB formation is also clarified in tokamak and helical plasmas. Relationship between sawtooth oscillation and impurity ejection is recently simulated in comparison with experimental data. In this conference, we will show above-stated new results on MHD instability effects on burning plasma transport. (author)

  6. Preliminary study on power balance in the plasma of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Yamato, Harumi

    1976-03-01

    The preliminary study on power balance in the plasma is described in the first-stage design of an experimental fusion reactor. The purpose is to show the ranges of plasma parameters for the design output of about 100 MW with an injection power less than 50 MW. The impurity is permitted to the extent of Zsub(eff) -- 5 to meet the design requirement. Influences of the uncertainty in scaling law on the power output and injection power are discussed, and also possibility of the self-ignition. (auth.)

  7. The effect of reactor geometry on the synthesis of graphene materials in plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Shatalova, T. B.

    2017-05-01

    The possibility of synthesis of graphene and graphane (hydrogenated graphene) using the decomposition of hydrocarbons by thermal plasma has been investigated. Investigations of the influence of the plasma-forming gas on the efficiency of synthesis and the morphology of graphene materials were carried out. The synthesis products have been characterized by the methods of scanning microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. It is found that the morphology of graphene materials is affected by the geometry of the reactor. It was demonstrated that the obtained graphene materials are uniformly distributed in the volume of plastic based on cyanate ester resins under mixing.

  8. A syncopated leap-frog algorithm for orbit consistent plasma simulation of materials processing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.W.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present a particle algorithm to extend simulation capabilities for plasma based materials processing reactors. The orbit integrator uses a syncopated leap-frog algorithm in cylindrical coordinates, which maintains second order accuracy, and minimizes computational complexity. Plasma source terms are accumulated orbit consistently directly in the frequency and azimuthal mode domains. Finally they discuss the numerical analysis of this algorithm. Orbit consistency greatly reduces the computational cost for a given level of precision. The computational cost is independent of the degree of time scale separation

  9. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Weisz, David G; Zaug, Joseph M; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L; Cappelli, Mark A; Rose, Timothy P

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  10. Hydrogen Generation by Koh-Ethanol Plasma Electrolysis Using Double Compartement Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, Nelson; Sasiang, Johannes; Dewi Rosalina, Chandra; Budikania, Trisutanti

    2018-03-01

    This study has successfully investigated the generation of hydrogen using double compartment reactor with plasma electrolysis process. Double compartment reactor is designed to achieve high discharged voltage, high concentration, and also reduce the energy consumption. The experimental results showed the use of double compartment reactor increased the productivity ratio 90 times higher compared to Faraday electrolysis process. The highest hydrogen production obtained is 26.50 mmol/min while the energy consumption can reach up 1.71 kJ/mmol H2 at 0.01 M KOH solution. It was shown that KOH concentration, addition of ethanol, cathode depth, and temperature have important effects on hydrogen production, energy consumption, and process efficiency.

  11. Integrated CFD Model for Nanoparticle Production in Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor: Implementation and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Benros Santos Lopes, Silvania

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent a very exciting new area of research. Their small size, ranging from several nanometers to tens of nanometers, is responsible for many changes in the structural, thermal, electromagnetic, optical and mechanical properties in comparison with the bulk solid of the same materials. However, promoting the use of such material requires well-controlled synthesis techniques to be developed. Inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) reactors have been shown to offer unique adva...

  12. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l i ). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q a ∼ 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l i plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q 0 > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions

  13. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Tri Nugroho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31. doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31

  14. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7115

  15. Production of Monodisperse Nanoparticles and Application of Discrete-Monodisperse Model in Plasma Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Kyo-Seon; Zhao, Qian-Qiu

    2003-01-01

    The particle growth in plasma reactor were investigated by using the discrete-monodisperse (D-M) model for various process conditions. The monodisperse large sized particle distribution predicted by the D-M model are in good agreement with the large sized particles by the discrete-sectional model and also in the experiments by Shiratani et al. (1996). Some fractions of the small size particles are in a neutral state or even charged positively, but most of the large sized monodisperse particles are charged negatively. As the mass generation rate of monomers increases, the large sized particles grow more quickly and the production rate of nanoparticles of 100nm by plasma reactor increases. As the initial electron concentration or the monomer diameter increases, it takes longer time for the large sized particles to grow up to 100nm, but the large sized particle concentration of 100nm increases and the resulting production rate of large sized particles of 100nm increases. As the residence time increases, the time for the large sized particles to grow up to 100nm decreases and the large sized particle concentration of 100nm increases and, as a result, the production rate of large sized particles of 100nm increases. We propose that the plasma reactor can be a good candidate to produce monodisperse nanoparticles

  16. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of EDTA contained reactor coolant using water dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sang Heon; Kwon, Daniel; Kim, Gon Ho

    2005-01-01

    EDTA (Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid) is used as a main absorbent for the metal ion in the secondary loop of the nuclear reactor. Dissolving the wasted EDTA with low cost, therefore, is important issue for the maintenance of the nuclear power reactor and the protection of environment. EDTA is not easily biodegradable, furthermore these methods could make remained another pollutant as complex chemical compounds. Compared to chemical method, the physical methods, using the energetic particles and UVs, are more favorable because they dissociate the bonds of organic compounds directly without the secondary chemical reactions during the treatment. Recently, high energy electron beam, the plasma torch, and the water breakdown by high voltage pulse are applied to treatment of the waste water contained chemicals. Here consideration is narrow down to improve the interaction between the plasma and the chemical bonds of EDTA because the energetic particles; activated radicals, and UVs, are abundant in plasmas. The new method adapted of the water DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) which plasma generates directly on the top of the water contained EDTA is proposed. The application of DBD plasmas has been extended for cleaning the organic compounds from the contaminated surface and also for removing volatile organic chemicals (VOC) such as NO x and SO x from the exhausted gases. Here, the water DBD reactor (SEMTECH, SD-DWG-04-1) is consisted that the one electrode is a ceramic insulator and another one is the water itself. Interestingly, the one electrode, the water, is not the solid dielectric electrode. In this study, therefore, the characteristics with driving frequency are considered and the feasibility of this new method for the DBD treatment of EDTA contained water is demonstrated

  18. Assessment of quasi-linear effect of RF power spectrum for enabling lower hybrid current drive in reactor plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Roberto; Cardinali, Alessandro; Castaldo, Carmine; Amicucci, Luca; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Galli, Alessandro; Napoli, Francesco; Panaccione, Luigi; Santini, Franco; Schettini, Giuseppe; Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The main research on the energy from thermonuclear fusion uses deuterium plasmas magnetically trapped in toroidal devices. To suppress the turbulent eddies that impair thermal insulation and pressure tight of the plasma, current drive (CD) is necessary, but tools envisaged so far are unable accomplishing this task while efficiently and flexibly matching the natural current profiles self-generated at large radii of the plasma column [1-5]. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [6] can satisfy this important need of a reactor [1], but the LHCD system has been unexpectedly mothballed on JET. The problematic extrapolation of the LHCD tool at reactor graded high values of, respectively, density and temperatures of plasma has been now solved. The high density problem is solved by the FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) method [7], and solution of the high temperature one is presented here. Model results based on quasi-linear (QL) theory evidence the capability, w.r.t linear theory, of suitable operating parameters of reducing the wave damping in hot reactor plasmas. Namely, using higher RF power densities [8], or a narrower antenna power spectrum in refractive index [9,10], the obstacle for LHCD represented by too high temperature of reactor plasmas should be overcome. The former method cannot be used for routinely, safe antenna operations, Thus, only the latter key is really exploitable in a reactor. The proposed solutions are ultimately necessary for viability of an economic reactor.

  19. Nonthermal fusion reactor concept based on Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The failure of magnetic confinement controlled thermonuclear fusion research to achieve its goal is attributed to its foundation on the incomplete MHD plasma description instead of the more general HMHD (Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics) theory. The latter allows for a certain magnetic plasma self-confinement under described stringent conditions. A reactor concept based on the formation, acceleration, and forced disintegration of magnetized whirl structures, plasmoids, is proposed. The four conventional MHD theory objections, i.e., absence of dynamo action, fast decay caused by resistivity, non-existence of magnetic self-confinement, and negligible non-thermal fusion yield, are shown not to apply. Support for the scheme from dense plasma focus research is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  20. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G. [GREMI, Université-CNRS, BP6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R., E-mail: mohamed-ramzi.ammar@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Strunskus, T. [Institute of Material Science, Chritian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  1. Plasma-materials interaction issues for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Werley, K.A.

    1992-02-01

    Analysis of proposed operating scenarios for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has yielded predictions for the power and particle fluxes onto the material surfaces facing the plasma. The particles, mostly deuterium, tritium, and helium ions, would have energies in the range of 50--2000 eV and fluxes up to 5 x 10 23 /m 2 s. Lower fluxes of multi-MeV electrons and alpha particles may also strike the plasma-facing surfaces, primarily during transient events. The peak power fluxes onto the plasma-facing surfaces during normal operation are expected to be 5--100 MW/m 2 , but much higher during transient events. At the extreme conditions expected for steady-state operation, commonly used heat-removal structures are unable to withstand either the high sputter erosion rates or power loads. To reduce the time-averaged power flux, active control of the plasma position is specified to sweep the plasma heat load across larger areas of plasma-facing components. However, the cyclic heat load creates fatigue lifetime problems. Solutions to these lifetime and reliability problems by (1) changes in machine design and operation, (2) redeposition mechanisms, and (3) changes in materials, will be discussed. A proposed accelerated-life test facility for prototype divertor plate development is described

  2. Development of the reactor lithium ampoule device for research of spectral-luminescent characteristics of nuclear-excited plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batyrbekov, E.G. [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Gordienko, Yu. N., E-mail: gordienko@nnc.kz [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Ponkratov, Yu. V. [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Khasenov, M.U. [PI “National Laboratory Astana”, Astana (Kazakhstan); Tazhibayeva, I.L.; Barsukov, N.I.; Kulsartov, T.V.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Skakov, M.K. [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The development procedure of the ampoule device for experiments with nuclear-excited plasma under neutron irradiation is described. • The methods of nuclear reactions’ energy conversion into the energy of optical radiation of nuclear-excited plasma are presented. • A scheme of reactor experiments, the experimental facility and experimental device to carry out the reactor experiments are considered. - Abstract: This paper describes the development procedure of the reactor ampoule device to perform the experiments on study of spectral luminescence characteristics of nuclear-excited plasma formed by products of {sup 6}Li(n,α){sup 3}H reaction under neutron irradiation at the IVG.1 M research reactor. The methods of nuclear reactions’ energy conversion into the energy of optical radiation of nuclear-excited plasma are presented. A scheme of reactor experiments, the experimental facility and experimental device to carry out the reactor experiments are considered in paper. The designed ampoule device is totally meets the requirements of irradiation experiments on the IVG.1M reactor.

  3. Experimental study and modelisation of a pulse tube refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravex, A.; Rolland, P.; Liang, J.

    1992-01-01

    A test bench for pulse tube refrigerator characterization has been built. In various configurations (basic pulse tube, orifice pulse tube and double inlet pulse tube), the ultimate temperature and the cooling power have been measured as a function of pressure wave amplitude and frequency for various geometries. A lowest temperature of 28 K has been achieved in a single staged double inlet configuration. A modelisation taking into account wall heat pumping, enthalpy flow and regenerator inefficiency is under development. Preliminary calculation results are compared with experimental data

  4. Steady-state plasma and reactor parameters for elliptical cross section tokamaks with very large power ratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    In previous studies only circular cross section reactor plasmas were considered. The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of elliptical plasma cross sections. Several technological benefits have been determined. Maximum magnetic field strength requirements are 30 to 65 percent less than for 5000 MW (th) reactors and may be as much as 40 percent less than for circular cross section reactors of comparable size. Very large n tau values are found (10 15 to 10 17 sec/cm 3 ), which produce large burn-up fractions (15 to 60 percent). There is relatively little problem with impurity build-up. Long confinement times (60 to 500 seconds) are found. Finally, the elliptical cross section reactors exhibit a major toroidal radius reduction of as large as 30 percent over circular reactors operating at comparable power levels

  5. Hierarchical modeling of plasma and transport phenomena in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N.; Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Skouras, E. D.; Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Burganos, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    A novel dual-time hierarchical approach is developed to link the plasma process to macroscopic transport phenomena in the interior of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor that has been used for soil remediation (Aggelopoulos et al 2016 Chem. Eng. J. 301 353-61). The generation of active species by plasma reactions is simulated at the microseconds (µs) timescale, whereas convection and thermal conduction are simulated at the macroscopic (minutes) timescale. This hierarchical model is implemented in order to investigate the influence of the plasma DBD process on the transport and reaction mechanisms during remediation of polluted soil. In the microscopic model, the variables of interest include the plasma-induced reactive concentrations, while in the macroscopic approach, the temperature distribution, and the velocity field both inside the discharge gap and within the polluted soil material as well. For the latter model, the Navier-Stokes and Darcy Brinkman equations for the transport phenomena in the porous domain are solved numerically using a FEM software. The effective medium theory is employed to provide estimates of the effective time-evolving and three-phase transport properties in the soil sample. Model predictions considering the temporal evolution of the plasma remediation process are presented and compared with corresponding experimental data.

  6. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  7. Applications and interactions of solid impurity pellets with reactor relevant plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Peng Lilin; Huang Jinhua; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    Based on the kinetic two-dimensional lentil-shape ablation theory of hydrogenic pellet developed by Kuteev, the new extended algorithm for erosion speed and ablation rate calculations of the impurity pellets in reactor relevant plasma has been derived. The preliminary exploration for the feasibility of applying impurity pellet injection to the α particle diagnostics in the future ITER device has been performed. The comparisons between the numerical integral calculation results and analysis show that the lithium pellet injection possesses much more compatibilities. It might be feasible to apply this technique to both α particle diagnostics and safety factor q profile measurement in the future ITER device. (authors)

  8. A review of the US joining technologies for plasma facing components in the ITER fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.; Watson, R.D.; Slattery, K.T.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is a review of the current joining technologies for plasma facing components in the US for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Many facilities are involved in this project. Many unique and innovative joining techniques are being considered in the quest to join two candidate armor plate materials (beryllium and tungsten) to a copper base alloy heat sink (CuNiBe, OD copper, CuCrZr). These techniques include brazing and diffusion bonding, compliant layers at the bond interface, and the use of diffusion barrier coatings and diffusion enhancing coatings at the bond interfaces. The development and status of these joining techniques will be detailed in this report

  9. Intense lower-hybrid wave penetration and current drive in reactor-grade plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1990-01-01

    Apply lower-hybrid power in short, intense pulses can overcome Landau damping, allowing penetration into the core of reactor-grade plasmas. We present a theoretical description of the absorption and parametric stability of the pulses, and show results of ray-tracing calculations which include the absorption calculation. Consideration of the absorption and potential source availability lead to the consideration of 5--10 GW peak power, 30--100 μs pulses for ITER, and ∼ 2 MW, 20 μs pulses for a proof-of-principle experiment in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

  10. Intense lower-hybrid wave penetration and current drive in reactor-grade plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Plasma Fusion Center)

    1990-01-01

    Apply lower-hybrid power in short, intense pulses can overcome Landau damping, allowing penetration into the core of reactor-grade plasmas. We present a theoretical description of the absorption and parametric stability of the pulses, and show results of ray-tracing calculations which include the absorption calculation. Consideration of the absorption and potential source availability lead to the consideration of 5--10 GW peak power, 30--100 {mu}s pulses for ITER, and {approximately} 2 MW, 20 {mu}s pulses for a proof-of-principle experiment in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX).

  11. Thermal responses of tokamak reactor first walls during cyclic plasma burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Charak, I.

    1978-01-01

    The CINDA-3G computer code has been adapted to analyze the thermal responses and operating limitations of two fusion reactor first-wall concepts under normal cyclic operation. A component of an LMFBR computer code has been modified and adapted to analyze the ablative behavior of first-walls after a plasma disruption. The first-wall design concepts considered are a forced-circulation water-cooled stainless steel panel with and without a monolithic graphite liner. The thermal gradients in the metal wall and liner have been determined for several burn-cycle scenarios and the extent of surface ablation that results from a plasma disruption has been determined for stainless steel and graphite first surfaces

  12. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volokitin, Oleg, E-mail: volokitin-oleg@mail.ru; Volokitin, Gennady, E-mail: vgg-tomsk@mail.ru; Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mai.ru; Shekhovtsov, Valentin, E-mail: shehovcov2010@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Vlasov, Viktor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ r{sub p} ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ r{sub p} ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  13. Thermal responses of tokamak reactor first walls during cyclic plasma burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Charak, I.

    1977-01-01

    The CINDA-3G computer code has been adapted to analyze the thermal responses and operating limitations of two fusion reactor first-wall concepts under normal cyclic operation. A component of an LMFBR computer has been modified and adapted to analyze the ablative behavior of first-walls after a plasma disruption. The first-wall design concepts considered are a forced-circulation water-cooled stainless steel panel with and without a monolithic graphite liner. The thermal gradients in the metal wall and liner have been determined for several burn-cycle scenarios and the extent of surface ablation that results from a plasma disruption has been determined for stainless steel and graphite first surfaces

  14. Evaluation of remote maintenance schemes by plasma equilibrium analysis in Tokamak DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The remote maintenance schemes in DEMO reactor were evaluated by the plasma equilibrium analysis. • Horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme requires the largest total PF coil current. • The difference of total PF coil current for MHD equilibrium in between the large segmented divertor maintenance and the segmentalized divertor maintenance was about 10%. - Abstract: The remote maintenance schemes in a DEMO reactor are categorized by insertion direction, blanket segmentation, and divertor maintenance scheme, and are quantitatively evaluated by analysing the plasma equilibrium. The positions of the poloidal field (PF) coil are limited by the size of the toroidal field (TF) coil and the maintenance port layout of each remote maintenance scheme. Because the PF coils are located near the larger TF coil and far from the plasma surface, the horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme requires the largest part of total PF coil current, 25% larger than that required for separated sector transport using vertical maintenance ports with segmented divertor maintenance (SDM). In the unsegmented divertor maintenance (UDM) scheme, the total magnetic stored energy in the PF coils at plasma equilibrium is about 30% larger than that stored in the SDM scheme, but the time required for removal and installation of all the divertor cassettes in the UDM scheme is roughly a third of that required in the SDM scheme because the number of divertor cassettes in the UDM scheme is a third of that in the SDM scheme. From the viewpoint of simple maintenance operations, the merit of the UDM scheme has more merit than the SDM scheme

  15. Development and evaluation of plasma facing materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Roedig, M.; Schmidt, A.; Thomser, C.

    2010-01-01

    More and more attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO 2 -emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible meterials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PEMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. Materials for plasma facing components have to fulfill a number of requirements. First of all the materials have to be plasma compatible, i.e. they should exhibit a low atomic number to avoid radiative losses whenever atoms from the wall material will be ionized in the plasma. In addition, the materials must have a high melting point, a high thermal conductivity, and adequate mechanical properties. To select the most suitable material candidates, a comprehensive data base is required which includes all thermo-physical and mechanical properties. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm -2 , meanwhile the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm -2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat

  16. Development and evaluation of plasma facing materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Roedig, M.; Schmidt, A.; Thomser, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    More and more attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO{sub 2}-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible meterials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PEMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. Materials for plasma facing components have to fulfill a number of requirements. First of all the materials have to be plasma compatible, i.e. they should exhibit a low atomic number to avoid radiative losses whenever atoms from the wall material will be ionized in the plasma. In addition, the materials must have a high melting point, a high thermal conductivity, and adequate mechanical properties. To select the most suitable material candidates, a comprehensive data base is required which includes all thermo-physical and mechanical properties. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm{sup -2}, meanwhile the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm{sup -2} for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs

  17. Interactions between plasma and wall materials in fusion reactors; Plasma-Wand Wechselwirkungen von Fusionsreaktormaterialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marot, L.; Moser, L.; and others

    2016-11-15

    First mirrors of optical diagnostics in ITER were exposed in Magnum-PSI linear plasma device and JET-ILW tokamak. For JET-ILW the mirrors with a rhodium (Rh) or a molybdenum (Mo) coating exhibited a decrease of the reflectivity according the location in the torus and especially the amount of beryllium (Be) deposited on them. No delamination of the coated reflective film was observed. Under very harsh erosion conditions in Magnum-PSI, Rh thick coated mock ups, cooled or not, for a high flux exposure the films underwent delamination. Mo coating on water cooled mock up mirrors exhibited a high diffuse reflectivity after H{sub 2}/Ar plasma exposure inducing an important decrease of the specular reflectivity and show important oxidation of the surface. Cleaning of mirrors was extensively studied during this period, with magnetic field in collaboration with the SPC Lausanne, or in term of repetitive cleaning till 34 cycles. Polycrystalline molybdenum mirror shows a high diffuse reflectivity after cleaning cycle and clearly demonstrate that they are not suitable for this purpose. Coated Rh or Mo mirrors like single crystal maintained good reflectivity. Test under magnetic field revealed the non-uniform erosion of the mirrors according the orientation between the field and the mirror. All these tests bring to a suitable schematic of the implementation of this technique in ITER and were deeply explained. The cleaning of the Be contaminated mirrors will be carried out using new parameters in December 2016. Investigations on formation of tungsten fuzz were carried out either in Basel using a new setup or in Pilot-PSI. These thickness measurements showed the fuzz growth is in square root dependence to time or fluence. From the results in Pilot-PSI, it has been shown that time was a critical parameter for the development of He-induced morphology changes and one needs to keep that factor in mind. (authors)

  18. Control of plasma layer in a fusion reactor correlated to DC motor control using PSO-ANFIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, Sakuntala; Daniel, Raju; Dey, Deep Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Plasma position and shape control is very crucial for the overall performance of the fusion reactor such as Tokamak. The quality of the discharge in the Saskatchewan TORus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak is strongly related to the position of the plasma column within the discharge vessel. If the plasma column approaches too near the wall, then either minor or complete disruption occurs. Consequently it is necessary to be able to control dynamically the position of the plasma column throughout the entire discharge. Now a day's most fusion reactor employs the traditional PID controller for the confinement of plasma layer. Fuzzy logic is used for the control of Plasma layer. In this paper we have used the hybrid of PSO-ANFIS technique to control the speed of a DC motor. We have used two input parameters like speed, torque and output is firing angle. In our work first order Sugeno fuzzy model is taken with three rules and the parameters of Gaussian membership function is controlled by the PSO technique. PSO-ANFIS speed controller obtains better dynamic behavior and superior performance of the DC motor speed control. Similar approach can be correlated to the control of plasma layer. For the plasma control two inputs can be taken as plasma position ΔH and the plasma current and the single output, the control decision u(t). (author)

  19. Plasma properties in a large-volume, cylindrical and asymmetric radio-frequency capacitively coupled industrial-prototype reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazović, Saša; Puač, Nevena; Spasić, Kosta; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran Lj; Cvelbar, Uroš; Mozetič, Miran; Radetić, Maja

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a large-volume low-pressure cylindrical plasma reactor with a size that matches industrial reactors for treatment of textiles. It was shown that it efficiently produces plasmas with only a small increase in power as compared with a similar reactor with 50 times smaller volume. Plasma generated at 13.56 MHz was stable from transition to streamers and capable of long-term continuous operation. An industrial-scale asymmetric cylindrical reactor of simple design and construction enabled good control over a wide range of active plasma species and ion concentrations. Detailed characterization of the discharge was performed using derivative, Langmuir and catalytic probes which enabled determination of the optimal sets of plasma parameters necessary for successful industry implementation and process control. Since neutral atomic oxygen plays a major role in many of the material processing applications, its spatial profile was measured using nickel catalytic probe over a wide range of plasma parameters. The spatial profiles show diffusion profiles with particle production close to the powered electrode and significant wall losses due to surface recombination. Oxygen atom densities range from 10 19 m −3 near the powered electrode to 10 17 m −3 near the wall. The concentrations of ions at the same time are changing from 10 16 to the 10 15 m −3 at the grounded chamber wall. (paper)

  20. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros

    2009-08-01

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 × 1021 m-3. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O2 molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  1. Simulation of pressurized water reactor in accidental state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop the 1300 MWe 4 loops 'PWR' simulator called 'SATRAPE', witch the adopted physics modelisation allows a simplified neutronic calculation, and focus essentially on the reactor thermal hydraulic behavior in the case of the following accidents: - Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). - Steam Generator Tube Failure (SGTF). - Steam Line Break (SLB). In case of the 'LOCA' or 'SLB' accident, this modelisation enables the calculation of the pressure and the temperature in the containment building, and also the debit of the released dose in this latter in case of the 'LOCA' accident. The adopted models are relatively simple so as to allow an explicit resolve. In SATRAPE, two graphical interfaces enables to launch orders, whereas the other permits to visualize, the principal state variables of installations. The results obtained show a very good consistency with the envisaged commonly scenario at the time of the considered accidents. 33 refs., 52 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  2. Plasma, a plant safety monitoring and assessment system for VVER-440 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornaes, A.; Hulsund, J. E. [Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE), OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Lipcsei, S.; Major, Cs.; Racz, A.; Vegh, J. [KFKI, Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary); Eiler, J. [Paks, Nuclear Power Plant Ltd, Paks (Hungary)

    1999-05-15

    The objective with the Plant Safety Monitoring and Assessment System (PLASMA) is to develop an operator support system to support the execution of new symptom-based Emergency Operating Procedures for application in VVER reactors, with the Paks NPP in Hungary as the target plant. Many of the VVER reactors are rewriting their EOPs to comply more with Western standards of symptom-based EOPs. In this connection it is desirable to improve the data validation, information integration and presentation for operators when executing the EOPs. The entry-point to a symptom-oriented procedure is defined by the occurrence of a well-defined reactor operation status, with all its symptoms. However, the application of the EOF benefits from an operator support system, which performs plant status and symptom identification reliably and accurately. The development of the PLASMA system is a joint venture between Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE) and KFKI with the NPP Paks as the target plant. The project has been initiated and partly funded by the Science and Technology Agency (STA), Japan through the OECD NEA assistance program. In Hungary, considerable effort has concentrated on the safety reassessment of the Paks NPP and new EOPs are being written, but no comprehensive Operator Support System (OSS) for plant safety assessment is installed. Some safety parameter display functions are incorporated into diverse operator support systems, but an online 'plant safety monitoring and assessment system' is still missing. The present project comprises designing, constructing, testing and installing such an OSS, which to a great extent could support plant operators in their safety assessment work (author) (ml)

  3. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetoli, Luis Otavio de Brito, E-mail: luskywalcker@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Geremias, Reginaldo [Departamento de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Goncalvez de Souza, Ivan [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, Nito Angelo, E-mail: debacher@qmc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use O{sub 2} as the feed gas and pyrite was added to the non-thermal plasma reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methylene blue removal by NTP increased in the presence of pyrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total organic carbon content decreased substantially. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acute toxicity test showed that the treated solution is not toxic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dye degradation occurs via electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation. - Abstract: In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N{sub 2}, Ar, and O{sub 2}. The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N{sub 2} < Ar < O{sub 2}). Using O{sub 2} as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O{sub 2} or O{sub 2}-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules.

  4. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.W.M.; Chan, C.S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum (~10 −4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al 2 O 3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films. (author)

  5. High effective heterogeneous plasma vortex reactor for production of heat energy and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, N. K.; Zavershinskii, I. P.; Klimov, A. I.; Molevich, N. E.; Porfiriev, D. P.; Tolkunov, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous studies [1-10] of physical parameters and properties of a long-lived heterogeneous plasmoid (plasma formation with erosive nanoclusters) created by combined discharge in a high-speed swirl flow. Here interaction of metal nanoclusters with hydrogen atoms is studied in a plasma vortex reactor (PVR) with argon-water steam mixture. Metal nanoclusters were created by nickel cathode’s erosion at combined discharge on. Dissociated hydrogen atoms and ions were obtained in water steam by electric discharge. These hydrogen atoms and ions interacted with metal nanoclusters, which resulted in the creation of a stable plasmoid in a swirl gas flow. This plasmoid has been found to create intensive soft X-ray radiation. Plasma parameters of this plasmoid were measured by optical spectroscopy method. It has been obtained that there is a high non-equilibrium plasmoid: Te > TV >> TR. The measured coefficient of energy performance of this plasmoid is about COP = 2÷10. This extra power release in plasmoid is supposed to be connected with internal excited electrons. The obtained experimental results have proved our suggestion.

  6. Particulate Filtration from Emissions of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly Reactor Using Regenerable Porous Metal Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Abney, Morgan; Greenwood, Zachary; West, Philip; Mitchell, Karen; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2017-01-01

    Microwave-based plasma pyrolysis technology is being studied as a means of supporting oxygen recovery in future spacecraft life support systems. The process involves the conversion of methane produced from a Sabatier reactor to acetylene and hydrogen, with a small amount of solid carbon particulates generated as a side product. The particles must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. We discuss developmental work on porous metal media filters for removing the carbon particulate emissions from the PPA exit gas stream and to provide in situ media regeneration capability. Because of the high temperatures involved in oxidizing the deposited carbon during regeneration, there was particular focus in this development on the materials that could be used, the housing design, and heating methods. This paper describes the design and operation of the filter and characterizes their performance from integrated testing at the Environmental Chamber (E-Chamber) at MSFC.

  7. Flash pyrolysis of agricultural residues using a plasma heated laminar entrained flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Shuangning; Yi Weiming; Li Baoming

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the volatilization characteristics of biomass particles at flash heating rates, a plasma heated laminar entrained flow reactor (PHLEFR) was designed and built in our lab. Two agricultural residues, wheat straw and corn stalk, were chosen as feedstock for pyrolysis which were conducted on the PHLEFR with the aim of determining the extent of thermal decomposition at high heating rate (more than 10 4o Cs -1 ). Based on the experimental data, a first order kinetic model was introduced and the relevant kinetic parameters (apparent active energy and apparent frequency factor) were determined for the two straws: E=31.51kJmol -1 , A=1028s -1 (wheat straw) and E=33.74kJmol -1 , A=1013s -1 (corn stalk). The predicted conversion of the fitted model to the experimental data provided general agreements when one considered the experimental errors

  8. Removal of NO and SO2 in Corona Discharge Plasma Reactor with Water Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺元吉; 董丽敏; 杨嘉祥

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a novel type of a corona discharge plasma reactor was designed, which consists of needle-plate-combined electrodes, in which a series of needle electrodes are placed in a glass container filled with flue gas, and a plate electrode is immersed in the water. Based on this model, the removal of NO and SO2 was tested experimentally. In addition, the effect of streamer polarity on the reduction of SO2 and NO was investigated in detail. The experimental results show that the corona wind formed between the high-voltage needle electrode and the water by corona discharge enhances the cleaning efficiency of the flue gas because of the presence of water,and the cleaning efficiency will increase with the increase of applied dc voltage within a definite range. The removal efficiency of SO2 up to 98%, and about 85% of NOx removal under suitable conditions is obtained in our experiments.

  9. Fuel gas and char from pyrolysis of waste paper in a microwave plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khongkrapan, Parin; Thanompongchart, Patipat; Tippayawong, Nakorn; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a microwave plasma reactor was used for pyrolysis of waste papers. The effects of different argon flow rates on char and gas generation were investigated. Changes in carbon and oxygen contents from those in paper to char were significant. Char yield of over 25 % was obtained with the heating value of about 38 MJ/kg. Average gas yield and total content of combustible fraction (CO, CH4 and H2) in the gas product were 2.56 m3/kg and 36 %, respectively. The heating value of gas product and carbon conversion efficiency of the process were maximum at 6.0 MJ/m3 and 73 %, respectively.

  10. Influence of implanted helium on nickel resistance under simulation of plasma flux disruption in nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadin, B.A.; Pol'skij, V.I.; Yakushin, V.L.; Markin, A.V.; Tserevitinov, S.S.; Vasil'ev, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Investigation results are presented of radiation erosion of constructive materials of the first wall of a thermonuclear reactor. The erosion is conditioned by successive repeated action of pulse processes, imitating plasma disruption, and helium ion fluxes at 40 keV and 2 x 10 21 -10 22 m -2 fluence. As imitating processes are used fluxes of deuterium high-temperature plasma. It is shown that preliminary action by high-temperature plasma leads to substantial suppression of radiation erosion, included by subsequent ion irradiation

  11. Optimization of tungsten-steel joints for plasma facing components in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuer, Simon; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); Weber, Thomas; Linke, Jochen [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Werkstoffstruktur und -eigenschaften, Juelich (Germany); Matejicek, Jiri [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Tungsten, joint to a martensitic-ferritic EUROFER97 structure, is a promising plasma facing material composite for fusion reactors. Due to the effect of mismatch in thermo-mechanical properties direct bonding is not feasible. Current research is therefore ongoing on interlayer systems. While the adhesion was already improved by the utilization of a discrete Cu, Ti or V interlayer, that is able to relax stresses by plastic deformation, joints still do not resist the expected load cycles in a fusion reactor. Therefore, alternatives for the interface are needed. This contribution presents research on functionally graded materials (FGM). The particular microstructure of a graded interlayer allows re-distributing macro stresses from a discrete interface to a greater volume while avoiding in particular Cu which tends to swell under neutron irradiation. A parameter study on the basis of finite element analysis will be presented as well as first results of several processing routes for FGM that shall be evaluated and benchmarked by mechanical as well as thermal testing.

  12. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  13. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  14. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. The application of dynamic method for the temperature measurement of gas destruction in a plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryszard, Sarba

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study of the conversion of measuring probe temperature into hot gas temperature. The author gives a solution to the problem of a destruction temperature measurement in a plasma reactor. The temperature conversion is based on the thermodynamic similarity theory and statistical thermodynamics verification. The experimental measurements of the hot gas temperature have been made in the place where it considerably exceeds the melting point of the measuring probe material. The heat exchange phenomenon on the measuring probe's surface with the hot gas surrounding it is described by a forced convection equation. An analysis has been made of the heat flowing in and out of the measuring probe. The experimental part of the paper includes: an experimental measurement of gas velocity by means of luminous particles, a hot gas measurement for one distance from a nozzle and different diameters of the measuring probe, as well as different probing velocities. Numerical simulations have been made of the temperature distribution in a plasma jet. The experimental results are congruent with theoretical predictions. The aim of this research is a contribution to the structuring of a mathematical model of mass and energy balance in the processes of NHF 2 CL waste destruction.

  16. Manufacturing and testing in reactor relevant conditions of brazed plasma facing components of the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, M.; Branca, V.; Marco, M. Di; Federici, A.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, G.; Guarnone, P.; Luconi, U.; Merola, M.; Ozzano, C.; Pasquale, G.; Poggi, P.; Rizzo, S.; Varone, F.

    2005-01-01

    A fabrication route based on brazing technology has been developed for the realization of the high heat flux components for the ITER vertical target and Dome-Liner. The divertor vertical target is armoured with carbon fiber reinforced carbon and tungsten in the lower straight part and in the upper curved part, respectively. The armour material is joined to heat sinks made of precipitation hardened copper-chromium-zirconium alloy. The plasma facing units of the dome component are based on a tungsten flat tile design with hypervapotron cooling. An innovative brazing technique based on the addition of carbon fibers to the active brazing alloy, developed by Ansaldo Ricerche for applications in the field of the energy production, has been used for the carbon fiber composite to copper joint to reduce residual stresses. The tungsten-copper joint has been realized by direct casting. A proper brazing thermal cycle has been studied to guarantee the required mechanical properties of the precipitation hardened alloy after brazing. The fabrication route of plasma facing components for the ITER vertical target and dome based on the brazing technology has been proved by means of thermal fatigue tests performed on mock-ups in reactor relevant conditions

  17. The thermal response of the first wall of a fusion reactor blanket to plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.Th.

    1983-09-01

    Major plasma disruptions in Tokamak power reactors are potentially dangerous because high thermal overloading of the first wall may occur, resulting in melting and evaporation. The present uncertainties of the disruption characteristics, in particular the space and time dependence of the energy deposition, lead to a wide variation in the prospective surface energy loads. The thermal response of a first wall of aluminium, stainless steel and of graphite subjected to disruption energy loads up to 1000 J cm -2 has been analysed including the effects of melting and surface evaporation, vapour recondensation, vapour shielding, and the moving of the surface boundary caused by the evaporation. A special calculation model has been developed for this purpose. The main results are the following: by values of local transient energy depositions over 1500 J cm -2 bare stainless steel walls are damaged severely. Further calculations are needed to estimate the endurance limit of several candidate first wall materials. Applications of coatings on surfaces need special attention. For the reference INTOR disruption (approx. 100 J cm -2 ) evaporation is not significant. The effect of vapour shielding on evaporation has been found to be significant. The effect on melting is less pronounced. In a complete analysis the stability and dynamic behaviour of the melted layer under electromagnetic forces should be included. Also a reliable set of plasma disruption characteristics should be gathered

  18. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  19. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Longhurst, G.

    1998-12-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 1st IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on December 19 and 20, 1998 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by meeting participants, a review of the data availability and data needs in the areas from the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the subject of the meeting, and recommendations regarding the future work within this CRP. (author)

  20. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on October 16 and 17, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  1. Thermal tests on UF6 containers and valves modelisation and extrapolation on real fire situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duret, B.; Warniez, P.

    1988-12-01

    From realistic tests on containers or on valves, we propose a modelisation which we apply to 3 particular problems: resistance of a 48 Y containers, during a fire situation. Influence of the presence of a valve. Evaluation of a leakage through a breach, mechanically created before a fire

  2. Reaction-rate coefficients, high-energy ions slowing-down, and power balance in a tokamak fusion reactor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo

    1978-07-01

    Described are the reactivity coefficient of D-T fusion reaction, slowing-down processes of deuterons injected with high energy and 3.52 MeV alpha particles generated in D-T reaction, and the power balance in a Tokamak reactor plasma. Most of the results were obtained in the first preliminary design of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) driven with stationary neutral beam injection. A manual of numerical computation program ''BALTOK'' developed for the calculations is given in the appendix. (auth.)

  3. Thermal and mechanical design of the plasma core CXRS diagnostics for the fusion reactor ITER; Thermische und mechanische Auslegung der Plasma Core CXRS Diagnostik des ITER Kernfusionsreaktors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greza, H. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Neubauer, O.; Wolters, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In the frame of the research project ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) the plasma state is monitored using the plasma core diagnostics CXRS (charge exchange recombination spectroscopy).The authors describe the thermal and mechanical design of the first mirror of the CXRS diagnostics. The components of the first mirror are exposed to high heat and neutron irradiation. The surface temperature will be 300 to 400 deg C. The misalignment tolerance is plus or minus 0.1 degree. The maximum mechanical stresses in the mirror have to be minimized. The design calculations use the finite element code ANSYS. The results indicate that the heat input from the plasma can be removed by the coolant flow. Further calculation shave to concern the brazed joints between mirror and cooling block.

  4. Thermal and mechanical design of the plasma core CXRS diagnostics for the fusion reactor ITER; Thermische und mechanische Auslegung der Plasma Core CXRS Diagnostik des ITER Kernfusionsreaktors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greza, H.; Knauff, R. [Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH (WTI), Juelich (Germany); Neubauer, O.; Wolters, J.; Offermanns, G.; Biel, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the frame of the research project ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) the plasma state is monitored using the plasma core diagnostics CXRS (charge exchange recombination spectroscopy).The authors describe the thermal and mechanical design of the first mirror of the CXRS diagnostics. The components of the first mirror are exposed to high heat and neutron irradiation. The surface temperature will be 300 to 400 deg C. The misalignment tolerance is plus or minus 0.1 degree. The maximum mechanical stresses in the mirror have to be minimized. The design calculations use the finite element code ANSYS. The results indicate that the heat input from the plasma can be removed by the coolant flow. Further calculation shave to concern the brazed joints between mirror and cooling block.

  5. Valorization of biogas into liquid hydrocarbons in plasma-catalyst reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravech, Mehrdad; Rahmani, Abdelkader; Labidi, Sana; Saintini, Noiric

    2016-09-01

    Biogas represents an important source of renewable energy issued from biological degradation of biomass. It is planned to produce in Europe the amount of biogas equivalent to 6400 kWh electricity and 4500 kteo (kilo tons equivalent oil) in 2020. Currently the biogas is used in cogeneration engines to produce heat and electricity directly in farms or it is injected in gas networks after purification and odorisation. The aim of this work is to propose a third option that consists of valorization of biogas by transformation into liquid hydrocarbons like acetone, methanol, ethanol, acetic acid etc. These chemicals, among the most important feed materials for chemical industries, retain CO2 molecules participating to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and have high storage energy capacity. We developed a low temperature atmospheric plasma-catalyst reactor (surface dielectric barrier discharge) to transform biogas into chemicals. The conversion rates of CH4 and CO2 are respectively about 50% and 30% depending on operational conditions. The energetic cost is 25 eV/molecule. The yields of liquid hydrocarbon reaches currently 10% wt. More the 11 liquid chemicals are observed in the liquid fraction. Acknowledgements are due to SPC Programme Energie de demain.

  6. Study of Raw Materials Treatment by Melting and Gasification Process in Plasma Arc Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter KURILLA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The world consumption of metals and energy has increased in last few decades and it is still increasing. Total volume production results to higher waste production. Raw material basis of majority metals and fossil fuels for energy production is more complex and current waste treatment has long term tendency. Spent power cells of different types have been unneeded and usually they are classified as dangerous waste. This important issue is the main topic of the thesis, in which author describes pyrometallurgical method for storage batteries – power cells and catalysts treatment. During the process there were tested a trial of spent NiMH, Li – ion power cells and spent copper catalysts with metal content treatment by melting and gasification process in plasma arc reactor. The synthetic gas produced from gasification process has been treated by cogenerations micro turbines units for energy recovery. The metal and slag from treatment process are produced into two separately phases and they were analyzing continually.

  7. Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a non-thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Trung Q; Zhu Xinli; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient non-thermal plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H 2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H 2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C 2 H x side products. H 2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO 2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C 2 H x products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H 2 only.

  8. Packed-bed reactor/silent-discharge plasma design data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facility Compliance Act requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) currently does not have adequate systems to treat the mixed wastes generated and stored at the nine DOE-AL sites. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, DOE-AL organized a Treatment Selection Team under the Mixed-Waste Treatment Program (MWTP) to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed waste. The strategy developed by the Treatment Selection Team, as described in the AL Mixed-Waste Treatment Plan (DOE 1994), is to use available off-site commercial treatment facilities for all wastes that can be successfully and cost-effectively treated by such facilities. Where no appropriate commercial treatment facilities exist, mobile treatment units (MTUs) would be developed to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste must not only address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. The packed-bed reactor/silent discharge plasma was chosen as a potential candidate for the treatment of the mixed wastes. The process is described.

  9. Packed-bed reactor/silent-discharge plasma design data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facility Compliance Act requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) currently does not have adequate systems to treat the mixed wastes generated and stored at the nine DOE-AL sites. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, DOE-AL organized a Treatment Selection Team under the Mixed-Waste Treatment Program (MWTP) to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed waste. The strategy developed by the Treatment Selection Team, as described in the AL Mixed-Waste Treatment Plan (DOE 1994), is to use available off-site commercial treatment facilities for all wastes that can be successfully and cost-effectively treated by such facilities. Where no appropriate commercial treatment facilities exist, mobile treatment units (MTUs) would be developed to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste must not only address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. The packed-bed reactor/silent discharge plasma was chosen as a potential candidate for the treatment of the mixed wastes. The process is described

  10. Electron temperature profiles in high power neutral-beam-heated TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Stauffer, F.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, the maximum neutral beam injection (NBI) power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was increased to 20 MW, with three beams co-parallel and one counter-parallel to I/sub p/. TFTR was operated over a wide range of plasma parameters; 2.5 19 19 m -3 . Data bases have been constructed with over 600 measured electron temperature profiles from multipoint TV Thomson scattering which span much of this parameter space. We have also examined electron temperature profile shapes from electron cyclotron emission at the fundamental ordinary mode and second harmonic extraordinary mode for a subset of these discharges. In the light of recent work on ''profile consistency'' we have analyzed these temperature profiles in the range 0.3 < (r/a) < 0.9 to determine if a profile shape exists which is insensitive to q/sub cyl/ and beam-heating profile. Data from both sides of the temperature profile [T/sub e/(R)] were mapped to magnetic flux surfaces [T/sub e/(r/a)]. Although T/sub e/(r/a), in the region where 0.3 < r/a < 0.9 was found to be slightly broader at lower q/sub cyl/, it was found to be remarkably insensitive to β/sub p/, to the fraction of NBI power injected co-parallel to I/sub p/, and to the heating profile going from peaked on axis, to hollow. 10 refs., 8 figs

  11. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft

  12. Modeling of thermal effects on TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor] divertor during plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, M.L.; Perkins, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the disruption power flow from the mid-plane of the TIBER Engineering Test Reactor to its divertor and calculating the resulting thermal effects are accomplished through the modification and coupling of three presently existing computer codes. The resulting computer code TADDPAK (Thermal Analysis Divertor during Disruption PAcKage) provides three-dimensional graphic presentations of time and positional dependent thermal effects on a poloidal cross section of the double-null-divertor configured reactor. These thermal effects include incident heat flux, surface temperature, vaporization rate, total vaporization, and melting depth. The dependence of these thermal effects on material choice, disruption pulse shape, and the characteristic thickness of the plasma scrape-off layer is determined through parametric analysis with TADDPAK. This computer code is designed to be a convenient, rapid, and user-friendly modeling tool which can be easily adapted to most tokamak double-null-divertor reactor designs. 14 refs

  13. Evaluation on nitrogen oxides and nanoparticle removal and nitrogen monoxide generation using a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehana, Kotaro; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from power plants and combustion sources cause air pollution problems. Selective catalytic reduction technology is remarkably useful for NOx removal. However, there are several drawbacks such as preparation of reducing agents, usage of harmful heavy metals, and higher cost. On the other hand, trace NO is a vasodilator agent and employed in inhalation therapies for treating pulmonary hypertension in humans. Considering these factors, in the present study, a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor, which can control NOx and nanoparticle emissions and generate NO, is investigated. The fundamental characteristics of the reactor are investigated. First, the experiment of nanoparticle removal is carried out. Collection efficiencies of over 99% are achieved for nanoparticles at 50 and 100 ml min‑1 of liquid flow rates. Second, experiments of NOx removal under air atmosphere and NOx generation under nitrogen atmosphere are carried out. NOx-removal efficiencies of over 95% under the air plasma are achieved in 50–200 ml min‑1 liquid flow rates. Moreover, under nitrogen plasma, NOx is generated, of which the major portion is NO. For example, NO concentration is 25 ppm, while NOx concentration is 31 ppm at 50 ml min‑1 liquid flow rate. Finally, experiments of NO generation under the nitrogen atmosphere with or without flowing water are carried out. When water flows on the inner surface of the reactor, approximately 14 ppm of NO is generated. Therefore, NO generation requires flowing water. It is considered that the reaction of N and OH, which is similar to the extended Zeldovich mechanism, could occur to induce NO formation. From these results, it is verified that the wet-type plasma reactor is useful for NOx removal and NO generation under nitrogen atmosphere with flowing water.

  14. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-01-01

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement

  15. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

    2006-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability

  16. Theoretical and numerical simulation of the saturation of the stimulated Raman scattering instability that occurs in laser-plasma interaction; Modelisation theorique et numerique de la saturation de l'instabilite de diffusion Raman stimulee se developpant dans l'interaction laser-plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, T

    2007-01-15

    In this work we present 2 important results. First, for a relatively moderate laser lighting (I*{lambda}{sup 2} {approx_equal} 10{sup 14} W{mu}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}), cavitation appears in Langmuir decay instability (LDI) whenever the plasma wavelength is above a certain limit. Secondly, in the case of an inhomogeneous plasma there is an increase of the Raman reflectivity in presence of LDI for a plasma density profile that was initially smooth. This work is divided into 5 chapters. The first chapter is dedicated to parametric instabilities especially Raman instability and Langmuir decay instability. The equations that govern these instabilities as well as their numerical solutions are presented in the second chapter. The third chapter deals with the case of a mono-dimensional plasma with homogenous density. The saturation of the Raman instability in a mono-dimensional plasma with inhomogeneous density is studied in the fourth chapter. The last chapter is dedicated to bi-dimensional simulations for various types of laser beams.

  17. Feasibility studies on plasma vertical position control by ex-vessel coils in ITER-like tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Shimomura, Yasuo

    1993-01-01

    Feasibility of the plasma vertical position control by control coils installed outside the vacuum vessel (ex-vessel) in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined for an ITER-like device. When a pair of ex-vessel control coils is made of normal conductor material and located near the outmost superconducting (SC) poloidal field (PF) coils, the applied voltage of several hundred volts on the control coils is the maximum allowable value which is limited by the maximum allowable induced voltage and eddy current heating on the SC PF coils, under the conditions that the SC PF coils are connected in series and a partitioning connection is employed for each of these PF coils. A proportional and derivative (PD) controller with and without voltage limitation has been employed to examine the feasibility. Indices of settling time and overshoot are introduced to measure the controllability of the control system. Based on these control schemes and indices, higher elongation (κ=2) and moderate elongation (κ=1.6) plasmas are examined for normal and deteriorated (low beta value and peaked current profile) plasma conditions within the restriction of applied voltage and current of control coils. The effect of the time constant of the passive stabilizer is also examined. The major results are: (1) A plasma with an elongation of 2.0 inevitably requires a passive stabilizer close to the plasma surface, (2) in case of a higher elongation than κ=2, even the ex-vessel control coil system is marginally controllable under normal plasma conditions, while it is difficult to control the deteriorated plasma conditions, (3) the time constant of the passive stabilizer is not an essential parameter for the controllability, (4) when the elongation is reduced down to 1.6, the ex-vessel control coil system can control the plasma even under deteriorated plasma conditions. (orig.)

  18. Report of the study meeting on the interaction between plasma and the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira; Akaishi, Kenya; Kawamura, Takaichi; Kabetani, Zenzaburo; Sagara, Akio.

    1978-12-01

    The study meeting on the interaction between plasma and the first wall of a fusion reactor was held from July 24 to July 27, 1978. At this meeting, discussions were made on the interaction between plasma and wall and the effect of impurities. Reports on the ISS observation concerning the Mo surface as a limiter, on the measurement of sputter rate by a microbalance, on the surface roughness of the materials for the first wall at the atomic order, on the selective sputtering of binary alloys, and on the physical and chemical sputtering on the material surface of C and SiC were also presented. The research projects of the Institute of Plasma Physics and Hokkaido University were introduced. Collaboration of two groups was considered. (Kato, T.)

  19. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor: an efficient tool to prepare novel RuO2 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananth, Antony; Gandhi, Mani Sanjeeva; Mok, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials have attracted a great deal of interest owing to their potential applications in various industries. Due to the limitations and cost associated with conventional low-pressure plasma systems, atmospheric-pressure plasma techniques such as dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are investigated as an alternative approach for inducing specific chemical reactions. RuO 2 nanomaterials are widely used as supercapacitor electrodes, in field-emission devices and for catalytic applications. In such applications, size and shape dependent properties of nanomaterials play critical roles in improving the performance. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare 1D RuO 2 nanostructured materials using a DBD plasma. It is reported here that the composition of feed gas is an important factor in determining the final morphology. For example, an Ar + H 2 plasma yields aggregated RuO 2 nanostructures, whereas ‘nanopillar’ and ‘nanorod’ morphologies are obtained when using Ar + O 2 and Ar, respectively. Possible mechanisms behind the morphological differences are elucidated on the basis of the temperature variations inside the plasma reactor and the chemistry of the gaseous reactive species. The application of a DBD plasma to the synthesis of RuO 2 nanorods is reported for the first time in this paper. (paper)

  20. Electro-Catalysis System for Biodiesel Synthesis from Palm Oil over Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis reaction routes from palm oil using plasma electro-catalysis process over Dielectric-Barrier Discharge (DBD plasma reactor were studied. The study was focused on finding possible reaction mechanism route during plasma electro-catalysis process. The prediction was performed based on the changes of Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FT-IR analyses to the biodiesel products with respect to time length of plasma treatment. It was found that main reaction mechanism occurred in the plasma electro-catalysis system was non-thermal pyrolysis rather than transesterification. The main reactions within the plasma treatment were due to collision between high energetic electrons (supplied from high voltage power supply through high voltage electrode and the reaction mixtures. The high energetic electrons affected the electrons pair of covalent bonding to be excited or dissociated even ionized at higher energy. Therefore, this plasma electro-catalysis system was promising for biodiesel synthesis from vegetable oils due to only very short time reaction was needed, even no need a catalyst, no soap formation, and no glycerol by-product. This system could produce fatty acid methyl ester yield of 75.65% at 120 seconds and other possible chemicals, such as alkynes, alkanes, esters, carboxylic acid, and aldehydes. However, during the plasma process, the reaction mechanisms were still difficult to be controlled due the action of available high energetic electrons. The advanced studies on how to control the reaction mechanism selectively in the plasma electro-catalysis will be published elsewhere. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 23rd January 2014; Revised: 20th March 2014; Accepted: 23rd March 2014[How to Cite: Istadi, I., Yudhistira, A.D., Anggoro, D.D., Buchori, L. (2014. Electro-Catalysis System for Biodiesel Synthesis from Palm Oil over Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor

  1. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marković, Marijana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor [Innovation Center, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Kovačević, Vesna [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 44, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Roglić, Goran [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Manojlović, Dragan, E-mail: manojlo@chem.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia)

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe{sup 2+}). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe{sup 2+} was 99%). • In DBD/Fe{sup 2+} only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions.

  2. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marković, Marijana; Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor; Kovačević, Vesna; Roglić, Goran; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Manojlović, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe 2+ ). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe 2+ was 99%). • In DBD/Fe 2+ only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions

  3. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  4. Predictions of ion energy distributions and radical fluxes in radio frequency biased inductively coupled plasma etching reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Robert J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1996-03-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors are being developed for low gas pressure (radio frequency (rf) bias is applied to the substrate. One of the goals of these systems is to independently control the magnitude of the ion flux by the inductively coupled power deposition, and the acceleration of ions into the substrate by the rf bias. In high plasma density reactors the width of the sheath above the wafer may be sufficiently thin that ions are able to traverse it in approximately 1 rf cycle, even at 13.56 MHz. As a consequence, the ion energy distribution (IED) may have a shape typically associated with lower frequency operation in conventional reactive ion etching tools. In this paper, we present results from a computer model for the IED incident on the wafer in ICP etching reactors. We find that in the parameter space of interest, the shape of the IED depends both on the amplitude of the rf bias and on the ICP power. The former quantity determines the average energy of the IED. The latter quantity controls the width of the sheath, the transit time of ions across the sheath and hence the width of the IED. In general, high ICP powers (thinner sheaths) produce wider IEDs.

  5. Plasma induced material defects and threshold values for thermal loads in high temperature resistant alloys and in refractory metals for first wall application in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Hoven, H.; Kny, E.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Nickel, H.; Wallura, E.

    1986-10-01

    Materials for the application in the first wall of fusion reactors of the tokamak type are subjected to pulsed heat fluxes which range from some 0.5 MW m -2 to 10 MW m -2 during normal plasma operation, and which can exceed 1000 MW m -2 during total plasma disruptions. The structural defects and material fatigue caused by this types of plasma wall interaction are investigated and the results are plotted in threshold loading curves. Additionally, the results are, as far as possible, compared with quantitative, theoretical calculations. These procedures allow a semiquantitative evaluation of the applicability of the mentioned metals in the first wall of fusion reactors. (orig.) [de

  6. SYNTHESIS OF BIODIESEL ON A HYBRID CATALYTIC-PLASMA REACTOR OVER K2O/CaO-ZnO CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to study the synergistic effects of dielectric barrier discharge plasma and 5 % K2O/CaO-ZnO catalyst on biodiesel synthesis. The catalyst was prepared using co-precipitation followed by impregnation method. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, while the catalyst basicity was tested by titration method. The effects of voltage, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV, and catalyst pellet diameter on the yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME and biodiesel were studied. The transesterification process within and without plasma environment was investigated to find synergistic effect between the role of high energetic electrons from the plasma through the catalytic reaction zone and the role of basicity in the catalyst. From the results, an applied voltage of 5 kV, a WHSV of 1.186 min-1, and a catalyst diameter of 5 mm gave the better FAME yield of 77.19 %. The reaction time required was only 1.25 minutes at a discharge power of 530 W. This result proved that the plasma environment has a significant effect on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel production.

  7. Numerical simulation of dual frequency etching reactors: Influence of the external process parameters on the plasma characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, V.; Bogaerts, A.

    2005-01-01

    A one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model is used to investigate Ar/CF 4 /N 2 discharges sustained in capacitively coupled dual frequency reactors, with special emphasis on the influence of the reactor parameters such as applied voltage amplitudes and frequencies of the two voltage sources. The presented calculation results include plasma density, ion current, average sheath potential and width, electron and ion average energies and energy distributions, and ionization rates. The simulations were carried out for high frequencies (HFs) of 27, 40, 60, and 100 MHz and a low frequency (LF) of 1 or 2 MHz, varying the LF voltage and keeping the HF voltage constant and vice versa. It is observed that the decoupling of the two sources is possible by increasing the applied HF to very high values (above 60 MHz) and it is not defined by the frequency ratio. Both voltage sources have influence on the plasma characteristics at a HF of 27 MHz and to some extent at 40 MHz. At HFs of 60 and 100 MHz, the plasma density and ion flux are determined only by the HF voltage source. The ion energy increases and the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) becomes broader with HF or LF voltage amplitude, when the other voltage is kept constant. The IEDF is broader with the increase of HF or the decrease of LF

  8. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  9. TMRBAR: a code to calculate plasma parameters for tandem-mirror reactors operating in the MARS mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the plasma power balance model currently used by LLNL to calculate steady state operating points for tandem mirror reactors. The code developed from this model, TMRBAR, has been used to predict the performance and define supplementary heating requirements for drivers used in the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) and for the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) study. The equations solved included particle and energy balance for central cell and end cell species, quasineutrality at several cardinal points in the end cell region, as well as calculations of volumes, densities and average energies based on given constraints of beta profiles and fusion power output. Alpha particle ash is treated self-consistently, but no other impurity species is treated

  10. Plasma CVD reactor with two-microwave oscillators for diamond film synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatsu, M.; Miyake, M.; Maeda, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we present the experimental results of a new type of microwave plasma CVD system, where two of 1.5 kW microwave sources were used for enlarging the plasma discharge and the diamond film growth. One of the microwave oscillators was used to produce the microwave plasma as in the conventional microwave plasma CVD device, while the second one was used to enlarge the plasma by introducing microwave from the launcher mounted at the substrate stage. We demonstrated the enlargement of plasma discharge area from 60 mm to 100 mm in diameter by using the two-microwave oscillators system. Characteristics of diamond films deposited using H 2 /CH 4 plasmas were also investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy

  11. Report of second meeting on the interaction of plasma and the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashina, Toshiro; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Mori, Mamoru; Tominaga, Goro; Kinbara, Akira.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents various problems on the interaction between plasma and materials. The first half of this report is the reports of international meetings. First topical meeting on fusion reactor materials, IEA-Textor workshop on surface measurements, and sixth international vacuum metallurgy conference on special melting and metallurgical coatings are summarized. The other half of the report is described on the present and future plans of the analysis of material surfaces which are carried out at the laboratories in Japan. The last part of the report introduces the TEXTOR international cooperative study project. (Kato, T.)

  12. Flow and heat transfer thermohydraulic modelisation during the reflooding phase of a P.W.R.'s core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Patrick

    1978-04-01

    Some generalities about L.O.C.A. are first recalled. The French experimental studies about Emergency Core Cooling System are briefly described. The different heat transfer mechanisms to take into account, according to the flow pattern in the dry zone, and the correlations or methods to calculate them, are defined. Then the Thermohydraulic code computer: FLIRA, which describe the reflooding phase, and a modelisation taking into account the different flow patterns are setted. A first interpretation of ERSEC experiments with a tubular test section shows that it is possible, with this modelisation and some classical heat transfer correlations, to describe the reflooding phase. [fr

  13. Functionalization of polymer powders for SLS-processes using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Marius; Schmitt, Adeliene; Schmidt, Jochen; Peukert, Wolfgang; Wirth, Karl-Ernst [Institute of Particle Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Recently additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser sintering (SLS) of polymers have gained more importance for industrial applications [1]. Tailor-made modification of polymers is essential in order to make these processes more efficient and to cover the industrial demands. The so far used polymer materials show weak performance regarding the mechanical stability of processed parts. To overcome this limitation, a new route to functionalize the surface of commercially available polymer particles (PA12; PE-HD; PP) using an atmospheric plasma jet in combination with a fluidized bed reactor has been investigated. Consequently, an improvement of adhesion and wettability [2] of the polymer surface without restraining the bulk properties of the powder is achieved. The atmospheric plasma jet process can provide reactive species at moderate temperatures which are suitable for polymer material. The functionalization of the polymer powders improves the quality of the devices build in a SLS-process.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigations of a plasma reactor for the thermal destruction of medical waste using a model substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, J; Lietz, E; Bendix, D; Hebecker, D

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration plant for the thermal destruction of medical waste using dc plasma torches as the energy source has been developed and tested in several set-ups and under different conditions. Three-dimensional CFD modelling of the gaseous phase in the thermal plasma reactor has been carried out to investigate the experimentally observed phenomena, with the objective of improving the process with respect to conversion rate and power consumption per unit weight. Several models for energy release, and additional parameter studies required to approach the real process as closely as possible, will be discussed. Results for velocity, temperature, and residence time distribution are presented and qualitatively compared with images taken from the running process

  15. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Influence of the low-frequency source parameters on the plasma characteristics in a dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma reactor: Two dimensional simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xu; Hao Ge; Shuai Wang; Zhongling Dai; Younian Wang; Aimin Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) fluid model is presented to study the discharge of argon in a dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor. We are interested in the influence of low-frequency (LF) source parameters such as applied voltage amplitudes and low frequencies on the plasma characteristics. In this paper, the high frequency is set to 60 MHz with voltage 50 V. The simulations were carried out for low frequencies of 1, 2 and 6 MHz with LF voltage 100 V, and for LF voltages of 60, 90 and 120 V with low frequency 2 MHz. The results of 2D distributions of electric field and ion density, the ion flux impinging on the substrate and the ion energy on the powered electrode are shown. As the low frequency increases, two sources become from uncoupling to coupling, When two sources are uncoupling, the increase in LF has little impact on the plasma characteristics, but when two sources are coupling, the increase in LF decreases the uniformities of ion density and ion flux noticeably. It is also found that with the increase in LF voltage, the uniformities in the radial direction of ion density distribution and ion flux at the powered electrode decreases significantly, and the energy of ions bombarding on the powered electrode increases significantly.

  17. The component content of active particles in a plasma-chemical reactor based on volume barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloshenko, I. A.; Tsiolko, V. V.; Pogulay, S. S.; Terent'yeva, A. G.; Bazhenov, V. Yu; Shchedrin, A. I.; Ryabtsev, A. V.; Kuzmichev, A. I.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the component content of active particles formed in a plasma-chemical reactor composed of a multiple-cell generator of active particles, based on volume barrier discharge, and a working chamber are presented. For calculation of the content of uncharged plasma components an approach is proposed which is based on averaging of the power introduced over the entire volume. Advantages of such an approach lie in an absence of fitting parameters, such as the dimensions of microdischarges, their surface density and rate of breakdown. The calculation and the experiment were accomplished with the use of dry air (20% relative humidity) as the plasma generating medium. Concentrations of O3, HNO3, HNO2, N2 O5 and NO3 were measured experimentally in the discharge volume and working chamber for the residence time of particles on a discharge of 0.3 s and more and discharge specific power of 1.5 W cm-3. It has been determined that the best agreement between the calculation and the experiment occurs at calculated gas medium temperatures in the discharge plasma of about 400-425 K, which correspond to the experimentally measured rotational temperature of nitrogen. In most cases the calculated concentrations of O3, HNO3, HNO2, N2O5 and NO3 for the barrier discharge and the working chamber are in fairly good agreement with the respective measured values.

  18. The component content of active particles in a plasma-chemical reactor based on volume barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloshenko, I A; Tsiolko, V V; Pogulay, S S; Terent'yeva, A G; Bazhenov, V Yu; Shchedrin, A I; Ryabtsev, A V; Kuzmichev, A I

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the component content of active particles formed in a plasma-chemical reactor composed of a multiple-cell generator of active particles, based on volume barrier discharge, and a working chamber are presented. For calculation of the content of uncharged plasma components an approach is proposed which is based on averaging of the power introduced over the entire volume. Advantages of such an approach lie in an absence of fitting parameters, such as the dimensions of microdischarges, their surface density and rate of breakdown. The calculation and the experiment were accomplished with the use of dry air (20% relative humidity) as the plasma generating medium. Concentrations of O 3 , HNO 3 , HNO 2 , N 2 O 5 and NO 3 were measured experimentally in the discharge volume and working chamber for the residence time of particles on a discharge of 0.3 s and more and discharge specific power of 1.5 W cm -3 . It has been determined that the best agreement between the calculation and the experiment occurs at calculated gas medium temperatures in the discharge plasma of about 400-425 K, which correspond to the experimentally measured rotational temperature of nitrogen. In most cases the calculated concentrations of O 3 , HNO 3 , HNO 2 , N 2 O 5 and NO 3 for the barrier discharge and the working chamber are in fairly good agreement with the respective measured values

  19. Experimental studies and modeling of X-Rays multilayer mirrors damages under high X-Ray flux generated by a laser-plasma experiment; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l`endommagement des miroirs multicouches X soumis a de hauts flux de rayonnement X dans le cadre de l`experience plasma-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guern, F

    1996-05-24

    We have been able with this work to point out characterize X-Rays multilayers mirrors damages. We have designed two experimental set-up which have been installed in the HELIOTROPE experimental chamber of the OCTAL facility located at the CEA in Limeil-Valenton. We have demonstrated that X-Rays multilayer mirrors properties were drastically modified by X-Rays emitted by a golden laser plasma. We have, more precisely, introduced the damage speed concept to quantify the expansion of the multilayer mirror period. We have been able to classify different multilayer mirrors in function of their resistance to damage and we have demonstrated that a silicate layer deposited on a mirror allowed to increase his resistance to damage. In a second part we have developed a simulation tool in order to simulate the X-Rays multilayer mirrors optical properties modifications. We have therefore coupled a thermo-mechanic code with an optical program. The results of the simulations are in a rather good agreement with the experiments and can be used to predict, before experiments, the multilayer mirror behavior under X-Rays irradiation. (author) 55 refs.

  20. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.

    2000-01-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''

  1. Modelization of physical phenomena in research reactors with the help of new developments in transport methods, and methodology validation with experimental data; Modelisation des phenomenes physiques dans les reacteurs de recherche a l'aide de developpements realises dans les methodes de transport et qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauck, St

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a scheme for experimental reactors, based on transport equations. This type of reactors is characterized by a small core, a complex, very heterogeneous geometry and a large leakage. The possible insertion of neutron beams in the reflector and the presence of absorbers in the core increase the difficulty of the 3D-geometrical description and the physical modeling of the component parameters of the reactor. The Orphee reactor has been chosen for our study. Physical models (homogenization, collapsing cross section in few groups, albedo multigroup condition) have been developed in the APOLLO2 and CRONOS2 codes to calculate flux and power maps in a 3D-geometry, with different burnup and through transport equations. Comparisons with experimental measurements have shown the interest of taking into account anisotropy, steep flux gradients by using Sn methods, and on the other hand using a 12-group cross section library. The modeling of neutron beams has been done outside the core modeling through Monte Carlo calculations and with the total geometry, including a large thickness of heavy water. Thanks to this calculations, one can evaluate the neutron beams anti-reactivity and determinate the core cycle. We assure these methods more accurate than usual transport-diffusion calculations will be used for the conception of new research reactors. (author)

  2. Theory and measurements of electrophoretic effects in monolith, fixed-bed, and fluidized-bed plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Pressure gradients and secondary flow fields generated by the passage of electrical current in a d.c. gas discharge or gas laser are topics of longstanding interest in the gaseous electronics literature. These hydrodynamic effects of space charge fields and charged particle density gradients have been principally exploited in the development of gas separation and purification processes. In recent characterization studies of fixed-bed and fluidized-bed plasma reactors several anomalous flow features have been observed. These reactors involve the contacting of a high-frequency, resonantly-sustained, disperse gas discharge with granular solids in a fixed or fluidized bed. Anomalies in the measured pressure drops and fluidization velocities have motivated the development of an appropriate theoretical approach to, and some additional experimental investigations of electrophoretic effects in disperse gas discharges. In this paper, a theory which includes the effects of space charge and diffusion is used to estimate the electric field and charged particle density profiles. These profiles are then used to calculate velocity fields and gas flow rates for monolith, fixed-bed, and fluidized-bed reactors. These results are used to rationalize measurements of gas flow rates and axial pressure gradients in high-frequency disperse gas discharges with and without an additional d.c. axial electric field

  3. Tailoring nanomaterial products through electrode material and oxygen partial pressure in a mini-arc plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Shumao; Mattson, Eric C.; Lu, Ganhua; Hirschmugl, Carol; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Chen Junhong

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials with controllable morphology and composition are synthesized by a simple one-step vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Through systematic investigation of mini-arc reactor parameters, the roles of carrier gas, electrode material, and precursor on producing diverse nanomaterial products are revealed. Desired nanomaterial products, including tungsten oxide nanoparticles (NPs), tungsten oxide nanorods (NRs), tungsten oxide and tin oxide NP mixtures and pure tin dioxide NPs can thus be obtained by tailoring reaction conditions. The amount of oxygen in the reactor is critical to determining the final nanomaterial product. Without any precursor material present, a lower level of oxygen in the reactor favors the production of W 18 O 49 NRs with tungsten as cathode, while a high level of oxygen produces more round WO 3 NPs. With the presence of a precursor material, amorphous particles are favored with a high ratio of argon:oxygen. Oxygen is also found to affect tin oxide crystallization from its amorphous phase in the thermal annealing. Results from this study can be used for guiding gas phase nanomaterial synthesis in the future.

  4. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-01-01

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust 2 and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  5. TRANSFERABLE CLASTOGENIC ACTIVITY IN PLASMA FROM PERSONS EXPOSED AS SALVAGE PERSONNEL OF THE CHERNOBYL REACTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EMERIT, [No Value; LEVY, A; CERNJAVSKI, L; ARUTYUNYAN, R; OGANESYAN, N; POGOSIAN, A; MEJLUMIAN, H; SARKISIAN, T; GULKANDANIAN, M; QUASTEL, M; GOLDSMITH, J; RIKLIS, E; KORDYSH, E; POLIAK, S; MERKLIN, L

    Clastogenic factors were first described in the plasma of people who had been accidentally or therapeutically irradiated. They were found also in A-bomb survivors, where they persisted for many years after the irradiation. The present study searched for these factors in the plasma of 32 civil

  6. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nad, Shreya [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η{sub coup}) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  7. Evolution of titanium residue on the walls of a plasma-etching reactor and its effect on the polysilicon etching rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Kosa, E-mail: hirota-kousa@sme.hitachi-hitec.com; Itabashi, Naoshi; Tanaka, Junichi [Hitachi, Ltd., Central Research Laboratory, 1-280, Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    The variation in polysilicon plasma etching rates caused by Ti residue on the reactor walls was investigated. The amount of Ti residue was measured using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with the HgCdTe (MCT) detector installed on the side of the reactor. As the amount of Ti residue increased, the number of fluorine radicals and the polysilicon etching rate increased. However, a maximum limit in the etching rate was observed. A mechanism of rate variation was proposed, whereby F radical consumption on the quartz reactor wall is suppressed by the Ti residue. The authors also investigated a plasma-cleaning method for the removal of Ti residue without using a BCl{sub 3} gas, because the reaction products (e.g., boron oxide) on the reactor walls frequently cause contamination of the product wafers during etching. CH-assisted chlorine cleaning, which is a combination of CHF{sub 3} and Cl{sub 2} plasma treatment, was found to effectively remove Ti residue from the reactor walls. This result shows that CH radicals play an important role in deoxidizing and/or defluorinating Ti residue on the reactor walls.

  8. Multifarious Physics Analyses of the Core Plasma Properties in a Helical DEMO Reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J.; Satake, S.; Goto, T.; Seki, R.; Nunami, M.; Funaba, H.; Yamada, I.; Suzuki, C.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yamada, H.; Sagara, A., E-mail: miyazawa@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Yokoyama, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Masaoka, Y.; Murakami, S. [Departement Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Theoretical analyses on the MHD equilibrium, the neoclassical transport, and the alpha particle transport, etc., are being carried out for a helical fusion DEMO reactor named FFHR- d1, using radial profiles extrapolated from LHD. FFHR-d1 is a heliotron type DEMO reactor of which the conceptual design activity has been launched since 2010. It is possible to sustain the burning plasma without auxiliary heating (i.e., self-ignition) in FFHR-d1, since there is no need of plasma current drive in heliotron plasmas. The device size is 4 times enlarged from LHD, i.e., the major radius of helical coil center is 15.6 m, the magnetic field strength at the helical coil center is 4.7 T, and the fusion output is {approx} 3 GW. One of the distinguished subjects in FFHR-d1 compared with the former FFHR design series is the robust similarity with LHD. The arrangement of superconducting magnet coils in FFHR-d1 is similar to that of LHD, except a pair of planar poloidal coils omitted to maximize the maintenance ports. This makes reasonable to assume a similar MHD equilibrium as observed in LHD for FFHR-d1, as long as the beta profiles in these two are similar. In FFHR-d1, radial profiles of density and temperature are determined by multiplying proper enhancement factors on those obtained in LHD, according to the DPE (Direct Profile Extrapolation) method. The enhancement factors are calculated consistently with the gyro-Bohm model. Therefore, the global confinement properties as expressed in ISS95 or ISS04 are kept in FFHR-d1. A large Shafranov shift is foreseen in FFHR-d1 due to its high-beta property. This leads to deterioration in the neoclassical transport and alpha particle confinement. Effectiveness of plasma position control and/or magnetic configuration optimization has been examined to solve this problem and to check the validity of extrapolated profiles. According to these analyses, it is concluded that the self-ignition condition can be achieved in FFHR-d1 by

  9. On the influence of fusion reactor conditions on optical properties of metallic plasma-viewing mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsenya, V.S.; Gritsyna, V.I.; Konovalov, V.G.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Shapoval, A.N.; Orlinskij, D.V.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of imitation experiments concerning the effects of fusion reactor conditions on the properties of mirrors made of stainless steel, copper and beryllium. The neutron irradiation was imitated using MeV energy range ions. To imitate the effects of charge exchange atoms (CXA) bombardment, keV energy range D + and He + ions were used. From the data obtained it was concluded that not only the reflectivity but also the resistance to CXA sputtering have to be taken into account when choosing the materials for the first mirrors of a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  10. Kinetics of decolorization of azo dye by bipolar pulsed barrier discharge in a three-phase discharge plasma reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruobing; Zhang, Chi; Cheng, XingXin; Wang, Liming; Wu, Yan; Guan, Zhicheng

    2007-04-02

    Removal of amaranth, a commercial synthetic azo dye widely used in the dye and food industry, was examined as a possible remediation technology for treating dye-contaminated water. Effects of various parameters such as gas flow rate, solution conductivity, pulse repetition frequency, etc., on decolorization kinetics were investigated. Experimental results show that an aqueous solution of 24 mg/l dye is 81.24% decolorized following 30 min plasma treatment for a 50 kV voltage and 0.75 m(3)/h gas flow rate. Decolorization reaction of amaranth in the plasma reactor is a pseudo first order reaction. Rate constant (k) of decolorization increases quickly with increasing the applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency and the gas flow rate. However, when the applied voltage is beyond 50 kV and increases further, increase rate of k decreases. In addition, k decreases quickly when the solution conductivity increases from 200 to 1481 microS/cm. The decolorization reaction has a high rate constant (k=0.0269 min(-1)) when the solution pH is beyond 10. Rate constant k decreases with the decrease of pH and reaches minimum at a pH of about 5 (k(min)=0.01603 min(-1)), then increases to 0.02105 min(-1) when pH decreases to 3.07. About 15% of the initial TOC can be degraded only in about 120 min non-thermal plasma treatment.

  11. Kinetics of decolorization of azo dye by bipolar pulsed barrier discharge in a three-phase discharge plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruobing; Zhang Chi; Cheng Xingxin; Wang Liming; Wu Yan; Guan Zhicheng

    2007-01-01

    Removal of amaranth, a commercial synthetic azo dye widely used in the dye and food industry, was examined as a possible remediation technology for treating dye-contaminated water. Effects of various parameters such as gas flow rate, solution conductivity, pulse repetition frequency, etc., on decolorization kinetics were investigated. Experimental results show that an aqueous solution of 24 mg/l dye is 81.24% decolorized following 30 min plasma treatment for a 50 kV voltage and 0.75 m 3 /h gas flow rate. Decolorization reaction of amaranth in the plasma reactor is a pseudo first order reaction. Rate constant (k) of decolorization increases quickly with increasing the applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency and the gas flow rate. However, when the applied voltage is beyond 50 kV and increases further, increase rate of k decreases. In addition, k decreases quickly when the solution conductivity increases from 200 to 1481 μS/cm. The decolorization reaction has a high rate constant (k = 0.0269 min -1 ) when the solution pH is beyond 10. Rate constant k decreases with the decrease of pH and reaches minimum at a pH of about 5 (k min = 0.01603 min -1 ), then increases to 0.02105 min -1 when pH decreases to 3.07. About 15% of the initial TOC can be degraded only in about 120 min non-thermal plasma treatment

  12. Destruction of POPs agents in a Plasma-Arc Reactor and equilibrium calculations of steam injected for syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Junguo; Li, Yaojian; Wang, Rui; Xu, Yongjiang; Sheng, Hongzhi

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A 30 kW DC plasma-arc reactor has been used to destruct hazardous Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of POPs is investigated. Due to similar to several POPs at chemical structure such as DDT, PCBs, pure chlorobenzene (C 6 H 5 Cl) is selected as the experimental material. Because the arc temperature attains 5000 K and the average temperature exceeds 1600 K in reaction area, the chlorinated organics, which are difficult to be destructed in conventional incinerators, can be rapidly pyrolyzed into simple molecules. Detected by Gas Chromatography (CP-3800 Varian), the off-gas is a mixture of H 2 , HCl and some hydrocarbons such as CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , and C 6 H 5 Cl is not detected in the off-gas. Furthermore, the treatment of POPs in a steam-plasma system has been simulated. The process acts as energy transformation - electrical energy is restored in the syngas. Based on the principle of Gibbs free energy minimum, the equilibrium product distribution versus steam content and temperature is calculated. At the ideal temperature of POPs treatment, the energy recovered (Qre) minus the energy input (Qin) gets to maximum while the molar ration of oxygen to carbon (O/C) is near 1. The results show that the plasma-arc technology is environmentally friendly and economically feasible for disposal of POPs. (author)

  13. Neutronics calculation of an heterogeneous compact and thermal core by means of deterministic and stochastic transport theory. Application to the experimental reactor of the University of Strasbourg; Modelisation neutronique d`un coeur thermique compact et heterogene en theorie du transport deterministe et probabiliste. Application au reacteur experimental de l`Universite de Strasbourg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, Ch

    1997-11-28

    The aim of this work is to create, validate theoretically and experimentally a calculation route for a thermal irradiation reactor. This is the research reactor of the University of Strasbourg, which presents all of characteristics of this reactor-type: compact and heterogeneous core, slab-type fuel with a high 235-uranium enrichment. This calculation route is based on the first use of the following two modern transport methods: the TDT method and the Monte Carlo method. The former, programmed within the APOLLO2 code, is a two dimensional collision probabilities method. The later, used by the TRIPOLI4 code, is a stochastic method. Both can be applied to complex geometries. After a few theoretical reminders about transport codes, a set of integral experiments is described which have been realized within the research reactor of the University of Strasbourg. One of them has been performed for this study. At the beginning of the theoretical part, significant errors are apparent due to the use of calculation route based on homogenization, condensation and the diffusion approximation. An extensive comparison between the discrete ordinates method and the TDT method carries out that the use of the TDT method is relevant for the studied reactor. The treatment of axial leakage with this method is the only disadvantage. Therefore, the use of the code TRIPOLI4 is recommended for a more accurate study of leakage within a reflector. By means of the experimental data, the ability of our calculation route is confirmed for essential neutronics questions such as the critical mass determination, the power distribution and the fuel management. (author)

  14. 1st IAEA research coordination meeting on tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components. October 5-6, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the 1st IAEA research Coordination Meeting on ''Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Components'' held on October 5 and 6, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the retention, release and removal of tritium from plasma facing components, a summary of data evaluation, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 4 tabs

  15. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Gravimetrical and chemical characterization of SiOx structures deposited on fine powders by short plasma exposure in a plasma down stream reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, Adrian; Sonnenfeld, Axel; Rohr, Philipp Rudolf von

    2008-01-01

    The surface of lactose particles was modified by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process to improve the flow behavior of the powder. For this, the particulates were treated in a plasma down stream reactor which provides a short (50 ms) and homogeneous exposure to the capacitively coupled RF discharge. The organosilicon monomer hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) was used as a precursor for the formation of SiO x which is deposited on the substrate particle surface. For varying process gas mixtures (O 2 /Ar/HMDSO) and RF power applied, the amount of the deposited material was determined gravimetrically after dissolution of the lactose substrate particles and the chemical composition of the accumulated deposition material was investigated by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The concentration of the deposited SiO x relating to the substrate material was found to be in the range of 0.1 wt.%. Based on the ATR-FTIR analysis, the inorganic, i.e. oxidic SiO x fraction of the obtained deposits was shown to be controllable by varying the process parameters, whilst a relatively large amount of organic structures must be considered.

  17. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis through transesterification of soybean oil with methanol on hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor over sulphated zinc oxide (SO42-/ZnO active acid catalyst was investigated. This research was aimed to study effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity (WHSV and the catalyst diameter on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel synthesis. The amount (20.2 g of active sulphated zinc oxide solid acid catalysts was loaded into discharge zone of the reactor. The WHSV and the catalyst diameter were varied between 0.89 to 1.55 min-1 and 3, 5, and 7 mm, respectively. The molar ratio of methanol to oil as reactants of 15:1 is fed to the reactor, while operating condition of the reactor was kept at reaction temperature of 65 oC and ambient pressure. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME component in biodiesel product was identified by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that the FAME yield decreases with increasing WHSV. It was found that the optimum FAME yield was achieved of 56.91 % at WHSV of 0.89 min-1 and catalyst diameter of 5 mm and reaction time of 1.25 min. It can be concluded that the biodiesel synthesis using the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor system exhibited promising the FAME yield. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 15th November 2016; Revised: 24th December 2016; Accepted: 16th February 2017 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2017. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 227-234 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234

  18. Experimental and density functional theoretical study of the effects of Fenton’s reaction on the degradation of Bisphenol A in a high voltage plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Fei; Fan, Xiangru; Stratton, Gunnar R.; Bellona, Christopher L.; Holsen, Thomas M.; Crimmins, Bernard S.; Xia, Xiaoyan; Mededovic Thagard, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combining the Fenton reaction with the plasma treatment reduces Bisphenol A concentration below the detection limit within 30 min. • Carbon steel electrode in the plasma reactor can be used as a source of iron ions. • OH radical attack on Bisphenol A is the primary pathway for byproduct formation. - Abstract: A novel electrical discharge plasma reactor configuration with and without iron ions was evaluated for the degradation of 0.02 mM Bisphenol A (BPA). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant calculated for the plasma treatment of BPA with a stainless steel electrode in the presence of dissolved ferrous ion (Fe"2"+) salts (termed plasma/Fenton treatment) was higher than in the plasma treatment in the absence of iron salts. At the optimal ferrous ion concentration, longer plasma treatment times resulted in higher BPA degradation rates, likely due to increased hydroxyl (OH) radical concentration formed through the decomposition of H_2O_2. Replacing the stainless steel with a carbon steel grounded electrode resulted in the release of iron ions from the carbon steel thereby increasing the rate of BPA removal and eliminating the need for iron salts. After the plasma/Fenton treatment, >97% of the residual iron salts were removed by coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation. Byproduct identification coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that OH radical attack on BPA’s hydroxyl group is the primary pathway for byproduct formation.

  19. Experimental and density functional theoretical study of the effects of Fenton’s reaction on the degradation of Bisphenol A in a high voltage plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Fei, E-mail: daif@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Fan, Xiangru, E-mail: fanx@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Stratton, Gunnar R., E-mail: strattgr@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Bellona, Christopher L., E-mail: cbellona@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1500 Illinois St., Colorado School of Mines, Golden, 80401 CO (United States); Holsen, Thomas M., E-mail: tholsen@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Crimmins, Bernard S., E-mail: bcrimmin@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Xia, Xiaoyan, E-mail: xiax@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Mededovic Thagard, Selma, E-mail: smededov@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Combining the Fenton reaction with the plasma treatment reduces Bisphenol A concentration below the detection limit within 30 min. • Carbon steel electrode in the plasma reactor can be used as a source of iron ions. • OH radical attack on Bisphenol A is the primary pathway for byproduct formation. - Abstract: A novel electrical discharge plasma reactor configuration with and without iron ions was evaluated for the degradation of 0.02 mM Bisphenol A (BPA). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant calculated for the plasma treatment of BPA with a stainless steel electrode in the presence of dissolved ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}) salts (termed plasma/Fenton treatment) was higher than in the plasma treatment in the absence of iron salts. At the optimal ferrous ion concentration, longer plasma treatment times resulted in higher BPA degradation rates, likely due to increased hydroxyl (OH) radical concentration formed through the decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Replacing the stainless steel with a carbon steel grounded electrode resulted in the release of iron ions from the carbon steel thereby increasing the rate of BPA removal and eliminating the need for iron salts. After the plasma/Fenton treatment, >97% of the residual iron salts were removed by coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation. Byproduct identification coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that OH radical attack on BPA’s hydroxyl group is the primary pathway for byproduct formation.

  20. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibling Zhao; Ji-Jun Zhang; Sanil John

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. A pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactor has been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. A nonthermal plasma cannot be produced in pure H{sub 2}S with our reactor geometry, even at discharge voltages of up to 30 kV, because of the high dielectric strength of pure H{sub 2}S ({approx}2.9 times higher than air). Therefore, H{sub 2}S was diluted in another gas with lower breakdown voltage (or dielectric strength). Breakdown voltages of H{sub 2}S in four balance gases (Ar, He, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}) have been measured at different H{sub 2}S concentrations and pressures. Breakdown voltages are proportional to the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and the balance gas. H{sub 2}S conversion and the reaction energy efficiency depend on the balance gas and H{sub 2}S inlet concentrations. With increasing H{sub 2}S concentrations, H{sub 2}S conversion initially increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. H{sub 2}S conversion in atomic balance gases, such as Ar and He, is more efficient than that in diatomic balance gases, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These observations can be explained by the proposed reaction mechanism of H{sub 2}S dissociation in different balance gases. The results show that nonthermal plasmas are effective for dissociating H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur.

  1. Contribution to multi-agents modeling of the operation of industrial processes: application to the operation of a pressurized water reactor under accidental situation; Contribution a la modelisation multi-agents de la conduite de processus industriels: application a la conduite en situation accidentelle d`un reacteur nucleaire a eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, P.

    1996-11-13

    This work is related to the CEA `Escrime` project which concerns the reliability and functioning safety of nuclear reactors, and in particular the operation and supervision of nuclear installations. Its aim is the analysis and the formalizing of PWRs operation in order to define the collaboration and optimum sharing of tasks between human operators and automatized systems for an improved functioning safety. Chapter 1 describes the operation of nuclear reactors and the instrumentation and control activities. It focusses on the weaknesses of actual automatized systems and examines the interest of the multi-agents approach to build an improved automatized system. Chapter 2 presents the actual state of the art about multi-agent systems and about their application to reactor operation. Chapter 3 is devoted to the definition of the conceptual model of automatized systems developed in this work (distribution of operation activities, competition between agents, hierarchy, arbitration). Chapter 4 describes the computer model of the essential operating system elaborated according to the conceptual model defined above. Modeling is performed using Spirit and an application is described in chapter 5. (J.S.). 58 refs.

  2. Etude de pratiques d'enseignement relatives a la modelisation en sciences et technologies avec des enseignants du secondaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurousseau, Emmanuelle

    Les modeles sont des outils amplement utilises en sciences et technologies (S&T) afin de representer et d’expliquer un phenomene difficilement accessible, voire abstrait. La demarche de modelisation est presentee de maniere explicite dans le programme de formation de l’ecole quebecoise (PFEQ), notamment au 2eme cycle du secondaire (Quebec. Ministere de l'Education du Loisir et du Sport, 2007a). Elle fait ainsi partie des sept demarches auxquelles eleves et enseignants sont censes recourir. Cependant, de nombreuses recherches mettent en avant la difficulte des enseignants a structurer leurs pratiques d’enseignement autour des modeles et de la demarche de modelisation qui sont pourtant reconnus comme indispensables. En effet, les modeles favorisent la conciliation des champs concrets et abstraits entre lesquels le scientifique, meme en herbe, effectue des allers-retours afin de concilier le champ experimental de reference qu’il manipule et observe au champ theorique relie qu’il construit. L’objectif de cette recherche est donc de comprendre comment les modeles et la demarche de modelisation contribuent a faciliter l’articulation du concret et de l’abstrait dans l’enseignement des sciences et des technologies (S&T) au 2eme cycle du secondaire. Pour repondre a cette question, nous avons travaille avec les enseignants dans une perspective collaborative lors de groupes focalises et d’observation en classe. Ces dispositifs ont permis d’examiner les pratiques d’enseignement que quatre enseignants mettent en oeuvre en utilisant des modeles et des demarches de modelisation. L’analyse des pratiques d’enseignement et des ajustements que les enseignants envisagent dans leur pratique nous permet de degager des connaissances a la fois pour la recherche et pour la pratique des enseignants, au regard de l’utilisation des modeles et de la demarche de modelisation en S&T au secondaire.

  3. Study of a low power plasma reactor for the synthesis of zinc oxide as window layers in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Alexandre, E-mail: alexadre.ma@chimie-paristech.fr [Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), Equipe 2PM (Procédés, Plasmas, Microsystèmes), UMR 8247, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institute of Research and Development of Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR7174, EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); ADEME (French Environment and Energy Management Agency), 20 avenue du Grésillé, BP 90406, 49004 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Donsanti, Frédérique [Institute of Research and Development of Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR7174, EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Rousseau, Frédéric; Morvan, Daniel [Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), Equipe 2PM (Procédés, Plasmas, Microsystèmes), UMR 8247, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-05-01

    The low power plasma reactor is an original process which allows the deposition of ZnO controlled thickness films from an aqueous precursor solution in a cold plasma only in order to reach high growth rates. The quality of the deposited material (purity, crystallinity, size of the grains…) depends primarily on the interactions in the reactor between the droplets and the plasma. In this study, the parameters of the deposition (composition of the gases, pressure, power, temperature…) were studied and controlled. The doping characteristics are mainly influenced by the concentration of the precursors in the solution and by the method of injection. The final optimizations allowed high growth rates ranging from 0.6 to 1 nm/s. X-ray Diffraction results show a good crystallinity of the deposited layer (würtzite structure). According to the transmittance measurements, the films present a good transparency and a calculated optical gap value ranging between 3.2 and 3.3 eV. This deposition technique using plasma is fast, flexible, low power consuming and easily adaptable. Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells with a ZnO window layer have successfully been achieved by using the low power plasma reactor and their performances show an efficiency of 11%. - Highlights: • The low power plasma reactor is a very fast and flexible deposition process. • ZnO films are realized from an aqueous nitrate solution in a plasma discharge only. • ZnO films exhibit good properties for the window layer application. • CIGS solar cells present promising performances with an efficiency of 11%.

  4. Synthesis of nanocrystalline Y2O3 in a specially designed atmospheric pressure radio frequency thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamale, G. D.; Mathe, V. L.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Ghorui, S.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of yttrium oxide nanoparticles in a specially designed radio frequency thermal plasma reactor is reported. Good crystallinity, narrow size distribution, low defect state concentration, high purity, good production rate, single-step synthesis, and simultaneous formation of nanocrystalline monoclinic and cubic phases are some of the interesting features observed. Synthesized particles are characterized through X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermo-luminescence (TL), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Polymorphism of the nanocrystalline yttria is addressed in detail. Synthesis mechanism is explored through in-situ emission spectroscopy. Post-synthesis environmental effects and possible methods to eliminate the undesired phases are probed. Defect states are investigated through the study of TL spectra

  5. Plasma exposure behavior of re-deposited tungsten on structural materials of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Wang, Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhou, Hai-Shan, E-mail: haishanzhou@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Zeng-De [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Tao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Hao-Dong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Ding, Fang; Mao, Hong-Min; Zhao, Ming-Zhong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Lin, Chen-Guang [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei 230031 (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230027 (China)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the effects of re-deposited tungsten (W) on the surface modification and hydrogen isotope retention behavior of fusion structural materials, the plasma exposure behavior of re-deposited W samples prepared by magnetron sputtering on the F82H steel, the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy as well as bare substrate samples was investigated. All the samples were exposed to 367 shots of deuterium plasmas in the 2015 spring EAST campaign. After the plasma exposure, large area of W layer was exfoliated, while big blisters were found at the interface between the remaining W layer and the substrate materials. The deuterium retention behavior of the samples with re-deposited W layer was characterized by thermal desorption spectroscopy and compared with the bare substrate samples.

  6. Development of a real-time simulation tool towards self-consistent scenario of plasma start-up and sustainment on helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Sakamoto, R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, C.; Seki, R.; Satake, S.; Huang, B.; Nunami, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Sagara, A.; the FFHR Design Group

    2017-06-01

    This study closely investigates the plasma operation scenario for the LHD-type helical reactor FFHR-d1 in view of MHD equilibrium/stability, neoclassical transport, alpha energy loss and impurity effect. In 1D calculation code that reproduces the typical pellet discharges in LHD experiments, we identify a self-consistent solution of the plasma operation scenario which achieves steady-state sustainment of the burning plasma with a fusion gain of Q ~ 10 was found within the operation regime that has been already confirmed in LHD experiment. The developed calculation tool enables systematic analysis of the operation regime in real time.

  7. Coatings for reducing plasma contamination and power loss in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, A.K.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    It has been brought out that the use of suitable low atomic number refractory material coatings, on different components (such as first wall, limiter, armours etc.) of 'Tokomak' fusion reactor, offers the desired, degree of design flexibility. Coating characteristics of interest, their preparation and characterization have been discussed. Status of the developmental work has been reviewed. Work on various aspects of the different coating-substrate combinations have been analysed singling out the systems which presently appear more appropriate. (orig.)

  8. Degradation of nicotine in water solutions using a water falling film DBD plasma reactor: direct and indirect treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupež, Jelena; Kovačević, Vesna V.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Natić, Maja M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.

    2018-05-01

    Nicotine degradation efficiency in water solutions was studied using a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. Two different treatments were applied: direct treatment, the recirculation of the solution through a DBD reactor, and indirect treatment, the bubbling of the gas from the DBD through the porous filter into the solution. In a separate experiment, samples spiked with nicotine in double distilled water (ddH2O) and tap water were studied and compared after both treatments. Furthermore, the effects of the homogeneous catalysts, namely, Fe2+ and H2O2, were tested in the direct treatment. Nicotine degradation efficiency was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. A degradation efficiency of 90% was achieved after the direct treatment catalyzed with Fe2+. In order to analyze the biodegradability, mineralization level, and toxicity of the obtained solutions, after all degradation procedures the values of the following parameters were determined: total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, and the Artemia salina toxicity test. The results showed that an increase in biodegradability was obtained, after all treatments. A partial nicotine mineralization was achieved and the mortality of the A. salina organism decreased in the treated samples, all of which indicating the effective removal of nicotine and the creation of less toxic solutions. Nicotine degradation products were identified using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a linear ion trap Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer and a simple mechanism for oxidative degradation of nicotine in non-thermal plasma systems is proposed.

  9. Chemical modeling of a high-density inductively-coupled plasma reactor containing silane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Boogaard, A.; Brunets, I.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    We carried out the modeling of chemical reactions in a silane-containing remote Inductively Coupled Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ICPECVD) system, intended for deposition of silicon, silicon oxide, and silicon nitride layers. The required electron densities and Electron Energy

  10. Review of the works on plasma-wall interactions in fusion reactors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho

    1975-09-01

    A review is made of the works on sputtering as one of the plasma-wall interactions in thermonuclear fusion devices. The present status and future problems are described mainly in experiments of low-energy light ions such as H + , H 2 + , D + , D 2 + and He + , heavy ions including self-ions, and fast neutrons for polycrystalline metal targets. (auth.)

  11. Chemical reactions inside the plasma chamber of the SEAFP reactor plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.M.; Ebert, E.; Mazille, F.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of coolant or loss of vacuum accidents may lead to chemical reactions between the protecting materials of the plasma facing components and air or water. A production of energy, reaction products and hydrogen may be induced. The paper defines the operating conditions and chemical reactions and presents the main results from the underlying studies. (orig.)

  12. Impurity Control Test Facility (ICTF) for the study of fusion reactor plasma/edge materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.; Ehst, D.A.; Boley, C.D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1984-05-01

    A test facility for investigating many of the impurity control issues associated with the interactions of materials with the plasma edge is outlined. Analysis indicates that the plasma edge conditions expected in TFCX, INTOR, etc. can be readily produced at the end cells of an rf stabilized mirror, similar in some respects to the Phaedrus device at the University of Wisconsin. A steady-state, Impurity Control Test Facility (ICTF) based on such a mirror device is expected to produce a plasma with typical parameters of n/sub e/ approx. 3 x 10 18 m -3 , T/sub e/ = 50 eV, and T/sub i/ = 100 eV at each end cell. A heat load of approx. 2 MW/m 2 over areas of approx. 1600 cm 2 could be produced at each end with 800 kW of ICRH power. These conditions would provide a unique capability for examining issues such as erosion/redeposition behavior, properties of redeposited materials, high recycling regimes, plasma edge operating limits for high-Z materials, and particle pumping efficiencies for limiter and divertor designs

  13. Final Report: Safety of Plasma-Facing Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m 2 over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER

  14. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmerman, G. De

    2006-01-01

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed

  15. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity

  16. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  17. Modelling of the hydrogen effects on the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulin, Q.

    2006-01-01

    This work pursues the goal of understanding mechanisms related to the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor through modeling techniques. Current technologies are first reviewed with an aim to understand the purpose behind their development. Then follows a summary of the possible studies which are useful in this particular context. The various techniques which make it possible to simulate the trajectories of atoms by molecular dynamics are discussed. The quantum methods of calculation of the interaction potential between chemical species are then developed, reaching the conclusion that only semi-empirical quantum methods are sufficiently fast to be able to implement an algorithm of quantum molecular dynamics on a reasonable timescale. From the tools introduced, a reflection on the nature of molecular metastable energetic states is presented for the theoretical case of the self-organized growth of a linear chain of atoms. This model - which consists of propagating the growth of a chain by the successive addition of the atom which least increases the electronic energy of the chain - shows that the Fermi level is a parameter essential to self organization during growth. This model also shows that the structure formed is not necessarily a total minimum energy structure. From all these numerical tools, the molecular growth of clusters can be simulated by using parameters from magnetohydrodynamic calculation results of plasma reactor modeling (concentrations of the species, interval between chemical reactions, energy of impact of the reagents...). The formation of silicon-hydrogen clusters is thus simulated by the successive capture of silane molecules. The structures formed in simulation at the operating temperatures of the plasma reactor predict the formation of spherical clusters constituting an amorphous silicon core covered by hydrogen. These structures are thus not in a state of minimum energy, contrary to certain experimental

  18. Implementation of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple for beam heating of tokamak reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Sheffield, G.V.; Towner, H.H.; Weissenburger, D.W.

    1976-10-01

    The neutral-beam energy required for adequate penetration of tokamak plasmas of high opacity can be reduced by a large factor if the beam is injected vertically into a region of large TF (toroidal-field) ripple. Energetic ions are trapped in local magnetic wells and drift vertically toward the midplane (z = 0). If the ripple is made very small on the opposite side of the midplane, drifting ions are detrapped and thermalized in the central plasma region. This paper discusses design considerations for establishing the required vertically asymmetric ripple. Examples are given of special TF-coil configurations, and of the use of auxiliary coil windings to create the prescribed ripple profiles

  19. An analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission compared with those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission as compared to those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion

  1. A study on the fusion reactor - Study of ICRF coupling in the KAIST tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Duk In; Chang, Hong Young; Lee, Sun Chil; Jun, Sang Jin; Kwon, Gi Chung; Seo, Sung Hun; Heo, Sung Hoi; You, Kwang Il; Song, Soo Bin; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Chan Hui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Research objectives are to design and fabricate the antenna, measure t property of absorption transmitted to the plasma, and research the physical phenomena about the ICRF coupling, Main heating method is ohmic heating at the KAIST tokamak. The power of the plasma produced by ohmic heating is about 100 kW. Because the toroidal field is 5 {approx} 8 kG, the RF system`s output power is about 10 kW and frequency range is 7 {approx} 30 MHz. In the first year, a 1 kW RF preamplifier was bought. In this year, a CW 2 kW RF main amp. and RF power monitoring system was bought. In the research on antenna, we study the method how to measure electric field emitted from antenna using piezo elements. The matching network composed of two VVC (35 kV), 100 {approx} 1000 pF match firmly up to 50 kW power. We studied the measurement method of antenna impedance theoretically, and measured power efficiency and antenna impedance in the helicon plasma. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  2. Evaluation of compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Huang Jinhua; Peng Lilin; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    A global model analysis of the compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma has been performed. The relationships between the surface temperature of lithium curtain and mean effective plasma charges, fuel dilution and produced fusion power have been obtained. Results show that under normal circumstances, the evaporation of liquid lithium does not affect Z eff seriously, but affects fuel dilution and fusion power sensitively. The authors have investigated the relationships between the flow velocity of liquid lithium and its surface temperature rise based on the conditions of the option II of the fusion experimental breeder (FEB-E) design with reversed shear configuration and fairly high power density. The authors concluded that the effects of evaporation from liquid lithium curtain for FEB-E on plasma are negligible even if the flow velocity of liquid lithium is as low as 0.5 m·s -1 . Finally, the sputtering yield of liquid lithium saturated by hydrogen isotopes is briefly discussed

  3. Edge Plasma Physics Issues for the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) in Reactor Relevant Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Apicella, M.L.; Calabro, G.; Crisanti, F.; Cucchiaro, A.; Ramogida, G.; Zagorski, R.

    2008-01-01

    The issue of First wall materials and compatibility with ITER /DEMO relevant plasmas is among the RD missions for possible new European plasma fusion devices that the FAST project will address. FAST can operate with ITER relevant values of P/R (up to 22 MW/m, against the ITER 24 MW/m, inclusive of the α particles power), thanks to its compactness; thus it can investigate the physics of large heat loads on divertor plates. The FAST divertor will be made of bulk W tiles, for basic operations, but also fully toroidal divertor targets made of liquid lithium (L-Li) are foreseen. To have reliable predictions of the thermal loads on the divertor plates and of the core plasma purity a number of numerical self-consistent simulations have been made for the H-mode and steady-state scenario by using the code COREDIV. This code, already validated in the past on experimental data (namely JET, FTU, Textor), is able to describe self-consistently the core and edge plasma in a tokamak device by imposing the continuity of energy and particle fluxes and of particle densities and temperatures at the separatrix. In the present work the results of such calculations will be illustrated, including heat loads on the divertor. The overall picture shows that, marginally in the intermediate and, necessarily in the high density H-mode scenarios ( e >=2 and 5·10 20 m -3 respectively), impurity seeding should be foreseen with W as target material: however, only a small amount of Ar (0.03% atomic concentration), not affecting the core purity, is sufficient to maintain the divertor peak loads below 18 MW/m 2 , that represents the safety limit for the W mono block technology, presently accepted for the ITER divertor tiles. Li always needs additional impurities for decreasing divertor heat loads, the Z eff value being ≤ than 1.8. At low plasma densities (but ≥ 1.3·10 20 m -3 ), typical of steady state regimes, W by alone is effective in dissipating the input power by radiative losses, without

  4. A Green Process for High-Concentration Ethylene and Hydrogen Production from Methane in a Plasma-Followed-by-Catalyst Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kangjun; Li Xiaosong; Zhu Aimin

    2011-01-01

    A green process for the oxygen-free conversion of methane to high-concentration ethylene and hydrogen in a plasma-followed-by-catalyst (PFC) reactor is presented. Without any catalysts and with pure methane used as the feed gas, a stable kilohertz spark discharge leads to an acetylene yield of 64.1%, ethylene yield of 2.5% and hydrogen yield of 59.0% with 80.0% of methane conversion at a methane flow rate of 50 cm 3 /min and a specific input energy of 38.4 kJ/L. In the effluent gas from a stable kilohertz spark discharge reactor, the concentrations of acetylene, ethylene and hydrogen were 18.1%, 0.7% and 66.9%, respectively. When catalysts Pd-Ag/SiO 2 were employed in the second stage with discharge conditions same as in the case of plasma alone, the PFC reactor provides an ethylene yield of 52.1% and hydrogen yield of 43.4%. The concentrations of ethylene and hydrogen in the effluent gas from the PFC reactor were found to be as high as 17.1% and 62.6%, respectively. Moreover, no acetylene was detected in the effluent gas. This means that a high concentration of ethylene and oxygen-free hydrogen can be co-produced directly from methane in the PFC reactor.

  5. A global model for SF6 plasmas coupling reaction kinetics in the gas phase and on the surface of the reactor walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkoris, George; Panagiotopoulos, Apostolos; Gogolides, Evangelos; Goodyear, Andy; Cooke, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Gas phase and reactor wall-surface kinetics are coupled in a global model for SF 6 plasmas. A complete set of gas phase and surface reactions is formulated. The rate coefficients of the electron impact reactions are based on pertinent cross section data from the literature, which are integrated over a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function. The rate coefficients of the surface reactions are adjustable parameters and are calculated by fitting the model to experimental data from an inductively coupled plasma reactor, i.e. F atom density and pressure change after the ignition of the discharge. The model predicts that SF 6 , F, F 2 and SF 4 are the dominant neutral species while SF 5 + and F - are the dominant ions. The fit sheds light on the interaction between the gas phase and the reactor walls. A loss mechanism for SF x radicals by deposition of a fluoro-sulfur film on the reactor walls is needed to predict the experimental data. It is found that there is a net production of SF 5 , F 2 and SF 6 , and a net consumption of F, SF 3 and SF 4 on the reactor walls. Surface reactions as well as reactions between neutral species in the gas phase are found to be important sources and sinks of the neutral species.

  6. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor for degradation and detoxification of high concentrations of dye Reactive Black 5 in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dojčinović Biljana P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation and detoxification efficiency of high concentrations of commercially available reactive textile dye Reactive Black 5 solution (40, 80, 200, 500, 1000 mg L-1, were studied. Advanced oxidation processes in water falling film based dielectric barrier discharge as a non-thermal plasma reactor were used. For the first time, this reactor was used for the treatment of high concentrations of organic pollutants such as reactive textile dye Reactive Black 5 in water. Solution of the dye is treated by plasma as thin water solution film that is constantly regenerated. Basically, the reactor works as a continuous flow reactor and the electrical discharge itself takes place at the gas-liquid interphase. The dye solution was recirculated through the reactor with an applied energy density of 0-374 kJ L-1. Decolorization efficiency (% was monitored by UV-VIS spectrophotometric technique. Samples were taken after every recirculation (~ 22 kJ L-1 and decolorization percent was measured after 5 min and 24 h of plasma treatment. The efficiency of degradation (i.e. mineralization and possible degradation products were also tracked by determination of the chemical oxygen demand (COD and by ion chromatography (IC. Initial toxicity and toxicity of solutions after the treatment were studied with Artemia salina test organisms. Efficiency of decolorization decreased with the increase of the dye concentration. Complete decolorization, high mineralization and non-toxicity of the solution (<10 % were acomplished after plasma treatment using energy density of 242 kJ L-1, while the initial concentrations of Reactive Black 5 were 40 and 80 mg L-1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172030 i br. 171034

  7. Destruction of tributylphosphate by cold plasma. Use of a gliding arc reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, David

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear industry uses the Purex process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel by plutonium and uranium separation. This process uses complexing properties of tributylphosphate. This solvent is aged by the high radioactivity and acidity of the medium and loses its extracting properties. Thus it becomes an highly radioactive liquid organic waste and it must be degraded before its conditioning. We have elaborated a new method for mineralizing TBP by exposure to the plasma produced by a wet air gliding arc. Electric discharges in wet air give rise to very reactive species like excited molecules and radicals. Such species can accelerate oxidation and degradation of organic compounds. The gliding arc discharge is obtained by applying high voltage between two divergent metal electrodes disposed around a blowing nozzle. The arc formed between the electrodes is blown by the air flow with growing in length. Thus a quenched wet air plasma trail is formed and licks an upper layer of TBP while the lower layer is water. Our device can degrade almost 40 percent of the treated TBP. The main degradation product is phosphoric acid for which we have monitored the production kinetics and suggested a model of a surface oxidation process to explain it. Another part of the TBP is converted into a phosphate layer found on the electrodes and phosphorus oxide white smokes present in exhaust fumes. By means of chromatography and spectroscopic analysis we have found the dibutyl-phosphoric acid as the main partial degradation product. The gliding arc device presents several advantages towards other plasma processes which are a low cost and especially for the present task i.e. an easy building and use, operating at atmospheric pressure and moderate temperature, and the possibility to use high powers (several kW for one unit). (author) [fr

  8. Co-generation of synthesis gas and C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide in a hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istadi; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia). Chemical Reaction Engineering Group (CREG), Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering

    2006-03-15

    The topics on conversion and utilization of methane and carbon dioxide are important issues in tackling the global warming effects from the two greenhouse gases. Several technologies including catalytic and plasma have been proposed to improve the process involving conversion and utilization of methane and carbon dioxide. In this paper, an overview of the basic principles, and the effects of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge power, catalyst, applied voltage, wall temperature, and system pressure in dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor are addressed. The discharge power, discharge gap, applied voltage and CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio in the feed showed the most significant effects on the reactor performance. Co-feeding carbon dioxide with the methane feed stream reduced coking and increased methane conversion. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the products was significantly affected by CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio. The synergism of the catalyst placed in the discharge gap and the plasma affected the products distribution significantly. Methane and carbon dioxide conversions were influenced significantly by discharge power and applied voltage. The drawbacks of DBD plasma application in the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} conversion should be taken into consideration before a new plausible reactor system can be implemented. 76 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Radiation transport effects in divertor plasmas generated during a tokamak reactor disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Vaporization of material from tokamak divertors during disruptions is a critical issue for tokamak reactors from ITER to commercial power plants. Radiation transport from the vaporized material onto the remaining divertor surface plays an important role in the total mass loss to the divertor. Radiation transport in such a vapor is very difficult to calculate in full detail, and this paper quantifies the sensitivity of the divertor mass loss to uncertainties in the radiation transport. Specifically, the paper presents the results of computer simulations of the vaporization of a graphite coated divertor during a tokamak disruption with ITER CDA parameters. The results show that a factor of 100 change in the radiation conductivity changes the mass loss by more than a factor of two

  10. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Thermal Plasma Reactor at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Szymanski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach to the synthesis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs in reactors operating at atmospheric pressure is presented. Based on the literature and our own research results, the most effective methods of CNT synthesis are investigated. Then, careful selection of reagents for the synthesis process is shown. Thanks to the performed calculations, an optimum composition of gases and the temperature for successful CNT synthesis in the CVD (chemical vapor deposition process can be chosen. The results, having practical significance, may lead to an improvement of nanomaterials synthesis technology. The study can be used to produce CNTs for electrical and electronic equipment (i.e., supercapacitors or cooling radiators. There is also a possibility of using them in medicine for cancer diagnostics and therapy.

  11. Development of plasma arc cutting technique for dismantlement of reactor internals in JPDR decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsugu; Ujihara, Norio.

    1988-01-01

    The decommissioning program for JPDR has been conducted by JAERI since 1981 under contact with the Science and Technology Agency of Japan. The development of cutting tools for dismantling the JPDR is one of the important items in the program. An underwater plasma arc cutting technique was selected for dismantling the JPDR core internals. The study was concentrated on improving the cutting ability in water. Various cutting tests were conducted changing the parameters such as arc current, supply gas and cutting speed to evaluate the most effective cutting condition. Through the study, it has been achieved to be able to cut a 130 mm thick stainless steel plate in water. In addition, the amount and the characteristics of by-products were measured during the cutting tests for the safety evaluation of the dismantling activities. Final cutting tests and checkout of whole plasma arc cutting system were conducted using a mockup water pool and test pieces simulating the JPDR core internals. It was proved from the tests that the cutting system developed in the program will be applicable for the JPDR core internals dismantlement. (author)

  12. Modelling of an intermediate pressure microwave oxygen discharge reactor: from stationary two-dimensional to time-dependent global (volume-averaged) plasma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemaneci, Efe; Graef, Wouter; Rahimi, Sara; Van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit; Carbone, Emile; Jimenez-Diaz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced oxygen plasma is simulated using both stationary and time-resolved modelling strategies. The stationary model is spatially resolved and it is self-consistently coupled to the microwaves (Jimenez-Diaz et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 335204), whereas the time-resolved description is based on a global (volume-averaged) model (Kemaneci et al 2014 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 23 045002). We observe agreement of the global model data with several published measurements of microwave-induced oxygen plasmas in both continuous and modulated power inputs. Properties of the microwave plasma reactor are investigated and corresponding simulation data based on two distinct models shows agreement on the common parameters. The role of the square wave modulated power input is also investigated within the time-resolved description. (paper)

  13. Implantation of β-emitters on biomedical implants: 32 P isotropic ion implantation using a coaxial plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, M.A.; Paynter, R.W.; Sarkissian, A.; Stansfield, B.L.; Terreault, B.; Dufresne, V.

    2003-01-01

    The development of endovascular brachytherapy and the treatment of certain types of cancers (liver, lung, prostate) often require the use of beta-emitters, sometimes in the form of radioisotope-implanted devices. Among the most commonly used isotopes figures 32 P, a pure beta-emitter (maximum energy: 1.7 MeV), of which the path in biological tissues is of a few cm, restricting the impact of electron bombardment to the immediate environment of the implant. Several techniques and processes have been tried to elaborate surfaces and devices showing strongly bonded, or implanted 32 P. Anodizing, vapor phase deposition, grafting of oligonucleotides, as well as ion implantation processes have been investigated by several research groups as methods to implant beta-radioisotopes into surfaces. A coaxial plasma reactor was developed at INRS to implant radioisotopes into cylindrical metallic objects, such as coronary stents commonly used in angioplasty procedures. The dispersion of 32 P atoms on the interior surfaces of the chamber can be investigated using radiographs, contributing to image the plasma ion transport mechanisms that guide the efficiency of the implantation procedure. The amount of radioactivity on the wall liner, on the internal components, and on the biomedical implants are quantified using a surface barrier detector. A comparative study establishes a relationship between the gray scale of the radiographs, and dose measurements. A program was developed to convert the digitized images into maps showing surface dose density in mCi/cm 2 . An integration process allows the quantification of the doses on the walls and components of the reactor. Finally, the resulting integral of the 32 P dose is correlated to the initial amount of radioactivity inserted inside the implanter before the dismantling procedure. This method could be introduced as a fast and reliable way to test, qualify and assess the amount of radioactivity present on the as-produced implants

  14. Tracking of nuclear reactor parameters via recursive non linear estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages Fita, J.; Alengrin, G.; Aguilar Martin, J.; Zwingelstein, M.

    1975-01-01

    The usefulness of nonlinear estimation in the supervision of nuclear reactors, as well for reactivity determination as for on-line modelisation in order to detect eventual and unwanted changes in working operation is illustrated. It is dealt with the reactivity estimation using an a priori dynamical model under the hypothesis of one group of delayed neutrons (measurements were done with an ionisation chamber). The determination of the reactivity using such measurements appears as a nonlinear estimation procedure derived from a particular form of nonlinear filter. Observed inputs being demand of power and inside temperature, and output being the reactivity balance, a recursive algorithm is derived for the estimation of the parameters that define the actual behavior of the reactor. Example of treatment of real data is given [fr

  15. Model etch profiles for ion energy distribution functions in an inductively coupled plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.; Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Rectangular trench profiles are modeled with analytic etch rates determined from measured ion distribution functions. The pattern transfer step for this plasma etch is for trilayer lithography. Argon and chlorine angular ion energy distribution functions measured by a spherical collector ring analyzer are fit to a sum of drifting Maxwellian velocity distribution functions with anisotropic temperatures. The fit of the model ion distribution functions by a simulated annealing optimization procedure converges adequately for only two drifting Maxwellians. The etch rates are proportional to analytic expressions for the ion energy flux. Numerical computation of the etch profiles by integration of the characteristic equations for profile points and connection of the profiles points is efficient. copyright 1999 American Vacuum Society

  16. Novel Plasma Reactor with Rotary Helix Electrode Used in Coupling of CH4 at Atmospheric Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dawang; Ma Tengcai

    2006-01-01

    At the ambient temperature and pressure a glow discharge plasma was used as a new approach for the coupling of methane with the newly-developed rotary multidentate helix electrode. In the presence of hydrogen, the effects of the input peak voltages and gas flow rates on methane conversion, C 2 single pass yield and selectivity were investigated, and then the results were compared with those from the three-disc multidentate electrode. This demonstrated, on an experimental scale, that the rotary multidentate helix electrode was better than the multidentate three-disc electrode as there was little accumulation of coke, and the C 2 yield per pass was 69.85% and C 2 selectivity over 99.14% with 70.46% methane conversion at an input peak voltage of 2300 V and 60 ml/min gas flow rate

  17. Destruction of acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene and pyrene by a dc gliding arc plasma reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Tu, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Wang, Yu; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-08-15

    In this study, four kinds of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) i.e. acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene and pyrene are used as targets for investigation of PAHs treatment process assisted by dc gliding arc discharge. The effects of carrier gas and external resistance on the PAHs decomposition process are discussed. The results indicate that the destruction rate can be achieved to the highest with the carrier gas of oxygen and the external resistance of 50 kOmega independent of type of PAHs. Furthermore, experimental results suggest that destruction energy efficiency of gliding arc plasma would be improved by treating higher concentration pollutants. Based on the analysis of experimental results, possible destruction mechanisms in different gas discharge are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Destruction of acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene and pyrene by a dc gliding arc plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Liang; Tu Xin; Li Xiaodong; Wang Yu; Chi Yong; Yan Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    In this study, four kinds of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) i.e. acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene and pyrene are used as targets for investigation of PAHs treatment process assisted by dc gliding arc discharge. The effects of carrier gas and external resistance on the PAHs decomposition process are discussed. The results indicate that the destruction rate can be achieved to the highest with the carrier gas of oxygen and the external resistance of 50 kΩ independent of type of PAHs. Furthermore, experimental results suggest that destruction energy efficiency of gliding arc plasma would be improved by treating higher concentration pollutants. Based on the analysis of experimental results, possible destruction mechanisms in different gas discharge are discussed.

  19. Development of online, continuous heavy metals detection and monitoring sensors based on microfluidic plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Majeed, Wameath Sh

    This research is dedicated to develop a fully integrated system for heavy metals determination in water samples based on micro fluidic plasma atomizers. Several configurations of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer are designed, fabricated and tested toward this target. Finally, a combination of annular and rectangular DBD atomizers has been utilized to develop a scheme for heavy metals determination. The present thesis has combined both theoretical and experimental investigations to fulfil the requirements. Several mathematical studies are implemented to explore the optimal design parameters for best system performance. On the other hand, expanded experimental explorations are conducted to assess the proposed operational approaches. The experiments were designed according to a central composite rotatable design; hence, an empirical model has been produced for each studied case. Moreover, several statistical approaches are adopted to analyse the system performance and to deduce the optimal operational parameters.. The introduction of the examined analyte to the plasma atomizer has been achieved by applying chemical schemes, where the element in the sample has been derivitized by using different kinds of reducing agents to produce vapour species (e.g. hydrides) for a group of nine elements examined in this research individually and simultaneously. Moreover, other derivatization schemes based on photochemical vapour generation assisted by ultrasound irradiation are also investigated. Generally speaking, the detection limits achieved in this research for the examined set of elements (by applying hydroborate scheme) are found to be acceptable in accordance with the standard limits in drinking water. The results of copper compared with the data from other technologies in the literature, showed a competitive detection limit obtained from applying the developed scheme, with an advantage of conducting simultaneous, fully automated, insitu, online- real time

  20. Physical and numerical modelling of corium spreading with solidification in safety studies of pressurized water reactors; Modelisation physique et numerique de l`etalement d`un fluide avec solidification dans le cadre des etudes de surete pour les reacteurs eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle Patrick [Service d`Etude et de Modelisation en Thermohydrolique, CEA/DRN/DTP/SMTH, Grenoble (France)]|[Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 Annecy (France)

    1997-12-12

    In the frame of severe accidents of nuclear pressurized water reactor, it is important to understand and to model phenomena of corium spreading with solidification. The first part of the study describes experiments with simulating materials as well as simple models of the literature. We deduce a model where the equations of conservation are averaged over the volume. This model gives interesting results for continuous spreading but it is not convenient for discontinuous phenomena. A more precise model is then necessary. In the second part of this study, we present a complete model from which the basic idea is to average the conservation equations over the fluid height, supposing the characteristic fluid thickness is small in comparison with the characteristic spreading length. This model describes the thermalhydraulic aspects of the spreading as well as the mechanical behaviour of the upper crust. The liquid phases are supposed to be stratified and have a Newtonian fluid behaviour. The dynamical crust model takes into account a non-linear behaviour law. This law depends on the deformation tensor whereas the liquid behaviour low, depends on the rate of deformation tensor, so it is necessary to link this two notions by supplementary equations. The operation of averaging the equations gives terms at the interfaces which must be determined by constitutive laws. We deduce laws by fixing the velocity and temperature profile in the fluid height. The previous system of equations is discretized by finite volumes and semi-implicit methods. The discretized models are included in the specific code THEMA. The results of the model show good agreement with available experimental results. (author) 9 refs., 45 figs., 42 tabs.

  1. Methodological developments and qualification of calculation schemes for the modelling of photonic heating in the experimental devices of the future Jules Horowitz material testing reactor (RJH); Developpements methodologiques et qualification de schemas de calcul pour la modelisation des echauffements photoniques dans les dispositifs experimentaux du futur reacteur d'irradiation technologiques Jules Horowitz (RJH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchet, D

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the modelling of the nuclear heating of the experimental devices of the future Jules Horowitz material testing reactor (RJH). The strong specific nuclear power produced (460 kW/l), induces so intense photonic fluxes which cause heating and large temperature gradients that it is necessary to control it by an adequate design. However, calculations of heating are penalized by the very large uncertainties estimated at a value of about 30% (2*{sigma}) coming from the gaps and uncertainties of the data of gamma emission present in the libraries of basic nuclear data. The experimental program ADAPh aims at reducing these uncertainties. Measurements by thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and ionisation chambers are carried out in the critical assemblies EOLE (Mox) and Minerve (UO{sub 2}). The rigorous interpretation of these measurements requires specific developments based on Monte-Carlo simulations of coupled neutron-gamma and gamma-electron transport. The developments carried out are made different in particular by the modelling of cavities phenomena and delayed gamma emissions by the decay of fission products. The comparisons calculation-measurement made it possible to identify a systematic bias confirming a tendency of calculations to underestimate measurements. A Bayesian method of adjustment was developed in order to re-estimate the principal components of the gamma heating and to transpose the results obtained to the devices of the RJH, under conditions clearly and definitely representative. This work made possible to reduce significantly the uncertainties on the determination of the gamma heating from 30 to 15 per cent. (author)

  2. Methodological developments and qualification of calculation schemes for the modelling of photonic heating in the experimental devices of the future Jules Horowitz material testing reactor (RJH); Developpements methodologiques et qualification de schemas de calcul pour la modelisation des echauffements photoniques dans les dispositifs experimentaux du futur reacteur d'irradiation technologiques Jules Horowitz (RJH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchet, D

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the modelling of the nuclear heating of the experimental devices of the future Jules Horowitz material testing reactor (RJH). The strong specific nuclear power produced (460 kW/l), induces so intense photonic fluxes which cause heating and large temperature gradients that it is necessary to control it by an adequate design. However, calculations of heating are penalized by the very large uncertainties estimated at a value of about 30% (2*{sigma}) coming from the gaps and uncertainties of the data of gamma emission present in the libraries of basic nuclear data. The experimental program ADAPh aims at reducing these uncertainties. Measurements by thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and ionisation chambers are carried out in the critical assemblies EOLE (Mox) and Minerve (UO{sub 2}). The rigorous interpretation of these measurements requires specific developments based on Monte-Carlo simulations of coupled neutron-gamma and gamma-electron transport. The developments carried out are made different in particular by the modelling of cavities phenomena and delayed gamma emissions by the decay of fission products. The comparisons calculation-measurement made it possible to identify a systematic bias confirming a tendency of calculations to underestimate measurements. A Bayesian method of adjustment was developed in order to re-estimate the principal components of the gamma heating and to transpose the results obtained to the devices of the RJH, under conditions clearly and definitely representative. This work made possible to reduce significantly the uncertainties on the determination of the gamma heating from 30 to 15 per cent. (author)

  3. Proposal for the theoretical investigation of the relativistic beam-plasma interaction with application to the proof-of-principle electron beam-heated linear solenoidal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1978-09-01

    A 36-month program to study the linear relativistic electron beam-plasma interaction is proposed. This program is part of a joint proposal between the Physics International Company (PI) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) that combines the advanced electron beam generator technology at PI with the highly developed computer simulation technology at LASL. The proposed LASL program includes direct support for 1- and 3-m beam-plasma interaction experiments planned at PI and development of theory relevant for design of a 10-m proof-of-principle electron beam-driven linear solenoidal reactor

  4. Mechanical Stress in InP Structures Etched in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor with Ar/Cl2/CH4 Plasma Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landesman, Jean-Pierre; Cassidy, Daniel T.; Fouchier, Marc; Pargon, Erwine; Levallois, Christophe; Mokhtari, Merwan; Jimenez, Juan; Torres, Alfredo

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the crystal lattice deformation that can occur during the etching of structures in bulk InP using SiNx hard masks with Ar/Cl2/CH4 chemistries in an inductively coupled plasma reactor. Two techniques were used: degree of polarization (DOP) of the photo-luminescence, which gives information on the state of mechanical stress present in the structures, and spectrally resolved cathodo-luminescence (CL) mapping. This second technique also provides elements on the mechanical stress in the samples through analysis of the spectral shift of the CL intrinsic emission lines. Preliminary DOP mapping experiments have been conducted on the SiNx hard mask patterns without etching the underlying InP. This preliminary study demonstrated the potential of DOP to map mechanical stress quantitatively in the structures. In a second step, InP patterns with various widths between 1 μm and 20 μm, and various depths between 1 μm and 6 μm, were analyzed by the 2 techniques. DOP measurements were made both on the (100) top surface of the samples and on the (110) cleaved cross section. CL measurements were made only from the (100) surface. We observed that inside the etched features, close to the vertical etched walls, there is always some compressive deformation, while it is tensile just outside the etched features. The magnitude of these effects depends on the lateral and depth dimensions of the etched structures, and on the separation between them (the tensile deformation increases between them due to some kind of proximity effect when separation decreases).

  5. A thermal packed-bed reactor and a silent discharge plasma cell for a two-stage treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy-Cabrera, O G; Lopez-Callejas, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Barocio, S R; Valencia, R; Munoz-Castro, A; Eguiluz, R Pena; Piedad-Beneitez, A de la

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge cells (DBDCs) have proved their efficiency in the generation of cold plasmas for hazardous organic compound degradation. Here, we describe the design and construction of a dual thermal packed-bed reactor and DBDC-based system to carry out the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in both liquid and gas phases. The main components of this system are: (i) the thermal treatment system (ii) DBDC and (iii) resonant inverters of low (3.3 kHz) and high (100 kHz) calculated frequencies. The definition of the cell physical parameters considers: (a) a first-order degradation ratio of the compound and (b) the air breakdown at atmospheric pressure as a function of the transport carrier gas. The power consumed by the cells during the discharges was computed theoretically and experimentally. Using the dual system along with a gas chromatography diagnostic system, highly efficient degradations of a test compound (benzene) have been obtained, reaching 99.950% in the case of a cell experimentally operated at 3.3 kHz and up to 99.996% in another one at 94.3 kHz. An additional 3.7 times reduction in the latter case residence time with respect to the low frequency cell has been found

  6. Development of low-Z materials for plasma facing, structural applications in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassen, R.; Foerster, J.; Yehia, A.; Hammelmann, K.; Buchkremer, H.P.; Bolt, H.; Stoever, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper results of a systematic development of materials with regard to an improvement of fusion reactor relevant properties (i.e. thermal shock resistance evaluated at heating rates comparable to those during disruptions) will be described. Materials were produced by sintering and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) of mixtures of SiC, B 4 C, TiC, C, B, and Ti powders. The variety of samples were devided into several groups: SiC-, TiC-, and B 4 C-based materials, depending on the majority phase within the composite. Also ultrafine SiC powders ( 2 and pulse duration of 5 ms in the KFA electron beam test facility JUDITH. Weight loss measurements, as well as microstructural investigations reveal large differences between the various samples. The results show clear tendencies of microstructural features (e.g. porosity, chemical composition, grain size) which lead to an increase in thermal shock resistance. An analytical model was developed and the results compared to the experimental erosion data. The model as well as beam current measurements gave indication that transgression of the maximal compressive strength at the surface is the mechanism, which determines erosion during the first transient heat phase. In order to compare our materials with conventional available ceramics, several SiC and graphite qualities of different manufactures were tested under the same conditions. The results show that commercial fine grained graphites have superior thermal shock properties compared to our materials (as was expected). But compared to the best tested commercial SiC quality our optimised ceramics reveal better shock resistance especially in the high energy range. (orig.)

  7. 3. IAEA research co-ordination meeting on atomic and plasma-wall interaction data for fusion reactor divertor modeling. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1999-04-01

    A brief description of the proceedings and the conclusions of the 3rd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Atomic and Plasma-Wall Interaction Data for Fusion Reactor Divertor Modeling', held on March 8-9, 1999, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, is provided. The reports on the activities within the individual projects pertinent to the IAEA Co-ordinated Research program with the same title are given as appendix to the present report. (author)

  8. A study on the fusion reactor - Study on the plasma transport in advanced= tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Bae; Hong, Kyu Seon; Choi, Kang Oak [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Upper bound on the heat transport is considered with varying {eta}{sub i} and the curvature of the q profile. Nonlinear variational principle is adopted to= maximize the heat transport under the conditions of energy balance and the parallel energy balance. As a model, fluid plasma is assumed in the slab geometry. Resulting Lagrange equations are solved on the computer. Critical value of {eta}{sub i} energy stability is obtained and eigen states for higher {eta}{sub i}`s are found upon considering only the critical mode. Upper bound is found to be smaller when the curvature of q profile id of the same sign as the magnetic shear than the opposite case. As future studies, study on the bifurcation of the modes and, thus, inclusion of more modes are suggested. For more sophisticated model, there seems to be no untoward problems in applying the same method and, after such calculation is done, useful bounds with direct implications to real experiments will be predicted. Lower bound may be interesting, as well, and the work is in progress. 23 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  9. Simulation of motions of the plasma in a fusion reactor for obtaining of future energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhumabekov, Askhat

    2017-01-01

    According to the most conservative estimates, by the middle of the XXI century in the world energy consumption will double. This will be a consequence of the global economic development, population growth and other geopolitical and economic factors. Energy consumption in the world is growing much faster than its production and industrial use of new advanced technologies in the energy sector, for objective reasons, will not begin until 2030. This paper discusses how to obtain and develop nuclear energy on the experience of the National Nuclear Center. Implemented model for the problem of plasma confinement, and also presents the main achievements of modern construction and Megaproject National Nuclear Center in Kurchatov, the Republic of Kazakhstan. Spend a social survey in the East Kazakhstan region on the theme: “Prospects for the development of nuclear energy in Kazakhstan” and the citizens’ opinion. Narration new priorities for May 22, 2015 in Ust-Kamenogorsk in the industrial park “Altai” based on the competition of innovation projects green technology in the international exhibition “OSKEMEN EXPO – 2015”, with the participation of the regional authorities of the Republic of Kazakhstan, representatives of JSC NC “Astana Expo” and delegations from Japan, Russia, Canada, USA, South Korea. (paper)

  10. Simulation of motions of the plasma in a fusion reactor for obtaining of future energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumabekov, Askhat

    2017-01-01

    According to the most conservative estimates, by the middle of the XXI century in the world energy consumption will double. This will be a consequence of the global economic development, population growth and other geopolitical and economic factors. Energy consumption in the world is growing much faster than its production and industrial use of new advanced technologies in the energy sector, for objective reasons, will not begin until 2030. This paper discusses how to obtain and develop nuclear energy on the experience of the National Nuclear Center. Implemented model for the problem of plasma confinement, and also presents the main achievements of modern construction and Megaproject National Nuclear Center in Kurchatov, the Republic of Kazakhstan. Spend a social survey in the East Kazakhstan region on the theme: “Prospects for the development of nuclear energy in Kazakhstan” and the citizens’ opinion. Narration new priorities for May 22, 2015 in Ust-Kamenogorsk in the industrial park “Altai” based on the competition of innovation projects green technology in the international exhibition “OSKEMEN EXPO - 2015”, with the participation of the regional authorities of the Republic of Kazakhstan, representatives of JSC NC “Astana Expo” and delegations from Japan, Russia, Canada, USA, South Korea.

  11. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  12. Seismic analysis of a PWR 900 reactor: study of reactor building with soil-structure interaction and evaluation of floor spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.; Aguilar, J.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is the evaluation of seismic response and floor spectra for a typical PWR 900 reactor building with respect to soil-structure interaction for soil stiffness). The typical PWR 900 reactor building consists of a concrete cylindrical external building and roof dome, a concrete internal structure (internals) on a common foundation mat as illustrated. The seismic response is obtained by SRSS method and floor spectra directly from ground spectrum and modal properties of the structure. Seismic responses and floor spectra computation is performed in the case of two different ground spectra: EDF spectrum (mean of oscillator spectra obtained from 8 californian records) normalized to 0.2 g, and DSN spectrum (typical of shallow seism) normalized to 0.3 g. The first section is devoted to internals' modelisation, the second one to the axisymmetric model of the reactor, the third one to the seismic response, the fourth one to floor spectra

  13. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  14. A study on tokamak fusion reactor - Numerical analyses of MHD equilibrium= and edge plasma transport in tokamak fusion reactor with divertor configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Hee; Lim, Ki Hang; Kang, Kyung Doo; Ryu, Ji Myung; Kim, Duk Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soo Won [Kyungki Unviersity, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    In the present project for developing the numerical codes of 2-DMHD equilibrium, edge plasma transport and neutral particle transport for the tokamak plasmas, we compute the plasma equilibrium of double null type and calculate the external coil currents and the plasma parameters used for operation and control data. Also the numerical algorithm is developed to analyse the behavior of edge plasmas in poloidal and radial directions and the programming and debugging of a 2-D transport code are completed. Furthermore, a neutral particle transport code for the edge region is developed and then used for the analysis of the neutral transport phenomena giving the sources in the fluid equations, and expected to supply the input parameters for the edge plasma transport code. 34 refs., 5 tabs., 28 figs. (author)

  15. A study on the fusion reactor - Numerical analyses of MHD equilibrium and= edge plasma transport in tokamak fusion reactor with divertor configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Hee; Kang, Kyung Doo; Ryu, Ji Myung; Kim, Deok Kyu; Chung, TaeKyun; Chung, Mo Se [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Su Won [Kyungki University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    In the present project for developing the numerical codes of 2-D MHD equilibrium, edge plasma transport and neutral particle transport for the tokamak plasmas, we computed the MHD equilibria of single and double null configurations and determined the external coil currents and the plasma parameters used for operation and control data. Also we numerically acquired the distributions of edge plasma parameters in poloidal and radial directions= and the design-related values according to the various operating conditions using the developed plasma transport code. Furthermore, a neutral particle transport code for the edge region is developed and them used for the analysis of the neutral particle behavior yielding the source terms in the fluid transport equations, and expected to supply the input parameters for the edge plasma transport code. 53 refs., 12 tabs., 44 figs. (author)

  16. Modelisation of the concentration of macromolecules moving in a Newtonian fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijazi, A.; Zoaeter, M.; Khater, A.; Aussere, D.

    1998-01-01

    Author.This article presents a modelisation of the distribution of a diluted solution of macromolecules submitted to a simple flow in the neighborhood of a non-absorbing solid surface. These macromolecules (length L, negligible diameter) are submitted to two kinds of forces: rotational and translational with brownian and hydrodynamic origins. The evolution of orientation of these molecules in terms of time has been studied, given Einstein equation =D with D coefficient of translation and rotation. By taking as parameters the orientation θ of the macromolecules with respect to an horizontal axis and Z the distance between these macromolecules and the surface, a statistical study has led to determine the distribution. For that reason, the brownian movement considered is supposed to follow a rule of random probability

  17. Development of bonding techniques of W and Cu-alloys for plasma facing components of fusion reactor with HIP method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, S.; Fukaya, K.; Ishiyama, S.; Eto, M.; Sato, K.; Akiba, M.

    1998-01-01

    W (tungsten) and Cu (copper)-alloys, like oxygen free high thermal conductivity (OFHC)-copper or dispersion strengthened (DS)-copper, are candidate materials for plasma facing components(PFC) of TOKAMAK type fusion reactor as armor tile and heat sink, respectively. However, PFC are exposed to cyclic high heat load and heavy irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons. Under these conditions, thermal stresses at bonding interface and irradiation damage will decrease the bonding strength between W and Cu alloys. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a reliable bonding techniques in order to make PFC with enough integrity. We have applied the hot isostatic press (HIP) method to bond W with Cu-alloys. In this experiments, to optimize HIP bonding conditions, four point bending tests were performed for different bonding conditions at temperatures from R.T. to 873 K and we obtained an optimum HIP bonding condition for W and OFHC-Cu as 1273 SK x 2 hours x 98 ∼ 147 MPa. Tensile tests were also performed at the same temperature range. The tensile strength of the bonded W / Cu was almost equal to that of OFHC Cu which was HIPed at the same conditions. Tensile specimens were broken at the bonding interface or OFHC-Cu side. Bonding tests of W and DS-Cu showed that HIP was not successful because tungsten oxide was produced at the bonding interface and residual stresses were not relaxed. Therefore, it was concluded that some insert materials will be needed to bond W and DS-Cu. (author)

  18. Effects of gas-flow structures on radical and etch-product density distributions on wafers in magnetomicrowave plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegawa, Masato; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Fukuyama, Ryoji

    2001-01-01

    To achieve high etch rate, uniformity, good selectivity, and etch profile control across large diameter wafers, the distributions of ions, radicals, and etch products in magnetomicrowave high-etch-rate plasma etching reactors must be accurately controlled. In this work the effects of chamber heights, a focus ring around the wafer, and gas supply structures (or gas flow structures) on the radicals and etch products flux distribution onto the wafer were examined using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and used to determine the optimal reactor geometry. The pressure uniformity on the wafer was less than ±1% when the chamber height was taller than 60 mm. The focus ring around the wafer produced uniform radical and etch-product fluxes but increased the etch-product flux on the wafer. A downward-flow gas-supply structure (type II) produced a more uniform radical distribution than that produced by a radial gas-supply structure (type I). The impact flow of the type II structure removed etch products from the wafer effectively and produced a uniform etch-product distribution even without the focus ring. Thus the downward-flow gas-supply structure (type II) was adopted in the design for the second-generation of a magnetomicrowave plasma etching reactor with a higher etching rate

  19. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  20. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Soto, Leopoldo; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Pavez, Cristian; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Moreno, José; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile))" >Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José; Veloso, Felipe; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; Vergara, Julio; Clausse, Alejandro; Bruzzone, Horacio; Castillo, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10 4 (W/cm 2 )s 1/2 can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules

  1. Apparatus and method for improving electrostatic precipitator performance by plasma reactor conversion of SO.sub.2 to SO.sub.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Gorski, Anthony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process that utilize a low temperature nonequilibrium plasma reactor, for improving the particulate removal efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are disclosed. A portion of the flue gas, that contains a low level of SO.sub.2 O.sub.2 H.sub.2 O, and particulate matter, is passed through a low temperature plasma reactor, which defines a plasma volume, thereby oxidizing a portion of the SO.sub.2 present in the flue gas into SO.sub.3. An SO.sub.2 rich flue gas is thereby generated. The SO.sub.3 rich flue gas is then returned to the primary flow of the flue gas in the exhaust treatment system prior to the ESP. This allows the SO.sub.3 to react with water to form H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 that is in turn is absorbed by fly ash in the gas stream in order to improve the removal efficiency of the EPS.

  2. Synthesis of Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles in radiofrequency thermal plasma reactor and their use for purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feczko, Tivadar; Muskotal, Adel; Gal, Lorand; Szepvoelgyi, Janos; Sebestyen, Anett; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2008-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized in radiofrequency thermal plasma reactor from aqueous solutions of Ni- and Zn-nitrates. The nanoparticles were studied for protein purification performance in both quantitative and qualitative terms. For comparison, experiments were also performed by Ni-charged affinity chromatography. It was proved that the Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles effectively purified histidine-tagged proteins with a maximum protein binding capacity of about 7% (w/w). Gel electrophoresis demonstrated better purification characteristics for magnetic nanoparticles than for affinity chromatography.

  3. Fusion reactor in which the hydrogen plasma is heated, confined, and stabilized by oscillating magnetic fields in the center of a spherical or toroidal reaction vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The two most difficult problems in the tests for controlled nuclear fusion are heating of the plasma to fusion temperature as well as the safe confinement in a magnetic field. According to the invention, low-resistance, low-inductive, iron-free AC compression coils are provided for dealing with these two problems the coils being arranged on the reactor vessel in such a way that both effective heating and a sufficient enclosure time are possible. It is of essential importance in this connection that the coils are fed with a relatively rectangular alternating current, which is variable with respect to frequency and power. (orig./GG) [de

  4. 2nd IAEA research coordination meeting on collection and evaluation of reference data for thermo-mechanical properties of fusion reactor plasma facing materials. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The proceedings and results of the 2nd IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Collection and Evaluation of Reference Data for Thermo-mechanical Properties of Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Materials'' held on March 25, 26 and 27, 1996 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of discussions amongst the participants regarding the status of data, publication of a multi-author review paper and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 1 tab

  5. Mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  6. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  7. Plasma non-uniformity in a symmetric radiofrequency capacitively-coupled reactor with dielectric side-wall: a two dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal

    2018-02-01

    A Cartesian-coordinate two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) plasma simulation code is presented, including a new treatment of charge balance at dielectric boundaries. It is used to simulate an Ar plasma in a symmetric radiofrequency capacitively-coupled parallel-plate reactor with a thick (3.5 cm) dielectric side-wall. The reactor size (12 cm electrode width, 2.5 cm electrode spacing) and frequency (15 MHz) are such that electromagnetic effects can be ignored. The dielectric side-wall effectively shields the plasma from the enhanced electric field at the powered-grounded electrode junction, which has previously been shown to produce locally enhanced plasma density (Dalvie et al 1993 Appl. Phys. Lett. 62 3207-9 Overzet and Hopkins 1993 Appl. Phys. Lett. 63 2484-6 Boeuf and Pitchford 1995 Phys. Rev. E 51 1376-90). Nevertheless, enhanced electron heating is observed in a region adjacent to the dielectric boundary, leading to maxima in ionization rate, plasma density and ion flux to the electrodes in this region, and not at the reactor centre as would otherwise be expected. The axially-integrated electron power deposition peaks closer to the dielectric edge than the electron density. The electron heating components are derived from the PIC/MCC simulations and show that this enhanced electron heating results from increased Ohmic heating in the axial direction as the electron density decreases towards the side-wall. We investigated the validity of different analytical formulas to estimate the Ohmic heating by comparing them to the PIC results. The widespread assumption that a time-averaged momentum transfer frequency, v m , can be used to estimate the momentum change can cause large errors, since it neglects both phase and amplitude information. Furthermore, the classical relationship between the total electron current and the electric field must be used with caution, particularly close to the dielectric edge where the (neglected

  8. Determination of the time evolution of the electron-temperature profile of reactor-like plasmas from the measurement of blackbody electron-cyclotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Bitzer, R.A.; Hosea, J.C.

    1982-04-01

    Plasma characteristics (i.e., n/sub e/ greater than or equal to 1 x 10 13 cm -3 , T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 10 7 0 K, B/sub psi/ greater than or equal to 20 kG) in present and future magnetically confined plasma devices, e.g., Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), meet the conditions for blackbody emission near the electron cyclotron frequency and at few harmonics. These conditions, derived from the hot plasma dielectric tensor, have been verified by propagation experiments on PLT and the Princeton Model-C Stellarator. Blackbody emission near the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic have been observed in PLT and is routinely measured to ascertain the time evolution of the electron temperature profile. These measurements are especially valuable in the study of auxiliary heating of tokamak plasma. Measurement and calibration techniques will also be discussed with special emphasis on our fast-scanning heterodyne receiver concept

  9. Feasibility of arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering methods in cleaning plasma-facing and diagnostics components of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakola, Antti, E-mail: antti.hakola@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Likonen, Jari [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Karhunen, Juuso; Korhonen, Juuso T. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (Finland); Aints, Märt; Laan, Matti; Paris, Peeter [Department of Physics, University of Tartu (Estonia); Kolehmainen, Jukka; Koskinen, Mika; Tervakangas, Sanna [DIARC-Technology Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Feasibility of the arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering techniques in removing deposited layers from ITER-relevant samples demonstrated. • Samples with the size of an A4 paper can be cleaned from 1-μm thick deposited layers in 10–20 minutes by the arc-discharge method. • The plasma-sputtering method is 5–10 times slower but the resulting surfaces are very smooth. • Arc-discharge method could be used for rapid cleaning of plasma-facing components during maintenance shutdowns of ITER, plasma sputtering is preferred for diagnostics mirrors. - Abstract: We have studied the feasibility of arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering methods in removing deposited layers from ITER-relevant test samples. Prototype devices have been designed and constructed for the experiments and the cleaning process is monitored by a spectral detection system. The present version of the arc-discharge device is capable of removing 1-μm thick layers from 350-mm{sup 2} areas in 4–8 s, but due to the increased roughness of the cleaned surfaces and signs of local melting, mirror-like surfaces cannot be treated by this technique. The plasma-sputtering approach, for its part, is some 5–10 times slower in removing the deposited layers but no changes in surface roughness or morphology of the samples could be observed after the cleaning phase. The arc-discharge technique could therefore be used for rapid cleaning of plasma-facing components during maintenance shutdowns of ITER while in the case of diagnostics mirrors plasma sputtering is preferred.

  10. Modified DLC coatings prepared in a large-scale reactor by dual microwave/pulsed-DC plasma-activated chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbella, C.; Bialuch, I.; Kleinschmidt, M.; Bewilogua, K.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films find abundant applications as hard and protective coatings due to their excellent mechanical and tribological performances. The addition of new elements to the amorphous DLC matrix tunes the properties of this material, leading to an extension of its scope of applications. In order to scale up their production to a large plasma reactor, DLC films modified by silicon and oxygen additions have been grown in an industrial plant of 1m 3 by means of pulsed-DC plasma-activated chemical vapour deposition (PACVD). The use of an additional microwave (MW) source has intensified the glow discharge, partly by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), accelerating therefore the deposition process. Hence, acetylene, tetramethylsilane (TMS) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) constituted the respective gas precursors for the deposition of a-C:H (DLC), a-C:H:Si and a-C:H:Si:O films by dual MW/pulsed-DC PACVD. This work presents systematic studies of the deposition rate, hardness, adhesion, abrasive wear and water contact angle aimed to optimize the technological parameters of deposition: gas pressure, relative gas flow of the monomers and input power. This study has been completed with measures of the atomic composition of the samples. Deposition rates around 1 μm/h, typical for standard processes held in the large reactor, were increased about by a factor 10 when the ionization source has been operated in ECR mode

  11. Surveillance of a nuclear reactor core by use of a pattern recognition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invernizzi, Michel.

    1982-07-01

    A pattern recognition system is described for the surveillance of a PWR reactor. This report contains four chapters. The first one succinctly deals with statistical pattern recognition principles. In the second chapter we show how a surveillance problem may be treated by pattern recognition and we present methods for surveillances (detection of abnormalities), controls (kind of running recognition) and diagnotics (kind of abnormality recognition). The third chapter shows a surveillance method of a nuclear plant. The signals used are the neutron noise observations made by the ionization chambers inserted in the reactor. Abnormality is defined in opposition with the training set witch is supposed to be an exhaustive summary of normality. In the fourth chapter we propose a scheme for an adaptative recognition and a method based on classes modelisations by hyper-spheres. This method has been tested on simulated training sets in two-dimensional feature spaces. It gives solutions to problems of non-linear separability [fr

  12. Home brew technetium : clinical scale desktop plasma fusion neutron source to produce Tc99m as an alternative to industrial scale fission reactor sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosi, S.G.; Khachan, J.; Oborn, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Tc-99m (decay product of Mo-99) accounts for ∼ 90% of world's production of radiopharmaceuticals. Recent unexpected shutdowns of two fission reactors and routine maintenance closures .e created a global shortage of Tc-99m, hence the large global effort to find alternative sources. This project aims to design and produce a novel prototype Mo-99/Tc-99m source. An operational desktop neutron source is available at the University of Sydney, employing a deuterium fusion-plasma to create 2.45 MeV neutrons. These neutrons will be used to activate Mo-98 thin an activation vessel. In one embodiment, the activation vessel contains an aqueous slurry or gel containing Mo-98 which converts to 0-99 upon activation. The decay product Tc-99m could then be milked, similar to existing Tc-99m generators. Monte Carlo will be :ed to assess yield versus size and geometry for various vessel designs. The neutron source filled with deuterium operating at 250 W, produces 3 x 106 neutrons continuously. The neutron flux can be increased ∼ 100-fold if the fill gas is 50% tritium and by another ∼ 100-1000-fold by increasing the power. This is being designed for local use, perhaps on the scale f one or a few hospitals, so the yield would not need to be industrial ;ale as with fission reactor sources. This device is low cost <$300 K) compared with cyclotrons and fission reactors.

  13. Possible fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1976-05-01

    A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor

  14. FABRICATION OF CNTS BY TOLUENE DECOMPOSITION IN A NEW REACTOR BASED ON AN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMA JET COUPLED TO A CVD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE RAMÍREZ-HERNÁNDEZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a method to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs based on the coupling between two conventional techniques used for the preparation of nanostructures: an arc-jet as a source of plasma and a chemical vapour deposition (CVD system. We call this system as an “atmospheric pressure plasma (APP-enhanced CVD” (APPE-CVD. This reactor was used to grow CNTs on non-flat aluminosilicate substrates by the decomposition of toluene (carbon source in the presence of ferrocene (as a catalyst. Both, CNTs and by-products of carbon were collected at three different temperatures (780, 820 and 860 °C in different regions of the APPE-CVD system. These samples were analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine the effect of APP on the thermal stability of the as-grown CNTs. It was found that the amount of metal catalyst in the synthesised CNTs is reduced by applying APP, being 820 °C the optimal temperature to produce CNTs with a high yield and carbon purity (95 wt. %. In contrast, when the synthesis temperature was fixed at 780 °C or 860 °C, amorphous carbon or CNTs with different structural defects, respectively, was formed through APEE-CVD reactor. We recommended the use of non-flat aluminosilicate particles as supports to increase CNT yield and facilitate the removal of deposits from the substrate surface. The approach that we implemented (to synthesise CNTs by using the APPE-CVD reactor may be useful to produce these nanostructures on a gram-scale for use in basic studies. The approach may also be scaled up for mass production.

  15. Numerical modelisation of RF waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequency for Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edery, D.; Picq, H.; Samain, A.; Gambier, D.J.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the numerical code ALCYON developed to compute the RF field structure in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The code handles fundamental and second harmonic heating while the mode conversion onto modes of decreasing wavelength is simulated by a selective power absorption on slow waves when their wavelength reaches the mesh size

  16. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors

  17. Use of code DTF-4 for determining the coefficient of back-reflection of the neutron within the thermonuclear plasma of a thermonuclear reactor controlled by the rate of the fission reactions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristea, G.

    1975-01-01

    The neutron problems are discussed of the thermonuclear reactor controlled by the rate of the fission reactions. The results obtained by rolling the DTF-4 program in a spherical geometry in the case of an ''external source'' problem permit to draw conclusions concerning the problems of the neutronics system of this thermonuclear reactor type. A relation is deduced for estimating the coefficient of back-reflection of the neutrons within the thermonuclear plasma and the focussion system is discussed of the neutronics of this reactor type

  18. The role of the neutral beam fueling profile in the performance of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and other tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Scalings for the stored energy and neutron yield, determined from experimental data are applied to both deuterium-only and deuterium-tritium plasmas in different neutral beam heated operational domains in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The domain of the data considered includes the Supershot, High poloidal beta, Low-mode, and limiter High-mode operational regimes, as well as discharges with a reversed magnetic shear configuration. The new important parameter in the present scaling is the peakedness of the heating beam fueling profile shape. Ion energy confinement and neutron production are relatively insensitive to other plasma parameters compared to the beam fueling peakedness parameter and the heating beam power when considering plasmas that are stable to magnetohydrodynamic modes. However, the stored energy of the electrons is independent of the beam fueling peakedness. The implication of the scalings based on this parameter is related to theoretical transport models such as radial electric field shear and Ion Temperature Gradient marginality models. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks

  19. The structure and thermal properties of plasma-sprayed beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Bartlett, A.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being studied for in situ repair of damaged Be and W plasma facing surfaces for ITER, the next generation magnetic fusion energy device, and is also being considered for fabricating Be and W plasma-facing components for the first wall of ITER. Investigators at LANL's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility have concentrated on investigating the structure-property relation between as-deposited microstructures of plasma sprayed Be coatings and resulting thermal properties. In this study, the effect of initial substrate temperature on resulting thermal diffusivity of Be coatings and the thermal diffusivity at the coating/Be substrate interface (interface thermal resistance) was investigated. Results show that initial Be substrate temperatures above 600 C can improve the thermal diffusivity of the Be coatings and minimize any thermal resistance at the interface between the Be coating and Be substrate

  20. Fusion reactor development: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current prospects for fusion reactor development based upon the present status in plasma physics research, fusion technology development and reactor conceptual design for the tokamak magnetic confinement concept. Recent advances in tokamak plasma research and fusion technology development are summarized. The direction and conclusions of tokamak reactor conceptual design are discussed. The status of alternate magnetic confinement concept research is reviewed briefly. A feasible timetable for the development of fusion reactors is presented

  1. Roles of individual radicals generated by a submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor during Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Saiful Islam [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Ji, E-mail: yunji@kfri.re.kr [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor (underwater DBD) has been used on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 35150). Plasma treatment was carried out using clean dry air gas to investigate the individual effects of the radicals produced by underwater DBD on an E. coli O157:H7 suspension (8.0 log CFU/ml). E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 6.0 log CFU/ml for 2 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment. Optical Emission Spectra (OES) shows that OH and NO (α, β) radicals, generated by underwater DBD along with ozone gas. E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by 2.3 log CFU/ml for 10 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment with the terephthalic acid (TA) OH radical scavenger solution, which is significantly lower (3.7 log CFU/ml) than the result obtained without using the OH radical scavenger. A maximum of 1.5 ppm of ozone gas was produced during the discharge of underwater DBD, and the obtained reduction difference in E.coli O157:H7 in presence and in absence of ozone gas was 1.68 log CFU/ml. The remainder of the 0.62 log CFU/ml reduction might be due to the effect of the NO (α, β) radicals or due to the combined effect of all the radicals produced by underwater DBD. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide was also generated but does not play any role in E. coli O157:H7 inactivation.

  2. Application of Response Surface Methodology for characterization of ozone production from Multi-Cylinder Reactor in non-thermal plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian See, Tan; Zulazlan Shah Zulkifli, Ahmad; Mook Tzeng, Lim

    2018-04-01

    Ozone is a reactant which can be applied for various environmental treatment processes. It can be generated via atmospheric air non-thermal plasmas when sufficient voltages are applied through a combination of electrodes and dielectric materials. In this study, the concentration of ozone generated via two different configurations of multi-cylinder dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor (3 x 40 mm and 10 x 10 mm) was investigated. The influence of the voltage and the duty cycle to the concentration of ozone generated by each configuration was analysed using response surface methodology. Voltage was identified as significant factor to the ozone production process. However, the regressed model was biased towards one of the configuration, leaving the predicted results of another configuration to be out of range.

  3. Treatment of spent ion-exchange resins in shaft-type reactor with fuel-plasma source of heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S. A.; Knyazev, I. A.; Lifanov, F. A.; Polkanov, M. A.; Shvetsov, S. Yu; Savkin, A. E.

    1999-01-01

    The method of high-temperature conditioning the spent radioactive ion-exchange resins in combination with other combustible and incombustible radioactive waste in the plasma shaft furnace with obtaining a crystalline glass-like matrix as a final product has been developed. The method was tested on the pilot plant consisted of ceramic plasma melter, steel water-cooled shaft furnace, lined by fire-resistant concrete, and system of gas purification. The capacity of the furnace was within the limits from 10 to 15 kg/h. The volume and mass reduction factors of treated waste were 36 and 7.6, accordingly. The content of gaseous products of thermal decomposition of a waste at an output of the shaft furnace and properties of obtained slag compound were determined. Based on test results the proposals on creation of compact plasma plant for treatment of mixed radioactive waste including spent ion exchange resins were developed. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Fusion reactor problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    It is pointed out that plasma parameters for a fusion reactor have been fairly accurately defined for many years, and the real plasma physics objective must be to find the means of achieving and maintaining these specifiable parameters. There is good understanding of the generic technological problems: breading blankets and shields, radiation damage, heat transfer and methods of magnet design. The required plasma parameters for fusion self-heated reactors are established at ntausub(E) approximately 2.10 14 cm -3 sec, plasma radius 1.5 to 3 m, wall loading 5 to 10 MW cm -2 , temperature 15 keV. Within this model plasma control by quasi-steady burn as a key problem is studied. It is emphasized that the future programme must interact more closely with engineering studies and should concentrate upon research which is relevant to reactor plasmas. (V.P.)

  5. Investigation of applications for high-power, self-critical fissioning uranium plasma reactors. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, R.J.; Latham, T.S.; Krascella, N.L.

    1976-09-01

    Analytical studies were conducted to investigate potentially attractive applications for gaseous nuclear cavity reactors fueled by uranium hexafluoride and its decomposition products at temperatures of 2000 to 6000 K and total pressures of a few hundred atmospheres. Approximate operating conditions and performance levels for a class of nuclear reactors in which fission energy removal is accomplished principally by radiant heat transfer from the high temperature gaseous nuclear fuel to surrounding absorbing media were determined. The results show the radiant energy deposited in the absorbing media may be efficiently utilized in energy conversion system applications which include (1) a primary energy source for high thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) an energy source for highly efficient generation of electricity, and (3) a source of high intensity photon flux for heating working fluid gases for hydrogen production or MHD power extraction. (Author)

  6. A study on the fusion reactor - Development of x-ray spectrometer for diagnosis of tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hong Young; Choi, Duk In; Seo, Sung Hun; Kwon, Gi Chung; Jun, Sang Jin; Heo, Sung Hoi; Lee, Chan Hui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technolgoy, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    This report of research is on the development of X-ray Photo-Electron Spectrometer (PES) for diagnosis of tokamak plasma. The spectrometer utilizes the fact that the energy of photo-electron is given by the difference between the energy of X-ray and the binding energy of materials. In the research of this year, we constructed two spectrometers; one is operated in KAIST tokamak and the other in KT1 tokamak. In addition, we reviewed the characteristics of the x-ray filter, the photo-electric effect of carbon foils and the detection efficiency of MCP and x-ray radiation of plasma. We measured the x-ray radiation in tokamak and diagnosed the qualitative plasma parameters from the analysis of data. The major interesting plasma parameters, which we can diagnose with the spectrometer, are the electron temperature, Z{sub eff}, the spatial distribution of x-ray radiation and etc. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 20 figs. (author)

  7. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  8. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  9. Decomposition of methane to hydrogen using nanosecond pulsed plasma reactor with different active volumes, voltages and frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalifeh, Omid; Mosallanejad, Amin; Taghvaei, Hamed; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Shariati, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CH 4 conversion into H 2 is investigated in a nanosecond pulsed DBD reactor. • The absence of CO and CO 2 in the product gas is highly favorable. • Effects of external electrode length, applied voltage and frequency are examined. • The maximum efficiency of 7.23% is achieved at the electrode length of 15 cm. • The maximum CH 4 conversion of 87.2% is obtained at discharge power 268.92 W. - Abstract: In this paper, the methane conversion into hydrogen is investigated experimentally in a nanosecond pulsed DBD reactor. In order to achieve pure hydrogen production with minimum power consumption, effects of some operating parameters including external electrode length, applied voltage and pulse repetition frequency have been evaluated. Results show that although higher CH 4 conversion and H 2 concentration can be obtained at longer electrode lengths, higher applied voltages and pulse repetition frequencies, these parameters should be optimized for efficient hydrogen production. Actually, the maximum CH 4 conversion of 87.2% and maximum hydrogen percentage of 80% are obtained at the external electrode length, discharge power, voltage and frequency of 15 cm, 268.92 W, 12 kV and 10 kHz, respectively. However, the maximum efficiency of 7.23% is achieved at the external electrode length of 15 cm, applied voltage of 6 kV, pulse repetition frequency of 0.9 kHz and discharge power of 4 W. Furthermore, at this condition, due to low temperature of discharge zone very little amount of solid carbon was observed on the inner electrode surface of the reactor.

  10. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  11. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  12. Two approaches to the reactor-relevant high-beta plasmas with profile control in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Sakakibara, S.

    2008-10-01

    From detailed optimization of configuration, volume averaged beta ∼ 5% has been achieved in the Large Helical Device(LHD). While the heating efficiency was the main point to be optimized in this approach, to form a more peaked pressure profile is another promising approach towards the high beta regime. A higher electron density profile with a steeper pressure gradient has been formed by pellet injection. From the MHD stability analysis, this peaked pressure profile is stable against the ideal MHD modes. By both approaches, the central plasma β 0 reaches about 10%. (author)

  13. Treatment of methyl orange by nitrogen non-thermal plasma in a corona reactor: The role of reactive nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadorin, Bruno Mena, E-mail: brunomenacadorin@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Tralli, Vitor Douglas [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Ceriani, Elisa [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Benetoli, Luís Otávio de Brito [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Marotta, Ester, E-mail: ester.marotta@unipd.it [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Ceretta, Claudio [Department of Industrial Engineering, Università di Padova (Italy); Debacher, Nito Angelo [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Paradisi, Cristina [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Nitration of methyl orange is one of the main processes in treatment with N{sub 2}-plasma. • MS/MS analysis shows preferred nitration of methyl orange in ortho position. • N{sub 2} plasma, N{sub 2}-PAW, reaction with NO{sub 2}{sup −} or NO{sub 2}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 give the same products. - Abstract: Methyl orange (MO) azo dye served as model organic pollutant to investigate the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in non-thermal plasma (NTP) induced water treatments. The results of experiments in which MO aqueous solutions were directly exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP are compared with those of control experiments in which MO was allowed to react with nitrite, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide, which are species formed in water exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Treatment of MO was also performed in PAW, Plasma Activated Water, that is water previously exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Both direct N{sub 2}-NTP and N{sub 2}-PAW treatments induced the rapid decay of MO. No appreciable reaction was instead observed when MO was treated with NO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} either under acidic or neutral pH. In contrast, in acidic solutions MO decayed rapidly when treated with NO{sub 2}{sup −} and with a combination of NO{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thorough product analysis was carried out by HPLC coupled with UV–vis and ESI–MS/MS detectors. In all experiments in which MO reaction was observed, the major primary product was a derivative nitro-substituted at the ortho position with respect to the N,N-dimethylamino group of MO. The reactions of RNS are discussed and a mechanism for the observed nitration products is proposed.

  14. Modeling of acoustic wave propagation and scattering for telemetry of complex structures; Modelisation de la propagation et de l'interaction d'une onde acoustique pour la telemetrie de structures complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LU, B.

    2011-11-07

    This study takes place in the framework of tools development for the telemetry simulation. Telemetry is a possible technology applied to monitoring the sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and consists in positioning in the reactor core a transducer to generate an ultrasonic beam. This beam propagates through an inhomogeneous random medium since temperature fluctuations occur in the liquid sodium and consequently the sound velocity fluctuates as well, which modifies the bream propagation. Then the beam interacts with a reactor structure immersed in sodium. By measuring the time of flight of the backscattered echo received by the same transducer, one can determine the precise location of the structure. The telemetry simulation therefore requires modeling of both the acoustic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous random medium and the interaction of this wave with structures of various shapes; this is the objective of this work. A stochastic model based on a Monte Carlo algorithm is developed in order to take into account the random fluctuations of the acoustic field. The acoustic field through an inhomogeneous random medium is finally modeled from the field calculated in a mean homogeneous medium by modifying the travel times of rays in the homogeneous medium, using a correction provided by the stochastic model. This stochastic propagation model has been validated by comparison with a deterministic model and is much simpler to integrate in the CIVA software platform for non destructive evaluation simulation and less time consuming than the deterministic model. In order to model the interaction between the acoustic wave and the immersed structures, classical diffraction models have been evaluated for rigid structures, including the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). These two approaches appear to be complementary. Combining them so as to retain only their advantages, we have developed a hybrid model (the so-called refined KA

  15. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  16. Dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities

  17. Simulation of lower hybrid current drive in enhanced reversed shear plasmas in the tokamak fusion test reactor using the lower hybrid simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Enhanced Reversed Shear (ERS) mode has already shown great potential for improving the performance of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and other devices. Sustaining the ERS, however, remains an outstanding problem. Lower hybrid (LH) current drive is a possible method for modifying the current profile and controlling its time evolution. To predict its effectiveness in TFTR, the Lower Hybrid Simulation Code (LSC) model is used in the TRANSP code and the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC). Among the results from the simulations are the following. (1) Single-pass absorption is expected in TFTR ERS plasmas. The simulations show that the LH current follows isotherms of the electron temperature. The ability to control the location of the minimum in the q profile (q min ) has been demonstrated by varying the phase velocity of the launched LH waves and observing the change in the damping location. (2) LH current drive can been used to sustain the q min location. The tendency of qmin to drift inward, as the inductive current diffuses during the formation phase of the reversed shear discharge, is prevented by the LH current driven at a fixed radial location. If this results in an expanded plasma volume with improved confinement as high power neutral beam injection is applied, the high bootstrap currents induced during this phase can then maintain the larger qmin radius. (3) There should be no LH wave damping on energetic beam particles. The values of perpendicular index of refraction in the calculations never exceed about 20, while ions at TFR injection energies are resonant with waves having values closer to 100. Other issues being addressed in the study include the LH current drive efficiency in the presence of high bootstrap currents, and the effect of fast electron diffusion on LH current localization

  18. A study on the nuclear fusion reactor - Development of the neutral particle analyzer for the measurement of plasma temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hee Dong [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Sung [Taegu University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    For measurements of the plasma ion temperature of KT-1 tokamak the charge exchange neutral particle analyzer was made. The NPA was contain stripping cell, cylinderical electrostatic plate type energy analyzer, and detector. The stripping cell has three beam path. The one is empty, the one is covered with Ni-mesh, and the other is covered with Ni-mesh and carbon foil. The mesh no. of the Ni-mesh is 70 lines/inch and the thickness of the carbon foil is 50 A . The radii of the cylinderical plate of the energy analyzer are 112 mm, 95 mm, and the height of the plate is 50 mm. The voltage of the plate is 0 {approx} 1 kV. The ion and neutral particle detector are channeltron (Galileo 4839). 36 refs., 1 tab., 43 figs. (author)

  19. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  20. Field Performance Test of an Air-Cleaner with Photocatalysis-Plasma Synergistic Reactors for Practical and Long-Term Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ochiai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A practical and long-term usable air-cleaner based on the synergy of photocatalysis and plasma treatments has been developed. A field test of the air-cleaner was carried out in an office smoking room. The results were compared to previously reported laboratory test results. Even after a treatment of 12,000 cigarettes-worth of tobacco smoke, the air-cleaner maintained high-level air-purification activity (98.9% ± 0.1% and 88% ± 1% removal of the total suspended particulate (TSP and total volatile organic compound (TVOC concentrations, respectively at single-pass conditions. Although the removal ratio of TSP concentrations was 98.6% ± 0.2%, the ratio of TVOC concentrations was 43.8% after a treatment of 21,900 cigarettes-worth of tobacco smoke in the field test. These results indicate the importance of suitable maintenance of the reactors in the air-cleaner during field use.

  1. Effect of ambient pressure on the crystalline phase of nano TiO2 particles synthesized by a dc thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, I.; Karmakar, Soumen; Kulkarni, Naveen V.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.; Bhoraskar, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) with varying percentages of anatase and rutile phases is reported. This was achieved by controlling the operating pressure in a transferred-arc, direct current thermal plasma reactor in which titanium vapors are evaporated, and then exposed to ambient oxygen. The average particle size remained around 15 nm in each case. The crystalline structure of the as-synthesized nanoparticles of TiO 2 was studied with X-ray diffraction analysis; whereas the particle morphology was investigated with the help of transmission electron microscopy. The precursor species responsible for the growth of these nanoparticles was studied with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. As inferred from the X-ray diffraction analysis, the relative abundance of anatase TiO 2 was found to be dominant when synthesized at 760 Torr, and the same showed a decreasing trend with decreasing chamber pressure. The study also reveals that anatase TiO 2 is a more effective photocatalytic agent in degrading methylene blue by comparison to its rutile phase.

  2. Processing of W-Cu functionally graded materials (FGM) through the powder metallurgy route: application as plasma facing components for ITER-like thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raharijaona, J.J.

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to study and optimize the sintering of W-Cu graded composition materials, for first wall of ITER-like thermonuclear reactor application. The graded composition in the material generates graded functional properties (Functionally Graded Materials - FGM). Rough thermomechanical calculations have shown the interest of W-Cu FGM to improve the lifetime of Plasma Facing Components (PFC). To process W-Cu FGM, powder metallurgy route was analyzed and optimized from W-CuO powder mixtures. The influence of oxide reduction on the sintering of powder mixtures was highlighted. An optimal heating treatment under He/H 2 atmosphere was determined. The sintering mechanisms were deduced from the analysis of the effect of the Cu-content. Sintering of W-Cu materials with a graded composition and grain size has revealed two liquid migration steps: i) capillary migration, after the Cu-melting and, ii) expulsion of liquid, at the end of sintering, from the dense part to the porous part, due to the continuation of W-skeleton sintering. These two steps were confirmed by a model based on capillary pressure calculation. In addition, thermal conductivity measurements were conducted on sintered parts and showed values which gradually increase with the Cu-content. Hardness tests on a polished cross-section in the bulk are consistent with the composition profiles obtained and the differential grain size. (author)

  3. Determination of low cadmium concentrations in wine by on-line preconcentration in a knotted reactor coupled to an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer with ultrasonic nebulization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, R.F. [Inst. de Investigaciones Mineras, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Wuilloud, R.G.; Salonia, J.A. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, National University of San Luis (Argentina); Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, National University of San Luis (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2001-12-01

    An on-line cadmium preconcentration and determination system implemented with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) associated to flow injection (FI) with ultrasonic nebulization system (USN) was studied. The cadmium was retained as the cadmium-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol, Cd-(5-Br-PADAP), complex, at pH 9.5. The cadmium complex was removed from the knotted reactor (KR) with 3.0 mol/L nitric acid. A total enhancement factor of 216 was obtained with respect to ICP-OES using pneumatic nebulization (12 for USN and 18 for KR) with a preconcentration time of 60 s. The value of the detection limit for the preconcentration of 5 mL of sample solution was 5 ng/L. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 5 {mu}g/L Cd level was 2.9% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for cadmium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 1000 {mu}g/L. The method was successfully applied to the determination of cadmium in wine samples. (orig.)

  4. Final Report for the Demonstration of Plasma In-situ Vitrification at the 904-65G K-Reactor Seepage Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blundy, R.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Zionkowki, P.G.

    1997-12-22

    The In-situ Vitrification (ISV) process potentially offers the most stable waste-form for containment of radiologically contaminated soils while minimizing personnel contamination. This is a problem that is extensive, and at the same time unique, to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex. An earlier ISV process utilized joule heating of the soil to generate the subsurface molten glass product. However previous test work has indicated that the Savannah river Site soils (SRS) may not be entirely suitable for vitrification by joule heating due to their highly refractory nature. The concept of utilizing a plasma torch for soil remediation by in-situ vitrification has recently been developed, and laboratory test work on a 100 kW unit has indicated a potentially successful application with SRS soils. The Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) conducted the first field scale demonstration of this process at the (904-65G) K-Reactor Seepage Basin in October 1996 with the intention of determining the applicability and economics of the process for remediation of a SRS radioactive seepage basin. The demonstration was successful in completing three vitrification runs, including two consecutive runs that fused together adjacent columns of glass to form a continuous monolith. This report describes the demonstration, documents the engineering data that was obtained, summarizes the process economics and makes recommendations for future development of the process and equipment.

  5. Final Report for the Demonstration of Plasma In-situ Vitrification at the 904-65G K-Reactor Seepage Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundy, R.F.; Zionkowki, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    The In-situ Vitrification (ISV) process potentially offers the most stable waste-form for containment of radiologically contaminated soils while minimizing personnel contamination. This is a problem that is extensive, and at the same time unique, to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Complex. An earlier ISV process utilized joule heating of the soil to generate the subsurface molten glass product. However previous test work has indicated that the Savannah river Site soils (SRS) may not be entirely suitable for vitrification by joule heating due to their highly refractory nature. The concept of utilizing a plasma torch for soil remediation by in-situ vitrification has recently been developed, and laboratory test work on a 100 kW unit has indicated a potentially successful application with SRS soils. The Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) conducted the first field scale demonstration of this process at the (904-65G) K-Reactor Seepage Basin in October 1996 with the intention of determining the applicability and economics of the process for remediation of a SRS radioactive seepage basin. The demonstration was successful in completing three vitrification runs, including two consecutive runs that fused together adjacent columns of glass to form a continuous monolith. This report describes the demonstration, documents the engineering data that was obtained, summarizes the process economics and makes recommendations for future development of the process and equipment

  6. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, J.D.; Stasko, R.R.

    1989-09-01

    An international design team comprised of members from Canada, Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States of America, are designing an experimental fusion test reactor. The engineering and testing objectives of this International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are to validate the design and to demonstrate controlled ignition, extended burn of a deuterium and tritium plasma, and achieve steady state using technology expected to be available by 1990. The concept maximizes flexibility while allowing for a variety of plasma configurations and operating scenarios. During physics phase operation, the machine produces a 22 MA plasma current. In the technology phase, the machine can be reconfigured with a thicker shield and a breeding blanket to operate with an 18 MA plasma current at a major radius of 5.5 meters. Canada's involvement in the areas of safety, facility design, reactor configuration and maintenance builds on our internationally recognized design and operational expertise in developing tritium processes and CANDU related technologies

  7. Partially ionized plasmas including the third symposium on uranium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, M. [ed.

    1976-09-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 28 papers on electrically generated plasmas, fission generated plasmas, nuclear pumped lasers, gaseous fuel reactor research, and applications. Five papers have been previously abstracted and included in ERA.

  8. Effect of Catalyst Pellet-Diameter and Basicity on Transesterification of Soybean Oil into Biodiesel using K2O/CaO-ZnO Catalyst over Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi I.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to study the effect of catalyst pellet-diameter and catalyst basicity on the transesterification process of soybean oil into biodiesel over a hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor. Various catalyst diameters (3, 5, and 7 mm were tested in this reaction system. Catalyst basicity was also examined by comparing fresh and used catalyst as well as with and without K2O promoter. All catalysts testing were performed in a hybrid plasma-catalytic reactor (dielectric barrier discharge – DBD type. From the results, the synergistic effects roles of the catalyst and the plasma in the transesterification process are important, in which the energetic electrons within plasma assist the reaction on the catalyst surface by an exciting bonded electron. The catalyst basicity was influenced by the composition of CaO on the catalyst as well as roles of the alkaline K2O promoter. Catalyst basicity is important in producing biodiesel with high performance. Yield of fatty acid alkyl ester (FAAE or biodiesel is slightly influenced by the catalyst diameter within the range of diameter studied.

  9. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  10. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  11. Fueling by coaxial plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the operational characteristics of ''snowplow'' and ''deflagration'' coaxial plasma guns is given. The injection of these plasmas into containment fields is discussed. The effect of a background plasma on low-beta injection is mentioned. The use of high-beta injection for reactor plasmas is described

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990

  14. Plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, R.

    1989-01-01

    Successful plasma heating is essential in present fusion experiments, for the demonstration of DpT burn in future devices and finally for the fusion reactor itself. This paper discusses the common heating systems with respect to their present performance and their applicability to future fusion devices. The comparative discussion is oriented to the various function of heating, which are: - plasma heating to fusion-relevant parameters and to ignition in future machines, -non-inductive, steady-pstate current drive, - plasma profile control, -neutral gas breakdown and plasma build-up. In view of these different functions, the potential of neutral beam injection (NBI) and the various schemes of wave heating (ECRH, LH, ICRH and Alven wave heating) is analyzed in more detail. The analysis includes assessments of the present physical and technical state of these heating methods, and makes suggestions for future developments and about outstanding problems. Specific attention is given to the still critical problem of efficient current drive, especially with respect to further extrapolation towards an economically operating tokamak reactor. Remarks on issues such as reliability, maintenance and economy conclude this comparative overview on plasma heating systems. (author). 43 refs.; 13 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. Design concept of conducting shell and in-vessel components suitable for plasma vertical stability and remote maintenance scheme in DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Tobita, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); Mori, Kazuo; Kudo, Tatsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto; Tokunaga, Shinsuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of in-vessel component including conducting shell has been investigated. • The conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability was clarified from the plasma vertical stability analysis. • The calculation results showed that the double-loop shell has the most effect on plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: In order to realize a feasible DEMO, we designed an in-vessel component including the conducting shell. The project is affiliated with the broader approach DEMO design activities and is conceptualized from a plasma vertical stability and engineering viewpoint. The dependence of the plasma vertical stability on the conducing shell parameters and the electromagnetic force at plasma disruption were investigated in numerical simulations (programmed in the 3D eddy current analysis code and a plasma position control code). The simulations assumed the actual shape and position of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components. The plasma vertical stability was most effectively maintained by the double-loop shell.

  16. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  17. Compression-absorption (resorption) refrigerating machinery. Modeling of reactors; Machine frigorifique a compression-absorption (resorption). Modelisation des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, O; Feidt, M; Benelmir, R [LEMTA-UHP Nancy-1, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1998-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies presenting a comparative study of the thermal performances of different types of refrigerating machineries: di-thermal with vapor compression, tri-thermal with moto-compressor, with ejector, with free piston, adsorption-type, resorption-type, absorption-type, compression-absorption-type. A prototype of ammonia-water compression-absorption heat pump is presented and modeled. (J.S.)

  18. Compression-absorption (resorption) refrigerating machinery. Modeling of reactors; Machine frigorifique a compression-absorption (resorption). Modelisation des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, O.; Feidt, M.; Benelmir, R. [LEMTA-UHP Nancy-1, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies presenting a comparative study of the thermal performances of different types of refrigerating machineries: di-thermal with vapor compression, tri-thermal with moto-compressor, with ejector, with free piston, adsorption-type, resorption-type, absorption-type, compression-absorption-type. A prototype of ammonia-water compression-absorption heat pump is presented and modeled. (J.S.)

  19. Modelisation de la diffusion sur les surfaces metalliques: De l'adatome aux processus de croissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Ghyslain

    Cette these est consacree a l'etude des processus de diffusion en surface dans le but ultime de comprendre, et de modeliser, la croissance d'une couche mince. L'importance de bien mai triser la croissance est primordiale compte tenu de son role dans la miniaturisation des circuits electroniques. Nous etudions ici les surface des metaux nobles et de ceux de la fin de la serie de transition. Dans un premier temps, nous nous interessons a la diffusion d'un simple adatome sur une surface metallique. Nous avons, entre autres, mis en evidence l'apparition d'une correlation entre evenements successifs lorsque la temperature est comparable a la barriere de diffusion, i.e., la diffusion ne peut pas etre associee a une marche aleatoire. Nous proposons un modele phenomenologique simple qui reproduit bien les resultats des simulations. Ces calculs nous ont aussi permis de montrer que la diffusion obeit a la loi de Meyer-Neldel. Cette loi stipule que, pour un processus active, le prefacteur augmente exponentiellement avec la barriere. En plus, ce travail permet de clarifier l'origine physique de cette loi. En comparant les resultats dynamiques aux resultats statiques, on se rend compte que la barriere extraite des calculs dynamiques est essentiellement la meme que celle obtenue par une approche statique, beaucoup plus simple. On peut donc obtenir cette barriere a l'aide de methodes plus precises, i.e., ab initio, comme la theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite, qui sont aussi malheureusement beaucoup plus lourdes. C'est ce que nous avons fait pour plusieurs systemes metalliques. Nos resultats avec cette derniere approche se comparent tres bien aux resultats experimentaux. Nous nous sommes attardes plus longuement a la surface (111) du platine. Cette surface regorge de particularites interessantes, comme la forme d'equilibre non-hexagonale des i lots et deux sites d'adsorption differents pour l'adatome. De plus, des calculs ab initio precedents n'ont pas reussi a confirmer la

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  1. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  2. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  3. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  4. Alushta-2012. International Conference-School on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion and the Adjoint Workshop 'Nano-and micro-sized structures in plasmas'. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlaj, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Conference was devoted to a new valuable information about the present status of plasma physics and controlled fusion research. The main topics was : magnetic confinement systems; plasma heating and current drive; ITER and fusion reactor aspects; basic plasma physics; space plasma; plasma dynamics and plasma-wall interaction; plasma electronics; low temperature plasma and plasma technologies; plasma diagnostics; formation of nano-and micro-sized structures in plasmas; properties of plasmas with nano- and micro- objects

  5. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  6. Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveryaev, V [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); others, and

    2012-09-15

    The success in achieving peaceful fusion power depends on the ability to control a high temperature plasma, which is an object with unique properties, possibly the most complicated object created by humans. Over years of fusion research a new branch of science has been created, namely plasma diagnostics, which involves knowledge of almost all fields of physics, from electromagnetism to nuclear physics, and up-to-date progress in engineering and technology (materials, electronics, mathematical methods of data treatment). Historically, work on controlled fusion started with pulsed systems and accordingly the methods of plasma parameter measurement were first developed for short lived and dense plasmas. Magnetically confined hot plasmas require the creation of special experimental techniques for diagnostics. The diagnostic set is the most scientifically intensive part of a plasma device. During many years of research operation some scientific tasks have been solved while new ones arose. New tasks often require significant changes in the diagnostic system, which is thus a very flexible part of plasma machines. Diagnostic systems are designed to solve several tasks. As an example here are the diagnostic tasks for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER: (1) Measurements for machine protection and basic control; (2) Measurements for advanced control; (3) Additional measurements for performance evaluation and physics. Every new plasma machine is a further step along the path to the main goal - controlled fusion - and nobody knows in advance what new phenomena will be met on the way. So in the planning of diagnostic construction we should keep in mind further system upgrading to meet possible new scientific and technical challenges. (author)

  7. High-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics

  8. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection

  9. Field-reversed mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor design is a multicell arrangement wherein a series of field-reversed plasma layers are arranged along the axis of a long superconducting solenoid which provides the background magnetic field. Normal copper mirror coils and Ioffe bars placed at the first wall radius provide shallow axial and radial magnetic wells for each plasma layer. Each of 11 plasma layers requires the injection of 3.6 MW of 200 keV deuterium and tritium and produces 20 MW of fusion power. The reactor has a net electric output of 74 MWe and an estimated direct capital cost of $1200/kWe

  10. Moving ring reactor 'Karin-1'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The conceptual design of a moving ring reactor ''Karin-1'' has been carried out to advance fusion system design, to clarify the research and development problems, and to decide their priority. In order to attain these objectives, a D-T reactor with tritium breeding blanket is designed, a commercial reactor with net power output of 500 MWe is designed, the compatibility of plasma physics with fusion engineering is demonstrated, and some other guideline is indicated. A moving ring reactor is composed mainly of three parts. In the first formation section, a plasma ring is formed and heated up to ignition temperature. The plasma ring of compact torus is transported from the formation section through the next burning section to generate fusion power. Then the plasma ring moves into the last recovery section, and the energy and particles of the plasma ring are recovered. The outline of a moving ring reactor ''Karin-1'' is described. As a candidate material for the first wall, SiC was adopted to reduce the MHD effect and to minimize the interaction with neutrons and charged particles. The thin metal lining was applied to the SiC surface to solve the problem of the compatibility with lithium blanket. Plasma physics, the engineering aspect and the items of research and development are described. (Kako, I.)

  11. General directions and recently test modelling results of lithium capillary-pore systems as plasma facing components for tokamak-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evtikhin, V.A.; Lyublinski, I.E.; Vertkov, A.V.; Azizov, E.A.; Mirnov, S.V.; Lazaret, V.B.; Safronov, V.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At present the most promising principal solution of the divertor problem appears to be the use of liquid metals and primarily of lithium Capillary-Pore Systems (CPS) as of plasma facing material. A solid CPS filled with liquid lithium will have high resistance to surface and volume damage because of neutron radiation effects, melting, splashing and thermal stress induced cracking in steady state and during plasma transitions (disruptions, ELMs, VDEs, runaways) to provide the normal operation of divertor target plates and first wall protection elements. These materials would not be the sources of impurities inducing the raise of Z eff and they will not be collected as dust in the divertor area and in ducts. The key directions of experimental investigation of lithium CPS behaviour in first wall and divertor operation simulating conditions are considered. Experiments with lithium CPS in plasma disruption simulation conditions on the hydrogen plasma accelerator MK-200UG (∼10-15 MJ/m 2 , ∼50 μs) have been performed. Shielding lithium plasma layer formation and high stability of these systems have been shown. The new lithium limiter with a thermal regulation system tests on up graded T-11M tokamak (plasma current up to 100 kA, pulse length ∼0.3 s) have been performed. Sorption and desorption of plasma-forming gas, lithium emission into discharge, lithium erosion, limiter deposited power are investigated in this tests

  12. Influence of Impurities on the Fuel Retention in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retentionin metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors.This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogenretention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ionenergy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma compositionis a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma willalso ...

  13. Compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants is discussed, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First, the existing literature is reviewed and summarized. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamaks power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field and by considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. Third, the analytic results are augmented by a numerical calculation that permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency and different confinement scaling relationships. Throughout, the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculation of electric power. The latest published reactor studies show little advantage in using low aspect ratios to obtain a more compact device (and a low cost of electricity) unless either remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, or unless confinement (the H factor), the permissible elongation and the permissible neutron wall loading increase as the aspect ratio is reduced. These results are reproduced with the analytic model. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  14. Modelisation numerique et validation experimentale d'un systeme de protection contre le givre par elements piezoelectriques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Derek

    Le degivrage au moyen d'actuateurs piezoelectriques est considere comme une avenue prometteuse pour le developpement de systemes a faible consommation d'energie applicables aux helicopteres legers. Ce type de systeme excite des frequences de resonances d'une structure pour produire des deformations suffisantes pour rompre l'adherence de la glace. Par contre, la conception de tel systeme demeure generalement mal comprise. Ce projet de maitrise etudie l'utilisation de methodes numeriques pour assister la conception des systemes de protection contre le givre a base d'elements piezoelectriques. La methodologie retenue pour ce projet a ete de modeliser differentes structures simples et de simuler l'excitation harmonique des frequences de resonance au moyen d'actuateurs piezoelectriques. Le calcul des frequences de resonances ainsi que la simulation de leur excitation a ensuite ete validee a l'aide de montages experimentaux. La procedure a ete realisee pour une poutre en porte-a-faux et pour une plaque plane a l'aide du logiciel de calcul par elements finis, Abaqus. De plus, le modele de la plaque plane a ete utilise afin de realiser une etude parametrique portant sur le positionnement des actuateurs, l'effet de la rigidite ainsi que de l'epaisseur de la plaque. Finalement, la plaque plane a ete degivree en chambre climatique. Des cas de degivrage ont ete simules numeriquement afin d'etudier la possibilite d'utiliser un critere base sur la deformation pour predire le succes du systeme. La validation experimentale a confirme la capacite du logiciel a calculer precisement a la fois les frequences et les modes de resonance d'une structure et a simuler leur excitation par des actuateurs piezoelectriques. L'etude revele que la definition de l'amortissement dans le modele numerique est essentiel pour l'obtention de resultats precis. Les resultats de l'etude parametrique ont demontre l'importance de minimiser l'epaisseur et la rigidite afin de reduire la valeur des frequences

  15. Plasma Process Modeling for Integrated Circuits Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    M. Meyyappan; T. R. Govindan

    1998-01-01

    A reactor model for plasma-based deposition and etching is presented. Two-dimensional results are discussed in terms of plasma density, ion flux, and ion energy. Approaches to develop rapid CAD-type models are discussed.

  16. TFTR plasma feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hojsak, W.; Marsala, R.J.; Mueller, D.; Rauch, W.; Tait, G.D.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor employs feedback control systems for four plasma parameters, i.e. for plasma current, for plasma major radius, for plasma vertical position, and for plasma density. The plasma current is controlled by adjusting the rate of change of current in the Ohmic Heating (OH) coil system. Plasma current is continuously sensed by a Rogowski coil and its associated electronics; the error between it and a preprogrammed reference plasma current history is operated upon by a ''proportional-plusintegral-plus-derivative'' (PID) control algorithm and combined with various feedforward terms, to generate compensating commands to the phase-controlled thyristor rectifiers which drive current through the OH coils. The plasma position is controlled by adjusting the currents in Equilibrium Field and Horizontal Field coil systems, which respectively determine the vertical and radial external magnetic fields producing J X B forces on the plasma current. The plasma major radius position and vertical position, sensed by ''B /sub theta/ '' and ''B /sub rho/ '' magnetic flux pickup coils with their associated electronics, are controlled toward preprogrammed reference histories by allowing PID and feedforward control algorithms to generate commands to the EF and HF coil power supplies. Plasma density is controlled by adjusting the amount of gas injected into the vacuum vessel. Time-varying gains are used to combine lineaveraged plasma density measurements from a microwave interferometer plasma diagnostic system with vacuum vessel pressure measurements from ion gauges, with various other measurements, and with preprogrammed reference histories, to determine commands to piezoelectric gas injection valves

  17. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein

  18. Reactor wall in thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, Masanao.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To always monitor the life of armours in reactor walls and automatically shutdown the reactor if it should be operated in excess of the limit of use. Constitution: Monitoring material of lower melting point than armours (for example beryllium pellets) as one of the reactor wall constituents of a thermonuclear device are embedded in a region leaving the thickness corresponding to the allowable abrasion of the armour. In this structure, if the armours are abrased due to particle loads of a plasma and the abrasion exceeds a predetermined allowable level, the monitoring material is exposed to the plasma and melted and evaporated. Since this can be detected by impurity monitors disposed in the reactor, it is possible to recognize the limit for the working life of the armours. If the thermonuclear reactor should be operated accidentally exceeding the life of the armours, since a great amount of the monitoring materials have been evaporated, they flow into the plasma to increase the plasma radiation loss thereby automatically eliminate the plasma. (K.M.)

  19. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  20. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  1. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  2. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  3. Plasma polymerization by Softplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.; Wu, Zhenning; Benter, Maike

    2008-01-01

    , external electrode, and electrodeless microwave or high frequency reactors. [3] Softplasma™ is an internal electrode plasma setup powered by low frequenc~ gower supply. It was developed in late 90s for surface treatment of silicone rubber. [ ]- 5] It is a low pressure, low electron density, 3D homogenous......In the late 19th century, the first depositions - known today as plasma polymers, were reported. In the last century, more and more research has been put into plasma polymers. Many different deposition systems have been developed. [1, 2] Shi F. F. broadly classified them into internal electrode...... plasma. In this study, we are presenting the surface modification"pf polymers by plasma polymerization using Softplasma™. Softplasma™ can be used for two major types of polymerization: polymerization of vinyl monomers, where plasma acts as initiator; chemical vapour deposition, where plasma acts...

  4. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  5. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  6. Thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutomi, Yoshiyuki; Nakagawa, Moroo; Sawai, Yuichi; Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon composited with reinforcing metals is used for a divertor cooling substrate having an effect as a cooling tube to provide a silicon base composite material having increased electric resistance and toughness. The blending ratio of reinforcing materials in the form of granules, whiskers or long fibers is controlled in order to control heat conductivity, electric resistivity and mechanical performances. The divertor cooling substrate comprising the silicon base composite material is integrated with a plasma facing material. The production method therefor includes ordinary metal matrix composite forming methods such as powder metallurgy, melting penetration method, high pressure solidification casting method, centrifugal casting method and vacuum casting method. Since the cooling plate is constituted with the light metal and highly electric resistant metal base composite material, sharing force due to eddy current can be reduced, and radiation exposure can be minimized. Accordingly, a cooling structure for a thermonuclear reactor effective for the improvement of environmental problems caused by waste disposal can be attained. (N.H.)

  7. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  8. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  9. Fueling by coaxial plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.

    1978-01-01

    The operating principles of pulsed coaxial guns are reviewed. Some problems involved with the injection of plasma beams from these guns into containment fields are described. The injection during reactor operating conditions is then discussed

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  11. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  12. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  13. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  14. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  16. MARS: Mirror Advanced Reactor Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    A recently completed two-year study of a commercial tandem mirror reactor design [Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS)] is briefly reviewed. The end plugs are designed for trapped particle stability, MHD ballooning, balanced geodesic curvature, and small radial electric fields in the central cell. New technologies such as lithium-lead blankets, 24T hybrid coils, gridless direct converters and plasma halo vacuum pumps are highlighted

  17. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  18. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  19. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  20. Comparison of ensemble post-processing approaches, based on empirical and dynamical error modelisation of rainfall-runoff model forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, J.; Mathevet, T.; Le Lay, M.; Gailhard, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the context of a national energy company (EDF : Electricité de France), hydro-meteorological forecasts are necessary to ensure safety and security of installations, meet environmental standards and improve water ressources management and decision making. Hydrological ensemble forecasts allow a better representation of meteorological and hydrological forecasts uncertainties and improve human expertise of hydrological forecasts, which is essential to synthesize available informations, coming from different meteorological and hydrological models and human experience. An operational hydrological ensemble forecasting chain has been developed at EDF since 2008 and is being used since 2010 on more than 30 watersheds in France. This ensemble forecasting chain is characterized ensemble pre-processing (rainfall and temperature) and post-processing (streamflow), where a large human expertise is solicited. The aim of this paper is to compare 2 hydrological ensemble post-processing methods developed at EDF in order improve ensemble forecasts reliability (similar to Monatanari &Brath, 2004; Schaefli et al., 2007). The aim of the post-processing methods is to dress hydrological ensemble forecasts with hydrological model uncertainties, based on perfect forecasts. The first method (called empirical approach) is based on a statistical modelisation of empirical error of perfect forecasts, by streamflow sub-samples of quantile class and lead-time. The second method (called dynamical approach) is based on streamflow sub-samples of quantile class and streamflow variation, and lead-time. On a set of 20 watersheds used for operational forecasts, results show that both approaches are necessary to ensure a good post-processing of hydrological ensemble, allowing a good improvement of reliability, skill and sharpness of ensemble forecasts. The comparison of the empirical and dynamical approaches shows the limits of the empirical approach which is not able to take into account hydrological

  1. Ground observations and remote sensing data for integrated modelisation of water budget in the Merguellil catchment, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougenot, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is affected by water scarcity. Some countries as Tunisia reached the limit of 550 m3/year/capita due overexploitation of low water resources for irrigation, domestic uses and industry. A lot of programs aim to evaluate strategies to improve water consumption at regional level. In central Tunisia, on the Merguellil catchment, we develop integrated water resources modelisations based on social investigations, ground observations and remote sensing data. The main objective is to close the water budget at regional level and to estimate irrigation and water pumping to test scenarios with endusers. Our works benefit from French, bilateral and European projects (ANR, MISTRALS/SICMed, FP6, FP7…), GMES/GEOLAND-ESA) and also network projects as JECAM and AERONET, where the Merguellil site is a reference. This site has specific characteristics associating irrigated and rainfed crops mixing cereals, market gardening and orchards and will be proposed as a new environmental observing system connected to the OMERE, TENSIFT and OSR systems respectively in Tunisia, Morocco and France. We show here an original and large set of ground and remote sensing data mainly acquired from 2008 to present to be used for calibration/validation of water budget processes and integrated models for present and scenarios: - Ground data: meteorological stations, water budget at local scale: fluxes tower, soil fluxes, soil and surface temperature, soil moisture, drainage, flow, water level in lakes, aquifer, vegetation parameters on selected fieds/month (LAI, height, biomass, yield), land cover: 3 times/year, bare soil roughness, irrigation and pumping estimations, soil texture. - Remote sensing data: remote sensing products from multi-platform (MODIS, SPOT, LANDSAT, ASTER, PLEIADES, ASAR, COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR X…), multi-wavelength (solar, micro-wave and thermal) and multi-resolution (0.5 meters to 1 km). Ground observations are used (1) to calibrate soil

  2. Modeling and simulation of VOCs removal by nonthermal plasma discharge with photocatalysis in a continuous reactor: Synergetic effect and mass transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Assadi , Aymen Amine; Bouzaza , Abdelkrim; Merabet , Smail; Wolbert , Dominique

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with photocatalysis (TiO2 + UV), nonthermal plasma (NTP) and their combinations. These processes have been widely studied for isovaleraldehyde (Isoval) treatment. Isoval removal, selectivity of CO2 and CO, and ozone formation are investigated in order to evaluate the performance of the combined process. The results show that the performance of the process has enhanced and a synergetic effect is observed. On the other hand, this work aims at investigati...

  3. Assessment of torsatrons as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Painter, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R 0 = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B 0 = 4.8-7.5 T, B max (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions

  4. Study of the hydrogen behavior in amorphous hydrogenated materials of type a - C:H and a - SiC:H facing fusion reactor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, G.

    1997-01-01

    Plasma facing components of controlled fusion test devices (tokamaks) are submitted to several constraints (irradiation, high temperatures). The erosion (physical sputtering and chemical erosion) and the hydrogen recycling (retention and desorption) of these materials influence many plasma parameters and thus affect drastically the tokamak running. First, we will describe the different plasma-material interactions. It will be pointed out, how erosion and hydrogen recycling are strongly related to both chemical and physical properties of the material. In order to reduce these interactions, we have selected two amorphous hydrogenated materials (a-C:H and a-SiC:H), which are known for their good thermal and chemical qualities. Some samples have been then implanted with lithium ions at different fluences. Our materials have been then irradiated with deuterium ions at low energy. From our results, it is shown that both the lithium implantation and the use of an a - SiC:H substrate can be beneficial in enhancing the hydrogen retention. These results were completed with thermal desorption studies of these materials. It was evidenced that the hydrogen fixation was more efficient in a-SiC:H than in a-C:H substrate. Results in good agreement with those described above have been obtained by exposing a - C:H and a - SiC:H samples to the scrape off layer of the tokamak of Varennes (TdeV, Canada). A modelling of hydrogen diffusion under irradiation has been also proposed. (author)

  5. Hydrogen behaviour study in plasma facing a-C:H and a-SiC:H hydrogenated amorphous materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Gauzelin

    1997-01-01

    Plasma facing components of controlled fusion test devices (tokamaks) are submitted to several constraints (irradiation, high temperatures). The erosion (physical sputtering and chemical erosion) and the hydrogen recycling (retention and desorption) of these materials influence many plasma parameters and thus affect drastically the tokamak running. Firstly, we will describe the different plasma-material interactions. It will be pointed out, how erosion and hydrogen recycling are strongly related to both chemical and physical properties of the material. In order to reduce this interactions, we have selected two amorphous hydrogenated materials (a-C:H and a-SiC:H), which are known for their good thermal and chemical qualities. Some samples have been then implanted with lithium ions at different fluences. Our materials have been then irradiated with deuterium ions at low energy. From our results, it is shown that both the lithium implantation and the use of an a-SiC:H substrate can be benefit in enhancing the hydrogen retention. These results were completed with thermal desorption studies of these materials. It was evidenced that the hydrogen fixation was more efficient in a -SiC:H than in a-C:H substrate. Results in good agreement with those described above have been obtained by exposing a-C:H and a-SiC:H samples to the scrape off layer of the tokamak of Varennes (TdeV, Canada). A modeling of hydrogen diffusion under irradiation has been also proposed. (author)

  6. Principle of a 'retro reflecting' or 'backfire' LH antenna. A robust efficiently cooled launching structure for LH waves in reactor grade plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibet, Ph.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    Up to now, lower hybrid current drive launchers have been made of waveguide arrays. To extrapolate present techniques despite the thermal power load and the mechanical stress, it is necessary to develop an advanced launcher concept which is simpler and more robust. To simplify the antennas between RF vacuum windows and plasma, studies have been carried, for example, the hyperguide for JET, the toroidal oversized waveguide for JT-60U and the poloidal mode converter for Tore Supra. For plasma-facing components, it has been proposed to use diffraction through rod arrays although this suffers from bad coupling per pass. Here a new concept is given which seems to be robust, and should leave enough space for efficient water cooling. The front part near plasma can be easily replaced by remote handling. Its principle is explained, and the description is made. The coupling properties of the proposed structure have been studied by using the SWAN code, and good agreement between the SWAN calculation and the coupling measurement performed at Tore Supra has been reported previously. (K.I.)

  7. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost

  8. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  9. Nonideal plasmas - experimental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, K.; Hess, H.; Radtke, R.

    1986-01-01

    The investigation of nonideal, strongly coupled, or non-Debye plasmas is a new field of the well-known arc plasma physics. The increased pressure and density cause different behaviour of the dense plasma. The paper surveys the main differences between the nonideal and the usual arc plasmas. The electrical conductivity, continuum radiation absorption coefficient, shift and broadening of spectral lines, and plasma phase transition are discussed. The problems of generation and diagnostics of nonideal plasmas are also described. Finally, the importance of the topic is underlined: possible applications in astrophysics and in different fields of technology: light sources, MHD generators, circuit breakers, laser mirrors and shutters, high temperature gas-phase fission reactors, material treatment and laser fusion are mentioned. (D.Gy.)

  10. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  11. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Aries-I Tokamak: Design description; systems studies and economics; reactor plasma physics; magnet engineering; fusion-power-ore engineering; and environmental and safety features

  12. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  13. Plasma-surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Bystrov, K.; Liu, F.; Liu, W.; Morgan, T.; Tanyeli, I.; van den Berg, M.; Xu, H.; Zielinski, J.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface

  14. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80 percent. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59 percent and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high recirculating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)

  15. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  16. Operating parameters of a reactor for early demonstration of electric power generation and the expansion by realization of advanced tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Hiwatari, Ryoji

    2004-01-01

    Beam driven stable equilibria for a conceptual reactor, Demo-CREST, which was designed for early demonstration of electric power generation, has been investigated. Considering current profiles driven by neutral beams, the attainable normalized beta β N with a stabilization wall is about 3.4 with a normal shear (NS). With reversed shear (RS), a higher β N is attainable. The stable equilibria up to 4.0 can be sustained by a couple of On- and Off-axis beams. In the range of 1.9 N N = 1.9 which is the base design point of Demo-CREST. In the case of RS operation with β N 4.0, the density ratio to the Greenwald limit can be maintain at about unity if high temperature operation with T e > 20 kV is allowable. (author)

  17. Uncertainties in modeling of consequences of tritium release from fusion reactors. Plasma Fusion Center No. PFC/TR-79-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    The bases for various models concerned with all phases of estimating doses from routine tritium releases from fusion reactors have been examined. The implications of uncertainties in parameters and assumptions for the uncertainty of the calculated doses and resulting maximum permissible releases are presented. Global dispersion models are most affected by the assumptions made concerning movement, such as the role of the ocean as a sink. Dose models were generally found to agree within a factor of two, with the largest variation due to agricultural data. Plant tritium flow studies are the least developed and require substantial improvement in the data base. Based on two possible arbitrary global standards, the maximum allowable releases were found to range from 1.6 to 20,000 Ci/day. The local criteria imply releases between 5 and 20 Ci/day

  18. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry

  19. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artem'ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, N. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Filimonova, E. A.; Firsov, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane–oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of ‘explosive’ inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of ‘incomplete combustion’ under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the ‘preflame’ and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density ne≈1012 cm−3) and a high frequency of electron–neutral collisions (νen≈1012 s−1). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed. PMID:26170426

  20. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  2. Plasma deposition of refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, V.V.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    The problems of deposition, testing and application of plasma coating of refractory metals and oxides are considered. The process fundamentals, various manufacturing procedures and equipment for their realization are described in detail. Coating materials are given (Al, Mg, Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , MgAlO 4 ) which are used in reactor engineering and their designated purposes are shown [ru

  3. Reprocessing of spent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierini, G.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for removing helium and other impurities from a mixture containing deuterium and tritium, a deuterium/tritium mixture when purified in accordance with such a process and, more particularly, to a process for the reprocessing of spent plasma removed from a thermofusion reactor. (U.K.)

  4. Radiofrequency power in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document includes the various communications that were presented at the 11th topical conference on radio frequency power in plasmas which took place in Palm Springs in May 1995. It includes current diffusion studies to assess the non-inductive current deposition profiles, experiments for plasma to reach quickly an equilibrium state, and modelling of electrons in plasma. Some comparison studies also reveal the efficiency of the Quasi-Optical Grill antenna for reactor applications. Finally, a scenario for efficient mode conversion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency is presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 6 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. MODELISATION DE LA CINETIQUE CHIMIQUE DANS LA REDUCTION DES OXYDES D4AZOTE PAR DECHARGE COURONNE.

    OpenAIRE

    MEDJAHDI, Sarah ines

    2015-01-01

    CE TRAVAIL DE recherche rentre dans le cadre général de modélisation de la réduction des oxydes d'azote . l'utilisation des réacteurs a plasma froid non-thermique généré par des décharges couronnes est actuellement l'une des techniques les puis promettre .ses pour la destruction des oxydes d'azote .en effet , le traitement des gaz pollués par les décharges couronnes est notamment rendu possible par la multiplication des décharges Électriques .

  8. Operations analysis of the unscheduled summer machine opening of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, M.E.; McCann, J.

    1985-01-01

    During experimental operation, a problem developed with the mechanical integrity of the TFTR surface pumping system neutralizer plates that required a vacuum vessel entry for repairs. This problem, coupled with several less significant machine internal problems that had been developing, forced the decision to make an unscheduled vacuum vessel entry. An extended machine outage at that time would have had a severe impact on the experimental schedule. Therefore, the goal was to make repairs and return the vacuum vessel to a clean condition as quickly as possible. The total time required between the end of regularly scheduled activity and restoration of the machine capability to routinely obtain 1 MA disruption-free plasma was 12 days

  9. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  10. Automatic plasma control in magnetic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Y.; Chuyanov, V.

    1984-01-01

    Hot plasma is essentially in thermodynamic non-steady state. Automatic plasma control basically means monitoring deviations from steady state and producing a suitable magnetic or electric field which brings the plasma back to its original state. Briefly described are two systems of automatic plasma control: control with a magnetic field using a negative impedance circuit, and control using an electric field. It appears that systems of automatic plasma stabilization will be an indispensable component of the fusion reactor and its possibilities will in many ways determine the reactor economy. (Ha)

  11. Plasma automatic control in magnetic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.I.; Chuyanov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Principles of constructing the systems providing a plasma equilibrium and stability in thermonuctear devices are laid down. Operation of the servo system to maintain a plasma equilibrium is described using the tokamak plasma filament as an example. Operation of the system to suppress a flute instability is also described. This system measures electric disturbances on the plasma body surface and controls charge distribution on external electrodes. It is pointed out that systems of automatic control of plasma equilibrium and stability become an essential element of a future thermonuclear reactor and the system potentialities would much determine the reactor economic efficiency

  12. Technical issues in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.; Vijayan, T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the issues in fusion reactor technology are examined. Rapid progress in fusion technology research in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial generation of fusion power greatly depends on the evolution and improvements in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, fusion reactor designs are becoming more and more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to compare various concepts within the framework of established technologies. The technological issues needing better understanding and solutions to problem areas are identified. Various instabilities and energy losses are major problem areas. Extensive developments in reactor-relevant advanced materials, compact and powerful superconducting magnets, high-power systems, and plasma heating drivers need to be undertaken and emphasized

  13. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.; Benford, J.; Cooper, R.; Dakin, D.; Ecker, B.; Lopez, O.; Putman, S.; Young, T.S.T.

    1977-01-01

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  14. Plasma-material interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-interactive components must be resistant to erosion processes, efficient in heat removal, and effective in minimizing tritium inventory and permeation. As long as plasma edge temperatures are 50 eV, no one material can satisfy the diverse requirements imposed by these plasma materials interactions. The only solution is the design of duplex, or even more complicated, structures. The material that faces the plasma should be low atomic number, with acceptable erosion and evaporation characteristics. The substrate material must have high thermal conductivity for heat removal. Finally, materials must be selected judiciously for tritium compatibility. In conclusion, materials play a critical role in the achievement of safe and economical magnetic fusion energy. Improvements in materials have already led to many advances in present day device operation, but additional innovative materials solutions are required for the critical plasma materials interaction issues in future power reactors

  15. Plasma state. The universe's fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma is the fourth state of matter, obtained at a very high temperature by the separation of the electrons from their nuclei. Plasma represents 99% of the visible mass of our present day universe and was the unique state of matter at its very beginning. Plasmas are present in the core of stars and in the interstellar environment. More closer to us, they are responsible of spectacular phenomena, like aurora borealis, lightning, comet queues etc.. This book makes a review of the different types of plasmas (electromagnetic, Earth's plasmas, spatial plasmas, solar plasmas, astrophysical plasmas). One chapter presents the thermonuclear fusion as future energy source. Another one treats of the chaos and turbulence inside plasmas. Some applications of plasmas are reviewed: MHD and ionic propulsion systems, MHD energy conversion and MHD generators, thermo-ionic converters, solid-state plasmas, particle accelerators, coherent radiation sources, 'Zeta' machines, X-ray lasers, isotopic separation, non-neutral plasmas and charged beams, free-electrons lasers, electrons and positrons plasmas, industrial applications (etching and cleaning, manufacturing of solar cells, flat screens, industrial reactors, waste treatment, cold plasma-assisted sterilization, effluents decontamination etc.). A last chapter makes an overview of the modern research in plasma physics. (J.S.)

  16. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  17. Degradation of aqueous phenol solutions by coaxial DBD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojcinovic, B. P.; Manojlovic, D.; Roglic, G. M.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric, J.

    2008-07-01

    Solutions of 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,6-dichlorophenol in bidistilled and water from the river Danube were treated in plasma reactor. In this reactor, based on coaxial dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure, plasma is formed over a thin layer of treated water. After one pass through the reactor, starting chlorophenols concentration of 20 mg/l was diminished up to 95 %. Kinetics of the chlorophenols degradation was monitored by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography method (HPLC).

  18. Progress on the reference mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Doggett, J.N.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a reference mirror fusion reactor is underway at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The reactor, rated at about 900 MWe, features steady-state operation, an absence of plasma impurity problems, and good accessibility for blanket maintenance. It is concluded that a mirror reactor appears workable, but its dollar/kWe cost will be considerably higher than present-day nuclear costs. The cost would be reduced most markedly by an increase in plasma Q

  19. Slurry reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  20. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  2. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masami; Nishio, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the rupture of the dry well even when the melted reactor core drops into a reactor pedestal cavity. Constitution: In a reactor container in which a dry well disposed above the reactor pedestal cavity for containing the reactor pressure vessel and a torus type suppression chamber for containing pressure suppression water are connected with each other, the pedestal cavity and the suppression chamber are disposed such that the flow level of the pedestal cavity is lower than the level of the pressure suppression water. Further, a pressure suppression water introduction pipeway for introducing the pressure suppression water into the reactor pedestal cavity is disposed by way of an ON-OFF valve. In case if the melted reactor core should fall into the pedestal cavity, the ON-OFF valve for the pressure suppression water introduction pipeway is opened to introduce the pressure suppression water in the suppression chamber into the pedestal cavity to cool the melted reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This chapter includes the following: General description of the RA reactor, organization of work, responsibilities of leadership and operators team, regulations concerning operation and behaviour in the reactor building, regulations for performing experiments, regulations and instructions for inserting samples into experimental channels [sr

  4. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  5. NE-213-scintillator-based neutron detection system for diagnostic measurements of energy spectra for neutrons having energies greater than or equal to 0.8 MeV created during plasma operations at the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Hill, N.W.; Hou, F.S.; McConnell, J.W.; Spencer, R.R.; Tsang, F.Y.

    1985-08-01

    A system for making diagnostic measurements of the energy spectra of greater than or equal to 0.8-MeV neutrons produced during plasma operations of the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been fabricated and tested and is presently in operation in the TFTR Test Cell Basement. The system consists of two separate detectors, each made up of cells containing liquid NE-213 scintillator attached permanently to RCA-8850 photomultiplier tubes. Pulses obtained from each photomultiplier system are amplified and electronically analyzed to identify and separate those pulses due to neutron-induced events in the detector from those due to photon-induced events in the detector. Signals from each detector are routed to two separate Analog-to-Digital Converters, and the resulting digitized information, representing: (1) the raw neutron-spectrum data; and (2) the raw photon-spectrum data, are transmited to the CICADA data-acquisition computer system of the TFTR. Software programs have been installed on the CICADA system to analyze the raw data to provide moderate-resolution recreations of the energy spectrum of the neutron and photon fluences incident on the detector during the operation of the TFTR. A complete description of, as well as the operation of, the hardware and software is given in this report

  6. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is...

  7. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  8. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A system for controlling combustible gases, it has been constituted at present such that the combustible gases are controlled by exhausting them to the wet well of a reactor container. In this system, however, there has been a problem, in a reactor container having plenums in addition to the wet well and the dry well, that the combustible gases in such plenums can not be controlled. In view of the above, in the present invention, suction ports or exhaust ports of the combustible gas control system are disposed to the wet well, the dry well and the plenums to control the combustible gases in the reactor container. Since this can control the combustible gases in the entire reactor container, the integrity of the reactor container can be ensured. (T.M.)

  9. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hosomi, Kenji; Otonari, Jun-ichiro.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen to be disposed in a reactor container upon rupture of pipelines of a reactor primary coolant system is prevented from deposition of water droplets formed from a reactor container spray to suppress elevation of hydrogen concentration in the reactor container. Namely, a catalytic combustion gas concentration control system comprises a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen and a support thereof. In addition, there is also disposed a water droplet deposition-preventing means for preventing deposition of water droplets in a reactor pressure vessel on the catalyst. Then, the effect of the catalyst upon catalytic oxidation reaction of hydrogen can be kept high. The local elevation of hydrogen concentration can be prevented even upon occurrence of such a phenomenon that various kinds of mobile forces in the container such as dry well cooling system are lost. (I.S.)

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  11. Advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Yukihiro

    2003-01-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p- 6 Li and p- 11 B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D- 3 He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D- 3 He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of 3 He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of 3 He is estimated to be in the moon. The 3 He of about 10 23 kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  12. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  13. ETF reactor design status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of a tokamak Engineering Test Facility (ETF) are being carried out as a joint laboratory--industry effort at the ETF Design Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Designs are being developed for two reactors, one with a bundle divertor and one with a poloidal divertor. These machines, which are designed for ignition and a burn time of 100 s, both have a major radius of 5.4 m, a plasma minor radius of 1.3 m, and a D-shaped plasma elongation ratio of 1.6. The plasma chamber must be conditioned at 10 -7 Torr (10 -5 Pa). During the 13 s dwell between burns, the chamber must be pumped down from 3 x 10 -4 to 3 x 10 -5 Torr. In the design with the bundle divertor, four pairs of compound cryopumps, each pump with a 4 m 2 cryosorption pumping surface, are installed to pump down the plasma chamber. In the design with the poloidal divertor, the plasma chamber is evacuated with the ten pairs of compound cryopumps, each pump with a cryosorption pumping surface of 13 m 2 , installed to handle the divertor load. In both cases the pumps are installed in pairs so that one set can be regenerated while the other set is on-line

  14. 10th International Conference and School on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2004-01-01

    About 240 abstracts by Ukrainian and foreign authors submitted to 10-th International Conference and School on Plasma Physics and Controlled fusion have been considered by Conference Program Committee members. All the abstracts have been divided into 8 groups: magnetic confinement systems: stellarators, tokamaks, alternative conceptions; ITER and Fusion reactor aspects; basic plasma physics; space plasma; plasma dynamics and plasma-wall interaction; plasma electronics; low temperature plasma and plasma technologies; plasma diagnostics

  15. Studies and modeling of cold neutron sources; Etude et modelisation des sources froides de neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campioni, G

    2004-11-15

    With the purpose of updating knowledge in the fields of cold neutron sources, the work of this thesis has been run according to the 3 following axes. First, the gathering of specific information forming the materials of this work. This set of knowledge covers the following fields: cold neutron, cross-sections for the different cold moderators, flux slowing down, different measurements of the cold flux and finally, issues in the thermal analysis of the problem. Secondly, the study and development of suitable computation tools. After an analysis of the problem, several tools have been planed, implemented and tested in the 3-dimensional radiation transport code Tripoli-4. In particular, a module of uncoupling, integrated in the official version of Tripoli-4, can perform Monte-Carlo parametric studies with a spare factor of Cpu time fetching 50 times. A module of coupling, simulating neutron guides, has also been developed and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code McStas. Thirdly, achieving a complete study for the validation of the installed calculation chain. These studies focus on 3 cold sources currently functioning: SP1 from Orphee reactor and 2 other sources (SFH and SFV) from the HFR at the Laue Langevin Institute. These studies give examples of problems and methods for the design of future cold sources.

  16. Prototype moving-ring reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Ashworth, C.P.; Abreu, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    We have completed a design of the Prototype Moving-Ring Reactor. The fusion fuel is confined in current-carrying rings of magnetically-field-reversed plasma (Compact Toroids). The plasma rings, formed by a coaxial plasma gun, undergo adiabatic magnetic compression to ignition temperature while they are being injected into the reactor's burner section. The cylindrical burner chamber is divided into three burn stations. Separator coils and a slight axial guide field gradient are used to shuttle the ignited toroids rapidly from one burn station to the next, pausing for 1/3 of the total burn time at each station. D-T- 3 He ice pellets refuel the rings at a rate which maintains constant radiated power

  17. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  18. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power

  19. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  20. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Satoru; Kawashima, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the temperature distribution of the reactor container so as to moderate the thermal stress distribution on the reactor wall of LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: A good heat conductor (made of Al or Cu) is appended on the outer side of the reactor container wall from below the liquid level to the lower face of a deck plate. Further, heat insulators are disposed to the outside of the good heat conductor. Furthermore, a gas-cooling duct is circumferentially disposed at the contact portion between the good heat conductor and the deck plate around the reactor container. This enables to flow the cold heat from the liquid metal rapidly through the good heat conductor to the cooling duct and allows to maintain the temperature distribution on the reactor wall substantially linear even with the abrupt temperature change in the liquid metal. Further, by appending the good heat conductor covered with inactive metals not only on the outer side but also on the inside of the reactor wall to introduce the heat near the liquid level to the upper portion and escape the same to the cooling layer below the roof slab, the effect can be improved further. (Ikeda, J.)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  2. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  3. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshihito; Sano, Tamotsu; Ueda, Sabuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the liquid surface disturbance in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A horizontal flow suppressing mechanism mainly comprising vertical members is suspended near the free liquid surface of coolants in the upper plenum. The horizontal flow of coolants near the free liquid surface is reduced by the suppressing mechanism to effectively reduce the surface disturbance. The reduction in the liquid surface disturbance further prevails to the entire surface region with no particular vertical variations to the free liquid surface to remarkably improve the preventive performance for the liquid surface disturbance. Accordingly, it is also possible to attain the advantageous effects such as prevention for the thermal fatigue in reactor vessel walls, reactor upper mechanisms, etc. and prevention of burning damage to the reactor core due to the reduction of envolved Ar gas. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  8. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  9. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollion, H.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components [fr

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  11. Reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdoes, P.

    1977-01-01

    This is one of a series of articles discussing aspects of nuclear engineering ranging from a survey of various reactor types for static and mobile use to mention of atomic thermo-electric batteries of atomic thermo-electric batteries for cardiac pacemakers. Various statistics are presented on power generation in Europe and U.S.A. and economics are discussed in some detail. Molten salt reactors and research machines are also described. (G.M.E.)

  12. CTR plasma engineering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The main focus of the work by the Fusion Plasma Engineering Group at the University during the prior contract year involved a study of fusion ash (helium) effects on burn efficiency and on potential ways to control ash buildup. This work has wide application to a variety of fusion reactor concepts, but the immediate application for the present work is in the ARIES tokamak reactor design study now being undertaken by a national design team headed by the UCLA. The examples presented here largely deal with the ARIES-I design which is a D-T device operating in the first instability regime

  13. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  14. Fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fast reactors have capacities to spare uranium natural resources by their breeding property and to propose solutions to the management of radioactive wastes by limiting the inventory of heavy nuclei. This article highlights the role that fast reactors could play for reducing the radiotoxicity of wastes. The conversion of 238 U into 239 Pu by neutron capture is more efficient in fast reactors than in light water reactors. In fast reactors multi-recycling of U + Pu leads to fissioning up to 95% of the initial fuel ( 238 U + 235 U). 2 strategies have been studied to burn actinides: - the multi-recycling of heavy nuclei is made inside the fuel element (homogeneous option); - the unique recycling is made in special irradiation targets placed inside the core or at its surroundings (heterogeneous option). Simulations have shown that, for the same amount of energy produced (400 TWhe), the mass of transuranium elements (Pu + Np + Am + Cm) sent to waste disposal is 60,9 Kg in the homogeneous option and 204.4 Kg in the heterogeneous option. Experimental programs are carried out in Phenix and BOR60 reactors in order to study the feasibility of such strategies. (A.C.)

  15. Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid

  16. Plasma physics aspects of ETF/INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.R.; Schmidt, J.A.; Cohn, D.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    In order to achieve their principle technical objectives, the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and the International Tokomak Reactor (INTOR) will require an ignited (or near ignited) plasma, sustained for pulse lengths of at least 100 secs at a high enough plasma pressure to provide a neutron wall loading of at least 1.3 MW/m 2 . The ignited plasma will have to be substantially free of impurities. Our current understanding of major plasma physics characters is summarized

  17. Fusion component design for the moving-ring field-reversed mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    This partial report on the reactor design contains sections on the following: (1) burner section magnet system design, (2) plasma ring energy recovery, (3) vacuum system, (4) cryogenic system, (5) tritium flows and inventories, and (6) reactor design and layout

  18. Spheromak type plasma experiment apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, Kiyoyuki; Miyauchi, Yasuyuki; Oomura, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    The fusion power reactor which is expected to be the most promising energy has been developed for several plasma confinement systems. Under these circumstances, Spheromak configuration has recently attracted attention because of its simple structure and efficient plasma confinement. This apparatus was ordered by the Engineering Department of University of Tokyo for basic studies of the Spheromak plasma confinement technologies. This forms Spheromak plasma according to the induction discharge system which injects this plasma with magnetic energy generated by a toroidal current in the plasma and discharges the current through the electrical feed through. Toroidal current is induced by the poloidal coil in the vessel. We worked together with the researchers of University of Tokyo to conduct experiments and confirmed the formation and confinement of Spheromak plasma in the initial test. (author)

  19. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlheinz, Thom.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into non-equilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in nearly thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme-non-equilibrium. The accompanying variations of temperatures, pressure and radiative spectrum suggest wide ranges of applications. For example, in the gas-phase fission reactor concept enriched uranium hexafluoride or an uranium plasma replaces conventional fuel elements and permits operation above the melting point of solid materials. This potential has been motivation for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to conduct relevant research for high specific impulse propulsion in space. The need to separate the high temperature gaseous fuel from the surfaces of a containing vessel and to protect them against thermal radiation has led to the concept of an externally moderated reactor in which the fissioning gaseous material is suspended by fluid dynamic means and the flow of opaque buffer gas removes the power. The gaseous nuclear fuel can slowly be circulated through the reactor for continuous on-site reprocessing including the annihilation of transuranium actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides can thus be achieved. These characteristics and the unique radiative properties led to the expectation that the gas-phase fission reactor could feature improved safety, safeguarding and economy, in addition to new technologies such as processing, photochemistry and the transmission of power over large distances in space

  20. Moving-ring field-reversed mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Ashworth, C.P.; Abreu, K.E.

    1981-01-01

    We describe a first prototype fusion reactor design of the Moving-Ring Field-Reversed Mirror Reactor. The fusion fuel is confined in current-carrying rings of magnetically-field-reversed plasma. The plamsa rings, formed by a coaxial plasma gun, are magnetically compressed to ignition temperature while they are being injected into the reactor's burner section. DT ice pellets refuel the rings during the burn at a rate which maintains constant fusion power. A steady train of plasma rings moves at constant speed through the reactor under the influence of a slightly diverging magnetic field. The aluminum first wall and breeding zone structure minimize induced radioactivity; hands-on maintenance is possible on reactor components outside the breeding blanket. Helium removes the heat from the Li 2 O tritium breeding blanket and is used to generate steam. The reactor produces a constant, net power of 376 MW