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Sample records for plasma plume induced

  1. Laser induced plasma plume imaging and surface morphology of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Siraj, K. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)], E-mail: ksiraj@uet.edu.pk; Rafique, M.S.; Bhatti, K.A.; Latif, A.; Jamil, H.; Basit, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15

    Shot-to-shot variation in the characteristics of laser produced plasma plume and surface profile of N-type silicon (1 1 1) are investigated. In order to produce plasma, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 mJ, 9-14 ns) is tightly focused on silicon target in air at room temperature. Target was exposed in such a way that number of laser shots was increased from point to point in ascending order starting from single shot at first point. Target was moved 2 mm after each exposure. In order to investigate shot-to-shot variation in the time integrated emission intensity regions within the plasma plume, a computer controlled CCD based image capture system was employed. Various intensity regimes were found depending strongly on the number of incident laser pulses. Plasma plume length was also found to vary with the number of pulses. The topographic analysis of the irradiated Si was performed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) which shows the primary mechanisms like thermal or non-thermal ablation depend on the number of shots. Surface morphological changes were also studied in terms of ripple formation, ejection, debris and re-deposition of material caused by laser beam at sample surface. The micrographs show ripples spacing versus wavelength dependence rule [{lambda} {approx} {lambda}/(1 - sin {theta})]. Intensity variations with number of shots are correlated with the surface morphology of the irradiated sample.

  2. Modelling nanoparticles formation in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Lavisse, L.; Lucas, M.C. Marco de [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Hebert, D. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles spatial localization in the plume induced by a pulsed laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma plume obtained by laser irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particles and debris formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Powder generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditions of formation. - Abstract: Nanoparticles formation in a laser-induced plasma plume in the ambient air has been investigated by using numerical simulations and physical models. For high irradiances, or for ultrashort laser pulses, nanoparticles are formed by condensation, as fine powders, in the expanding plasma for very high pairs of temperature and pressure. At lower irradiances, or nanosecond laser pulses, another thermodynamic paths are possible, which cross the liquid-gas transition curve while laser is still heating the target and the induced plasma. In this work, we explore the growth of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers as a function of the laser irradiance. Moreover, the influence of the ambient gas has also been investigated.

  3. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Nedela, T; Urbassek, H;

    2002-01-01

     The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  4. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Nedelea, T.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  5. Space-dependent characterization of laser-induced plasma plume during fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xianfeng; Song, Lijun; Xiao, Wenjia; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-12-01

    The role of a plasma plume in high power fiber laser welding is of considerable interest due to its influence on the energy transfer mechanism. In this study, the space-dependent plasma characteristics including spectrum intensity, plasma temperature and electron density were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy technique. The plasma temperature was calculated using the Boltzmann plot of atomic iron lines, whereas the electron density was determined from the Stark broadening of the Fe I line at 381.584 nm. Quantitative analysis of plasma characteristics with respect to the laser radiation was performed. The results show that the plasma radiation increases as the laser power increases during the partial penetration mode, and then decreases sharply after the initiation of full penetration. Both the plasma temperature and electron density increase with the increase of laser power until they reach steady state values after full penetration. Moreover, the hottest core of the plasma shifts toward the surface of the workpiece as the penetration depth increases, whereas the electron density is more evenly distributed above the surface of the workpiece. The results also indicate that the absorption and scattering of nanoparticles in the plasma plume is the main mechanism for laser power attenuation.

  6. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon and pressure (from ∼5 × 10−7 Torr up to atmosphere is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  7. Pressure and temperature dependence of the laser-induced plasma plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Schneider, Christof W.; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    The influence of different background gases and substrate heating on the plasma plume dynamics from silver ablation is investigated by species selected time and space resolved imaging. The results provide a time-resolved understanding on how those process parameters affect the expansion: from a free expansion in vacuum with velocities exceeding 20 000 m/s to a very slow expansion in Ar at 1 × 10-1 mbar with arrival velocities of 280 m/s. In addition, we observe a rebound of the ablated material on the substrate holder leading to a re-coating of the ablated target. At 1 × 10-1 mbar, it seems that the expansion of the plasma plume displaces a considerable portion of the background gas and traps it against the frontal area of the substrate holder. This leads to a transient high local pressure just above the substrate. In the case of Ar, the rebound is enhanced due to inelastic scattering, whereas for an O2 background, an area of high reactivity/emission in addition to the rebound is created. Imaging of selected species shows that the light emission in this area is mainly due to excited Ag and metal oxygen species. There is a clear influence of substrate heating on the plasma expansion due to the background gas density gradients, reducing the stopping ability of the background gas and already detectable 2 cm away from the substrate. Both rebound and excitation effects are reduced in intensity due to the substrate heating.

  8. Pulsed Plasma Thruster plume analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, K. [Washington Univ., Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Micro-Pulsed Plasma Thrusters ({mu}PPTs) are a promising method for precision attitude control for small spacecraft in formation flying. They create an ionized plasma plume, which may interfere with other spacecraft in the formation. To characterize the ions in the plume, a diagnostic has been built that couples a drift tube with an energy analyzer. The drift tube provides time of flight measurements to determine the exhaust velocity, and the energy analyzer discriminates the ion energies. The energy analyzer measures the current on a collector plate downstream of four grids that repel electrons and ions below a specified energy. The first grid lowers the density of the plasma, therefore increasing Debye length. The second and fourth grids have a negative potential applied to them so they repel the electrons, while the third grid's voltage can be varied to repel lower energy ions. The ion energies can be computed by differentiating the data. Combining the information of the ion energies and their velocities identifies the ion masses in the PPT plume. The PPT used for this diagnostic is the micro-PPT developed for the Dawgstar satellite. This PPT uses 5.2 Joules per pulse and has a 2.3 cm{sup 2} propellant area, a 1.3 cm electrode length, and an estimated thrust of 85 {mu}N [C. Rayburn et al., AIAA-2000-3256]. This paper will describe the development and design of the time of flight/gridded energy analyzer diagnostic and present recent experimental results. (Author)

  9. Modeling the Enceladus plume--plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fleshman, B L; Bagenal, F

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the chemical interaction between Saturn's corotating plasma and Enceladus' volcanic plumes. We evolve plasma as it passes through a prescribed H2O plume using a physical chemistry model adapted for water-group reactions. The flow field is assumed to be that of a plasma around an electrically-conducting obstacle centered on Enceladus and aligned with Saturn's magnetic field, consistent with Cassini magnetometer data. We explore the effects on the physical chemistry due to: (1) a small population of hot electrons; (2) a plasma flow decelerated in response to the pickup of fresh ions; (3) the source rate of neutral H2O. The model confirms that charge exchange dominates the local chemistry and that H3O+ dominates the water-group composition downstream of the Enceladus plumes. We also find that the amount of fresh pickup ions depends heavily on both the neutral source strength and on the presence of a persistent population of hot electrons.

  10. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...

  11. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  12. The study of laser plasma plume radiation produced by laser ablation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingju

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the laser plasma plume radiation mechanisms induced by the interaction between Nd: YAG plused laser and silicon, the radiation model of silicon laser plasma plume is established. Laser plasma plume radiation includes atom characteristic lines, ion lines and continuous background. It can reflect the characteristics of laser plasma plume radiation, reveal the mechanism of laser ablation on silicon. Time-resolved measurment of laser plasma plume radiation produced by pulsed Nd: YAG laser ablation of silicon in different ambient gas is thoroughly studied. The experimental ambient gas are N2 and O2.The pulse width of Nd: YAG plused laser adopted in the experiment is 20ns, the pulse energy is 60mJ, the laser pulsing frequency is 10Hz, and the emitted laser wavelength is 1064nm, The silicon target purity is 99.99%, The target is rotating at a speed of 240r/min. The focusing area of the laser on the Si target has a diameter of around 0.8mm.The pressure of ambient gas is tunable between 13Pa and 101.3kPa in the induced chamber, the number of points used in averaging is 15. The experimental results show that the ambient gas has obvious enhancement effect on the radiation intensity of silicon laser plasma plume. With the increase of the ambient gas pressure, the silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity will first be increased and then be decreased, and the ambient gas has an obvious compression effect on the scope of silicon laser plasma plume radiation. For the two different ambient gases, the maximum silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity and maximum pressure for they are different, for oxygen at 35kPa, for nitrogen at 50kPa. The silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity in oxygen is bigger than that in nitrogen.The main excition mechanisms of laser plasma plume radiation induced by Nd:YAG plused laser induced silicon is analyzed, The plused laser can makes part molecules in the ambient gas and silicon atoms ionized at the surface of

  13. Identification of discontinuities in plasma plume evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gojani, Ardian B; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The ejection of material during laser ablation gives rise to the development of discontinuities in the ambient gas. Several of these discontinuities are observed and characterized, including externally and internally propagating shock waves, contact surface, and the ionization front. Qualitative experimental observations and analysis of these discontinuities is presented. Results from shadowgraphy enabled determination of an irradiance threshold between two different ablation mechanisms, and determination of several stages of plasma plume evolution. Consideration of the refractive index as a dynamic sum of the contributions from gas and electrons led to separate identification of ionization front from the contact surface. Furthermore, ionization front was observed to lead the shock wave at the earlier stage of the ablation.

  14. In-situ small-angle x-ray scattering study of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavisse, L.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Girault, M.; Potin, V.; Andrzejewski, H.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue A. Savary, BP 47870-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Carles, S.; Mitchell, J. B. A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Hallo, L. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Decloux, J. [Kaluti System, Optique et Laser, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, 91400 Orsay (France)

    2012-04-16

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to probe in-situ the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume generated by pulsed laser irradiation of a titanium metal surface under atmospheric conditions. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized as function of laser irradiance. Two families of nanoparticles were identified with sizes on the order of 10 and 70 nm, respectively. These results were confirmed by ex-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  15. On the mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longwei; Zhao, Peng; Shu, Xingsheng; Shen, Jie; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-08-01

    For the purpose of unveiling the parameters influencing the length of atmospheric pressure plasma plume, an over 165 cm long argon plasma plume is generated in the quartz tube attached to the nozzle of the device. Dependence of plasma length on discharge parameters such as applied voltage, frequency of power supply, and argon gas flow rate was investigated. Experimental results indicated that (a) the applied voltage plays crucial roles on plasma plume length, that is, the plasma plume length exponentially increases with the applied voltage, (b) the plasma plume length increases with frequency, more obviously when the applied voltage is higher, (c) the plasma plume length increases with argon gas flow rate, reaches its maximum at critical value of the gas flow rate, and then decreases again. An evaluation of the physical phenomena involved in streamer propagation, particularly of the energy balance, was investigated. The numerical results were qualitatively consistent with previous experimental results by successfully indicating the high velocity of "plasma bullet" and providing physical mechanism of energy balance determining streamer length.

  16. Modelling the plasma plume of an assist source in PIAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauer, Jochen; Harhausen, Jens; Foest, Rüdiger; Loffhagen, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD) is a technique commonly used to produce high-precision optical interference coatings. Knowledge regarding plasma properties is most often limited to dedicated scenarios without film deposition. Approaches have been made to gather information on the process plasma in situ to detect drifts which are suspected to cause limits in repeatability of resulting layer properties. Present efforts focus on radiance monitoring of the plasma plume of an Advanced Plasma Source (APSpro, Bühler) by optical emission spectroscopy to provide the basis for an advanced plasma control. In this contribution modelling results of the plume region are presented to interpret these experimental data. In the framework of the collisional radiative model used, 15 excited neutral argon states in the plasma are considered. Results of the species densities show good consistency with the measured optical emission of various argon 2 p - 1 s transitions. This work was funded by BMBF under grant 13N13213.

  17. A cold plasma plume with a highly conductive liquid electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guang-Liang; Chen Shi-gua; Chen Wen-Xing; Yang Si-Ze

    2008-01-01

    A cold dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma plume with one highly conductive liquid electrode has been developed to treat thermally sensitive materials, and its preliminary discharging characteristics have been studied. The averaged electron temperature and density is estimated to be 0.6eV and 1011/cm3, respectively. The length of plasma plume can reach 5cm with helium gas (He), and the conductivity of the outer electrode affects the plume length obviously. This plasma plume could be touched by bare hand without causing any burning or painful sensation,which may provide potential application for safe aseptic skin care. Moreover, the oxidative particles (e.g., OH, O*03) in the downstream oxygen (02) gas of the plume have been applied to treat the landfill leachate. The results show that the activated 02 gas can degrade the landfill leachate effectively, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD),conductivity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and suspended solid (SS) can be decreased by 52%, 57%, 76% and 92%, respectively.

  18. Effects of Boundary Conditions on Near Field Plasma Plume Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Iain

    2004-11-01

    The successful development of various types of electric propulsion devices is providing the need for accurate assessment of integration effects generated by the interaction of the plasma plumes of these thrusters with the host spacecraft. Assessment of spacecraft interaction effects in ground based laboratory facilities is inadequate due to the technical difficulties involved in accurately recreating the near vacuum ambient conditions experienced in space. This situation therefore places a heavy demand on computational modeling of plasma plume phenomena. Recently (Boyd and Yim, Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 95, 2004, pp. 4575-5484) a hybrid model of the near field of the plume of a Hall thruster was reported in which the heavy species are modeled using particles and the electrons are modeled using a detailed fluid description. The present study continues the model development and assessment by considering the sensitivity of computed results to different types of boundary conditions that must be formulated for the thruster exit, for the cathode exit, for the thruster walls, and for the plume far field. The model is assessed through comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data measured in the plume of the BHT-200 Hall thruster.

  19. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  20. Electrical conductivity of the dusty plasma in the Enceladus plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Lühr, H.

    2016-11-01

    The plasma conductivity is an important issue for understanding the magnetic field structure registered by Cassini in the Enceladus proximity. We have revise the conductivity mechanism to incorporate the plume nanograins as a new plasma species and take into account the relevant collisional processes including those accounting for the momentum exchange between the charged dust and co-rotating ions. It is concluded that in the Enceladus plume the dust dynamics affects the Pedersen and Hall conductivity more efficiently than the electron depletion associated with the presence of the negatively charged dust as has been suggested by Simon et al. (Simon, S., Saur, J., Kriegel, H., Neubauer, F. M., Motschmann, U., and Dougherty, U. [2011] J. Geophys. Res., 116, A04221, doi:10.1029/2010JA016338). The electron depletion remains a decisive factor for only the parallel conductivity. In the parameter regime relevant for the Enceladus plume, one finds increase of the Pedersen and decrease of the parallel components, whereas for the Hall conductivity the charged dust changes both - its value and the sign. The associated reversed Hall effect depends significantly upon the local dust-to-plasma density ratio. An onset of the reversed Hall effect appears to be restricted to outer parts of the Enceladus plume. The results obtained can significantly modify Enceladus' Alfvén wing structure and thus be useful for interpretations of the magnetic field perturbations registered by the Cassini Magnetometer during the close Enceladus flybys.

  1. Magnetic reconnection between colliding magnetized laser-produced plasma plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Barnak, D H; Chang, P-Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2014-09-05

    Observations of magnetic reconnection between colliding plumes of magnetized laser-produced plasma are presented. Two counterpropagating plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic (CH) targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the Omega EP Laser System. The interaction region between the plumes is prefilled with a low-density background plasma and magnetized by an externally applied magnetic field, imposed perpendicular to the plasma flow, and initialized with an X-type null point geometry with B=0 at the midplane and B=8  T at the targets. The counterflowing plumes sweep up and compress the background plasma and the magnetic field into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing the first detailed observations of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The dynamics of current sheet formation are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations that model the experiments.

  2. Study of Plume Characteristics of a Stationary Plasma Thruster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Zhong; WANG Pingyang; DU Zhaohui; KANG Xiaolu

    2008-01-01

    Electron density and temperature of the plume are measured by a double Langmuir probe in an experimental chamber.A numerical model based on both particle-in-cell scheme and direct simulation Monte Carlo hybrid method is developed to simulate the flow field of plume.The equation for plasma potential is solved by alternative direction implicit technique. The simulation is verified by comparing the computational results with the measured data.The study indicates that the electron temperature of flow field is about 2 eV and the electron density is about 2.5 × 1016 ~ 5 × 1015 m-3 at the central line with a distance of 0.3 ~ 1.0 m downstream of the thruster exit.The model can well predict the flow field parameters of the steady plume.The efforts of this paper are referable for further investigation.

  3. Satellite Microwave Communication Signal Degradation Due To Hall Thruster Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J. C.; Hallock, G. A.; Spencer, E. A.; Meyer, J. W.; Loane, J. T.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a geometric optics vector ray-tracing code, BeamServer, for analyzing the effects of Hall thruster plasma plumes on satellite microwave communication signals. The possible effects include main beam attenuation and squinting, side lobe degradation, and induced cross-polarization. We report on a study of Hall current thruster (HCT) mounting positions on a realistic satellite configuration and a study with a highly shaped reflector. Results indicate HCT signal degradation can occur and should be considered in the satellite design process. Initial results of antenna pattern perturbations due to low frequency plume oscillations driven by thruster instabilities are also given.

  4. Plasma Diagnostic in laser ablation plumes for isotope separation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Juliana B. de [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: juliana@ieav.cta.br; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Neri, Jose W.; Silveira, Carlos A.B. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica

    2008-07-01

    The plasma plume produced in vacuum by ablation of copper, aluminum and tungsten samples, illuminated by copper laser pulses, was investigated. A Langmuir probe was used to study the macroscopic parameters electron number density (Ne) and electron temperature (Te). Plasma expansion velocity (Vp) was also investigated and it was studied the dependence of these parameters with the laser irradiance. Typical values are respectively N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} {approx} 15 eV and Vp {approx} 10 km/s. (author)

  5. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive treatment of high-order harmonic generation in laser-produced plumes, covering the principles, past and present experimental status and important applications. It shows how this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range matured over the course of multiple studies and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications. Significant discoveries and pioneering contributions of researchers in this field carried out in various laser scientific centers worldwide are included in this first attempt to describe the important findings in this area of nonlinear spectroscopy. "High-Order Harmonic Generation in Laser Plasma Plumes" is a self-contained and unified review of the most recent achievements in the field, such as the application of clusters (fullerenes, nanoparticles, nanotubes) for efficient harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in cluster-containin...

  6. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  7. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J.B.A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Carvou, E. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Menneveux, J.; Yu, J. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ouf, F.-X. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire IRSN/PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA BP 68, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Carles, S. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marco de Lucas, M.C., E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • NPs formed in a plasma-plume during laser irradiation of metals (Al, Ti, Ag) were studied. • In situ SAXS and ex situ TEM, XRD and Raman spectra were measured. • NPs size decreased when increasing the O{sub 2} fraction in a controlled O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} atmosphere. • The oxidation of metal NPs in the plasma restricts the increase of the size of the NPs. - Abstract: The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2–5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O{sub 2} percentage in the O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  8. Numerical Studies on Fire-induced Thermal Plumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junmei LI; Yanfeng LI; Wan Ki CHOW; Huairong HUANG

    2005-01-01

    Most of the expressions describing fire plumes reported in the literature are known to be based on experiments.Due to different experimental methods, the geometry of the fire sources, fuel types and surrounding conditions, it is difficult to derive a comprehensive picture of a plume with its temperature and velocity fields on the basis of existing theoretical work. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), which is regarded as a practical engineering tool in fire engineering by the experts, is sure to be able to give more details of the plume behavior under various situations. Aerodynamics for thermally-induced plumes will be studied numerically with CFD. Four typical axisymmetric plume equations will be assessed in this paper, and investigations will be useful for fire engineers in designing smoke management systems in an affordable fashion. This is a critical point in implementing engineering performance-based fire code.

  9. Plasma Plume Characterization of the HERMeS during a 1722-hr Wear Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Williams, George J.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Gilland, James H.; Herman, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    A 1722-hour wear test campaign of NASAs 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding was completed. This wear test campaign, completed in 2016, was divided into four segments including an electrical configuration characterization test, two short duration tests, and one long wear test. During the electrical configuration characterization test, the plasma plume was examined to provide data to support the down select of the electrical configuration for further testing. During the long wear tests, the plasma plume was periodically examined for indications of changes in thruster behavior. Examination of the plasma plume data from the electrical configuration characterization test revealed a correlation between the plume properties and the presence of a conduction path through the front poles. Examination of the long wear test plasma plume data revealed that the plume characteristics remained unchanged during testing to within the measurement uncertainty.

  10. 3-D numerical modeling of plume-induced subduction initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, Marzieh; Gerya, taras; Sobolev, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of mechanisms involved in formation of a new subduction zone can help us to better understand plate tectonics. Despite numerous previous studies, it is still unclear how and where an old oceanic plate starts to subduct beneath the other plate. One of the proposed scenarios for nucleation of subduction is plume-induced subduction initiation, which was investigated in detail, using 2-D models, by Ueda et al. (2008). Recently. Gerya et al. (2015), using 3D numerical models, proposed that plume-lithosphere interaction in the Archean led to the subduction initiation and onset of plate tectonic. In this study, we aim to pursue work of Ueda et al. (2008) by incorporation of 3-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate conditions leading to oceanic subduction initiation as a result of thermal-chemical mantle plume-lithosphere interaction in the modern earth. Results of our experiments show four different deformation regimes in response to plume-lithosphere interaction, that are a) self-sustaining subduction initiation where subduction becomes self-sustained, b) freezing subduction initiation where subduction stops at shallow depths, c) slab break-off where subducting circular slab breaks off soon after formation and d) plume underplating where plume does not pass through the lithosphere but spreads beneath it (failed subduction initiation). These different regimes depend on several parameters such as plume's size, composition and temperature, lithospheric brittle/plastic strength, age of the oceanic lithosphere and presence/absence of lithospheric heterogeneities. Results show that subduction initiates and becomes self-sustained when lithosphere is older than 10 Myr and non-dimensional ratio of the plume buoyancy force and lithospheric strength above the plume is higher than 2.

  11. Spacecraft plume interactions with the magnetosphere plasma environment in geostationary Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephani, K. A.; Boyd, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-based kinetic simulations of steady and unsteady hydrazine chemical rocket plumes are presented in a study of plume interactions with the ambient magnetosphere in geostationary Earth orbit. The hydrazine chemical rocket plume expands into a near-vacuum plasma environment, requiring the use of a combined direct simulation Monte Carlo/particle-in-cell methodology for the rarefied plasma conditions. Detailed total and differential cross sections are employed to characterize the charge exchange reactions between the neutral hydrazine plume mixture and the ambient hydrogen ions, and ion production is also modeled for photoionization processes. These ionization processes lead to an increase in local plasma density surrounding the spacecraft owing to a partial ionization of the relatively high-density hydrazine plume. Results from the steady plume simulations indicate that the formation of the hydrazine ion plume are driven by several competing mechanisms, including (1) local depletion and (2) replenishing of ambient H+ ions by charge exchange and thermal motion of 1 keV H+ from the ambient reservoir, respectively, and (3) photoionization processes. The self-consistent electrostatic field forces and the geostationary magnetic field have only a small influence on the dynamics of the ion plume. The unsteady plume simulations show a variation in neutral and ion plume dissipation times consistent with the variation in relative diffusion rates of the chemical species, with full H2 dissipation (below the ambient number density levels) approximately 33 s after a 2 s thruster burn.

  12. A tandem mirror plasma source for a hybrid plume plasma propulsion concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. F.; Miller, R. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Krueger, W. A.; Chang, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a tandem mirror magnetic plasma confinement device to be considered as a hot plasma source for the hybrid plume rocket concept. The hot plasma from this device is injected into an exhaust duct, which will interact with an annular layer of hypersonic neutral gas. Such a device can be used to study the dynamics of the hybrid plume and to experimentally verify the numerical predictions obtained with computer codes. The basic system design is also geared toward being lightweight and compact, as well as having high power density (i.e., several kW/sq cm) at the exhaust. This feature is aimed toward the feasibility of 'space testing'. The plasma is heated by microwaves. A 50 percent heating efficiency can be obtained by using two half-circle antennas. The preliminary Monte Carlo modeling of test particles result reported here indicates that interaction does take place in the exhaust duct. Neutrals gain energy from the ion, which confirms the hybrid plume concept.

  13. Effect of characteristics of plasma plume on the diamond-like film deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚东升; 刘晶儒; 俞昌旋; 王丽戈; 詹如娟

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed KrF lasers of two different durations (30 ns, 500 fs) are used to deposit DLCfilms. By optical emission spectroscopy and ion probe, the composite species of laser generated plas-ma plume are identified, the average kinetic energy of ions, the plume flux and their variation with laserenergy density, and the distance from the target are investigated. The relation of the properties of de-posited films with the plasma characteristics is studied.

  14. Tidally induced lateral dispersion of the Storfjorden overflow plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wobus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the flow of brine-enriched shelf water from Storfjorden (Svalbard into Fram Strait and onto the western Svalbard Shelf using a regional set-up of NEMO-SHELF, a 3-D numerical ocean circulation model. The model is set up with realistic bathymetry, atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions and tides. The model has 3 km horizontal resolution and 50 vertical levels in the sh-coordinate system which is specially designed to resolve bottom boundary layer processes. In a series of modelling experiments we focus on the influence of tides on the propagation of the dense water plume by comparing results from tidal and non-tidal model runs. Comparisons of non-tidal to tidal simulations reveal a hotspot of tidally induced horizontal diffusion leading to the lateral dispersion of the plume at the southernmost headland of Spitsbergen which is in close proximity to the plume path. As a result the lighter fractions in the diluted upper layer of the plume are drawn into the shallow coastal current that carries Storfjorden water onto the western Svalbard Shelf, while the dense bottom layer continues to sink down the slope. This bifurcation of the plume into a diluted shelf branch and a dense downslope branch is enhanced by tidally induced shear dispersion at the headland. Tidal effects at the headland are shown to cause a net reduction in the downslope flux of Storfjorden water into the deep Fram Strait. This finding contrasts previous results from observations of a dense plume on a different shelf without abrupt topography.

  15. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  16. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a collisionally confined laser-ablated plasma plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, M E; Mancini, R C; Bailey, J; Filuk, A; Clark, B; Lake, P; Abdallah, J

    2007-11-01

    Plasma plumes produced by laser ablation are an established method for manufacturing the high quality stoichiometrically complex thin films used for a variety of optical, photoelectric, and superconducting applications. The state and reproducibility of the plasma close to the surface of the irradiated target plays a critical role in producing high quality thin films. Unfortunately, this dense plasma has historically eluded quantifiable characterization. The difficulty in modeling the plume formation arises in the accounting for the small amount of energy deposited into the target when physical properties of these exotic target materials are not known. In this work we obtain the high density state of the plasma plume through the use of an experimental spectroscopic technique and a custom spectroscopic model. In addition to obtaining detailed temperature and density profiles, issues regarding line broadening and opacity for spectroscopic characterization will be addressed for this unique environment.

  17. Shock wave mediated plume chemistry for molecular formation in laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-16

    Laser ablation is used in a variety of applications albeit formation mechanisms of molecules and nanoclusters are not well understood. We investigated the formation mechanisms of AlO molecules during complex interactions between an Al laser plume expanding into ambient air at atmospheric pressure levels. To produce the plasma a high-purity Al target was ablated using 1064 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Our results show that the plasma chemistry leading to the formation of AlO is mediated by shock waves. During the early times of plasma expansion, the generated shock waves at the plume edges act as a barrier for the combustion process and the molecular formation is prevalent after the shockwave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of Al and AlO highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and its relation to plume hydrodynamics.

  18. Plasma observations during the Mars atmospheric "plume" event of March-April 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, D J; Edberg, N J T; Gurnett, D A; Hall, B E S; Holmström, M; Lester, M; Morgan, D D; Opgenoorth, H J; Ramstad, R; Sanchez-Cano, B; Way, M; Witasse, O

    2016-01-01

    We present initial analysis and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported "Mars plume event" of March - April 2012. During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude "plume" over the Martian dawn terminator [Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature14162], the cause of which remains to be explained. The estimated brightness of the plume exceeds that expected for auroral emissions, and its projected altitude greatly exceeds that at which clouds are expected to form. We report on in-situ measurements of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters throughout this interval made by Mars Express, obtained over the same surface region, but at the opposing terminator. Measurements in the ionosphere at the corresponding location frequently show a disturbed structure, though this is not atypical for such regions with intense crustal magnetic fields. We tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the alt...

  19. Plasma-gas interactions studies in a hybrid plume plasma rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, F. R.; Krueger, W. A.; Yang, T. F.; Fisher, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma-gas interaction was investigated and the basic mechanisms for energy and particle transport. The solution approach assumes cylindrical geometry and includes a multiplicity of atomic reactions, and the presence of a strong magnetic field is described. The principal reactions are electron and ion impact ionization, and charge exchange between hot ions and cold neutrals. Radial particle and energy transport is mainly by diffusion. A modified Bohm diffusion model for plasma in the core of the plume, and classical neutral particle diffusion in the cooler regions of the flow are presented. Neutrals are allowed to free stream in the low density regions, where the collision mean-free-path becomes comparable, or even larger than the characteristic dimensions of the system.

  20. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser-Ablation Plasma Plumes at Various Ar Ambient Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Phillips, Mark C.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-07-28

    Expansion dynamics and internal plume structures of fs laser ablated brass plasma in Ar at various pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric were studied using multitude of diagnostic tools including time resolved and time integrated 2-dimensional imaging, optical time of flight measurements and visible emission spectroscopy. Temporal evolution of excited Cu and Zn species in the plume were imaged using band pass interference filters and compared its hydrodynamic expansion features with spectrally integrated images of the plume. 2D imaging coupled with monochromatic line selection showed several interesting features at various pressure levels which include velocity differences among the plume species, emission intensity distribution, plasma temperature, electron density etc. Plume confinement, enhanced signal intensity, and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were observed at intermediate pressure range of ~10 Torr. Optimum signal to background ratio was also observed in this pressure range. Possible mechanisms for observed changes in plume shape, optical emission intensity and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were discussed.

  1. Iodine Plasma Species Measurements in a Hall Effect Thruster Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    vary across the plume. Furthermore, ion energy measurements here and historically show non - Maxwellian ion velocity distributions that vary with...related to beam composition or to non -uniformities in the gas flow distribution. Thus, thrust data are not reported...distribution is far from Maxwellian . D. Combined Probe The combined ESA/ExB probe was used to analyze specific populations selected from the ESA data

  2. Evolution of the plasma parameters in the expanding laser ablation plume of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.;

    2002-01-01

    The angular and radial variation of the ion density and electron temperature in the plasma plume produced by laser ablation of silver at fluences of 0.8-1.3 J cm(-2) at 355 nm have been studied using a time-resolving Langmuir probe. The angular dependence of the electron temperature and the magni...

  3. A linear-field plasma jet for generating a brush-shaped laminar plume at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Li, Jiyuan; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2016-06-01

    A linear-field plasma jet composed of line-to-plate electrodes is used to generate a large-scale brush-shaped plasma plume with flowing argon used as working gas. Through electrical measurement and fast photography, it is found that the plasma plume bridges the two electrodes for the discharge in the positive voltage half-cycle, which behaves like fast moving plasma bullets directed from the anode to the cathode. Compared with the positive discharge, the negative discharge only develops inside the nozzle and propagates much slower. Results also indicate that the gas temperature of the plume is close to room temperature, which is promising for biomedical application.

  4. Fortuitous Plasma Observations During the Mars Atmospheric "Plume" Event of March-April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David; Barabash, Stas; Edberg, Niklas; Gurnett, Donald; Hall, Ben; Holmström, Mats; Lester, Mark; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Ramstad, Robin; Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Way, Michael; Witasse, Olivier; Morgan, David

    2016-04-01

    We present initial analysis and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported `Mars Dust plume event' of March - April 2012.During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude feature over the Martian terminator [Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature14162], the explanation for which remains incomplete. The brightness of the feature in visible light is too extreme for auroral emissions to explain, despite its occurrence at a location where these have been previously reported. Likewise, the (projected) altitude of the feature is significantly too high to allow for the local formation of clouds. Fortuitously, the orbit of ESA's Mars Express allowed the measurement of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters over the precise location of the plume sighting at multiple points during this interval. Based on these observations, we tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the altitudes where it was observed was in part the result of a large Coronal Mass Ejection encountering the Martian system. However, while measurements of ionospheric plasma density at the corresponding altitudes indicate a disturbed structure, this is not a-typical of this location over Mars. Finally, we briefly discuss some possible mechanisms that may lead to the formation of this plume.

  5. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  6. Experimental studies of the effect target geometry on the evolution of laser produced plasma plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Cuyler; Anderson, Austin; Iratcabal, Jeremy; Dutra, Eric; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of the laser plumes was shown to be dependent on the initial target geometry. A 16 channel framing camera was used to record the plume shape and propagation speeds were determined from analysis of the images. Plastic targets were manufactured using different methods including 3D printing, CNC machining and vacuum casting. Preliminary target designs were made using a 3D printer and ABS plastic material. These targets were then tested using a 3 J laser with a 5 ns duration pulse. Targets with a deep conical depression were shown to produce highly collimated plumes when compared to flat top targets. Preliminary results of these experiments will be discussed along with planned future experiments that will use the indented targets with a 30 J laser with a 0.8 ns duration pulse in preparation for pinched laser plume experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Other polymers that are readily available in a deuterated form will also be explored as part of an effort to develop a cost effective plasma plume target for follow on neutron production experiments. Dr. Austin Anderson.

  7. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding titanium with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Mironov, V. D.; Prokopova, N. M.; Tret'yakov, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to the research of welding plume during high power ytterbium fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy in the Ar shielding gas environment. High speed video observation of a vapor-plasma plume for visualization of processes occurring at laser welding was carried out. The coefficient of the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is calculated for a plasma welding plume by results of spectrometer researches. The conclusion deals with the impact of plasma on a high-power fiber laser radiation.

  8. 3-D thermo-mechanical modeling of plume-induced subduction initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, M.; Gerya, T.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we study the 3-D subduction initiation process induced by the interaction between a hot thermo-chemical mantle plume and oceanic lithosphere using thermo-mechanical viscoplastic finite difference marker-in-cell models. Our numerical modeling results show that self-sustaining subduction is induced by plume-lithosphere interaction when the plume is sufficiently buoyant, the oceanic lithosphere is sufficiently old and the plate is weak enough to allow the buoyant plume to pass through it. Subduction initiation occurs following penetration of the lithosphere by the hot plume and the downward displacement of broken, nearly circular segments of lithosphere (proto-slabs) as a result of partially molten plume rocks overriding the proto-slabs. Our experiments show four different deformation regimes in response to plume-lithosphere interaction: a) self-sustaining subduction initiation, in which subduction becomes self-sustaining; b) frozen subduction initiation, in which subduction stops at shallow depths; c) slab break-off, in which the subducting circular slab breaks off soon after formation; and d) plume underplating, in which the plume does not pass through the lithosphere and instead spreads beneath it (i.e., failed subduction initiation). These regimes depend on several parameters, such as the size, composition, and temperature of the plume, the brittle/plastic strength and age of the oceanic lithosphere, and the presence/absence of lithospheric heterogeneities. The results show that subduction initiates and becomes self-sustaining when the lithosphere is older than 10 Myr and the non-dimensional ratio of the plume buoyancy force and lithospheric strength above the plume is higher than approximately 2. The outcomes of our numerical experiments are applicable for subduction initiation in the modern and Precambrian Earth and for the origin of plume-related corona structures on Venus.

  9. Absorption tomography of laser induced plasmas with a large aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Shabanov, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    An emission tomography of laser-induced plasmas employed in the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) requires long signal integration times during which the plasma cannot be considered stationary. To reduce the integration time, it is proposed to measure a plasma absorption in parallel rays with an aperture that collects light coming from large fractions of the plasma plume at each aperture position. The needed spatial resolution is achieved by a special numerical data processing. Another advantage of the proposed procedure is that inexpensive linear CCD or non-discrete (PMT, photodiode) detectors can be used instead of costly 2-dimensional detectors.

  10. DETERMINATION OF PROMINENCE PLASMA {beta} FROM THE DYNAMICS OF RISING PLUMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, Andrew [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hillier, Richard [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Durgesh, E-mail: andrew@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2012-12-20

    Observations by the Hinode satellite show in great detail the dynamics of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, in quiescent prominences that propagate from large ({approx}10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of the prominences. These plumes present a very interesting opportunity to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena in quiescent prominences, but obstacles still remain. One of the biggest issues is that of the magnetic field strength, which is not easily measurable in prominences. In this paper we present a method that may be used to determine a prominence's plasma {beta} when rising plumes are observed. Using the classic fluid dynamic solution for flow around a circular cylinder with an MHD correction, the compression of the prominence material can be estimated. This has been successfully confirmed through simulations; application to a prominence gave an estimate of the plasma {beta} as {beta} = 0.47 {+-} 0.079 to 1.13 {+-} 0.080 for the range {gamma} = 1.4-1.7. Using this method it may be possible to estimate the plasma {beta} of observed prominences, therefore helping our understanding of a prominence's dynamics in terms of MHD phenomena.

  11. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation. II. Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L.; Nie, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-12-01

    One of the distinguishable features of plasma jets compared with the traditional streamers is their repeatable propagation. As an initial objective, the effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of plasma plume propagation is investigated numerically. Besides residual electrons left from previous pulses, the electrons detached from O2 - ions could also be a significant source of the seed electrons to affect the repeatability of plasma plume propagation when an electronegative gas admixture is presented. In this investigation, a global plasma chemical kinetics model is developed to investigate the temporal evolution of the electron and O2 - ions in the afterglow of a plasma plume driven by microsecond pulse direct current voltages, at a total gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa or 4 × 103 Pa in helium or helium-oxygen mixtures with an air impurity of 0.025%. In addition, a Monte Carlo technique has been applied to calculate the O2 - detachment rate coefficient. Accordingly, the seed electron density due to detachment from O2 - ions for different percentages of oxygen is obtained. Finally, the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullets to propagate in a repeatable mode is obtained according to the critical frequency from the experiments. It is found that the order of minimum seed electron number density required for repeatable propagation mode is independent of oxygen concentrations in the helium-oxygen mixture. It is 10 8 cm - 3 for 20 kPa and 10 7 cm - 3 for 4 kPa. Furthermore, for the helium with an air impurity of 0.025%, the residual electrons left over from previous discharges are the main source of seed electrons. On the other hand, when 0.5% of O2 is added, the detachment of O2 - is the main source of the seed electrons.

  12. Pulsed microwave-driven argon plasma jet with distinctive plume patterns resonantly excited by surface plasmon polaritons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兆权; 殷志祥; 夏广庆; 洪伶俐; 胡业林; 刘明海; 胡希伟

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric lower-power pulsed microwave argon cold plasma jets are obtained by using coaxial transmission line resonators in ambient air. The plasma jet plumes are generated at the end of a metal wire placed in the middle of the dielec-tric tubes. The electromagnetic model analyses and simulation results suggest that the discharges are excited resonantly by the enhanced electric field of surface plasmon polaritons. Moreover, for conquering the defect of atmospheric argon filamentation discharges excited by 2.45-GHz continued microwave, the distinctive patterns of the plasma jet plumes can be maintained by applying different gas flow rates of argon gas, frequencies of pulsed modulator, duty cycles of pulsed microwave, peak values of input microwave power, and even by using different materials of dielectric tubes. In addition, the emission spectrum, the plume temperature, and other plasma parameters are measured, which shows that the proposed pulsed microwave plasma jets can be adjusted for plasma biomedical applications.

  13. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  14. Microwave interrogation of an air plasma plume as a model system for hot spots in explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Ronald J.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Klunder, Gregory L.; Baluyot, Emer V.; Densmore, John M.; Converse, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of hot spots within explosives is critical to understand for predicting how detonation waves form and propagate. However, it is challenging to observe hot spots directly because they are small (˜micron diameter), form quickly (much less than a microsecond), and many explosives of interest are optically opaque. Microwaves are well-suited to characterize hot spots because they readily penetrate most explosives. They also have sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to measure the coalescence of an ensemble of hot spots inside explosives. Here we employ 94 GHz microwaves to characterize the evolution of individual plasma plumes formed by laser ionization of air. We use interferometry to obtain plume diameter as a function of time. Although the plasma plumes are larger than individual hot spots in explosives, they expand rapidly and predictably, and their structure can be optically imaged. They are therefore useful model systems to establish the spatial and temporal limits of microwave interferometry (MI) for understanding more complex hot spot behavior in solid explosives.

  15. Destratification induced by bubble plumes as a means to reduce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to reduce evaporation from open impoundments. M van Dijk* and SJ van .... The air injection bubble plume system used for water quality applications has been ...... ervoir Evaporation Utilizing Mass Transfer Theory. US Geological. Survey.

  16. Hydrocarbon Rocket Engine Plume Imaging with Laser Induced Incandescence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) needs sensors that can be operated on rocket engine plume environments to improve NASA/SSC rocket engine performance. In...

  17. A Critical study on Fire-induced Aerodynamics of Balcony Spill Plumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Balcony spill plume is one of the main plume forms in an atrium fh'e, its thermal behavior which is important to the designers for the smoke control system design is still not well understood now. The fire-induced aerodynamics of balcony spill plume would be studied by the numerical method in this paper. Some uncertainties relating to the available calculation methods for the smoke production rate would be reexamined. Numerical results indicated that using an entrainment coefficient 0.11 would be better than 0.16 in describing the entrainment behavior, end effect should not be ignored for the plume being not two-dimensional (2-D). Suitable empirical spill plume equations would be recommended for the smoke management system design.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Investigations of Laser Ablation Plasma Plume Density and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iratcabal, Jeremy; Bach, Bernhard; Beatty, Cuyler; Dutra, Eric; Darling, Timothy; Wiewior, Piotr; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Laser ablation of solid targets with laser intensities of the order of 108-1011 W/cm2 provides a rich platform for investigating the density and composition of coexisting molecular, atomic, and ion species in the resulting plasma plume. Experiments measuring the spatial- and temporal-evolution of laser ablation plumes have been performed to simultaneously characterize the multiple parameters related to the energy and momentum partitioning of the incident laser energy as the ablation process occurs. The temperature, density, and relative populations of different molecular, atomic, and ion species can be determined by the simultaneous measurement of optical and charged particle spectroscopy, fast imaging cameras, and optical interferometric diagnostics. Additionally, background gas pressure, density, and species were carefully varied. A comparison of density measurements obtained with multiple interferometric, spectroscopic, and fast imaging diagnostics for a carbon ablation plume expanding into vacuum and into background gases with different Reynolds numbers will be presented. Atomic, molecular, and ion species population evolution will be presented as measured with optical and charged particle spectroscopy. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE NNSA Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002075 and National Securities Technologies, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946/subcontract No. 165819.

  19. High-order harmonic generation in a plasma plume of in situ laser-produced silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, H.; Ganeev, R. A.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Chakravarty, U.; Vora, H. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Navathe, C. P.; Deb, S. K.; Gupta, P. D.

    2010-10-01

    The results of the experimental study of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from the interaction of 45-fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses with plasma plumes of Ag nanoparticles produced in situ are presented in this article. The nanoparticles were generated by the interaction of 300-ps, 20-mJ laser pulses with bulk silver targets at an intensity of ~1×1013W/cm2. The spectral characteristics of the HHG from nanoparticles produced in situ are compared with the HHG from monoparticle plasma plumes and with the HHG from preformed nanoparticle-containing plasma plumes. The cutoff harmonic order generated using the in situ silver nanoparticles is at the 21st harmonic order.

  20. Plasma plume diagnostics of low power stationary plasma thruster (SPT-20M8) with collisional radiative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttamsing Rajput, Rajendrasing; Alona, Khaustova; Loyan, Andriy V.

    2017-03-01

    Electric propulsion offers higher specific impulse compared to the chemical propulsion systems. It reduces the overall propellant mass and enables high operational lifetimes. Scientific Technological Center of Space Power and Energy (STC SPE), KhAI is involved in designing, manufacturing and testing of stationary plasma thrusters (SPT). Efforts are made to perform plasma diagnostics with corona and collisional radiative models (C-R model), as expected corona model falls short below 4 eV because of the heavy particle collisions elimination, whereas the C-R model's applicability is confirmed. Several tests are performed to analyze the electron temperature at various operational parameters of thruster like discharge voltage and mass flow rate. SPT-20M8 far and near-field plumes diagnostics are performed. Feasibility of C-R model by comparing its result to optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to investigate the electron temperature is validated with the probe measurements within the 10% of discrepancy.

  1. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5–6 J/cm{sup 2}) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis. - Highlights: • Ablated ground-state species accumulated in a thin hemispherical boundary layer • Inside the layer, a cavity containing a small density of ablated species was formed. • The hemispherical layers of atoms and ions appeared at a nearly identical location. • The measured intensity peak variation was in good agreement with a model prediction. • We ascribed the dominant process for forming the layer to a three

  2. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocarlan, C.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; 10.1063/1.4822333

    2013-01-01

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive selffocusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.01018 cm3, the peak normalized...

  3. Pulsed microwave-driven argon plasma jet with distinctive plume patterns resonantly excited by surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Quan; Yin, Zhi-Xiang; Xia, Guang-Qing; Hong, Ling-Li; Hu, Ye-Lin; Liu, Ming-Hai; Hu, Xi-Wei; A. Kudryavtsev, A.

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric lower-power pulsed microwave argon cold plasma jets are obtained by using coaxial transmission line resonators in ambient air. The plasma jet plumes are generated at the end of a metal wire placed in the middle of the dielectric tubes. The electromagnetic model analyses and simulation results suggest that the discharges are excited resonantly by the enhanced electric field of surface plasmon polaritons. Moreover, for conquering the defect of atmospheric argon filamentation discharges excited by 2.45-GHz of continued microwave, the distinctive patterns of the plasma jet plumes can be maintained by applying different gas flow rates of argon gas, frequencies of pulsed modulator, duty cycles of pulsed microwave, peak values of input microwave power, and even by using different materials of dielectric tubes. In addition, the emission spectrum, the plume temperature, and other plasma parameters are measured, which shows that the proposed pulsed microwave plasma jets can be adjusted for plasma biomedical applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11105002 and 61170172), the Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province, China (Grant Nos. 1408085QA16 and 1408085ME101), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M551788), and the Open-end Fund of State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology (HUST), China (Grant No. GZ1301).

  4. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  5. Plasma generation induced by triboelectrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Michelsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    A gas discharge plasma can be induced by triboelectrification around a sliding contact. The detailed physical mechanism of triboelectrification is unknown, but an empirical classification scheme can be referred to in practice. It is reported that intense ultra-violet emission from a plasma...

  6. Thomson scattering from laser induced plasma in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierzega, K; Mendys, A [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S; Thouin, E [GREMI - site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France); Travaille, G; Bousquet, B; Canioni, L [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence CEDEX (France); Pokrzywka, B, E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.p [Mt. Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University of Cracow, ul. Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland)

    2010-05-01

    The laser induced plasma in air produced by 6 ns, 532 nm Nd:YAG pulses with 25 mJ energy was studied using the Thomson scattering method and plasma imaging techniques. Plasma images and Thomson scattered spectra were registered at delay times ranging from 150 ns to 1 {mu}s after the breakdown pulses. The electron density and temperature, as determined in the core of the plasma plume, were found to decrease from 7.4 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} to about 1.03 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and from 100 900 K to 22 700 K. The highly elevated electron temperatures are the result of plasma heating by the second, probe pulse in the Thomson scattering experiments.

  7. Laser ablation of (GeSe2)100-x(Sb2Se3)x chalcogenide glasses: Influence of the target composition on the plasma plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimiciuc, S.; Boidin, R.; Bulai, G.; Gurlui, S.; Nemec, P.; Nazabal, V.; Focsa, C.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics and properties of the (GeSe2)100-x(Sb2Se3)x laser-induced plasma were investigated by fast ICCD imaging and space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The experiments were performed at 10-6 Torr background pressure, using the second harmonic (532 nm) of the Nd-YAG laser (10 ns, 10 Hz). For all investigated samples, the ICCD images revealed a splitting of the plasma plume into three components with distinct dynamics. Based on OES measurements, the first and second plasma structures were found to be represented mainly by ionic and neutral species, respectively. As the Sb2Se3 content of the samples increases, the three structures present an increase in their velocities. This dynamic variation and also the compositional dependence of the excitation temperature obtained from Boltzmann plots were correlated to the changes in the structure and electrical/thermal properties of the bulk chalcogenide glasses.

  8. Comparative investigation of laser ablation plumes in air and argon by analysis of spectral line shapes: Insights on calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Jörg, E-mail: hermann@lp3.univ-mrs.fr [LP3, CNRS — Aix Marseille University, 163 Av. de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Gerhard, Christoph [Laboratory of Laser and Plasma Technologies, University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Straße 99, 37085 Göttingen (Germany); Axente, Emanuel [Laser–Surface–Plasma Interactions Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Măgurele (Romania); Dutouquet, Christophe [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS/DRC/CARA/NOVA), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-En-Halatte (France)

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the characteristic features of plume expansion in air and argon resulting from ultraviolet laser ablation of solid matter in conditions typically applied in material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Barite crown glass is chosen as a target material for the characteristic emission spectrum suitable for plasma diagnostics. The space-integrated plasma emission spectrum recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector is compared to the computed spectral radiance of a nonuniform plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. In particular, resonance lines of neutral sodium atoms and barium ions are observed to probe gradients of temperature and density within the plume. It is shown that laser ablation in argon leads to an almost uniform plasma whereas gradients of temperature and density are evidenced in ambient air. The discrepancy is attributed to the different physical properties of both gases leading to a stronger vapor–gas energy exchange in the case of air. However, strong gradients occur only in a thin peripheral zone, close to the vapor–gas contact front. The larger plasma core appears almost uniform. The peripheral zone of low temperature mostly contributes to the plasma emission spectrum by absorption and material analysis via calibration-free LIBS in air may ignore the nonuniform character of the plasma if only transitions of small optical thickness are considered. - Highlights: • Investigation of laser ablation plumes by analysis of spectral line shapes • Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform laser-produced plasmaPlasma is more uniform for ablation in argon. • Plasma nonuniformity mostly affects optically thick lines. • Calibration-free LIBS may ignore gradients if optically thin lines are chosen.

  9. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Shcheglov, P. Yu.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Gumenyuk, A. V.; Rethmeier, M.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted spectroscopic studies of the welding plasma formed in the process of welding with an ytterbium fiber laser delivering output power of up to 20 kW. The influence of shielding gases (Ar, He) on different parts of the welding plume is investigated. The absorption coefficient of the laser radiation by the welding-plume plasma is estimated. Scattering of 532-nm probe radiation from particles of the condensed metal vapor within the caustic of a high-power fiber laser beam is measured. Based on the obtained results, conclusions are made on the influence of the plasma formation and metal vapor condensation on the radiation of the high-power fiber laser and the stability of the welding process.

  10. Feasibility study of in-situ measurements of Europa's neutral and plasma plumes with JUICE/PEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrighs, Hans; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Vermeersen, Bert

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of the neutral and plasma particles originating from the Europa plume [1] by simulating their trajectories in order to evaluate their in-situ detection by the PEP (Particle Environment Package) instrument, a part of the JUICE scientific payload. We first produced neutral test particles by assuming source characteristics (temperature and mass flux) of the water plume. Subsequently these particles were traced under Europa's gravity field to obtain the density distribution of the plume gas. Then test particles representing water molecule ions were produced by combining the neutral density distribution and a time constant for electron impact reactions. Subsequently the trajectories of the produced water molecule ions were traced under the Jovian corotational electromagnetic field. Finally, from the calculated neutral density and the plasma velocity distributions, we emulated the observations of the neutrals and ions along the two Europa flybys planned for the JUICE mission. We did this specifically for the PEP/NIM (Neutral gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer) and PEP/JDC (Jovian plasma Dynamics and Composition analyser) sensor. The derived signal to noise ratios are well above the detection limits of NIM and JDC (S/N>100 and >10, respectively), even if we assume a rather low-mass-flux plume (˜0.7 kg/s, which is 104 times less than what was reported in [1]). The flux is significantly asymmetrical between the inbound and outbound trajectory, because the charged particles are flowing downtail (leading hemisphere direction) due to the Jovian co-rotation flow. [1] Roth, L., J. Saur, K. D. Retherford, D. F. Strobel, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and F. Nimmo, Transient water vapor at europa's south pole, Science, 343(6167), 171-174, doi:10.1126/science.1247051, 2014.

  11. Plate tectonics on the Earth triggered by plume-induced subduction initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T V; Stern, R J; Baes, M; Sobolev, S V; Whattam, S A

    2015-11-12

    Scientific theories of how subduction and plate tectonics began on Earth--and what the tectonic structure of Earth was before this--remain enigmatic and contentious. Understanding viable scenarios for the onset of subduction and plate tectonics is hampered by the fact that subduction initiation processes must have been markedly different before the onset of global plate tectonics because most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are both consequences of plate tectonics. However, plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without the help of plate tectonics. Here, we test this mechanism using high-resolution three-dimensional numerical thermomechanical modelling. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained subduction: (1) a strong, negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) focused magmatic weakening and thinning of lithosphere above the plume; and (3) lubrication of the slab interface by hydrated crust. We also show that plume-induced subduction could only have been feasible in the hotter early Earth for old oceanic plates. In contrast, younger plates favoured episodic lithospheric drips rather than self-sustained subduction and global plate tectonics.

  12. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fukao; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-01-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam obs...

  13. Time of Flight Measurements of a Plasma Plume in a Glass Tube With and Without a Metal Liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler Kawaguchi, C.; Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R.; Kaur, M.; Johnson, H. K.

    2016-10-01

    Researchers have yet to attain a self-sustaining fusion reaction in which the amount of energy put in is less than that being produced. A novel approach for the compression and heating of plasma is under development at Swarthmore College with collaboration from Bryn Mawr College through the ARPA-E ALPHA program. Two acceleration modules are being designed to accelerate and compress plasma plumes using pulsed copper rings outside of a glass chamber (module one) and inside of a stainless steel chamber (module two). Measurements of plasma velocity are made using a time of flight technique using Hall probes and magnetic pickup probes (B-dot) probes to measure magnetic field at an array of spatial locations along the chamber. Results shows that the response time of the Hall probe chip used was too slow to register the fast changing fields. B-dot probes were shown to have a fast enough response. Time of flight measurements of field are made in the glass tube using cross correlation methods, with and without a stainless steel liner. Preliminary results show an average increase in the plasma plume velocity, from 38 km/s to 45 km/s, when the glass chamber is lined. Work supported by ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  14. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fukao

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF, probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  15. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-07-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE) is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  16. Comparison of pulsating DC and DC power air-water plasma jet: A method to decrease plume temperature and increase ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Hu, H.; Lei, J.; Hu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Most air-water plasma jets are rich in hydroxyl radicals (•OH), but the plasma has higher temperatures, compared to that of pure gas, especially when using air as working gas. In this paper, pulsating direct current (PDC) power was used to excite the air-water plasma jet to reduce plume temperature. In addition to the temperature, other differences between PDC and DC plasma jets are not yet clear. Thus, comparative studies of those plasmas are performed to evaluate characteristics, such as breakdown voltage, temperature, and reactive oxygen species. The results show that the plume temperature of PDC plasma is roughly 5-10 °C lower than that of DC plasma in the same conditions. The •OH content of PDC is lower than that of DC plasma, whereas the O content of PDC plasma is higher. The addition of water leads in an increase in the plume temperature and in the production of •OH with two types of power supplies. The production of O inversely shows a declining tendency with higher water ratio. The most important finding is that the PDC plasma with 100% water ratio achieves lower temperature and more abundant production of •OH and O, compared with DC plasma with 0% water ratio.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsel, Kasper; Groenen, Rik; Bastiaens, Bert; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2016-12-01

    We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO) in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Orsel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We record the two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF on multiple plasma constituents in a YBiO3 plasma. This allows us to directly link the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of the plasma species (Y, YO, Bi, and BiO in different background gas compositions, we find that little direct chemical interaction takes place between the plasma plume constituents and the background gas. However, a strong influence of the background gas composition can be seen on the YBO film growth, as well as a strong correlation between the oxygen fraction in the background gas and the amount of YO in the plasma plume. We assign this correlation to a direct interaction between the background gas and the target in between ablation pulses. In an O2 background, an oxygen-rich surface layer forms in between ablation pulses, which provides additional oxygen for the plasma plume during target ablation. This differs from our previous observations in STO and LAO plasmas, where species oxidation primarily takes place during propagation of the plasma plume towards the substrate.

  19. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA 300M Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; KamHawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA 300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 DT,m downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 DT,m from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the nearfield, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was small, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA 300 M.

  20. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  1. Classification of plastic materials by imaging laser-induced ablation plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Pelascini, Frederic; Yu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A method of rapid classification and identification of plastic materials has been studied in this work. Such method is based on fast spectroscopic imagery of laser-induced ablation plume on plastics to be analyzed. More specifically, a classification schema has been developed first according to the nature of the CC bonds which characterize the polymer matrix. Our results show that the spatial distribution and the evolution of the molecular species in the ablation plume, such as C2 and CN, exhibit clear different behaviors for polymers without any native CC bond, with CC single bonds or with CC double bonds respectively. Therefore the morphological parameters of the populations of the molecular species extracted from the time-resolved spectroscopic images of the plumes provide efficient indicators to classify the polymers characterized by the above mentioned different kinds of CC bonds. When dealing with different polymers with the same kind of CC bond, CC single bond for instance, other indicators should be introduced to provide the further discrimination. Such indicators can be for example a specific native molecular bond other than CC bonds, CN for example, the total emission intensity of which may exhibit specific time evolution. The robustness of the developed classification schema has been then studied with respect to two of the most frequently used additives in plastics fabrication, graphite and titanium. Our results show a negligible influence of these additives in the morphology of the populations of the molecular species when such additives are mixed into the polymer matrix with the percentages usually used in plastics productions, which demonstrates the validity of the developed classification schema for plastics.

  2. Composition and species evolution in a laser-induced LuMnO3 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bator, Matthias; Hu, Yi; Esposito, Martin; Schneider, Christof W.; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    Pulsed laser deposition is often used to grow multi-elemental thin films from stoichiometric targets. The growth process is influenced by a wide variety of parameters like the target composition, background gases, laser wavelength, laser fluence, or spot size. The changes these parameters induce in the film growth also affect the plasma plume and species formed during laser ablation. For oxide growth O2, and sometimes N2O, is utilized as background gas to achieve the required oxygen composition for the as-grown film. Mass spectrometry combined with time- and space resolved emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the behavior and evolution of plasma species in the plasma plume during the ablation process of LuMnO3 dependent on the background gas.

  3. 大气压空气等离子体羽的振动温度研究%Vibrational Temperature of Plasma Plume in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪辰; 常媛媛; 贾鹏英; 赵欢欢; 鲍文婷

    2013-01-01

    A tri-electrode discharge device was designed in a dielectric barrier discharge configurations to generate a fairly large volume plasma plume in atmospheric pressure air.The discharge characteristics of the plasma plume were investigated by an optical method.The discharge emission from the plasma plume was collected by a photomultiplier tube.It was found that the number of discharge pulse per cycle of the applied voltage increased with increasing the peak value of the applied voltage.The emission spectra of the plasma plume were collected by a spectrometer.The vibrational temperature was calculated by fitting the experimental data to the theoretical one.Results showed that the vibrational temperature of the plasma plume decreases with increasing the Up.Spatially resolved measurement of the vibrational temperature was also conducted on the plasma plume with the same method.Results showed that the vibrational temperature increases firstly and then decreases with increasing distance from the nozzle.The vibrational temperature reachs its maximum when the distance is 5.4 mm from the nozzle.These experimental phenomena were analyzed qualitatively based on the discharge theory.These results have important significance for the industrial applications of the plasma plume in atmospheric pressure air.%利用三电极介质阻挡放电装置,在大气压空气中产生了较大体积的等离子体羽.采用光学方法对该等离子体羽的特性进行了研究.发现随着外加电压峰值增加,每个外加电压周期的放电脉冲个数增加.通过采集等离子体羽的发射光谱,空间分辨地研究了放电等离子体羽的振动温度.结果表明等离子体羽的振动温度随着外加电压峰值的增加而减小;随着远离喷嘴的距离的增加,等离子体振动温度先增加后减小,当距离喷嘴5.4mm时振动温度达到最高值.对上述现象进行了定性分析.研究结果对大气压空气等离子体羽在杀菌消毒等领域的应用具有重要意义.

  4. Turbulence-induced anomalous electron diffusion in the plume of the VASIMR VX-200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christopher; Ballenger, Maxwell; Squire, Jared; Longmier, Benjamin; Carter, Mark; Glover, Tim

    2012-10-01

    The separation of electrons from magnetic nozzles is critical to the function of the VASIMR engine and is of general importance to the field of electric propulsion. Separation of electrons by means of anomalous cross field diffusion is considered. Plume measurements using spectral analysis of custom high frequency probes characterizes the nature of oscillating electric fields in the expanding magnetic nozzle. The oscillating electric field results in frequency dependent density variations that can lead to anomalously high transport in the absence of collisions mimicking collisional transport. The spatial structure of the fluctuating fields is consistent with turbulence caused by separation of energetic (> 100 eV) non-magnetized ions and low energy magnetized electrons via the modified two-stream instability (MTSI) and generalized lower hybrid drift instability (GLHDI). Electric fields as high as 300 V/m are observed at frequencies up to an order of magnitude above the lower hybrid frequency. The electric field fluctuations dissipate with increasing axial distance consistent with changes in ion flux streamlines as plasma detachment occurs.

  5. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.; Belenkiy, V. Ya.; Koleva, E. G.; Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 1016 m-3, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A.m-2, i.e. 8 mA for a 3-10 cm2 collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  6. Development of a non-equilibrium 60 MHz plasma jet with a long discharge plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Kawabata, Kazufumi; Ito, Taiki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-01

    High-frequency plasma jets driven by voltages in the frequency range of 6-60 MHz are developed. A long plasma jet, 40 mm in length, is successfully produced by using a pair of ring electrodes outside a quartz tube. The electrode pair consists of a wide power electrode and a narrow ground electrode that is positioned at the head of the tube. The ratio of the length of the ground electrode to the length of the power electrode must be small in order to produce long plasma jets. The high-frequency plasma jet is operated in a non-thermal-equilibrium state at a gas temperature of around 60 °C. Operation at the very-high-frequency of 60 MHz leads to a lower discharge voltage and lower electron energy compared to lower frequencies of 6 and 13.56 MHz. The ability of the very-high-frequency (60 MHz) plasma jet to produce reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in water is also investigated. High H2O2 and NO3- concentrations of more than 1 mmol/l are realized by irradiating 3 ml of deionized water with the plasma for a short period of 2 min.

  7. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  8. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kukushkin, A. S. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  9. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  10. USM3D Simulations of Saturn V Plume Induced Flow Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deere, Karen; Elmlilgui, Alaa; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program included the Ares V heavy lift cargo vehicle. During the design stage, engineers questioned if the Plume Induced Flow Separation (PIFS) that occurred along Saturn V rocket during moon missions at some flight conditions, would also plague the newly proposed rocket. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was offered as a tool for initiating the investigation of PIFS along the Ares V rocket. However, CFD best practice guidelines were not available for such an investigation. In an effort to establish a CFD process and define guidelines for Ares V powered simulations, the Saturn V vehicle was used because PIFS flight data existed. The ideal gas, computational flow solver USM3D was evaluated for its viability in computing PIFS along the Saturn V vehicle with F-1 engines firing. Solutions were computed at supersonic freestream conditions, zero degree angle of attack, zero degree sideslip, and at flight Reynolds numbers. The effects of solution sensitivity to grid refinement, turbulence models, and the engine boundary conditions on the predicted PIFS distance along the Saturn V were discussed and compared to flight data from the Apollo 11 mission AS-506.

  11. Characteristics of the ablation plume induced on glasses for analysis purposes with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Sokolova, Ekaterina B.; Zheng, Ronger; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for elemental analyses of transparent dielectric materials such as glasses or crystals for more than ten years. The induced plasma is however much less studied compared to that induced on the surface of a metal. The purpose of this work is therefore to characterize the plasma induced on the surface of a glass sample for analytical purpose as a function of the ablation laser wavelength, infrared (IR) or ultraviolet (UV), and the ambient gas, air or argon. The surface damage of the samples was also observed for ablation with IR or UV laser pulse when the sample was a float glass or a frosted one. Optimized ablation fluence was then determined. The morphology of the plasma was observed with time-resolved spectroscopic imaging, while the profiles of the electron density and temperature were extracted from time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The analytical performance of the plasmas was then studied in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio for several emission lines from some minor elements, Al, Fe, contained in glasses, and of the behavior of self-absorption for another minor element, Ca, in the different ablation conditions.

  12. Observational evidence for dust-plasma interactions in the Enceladus' plume, Saturn E-ring, in Titan's ionosphere, and near comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, J. E.; Holmberg, M. K. G.; Engelhardt, I. A. D.; Eriksson, A. I.; Shebanits, O.; Morooka, M. W.; Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Ye, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini mission has identified dust-plasma interactions in at least three different regions in the Saturn system. These are the dusty plasma environment near Enceladus, in particular within its plume the dusty plasma environment in the Saturn inner plasma disk enveloping the E-ring the aerosol-plasma environment in Titan's deep ionosphere. It is also believed to affect the dynamics substantially in a comet coma, now studied by Rosetta. The motion of plasma is changed considerably by the presence of substantial amounts of charged dust due to the added effect of gravity and radiation pressure forces on the dust component, thereby affecting the dynamics of the magnetosphere. Conversely the Lorentz force affects the charged dust through electric and magnetic fields that normally govern the motion of the plasma. Part of the dust size distribution should be considered a component of the plasma collective ensemble. The Cassini RPWS Langmuir Probe clearly detects a difference between the electron and ion number densities in all these regions, from which the total charge density of the negatively charged dust can be estimated. Moreover, the Cassini electron spectrometer (CAPS/ELS) detects negatively charged nanometer sized particles both in Titan's ionosphere as well as in Enceladus' plume. The inferred number densities are consistent with the Langmuir probe measurements. Here, the dust absorption of electrons is so strong that an ion-dust plasma is created with few free electrons. In the case of Titan's ionosphere this triggers the formation of aerosols that then diffuse to the ground. We show here new measurements from the E-ring showing electron density depletions due to dust absorption, a dust tail region of Enceladus, and confirm the consistency between measurements of negative ions by CAPS/ELS and the Radio and Plasma Wave Science Langmuir Probe (RPWS/LP) in Titan's ionosphere. We will also show initial hints regarding dust-plasma interaction near comets from the

  13. Plasma Plume Oscillations Monitoring during Laser Welding of Stainless Steel by Discrete Wavelet Transform Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Sibillano

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The plasma optical radiation emitted during CO2 laser welding of stainless steel samples has been detected with a Si-PIN photodiode and analyzed under different process conditions. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT has been used to decompose the optical signal into various discrete series of sequences over different frequency bands. The results show that changes of the process settings may yield different signal features in the range of frequencies between 200 Hz and 30 kHz. Potential applications of this method to monitor in real time the laser welding processes are also discussed.

  14. Plasma Plume Oscillations Monitoring during Laser Welding of Stainless Steel by Discrete Wavelet Transform Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibillano, Teresa; Ancona, Antonio; Rizzi, Domenico; Lupo, Valentina; Tricarico, Luigi; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2010-01-01

    The plasma optical radiation emitted during CO2 laser welding of stainless steel samples has been detected with a Si-PIN photodiode and analyzed under different process conditions. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has been used to decompose the optical signal into various discrete series of sequences over different frequency bands. The results show that changes of the process settings may yield different signal features in the range of frequencies between 200 Hz and 30 kHz. Potential applications of this method to monitor in real time the laser welding processes are also discussed. PMID:22319311

  15. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Laser Ablation Plumes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2017-02-06

    We used a CW laser as a narrow-band (~50kHz) tunable LIF excitation source to probe absorption from selected atomic transitions (Al, U etc. ) in a ns laser ablation plume. A comparison of fluorescence signal with respect to emission spectroscopy show significant increase in the magnitude and persistence from selected Al and U transitions in a LIBS plume. The high spectral resolution provided by the LIF measurement allows peaks to be easily separated even if they overlap in the emission spectra.

  16. Effect of mass and density of ambient gas on the interaction of laser-blow-off plasma plumes propagating in close proximity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2016-04-01

    The effects of mass and pressure of ambient gas on the propagation dynamics of two laser-blow-off plasma plumes created in close proximity are investigated. A time gated fast imaging technique is used for recording the images of the laterally colliding plumes under different experimental conditions. Pressure is varied from 0.1 to 3 mbar in three ambient, i.e., helium, neon, and argon. Emphasis is given on the nature of shock-shock interaction under different ambient conditions. It has been observed that the shock-velocity, shape, strength, and their interactions are strongly dependent on the mass and density of the ambient gases. The role of the interacting shocks and their subsequent reflections on the formation and geometrical shape of the interaction region in different ambient conditions is briefly described.

  17. Effect of applying static electric field on the physical parameters and dynamics of laser-induced plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Elhassan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of the LIBS technique – in particular its sensitivity, reproducibility and limit of detection – we studied the effect of applying a static electric field with different polarities on the emission spectra obtained in a typical LIBS set-up. The physical parameters of the laser-induced plasma, namely the electron density Ne and the plasma temperature Te, were studied under such circumstances. In addition to the spectroscopic analysis of the plasma plume emission, the laser-induced shock waves were exploited to monitor the probable changes in the plasma plume dynamics due to the application of the electric field. The study showed a pronounced enhancement in the signal-to-noise (S/N ratio of different Al, neutral and ionic lines under forward biasing voltage (negative target and positive electrode. On the other hand, a clear deterioration of the emission line intensities was observed under conditions of reversed polarity. This negative effect may be attributed to the reduction in electron-ion recombinations due to the stretched plasma plume. The plasma temperature showed a constant value in the average with the increasing electric field in both directions. This effect may be due to the fact that the measured values of Te were averaged over the whole plasma emission volume. The electron density was observed to decrease slightly in the case of forward biasing while no significant effect was noticed in the case of reversed biasing. This slight decrease in Ne can be interpreted in view of the increase in the rate of electron–ion recombinations due to the presence of the electric field. No appreciable effects of the applied electric field on the plasma dynamics were noticed.

  18. Oxidation-Induced Surface Roughening of Aluminum Nanoparticles Formed in an Ablation Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Georg Daniel; Girault, Marie; Menneveux, Jérôme; Lavisse, Luc; Jouvard, Jean-Marie; Marco de Lucas, Maria del Carmen; Potin, Valérie; Ouf, François-Xavier; Kerkar, Moussa; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Carvou, Erwann; Carles, Sophie; Rabilloud, Franck; Calvo, Florent; Yu, Jin; Mitchell, James Brian

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles formed within an ablation plume produced by the impact of a nanosecond laser pulse on the surface of an aluminum target have been directly measured using small-angle x-ray scattering. The target was immersed in an oxygen-nitrogen gas mixture at atmospheric pressure with the O2/N2 ratio being precisely controlled. The results for an increasing oxygen content reveal remarkable effects on the morphology of the generated particles, which include a decrease in the particle volume but a marked increase in its surface ruggedness. Molecular dynamics simulations using a reactive potential and performed under similar conditions as the experiment reproduce the experimental trends and show in detail how the shape and surface structure of the nanoparticles evolve with increasing oxygen content. This good agreement between in situ observations in the plume and atomistic simulations emphasizes the key role of chemical reactivity together with thermodynamic conditions on the morphology of the particles thus produced.

  19. Laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of neon in a discharge plasma and modeling and analysis of rocket plume RF-line emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbemi, Kayode I.

    The Optogalvanic Effect (OGE) of neon in a hollow cathode discharge lamp has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A tunable dye laser was tuned to several 1si -- 2pj neon transitions and the associated time--resolved optogalvanic (OG) spectral waveforms recorded corresponding to the DeltaJ = DeltaK = 0, +/-1 selection rules and modeled using a semi-empirical model. Decay rate constants, amplitudes and the instrumentation time constants were recorded following a good least-squares fit (between the experimental and the theoretical OG data) using the Monte Carlo technique and utilizing both the search and random walk methods. Dominant physical processes responsible for the optogalvanic effect have been analyzed, and the corresponding populations of the laser-excited level and collisional excited levels determined. The behavior of the optogalvanic signal waveform as a function of time, together with the decay rate constants as a function of the discharge current and the instrumentation time constant as a function of current have been studied in detail. The decay times of the OG signals and the population redistributions were also determined. Fairly linear relationships between the decay rate constant and the discharge current, as well as between the instrumental time constant and the discharge current, have been observed. The decay times and the electron collisional rate parameters of the 1s levels involved in the OG transitions have been obtained with accuracy. The excitation temperature of the discharge for neon transitions grouped with the same 1s level have been determined and found to be fairly constant for the neon transitions studied. The experimental optogalvanic effort in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum has been complemented by a computation-intensive modeling investigation of rocket plumes in the microwave region. Radio frequency lines of each of the plume species identified were archived utilizing the HITRAN and other

  20. Influence of plume-induced internal gravity waves on the rotation profile of low-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    High-quality seismic data due to the space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler provide precious information on the core rotation of thousands of stars from the subgiant to the red giant stages. We know today that current stellar evolution codes need for an additional physical mechanism to extract angular momentum from the core to the envelope of evolved low-mass stars and explain the low observed internal rotation. In this framework, internal gravity waves generated by penetrative convection at the top of the radiative region may play a role. In this work, we investigate whether the transport of angular momentum by plume-induced gravity waves may counteract the accelereration due the the strong contraction of the innermost layers. On the red giant branch, we find that the strong radiative damping near the H-burning shell prevents these waves from slowing down the core, so that another process should operate in these stars. Nevertheless, we show that plume-induced gravity waves are a good candidate to regulate the amplitude of the differential rotation in subgiant stars.

  1. Large eddy simulation of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume dispersion in an urban street canyon under perpendicular wind flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L H; Huo, R; Yang, D

    2009-07-15

    The dispersion of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume in and above an idealized street canyon of 18 m (width) x 18 m (height) x 40 m (length) with a wind flow perpendicular to its axis was investigated by Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Former studies, such as that by Oka [T.R. Oke, Street design and urban canopy layer climate, Energy Build. 11 (1988) 103-113], Gayev and Savory [Y.A. Gayev, E. Savory, Influence of street obstructions on flow processes within street canyons. J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 82 (1999) 89-103], Xie et al. [S. Xie, Y. Zhang, L. Qi, X. Tang, Spatial distribution of traffic-related pollutant concentrations in street canyons. Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 3213-3224], Baker et al. [J. Baker, H. L. Walker, X. M. Cai, A study of the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in and above street canyons--a large eddy simulation, Atmos. Environ. 38 (2004) 6883-6892] and Baik et al. [J.-J. Baik, Y.-S. Kang, J.-J. Kim, Modeling reactive pollutant dispersion in an urban street canyon, Atmos. Environ. 41 (2007) 934-949], focus on the flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the street canyon with no buoyancy effect. Results showed that with the increase of the wind flow velocity, the dispersion pattern of a buoyant plume fell into four regimes. When the wind flow velocity increased up to a certain critical level, the buoyancy driven upward rising plume was re-entrained back into the street canyon. This is a dangerous situation as the harmful fire smoke will accumulate to pollute the environment and thus threaten the safety of the people in the street canyon. This critical re-entrainment wind velocity, as an important parameter to be concerned, was further revealed to increase asymptotically with the heat/buoyancy release rate of the fire.

  2. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  3. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mehari, Fanuel; Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures.

  4. Influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics and the optical emission of laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Haslinger, M.J.; Hinterreiter, A.; Kolmhofer, P.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Heitz, J. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the influence of sample temperature on the dynamics and optical emission of laser induced plasma for various solid materials. Bulk aluminum alloy, silicon wafer, and metallurgical slag samples are heated to temperature T{sub S} ≤ 500 °C and ablated in air by Nd:YAG laser pulses (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration approx. 7 ns). The plasma dynamics is investigated by fast time-resolved photography. For laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the optical emission of plasma is measured by Echelle spectrometers in combination with intensified CCD cameras. For all sample materials the temporal evolution of plume size and broadband plasma emission vary systematically with T{sub S}. The size and brightness of expanding plumes increase at higher T{sub S} while the mean intensity remains independent of temperature. The intensity of emission lines increases with temperature for all samples. Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with T{sub S}. We apply the calibration-free LIBS method to determine the concentration of major oxides in slag and find good agreement to reference data up to T{sub S} = 450 °C. The LIBS analysis of multi-component materials at high temperature is of interest for technical applications, e.g. in industrial production processes. - Highlights: • Size and emission of laser-induced plasma increase with sample temperature Ts. • Mean optical intensity of plasma is independent of Ts. • Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with Ts. • Major oxides in steel slag are quantified up to Ts = 450 °C. • Industrial steel slags are analyzed by calibration-free LIBS method.

  5. Radial variation of refractive index, plasma frequency and phase velocity in laser induced air plasma

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathuthu, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available induced air plasma to study the spatial variation of plasma parameters in the axial direction of the laser beam. In this paper, the authors report investigation on the radial variation of the refractive index, plasma frequency, and phase velocity of a...

  6. Laser-Induced Emissions Sensor for Soot Mass in Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method is proposed to measure soot mass concentration non-intrusively from a distance in a rocket engine exhaust stream during ground tests using laser-induced...

  7. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  8. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanawade, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Kanawade@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Mehari, Fanuel [Master Programme in Advanced Optical Technologies (MAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glueckstrasse 11, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Tangermann-Gerk, Katja [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS.

  9. Plume Comparisons between Segmented Channel Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemack, Michael; Staack, David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2001-10-01

    Angular ion flux plume measurements were taken in several configurations of segmented channel Hall thrusters. The configurations differed by the placement of relatively short rings made from materials with different conductive and secondary electron emission properties along the boron nitride ceramic channel of the thrusters (these have been shown to affect the plume [1]). The ion fluxes are compared with ion trajectory simulations based on plasma potential data acquired with a high speed emissive probe [2]. Preliminary results indicate that in addition to the physical properties of the segments, the plume angle can be strongly affected by the placement of segmented rings relative to the external and internal walls of the channel. [1] Y. Raitses, L. Dorf, A. Litvak and N. J. Fisch, Journal of Applied Physics 88, 1263, 2000 [2] D. Staack, Y. Raitses, N. J. Fisch, Parametric Investigations of Langmuir Probe Induced Perturbations in a Hall Thruster, DPP01 Poster Presentation This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-ACO2-76-CHO3073.

  10. Investigations of laser-induced plasma in argon by Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI - site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France); Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Travaille, G.; Bousquet, B. [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence CEDEX (France)

    2011-09-15

    The Thomson scattering method was applied to quantify the electron number density and temperature of a laser spark formed in argon. The laser spark was generated by focusing a 15 mJ beam from the second harmonic ({lambda}{sub L} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with an 80 mm focal length lens. Images of the spark emission were obtained for times between 1 ns and 20 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The electron density and temperature for the core of the plasma plume at different instants of its evolution were determined from the Thomson scattered spectra of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 to 60 mJ/pulse). In the time interval between 400 ns and 10 {mu}s between the laser induced plasma and Thomson scattering probe pulses, we found n{sub e} and T{sub e} to decrease from 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} to 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} and from 50 700 K to 11 100 K, respectively. Special care was paid to the plasma disturbance by the probe laser pulse in Thomson scattering experiments due to absorption of laser photons by electrons through the inverse bremsstrahlung process.

  11. On Stability of Targets for Plasma Jet Induced Magnetoinertial Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Samulyak, Roman; Kim, Hyoungekun

    2015-01-01

    The compression and stability of plasma targets for the plasma jet-induced magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) have been investigated via large scale simulations using the FronTier code capable of explicit tracking of material interfaces. In the PJMIF concept, a plasma liner, formed by the merger of a large number of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on a magnetized plasma target and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. A multi-stage computational approach for simulations of the liner-target interaction and the compression of plasma targets has been developed to minimize computing time. Simulations revealed important features of the target compression process, including instability and disintegration of targets. The non-uniformity of the leading edge of the liner, caused by plasma jets as well as oblique shock waves between them, leads to instabilities during the target compression. By using front tracking, the evolution of targets has been studied in 3-dimensional simulations. Optimi...

  12. Equatorial spread F fossil plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Ossakow

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Behaviour of equatorial spread F (ESF fossil plumes, i.e., ESF plumes that have stopped rising, is examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. We find that fossil bubbles, plasma density depletions associated with fossil plumes, can persist as high-altitude equatorial depletions even while being "blown" by zonal winds. Corresponding airglow-proxy images of fossil plumes, plots of electron density versus longitude and latitude at a constant altitude of 288 km, are shown to partially "fill in" in most cases, beginning with the highest altitude field lines within the plume. Specifically, field lines upon which the E field has fallen entirely to zero are affected and only the low altitude (≤600 km portion if each field line fills in. This suggests that it should be possible to observe a bubble at high altitude on a field line for which the corresponding airglow image no longer shows a depletion. In all cases ESF plumes stop rising when the flux-tube-integrated ion mass density inside the upper edge of the bubble is equal to that of the nearby background, further supporting the result of Krall et al. (2010b.

  13. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) plume and plume effects study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to characterize the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) propulsion and attitude control system engine exhaust plumes and predict the resultant plume impingement pressure, heat loads, forces, and moments. Detailed description is provided of the OMV gaseous nitrogen (GN2) thruster exhaust plume flow field characteristics calculated with the RAMP2 snd SFPGEN computer codes. Brief descriptions are included of the two models, GN2 thruster characteristics and RAMP2 input data files. The RAMP2 flow field could be recalculated by other organizations using the information presented. The GN2 flow field can be readily used by other organizations who are interested in GN2 plume induced environments which require local flow field properties which can be supplied using the SFPGEN GN2 model.

  14. Plasma-induced polymerization for enhancing paper hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoping; Tang, Jiebin; Li, Junrong; Xiao, Huining

    2013-01-30

    Hydrophobic modification of cellulose fibers was conducted via plasma-induced polymerization in an attempt to graft the hydrophobic polymer chains on paper surface, this increasing the hydrophobicity of paper. Two hydrophobic monomers, butyl acrylate (BA) and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (2-EHA), were grafted on cellulose fibers, induced by atmospheric cold plasma. Various influencing factors associated with the plasma-induced grafting were investigated. Contact-angle measurement, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to ascertain the occurrence of the grafting and characterized the changes of the cellulose fiber after modification. The results showed that the hydrophobicity of the modified paper sheet was improved significantly after the plasma-induced grafting. The water contact angle on the paper surface reached up to 130°. The morphological differences between modified and unmodified samples were also revealed by SEM observation. The resulting paper is promising as a green-based packaging material.

  15. Can plume-induced internal gravity waves regulate the core rotation of subgiant stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.; Marques, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The seismic data provided by the space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler enabled us to probe the internal rotation of thousands of evolved low-mass stars. Subsequently, several studies showed that current stellar evolution codes are unable to reproduce the low core rotation rates observed in these stars. These results indicate that an additional angular momentum transport process is necessary to counteract the spin up due to the core contraction during the post-main sequence evolution. For several candidates, the transport induced by internal gravity waves (IGW) could play a non-negligible role. Aims: We aim to investigate the effect of IGW generated by penetrative convection on the internal rotation of low-mass stars from the subgiant branch to the beginning of the red giant branch. Methods: A semi-analytical excitation model was used to estimate the angular momentum wave flux. The characteristic timescale associated with the angular momentum transport by IGW was computed and compared to the contraction timescale throughout the radiative region of stellar models at different evolutionary stages. Results: We show that IGW can efficiently counteract the contraction-driven spin up of the core of subgiant stars if the amplitude of the radial-differential rotation (between the center of the star and the top of the radiative zone) is higher than a threshold value. This threshold depends on the evolutionary stage and is comparable to the differential rotation rates inferred for a sample of subgiant stars observed by the satellite Kepler. Such an agreement can therefore be interpreted as the consequence of a regulation mechanism driven by IGW. This result is obtained under the assumption of a smooth rotation profile in the radiative region and holds true even if a wide range of values is considered for the parameters of the generation model. In contrast, on the red giant branch, we find that IGW remain insufficient, on their own, to explain the observations because

  16. Buildup of aerosol precursor gases and sulfur-induced activation of soot in nascent jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Hirschberg, M.M.; Fabian, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung; Gerz, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Research issues concerning the chemical transformation of exhaust trace gases are summarized. The photochemical evolution of NO{sub x} early in the plume is strongly coupled to plume mixing. Substantial amounts of HNO{sub 3} are generated in nascent plumes even if no NO{sub 2} is emitted. The production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes very efficient if part of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. Each emitted soot particle can acquire 1-10% by mass fully oxidized sulfur molecules prior to binary homogeneous nucleation, if a few percent of the exhaust SO{sub x} are emitted as SO{sub 3}, indicating an important activation pathway for soot, and leading to a marked enhancement of new aerosol formation and growth rates. (author) 11 refs.

  17. Experimental evidence for heat plume-induced cavitation and xylem deformation as a mechanism of rapid post-fire tree mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Adam G; Nel, Jacques A; Bond, William J; Midgley, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Recent work suggests that hydraulic mechanisms, rather than cambium necrosis, may account for rapid post-fire tree mortality. We experimentally tested for xylem cavitation, as a result of exposure to high-vapour-deficit (D) heat plumes, and permanent xylem deformation, as a result of thermal softening of lignin, in two tree species differing in fire tolerance. We measured percentage loss of conductance (PLC) in distal branches that had been exposed to high-D heat plumes or immersed in hot water baths (high temperature, but not D). Results were compared with predictions from a parameterized hydraulic model. Physical damage to the xylem was examined microscopically. Both species suffered c. 80% PLC when exposed to a 100°C plume. However, at 70°C, the fire-sensitive Kiggelaria africana suffered lower PLC (49%) than the fire-resistant Eucalytpus cladocalyx (80%). Model simulations suggested that differences in PLC between species were a result of greater hydraulic segmentation in E. cladocalyx. Kiggelaria africana suffered considerable PLC (59%), as a result of heat-induced xylem deformation, in the water bath treatments, but E. cladocalyx did not. We suggest that a suite of 'pyrohydraulic' traits, including hydraulic segmentation and heat sensitivity of the xylem, may help to explain why some tree species experience rapid post-fire mortality after low-intensity fires and others do not.

  18. Laser induced phase locking of hydrogen plasma striations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Laser induced transient striations of a hydrogen discharge plasma are studied as a function of the ''detuning'' of the discharge parameters from the steady-state oscillatory response conditions. We observed laser induced phase locking of the steady-state striations.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  20. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-14

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma strongly depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in femtosecond laser (800 nm, ≈ 40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging methods over a wide fluence range of 0.5 J/cm2-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed distinct plume splitting between the neutral and ions especially at moderate to higher fluence ranges. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence regime confirm intense neutral line emission over the ion emission whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in femtosecond laser matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from the OES, and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe and results showed good correlation.

  1. Image Analysis of Plasma Induced by Focused IR Pulsed Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hadi Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma induced by focused laser beam is very essential especially in laser material interaction. Preliminary study leading to this research has been carried out. A Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was employed as a source of energy. The laser was focused using a wide-angle camera lens. The formation of plasma at the focal region was visualized perpendicularly using a CCD video camera interfaced to an image processing system. The dynamic expansion of the laser plasma was grabbed in conjunction with a high-speed photographic system. The observation results show that the plasma was formed in an ellipsoidal shape. The lateral width and the length of the plasma were found gradually increased

  2. Plasma Induced Grafting of PMMA onto Titanium Dioxide Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Shaofeng; Meng Yuedong; Ou Qiongrong; Xu Xu

    2005-01-01

    Grafting of polymer of methyl methacrylate (PMMA) onto titanium dioxide powder is investigated in this paper. The graft polymerization reaction is induced by dielectric-barrierdischarge produced N2 plasma treatment of titanium dioxide surfaces. IR, XPS and TGA results show that PMMA is grafted onto the surfaces of titanium dioxide powder. And crystal structure of the titanium dioxide powder observed with XRD spectra is unchanged after plasma graft polymerization.

  3. Investigation of the effect of laser parameters on the target, plume and plasma behavior during and after laser-solid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancalie, A.; Ciobanu, S. S.; Sporea, D.

    2017-09-01

    A detailed theoretical and experimental analysis is performed for a wide range of laser operating conditions, typical for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) experiments on copper metallic target. The plasma parameters were experimentally estimated from the line intensities ratio which reflects the relative population of neutral excited species in the plasma. In the case of LA experiments the highest temperature observed was 8210 ± 370 K. In case of LIBS measurements, a maximum temperature of 8123 K has been determined. The experimental results are in good agreement with a stationary, hydrodynamic model. We have theoretically investigated the plasma emission based on the generalized collisional-radiative model as implemented in the ADAS interconnected set of computer codes and data collections. The ionic population density distribution over the ground and excited states into the cooper plasma is graphically displayed as output from the code. The theoretical line intensity ratios are in good agreement with experimental values for the electron density and temperature range measured in our experiments.

  4. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  5. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP)-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  6. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed.

  7. Study on the influence of laser pulse duration in the long nanosecond regime on the laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasharty, I. Y.

    2016-10-01

    By using a high power pulsed fiber laser, this study reports the experimental investigation of the laser-induced plasma characteristics for the laser pulse duration range extended from 40 ns to 200 ns. The experiments were performed with keeping the laser fluence constant at 64 J/cm2. The measurements show that, for the early phase of plasma formation, the spectral line intensities and the continuum emissions as well as the plasma characteristics decay to a certain extent with the increase of the pulse duration. On the other hand, as the plasma evolves in post laser pulse regime, the electron density and the degree of ionization increase slightly for the longer pulses, while the plume temperature is more or less independent from the pulse duration. Furthermore, the ablation characteristics, such as the ablation rate, coincide with the results of plasma characteristics for the different pulse durations. Eventually, with keeping the laser fluence constant at 64 J/cm2, the analytical performance of Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) for the corresponding pulse duration range is examined by using a temporal gating and non-gating analyses. The measurements show that, in the case of gating analysis, all pulse durations yield almost the same range of limits of detections LODs. On the other hand, for non-gating analysis, the longer pulse durations provide lower LODs (better) than the shorter ones by orders of magnitude. Moreover, the calculated absolute limit of detection (LODAbs) for the longest pulse duration (i.e. 200 ns) is lower by approximately factor 2 than that of the shortest one (i.e. 40 ns).

  8. Mantle plumes in the vicinity of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mériaux, C. A.; Mériaux, A.-S.; Schellart, W. P.; Duarte, J. C.; Duarte, S. S.; Chen, Z.

    2016-11-01

    We present three-dimensional deep-mantle laboratory models of a compositional plume within the vicinity of a buoyancy-driven subducting plate with a fixed trailing edge. We modelled front plumes (in the mantle wedge), rear plumes (beneath the subducting plate) and side plumes with slab/plume systems of buoyancy flux ratio spanning a range from 2 to 100 that overlaps the ratios in nature of 0.2-100. This study shows that 1) rising side and front plumes can be dragged over thousands of kilometres into the mantle wedge, 2) flattening of rear plumes in the trench-normal direction can be initiated 700 km away from the trench, and a plume material layer of lesser density and viscosity can ultimately almost entirely underlay a retreating slab after slab/plume impact, 3) while side and rear plumes are not tilted until they reach ∼600 km depth, front plumes can be tilted at increasing depths as their plume buoyancy is lessened, and rise at a slower rate when subjected to a slab-induced downwelling, 4) rear plumes whose buoyancy flux is close to that of a slab, can retard subduction until the slab is 600 km long, and 5) slab-plume interaction can lead to a diversity of spatial plume material distributions into the mantle wedge. We discuss natural slab/plume systems of the Cascadia/Bowie-Cobb, and Nazca/San Felix-Juan Fernandez systems on the basis of our experiments and each geodynamic context and assess the influence of slab downwelling at depths for the starting plumes of Java, Coral Sea and East Solomon. Overall, this study shows how slab/plume interactions can result in a variety of geological, geophysical and geochemical signatures.

  9. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  10. Decreased plasma levels of the endothelial protective sphingosine-1-phosphate are associated with dengue-induced plasma leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, M.; Japtok, L.; Alisjahbana, B.; Wisaksana, R.; Sumardi, U.; Puspita, M.; Kleuser, B.; Mast, Q. de; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A transient endothelial hyperpermeability is a hallmark of severe dengue infections. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) maintains vascular integrity and protects against plasma leakage. We related plasma S1P levels to dengue-induced plasma leakage and studied mechanisms that may underlie the

  11. The study of UHMWPEF surface modification with plasma- induced polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Fang; Jia, Qing-Xiu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pei-Ran

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the surface activity levels of the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPEF), as well as enhancing the interface strength of the UHMWPEF based composite materials, the method of plasma-induced polymerization was applied to modify the UHMWPEF surface. In this study, the plasma's power, time, pressure and the grafting monomer concentration were introduced. Also, through a well-conducted comparison and analysis of the grafting rate, fabric surface functional groups and the microcosmic morphology, the most suitable plasma modification process was discovered and determined. The mechanics performance of hybrid composites with the modified UHMWPEF and unidirectional carbon fiber cloth (CF) was tested to reveal that, compared with the unmodified composites, the tensile strength and the laminar shear strength could be improved.

  12. Agyrotropic pressure tensor induced by the plasma velocity shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Francesco; Del Sarto, Danele; Califano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We show that the spatial inhomogeneity of a shear flow in a fluid plasma is transferred to a pressure anisotropy that has both a gyrotropic and a non gyrotropic component. We investigate this process both analytically and numerically by including the full pressure tensor dynamics. We determine the time evolution of the pressure agyrotropy and in general of the pressure tensor anisotropization which arise from the action of both the magnetic eld and the flow strain tensor. This mechanism can affect the onset and development of shear-induced fluid instabilities in plasmas and is relevant to the understanding of the origin of some of the non-Maxwellian distribution functions evidenced both in Vlasov simulations and in space plasma measurements that exhibit pressure agyrotropy.

  13. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of proteins in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 microM) with dil......Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 micro......M) with diluted fresh human plasma has been shown to generate material that oxidizes 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid; these oxidants are believed to be chloramines formed from the reaction of HOCl with protein amine groups. Chloramines have also been detected with isolated plasma proteins treated with HOCl. In both....... These results are consistent with protein-derived chloramines, and the radicals derived from them, as contributing agents in HOCl-induced plasma protein oxidation....

  14. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  15. Laser radiation frequency conversion in carbon- and cluster-containing plasma plumes under conditions of single and two-color pumping by pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    This work reviews a series of investigations of different plasma plumes using single- and two-color laser systems that emit femtosecond pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate. Results of investigation of the resonant enhancement of harmonics in tin plasma with the use of two types of pumps are analyzed, and it is shown that the tuning of the wavelengths of harmonics to ion-resonance levels plays an important role in increasing the conversion efficiency to high-order harmonics of the radiation to be converted. Investigations of different carbon-containing plasma media (carbon nanotubes, graphite, carbon aerogel, etc.) exhibit attractive properties of the nonlinear medium of this type for efficient generation of high-order harmonics. The results of the first experiments on the use of nanoparticles produced directly in the course of laser ablation of metals for increasing the efficiency of harmonics generated in this cluster-containing medium are analyzed. It is shown that new approaches realized in these investigations give hope that the nonlinear optical response of plasma media in the far-ultraviolet range can be further increased.

  16. Analysis of fast ion induced instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, László

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices like tokamaks, it is crucial to confine the high energy fusion-born helium nuclei ($\\alpha$-particles) to maintain the energy equilibrium of the plasma. However, energetic ions can excite various instabilities which can lead to their enhanced radial transport. Consequently, these instabilities may degrade the heating efficiency and they can also cause harmful power loads on the plasma-facing components of the device. Therefore, the understanding of these modes is a key issue regarding future burning plasma experiments. One of the main open questions concerning energetic particle (EP) driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. In this thesis, I present my results on the investigation of $\\beta$-induced Alfv\\'{e}n eigenmodes (BAEs) and EP-driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. These modes were well visible on several line-of-sights (LOSs) of the soft X-ra...

  17. Laser-induced breakdown plasma-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2010-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is dependent on the interaction between the initiating Laser sequence, the sampled material and the intermediate plasma states. Pulse shaping and timing have been empirically demonstrated to have significant impact on the signal available for active/passive detection and identification. The transient nature of empirical LIBS work makes data collection for optimization an expensive process. Guidance from effective computer simulation represents an alternative. This computational method for CBRNE sensing applications models the Laser, material and plasma interaction for the purpose of performance prediction and enhancement. This paper emphasizes the aspects of light, plasma, and material interaction relevant to portable sensor development for LIBS. The modeling structure emphasizes energy balances and empirical fit descriptions with limited detailed-balance and finite element approaches where required. Dusty plasma from partially decomposed material sample interaction with pulse dynamics is considered. This heuristic is used to reduce run times and computer loads. Computer simulations and some data for validation are presented. A new University of Memphis HPC/super-computer (~15 TFLOPS) is used to enhance simulation. Results coordinated with related effort at Arkansas State University. Implications for ongoing empirical work are presented with special attention paid to the application of compressive sensing for signal processing, feature extraction, and classification.

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  19. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-04-01

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from  <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 e cm‑3. The spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.

  20. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by

  1. Cold plasma interactions with plants: Morphing and movements of Venus flytrap and Mimosa pudica induced by argon plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Xu, Kunning G; Kolobov, Vladimir I

    2017-12-01

    Low temperature (cold) plasma finds an increasing number of applications in biology, medicine and agriculture. In this paper, we report a new effect of plasma induced morphing and movements of Venus flytrap and Mimosa pudica. We have experimentally observed plasma activation of sensitive plant movements and morphing structures in these plants similar to stimulation of their mechanosensors in vivo. Application of an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet to the inside or outside of a lobe, midrib, or cilia in Dionaea muscipula Ellis induces trap closing. Treatment of Mimosa pudica by plasma induces movements of pinnules and petioles similar to the effects of mechanical stimulation. We have conducted control experiments and simulations to illustrate that gas flow and UV radiation associated with plasma are not the primary reasons for the observed effects. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by cold plasma in atmospheric air appear to be the primary reason of plasma-induced activation of phytoactuators in plants. Some of these RONS are known to be signaling molecules, which control plants' developmental processes. Understanding these mechanisms could promote plasma-based technology for plant developmental control and future use for plant protection from pathogens. Our work offers new insight into mechanisms which trigger plant morphing and movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Wake-induced bending of two-dimensional plasma crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röcker, T. B., E-mail: tbr@mpe.mpg.de; Ivlev, A. V., E-mail: ivlev@mpe.mpg.de; Zhdanov, S. K.; Morfill, G. E. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85741 Garching (Germany); Couëdel, L. [CNRS, Aix-Marseille-Université, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-07-15

    It is shown that the wake-mediated interactions between microparticles in a two-dimensional plasma crystal affect the shape of the monolayer, making it non-flat. The equilibrium shape is calculated for various distributions of the particle number density in the monolayer. For typical experimental conditions, the levitation height of particles in the center of the crystal can be noticeably smaller than at the periphery. It is suggested that the effect of wake-induced bending can be utilized in experiments, to deduce important characteristics of the interparticle interaction.

  3. Wake-induced bending of two-dimensional plasma crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Röcker, T B; Zhdanov, S K; Couëdel, L; Morfill, G E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the wake-mediated interactions between microparticles in a two-dimensional plasma crystal affect the shape of the monolayer, making it non-flat. The equilibrium shape is calculated for various distributions of the particle number density in the monolayer. For typical experimental conditions, the levitation height of particles in the center of the crystal can be noticeably smaller than at the periphery. It is suggested that the effect of wake-induced bending can be utilized in experiments, to deduce important characteristics of the interparticle interaction.

  4. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  5. Plasma-induced field emission study of carbon nanotube cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the plasma-induced field emission (PFE properties of a large area carbon nanotube (CNT cathode on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector is presented. Experimental results show that the cathode is able to emit intense electron beams. Intense electron beams of 14.9–127.8  A/cm^{2} are obtained from the cathode. The CNT cathode desorbs gases from the CNTs during the PFE process. The fast cathode plasma expansion affects the diode perveance. The amount of outgassing is estimated to be 0.06–0.49  Pa·L, and the ratio of outgassing and electron are roughly calculated to be within the range of 170–350 atoms per electron. The effect of the outgassing is analyzed, and the outgassing mass spectrum of the CNT cathode has been studied during the PFE. There is a significant desorption of CO_{2}, N_{2}(CO, and H_{2} gases, which plays an important role during the PFE process. All the experiments demonstrate that the outgassing plays an important role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Moreover, the characteristic turn-on time of the CNT cathode was measured to be 39 ns.

  6. Plasma transport induced by the stochastic magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Tetsuyuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-10-01

    The anomalous plasma transport induced by the stochastic magnetic field is studied to understand the disruption phenomena in the tokamak plasma. At first, the transport matrix which indicate the plasma transport in the stochastic magnetic field is formulated. For the formulation, the quasi-linear approximation for the diffusivity of the stochastic magnetic field is used and the shifted Maxwellian is assumed to the particle distribution. Using this transport matrix the radial electric field formation, which is generated by the ambipolar condition, and the associated temperature profile is obtained. The temperature profile in the stochastic magnetic field becomes flat because of the rapid temperature diffusion. Next the temperature crash, i.e., the sawtooth oscillation and the giant ELM, is analyzed using the turbulence-turbulence transition model, which describes the transition between the state of the electrostatic turbulence and that of the electromagnetic turbulence. This transition has a hysteresis characteristics. When the state changes to the electromagnetic mode, the stochastic magnetic field appears and the temperature transport is enhanced. This transition model is included in the 1-D transport equation. To calculate this transport equation numerically the crash of the temperature profile and the propagation of the crash front (avalanche) are realized by this model. The collapse without a precursor oscillation is revealed. (author)

  7. Plume tectonics and cratons formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Fischer, R.; Sizova, E.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geodynamics and continental growth are critically driven by subduction and plate tectonics, however how this tectonic regime started and what geodynamic regime was before remains controversial. Most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves the consequence of plate tectonics. Here, we focus on plume-lithosphere interactions and spontaneous plume-induced subduction initiation, which does not require pre-existing lithospheric fabric and is viable for both stagnant lid and mobile/deformable lid conditions. We present results of 2D and 3D numerical modeling of plume-induced deformation and associated crustal growth resulting from tectono-magmatic interaction of ascending mantle plumes with oceanic-type lithosphere. We demonstrate that weakening of the lithosphere by plume-induced magmatism is the key factor allowing for its internal deformation and differentiation resulting in continental crust growth. We also show that plume-lithosphere interaction can enable subduction and rudimentary plate tectonics initiation at the margins of a crustal plateau growing above the plume head. We argue that frequent plume-arc interactions recorded in Archean crust could reflect either short-term plume-induced subduction or plume-induced episodic lithospheric drips. We furthermore suggest a distinct plume-tectonics regime operated on Earth before plate tectonics, which was associated with widespread tectono-magmatic heat and mass exchange between the crust and the mantle. This regime was characterized by weak deformable plates with low topography, massive juvenile crust production from mantle derived melts, mantle-flows-driven crustal deformation, magma-assisted crustal convection and widespread development of lithospheric delamination and crustal drips. Plume tectonics also resulted in growth of hot depleted chemically buoyant subcrustal proto-cratonic mantle layer. Later

  8. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  9. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  10. Plasma-ion Induced Sputtering and Heating of Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.

    2007-05-01

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmospheric mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the use of Cassini data to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere provides an important end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that are used to interpret Cassini data at Titan. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasmadriven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann, "Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003).

  11. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  12. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  13. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  14. Schlieren High Speed Imaging on Fluid Flow in Liquid Induced by Plasma-driven Interfacial Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    Effective plasma-based water purification depends heavily on the transport of plasma-derived reactive species from the plasma into the liquid. Plasma interactions at the liquid-gas boundary are known to drive circulation in the bulk liquid. This forced circulation is not well understood. A 2-D plasma- in-liquid water apparatus is currently being investigated as a means to study the plasma-liquid interface to understand not only reactive species flows but to also understand plasma- driven fluid dynamic effects in the bulk fluid. Using Schlieren high speed imaging, plasma-induced density gradients near the interfacial region and into the bulk solution are measured to investigate the nature of these interfacial forces. Plasma-induced flow was also measured using particle imaging velocimetry. NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  15. Induced Compton Scattering by Relativistic Electrons in Magnetized Astrophysical Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincell, Mark William

    1994-01-01

    The effects of stimulated scattering on high brightness temperature radiation are studied in two important contexts. In the first case, we assume that the radiation is confined to a collimated beam traversing a relativistically streaming magnetized plasma. When the plasma is cold in the bulk frame, stimulated scattering is only significant if the angle between the photon motion and the plasma velocity is less than gamma^{-1} , where gamma is the bulk Lorentz factor. Under the assumption that the center of the photon beam is parallel to the bulk motion, we calculate the scattering rate as a function of the angular spread of the beam and gamma. Magnetization changes the photon recoil, without which stimulated scattering has no effect. It also introduces a strong dependence on frequency and polarization: if the photon frequency matches the electron cyclotron frequency, the scattering rate of photons polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field can be substantially enhanced relative to Thomson, and if the photon frequency is much less than the cyclotron frequency the scattering is suppressed. Applying these calculations to pulsars, we find that stimulated scattering of the radio beam in the magnetized wind believed to exist outside the light cylinder can substantially alter the spectrum and polarization state of the radio signal. We suggest that the scattering rate is so high in some pulsars that the ability of the radio signal to penetrate the pulsar magnetosphere requires modification of either the conventional model of the magnetosphere or assumptions about the effects of stimulated scattering upon a beam. In the second case, we present a model of the radio emission from synchrotron self-absorbed sources, including the effects of induced Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in the source. Order of magnitude estimates show that stimulated scattering becomes the dominant absorption process when (kTB/m ec^2)tau_{T }_sp{~}> 0.1. Numerical simulations

  16. Cassini detection of Enceladus' cold water-group plume ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.; Young, D. T.; Crary, F. J.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Paty, C. S.

    2009-07-01

    This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+) and heavier water dimer ions (HxO2)+ very close to Enceladus where the plasma begins to emerge from the plume. The data were obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008 and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction exhibiting energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicative of a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enceladus signatures of the plasma interaction with the plume are detected 22 Enceladus radii away.

  17. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  18. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  19. Numerical and experimental studies of the carbon etching in EUV-induced plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astakhov, Dmitry; Goedheer, W.J.; Lee, Christopher James; Ivanov, V.V.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Yakushev, O.; Koshelev, K.N.; Lopaev, D.V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    We have used a combination of numerical modeling and experiments to study carbon etching in the presence of a hydrogen plasma. We model the evolution of a low density EUV-induced plasma during and after the EUV pulse to obtain the energy resolved ion fluxes from the plasma to the surface. By

  20. Experimental study of oil plume stability: Parametric dependences and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoshuai; Shen, Tiantian; Bao, Mutai

    2016-10-15

    Oil plume is known to interact with density layer in spilled oil. Previous studies mainly focused on tracking oil plumes and predicting their impact on marine environment. Here, simulated experiments are presented that investigated the conditions inducing the formation of oil plume, focusing especially on the effects of oil/water volume ratio, oil/dispersant volume rate, ambient stratification and optimal conditions of oil plume on determining whether a plume will trap or escape. Scenario simulations showed that OWR influences the residence time most, dispersants dosage comes second and salinity least. The optimum residence time starts from 2387s, occurred at approximately condition (OWR, 0.1, DOR, 25.53% and salinity, 32.38). No change in the relative distribution under the more scale tank was observed, indicating these provide the time evolution of the oil plumes.

  1. Broadband field-resolved terahertz detection via laser induced air plasma with controlled optical bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Yeh; Seletskiy, Denis V; Yang, Zhou; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2015-05-04

    We report a robust method of coherent detection of broadband THz pulses using terahertz induced second-harmonic (TISH) generation in a laser induced air plasma together with a controlled second harmonic optical bias. We discuss a role of the bias field and its phase in the process of coherent detection. Phase-matching considerations subject to plasma dispersion are also examined.

  2. Martian Atmospheric Plumes: Behavior, Detectability and Plume Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Mischna, M.; Sykes, R.; Dissly, R.

    2013-10-01

    We will present our recent work simulating neutrally buoyant plumes in the martian atmosphere. This work is primarily directed at understanding the behavior of discrete plumes of biogenic tracer gases, and thus increasing our understanding of their detectability (both from orbit and from in situ measurements), and finally how to use the plumes to identify their precise source locations. We have modeled the detailed behavior of martian atmospheric plumes using MarsWRF for the atmospheric dynamics and SCIPUFF (a terrestrial state of the art plume modeling code that we have modified to represent martian conditions) for the plume dynamics. This combination of tools allows us to accurately simulate plumes not only from a regional scale from which an orbital observing platform would witness the plume, but also from an in situ perspective, with the instantaneous concentration variations that a turbulent flow would present to a point sampler in situ instrument. Our initial work has focused on the detectability of discrete plumes from an orbital perspective and we will present those results for a variety of notional orbital trace gas detection instruments. We have also begun simulating the behavior of the plumes from the perspective of a sampler on a rover within the martian atmospheric boundary layer. The detectability of plumes within the boundary layer has a very strong dependence on the atmospheric stability, with plume concentrations increasing by a factor of 10-1000 during nighttime when compared to daytime. In the equatorial regions of the planet where we have simulated plumes, the diurnal tidal “clocking” of the winds is strongly evident in the plume trail, which similarly “clocks” around its source. This behavior, combined with the strong diurnal concentration variations suggests that a rover hunting a plume source would be well suited to approach it from a particular azimuth (downwind at night) to maximize detectability of the plume and the ability to

  3. Plasma Induced Physicochemical Changes and Reactive Dyeing of Wool Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Udakhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effect of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma treatment on physical and chemical properties of wool fabric and its relation to exhaustion of Drimalan Navy Blue FBI reactive dye. AFM analysis of plasma treated wool fabric has shown partial removal of epicuticle and thus reduced scale height. FD spectroscopy has shown improvement in hydrophilicity by many folds after plasma treatment. ATR graphs depict the removal of hydrophobic layer of 18-MEA and introduction of hydrophilic groups like cysteic acid after plasma treatment. Alkali solubility of wool fabric increases with increasing plasma treatment time. Wetting time for plasma treated fabric reduces drastically when compared to untreated wool fabric. It is found that plasma treated fabric takes much lesser time to reach maximum dye exhaustion than untreated fabric. Substantivity of the dye increases significantly after plasma treatment. Colour fastness properties improve with increase in plasma treatment time. Chemical oxygen demand (COD of spent dyebath liquor is found to reduce with increase in plasma treatment time. Biological oxygen demand (BOD is found to be higher for plasma treated samples, while ratio of COD/BOD has reduced with increase in the plasma treatment time.

  4. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications.

  5. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  6. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  7. Tomography of homogenized laser-induced plasma by Radon transform technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Demidov, A.; Gornushkin, I. B.; Schmid, T.; Rössler, R.; Huber, N.; Panne, U.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2016-09-01

    Tomography of a laser-induced plasma in air is performed by inverse Radon transform of angle-resolved plasma images. Plasmas were induced by single laser pulses (SP), double pulses (DP) in collinear geometry, and by a combination of single laser pulses with pulsed arc discharges (SP-AD). Images of plasmas on metallurgical steel slags were taken at delay times suitable for calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS). Delays ranged from few microseconds for SP and DP up to tens of microseconds for SP-AD excitation. The white-light and the spectrally resolved emissivity ε(x,y,z) was reconstructed for the three plasma excitation schemes. The electron number density Ne(x,y,z) and plasma temperature Te(x,y,z) were determined from Mg and Mn emission lines in reconstructed spectra employing the Saha-Boltzmann plot method. The SP plasma revealed strongly inhomogeneous emissivity and plasma temperature. Re-excitation of plasma by a second laser pulse (DP) and by an arc discharge (SP-AD) homogenized the plasma and reduced the spatial variation of ε and Te. The homogenization of a plasma is a promising approach to increase the accuracy of calibration-free LIBS analysis of complex materials.

  8. Wind-Forced Baroclinic Beta-Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmadani, A.; Maximenko, N. A.; Melnichenko, O.; Schneider, N.; Di Lorenzo, E.

    2011-12-01

    A planetary beta-plume is a classical example of oceanic circulation induced by a localized vorticity source or sink that allows an analytical description in simplistic cases. Its barotropic structure is a zonally-elongated, gyre-like cell governed by the Sverdrup circulation on the beta-plane. The dominant zonal currents, found west of the source/sink, are often referred to as zonal jets. This simple picture describes the depth-integrated flow. Previous studies have investigated beta-plumes in a reduced-gravity framework or using other simple models with a small number of vertical layers, thereby lacking representation of the vertical structure. In addition, most previous studies use a purely linear regime without considering the role of eddies. However, these jets are often associated with strong lateral shear that makes them unstable under increased forcing. The circulation in such a nonlinear regime may involve eddy-mean flow interactions, which modify the time-averaged circulation. Here, the baroclinic structures of linear and nonlinear wind-forced beta-plumes are studied using a continuously-stratified, primitive equation, eddy-permitting ocean model (ROMS). The model is configured in an idealized rectangular domain for the subtropical ocean with a flat bottom. The surface wind forcing is a steady anticyclonic Gaussian wind vortex, which provides a localized vorticity source in the center of the domain. The associated wind stress curl and Ekman pumping comprise downwelling in the vortex center surrounded by a ring of weaker upwelling. Under weak forcing, the simulated steady-state circulation corresponds well with a theoretical linear beta-plume. While its depth-integrated transport exhibits a set of zonal jets, consistent with Sverdrup theory, the baroclinic structure of the plume is remarkably complex. Relatively fast westward decay of the surface currents occurs simultaneously with the deepening of the lower boundary of the plume. This deepening suggests

  9. Cassini Radio Occultation by Enceladus Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliore, A.; Armstrong, J.; Flasar, F.; French, R.; Marouf, E.; Nagy, A.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Aguilar, R.; Rochblatt, D.

    2006-12-01

    A fortuitous Cassini radio occultation by Enceladus plume occurs on September 15, 2006. The occultation track (the spacecraft trajectory in the plane of the sky as viewed from the Earth) has been designed to pass behind the plume (to pass above the south polar region of Enceladus) in a roughly symmetrical geometry centered on a minimum altitude above the surface of about 20 km. The minimum altitude was selected primarily to ensure probing much of the plume with good confidence given the uncertainty in the spacecraft trajectory. Three nearly-pure sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm-wavelength (Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively) are simultaneously transmitted from Cassini and are monitored at two 34-m Earth receiving stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in Madrid, Spain (DSS-55 and DSS-65). The occultation of the visible plume is extremely fast, lasting less than about two minutes. The actual observation time extends over a much longer time interval, however, to provide a good reference baseline for potential detection of signal perturbations introduced by the tenuous neutral and ionized plume environment. Given the likely very small fraction of optical depth due to neutral particles of sizes larger than about 1 mm, detectable changes in signal intensity is perhaps unlikely. Detection of plume plasma along the radio path as perturbations in the signals frequency/phase is more likely and the magnitude will depend on the electron columnar density probed. The occultation time occurs not far from solar conjunction time (Sun-Earth-probe angle of about 33 degrees), causing phase scintillations due to the solar wind to be the primary limiting noise source. We estimate a delectability limit of about 1 to 3E16 electrons per square meter columnar density assuming about 100 seconds integration time. Potential measurement of the profile of electron columnar density along the occultation track is an exciting prospect at this time.

  10. Plumes Do Not Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. B.; Anderson, D. L.; Foulger, G. R.; Winterer, E. L.

    Hypothetical plumes from the deep mantle are widely assumed to provide an abso- lute hotspot reference frame, inaugurate rifting, drive plates, and profoundly influence magmatic and tectonic evolution of oceans and continents. Many papers on local to global tectonics, magmatism, and geochemistry invoke plumes, and assign to the man- tle whatever properties, dynamics, and composition are needed to enable them. The fixed-plume concept arose from the Emperor-Hawaii seamount-and-island province, the 45 Ma inflection in which was assumed to record a 60-degree change in direction by the Pacific plate. Paleomagnetic latitudes and smooth Pacific spreading patterns show that such a change did not occur. Other Pacific chains once assumed to be syn- chronous with, and Euler-parallel to, Hawaii have proved to be neither. Thermal and physical properties of Hawaiian lithosphere falsify plume predictions. Rationales for fixed hotspots elsewhere also have become untenable as databases enlarged. Astheno- sphere is everywhere near solidus temperature, so buoyant melt does not require a local heat source but, rather, needs a thin roof or crack or tensional setting for egress. MORB and ocean-island basalt (OIB) broadly intergrade in composition, but MORB typically is richer in refractory elements and their radiogenic daughters, whereas OIB commonly is richer in fusible elements and their daughters. MORB and OIB contrasts are required by melt behavior and do not indicate unlike source reservoirs. MORB melts rise, with minimal reaction, through hot asthenosphere, whereas OIB melts re- act, and thereby lose substance, by crystallizing refractories and retaining and assim- ilating subordinate fusibles, with thick, cool lithosphere and crust. There is no need for hypotheses involving chaotic plume behavior or thousands of km of lateral flow of plume material, nor for postulates of SprimitiveT lower mantle contrary to cos- & cedil;mological and thermodynamic considerations. Plume

  11. Where Plumes Live

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  12. Mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Rui; Liang Zhong-Cheng; Han Bing; Zhang Hong-Chao; Xu Rong-Qing; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe the mechanism of laser-induced plasma shock wave evolution in air. To verify the validity of the theoretical model, an optical beam deflection technique is employed to track the plasma shock wave evolution process. The theoretical model and the experimental signals are found to be in good agreement with each other. It is shown that the laser-induced plasma shock wave undergoes formation, increase and decay processes; the increase and the decay processes of the laser-induced plasma shock wave result from the overlapping of the compression wave and the rarefaction wave, respectively. In addition, the laser-induced plasma shock wave speed and pressure distributions, both a function of distance, are presented.

  13. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  14. Dilution in Transition Zone between Rising Plumes and Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    The papers presents some physical experiments with the dilution of sea outfall plumes with emphasize on the transition zone where the relative fast flowing vertical plume turns to a horizontal surface plume following the slow sea surface currents. The experiments show that a considerable dilution...

  15. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuchimanchi K Bharadwaj; Debopam Das; Pavan K Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Puffing and entrainment characteristics of helium plumes emanating out into ambient air from a circular orifice are investigated in the present study. Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively in phase resolved manner. Experiments are performed in Froude numbers range 0.2–0.4 and for Reynolds numbers 58–248. Puffing frequency measurements reveal that the plume puffing frequencies are insensitive to the plume exit conditions, since the instability is buoyancy driven. The frequencies obtained in the present case are in agreement with frequencies obtained by Cetegen & Kasper (1996) for plumes originating from circular nozzles of various L/D ratios. Velocity and density measurements reveal that toroidal vortex formed during a puffing cycle entrains ambient air as it traverses downstream and this periodic engulfment governs the entrainment mechanism in pulsating plumes. The obtained velocity and density fields are used to calculate mass entrainment rates. It is revealed that though the flow is unsteady, the contribution of unsteady term in mass conservation to entrainment is negligible, and it becomes zero over a puff cycle. Finally, an empirical relation for variation of mass entrainment with height has been proposed, in which the non-dimensional mass entrainment is found to follow a power law with the non-dimensional height.

  16. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  17. Characteristics of Ions Emitted from Laser-Induced Silver Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. S. RAFIQUE; M. KHALEEQ-UR-RAHMAN; Shakoor MUNAZZA; K. A. BHATTI

    2008-01-01

    In this work, study of laser-induced ions is presented. The plasma was produced by focusing a Nd:YAG laser, with a wavelength of 1064 nm, a pulsed width of 9~14 ns, a power of 1.1 MW and energy of 10 mJ, on silver target in vacuum (10'-3> Torr = 1.3332 Pa). The charac-teristics of ion streams were investigated by CR-39 detectors located at angles of 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° with respect to normal of the target. The distance between the silver target and each detector was 11 cm. The energy of silver ions was found ranging from 1.5 eV to 1.06E4 eV. There was a high concentration of ions with low energy as compared to those with high energy, showing the energy distribution amongst the ions. The flux of ions was maximum in the axial direction which was decreasing with the angle increase with respect to normal of the target, and finally became minimum in the radial direction. Hence the silver ions have shown anisotropic behaviour.

  18. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  19. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  20. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  1. On predicting mantle mushroom plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kheng Tan

    2011-04-01

    Top cooling may produce plunging plumes of diameter of 585 km and at least 195 Myr old. The number of cold plumes is estimated to be 569, which has not been observed by seismic tomography or as cold spots. The cold plunging plumes may overwhelm and entrap some of the hot rising plumes from CMB, so that together they may settle in the transition zone.

  2. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number den...

  3. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Anmin [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Huang, Xuri [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Jin, Mingxing [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  4. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... to be the only possible approach to obtain the volume flow in: thermal plumes in ventilated rooms....

  5. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    CERN Document Server

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  6. Chemical release experiments to induce F region ionospheric plasma irregularities at the magnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Peter Jared

    1994-01-01

    The largest-scale plasma instability that occurs naturally in the Earth's ionosphere is a turbulent upwelling of the equatorial F region known as equatorial spread-F (ESF). During an ESF event, high plasma density magnetic fluxtubes at the bottomside of the F region are thought to change places with lower plasma density flux-tubes from below in a Rayleigh-Taylor type (heavy fluid over light fluid) instability. This interchange creates a large-scale (10's of km) density perturbation locally, which rapidly penetrates through to the topside of the F region, creating a plume of cascading smaller-scale (meter to centimeter scale) irregularities from the sharp density gradients at the edges of the rising plasma 'bubble'. In a theoretical test of this overall scenario for ESF, a linear instability growth rate is derived following the magnetic fluxtube formalism of Haerendel. Using realistic atmospheric and ionospheric density model inputs, growth rates are calculated for a range of geophysical conditions. Time/altitude domains having positive growth rates are found to coincide with observed time/altitude patterns of ESF occurrence, thus supporting the fluxtube model. The physics also are tested experimentally by the deliberate creation of plasma bubbles in ambient ionospheres that the fluxtube model predicts are susceptible to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Two such artificial seed perturbations were generated during the 1990 NASA/Boston University CRRES-at-Kwajalein campaign, when clouds of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were released by sounding rockets to initiate plasma recombinations near the bottomside of the equatorial ionosphere. Multiple diagnostics (incoherent scatter radar, high frequency radar, optics, and satellite polarimeters at several sites) were used to monitor the prelaunch status of the ionosphere and the electron depleted regions that resulted from the chemical releases. Small ESF plumes were observed to form in the region of the artificial perturbation

  7. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Induced Etch Damage of GaN p-n Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHUL,RANDY J.; ZHANG,LEI; BACA,ALBERT G.; WILLISON,CHRISTI LEE; HAN,JUNG; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.

    1999-11-03

    Plasma-induced etch damage can degrade the electrical and optical performance of III-V nitride electronic and photonic devices. We have investigated the etch-induced damage of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etch system on the electrical performance of mesa-isolated GaN pn-junction diodes. GaN p-i-n mesa diodes were formed by Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3}/Ar ICP etching under different plasma conditions. The reverse leakage current in the mesa diodes showed a strong relationship to chamber pressure, ion energy, and plasma flux. Plasma induced damage was minimized at moderate flux conditions ({le} 500 W), pressures {ge}2 mTorr, and at ion energies below approximately -275 V.

  8. Growth Enhancement of Radish Sprouts Induced by Low Pressure O2 Radio Frequency Discharge Plasma Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    We studied growth enhancement of radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus L.) induced by low pressure O2 radio frequency (RF) discharge plasma irradiation. The average length of radish sprouts cultivated for 7 days after O2 plasma irradiation is 30-60% greater than that without irradiation. O2 plasma irradiation does not affect seed germination. The experimental results reveal that oxygen related radicals strongly enhance growth, whereas ions and photons do not.

  9. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in EUV induced plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    We measured for the first time the electron density in an Extreme Ultra-Violet induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Good agreement is found between the measured electron density at the end of the EUV pulse and a theoretical prediction. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  10. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa-Aleman, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces apoptosis involving mitochondria via generation of free radicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, its biological effects and mechanism of action remain elusive. Here, we investigated its cell death effects and underlying molecular mechanisms, using air and N₂ plasma jets from a micro nozzle array. Treatment with air or N₂ plasma jets caused apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells, simultaneously with depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, the plasma jets were able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS, which function as surrogate apoptotic signals by targeting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Antioxidants or caspase inhibitors ameliorated the apoptotic cell death induced by the air and N₂ plasma jets, suggesting that the plasma jet may generate ROS as a proapoptotic cue, thus initiating mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest the potential employment of plasma jets as a novel therapy for cancer.

  12. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces apoptosis involving mitochondria via generation of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Kim, Geunyoung; Moon, Eunpyo; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2011-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, its biological effects and mechanism of action remain elusive. Here, we investigated its cell death effects and underlying molecular mechanisms, using air and N₂ plasma jets from a micro nozzle array. Treatment with air or N₂ plasma jets caused apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells, simultaneously with depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, the plasma jets were able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function as surrogate apoptotic signals by targeting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Antioxidants or caspase inhibitors ameliorated the apoptotic cell death induced by the air and N₂ plasma jets, suggesting that the plasma jet may generate ROS as a proapoptotic cue, thus initiating mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest the potential employment of plasma jets as a novel therapy for cancer.

  13. Microwave tunneling in heterostructures with electromagnetically induced transparency-like metamaterials based on solid state plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-kun; Li, Hai-ming; Bian, Bo-rui; Xue, Feng; Ding, Guo-wen; Yu, Shao-jie; Liu, Si-yuan

    2016-06-01

    Interference induced electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT)-like effect has demonstrated the ability to realize narrow transmission resonances within the single-resonator stop band. Due to the limited plasma density in actual devices, only few reports discuss the plasma metamaterials and truncated photonic crystals which support electromagnetically induced transparency. However, solid state plasma realized by some semiconductors have the advantages of higher order plasma density and the characteristics of the reconfiguration and tunability. Here, we conduct a numerical study of the perfect microwave tunneling in heterostructures composed of solid state plasma metamaterials and truncated photonic crystal. There is particular emphasis on the tunability of tunneling frequency by changing plasma frequency in solid state plasma, as well as the electric energy density distributions in heterostructures. It was found that, compared to conventional metal photonic crystal, the reflectance of tunneling mode can be reduced from -25.8 dB to -41.7 dB with an optimized Q-factor. Further study on electric energy density distribution confirms that EM wave in-plane localization originated from the EIT-like solid state plasma, which gives rise to the three-dimensional enhancement of sub-wavelength EM wave localization, is stronger than EM wave confinement along the propagation direction. Owing to the tunability of plasma, the tunneling frequency channel can be adjusted or reconfigured in a certain range without adjusting the geometry of the heterostructure. It suggests the fabrication for highly sensitive dielectric sensing, optical switches, and so on.

  14. High Frequency Discharge Plasma Induced Grafting of Polystyrene onto Titanium Dioxide Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shaofeng; OU Qiongrong; MENG Yuedong

    2007-01-01

    Grafting of polystyrene (PS) onto titanium dioxide powder was investigated. The graft polymerization reaction was induced by high frequency discharge produced N2 plasma treatment of the surfaces of titanium dioxide. IR , XPS and TGA results show that PS was grafted on the titanium dioxide powder. And the crystal structure of the titanium dioxide powder observed by XRD was unchanged after plasma treatment.

  15. DNA strand scission induced by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptasińska, Sylwia; Bahnev, Blagovest; Stypczyńska, Agnieszka; Bowden, Mark; Mason, Nigel J; Braithwaite, Nicholas St J

    2010-07-28

    The DNA molecule is observed to be very susceptible to short-term exposures to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The DNA damage induced by plasma-generated species, i.e. excited atoms, charged particles, electrons and UV light is determined.

  16. Acoustic Diagnostics of Plasma Channels Induced by Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zuo-Qiang; WEI Zhi-Yi; YU Jin; ZHANG Jie; LI Yu-Tong; YUAN Xiao-Hui; ZHENG Zhi-Yuan; WANG Peng; WANG Zhao-Hua; LING Wei-Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Long plasma channels induced by femtosecond laser pulses in air are diagnosed using the sonographic method. By detecting the sound signals along the channels, the length and the electron density of the channels are measured.

  17. Surface modification of aramid fiber by plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization of acrylic acid. I. Influence of plasma conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.X., E-mail: cxwang@mail.dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China); Du, M. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Industry Technology, Jiangsu 224000 (China); Lv, J.C.; Zhou, Q.Q. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); Ren, Y. [School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China); Liu, G.L.; Gao, D.W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); Jin, L.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Aramid fiber surface was modified by PIVPGP of AA to improve wettability, adhesion. • Surface modification effect by PIVPGP of AA increased and then decreased with time. • Surface modification effect increased and then stayed unaltered with output power. • Ar plasma was the most effective in PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface. • In studied range, optimum technology of PIVPGP of AA: Ar plasma, 15 min, 300 W. - Abstract: Plasma induced vapor phase graft polymerization (PIVPGP) method was applied to modify aramid fiber surface. In this study, aramid fibers were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases to see how these plasma processing parameters influenced the PIVPGP of acrylic acid (AA) on aramid fiber surface and its surface structure and properties. The analysis results of atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) showed the increase of surface roughness and the introduction of O=C−OH, which confirmed that the PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface was achieved. The contact angle and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the aramid fibers modified by PIVPGP of AA prominently decreased and increased, respectively, indicating the obvious improvements of surface wettability and adhesion between aramid fiber and matrix. The surface modification effects of aramid fiber by PIVPGP of AA firstly increased and then after 15 min slightly decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time, and but firstly increased and then after 300 W nearly remained unchanged with the increasing output power, respectively. Among different working gases, Ar plasma occupied first place, O{sub 2} plasma and N{sub 2} plasma came second and third in the aspect of PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface, respectively. It could be concluded that the PIVPGP of AA on aramid fiber surface could effectively improve surface wettability and adhesion. Plasma conditions had signally

  18. Oxidation Degradation of Aqueous Carbofuran Induced by Low Temperature Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Lumei; Gao, Jinzhang; Hu, Yusen; Liang, Huiguang; Xiao, Wen; Wang, Xingmin

    2008-06-01

    The oxidative degradation of aqueous carbofuran, a heavily used toxic carbamate insecticide by low temperature plasma, was investigated. The results show that the treatment efficiency increases with the increase in initial concentration. Raising the treatment temperature and changing the pH value can result in enhanced degradation of carbofuran in solution. The results also show that low temperature plasma treatment can effectively remove chemical oxygen demand (COD) of carbofuran in the solution.

  19. Oxidation Degradation of Aqueous Carbofuran Induced by Low Temperature Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Lumei; GAO Jinzhang; HU Yusen; LIANG Huiguang; XIAO Wen; WANG Xingmin

    2008-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of aqueous carbofuran, a heavily used toxic carbamate insecticide by low temperature plasma, was investigated. The results show that the treatment efficiency increases with the increase in initial concentration. Raising the treatment temperature and changing the pH value can result in enhanced degradation of carbofuran in solution. The results also show that low temperature plasma treatment can effectively remove chemical oxygen demand (COD) of carbofuran in the solution.

  20. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 1014 W/cm2. Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions12. The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. 12 to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators. PMID:22806170

  1. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  2. Kr photoionized plasma induced by intense extreme ultraviolet pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Skrzeczanowski, W.

    2016-04-01

    Irradiation of any gas with an intense EUV (extreme ultraviolet) radiation beam can result in creation of photoionized plasmas. The parameters of such plasmas can be significantly different when compared with those of the laser produced plasmas (LPP) or discharge plasmas. In this work, the photoionized plasmas were created in a krypton gas irradiated using an LPP EUV source operating at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The Kr gas was injected into the vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV radiation pulses. The EUV beam was focused onto a Kr gas stream using an axisymmetrical ellipsoidal collector. The resulting low temperature Kr plasmas emitted electromagnetic radiation in the wide spectral range. The emission spectra were measured either in the EUV or an optical range. The EUV spectrum was dominated by emission lines originating from Kr III and Kr IV ions, and the UV/VIS spectra were composed from Kr II and Kr I lines. The spectral lines recorded in EUV, UV, and VIS ranges were used for the construction of Boltzmann plots to be used for the estimation of the electron temperature. It was shown that for the lowest Kr III and Kr IV levels, the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions were not fulfilled. The electron temperature was thus estimated based on Kr II and Kr I species where the partial LTE conditions could be expected.

  3. The impact of glacier geometry on meltwater plume structure and submarine melt in Greenland fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Hudson, B.; Moon, T.; Catania, G. A.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Felikson, D.; Stearns, L. A.; Noël, B. P. Y.; Broeke, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    Meltwater from the Greenland Ice Sheet often drains subglacially into fjords, driving upwelling plumes at glacier termini. Ocean models and observations of submarine termini suggest that plumes enhance melt and undercutting, leading to calving and potential glacier destabilization. Here we systematically evaluate how simulated plume structure and submarine melt during summer months depends on realistic ranges of subglacial discharge, glacier depth, and ocean stratification from 12 Greenland fjords. Our results show that grounding line depth is a strong control on plume-induced submarine melt: deep glaciers produce warm, salty subsurface plumes that undercut termini, and shallow glaciers produce cold, fresh surface-trapped plumes that can overcut termini. Due to sustained upwelling velocities, plumes in cold, shallow fjords can induce equivalent depth-averaged melt rates compared to warm, deep fjords. These results detail a direct ocean-ice feedback that can affect the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  4. Experimental Research on Plasma Induced by TEA CO2 Laser Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong; CHENG Zuhai; ZUO Duluo; ZHAI Bingjie; YU Liangying; ZHU Haihong

    2008-01-01

    Results in the air-breathing propulsion experiments with a parabolic light craft and a self-made UV-preionized 100 J TEA CO2 laser device are presented. Air disturbance and the spectrum of the plasma after the interaction of pulsed laser radiation with the light craft were studied. It was found that the focal length of the parabolic light craft had a significant effect on the air-disturbance. Two shock waves were detected for the longer focal length, while only one shock wave detected for the short focal length. The spectrum of the laser-induced plasma, the distribution of the characteristic lines, and the temporal behaviors of the air plasma were studied in detail. The results showed that, the evolution of the laser-induced plasma lasted 20 μs, and the plasma spectrum would reach the maximum intensity at 7 μs.

  5. Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase in Maize Roots Induced for NO3- Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, S.; Locci, G.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Varanini, Z.

    1995-12-01

    Plasma membrane H+-ATPase was studied in maize (Zea mays L.) roots induced for NO3- uptake. Membrane vesicles were isolated by means of Suc density gradient from roots exposed for 24 h either to 1.5 mM NO3- or 1.5 mM SO4-. The two populations of vesicles had similar composition as shown by diagnostic inhibitors of membrane-associated ATPases. However, both ATP-dependent intravesicular H+ accumulation and ATP hydrolysis were considerably enhanced (60-100%) in vesicles isolated from NO3--induced roots. Km for Mg:ATP and pH dependency were not influenced by NO3- treatment of the roots. ATP hydrolysis in plasma membrane vesicles for both control and NO3--induced roots was not affected by 10 to 150 mM NO3- or Cl-. On the other hand, kinetics of NO3-- or Cl--stimulated ATP-dependent intravesicular H+ accumulation were modified in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from NO3-- induced roots. Immunoassays carried out with polyclonal antibodies against plasma membrane H+-ATPase revealed an increased steady-state level of the enzyme in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from NO3--induced roots. Results are consistent with the idea of an involvement of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in the overall response of roots to NO3-.

  6. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory a study on surface dispersion of buoyant plumes in open channel turbulence in made, where the buoyancy is due to both salinity and heat. The measured parameters are the downstream derivative of a plume width and height, which are integral-characteristics of the distributions of density......-differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced...

  7. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  8. Dusty plasma cavities: probe-induced and natural

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, B J; Hyde, T W

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in 3D crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified GEC RF cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a DC plasma is modified and applied to explain new experimental data in RF plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation unexpectedly occurs up...

  9. The EUV Spectrum of Sunspot Plumes Observed by SUMER on SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W. Curdt; B. N. Dwivedi; U. Feldman

    2000-09-01

    We present results from sunspot observations obtained by SUMER on SOHO. In sunspot plumes the EUV spectrum differs from the quiet Sun; continua are observed with different slopes and intensities; emission lines from molecular hydrogen and many unidentified species indicate unique plasma conditions above sunspots. Sunspot plumes are sites of systematic downflow. We also discuss the properties of sunspot oscillations.

  10. Numerical simulations based on probe measurements in EUV-induced hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikosov, Alex; Reshetnyak, Viktor; Astakhov, Dmitry; Dolgov, Alexandr; Yakushev, Oleg; Lopaev, Dmitry; Krivtsun, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    We use the two-dimensional particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions to study the plasma induced in hydrogen by short pulses of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation at wavelengths in the range 10–20 nm with a pulse duration of about 40 ns (FWHM). This plasma is formed via both photoionization by the high-energy EUV photons and by the secondary photoelectrons emitted from the hydrogen molecules and the irradiated surface. The latter process can be enhanced by the external electric field that accelerates the electrons. In order to establish a base for our model so as to obtain accurate results, we record a temporally-resolved series of current–voltage characteristics for a small probing electrode inserted into EUV-induced hydrogen plasma. We then resort to simulating this plasma in the same geometry with the probe in our model which we validate by matching its results to the experimentally measured dynamics of the probe current–voltage curves. Having validated the model this way, we use this model as an independent instrument capable of obtaining the spatiotemporal picture of EUV-induced plasma evolution. We use this instrument to study the plasma formation during the EUV pulse and point out the processes that take part in forming this plasma, such as impact ionization and direct ionization by EUV photons.

  11. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  13. A case for mantle plumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geoffrey F. Davies

    2005-01-01

    The existence of at least several plumes in the Earth's mantle can be inferred with few assumptions from well-established observations. As well, thermal mantle plumes can be predicted from well-established and quantified fluid dynamics and a plausible assumption about the Earth's early thermal state. Some additional important observations, especially of flood basalts and rift-related magmatism, have been shown to be plausibly consistent with the physical theory. Recent claims to have detected plumes using seismic tomography may comprise the most direct evidence for plumes, but plume tails are likely to be difficult to resolve definitively and the claims need to be well tested. Although significant questions remain about its viability, the plume hypothesis thus seems to be well worth continued investigation. Nevertheless there are many non-plate-related magmatic phenomena whose association with plumes is unclear or unlikely. Compositional buoyancy has recently been shown potentially to substantially complicate the dynamics of plumes, and this may lead to explanations for a wider range of phenomena, including "headless" hotspot tracks, than purely thermal plumes.

  14. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  15. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  16. Time-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma from fresh potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenqi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Boueri, Myriam; Ma, Qianli; Zhang, Dacheng; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping; Yu, Jin

    2009-09-01

    Optical emission of laser-induced plasma on the surface of fresh vegetables provides sensitive analysis of trace elements for in situ or online detection of these materials. This emergent technique promises applications with expected outcomes in food security or nutrition quality, as well as environment pollution detection. Characterization of the plasma induced on such soft and humid materials represents the first step towards quantitative measurement using this technique. In this paper, we present the experimental setup and protocol that optimize the plasma generation on fresh vegetables, potatoes for instance. The temporal evolution of the plasma properties are investigated using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In particular, the electron density and the temperatures of the plasma are reported as functions of its decay time. The temperatures are evaluated from the well known Boltzmann and Saha-Boltzmann plot methods. These temperatures are further compared to that of the typical molecular species, CN, for laser-induced plasma from plant materials. This comparison validates the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the specific case of fresh vegetables ablated in the typical LIBS conditions. A study of the temporal evolution of the signal to noise ratio also provides practical indications for an optimized detection of trace elements. We demonstrate finally that, under certain conditions, the calibration-free LIBS procedure can be applied to determine the concentrations of trace elements in fresh vegetables.

  17. Plasma-induced graft-polymerization of polyethylene glycol acrylate on polypropylene substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S.; Orlandi, M.; Colombo, C.; Grimoldi, E.; Riccardi, C.

    2009-08-01

    A detailed study of argon plasma-induced graft-polymerization of polyethylene glycol acrylate (PEGA) on polypropylene (PP) substrates (membranes and films) is presented. The process consists of four steps: (a) plasma pre-activation of the PP substrates; (b) immersion in a PEGA solution; (c) argon plasma-induced graft-polymerization; (d) washing and drying of the samples. Influence of the solution and plasma parameters on the process efficiency evaluated in terms of amount of grafted polymer, coverage uniformity and substrates wettability, are investigated. The plasma-induced graft-polymerization of PEGA is then followed by sample weighting, water droplet adsorption time and contact angle measurements, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses. The stability of the obtained thin films was evaluated in water and in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at 37 °C. Results clearly indicates that plasma-induced graft-polymerization of PEGA is a practical methodology for anti-fouling surface modification of materials.

  18. Plasma and wave phenomena induced by neutral gas releases in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available We investigate plasma and wave disturbances generated by nitrogen (N2 gas releases from the cooling system of an IR-camera on board the Vega 1 and Vega 2 spacecraft, during their flybys of comet Halley in March 1986. N2 molecules are ionized by solar UV radiation at a rate of ~ 7 · 10-7 s-1 and give rise to a plasma cloud expanding around the spacecraft. Strong disturbances due to the interaction of the solar wind with the N+2 ion cloud are observed with a plasma and wave experiment (APV-V instrument. Three gas releases are accompanied by increases in cold electron density and simultaneous decreases of the spacecraft potential; this study shows that the spacecraft potential can be monitored with a reference sensor mounted on a short boom. The comparison between the model and observations suggests that the gas expands as an exhaust plume, and approximately only 1% of the ions can escape the beam within the first meters. The releases are also associated with significant increases in wave electric field emission (8 Hz–300 kHz; this phenomenon lasts for more than one hour after the end of the release, which is most likely due to the temporary contamination of the spacecraft surface by nitrogen gas. DC electric fields associated with the events are complex but interesting. No magnetic field perturbations are detected, suggesting that no significant diamagnetic effect (i.e. magnetic cavity is associated with these events.

    Key words. Ionosphere (planetary ionosphere – Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; instruments and techniques

  19. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, R.A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  20. Thermally enhanced formation of photon-induced damage on GaN films in Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zecheng; Asano, Atsuki; Imamura, Masato; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2017-09-01

    Deep ultraviolet (UV) photons emitted from Cl2 plasmas become a critical cause of degradation in both photoluminescence (PL) properties and surface stoichiometry as a result of plasma-induced damage on GaN films in Cl2 plasma etching at high temperatures. The damages were formed thermally by photon-irradiations of plasma UV emissions with wavelengths of ˜258-306 nm from Cl2 plasma at temperatures greater than 500 °C. The damage were observed with a depth of approximately 3.2 nm. The PL property degraded by the UV emission-induced damage at an early period of plasma etching and reached a constant value.

  1. Stability of Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Induced Changes on Polycarbonate Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Holcomb, Edward; Trigwell, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Polycarbonate films are subjected to plasma treatment in a number of applications such as improving adhesion between polycarbonate and silicon alloy in protective and optical coatings. The changes in surface chemistry due to plasma treatment have tendency to revert back. Thus stability of the plasma induced changes on polymer surfaces over desired time period is very important. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ageing on atmospheric pressure helium-plasma treated polycarbonate (PC) sample as a function of treatment time. The ageing effects were studied over a period of 10 days. The samples were plasma treated for 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 minutes. Contact angle measurements were made to study surface energy changes. Modification of surface chemical structure was examined using, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Contact angle measurements on untreated and plasma treated surfaces were made immediately, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after treatment. Contact angle decreased from 93 deg for untreated sample to 30 deg for sample plasma treated for 10 minutes. After 10 days the contact angles for the 10 minute plasma treated sample increased to 67 deg, but it never reverted back to that of untreated surface. Similarly the O/C ratio increased from 0.136 for untreated sample to 0.321 for 10 minute plasma treated sample indication increase in surface energy.

  2. Confinement effect of cylindrical-separatrix-type magnetic field on the plume of magnetic focusing type Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daren; Meng, Tianhang; Ning, Zhongxi; Liu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic focusing type Hall thruster was designed with a cylindrical magnetic seperatrix. During the process of a hollow cathode crossing the separatrix, the variance of plume parameter distribution was monitored. Results show that the ion flux on the large spatial angle is significantly lower when the hollow cathode is located in the inner magnetic field. This convergence effect is preserved even in a distant area. A mechanism was proposed for plume divergence from the perspective of cathode-to-plume potential difference, through which the confinement effect of cylindrical-separatrix-type magnetic field on thruster plume was confirmed and proposed as a means of plume protection for plasma propulsion devices.

  3. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  4. Plasma induced DNA damage: Comparison with the effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Puač, N.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Leskovac, A.; Filipović, J.; Joksić, G. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-09-22

    We use human primary fibroblasts for comparing plasma and gamma rays induced DNA damage. In both cases, DNA strand breaks occur, but of fundamentally different nature. Unlike gamma exposure, contact with plasma predominantly leads to single strand breaks and base-damages, while double strand breaks are mainly consequence of the cell repair mechanisms. Different cell signaling mechanisms are detected confirming this (ataxia telangiectasia mutated - ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related - ATR, respectively). The effective plasma doses can be tuned to match the typical therapeutic doses of 2 Gy. Tailoring the effective dose through plasma power and duration of the treatment enables safety precautions mainly by inducing apoptosis and consequently reduced frequency of micronuclei.

  5. Measurements of egg shell plasma parameters using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wenfeng Luo; Xiaoxia Zhao; Shuyuan Lv; Haiyan Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of 1064 nm laser-induced egg shell plasma parameters are presented in this paper. Of special interests were its elemental identification and the determination of spectroscopic temperature and electron density. The electron temperature of 5956 K was inferred using an improved iterative Boltzmann plot method with six calcium atomic emission lines, and the electron number density of 6.1 × 1016 cm−3 was determined by measuring the width of Stark-broadened once-ionized calcium line at 393.37 nm. Based on the experimental results, the laser-induced egg shell plasma was verified to be optically thin and satisfy local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Furthermore, experiments also demonstrated that the loss of energy due to the reflection of the laser beam from the plasma can be neglected and the inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption was the dominant mechanism of plasma heating at the IR wavelength.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative spectro-chemical analysis of dates using UV-pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehder, A O; Habibullah, Y B; Gondal, M A; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is demonstrated for the spectral analysis of nutritional and toxic elements present in several varieties of date fruit samples available in the Saudi Arabia market. The method analyzes the optical emission of a test sample when subjected to pulsed laser ablation. In this demonstration, our primary focus is on calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), as nutritional elements, and on chromium (Cr), as a toxic element. The local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was confirmed prior to the elemental characterization of date samples to ensure accuracy of the LIBS analysis. This was achieved by measuring parameters associated with the plasma, such as the electron temperature and the electron number density. These plasma parameters aid interpretation of processes such as ionization, dissociation, and excitation occurring in the plasma plume formed by ablating the date palm sample. The minimum detection limit was established from calibration curves that involved plotting the LIBS signal intensity as a function of standard date samples with known concentrations. The concentration of Ca and Mg detected in different varieties of date samples was between 187 and 515 and 35-196mgL(-1) respectively, while Cr concentration measured between 1.72 and 7.76mgL(-1). In order to optimize our LIBS system, we have studied how the LIBS signal intensity depends on the incident laser energy and the delay time. In order to validate our LIBS analysis results, standard techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were also applied on an identical (duplicate) date samples as those used for the LIBS analysis. The LIBS results exhibit remarkable agreement with those obtained from the ICP-MS analysis. In addition, the finger print wavelengths of other elements present in date samples were also identified and are reported here, which has not been previously reported, to the best of our knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  7. Flash characteristics of plasma induced by hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Qingming; Xue, Yijiang; Ju, Yuanyuan

    2016-08-01

    Using a two-stage light gas gun, a series of hypervelocity impact experiments was conducted in which 6.4-mm-diameter spherical 2024-aluminum projectiles impact 23-mm-thick targets made of the same material at velocities of 5.0, 5.6, and 6.3 km/s. Both an optical pyrometer composed of six photomultiplier tubes and a spectrograph were used to measure the flash of the plasma during hypervelocity impact. Experimental results show that, at a projectile velocity of 6.3 km/s, the strong flash lasted about 10 μs and reached a temperature of 4300 K. Based on the known emission lines of AL I, spectral methods can provide the plasma electron temperature. An electron-temperature comparison between experiment and theoretical calculation indicates that single ionization and secondary ionization are the two main ionizing modes at velocities 5.0-6.3 km/s.

  8. Salt wastage, plasma volume contraction and hypokalemic paralysis in self-induced water intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanneau, R S; Pennec, Y L; Morin, J F; Codet, J P; Bourbigot, B; Garre, M; Le Menn, G

    1993-01-01

    Eleven episodes of severe hyponatremia secondary to hiccup-induced potomania were recorded in 3 years in a man who had essential hypertension, a low protein intake and a normal diluting ability. Paradoxical increase in hematocrit and plasma protein with acute extensive natriuresis was associated as well as urine potassium loss and hypokalemia producing paralysis in 1 episode. During a chronic water loading test, the defect in water excretion was related to a low urine solute delivery which was partially reverted by the natriuretic response to plasma volume expansion, promoting water diuresis. In acute water intoxication, this natriuretic response was exaggerated, producing a brisk water diuresis. Plasma volume was rapidly normalized but without any improvement in plasma sodium due to the concomitant negative sodium balance. Thus, water diuresis persisted until plasma volume was significantly contracted. Potassium loss appeared to be related to sodium excretion. Metabolic disturbances have not reoccurred despite persistent hiccup and potomania during 2 years of urea therapy.

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓永锋; 谭畅; 韩先伟; 谭永华

    2012-01-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  10. Flow shear induced fluctuation suppression in finite aspect ratio shaped tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Burrell, K.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The suppression of turbulence by the E {times} B flow shear and parallel flow shear is studied in an arbitrary shape finite aspect ratio tokamak plasma using the two point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a high aspect rat& tokamak plasma. The result shows that only the E {times} B flow shear is responsible for the suppression of flute-like fluctuations. This suppression occurs regardless of the plasma rotation direction and is therefore, relevant for the VH mode plasma core as well as for the H mode plasma edge. Experimentally observed in-out asymmetry of fluctuation reduction behavior can be addressed in the context of flux expansion and magnetic field pitch variation on a given flux surface. The adverse effect of neutral particles on confinement improvement is also discussed in the context of the charge exchange induced parallel momentum damping.

  11. Perforin rapidly induces plasma membrane phospholipid flip-flop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil S Metkar

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic cell granule secretory pathway is essential for host defense. This pathway is fundamentally a form of intracellular protein delivery where granule proteases (granzymes from cytotoxic lymphocytes are thought to diffuse through barrel stave pores generated in the plasma membrane of the target cell by the pore forming protein perforin (PFN and mediate apoptotic as well as additional biological effects. While recent electron microscopy and structural analyses indicate that recombinant PFN oligomerizes to form pores containing 20 monomers (20 nm when applied to liposomal membranes, these pores are not observed by propidium iodide uptake in target cells. Instead, concentrations of human PFN that encourage granzyme-mediated apoptosis are associated with pore structures that unexpectedly favor phosphatidylserine flip-flop measured by Annexin-V and Lactadherin. Efforts that reduce PFN mediated Ca influx in targets did not reduce Annexin-V reactivity. Antigen specific mouse CD8 cells initiate a similar rapid flip-flop in target cells. A lipid that augments plasma membrane curvature as well as cholesterol depletion in target cells enhance flip-flop. Annexin-V staining highly correlated with apoptosis after Granzyme B (GzmB treatment. We propose the structures that PFN oligomers form in the membrane bilayer may include arcs previously observed by electron microscopy and that these unusual structures represent an incomplete mixture of plasma membrane lipid and PFN oligomers that may act as a flexible gateway for GzmB to translocate across the bilayer to the cytosolic leaflet of target cells.

  12. Laser induced fluorescence applied to studies of particle behaviour in high-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K.; Uchino, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Maeda, M.; Okada, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we first review the principle of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), then give an overview of tunable laser sources, the crucial hardware for the experiment, and describe methods of calibration to obtain necessary information from the observed fluorescence, followed by the plasma measurements which have already been conducted. Comments are made for the future perspective of LIF for high-temperature plasma diagnostics. (J.P.N.).

  13. NW Iberia Shelf Dynamics. Study of the Douro River Plume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Iglesias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available River plumes are one of the most important mechanisms that transport the terrestrial materials to the coast and the ocean. Some examples of those materials are pollutants, essential nutrients, which enhance the phytoplankton productivity or sediments, which settle on the seabed producing modifications on the bathymetry affecting the navigation channels. The mixing between the riverine and the oceanic waters can induce instabilities, which might generate bulges, filaments, and buoyant currents over the continental shelf. Offshore, the buoyant riverine water could form a front with the oceanic waters often related with the occurrence of current-jets, eddies and strong mixing. The study and modelling of the river plumes is a key factor for the complete understanding of sediment transport mechanisms and patterns, and of coastal physics and dynamic processes. On this study the Douro River plume will be simulated. The Douro River is located on the north-west Iberian coast and its daily averaged freshwater discharge can range values from 0 to 13000 m3/s. This variability impacts the formation of the river plumes and its dispersion along the continental shelf. This study builds on the long-term objective of generate a Douro River plume forecasting system as part of the RAIA and RAIA.co projects. Satellite imagery was analyzed showing that the river Douro is one of the main sources of suspended particles, dissolved material and chlorophyll in the NW Iberian Shelf. The Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS model was selected to reproduce scenarios of plume generation, retention and dispersion. Whit this model, three types of simulations were performed: (i schematic winds simulations with prescribed river flow, wind speed and direction; (ii multi-year climatological simulation, with river flow and temperature change for each month; (iii extreme case simulation, based on the Entre-os-Rios accident situation. The schematic wind case-studies suggest that the

  14. Investigation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser-induced aluminum plasma by Thomson scattering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Kański, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Farah-Sougueh, A. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); GREMI — site de Bourges, Université d' Orléans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France); Pellerin, S. [GREMI — site de Bourges, Université d' Orléans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France); Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ul. Podchorażych 2, 30-084 Kraków (Poland); Dzierżęga, K. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    A laser Thomson scattering method was applied to investigate the local Saha–Boltzmann equilibrium in aluminum laser-induced plasma. Plasma was created in ambient air using 4.5 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm, focused on an Al target. Spatially resolved measurements, performed for the time interval between 600 ns and 3 μs, show electron density and temperature to decrease from 3.4 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −3} to 0.5 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −3} and from 61,000 K to 13,000 K in the plasma core. The existence of local thermodynamic equilibria in the plasma was verified by comparing the rates of the collisional to radiative processes (the McWhirter criterion), as well as relaxation times and diffusion lengths of different plasma species, with the appropriate rate of electron density evolution and its gradients at given, experimentally determined, electron temperatures. We found these criteria to be much easier to satisfy for metallic plasma species than for nitrogen. The criteria are also easier to satisfy in the plasma core of higher electron density. - Highlights: • Laser Thomson scattering method was applied to investigate aluminum laser-induced plasma. • Spatio-temporal evolution of electron temperature and density was determined. • Three criteria for existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium were verified. • Criteria are much easier to satisfy for metallic plasma species than for nitrogen. • Criteria are easier to satisfy at earlier times and in the plasma core.

  15. Numerical and experimental studies of the carbon etching in EUV-induced plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Yakushev, O; Koshelev, K N; Lopaev, D V; Bijkerk, F

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of numerical modeling and experiments to study carbon etching in the presence of a hydrogen plasma. We model the evolution of a low density EUV-induced plasma during and after the EUV pulse to obtain the energy resolved ion fluxes from the plasma to the surface. By relating the computed ion fluxes to the experimentally observed etching rate at various pressures and ion energies, we show that at low pressure and energy, carbon etching is due to chemical sputtering, while at high pressure and energy a reactive ion etching process is likely to dominate.

  16. Numerical Simulation on Expansion Process of Ablation Plasma Induced by Intense Pulsed Ion Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Chang; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang; MA Teng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional time-dependent numerical model for the expansion process of ablation plasmainduced by intense pulsed ion beam(IPIB).The evolutions of density,velocity,temperature,and pressure of theablation plasma of the aluminium target are obtained.The numerical results are well in agreement with therelative experimental data.It is shown that the expansion process of ablation plasma induced by IPIB includesstrongly nonlinear effects and that shock waves appear during the propagation of the ablation plasma.

  17. Plasma diagnostics from self-absorbed doublet lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, C. A.; Garcimuño, M.; Díaz Pace, D. M.; Bertuccelli, G.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a generalized approach is developed and applied for plasma characterization and quantitative purposes in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiences by employing a selected pair of spectral lines belonging to the same multiplet. It is based on the comparison between experimental ratios of line parameters and the theoretical calculus obtained under the framework of a homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The applicability of the method was illustrated by using the atomic resonance transitions 279.55-280.27 nm of Mg II, which are usually detected in laser-induced plasma (LIP) during laser ablation of many kinds of targets. The laser induced plasmas were produced using a Nd:YAG laser from a pressed pellet of powdered calcium hydroxide with a concentration of 300 ppm of Mg. The experimental ratios for peak intensities, total intensities and Stark widths were obtained for different time windows and matched to the theoretical calculus. The temperature and the electron density of the plasma, as well as the Mg columnar density (the atom/ion concentration times the length of the plasma along the line-of-sight), were determined. The results were interpreted under the employed approach.

  18. Ovulation-inducing factor: a protein component of llama seminal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanca Wilfredo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we documented the presence of ovulation-inducing factor (OIF in the seminal plasma of llamas and alpacas. The purpose of the study was to define the biochemical characteristics of the molecule(s in seminal plasma responsible for inducing ovulation. Methods In Experiment 1, llama seminal plasma was centrifuged using filtration devices with nominal molecular mass cut-offs of 30, 10 and 5 kDa. Female llamas (n = 9 per group were treated i.m. with whole seminal plasma (positive control, phosphate-buffered saline (negative control, or the fraction of seminal plasma equal or higher than 30 kDa, 10 to 30 kDa, 5 to 10 kDa, or Results In Experiment 1, all llamas in the equal or higher than 30 kDa and positive control groups ovulated (9/9 in each, but none ovulated in the other groups (P Conclusions We conclude that ovulation-inducing factor (OIF in llama seminal plasma is a protein molecule that is resistant to heat and enzymatic digestion with proteinase K, and has a molecular mass of approximately equal or higher than 30 kDa.

  19. Resonant-magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C. [University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609 (United States); Cole, A. J. [Columbia University, 201 S.W. Mudd, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Plasma toroidal rotation reduces reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields {delta}B on rational (q = m/n) magnetic flux surfaces. Hence, it causes radial perturbations {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} to be small there, and thus inhibits magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of high (H-) mode confinement tokamak plasmas. However, electron collisional damping combined with the spatial magnetic flutter {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} induced by RMPs in the vicinity of rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity in which {chi}{sub e Parallel-To }{sup eff}{approx}(v{sub Te}{sup 2}/{nu}{sub e})/(1+x{sup 2}/{delta}{sub Parallel-To }{sup 2}) is an effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity. These effects are reduced by magnetic shear effects at a distance x from rational surfaces for |x|>{delta}{sub Parallel-To} but amplified for {delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(x)>{delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(0). A kinetic, toroidal model of these RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport effects is developed and compared to a previously developed cylindrical model. The RMP-induced increases in plasma transport can be large enough to reduce plasma gradients in H-mode pedestals. Thus, they may contribute to suppressing edge localized modes in tokamak plasmas.

  20. Surface characterization and platelet adhesion studies on fluorocarbons prepared by plasma-induced graft polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J C; Tiong, S L; Chen, C Y

    2000-01-01

    It is believed that the interactions between the biological environment and biomaterial surface are the key factors influencing its biocompatibility. Therefore, plasma processing, which can vary the surface properties without altering the bulk properties, has been considered as one of the important techniques for improving a materials' biocompatibility. In this investigation, plasma-induced grafting polymerization of vinylidene fluoride (VDF) and chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE), instead of direct plasma polymerization, was attempted with an aim to improve the substrate blood compatibility. Contact angle measurement indicated both fluorocarbon-grafted Pdyethylenes (PEs) are hydrophobic. Due to the additional fluorine and chlorine atoms on the CTFE chain, the PCTFE-grafted PE exhibited a higher hydrophobicity than the PVDF-grafted one. ESCA analysis has revealed that these two plasma-induced fluorocarbon deposits contain almost no CFx (x > 2) binding on the surface layer, indicating the grafting polymerization mainly follows the free radical mechanism instead of the molecule-highly-fragmented reaction steps commonly seen in the direct plasma polymerization treatment. In addition, ATR-FTIR has shown the surface chemical configuration of these PVDF- and PCTFE-grafted PEs to be very similar to those of the bulk samples of PVDF and PCTFE. The surface roughness decreased after oxygen plasma treatment and was further reduced by VDF and CTFE grafting polymerization. In vitro platelet adhesion testing indicated these two fluorocarbon grafted PEs are less platelet-activating than the nontreated PE control and oxygen plasma activated one.

  1. Non-thermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes by inducing oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, KI CHEON; PIAO, MEI JING; HEWAGE, SUSARA RUWAN KUMARA MADDUMA; HAN, XIA; KANG, KYOUNG AH; JO, JIN OH; MOK, YOUNG SUN; SHIN, JENNIFER H.; PARK, YEUNSOO; YOO, SUK JAE; HYUN, JIN WON

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms through which dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) through the induction of oxidative stress. For this purpose, the cells were exposed to surface dielectric-barrier discharge plasma in 70% oxygen and 30% argon. We noted that cell viability was decreased following exposure of the cells to plasma in a time-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate and dihydroethidium was used to monitor superoxide anion production. Plasma induced the generation of ROS, including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. N-acetyl cysteine, which is an antioxidant, prevented the decrease in cell viability caused by exposure to plasma. ROS generated by exposure to plasma resulted in damage to various cellular components, including lipid membrane peroxidation, DNA breaks and protein carbonylation, which was detected by measuring the levels of 8-isoprostane and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine assay, comet assay and protein carbonyl formation. These results suggest that plasma exerts cytotoxic effects by causing oxidative stress-induced damage to cellular components. PMID:26573561

  2. Development of a numerical model to characterize laser-induced plasmas in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, M. Z.; Salehi, M. R.; Abiri, E.

    2017-09-01

    A spatio-temporal model for investigating the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas in aqueous media is developed by modifying the general form of the well-known rate equation and simultaneously accounting for the influences of multiphoton and cascade ionization on the propagation of short laser pulses. In this model, the nonlinear absorption of laser pulse energy is considered to be time and space dependent inside the computational volume. The model is verified by comparing the results of three-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations with existing experimental data for laser pulses of 30 ps, 1064 nm at focusing angles between 4° and 28° with energies in the wide range between 0.1 to 6000 μJ. This model could reasonably predict the various characteristics of a laser-induced plasma, such as breakdown threshold, size, shape and energy transmitted through the plasma. Also the transmitted energy data obtained from the model is within 10% of the experimental data at the largest focusing angle and 20% at the smallest angle. To compare the calculations with plasma photographs, electron density values are transformed into a gray scale. The simulated plasma shapes correlate well with the existing experimental observations. The outcomes of the model, such as spatial distribution of plasma energy density, could be used as input for a hydrodynamic model to estimate the strength of the mechanical effects associated with plasma formation.

  3. Development And Optical Absorption Properties Of A Laser Induced Plasma During CO2-Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, E.; Bakowsky, L.; Loosen, P.; Poprawe, R.; Herziger, G.

    1984-03-01

    Laser material processing is accompanied by a laser induced plasma in front of the target surface as soon as the laser radiation exceeds a certain critical intensity. For cw CO2-laser machining of metal targets the threshold for plasma onset is about 106 W/cm2. Critical condition for plasma generation at this intensity level is to reach evaporation temperature at the target's surface. At intensity levels exceeding 106 W/cm2 the laser light is interacting with the laser induced plasma and then the plasma in turn interacts with the target. The absorptivity is no longer constant, but increases with increasing intensity of the incident radiation, so that the total amount of power coupled to the target is increasing. This holds up to intensity levels of 2'10 Wicm2. Then the plasma begins to withdraw from the target surface, thus interrupting plasma-target interaction so that the laser power is no longer coupled into the target completely. The results of laser welding (welding depth) in the intensity level of 106 W/cm2 are governed by the product of incident intensity times focus radius, so that welding results are a measure to determine focus radius and laser intensity.

  4. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  5. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects....

  6. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  7. Investigation of Normalization Methods using Plasma Parameters for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) under simulated Martian Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, David; Schröder, Susanne; Hübers, H.-W.

    2017-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy data need to be normalized, especially in the field of planetary exploration We investigated plasma parameters as temperature and electron density for this purpose.

  8. Plasma plume effects on the conductivity of amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces grown by pulsed laser deposition in O2 and Ar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambri, A.; Christensen, Dennis; Trier, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces exhibit metallic conductivity similar to those found for the extensively studied crystalline-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. Here, we investigate the conductivity of the amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces grown in different pressures of O2 and Ar background gases....... During the deposition, the LaAlO3 ablation plume is also studied, in situ, by fast photography and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. An interesting correlation between interfacial conductivity and kinetic energy of the Al atoms in the plume is observed: to assure conducting interfaces...

  9. Numerical study on the characteristics of nitrogen discharge at high pressure with induced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yi-Nan; Liu Yue; Zheng Shu; Lin Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the fluid theory of plasma,a model is built to study the characteristics of nitrogen discharge at high pressure with induced argon plasma.In the model,species such as electrons,N2+,N4+,Ar+,and two metastable states (N2(A3 ∑ u+),N2(a1 ∑ u-)) are taken into account.The model includes the particle continuity equation,the electron energy balance equation,and Poisson(柤)equation.The model is solved with a finite difference method.The numerical results are obtained and used to investigate the effect of time taken to add nitrogen gas and initially-induced argon plasma pressure.It is found that lower speeds of adding the nitrogen gas and varying the gas pressure can induce higher plasma density,and inversely lower electron temperature.At high-pressure discharge,the electron density increases when the proportion of nitrogen component is below 40%,while the electron density will keep constant as the nitrogen component further increases.It is also shown that with the increase of initially-induced argon plasma pressure,the density of charged particles increases,and the electron temperature as well as the electric field decreases.

  10. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  11. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Virard

    Full Text Available Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial.Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells.These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy.

  12. High-Frequency-Induced Cathodic Breakdown during Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nominé, A.; Nominé, A. V.; Braithwaite, N. St. J.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.

    2017-09-01

    The present communication shows the possibility of observing microdischarges under cathodic polarization during plasma electrolytic oxidation at high frequency. Cathodic microdischarges can ignite beyond a threshold frequency found close to 2 kHz. The presence (respectively, absence) of an electrical double layer is put forward to explain how the applied voltage can be screened, which therefore prevents (respectively, promotes) the ignition of a discharge. Interestingly, in the conditions of the present study, the electrical double layer requires between 175 and 260 μ s to form. This situates the expected threshold frequency between 1.92 and 2.86 kHz, which is in good agreement with the value obtained experimentally.

  13. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  14. Evaluating Oxidative Stress Factors Induced by Chlorpyrifos Poisoning in Plasma of Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saberi

    2014-06-01

    Results: The oral administration of CPF could induce symptoms such as tremors, hair erection, weakness, diarrhea and asthma on Day 7 and onward. The data analysis of plasma samples showed significant (P<0.001 decrease in the levels of glutathione and CAT enzymatic activity and a significant increase in SOD enzymatic activity and the MDA level. Conclusion: CPF could induce oxidative stress probably via production of free radicals as was evident by reduction of GSH level and CAT activity accompanied by increase in the activity of SOD and enhancement in the level of MDA in plasma samples. This necessitates the application of antioxidants when having exposure with OP pesticides.

  15. Online compositional analysis in coal gasification environment using laser-induced plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kung-Li; Wu, Juntao; Wang, Zhe; Lee, Boon; Guida, Renato

    2006-08-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants have great potential for future clean-coal power generation. Today, the quality of coal is measured by sampling coal using various offline methods, and the syn-gas composition is determined by taking samples downstream of the gasifier and measured by gas chromatograph (GC). Laser induced plasma technology has demonstrated high sensitivity for elementary detection. The capability of free space transmission and focusing of laser beam makes laser induced plasma a unique technology for online compositional analysis in coal gasification environment and optimization control.

  16. Laser Mode-Dependent Size of Plasma Zones Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Fused Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shan-Chun; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Yi; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    We carry out the numerical simulations of #emtosecond laser propagation with TEM00 mode, TEM10 mode and a beam combining both the modes in fused silica. It is found that the transverse size of plasma zones induced by laser pulses with the TEM10 mode is smaller than that induced by the TEMoo mode, while the longitudinal size is almost the same, and the saturated plasma density is higher. The transverse size, the longitudinal size and the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse size, for the beam combining both the modes, all could be reduced at the same time in comparison with the TEMoo mode under the same focusing conditions.

  17. Surface-nitriding treatment of steels using microwave-induced nitrogen plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Arai, Yuuki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamashita, Noboru; Kojyo, Atsushi; Kodama, Kenji [Rigaku Corporation, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1146 (Japan); Ohtsu, Naofumi [Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Okamoto, Yukio [Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    A rapid surface-nitriding system using microwave-induced nitrogen plasma at atmospheric pressure was developed for modifying iron and steel surfaces. Since the conventional plasma nitriding technique requires a low-pressure atmosphere in the treatment chamber, the population of excited nitrogen molecules in the plasma is limited. Accordingly, several hours are required for nitriding treatment. By contrast, the developed nitriding system can use atmospheric-pressure plasma through application of the Okamoto cavity for excitation of nitrogen plasma. The high population of excited nitrogen molecules induced by the atmospheric-pressure plasma allowed the formation of a nitriding layer that was several micrometers thick within 1 min and produced an expanded austenite iron phase with a high nitrogen concentration close to the solubility limit on the iron substrate. In addition, the nitriding treatment on high-chromium steel was performed by introducing a reducing gas such as NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} into the treatment chamber. While the nitriding reaction did not proceed in a simple N{sub 2} atmosphere due to surface oxidation, the surface reduction induced by the NH{sub 3} or H{sub 2} gas promoted the nitriding reaction at the surface. These nitriding phenomena characteristics of the atmospheric-pressure plasma are discussed in this paper based on the effects of the specimen temperature and plasma atmosphere on the thickness, the chemical states, and the nitride compounds of the nitrided layer as investigated by X-ray diffraction, glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  18. On Plasma Rotation Induced by Traveling Fast Alfvin Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; and V.S. Chan

    2001-08-09

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the minority fundamental ion-cyclotron resonance, coupled with finite banana width physics, generates torque distributions and ultimately rotational shear layers in the bulk plasma, even when the toroidal wavenumber k(subscript ''phi'') = n/R of the fast wave vanishes (n=0) and cyclotron absorption introduces no angular momentum nor canonical angular momentum [F.W. Perkins, R.B. White, P.T. Bonoli, and V.S. Chan, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2181]. The present work extends these results to travelling waves with non-zero n where heating directly introduces angular momentum. Since tokamak fast-wave antennas have approximately one wavelength per toroidal field coil, the toroidal mode number n lies in the range n = 10-20, independent of machine size. A zero-dimensional analysis shows that the rotation rate arising from direct torque is comparable to that of the rotational shear layer and has the same scaling. Nondimensional rotation profiles for n = (-10, 10) show modest changes from the n = 0 case in the expected direction. For a balanced antenna spectrum, the nondimensional rotational profile (averaged over n = -10, 10) lies quite close to the n = 0 profile.

  19. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  20. Three-dimensional laboratory modeling of the Tonga trench and Samoan plume interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druken, K. A.; Kincaid, C. R.; Pockalny, R. A.; Griffiths, R. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Plume processes occurring near ridge centers (e.g. Iceland) or mid-plate (e.g. Hawaii) have been well studied; however, the behavior of a plume near a subducting plate is still poorly understood and may in fact differ from the typical expected plume surfacing patterns. We investigate how three-dimensional subduction-driven flow relates to the deformation and dispersal of nearby upwelling plume material and the associated geochemical spatial patterns, with site-specific comparisons to the Tonga trench and Samoan plume system. Eighteen plume-trench laboratory experiments were conducted with varied combinations of subduction motions (down-dip, trench rollback, slab steepening and back-arc extension) and plume parameters (position and temperature.) A phenolic plate and glucose syrup, with a temperature dependent viscosity, are used to model the slab and upper mantle, respectively. Hydraulic pistons control longitudinal, translational and steepening motions of the slab as a simplified kinematic approach to mimic dynamic experiments. Results show that the subduction-induced flow dominates the upwelling strength of the plume, causing a significant portion of the plume head to subduct before reaching the melt zone. The remaining material is entrained around the slab edge into the mantle wedge by the trench rollback-induced flow. The proportion of subducted verses entrained material is predominantly dependent on plume location (relative to the trench) and thermal strength, with additional effects from back-arc extension and plate steepening.

  1. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  2. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  3. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  4. Global Circulation and Impact of Plasmaspheric Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Hsiem; Delcourt, Dominique C.; Fedder, Joel A.; Slinker, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    We report results from the global circulation model of Lyon, Fedder, and Mobarry with an embedded model of the inner magnetosphere including the plasmasphere. The combination is used to initiate large numbers of representative protons on the geosynchronous orbit L shell, to assign particle weightings, to track their: subsequent trajectories in the 3D fields. This permits us to study the global circulation of plasmaspheric plumes and to compare these with Polar observations from the dayside magnetopause region . A range of events is studied from an isolated period of SBz in the solar wind,to a large storm sequence. We consider effects on circulating plasma reaching the dayside reconnection X-line, the population of the plasma sheet with ionospheric protons and the generation of ring current pressure from this source, compared with solar wind, polar wind, and auroral wind sources. We find that the transient plasmaspheric plume source is large in terms of total fluence, but of modest proportions in terms of contribution to the ring current. Implications of this and other results for improved space weather modeling and prediction will be discussed.

  5. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili, E-mail: zzhang24@utk.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Jiang, Naibo; Roy, Sukesh [Spectral Energies, LLC, 5100 Springfield St., Suite 301, Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States); Gord, James R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace Systems Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O₂/N₂ and O₂/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O₂ 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (≤100 Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  6. Impact of plasma induced liquid chemistry and charge on bacteria loaded aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, David; McDowell, David; Mariotti, Davide; Mahony, Charles; Diver, Declan; Potts, Hugh; Bennet, Euan; Maguire, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of living organisms, such as bacteria, into atmospheric pressure microplasmas offers a unique opportunity to study the local chemical and electrical effects on cell structure and viability. Individual bacteria, each encapsulated in an aerosol droplet, were successfully transmitted through a non-thermal equilibrium RF coaxial plasma, using a custom-design concentric double gas shroud interface and via adjustment of transit times and plasma parameters, we can control cell viability. Plasma electrical characteristics (ne ~ 1013 cm-3), droplet velocity profiles and aspects of plasma-induced droplet chemistry were determined in order to establish the nature of the bacteria in droplet environment. Plasma-exposed viable E coli cells were subsequently cultured and the growth rate curves (lag and exponential phase gradient) used to explore the effect of radical chemistry and electron bombardment on cell stress. The extent and nature of membrane disruption in viable and non-viable cells were investigated through genomic and protein/membrane lipid content estimation. We will also compare our results with simulations of the effect of bacterial presence on plasma induced droplet charging and evaporation. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  7. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  8. Pro-apoptotic NOXA is implicated in atmospheric-pressure plasma-induced melanoma cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) has been successfully used to treat several types of cancers in vivo and in vitro, with the effect being primarily attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanisms by which APP induces apoptosis in cancer cells require further elucidation. In this study, the effects of APP on the expression of 500 genes in melanoma Mel007 cancer cells were examined. Pro-apoptotic phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein (PMAIP1), also known as NOXA, was highly expressed as a result of APP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking of ROS using scavenger NAC or silencing of NOXA gene by RNA interference inhibited the APP-induced NOXA genes upregulation and impaired caspases 3/7 mediated apoptosis, confirming the important role plasma-generated ROS species and pro-apoptotic NOXA play in APP-induced cancer cell death.

  9. Does plasma ANP participate in natriuresis induced by a-MSH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L.W. Picanço-Diniz

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available a-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (a-MSH; 0.6 and 3 nmol microinjected into the anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V induced a significant increase in diuresis without modifying natriuresis or kaliuresis. Intraperitoneal (ip injection of a-MSH (3 and 9.6 nmol induced a significant increase in urinary sodium, potassium and water excretion. Intraperitoneal (3 and 4.8 nmol or iv (3 and 9.6 nmol administration of a-MSH did not induce any significant changes in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, suggesting that the natriuresis, kaliuresis and diuresis induced by the systemic action of a-MSH can be dissociated from the increase in plasma ANP. These preliminary results suggest that a-MSH may be involved in a g-MSH-independent mechanism of regulation of hydromineral metabolism

  10. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma induced degradation of aqueous atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingwei; Jiang, Lin; Zhu, Dan; Su, Kuizu; Zhao, Dayong; Zhang, Jibiao; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Degradation of herbicide atrazine in aqueous solution was investigated using a plate type dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. DBD plasma was generated at the gas-liquid interface of the formed water film. At discharge time of 14 min, atrazine was degradated effectively with a degradation rate of 99 % at the discharge power of 200 W. The experimental data fitted well with first-order kinetics and the energy efficiency for 90 % degradation of atrazine (G value) was calculated, obtaining a rate constant of 0.35 min(-1) and a G value of 1.27 × 10(-10) mol J(-1) (98.76 mg kW(-1) h(-1)) at a discharge power of 200 W, respectively. The addition of Fe(2+) increased the rate constant and G value dramatically, and a significant decrease of the rate constant and G value was observed with the addition of radical scavengers (tert-butyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, or Na2CO3). The generated aqueous O3 and H2O2 were determined, which promoted the degradation of herbicide atrazine. Dechlorination was observed and the experimentally detected Cl(-) was 1.52 mg L(-1) at a discharge time of 14 min. The degradation intermediates of atrazine were detected by means of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; dechlorination, hydroxylation, dealkylation, and alkyl oxidation processes were involved in the degradation pathways of atrazine.

  11. Laser-induced incandescence diagnostic for in situ monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis in an atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrani, James; Patel, Shane; Shneider, Mikhail; Stratton, Brent; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    A DC arc discharge with a consumed graphite electrode is commonly used for synthesis of carbon nanoaparticles in a low temperature (0.1-1 eV), atmospheric pressure plasma. The formation of nanoparticles in this plasma is poorly understood; it is not clear where nanoparticles nucleate and grow in the arc discharge. Therefore, a laser-induced incandescence (LII) diagnostic for in situ monitoring of the nanoparticles' spatial distribution in the plasma is currently being constructed. The LII diagnostic involves heating the particles with a short-pulsed laser, and measuring the induced spatiotemporal incandescence profiles on longer timescales. By appropriately modeling the induced spatiotemporal incandescence profiles, one can measure particle diameters and volume fraction. LII diagnostics have been extensively used to study soot particles in flames. However, they have never been applied in a strongly coupled plasma background. Even though the spatial dimensions for soot and nanoparticles are similar, great care is needed in developing an LII diagnostic for monitoring nanoparticles in a plasma background. Therefore, we will calibrate our LII diagnostic by measuring spatiotemporal incandescence profiles of known, research grade soot and nanoparticles. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongfeng, DENG; Jian, JIANG; Xianwei, HAN; Chang, TAN; Jianguo, WEI

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  13. Magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J. D.; Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can prevent reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on rational surfaces and hence magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of tokamak H-mode plasmas. However, magnetic flutter induced by RMPs off the rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity χe^RMP˜(δBr/B0)^2χ| F(x) in which χ|˜vTe^2/νe is an effective parallel electron heat diffusivity and F is a spatially varying factor [1]. The flutter also diffuses electrons radially and causes a factor of about 3 smaller increases in density diffusion. Since the electron density transport is non-ambipolar, this flutter process also modifies the radial electric field and plasma toroidal rotation. This work extends the previously developed periodic cylinder screw pinch model [1] of RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport to a full toroidal model which is axisymmetric to lowest order plus gyroradius-small magnetic field perturbations. The possible role of the RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport in reducing pressure gradients in H-mode pedestals and thereby suppressing ELMs will be discussed.[4pt] [1] J.D. Callen et al., UW-CPTC 11-13, http://www.cptc.wisc.edu (submitted to Nucl. Fusion.)

  14. Evaluating Oxidative Stress Factors Induced by Chlorpyrifos Poisoning in Plasma of Wistar Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Saberi, M.; A Zare’i Mahmoudabadi; M Fasihi Ramandi; A Kazemi; J Rasouli Vani

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a broad-spectrum organophosphorus insecticide that has been used abundantly over the globe during the past 40 years. Chemical pesticides may induce oxidative stress via generating free radicals and altering antioxidant levels of the free radical scavenging enzyme activity. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the toxicity of Chlorpyrifos-induced oxidative stress in the plasma samples of Wistar rat. Methods: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were selected r...

  15. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Feng-Yin; /Taiwan, Natl. Chiao Tung U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Lin, Guey-Lin; /Taiwan, Natl. Chiao Tung U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Noble, Robert; /SLAC; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  16. Plasmonic emission and plasma lattice structures induced by pulsed laser in Purcell cavity on silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄伟其; 黄忠梅; 苗信建; 刘世荣; 秦朝建

    2015-01-01

    The lattice structure image of a plasma standing wave in a Purcell cavity of silicon is observed. The plasma wave produced by the pulsed laser could be used to fabricate the micro-nanostructure of silicon. The plasma lattice structures induced by the nanosecond pulsed laser in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. It is interesting that the beautiful diffraction pattern could be observed in the plasma lattice structure. The radiation lifetime could be shortened to the nanosecond range throughout the entire spectral range and the relaxation time could be lengthened for higher emission efficiency in the Purcell cavity, which results in the fact that the plasmonic emission is stronger and its threshold is lower.

  17. Theory of terahertz emission from femtosecond-laser-induced micro-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Thiele, I; Bousquet, B; Tikhonchuk, V; Davoine, X; Gremillet, L; Bergé, L; Skupin, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of terahertz (THz) generation in laser-induced gas plasmas. The work is strongly motivated by recent experimental results on micro-plasmas, but our general findings are not limited to such a configuration. The electrons and ions are created by tunnel-ionization of neutral atoms, and the resulting plasma is heated by collisions. Electrons are driven by electromagnetic, convective and diffusive sources and produce a macroscopic current which is responsible for THz emission. The model naturally includes both, ionization current and transition-Cherenkov mechanisms for THz emission, which are usually investigated separately in the literature. The latter mechanism is shown to dominate for single-color multi-cycle lasers pulses, where the observed THz radiation originates from longitudinal electron currents. However, we find that the often discussed oscillations at the plasma frequency do not contribute to the THz emission spectrum. In order to predict the scaling of the conver...

  18. AC plasma induced modifications in Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto-Rodriguez, M; Martinez, H [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62210, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Castillo, F [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Pena, Y [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Pedro de Alba s/n, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L (Mexico); Sanchez-Juarez, A, E-mail: ciro@nucleares.unam.m [Centro de Investigacion en EnergIa, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n Col. Centro, Temixco, Morelos, C.P. 62580 (Mexico)

    2010-01-01

    Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films, deposited by the chemical bath deposition method, were treated with N{sub 2} plasma at 3.0 Torr during several minutes. The as-prepared Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films and films treated with N{sub 2} plasma have been characterized using several techniques. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that plasma treatment induced recrystallization on the as-prepared Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}thin films. The band gap values decreased from 2.37 to 1.82 eV after plasma treatment, and the electrical conductivity increased from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 7} ({Omega}cm){sup -1} due to the annealing effect.

  19. Influence of collisions on parametric instabilities induced by lower hybrid waves in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, C.; Di Siena, A.; Fedele, R.; Napoli, F.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Schettini, G.

    2016-01-01

    Parametric instabilities induced at the plasma edge by lower hybrid wave power externally coupled to tokamak plasmas have, via broadening of the antenna spectrum, strong influence on the power deposition and current drive in the core. For modeling the parametric instabilities at the tokamak plasma edge in lower hybrid current drive experiments, the effect of the collisions has been neglected so far. In the present work, a specific collisional parametric dispersion relation, useful to analyze these nonlinear phenomena near the lower hybrid antenna mouth, is derived for the first time, based on a kinetic model. Numerical solutions show that in such cold plasma regions the collisions prevent the onset of the parametric instabilities. This result is important for present lower hybrid current drive experiments, as well as in fusion reactor scenarios.

  20. Biogeochemistry of landfill leachate plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2001-01-01

    is on dissolved organic matter, xenobiotic organic compounds, inorganic macrocomponents as anions and cations, and heavy metals. Laboratory as well as field investigations are included. This review is an up-date of an earlier comprehensive review. The review shows that most leachate contamination plumes...... the behavior of the contaminants in the plume as the leachate migrates away from the landfill. Diverse microbial communities have been identified in leachate plumes and are believed to be responsible for the redox processes. Dissolved organic C in the leachate, although it appears to be only slowly degradable...

  1. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Reil, Kevin; Sydora, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultra high energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield so induced validates precisely the theoretical prediction. We show that under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over a macroscopic distance. Invoking gamma ray burst (GRB) as the source, we show that MPWA production of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) beyond ZeV 10^21 eV is possible.

  2. Anisotropic fluorocarbon plasma etching of silicon/silicon germanide heterostructures and plasma etching-induced sidewall damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ruhang

    Plasma etching is a critical tool in the fabrication of Si/SiGe heterostructure quantum devices, but with challenges addressed herein, including (1) control of etch profiles and (2) damage to etched feature sidewalls that affects device performance. (1) Fluorocarbon-based plasma etching often results in device profiles with undercuts due to preferential etching of SiGe over silicon. A C4F8/N2/Ar etch plasma gas mixture introduced here has been successfully used to achieve straight sidewalls through heterostructure layers by formation of a fluorocarbon inhibitor film on feature sidewalls to prevent undercutting. (2) Chemical and structural changes in the semiconductor at feature sidewalls associated with plasma-surface interactions are considered damage, as they affect band structure and electrical conduction in the active region of the device, known as the 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In experiments designed to better understand the mechanisms of plasma-induced sidewall damage, damage to straight wires was characterized both by the width of a non-conductive "sidewall depletion" region at the device sidewall, and by the noise level factor, gamma H/N, determined from spectra of low frequency noise. Observed increases in sidewall depletion width with increasing etch depth are tentatively attributed to the increase in total number of defects with increased plasma exposure time. Excess negative charge incorporated into the fluorocarbon inhibitor film could be another contributing factor. Other factors considered, including defects at the bottom of etched features as well as leakage current bypassing the wire, are ruled out as their contribution is expected to diminish as the distance between the 2DEG and feature bottom increases. The noise level factor, gammaH /N, shows a maximum with increasing etch depth, possibly the result of two competing effects: increasing ion dose and decreasing leakage current. The noise level shows a minimum at an ion bombardment energy

  3. Dose dependence of endotoxin-induced activation of the plasma contact system: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeise, O; Bouma, B N; Stadaas, J O; Aasen, A O

    1988-12-01

    The dose and time dependence of endotoxin-induced activation of the plasma contact system have been studied. Citrated pool plasma was incubated at 37 degrees C with endotoxin doses of 2.10(5), 2.10(6), 2.10(7), and 2.10(9) ng/l (lipopolysaccharide B, E. coli 026: B6, Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI) for 24 hr. Samples for determination of components of the contact system were obtained prior to incubation and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hr. Plasma kallikrein (KK) activity markedly increased at 12 hr in test plasma containing the highest dose of endotoxin (2.10(9) ng/l). Coincident with the elevated KK activity, reductions of both plasma prekallikrein (PKK) and functional kallikrein inhibition (KKI) were seen as assayed by chromogenic peptide substrate analyses. Also, functionally determined alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M) and C1 inhibitor (C1INH) values were decreased, confirming the reduction of KKI values. Changes of Hageman factor (FXII), PKK, and high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) values were also found at the same time point when assayed by immunochemical techniques. The same pattern of changes was seen in test plasma containing 2.10(7) and 2.10(6) ng/l of endotoxin. These changes, however, were less pronounced and not seen until 24 hr after beginning incubation. In control plasma and in plasma containing the lowest dose of endotoxin (2.10(5) ng/l), no changes were seen in any factors of the contact system. Our study shows that in vitro endotoxin-induced activation of the contact system is a slow process that is both time and dose dependent.

  4. Biochemical isolation and purification of ovulation-inducing factor (OIF in seminal plasma of llamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierson Roger A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the present study was to isolate and purify the protein fraction(s of llama seminal plasma responsible for the ovulation-inducing effect of the ejaculate. Methods Semen collected from male llamas by artificial vagina was centrifuged and the seminal plasma was harvested and stored frozen. Seminal plasma was thawed and loaded onto a Type 1 macro-prep ceramic hydroxylapatite column and elution was carried out using a lineal gradient with 350 mM sodium phosphate. Three protein fractions were identified clearly (Fractions A, B, and C, where a prominent protein band with a mass of 14 kDa was identified in Fraction C. Fraction C was loaded into a sephacryl gel filtration column for further purification using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC. Isocratic elution resulted in 2 distinct protein fractions (Fractions C1 and C2. An in vivo bioassay (n = 10 to 11 llamas per group was used to determine the ovarian effect of each fraction involving treatment with saline (negative control, whole seminal plasma (positive control, or seminal plasma Fractions A, B or C2. Ultrasonography was done to detect ovulation and CL formation, and blood samples were taken to measure plasma progesterone and LH concentrations. Results Ovulation and CL formation was detected in 0/10, 10/11, 0/10, 2/11, and 10/11 llamas treated with saline, whole seminal plasma, Fractions A, B and C2 respectively (P Conclusion Ovulation-inducing factor was isolated from llama seminal plasma as a 14 kDa protein molecule that elicits a preovulatory LH surge followed by ovulation and CL formation in llamas, suggesting an endocrine effect at the level of the hypothalamus (release of GnRH or the pituitary (gonadotrophs.

  5. Minimal change-like glomerular alterations induced by a human plasma factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, PK; Klok, PA; Bakker, WW

    1996-01-01

    Circulating factors, including the plasma protease (100KF) described previously, have been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of minimal change disease (MCD) for several decades. This factor was able to induce MCD-like alterations in kidney tissue in vitro, i.e. impairment of glomerular po

  6. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding.

  7. A Review on Chemical Effects in Aqueous Solution induced by Plasma with Glow Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Chemical effects in different aqueous solutions induced by plasma with glow dis charge electrolysis (GDE) and contact glow discharge electrolysis (CGDE) are described in this paper. The experimental and discharge characteristics are also reviewed. These are followed by a discussion of their mechanisms of both anodic and cathodic CGDE..

  8. A Study on Water Treatment Induced by Plasma with Contact Glow Discharge Electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡中爱; 王晓艳; 高锦章; 邓华陵; 侯经国; 卢小泉; 康敬万

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of eight kinds of dyes induced by plasma in aqueous solution was investigated with contact glow discharge electrolysis (CGDE). It has been demonstrated that these eight dyes underwent degradation in CGDE, where Fe2+ could be utilised to raise the efficiency of degradation of dyes.

  9. Velocity Diagnosis of Critical Surface at Microwave Band in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; WANG Junyan; BAI Shunbo; CHEN Jianping; CHU Ran; YUN Xiaohua; NI Xiaowu

    2008-01-01

    The velocity of critical surface at microwave band in laser-induced plasma was mea-sured and the results are presented. The results indicate that the velocity of critical surface with low electron density is larger than that with the high one; and the velocity of critical surface increases with the laser power density.

  10. Plasma volume substitution does not inhibit plasma noradrenaline and muscle nerve sympathetic responses to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Berne, C; Fagius, J;

    1989-01-01

    underly the sympathetic activation. To study the effect of prevention of plasma volume reduction during hypoglycaemia, saline containing albumin was infused intravenously in healthy adult volunteers during hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia was induced by an intravenous injection of soluble insulin in a dose...... of 0.15 IU/kg body weight. Peripheral venous plasma noradrenaline concentrations were identical in experiments without and with plasma volume substitution. Muscle nerve sympathetic activity increased to the same extent during hypoglycaemia with and without plasma volume substitution. It is concluded...

  11. Electron induced inelastic and ionization cross section for plasma modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pankaj; Mahato, Dibyendu; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The present paper reports electron impact total inelastic and ionization cross section for silicon, germanium, and tin tetrahalides at energies varying from ionization threshold of the target to 5000 eV. These cross section data over a wide energy domain are very essential to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in various environments such as plasma modeling, semiconductor etching, atmospheric sciences, biological sciences, and radiation physics. However, the cross section data on the above mentioned molecules are scarce. In the present article, we report the computation of total inelastic cross section using spherical complex optical potential formalism and the estimation of ionization cross section through a semi-empirical method. The present ionization cross section result obtained for SiCl4 shows excellent agreement with previous measurements, while other molecules have not yet been investigated experimentally. Present results show more consistent behaviour than previous theoretical estimates. Besides cross sections, we have also studied the correlation of maximum ionization cross section with the square root of the ratio of polarizability to ionization potential for the molecules with known polarizabilities. A linear relation is observed between these quantities. This correlation is used to obtain approximate polarizability volumes for SiBr4, SiI4, GeCl4, GeBr4, and GeI4 molecules.

  12. Rotation shear induced fluctuation decorrelation in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    The enhanced decorrelation of fluctuations by the combined effects of the E {times} B flow (V{sub E}) shear, the parallel flow (V{sub {parallel}}) shear, and the magnetic shear is studied in toroidal geometry. A two-point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a cylindrical model shows that the reduction of the radial correlation length below its ambient turbulence value ({Delta}r{sub 0}) is characterized by the ratio between the shearing rate {omega}{sub s} and the ambient turbulence scattering rate {Delta}{omega}{sub T}. The derived shearing rate is given by {omega}{sub s}{sup 2} = ({Delta}r{sub 0}){sup 2}[1/{Delta}{phi}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(qV{sub E}/r){r_brace}{sup 2} + 1/{Delta}{eta}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(V{parallel}/qR){r_brace}{sup 2}], where {Delta}{phi} and {Delta}{eta} are the correlation angles of the ambient turbulence along the toroidal and parallel directions. This result deviates significantly from the cylindrical result for high magnetic shear or for ballooning-like fluctuations. For suppression of flute-like fluctuations, only the radial shear of qV{sub E}/r contributes, and the radial shear of V{parallel}/qR is irrelevant regardless of the plasma rotation direction.

  13. Smoke plumes: Emissions and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan O' Neill; Shawn Urbanski; Scott Goodrick; Sim Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Smoke can manifest itself as a towering plume rising against the clear blue sky-or as a vast swath of thick haze, with fingers that settle into valleys overnight. It comes in many forms and colors, from fluffy and white to thick and black. Smoke plumes can rise high into the atmosphere and travel great distances across oceans and continents. Or smoke can remain close...

  14. Dynamics of the spatial electron density distribution of EUV-induced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temporal evolution of the electron density distribution in a low pressure pulsed plasma induced by high energy extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy (MCRS). In principle, MCRS only provides space averaged information about the electron density. However, we demonstrate here the possibility to obtain spatial information by combining multiple resonant modes. It is shown that EUV-induced plasmas, albeit being a rather exotic plasma, can be explained by known plasma physical laws and processes. Two stages of plasma behaviour are observed: first the electron density distribution contracts, after which it expands. It is shown that the contraction is due to cooling of the electrons. The moment when the density distribution starts to expand is related to the inertia of the ions. After tens of microseconds, the electrons reached the wall of the cavity. The speed of this expansion is dependent on the gas pressure and can be divided into two regimes. It is shown that the acoustic dominated regime the expansion speed is independent of the gas pressure and that in the diffusion dominated regime the expansion depends reciprocal on the gas pressure.

  15. Does plasma ANP participate in natriuresis induced by a-MSH?

    OpenAIRE

    Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley Picanço; OLIVEIRA,Gustavo Ribeiro de; FAVARETTO, Ana Lucia Vianna; Gutkowska, J.; MCCANN, S.M.; RODRIGUES, José Antunes

    1997-01-01

    -Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (-MSH; 0.6 and 3 nmol) microinjected into the anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V) induced a significant increase in diuresis without modifying natriuresis or kaliuresis. Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of -MSH (3 and 9.6 nmol) induced a significant increase in urinary sodium, potassium and water excretion. Intraperitoneal (3 and 4.8 nmol) or iv (3 and 9.6 nmol) administration of -MSH did not induce any significant changes in plasma atrial natr...

  16. Canard-induced mixed mode oscillations in an excitable glow discharge plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nurujjaman, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated experimentally canard induced mixed mode oscillations (MMO) in an excitable glow discharge plasma, and the results are validated through numerical solution of the FitzHugh Nagumo (FHN) model. When glow discharge plasma is perturbed by applying a magnetic field, it shows mixed mode oscillatory activity, i.e., quasiperiodic small oscillations interposed with large bounded limit cycles oscillations. The initial quasiperiodic oscillations were observed to change into large amplitude limit cycle oscillations with magnetic field, and the number of these oscillation increases with increase in the magnetic field. Fourier analysis of both numerical and experimental results show that the origin of these oscillations are canard-induced phenomena, which occurs near the threshold of the control parameter. Further, the phase space plots also confirm that the oscillations are basically canard-induced MMOs.

  17. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  18. Exhaust Plume Measurements of the VASIMR VX-200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmier, Benjamin; Bering, Edgar, III; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Brukardt, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress is discussed in the development of an advanced RF electric propulsion concept: the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) VX-200 engine, a 200 kW flight-technology prototype. Results from high power Helicon only and Helicon with ICRH experiments are performed on the VX-200 using argon plasma. Recent measurements of axial plasma density and potential profiles, magnetic field-line shaping, charge exchange, and force measurements taken in the plume of the VX-200 exhaust are made within a new 125 cubic meter cryo-pumped vacuum chamber and are presented in the context of RF plasma thruster physics.

  19. Plasma induced by pulsed laser and fabrication of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Wei-Qi; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liu Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Lv, Quan; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-08-01

    It is interesting that in preparing process of nanosilicon by pulsed laser, the periodic diffraction pattern from plasmonic lattice structure in the Purcell cavity due to interaction between plasmons and photons is observed. This kind of plasmonic lattice structure confined in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. Emission manipulation on Si nanostructures fabricated by the plasmonic wave induced from pulsed laser is studied by using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The electronic localized states and surface bonding are characterized by several emission bands peaked near 600 nm and 700 nm on samples prepared in oxygen or nitrogen environment. The electroluminescence wavelength is measured in the telecom window on silicon film coated by ytterbium. The enhanced emission originates from surface localized states in band gap due to broken symmetry from some bonds on surface bulges produced by plasmonic wave in the cavity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  20. Plasma membrane ubiquinone controls ceramide production and prevents cell death induced by serum withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M P; Gómez-Díaz, C; Villalba, J M; Burón, M I; López-Lluch, G; Navas, P

    1997-06-01

    Serum provides cultured cells with survival factors required to maintain growth. Its withdrawal induces the development of programmed cell death. HL-60 cells were sensitive to serum removal, and an increase of lipid peroxidation and apoptosis was observed. Long-term treatment with ethidium bromide induced the mitochondria-deficient rho(o)HL-60 cell line. These cells were surprisingly more resistant to serum removal, displaying fewer apoptotic cells and lower lipid peroxidation. HL-60 cells contained less ubiquinone at the plasma membrane than rho(o)HL-60 cells. Both cell types increased plasma membrane ubiquinone in response to serum removal, although this increase was much higher in rho(o) cells. Addition of ubiquinone to both cell cultures in the absence of serum improved cell survival with decreasing lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Ceramide was accumulated after serum removal in HL-60 but not in rho(o)HL-60 cells, and exogenous ubiquinone reduced this accumulation. These results demonstrate a relationship between ubiquinone levels in the plasma membrane and the induction of serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis, and ceramide accumulation. Thus, ubiquinone, which is a central component of the plasma membrane electron transport system, can represent a first level of protection against oxidative damage caused by serum withdrawal.

  1. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  2. Amplification of 126 nm femtosecond seed pulses in optical-field-induced Ar plasma filamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Deshimaru, Naoyuki; Kaku, Masanori; Katto, Masahito

    2014-10-01

    We have observed amplification of femtosecond (fs) VUV coherent seed beam at 126 nm by utilizing an optical-field-induced ionization (OFI) high-pressure Ar plasma filamentation. We have produced a low-temperature and high-density Ar plasma filamentation inside a high-pressure Ar cell by irradiating a high-intensity laser with an intensity of approximately 1014 W cm-2. Argon excimer molecules (Ar2*) as an amplifier medium were produced inside the high-pressure cell and were used to amplify a weak VUV ultrashort seed pulse at 126 nm, which was generated by harmonic generation of another short pulse infrared laser at 882 nm. We have measured the amplification characteristics and the OFI plasma diagnosis by utilizing the fs VUV pulses at 126 and 882 nm, respectively. The maximum optical gain value of 1.1 cm-1 was observed. Temporal behaviors of the plasma temperature and density in the nano-second time scale indicated a high-density and low-temperature plasma produced by using the OFI. These plasma behaviors were utilized to reproduce the optical amplification characteristics with our OFI excimer simulation code.

  3. Effect of pharmacological lowering of plasma urate on exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, S R; Hosick, P A; McAnulty, L S; Quindry, J C; Still, L; Hudson, M B; Dibarnardi, A N; Milne, G L; Morrow, J D; Austin, M D

    2007-12-01

    Urate is a metabolic end product of purine metabolism that contributes about 66% of the antioxidant capacity of plasma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the importance of plasma urate as an antioxidant using pharmacological lowering and examining the impact on plasma antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress after intense exercise. Fifteen subjects ran for 45 min at approximately 80% VO2 max under the influence of probenecid (1 g/d) (PRO) or placebo (PLA) in a double-blind, crossover design. Blood samples obtained at baseline, pre-exercise, and immediately post-exercise were analyzed for F2-isoprostanes, lipid hydroperoxides (LHs), ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), urate, ascorbate (AA), and nitrite. A 2 (group)x2 (time) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests, and Student's t tests were used for statistical analysis. PRO exhibited lowered urate and FRAP compared with baseline (pplasma markers of exercise-induced oxidative stress were not affected by below-normal physiological concentrations of urate and a diminished antioxidant capacity within the plasma compartment.

  4. Application of inertia-induced excitation theory for nonlinear acoustic modes in colloidal plasma equilibrium flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Karmakar

    2007-04-01

    Application of inertia-induced acoustic excitation theory offers a new resonant excitation source channel of acoustic turbulence in the transonic domain of plasma flow. In bi-ion plasmas like colloidal plasma, two well-defined transonic points exist corresponding to the parent ion and the dust grain-associated acoustic modes. As usual, the modified ion acoustic mode (also known as dust ion-acoustic (DIA) wave) dynamics associated with parent ion inertia is excitable for both nanoscale- and micronscale-sized dust grains. It is found that the so-called (ion) acoustic mode (also known as dust-acoustic (DA) wave) associated with nanoscale dust grain inertia is indeed resonantly excitable through the active role of weak but finite parent ion inertia. It is interestingly conjectured that the same excitation physics, as in the case of normal plasma sound mode, operates through the active inertial role of plasma thermal species. Details of the nonlinear acoustic mode analyses of current interest in transonic domains of such impure plasmas in hydrodynamic flow are presented.

  5. Ion energy distributions and densities in the plume of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shotaro; Cravens, Thomas E.; Omidi, Nojan; Perry, Mark E.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2016-10-01

    Enceladus has a dynamic plume that is emitting gas, including water vapor, and dust. The gas is ionized by solar EUV radiation, charge exchange, and electron impact and extends throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. The charge exchange collisions alter the plasma composition. Ice grains (dust) escape from the vicinity of Enceladus and form the E ring, including a portion that is negatively charged by the local plasma. The inner magnetosphere within 10 RS (Saturn radii) contains a complex mixture of plasma, neutral gas, and dust that links back to Enceladus. In this paper we investigate the energy distributions, ion species and densities of water group ions in the plume of Enceladus using test particle and Monte Carlo methods that include collisional processes such as charge exchange and ion-neutral chemical reactions. Ion observations from the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) for E07 are presented for the first time. We use the modeling results to interpret observations made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the INMS. The low energy ions, as observed by CAPS, appear to be affected by a vertical electric field (EZ=-10 μV/m) in the plume. The EZ field may be associated with the charged dust and/or the pressure gradient of plasma. The model results, along with the results of earlier models, show that H3O+ ions created by chemistry are predominant in the plume, which agrees with INMS and CAPS data, but the INMS count rate in the plume for the model is several times greater than the data, which we do not fully understand. This composition and the total ion count found in the plume agree with INMS and CAPS data. On the other hand, the Cassini Langmuir Probe measured a maximum plume ion density more than 30,000 cm-3, which is far larger than the maximum ion density from our model, 900 cm-3. The model results also demonstrate that most of the ions in the plume are from the external magnetospheric flow and are not generated by local

  6. Ionization Induced Scattering of Femtosecond Intense Laser Pulses in Cluster Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangxin; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Li Shaohui; Ni Guoquan

    2005-01-01

    The 45° scattering of a femtosecond (60 fs) intense laser pulse with a 20 nm FWHM (the full width at half maximum) spectrum centered at 790 nm has been studied experimentally while focused in argon clusters at intensity ~ 1016 W/cra2. Scattering spectra under different backing pressures and laser-plasma interaction lengths were obtained, which showed spectral blueshifting, beam refraction and complex modulation. These ionization-induced effects reveal the modulation of laser pulses propagating in plasmas and the existing obstacle in laser cluster interaction at high laser intensity and high electron density.

  7. Investigations of plasma induced effects on the surface properties of lignocellulosic natural coir fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen, K.M., E-mail: praveenkmiiucnn@gmail.com [International and Inter University Centre for Nano Science and Nanotechnology (IIUCNN), Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala (India); Centre de Recherche C.Huygens, LIMATB (Laboratoired’Ingénierie des Matériaux de Bretagne), Université De Bretagne-Sud, Rue stMaudé – BP 92116, Cedex Lorient 56321 Lorient (France); Thomas, Sabu [International and Inter University Centre for Nano Science and Nanotechnology (IIUCNN), Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala (India); Grohens, Yves [Centre de Recherche C.Huygens, LIMATB (Laboratoired’Ingénierie des Matériaux de Bretagne), Université De Bretagne-Sud, Rue stMaudé – BP 92116, Cedex Lorient 56321 Lorient (France); Mozetič, Miran; Junkar, Ita; Primc, Gregor [Department of Surface Engineering, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamovacesta 39, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Gorjanc, Marija [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 12, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Plasma induced changes on the morphology of coir fibres (Viewed and Analysed using scanning electron microscopy, Jeol JSM 7600 FEG). The O{sub 2} plasma treated fibre possessed increased hydrophilicity due to the chemical and physical changes induced by plasma. - Highlights: • Plasma-induced effects on the surface properties of lignocellulosic natural coir fibres were investigated. • The morphological study using SEM analysis also confirmed the surface changes which were observed after plasma treatment. • The water absorption studies show an increase of water absorption from 39% to around 100%. • The topographic measurements done using atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed etching of fibre wall, and this is responsible for higher water absorption. • XPS analysis reveals that the oxygen content measured for samples treated at 50 Pa increased from initial 18 at% to about 32 at%. - Abstract: The development of lignocellulosic natural-fibre-reinforced polymers composites are constrained by two limitations: the upper temperature at which the fibre can be processed and the significant differences between the surface energy of the fibre and the polymer matrix. Since the fibres and matrices are chemically different, strong adhesion at their interface is needed for the effective transfer of stress and bond distribution throughout the interface. The present study investigated the plasma induced effects on the surface properties of natural coir fibres. Weakly ionized oxygen plasma was created in two different discharge chambers by an inductively coupled radiofrequency (RF) discharge. The water absorption studies showed an increase of water sorption from 39% to 100%. The morphological study using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis also confirmed the surface changes which were observed after the plasma treatment. The topographic measurements and phase imaging done using atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated difference in topographic

  8. Radiation characteristics of femtosecond laser-induced plasma channel Vee antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Yun-Sik; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2015-06-01

    A virtual reconfigurable plasma Vee antenna consisting of a set of laser plasma filaments produced by femtosecond laser pulses in air is investigated in this paper. The calculation results show that radiation pattern becomes more complex and gain shows initially rapid rise but gradually saturate as the leg length increases, but the pattern and gain are not seriously affected by the plasma conductivity; particularly, the gain of the Vee antenna with plasma conductivity σ = 100S/m can reach about 80% of that of a copper antenna. Radiation efficiency of the antenna has shown a strong dependence on radius of the antenna leg, and an efficiency of 65%, considered to have a proper performance, can be obtained with the channel radius of about 10 mm. Apex angle variation can lead to significant change of the radiation pattern and influence the gain; the best apex angle corresponding to maximal gain and good directivity for the third resonance antenna leg length is found to be at 74° at 600 MHz and σ = 100 S/m. The calculation has shown that at terawatt laser power level, the plasma channel conductivity is close to that of conventional plasma antenna, and peak gain of the Vee antenna is more than 8 dB with a good directivity. In addition, the radiation pattern of special Vee antennas with apex angle 180°-dipole antennas, for first and third resonance leg lengths, is compared and underneath physics of the difference is given. The laser-induced plasma channel antenna is especially suitable for achieving good directivity and gain, which has advantage over conventional plasma antenna with gas discharge tube or metal antenna.

  9. Radiation characteristics of femtosecond laser-induced plasma channel Vee antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yun-Sik [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, 130022 Changchun (China); Department of Physics, University of Science, Pyongyang, North Korea (Korea, Republic of); Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan, E-mail: linjingquan@cust.edu.cn [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, 130022 Changchun (China)

    2015-06-15

    A virtual reconfigurable plasma Vee antenna consisting of a set of laser plasma filaments produced by femtosecond laser pulses in air is investigated in this paper. The calculation results show that radiation pattern becomes more complex and gain shows initially rapid rise but gradually saturate as the leg length increases, but the pattern and gain are not seriously affected by the plasma conductivity; particularly, the gain of the Vee antenna with plasma conductivity σ = 100S/m can reach about 80% of that of a copper antenna. Radiation efficiency of the antenna has shown a strong dependence on radius of the antenna leg, and an efficiency of 65%, considered to have a proper performance, can be obtained with the channel radius of about 10 mm. Apex angle variation can lead to significant change of the radiation pattern and influence the gain; the best apex angle corresponding to maximal gain and good directivity for the third resonance antenna leg length is found to be at 74° at 600 MHz and σ = 100 S/m. The calculation has shown that at terawatt laser power level, the plasma channel conductivity is close to that of conventional plasma antenna, and peak gain of the Vee antenna is more than 8 dB with a good directivity. In addition, the radiation pattern of special Vee antennas with apex angle 180°-dipole antennas, for first and third resonance leg lengths, is compared and underneath physics of the difference is given. The laser-induced plasma channel antenna is especially suitable for achieving good directivity and gain, which has advantage over conventional plasma antenna with gas discharge tube or metal antenna.

  10. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence at 10 kHz in a seeded flow, a plasma discharge, and a flame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammack, Stephen D; Carter, Campbell D; Gord, James R; Lee, Tonghun

    2012-12-20

    This study demonstrates high-repetition-rate planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of both cold (~300 K) and hot (~2400 K) nitric oxide (NO) at a framing rate of 10 kHz. The laser system is composed of a frequency-doubled dye laser pumped by the third harmonic of a 10 kHz Nd:YAG laser to generate continuously pulsed laser radiation at 226 nm for excitation of NO. The laser-induced fluorescence signal is detected using a high-frame rate, intensified CMOS camera, yielding a continuous cinematographic propagation of the NO plume where data acquisition duration is limited only by camera memory. The pulse energy of the beam is ~20 μJ with a spectral width ~0.15 cm(-1), though energies as high as 40 μJ were generated. Hot NO is generated by passing air through a DC transient-arc plasma torch that dissociates air. The plasma torch is also used to ignite and sustain a CH(4)/air premixed flame. Cold NO is imaged from a 1% NO flow (buffered by nitrogen). The estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the cold seeded flow and air plasma exceeds 50 with expected NO concentrations of 6000-8000 parts per million (ppm, volume basis). Images show distinct, high-contrast boundaries. The plasma-assisted flame images have an SNR of less than 10 for concentrations reaching 1000 ppm. For many combustion applications, the pulse energy is insufficient for PLIF measurements. However, the equipment and strategies herein could be applied to high-frequency line imaging of NO at concentrations of 10-100 ppm. Generation of 226 nm radiation was also performed using sum-frequency mixing of the 532 nm pumped dye laser and 355 nm Nd:YAG third harmonic but was limited in energy to 14 μJ. Frequency tripling a 532 nm pumped dye laser produced 226 nm radiation at energies comparable to the 355 nm pumping scheme.

  11. The story of plumes: the development of a new conceptual framework for understanding magnetosphere and ionosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, Mark B.; Zou, Shasha; Heine, Tom

    2016-12-01

    The name "plume" has been given to a variety of plasma structures in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. Some plumes (such as the plasmasphere plume) represent elevated plasma density, while other plumes (such as the equatorial F region plume) represent low-density regions. Despite these differences these structures are either directly related or connected in the causal chain of plasma redistribution throughout the system. This short review defines how plumes appear in different measurements in different regions and describes how plumes can be used to understand magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The story of the plume family helps describe the emerging conceptual framework of the flow of high-density-low-latitude ionospheric plasma into the magnetosphere and clearly shows that strong two-way coupling between ionospheric and magnetospheric dynamics occurs not only in the high-latitude auroral zone and polar cap but also through the plasmasphere. The paper briefly reviews, highlights and synthesizes previous studies that have contributed to this new understanding.

  12. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2010-08-01

    A pulse Nd: YAG laser with pulse duration 5–10 ns, beam radius at focal point 0·2–0·4 mm, wavelengths 1064 nm, 532 nm and 238 nm with linearly polarized radiation and Gaussian beam profile, was impacted on a thin foil of titanium metal for generating plasma plume. Numerically, the above parameters were linked with average kinetic energy of the electrons and ions in the laser-induced plasma. In the present model, electrons having higher velocities are assumed to escape from plasma, that forms a negatively charged sheath around the plasma. It is seen from present computations that the forward directed nature of the laser evaporation process results from the anisotropic expansion velocities associated with different species. These velocities are mainly controlled by the initial dimension of the expanding plasma. An attempt was undertaken to estimate the length of the plume at different ambient gas pressures using an adiabatic expansion model. The rate of the plasma expansion for various Ar+ ion energies was derived from numerical calculations. A numerical definition of this plasma includes events like collisional/radiative, excitation/de-excitation and ionization/recombination processes involving multiples of energy levels with several ionization stages. Finally, based on a kinetic model, the plasma expansion rate across the laser beam axis was investigated.

  13. Anisotropy induced wave birefringence in bounded supercritical plasma confined in a multicusp magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2011-04-01

    Laboratory observation of rotation of the polarization axis (θc˜20°-40° with respect to vacuum) of a penetrating electromagnetic wave through a bounded supercritical plasma (plasma frequency ωp>wave frequency ω), confined in a multicusp magnetic field is reported. Birefringence of the radial and polar wave electric field components (Er and Eθ) has been identified as the cause for the rotation, similar to a magneto-optic medium, however, with distinct differences owing to the presence of wave induced resonances. Numerical simulation results obtained by solving the Maxwell's equations by incorporating the plasma and magnetostatic field inhomogeneities within a conducting boundary shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Simulation of vibration-induced effect on plasma current measurement using a fiber optic current sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Frédéric; Aerssens, Matthieu; Gusarov, Andrei; Mégret, Patrice; Massaut, Vincent; Wuilpart, Marc

    2014-06-16

    An accurate measurement of the plasma current is of paramount importance for controlling the plasma magnetic equilibrium in tokamaks. Fiber optic current sensor (FOCS) technology is expected to be implemented to perform this task in ITER. However, during ITER operation, the vessel and the sensing fiber will be subject to vibrations and thus to time-dependent parasitic birefringence, which may significantly compromise the FOCS performance. In this paper we investigate the effects of vibrations on the plasma current measurement accuracy under ITER-relevant conditions. The simulation results show that in the case of a FOCS reflection scheme including a spun fiber and a Faraday mirror, the error induced by the vibrations is acceptable regarding the ITER current diagnostics requirements.

  15. Plasma leptin, insulin and free tryptophan contribute to cytokine-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoi; Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo

    2003-01-01

    Cytokines contribute to anorexia of diseases. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and/or interleukin-1 (IL-1) stimulate leptin release, but not insulin. Both affect hypothalamus to decrease food intake (FI). Hypothalamic serotonin (5HT) decreases FI. Its synthesis depends on brain availability of precursor, tryptophan (TRP), which depends on plasma free TRP. Purpose is to test involvement of plasma leptin, insulin, TRP, and thus hypothalamic 5HT in cytokine-induced anorexia in rats. In male rats, IL-1alpha (10 mg/kg/d; n=9), TNFalpha (30 mg/kg/d; n=9), Il-1alpha+TNFalpha (10:30 mg/kg/d; n=9), TRP (100 mg/kg/d, n=8) and saline (n=8; Control) were injected sc for 2 days. FI, BW, plasma free and total TRP, leptin and insulin, and body fat were measured. Data analyzed via ANOVA. IL-1alpha and IL-1alpha+TNFalpha vs others decreased FI and BW. TNFalpha and TRP did not change FI and BW. Plasma total TRP was higher in TRP vs IL-1alpha, TNFalpha, and IL-1alpha+TNFalpha. Plasma free TRP was higher in IL-1alpha and IL-1alpha+TNFalpha vs Control. IL-1alpha and IL-1alpha+TNFalpha decreased leptin and body fat. Insulin in Control was lower than others. Data suggest: i) IL-1alpha increases plasma free TRP, but not total TRP, thus increases hypothalamic 5HT synthesis, resulting in anorexia; ii) leptin does not mediate anorexia, but; iii) insulin may contribute to anorexia induced by cytokines.

  16. Optical emission studies of plasma induced by single and double femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinon, V. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Universidad de A Coruna, Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, E-15403 Ferrol, A Coruna (Spain); Anglos, D., E-mail: anglos@iesl.forth.g [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    Double-pulse femtosecond laser ablation has been shown to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to single-pulse ablation particularly when an appropriate interpulse delay is selected, that is typically in the range of 50-1000 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of materials. A detailed comparative study of collinear double- over single-pulse femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been carried out, based on measurements of emission lifetime, temperature and electronic density of plasmas, produced during laser ablation of brass with 450 fs laser pulses at 248 nm. The results obtained show a distinct increase of plasma temperature and electronic density as well as a longer decay time in the double-pulse case. The plasma temperature increase is in agreement with the observed dependence of the emission intensity enhancement on the upper energy level of the corresponding spectral line. Namely, intensity enhancement of emission lines originating from higher lying levels is more profound compared to that of lines arising from lower energy levels. Finally, a substantial decrease of the plasma threshold fluence was observed in the double-pulse arrangement; this enables sensitive analysis with minimal damage on the sample surface.

  17. [Doppler effect on width of characteristic line in plasma induced by pulsed laser ablating Al].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi-Zhong; He, An-Zhi

    2005-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) plasma was induced with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser beam ablating Al target in Ar. Time-resolved information of the plasma radiation was taken with time-resolved technique, and the spectra of the radiation were recorded with an optical multi-path analyzer (OMA III ), whereupon, time-resolved spectra of the plasma radiation induced by pulsed laser were acquired. Based on the experiment data, Al resonant double lines, Al I 396.15 nm, Al I 394.40 nm, were respectively fitted with Lorentz, Gauss and their linear integrated function (abbr. Integrated function), whereupon, Lorentz and Gauss elements were separated from the experiment data profile curve. By contrasting Lorentz with Gauss curve separated, it was found that the experiment curve mainly consisted of Lorentz element, a with little Gauss. By contrasting Lorentz with Integrated fitting curve for experiment data, a visual picture of the characteristic lines broadened by Doppler effect was exhibited. According to the visual picture, the increase of full half-high width of the characteristic line broadened by Doppler effect was estimated. It was about 2 x 10(-)3 -8 x 10(-3) nm, approximating the theoretical value 6.7 x 10(-)3 nm. As a result, Doppler effect on the width of characteristic lines in the plasma could be reasonably explained by curve fitting analysis and theoretical calculation.

  18. Distribution of plasma and magnetic field in the Venus induced magnetosphere is strongly asymmetrical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Zhang, T.; Woch, J. G.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S. V.; Lundin, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    Venus Express spacecraft have provided us a wealth of in-situ observations of characteristics of induced magnetosphere of Venus. One of its important features is a distinct asymmetry in plasma and field characteristics between the hemisphere pointed in the direction of the motional electric field and the opposite hemisphere. Asymmetry starts from formation of the magnetic barrier, then continues to low altitudes where effects of finite conductivity become important and further to the near Venus tail where the magnetic tail and plasma sheet are formed. As a result, the structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere in both hemispheres occur different. We present different aspects of such an asymmetry and discuss possible mechanisms of its appearance.

  19. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  20. Beta-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reduces plasma lipid peroxidation induced by haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2011-07-01

    Since oxidative stress observed in schizophrenia may be caused partially by the treatment of patients with various antipsychotics, the aim of the study was to establish the effects of beta-d-glucan, polysaccharide derived from the yeast cell walls of species such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the antipsychotics (the first generation antipsychotic (FGA) - haloperidol and the second generation antipsychotic (SGA) - amisulpride) action on plasma lipid peroxidation in vitro. Lipid peroxidation in human plasma was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). The samples of plasma from healthy subjects were incubated with haloperidol or amisulpride in the presence of beta-glucan (4 μg/ml). The action of beta-d-glucan was also compared with the properties of a well characterized commercial monomeric polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene, the final concentration - 4 μg/ml). The two-way analysis variance showed that the differences in TBARS levels were depended on the type of tested drugs (p=7.9 × 10(-6)). We observed a statistically increase of the level of biomarker of lipid peroxidation such as TBARS after 1 and 24h incubation of plasma with haloperidol compared to the control samples (p0.05). We showed that in the presence of beta-glucan, lipid peroxidation in plasma samples treated with haloperidol was significantly decreased. Moreover, we did not observe the synergistic action of beta-glucan and amisulpride on the inhibition of plasma lipid peroxidation. However, the beta-d-glucan was found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. The presented results indicate that beta-glucan seems to have distinctly protective effects against the impairment of plasma lipid molecules induced by haloperidol.

  1. Mitigation of plasma-induced damage in porous low-k dielectrics by cryogenic precursor condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; de Marneffe, Jean-François; Leroy, Floriane; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Tillocher, Thomas; Dussart, Remi; Maekawa, Kaoru; Yatsuda, Koichi; Dussarrat, Christian; Goodyear, Andy; Cooke, Mike; De Gendt, Stefan; Baklanov, Mikhail R.

    2016-05-01

    The present work describes the plasma etch properties of porous organo-silicate materials at cryogenic temperature. The mechanism of plasma damage is studied by means of in situ ellipsometry and post-etch material evaluation. Using conventional volatile reactants such as SF6, it is found that low plasma damage can be achieved below  -120 °C through two main channels: pore sidewall passivation by molecular SF6 and partial condensation of non-volatile etch by-products. The protection can be enhanced by means of gas phase precursors with low saturated vapor pressure. Using C4F8, complete pore filling is achieved at  -110 °C and negligible plasma-induced damage is demonstrated on both blanket and patterned low-k films. The characteristics of the precursor condensation process are described and discussed in detail, establishing an optimal process window. It is shown that the condensation temperature can be raised by using precursors with even lower vapor pressure. The reported in situ densification through precursor condensation could enable damage-free plasma processing of mesoporous media.

  2. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  3. Study of plasma-induced graft polymerization of stearyl methacrylate on cotton fabric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Chao; Shao, Jianzhong

    2015-12-01

    A simple and facile method to prepare the cotton fabric with hydrophobicity was described in the present work. In the one-step process, the cotton fabric pre-impregnated with the monomer solution of stearyl methacrylate (SMA) was placed in the plasma chamber and followed by glow discharge of the Helium low temperature plasma. The cotton fabrics before and after the plasma treatment were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), infrared spectroscopic analysis (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The wettability of the cotton fabrics was evaluated by contact angle measurement. Fabric Hand Values and mechanical properties were also measured in the experiment. The results showed that polymer films could be coated on the cotton fibers through the plasma induced grafting polymerization of SMA. The modified cotton fabrics exhibited an extraordinary hydrophobicity with a contact angle of 149° for a 5 μL water droplet and excellent thermal stability. The relative hand value and mechanical breaking strength of the cotton fabrics declined slightly after graft polymerization of SMA by the plasma.

  4. Fast magnetic energy dissipation in relativistic plasma induced by high order laser modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.J.Gu; Q.Yu; O.Klimo; T.Zh.Esirkepov; S.V.Bulanov; S.Weber; G.Korn

    2016-01-01

    Fast magnetic field annihilation in a collisionless plasma is induced by using TEM(1,0) laser pulse. The magnetic quadrupole structure formation, expansion and annihilation stages are demonstrated with 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The magnetic field energy is converted to the electric field and accelerate the particles inside the annihilation plane. A bunch of high energy electrons moving backwards is detected in the current sheet. The strong displacement current is the dominant contribution which induces the longitudinal inductive electric field.

  5. Plasma lipidomics reveal profound perturbation of glycerophospholipids, fatty acids, and sphingolipids in diet-induced hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hua; Chen, Hua; Pei, Songwen; Bai, Xu; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2015-02-25

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease and has emerged as an important public health problem. Lipidomics is a powerful technology for assessment of global lipid metabolites in a biological system and for biomarker discovery. In the present study, hyperlipidemia was induced by feeding rats a high fat diet. A sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight synapt high-definition mass spectrometry method was used for the analysis of plasma lipids. Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis, correlation analysis and heatmap analysis were performed to investigate the metabolic changes in rats with diet-induced hyperlipidemia. Potential biomarkers were detected using S-plot and were identified by accurate mass data, isotopic pattern and MS(E) fragments information. Significantly increased total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol as well as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed in diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. Combined with standard serum biochemical results, significant differences in plasma lipid compounds including eleven glycerophospholipids, six fatty acids, two sphingolipids, one eicosanoid, one sterol lipid and one glycerolipid were observed, highlighting the perturbation of lipid metabolism in diet-induced hyperlipidemia. These findings provide further insights into the lipid profile across a wide range of biochemical pathways in diet-induced hyperlipidemia.

  6. Plumes in stellar convection zones

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, J P

    1999-01-01

    All numerical simulations of compressible convection reveal the presence of strong downwards directed flows. Thanks to helioseismology, such plumes have now been detected also at the top of the solar convection zone, on super- granular scales. Their properties may be crudely described by adopting Taylor's turbulent entrainment hypothesis, whose validity is well established under various conditions. Using this model, one finds that the strong density stratification does not prevent the plumes from traversing the whole convection zone, and that they carry upwards a net energy flux (Rieutord & Zahn 1995). They penetrate to some extent in the adjacent stable region, where they establish a nearly adiabatic stratification. These plumes have a strong impact on the dynamics of stellar convection zones, and they play probably a key role in the dynamo mechanism.

  7. Simultaneous application of microbial transglutaminase and high hydrostatic pressure to improve heat induced gelation of pork plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, N; Lanier, T C; Amato, P M; Carretero, C; Saguer, E

    2008-11-01

    The effects of treating porcine plasma with microbial tranglutaminase (MTGase) under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) were studied as a means of improving its gel-forming properties when subsequently heated at pH 5.5, near the pH of meats. Plasma containing varying levels of commercial MTGase was pressurized (400MPa, room temperature, pH 7) for different times, and adjusted to pH 5.5 prior to heating to induce gelation. MTGase-treatment under HHP led to greater enhancement of heat-induced plasma gel properties as compared to control samples. The greatest improvements were achieved by pressurising plasma with 43.3U MTGase/g protein for 30min, thereby achieving recoveries of 49% and 63% in fracture force (gel strength) and fracture distance (gel deformability) of the subsequently heat-induced gels, respectively, relative to gel properties obtained by heating untreated plasma at physiological conditions (pH 7.5).

  8. Investigation on the Plasma-Induced Emission Properties of Large Area Carbon Nanotube Array Cathodes with Different Morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qingliang; Qin, Zi; Zhang, Zheng; Qi, Junjie; Zhang, Yue; Huang, Yunhua; Liu, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Large area well-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays with different morphologies were synthesized by using a chemical vapor deposition. The plasma-induced emission properties of CNT array cathodes with different morphologies were investigated. The ratio of CNT height to CNT-to-CNT distance has considerable effects on their plasma-induced emission properties. As the ratio increases, emission currents of CNT array cathodes decrease due to screening effects. Under the pulse electric field of about 6 V/μm, high-intensity electron beams of 170-180 A/cm(2) were emitted from the surface plasma. The production mechanism of the high-intensity electron beams emitted from the CNT arrays was plasma-induced emission. Moreover, the distribution of the electron beams was in situ characterized by the light emission from the surface plasma.

  9. Investigation on the Plasma-Induced Emission Properties of Large Area Carbon Nanotube Array Cathodes with Different Morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large area well-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT arrays with different morphologies were synthesized by using a chemical vapor deposition. The plasma-induced emission properties of CNT array cathodes with different morphologies were investigated. The ratio of CNT height to CNT-to-CNT distance has considerable effects on their plasma-induced emission properties. As the ratio increases, emission currents of CNT array cathodes decrease due to screening effects. Under the pulse electric field of about 6 V/μm, high-intensity electron beams of 170–180 A/cm2 were emitted from the surface plasma. The production mechanism of the high-intensity electron beams emitted from the CNT arrays was plasma-induced emission. Moreover, the distribution of the electron beams was in situ characterized by the light emission from the surface plasma.

  10. Performance of a large-scale barrier discharge plume improved by an upstream auxiliary barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying; Geng, Jinling

    2016-11-01

    Enhanced by an upstream auxiliary dielectric barrier discharge (ADBD), a transverse barrier discharge plume with a fairly large scale is generated downstream of a narrow slit. Electrical and optical characteristics are compared for the two discharges with and without the ADBD. Results indicate that the plume with the ADBD is longer, more uniform, and dissipates a higher power. Moreover, its inception voltage is much lower. High-speed imaging presents that the uniform plasma plume with the ADBD comprises a series of moving micro-discharge filaments in a glow regime, which are much smoother than those without the ADBD.

  11. Discharge-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source and ultra high vacuum chamber for studying EUV-induced processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A; Abrikosov, A; Snegirev, E; Krivtsun, V M; Lee, C J; Bijkerk, F

    2014-01-01

    An experimental setup that directly reproduces Extreme UV-lithography relevant conditions for detailed component exposure tests is described. The EUV setup includes a pulsed plasma radiation source, operating at 13.5 nm; a debris mitigation system; collection and filtering optics; and an UHV experimental chamber, equipped with optical and plasma diagnostics. The first results, identifying the physical parameters and evolution of EUV-induced plasmas are presented. Finally, the applicability and accuracy of the in situ diagnostics is briefly discussed.

  12. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Farnsworth, Katherine L.

    2017-02-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world's coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas 100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world's smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to better

  13. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world’s coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas  100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world’s smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to

  14. The Generation of Smooth High Speed Solar Wind from Plume-Interplume Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Shyamsundar; Suess, Steven T.; Sulkanen, Martin E.

    1998-01-01

    Plumes and rays are magnetic field aligned density striations in coronal holes with different values of plasma beta. The overall plasma beta is very small in the low corona but exceeds unity beyond 15-20 solar radius. High speed solar wind reported beyond 0.3 AU is relatively smooth and uniform and known to originate from the much filamented coronal hole. Thus the obvious question is how to generate a smooth solar wind from seemingly filamentary structure. Hence one has to find a mechanism to substantiate this apparent observed (Ulysses) phenomenon. To do this we model plumes as jets (or wakes) of plasma emitted from the solar surface. The shear between a jet and its ambient is known to become unstable to the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability if the Alfven Mach number of the jet is greater than one and the uniform external magnetic field is small. Starting with a simple configuration we consider a jet of half thickness R, having uniform density and uniform internal magnetic field. The external medium has also a uniform density and uniform magnetic field. The jet is perturbed at the boundary with a linear amplitude and fixed frequency. We simulate the coronal jet using the 3D ZEUS code. The first results indicate the slab jet is unstable to the MHD KH instability at 5-10 solar radius for some angle of wave propagation. The propagating instability may smooth the filamented flow. It may also produce the entrained Alfvenic fluctuations observed by Ulysses in the high speed wind. We are at present determining the parameters which induce large growth rate. This may clarify the mystery behind the emergence of fast smooth solar wind from very filamentary structures in coronal holes. Also, using the dispersion relation already available for such a flow we obtain some general description of the instability criteria for the KH instability at a jet interface.

  15. Proteomic identification of novel differentiation plasma protein markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. METHODS: In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h, separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF. Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers.

  16. Combined laser induced ignition and plasma spectroscopy: Fundamentals and application to a hydrogen-air combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, L. [Aeroengine Technology Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 7-44-1 Jindaiji-Higashi Chofu, 182-8522 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: laurent.zimmer@em2c.ecp.fr; Okai, K. [Aeroengine Technology Center, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 7-44-1 Jindaiji-Higashi Chofu, 182-8522 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: okai@chofu.jaxa.jp; Kurosawa, Y. [Clean engine team, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 7-44-1 Jindaiji-Higashi Chofu, 182-8522 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: kuro@chofu.jaxa.jp

    2007-12-15

    Combined Laser Induced Ignition and Plasma Spectroscopy (LI2PS) has the potential to give the exact local composition of a mixture at the ignition point and at the ignition time. However, as different laser energies are required to ignite a particular mixture as function of space, the typical approach using two power meters to calibrate the plasma spectroscopy measurement is not well suited. Furthermore, LI2PS requires single shot measurements and therefore high accuracy. In this paper, a novel calibration scheme is presented for application of Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS) to gaseous analyses. Numerical simulations of air spectra are used to show that species emission can be used directly from the broadband spectra to determine the plasma conditions. The ratio of nitrogen emission around 744 nm and around 870 nm is found to be a sensitive indication of temperature in the emission ranging from 700 to 890 nm. Comparisons with experimental spectra show identical tendencies and validate the findings of the simulations. This approach is used in a partially-premixed hydrogen-air burner. First, helium is used instead of hydrogen. After an explanation of timing issue related to LIPS, it is shown that the calibration required depends only on nitrogen excitation and nitrogen-hydrogen ratio, without the need to know the deposited power. Measurements of the fuel distribution as function of injection momentum and spatial localization are reported. To illustrate the use of such a single shot approach, combined laser ignition and plasma spectroscopy is proposed. In this case, the calibration is based on hydrogen excitation and hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-nitrogen ratio. Results obtained with LI2PS show that ignition is successful only for high power and relatively high hydrogen concentration compared to the local mean. It is expected that LI2PS will become an important tool when dealing with partially-premixed or diffusion flame ignition.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide decreases the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by homocysteine and its thiolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been investigated widely in recent years. H2S plays a variety of roles in different biological systems, including cardiovascular system. It is the final product of amino acids metabolism, which contains sulfur-cysteine and homocysteine (Hcy). In human plasma, there are several various forms of homocysteine: free Hcy, protein-bound Hcy (S-linked, and N-linked), and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL). Our previous works have shown that both Hcy in the reduced form and its thiolactone may modify fibrinolysis, coagulation process, and biological activity of blood platelets. Moreover, we have observed that HTL, like its precursor-Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion radicals (O 2 (-•) ) in blood platelets. The aim of our study in vitro was to establish the influence of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, as a fast-releasing H2S donor; at tested concentrations: 10-1000 µM) on the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by the reduced Hcy (at final concentrations of 0.01-1 mM) and HTL (at final concentrations of 0.1-1 µM). Our results indicate that 10 and 100 µM NaHS decreased the lipid peroxidation in plasma treated with 1 mM Hcy or 1 µM HTL (when NaHS and Hcy/HTL were added to plasma together). The protective effect of 10 and 100 µM NaHS against the lipid peroxidation in plasma preincubated with 1 mM Hcy or 1 µM HTL was also observed. Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the lipid peroxidation (induced by different forms of homocysteine) may be reduced by hydrogen sulfide.

  18. Plasma induced tungsten doping of TiO2 particles for enhancement of photocatalysis under visible light

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Yohei; Motokane, Yasutomo; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a novel method for modifying commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles by a microwave-induced plasma technique. After the plasma treatment TiO2 nanoparticles showed enhanced visible absorption due to the doped W atoms, and the photocatalytic methylene blue degradation above 440 nm was successfully improved.

  19. Comparison of H2 and He carbon cleaning mechanisms in extreme ultraviolet induced and surface wave discharge plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A; Rachimova, T; Kovalev, A; Vasilyeva, A; Lee, C J; Krivtsun, V M; Yakushev, O; Bijkerk, F

    2013-01-01

    Cleaning of contamination of optical surfaces by amorphous carbon (a-C) is highly relevant for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. We have studied the mechanisms for a-C removal from a Si surface. By comparing a-C removal in a surface wave discharge (SWD) plasma and an EUV-induced plasma, the cleaning mechanisms for hydrogen and helium gas environments were determined. The C-atom removal per incident ion was estimated for different sample bias voltages and ion fluxes. It was found that H2 plasmas generally had higher cleaning rates than He plasmas: up to seven times higher for more negatively biased samples in EUV induced plasma. Moreover, for H2, EUV induced plasma was found to be 2-3 times more efficient at removing carbon than the SWD plasma. It was observed carbon removal during exposure to He is due to physical sputtering by He+ ions. In H2, on the other hand, the increase in carbon removal rates is due to chemical sputtering. This is a new C cleaning mechanism for EUV-induced plasma, which we call "E...

  20. [A comparative analysis of the passive electric probe detection and spectrum diagnosis of laser-induced plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Lang-Ping

    2014-02-01

    An approach to detecting laser-induced plasma using passive probe was brought up. The plasma of laser welding was studied by using a synchronous electric and spectral information acquisition system, the laser-induced plasma was detected by a passive electric probe and fiber spectrometer, the electrical signal was analyzed on the basis of the theory of plasma sheath, and the temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity. The analysis results from electrical signal and spectral one were compared. Calculation results of three kinds of surface circumstances, which were respectively coated by KF, TiO2 and without coating, were compared. The factors affecting the detection accuracy were studied. The results indicated that the results calculated by passive probe matched that by spectral signal basically, and the accuracy was affected by ions mass of the plasma. The designed passive electric probe can be used to reflect the continuous fluctuation of electron temperature of the generated plasma, and monitor the laser-induced plasma.

  1. Plasma induced tungsten doping of TiO2 particles for enhancement of photocatalysis under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yohei; Motokane, Yasutomo; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2015-10-14

    Here we report a novel method for modifying commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles by a microwave-induced plasma technique. After the plasma treatment TiO2 nanoparticles showed enhanced visible absorption due to the doped W atoms, and the photocatalytic methylene blue degradation above 440 nm was successfully improved.

  2. Enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants increase plasma clearance of dexmedetomidine: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Alana M; Wong, Harvey; Riggs, K Wayne; Shih, Tina; Garcia, Paul A; Vacas, Susana; Talke, Pekka O

    2014-05-01

    Dexmedetomidine is useful during mapping of epileptic foci as it facilitates electrocorticography unlike most other anesthetic agents. Patients with seizure disorders taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants appear to be resistant to its sedative effects. The objective of the study was to compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of dexmedetomidine in healthy volunteers with volunteers with seizure disorders receiving enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant medications. Dexmedetomidine was administered using a step-wise, computer-controlled infusion to healthy volunteers (n = 8) and volunteers with seizure disorders (n = 8) taking phenytoin or carbamazapine. Sedation and dexmedetomidine plasma levels were assessed at baseline, during the infusion steps, and after discontinuation of the infusion. Sedation was assessed by using the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale, Ramsay Sedation Scale, and Visual Analog Scale and processed electroencephalography (entropy) monitoring. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on both groups, and differences between groups were determined using the standard two-stage approach. A two-compartment model was fit to dexmedetomidine concentration-time data. Dexmedetomidine plasma clearance was 43% higher in the seizure group compared with the control group (42.7 vs. 29.9 l/h; P = 0.007). In contrast, distributional clearance and the volume of distribution of the central and peripheral compartments were similar between the groups. No difference in sedation was detected between the two groups during a controlled range of target plasma concentrations. This study demonstrates that subjects with seizure disorders taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant medications have an increased plasma clearance of dexmedetomidine as compared with healthy control subjects.

  3. Velocity and magnetic field measurements of Taylor plumes in SSX under different boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjit; Brown, M. R.; Han, J.; Shrock, J. E.; Schaffner, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    The SSX device has been modified by the addition of a 1 m long glass extension for accommodating pulsed theta pinch coils. The Taylor plumes are launched from a magnetized plasma gun and flow to an expansion volume downstream. The time of flight (TOF) measurements of these plumes are carried out using a linear array of Ḃ probes (separated by 10cm). TOF of the plasma plumes from one probe location to the next is determined by direct comparison of the magnetic field structures as well as by carrying out a cross-correlation analysis. With the glass boundary, the typical velocity of the Taylor plumes is found to be 25km /s , accompanied by a fast plasma (>= 50km /s) at the leading edge. Magnetic field embedded in the Taylor plumes is measured in the expansion chamber using a three-dimensional array of Ḃ probes and is found to be 700G . Some flux conservation of the Taylor plumes is provided by using a resistive (soak time 3 μs) and a mesh (soak time 170 μs > discharge time) liner around the glass tube for improving the downstream Taylor state velocity as well as the magnetic field. The results from these different boundary conditions will be presented. Work supported by DOE OFES and ARPA-E ALPHA programs.

  4. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3-TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnama, K.; Alkhawwam, A.; Jazmati, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma plume of Al2O3-TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  5. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3–TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alnama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma plume of Al2O3–TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  6. Investigation on the Plasma-Induced Emission Properties of Large Area Carbon Nanotube Array Cathodes with Different Morphologies

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Liang; Liao Qingliang; Qin Zi; Zhang Zheng; Qi Junjie; Zhang Yue; Huang Yunhua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Large area well-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays with different morphologies were synthesized by using a chemical vapor deposition. The plasma-induced emission properties of CNT array cathodes with different morphologies were investigated. The ratio of CNT height to CNT-to-CNT distance has considerable effects on their plasma-induced emission properties. As the ratio increases, emission currents of CNT array cathodes decrease due to screening effects. Under the pulse electric fie...

  7. Time resolved study of the emission enhancement mechanisms in orthogonal double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanginés, R., E-mail: roberto.sangines@ccadet.unam.mx; Sobral, H.

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of laser induced ablation plume on aluminum targets has been investigated in orthogonal pre-ablation double pulse scheme at atmospheric pressure from the earliest stages of plasma evolution. Time-resolved emission spectra from neutrals, singly- and doubly-ionized species obtained with the double pulse experiment have been compared with those from the single pulse configuration. Signal-to-noise enhancement reaches values of up to 15 depending on the analyzed species; and the lower the charge state the later its maximum signal-to-noise ratio is reached. Ablation plume dynamics was monitored from 10 ns after the plasma onset via shadowgraphy and fast-photography with narrow interference filters to follow the evolution of individual species. Results show that ionic species from the target are located at the plasma core while nitrogen from the background air is found at the plume peripheral. Initially both configurations exhibit similar ablation plume sizes and their expansions were successfully fitted with the strong explosion model for the first 500 ns. At later times a good agreement was obtained by using the drag model, which predicts that the plume expansion eventually stops due to interaction with the background gas particles. The emission enhancement measured in the double pulse scheme is discussed in terms of the models describing the plume dynamics. - Highlights: • Production of 2 + ions at the earliest stages of plasma evolution • The higher the charge state the inner the location within the ablation plume. • The expansion rate of the second (ablation) plume was measured. • Shock and drag models successfully fit the ablation shock front expansion.

  8. Temporal-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma for spectrochemical analysis of gas shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Ming; He, Yi; Yu, Qiaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-07-01

    Optical emission of laser ablation plasma on a shale target surface provides sensitive laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) detection of major, minor or trace elements. An exploratory study for the characterization of the plasma induced on shale materials was carried out with the aim to trigger a crucial step towards the quantitative LIBS measurement. In this work, the experimental strategies that optimize the plasma generation on a pressed shale pellet surface are presented. The temporal evolution properties of the plasma induced by ns Nd:YAG laser pulse at the fundamental wavelength in air were investigated using time-resolved space-integrated optical emission spectroscopy. The electron density as well as the temperatures of the plasma were diagnosed as functions of the decay time for the bulk plasma analysis. In particular, the values of time-resolved atomic and ionic temperatures of shale elements, such as Fe, Mg, Ca, and Ti, were extracted from the well-known Boltzmann or Saha-Boltzmann plot method. Further comparison of these temperatures validated the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) within specific interval of the delay time. In addition, the temporal behaviors of the signal-to-noise ratio of shale elements, including Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Ba, Li, Ti, K, Na, Sr, V, Cr, and Ni, revealed the coincidence of their maximum values with LIBS LTE condition in the time frame, providing practical implications for an optimized LIBS detection of shale elements. Analytical performance of LIBS was further evaluated with the linear calibration procedure for the most concerned trace elements of Sr, V, Cr, and Ni present in different shales. Their limits of detection obtained are elementally dependent and can be lower than tens of parts per million with the present LIBS experimental configurations. However, the occurrence of saturation effect for the calibration curve is still observable with the increasing trace element content, indicating that, due to the

  9. Electron acceleration in collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection by laser-produced plasma ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehong; Spitkovksy, Anatoly; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    We perform particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection generated by ablated plasma expanding into a magnetized background plasma. We find: (1) The simulated proton radiography produces different morphology of the shock structure depending on the orientation of the magnetic field and can be used to identify a shock in the experiment. Electrons are accelerated by the whistler waves generated at oblique sites of the shock. (2) Forced collisionless magnetic reconnection is induced when the expanding plumes carry opposite magnetic polarities and interact with a background plasma. Electrons are accelerated at the reconnection X line and reveal a power-law distribution as the plasma beta is lowered, β = 0.08 . As the plasma beta is increased, β = 0.32 , the 1st order Fermi mechanism against the two plasma plumes contributes to the electron acceleration as well as the X line acceleration. Using 3-D simulations, we also explore the effect of 3-D instabilities (Weibel instability or drift-kink) on particle acceleration and magnetic field annihilation between the colliding magnetized plumes

  10. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergemann, Claudia [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Cornelsen, Matthias [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Quade, Antje [Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias [INNOVENT e.V., Biomaterials Department, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Rebl, Henrike [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Weißmann, Volker [Institute for Polymer Technologies (IPT) e.V., Alter Holzhafen 19, D-23966 Wismar (Germany); Seitz, Hermann [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Nebe, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.nebe@med.uni-rostock.de [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA — improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds – is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10 mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14 days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. - Highlights: • Mechanical stabilization of β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds by PLA infiltration • Hybrid scaffolds with higher cell attraction due to plasma polymerized allylamine • 3D perfusion in vitro model for observation of cell migration inside scaffolds • Enhanced cell migration within plasma polymer coated TCP hybrid scaffolds.

  11. 2-Methoxyestradiol induce the conversion of human peripheral blood memory B lymphocytes into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Drouin, Mathieu; Proulx, Maryse; Jung, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), an end-metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, is an antiproliferative agent that is currently being tested in clinical trials for cancer treatment. We hereby report that sub-cytotoxic concentrations of 2ME influence the in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. More surprisingly, we have observed that 2ME induces the conversion of CD138(-) B lymphocytes into CD138(+) cells of phenotype similar to immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells. Normal human B lymphocytes expressing CD138 increased in response to 2ME in a dose-dependent fashion, from 2% at baseline up to 31% in cells cultured in the presence of 0.75 microM 2ME. Moreover, most of the converted cells were also CD27(+) and secreted high levels of IgG (151 microg/10(6)cells/24h). IEF studies revealed that conversion occurred in a polyclonal manner. We then exploited this effect of 2ME to gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern changes in transcription factors involved in plasma cells differentiation. Plasma cells generated by 2ME treatment of normal human B lymphocytes expressed elevated levels of IRF4 and reduced levels of Pax5 and Bcl-6. Similarly, levels of XBP-1 and Blimp-1 transcripts were increased. Our results suggest that the differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into plasma cells requires a similar modulation of transcription factors expression that for tonsil and bone marrow B lymphocytes.

  12. Nanoshaping field emitters from glassy carbon sheets: a new functionality induced by H-plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, S; Orlanducci, S; Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Terranova, M L

    2016-09-14

    This paper reports on the morphological and electrical characterization at the nanometer scale and the investigation of the field emission characteristics of glassy carbon (GC) plates which underwent H-induced physical/chemical processes occurring in a dual-mode MW-RF plasma reactor. Plasma treatment produced on the GC surface arrays of vertically aligned conically shaped nanostructures, with density and height depending on the plasma characteristics. Two kinds of samples obtained under two different bias regimes have been deeply analyzed using an AFM apparatus equipped with tools for electric forces and surface potential measurements. The features of electron emission via the Field Emission (FE) mechanism have been correlated with the morphology and the structure at the nanoscale of the treated glassy carbon samples. The measured current density and the characteristics of the emission, which follow the Fowler-Nordheim law, indicate that the plasma-based methodology utilized for the engineering of the GC surfaces is able to turn conventional GC plates into efficient emission devices. The outstanding properties of GC suggest the use of such nanostructured materials for the assembling of cold cathodes to be used in a harsh environment and under extreme P/T conditions.

  13. Carbon dioxide-induced anesthesia results in a rapid increase in plasma levels of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Varon, Jack; Chait, Brian T; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2009-06-01

    Brief anesthesia, such as after exposure to high levels of carbon dioxide, prior to decapitation is considered a more humane alternative for the euthanasia of rodents, compared with use of decapitation alone. Studies of the levels of certain stress hormones in plasma such as corticosterone and ACTH have supported the use of this method of euthanasia in endocrinological and molecular studies. In the current study, rats were briefly exposed to a chamber filled with carbon dioxide until recumbent (20-25 sec), immediately killed via decapitation, and trunk blood collected; findings were compared with rats killed via decapitation with no exposure to carbon dioxide. RIAs were used to measure arginine vasopressin (AVP) and ACTH immunoreactivity (ir) in plasma. Whereas ACTH-ir levels remained steady after brief exposure to carbon dioxide (in accordance with results of other investigators), AVP-ir levels were increased by more than an order of magnitude. These results were confirmed by quantitative capillary-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, indicating this observation of rapid increase in plasma AVP-ir levels is not due to nonspecific recognition by the antibody used in the RIA. Likewise, using capillary-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we observed a rapid increase in plasma oxytocin levels after carbon dioxide exposure. These surprising findings have important implications for the design and interpretation of studies involving brief carbon dioxide exposure prior to decapitation as well as those with euthanasia resulting from carbon dioxide-induced asphyxiation.

  14. The role of plasma shielding in collinear double-pulse femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penczak, John [Department of Chemistry (m/c 111), University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60680-7061 (United States); Kupfer, Rotem; Bar, Ilana [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Gordon, Robert J. [Department of Chemistry (m/c 111), University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60680-7061 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the mechanism for the enhancement of the laser-induced breakdown signal produced by two collinear femtosecond pulses separated by a suitable delay. A bilayer sample consisting of a 500 nm thick film of Ag deposited on Al was used in the experiments, and a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation was implemented in the theoretical part of the study. Experiments on the effect of laser polarization, performed at a 30° angle of incidence over a wide range of fluences, together with the PIC results, showed that the plasma produced by the first pulse was further excited by the second pulse. Experiments at normal incidence and a fluence of 200 J/cm{sup 2} showed that the second pulse did not penetrate the Ag layer. In addition, measurements of the effect of pulse delay on the signal supported the conclusion that double pulse enhancement is produced by plasma heating rather than by increased surface ablation. - Highlights: • We study the mechanism for collinear double-pulse enhancement of LIBS produced by a fs laser. • We use a bilayer of Ag on Al to determine which region is reached by the 2nd pulse. • Signal enhancement is produced by plasma heating rather than by increased surface ablation. • Particle-in-cell calculations show that plasma shielding plays a key role.

  15. Plasma carnosine, but not muscle carnosine, attenuates high-fat diet-induced metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, Sanne; Stegen, Bram; Aldini, Giancarlo; Altomare, Alessandra; Cannizzaro, Luca; Orioli, Marica; Gerlo, Sarah; Deldicque, Louise; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter; Derave, Wim

    2015-09-01

    There is growing in vivo evidence that the dipeptide carnosine has protective effects in metabolic diseases. A critical unanswered question is whether its site of action is tissues or plasma. This was investigated using oral carnosine versus β-alanine supplementation in a high-fat diet rat model. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats received a control diet (CON), a high-fat diet (HF; 60% of energy from fat), the HF diet with 1.8% carnosine (HFcar), or the HF diet with 1% β-alanine (HFba), as β-alanine can increase muscle carnosine without increasing plasma carnosine. Insulin sensitivity, inflammatory signaling, and lipoxidative stress were determined in skeletal muscle and blood. In a pilot study, urine was collected. The 3 HF groups were significantly heavier than the CON group. Muscle carnosine concentrations increased equally in the HFcar and HFba groups, while elevated plasma carnosine levels and carnosine-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal adducts were detected only in the HFcar group. Elevated plasma and urine N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine in HF rats was reduced by ∼50% in the HFcar group but not in the HFba group. Likewise, inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA was decreased by 47% (p muscle carnosine, is involved in preventing early-stage lipoxidation in the circulation and inflammatory signaling in the muscle of rats.

  16. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.

    1993-01-01

    the source, instantaneous crosswind plume profiles were detected repetitively at high spatial (1.5 m) and temporal (3 sec) intervals by use of a mini LIDAR system. The experiments were accompanied by measurement of the surface-layer mean wind and turbulence quantities by sonic anemometers. On the basis...

  17. Ship exhaust gas plume cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Neele, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The exhaust gas plume is an important and sometimes dominating contributor to the infrared signature of ships. Suppression of the infrared ship signatures has been studied by TNO for the Royal Netherlands Navy over considerable time. This study deals with the suppression effects, which can be achiev

  18. Improving Resolution of Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence in Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderholm, Mark; Vandervort, Robert; Scime, Earl; McKee, John; McCarren, Dustin

    2014-10-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A dichroic mirror is used to separate the injected laser light from the collected emission. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. In the initial version of the confocal optical system, measurements were poorly resolved radially because they were integrated over a fairly large path length (~4 cm) centered at the focal point. Here we present collected data from a modified configuration that significantly improves the special resolution of confocal measurements. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range.

  19. Protection Against Lung Cancer Patient Plasma-Induced Lymphocyte Suppression by Ganoderma Lucidum Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study was conducted to determine the potential of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS in protection against lung cancer patient plasma-induced suppression of lymphocytes. Lung cancer is a major cause of disease and loss of life in the United States and worldwide. Cancer cells release immunosuppressive mediators, such as PGE2, TGF-β, IL-10, and VEGF, to inhibit the immune response to escape from immune surveillance. Gl-PS has been shown to counteract this immune inhibition in an animal cell culture model, and thus to facilitate tumor control. The present study explored whether or not such an effect could also be demonstrated in human lung cancer patients. Methods: Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, MTT, immunocytochemistry, and western blot analysis were used to assess lymphocyte activation with PHA. Results: The plasma of lung cancer patients suppressed proliferation, CD69 expression, and perforin and granzyme B production in lymphocytes upon activation by PHA, effects that were partially of fully reversed by Gl-PS. Conclusion: Lung cancer patient plasma-induced suppression of lymphocyte activation by phytohemagglutinin may be antagonized fully or partially by Gl-PS, an observation suggesting the potential of Gl-PS in cancer therapy.

  20. In vivo direct patulin-induced fluidization of the plasma membrane of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Eszter; Papp, Gábor; Belágyi, József; Gazdag, Zoltán; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Pesti, Miklós

    2010-07-01

    Patulin is a toxic metabolite produced by various species of Penicillium, Aspergillus and Byssochlamys. In the present study, its effects on the plasma membrane of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were investigated. The phase-transition temperature (G) of untreated cells, measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry proved to be 14.1 degrees C. Treatment of cells for 20 min with 50, 500, or 1000 microM patulin resulted in a decrease of the G value of the plasma membrane to 13.9, 10.1 or 8.7 degrees C, respectively. This change in the transition temperature was accompanied by the loss of compounds absorbing light at 260 nm. Treatment of cells with 50, 500 or 1000 microM patulin for 20 min induced the efflux of 25%, 30.5% or 34%, respectively, of these compounds. Besides its cytotoxic effects an adaptation process was observed. This is the first study to describe the direct interaction of patulin with the plasma membrane, a process which could definitely contribute to the adverse toxic effects induced by patulin.

  1. Propane decomposition and conversion into other hydrocarbons using metal target assisted laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosakhani, A.; Parvin, P.; Reyhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the propane molecules are strongly decomposed in the metal assisted laser induced plasma based on the nano-catalytic adsorption. A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is employed to irradiate the propane gas filled in the control chamber in the presence of the reactive metals such as Ni, Fe, Pd, and Cu in order to study the effect of catalysts during the decomposition. The catalytic targets simultaneously facilitate the plasma formation and the decomposition events leading to generate a wide distribution of the light and heavy hydrocarbon molecules, mainly due to the recombination processes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography instruments support the findings by detecting the synthetic components. Furthermore, the optical emission spectroscopy of the laser induced plasma emissions realizes the real time monitoring of the reactions taking place during each laser shot. The subsequent recombination events give rise to the generation of a variety of the hydrocarbon molecules. The dissociation rate, conversion ratio, selectivity, and yield as well as the performance factor arise mainly from the catalytic effects of the metal species. Moreover, the ablation rate of the targets of interest is taken into account as a measure of the catalytic reactivity due to the abundance of the metal species ablated from the target. This leads to assess the better performance factor for Pd among four metal catalysts of interest during propane decomposition. Finally, the molecules such as ethane and ethylene are identified as the stable abundant species created during the successive molecular recombination processes.

  2. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  3. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  4. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  5. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, I., E-mail: eu13z002@steng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  6. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  7. Ion Engine Plume Interaction Calculations for Prototypical Prometheus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Myron J.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Gardner, Barbara M.; Katz, Ira; Randolph, Tom; Dougherty, Ryan; Ferguson, Dale C.

    2005-01-01

    Prometheus 1 is a conceptual mission to demonstrate the use of atomic energy for distant space missions. The hypothetical spacecraft design considered in this paper calls for multiple ion thrusters, each with considerably higher beam energy and beam current than have previously flown in space. The engineering challenges posed by such powerful thrusters relate not only to the thrusters themselves, but also to designing the spacecraft to avoid potentially deleterious effects of the thruster plumes. Accommodation of these thrusters requires good prediction of the highest angle portions of the main beam, as well as knowledge of clastically scattered and charge exchange ions, predictions for grid erosion and contamination of surfaces by eroded grid material, and effects of the plasma plume on radio transmissions. Nonlinear interactions of multiple thrusters are also of concern. In this paper we describe two- and three-dimensional calculations for plume structure and effects of conceptual Prometheus 1 ion engines. Many of the techniques used have been validated by application to ground test data for the NSTAR and NEXT ion engines. Predictions for plume structure and possible sputtering and contamination effects will be presented.

  8. Control plasma renin activity and changes in sympathetic tone as determinants of minoxidil-induced increase in plasma renin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, K; Velasco, M; Wells, J; McNay, J L

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the possible mechanism(s) underlying minoxidil-induced increase in plasma renin activity (PRA). 10 patients with essential hypertension were treated with minoxidil and subsequently with a combination of minoxidil plus propranolol. Minoxidil lowered mean arterial pressure 31.6 plus or minus 3.3 mm Hg, mean plus or minus SEM. There was an associated increase in both PRA, 6.26 plus or minus 2.43 NG/ML/H, and heart rate, 21.4 plus or minus 2.7 beats/min. The changes in PRA and heart rate were positively correlated, r, 0.79. Addition of propranolol reduced mean arterial pressure by a further 10.1 plus or minus 1.5 mm Hg and returned heart rate to control levels. Propranolol reduced PRA significantly but not to control levels. Control PRA positively correlated with PRA on minoxidil, r, 0.97, and with PRA on minoxidil plus propranolol, r, 0.98. We conclude that control PRA is a major determinant of change in PRA with minoxidil. Minoxidil increased PRA by at least two mechanisms: (a) an adrenergic mechanism closely related to change in heart rate and blocked by propranolol, and (b) a mechanism(s) not sensitive to propranolol and possibly related to decrease in renal perfusion pressure. PMID:1127099

  9. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Koshelev, K N; Lopaev, D V; van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Osorio, E A; Bijkerk, F

    2016-01-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral amount of plasma in the cavity. However, in some regimes, the impact of the setup geometry, EUV spectrum, and EUV induced secondary emission should be taken into account. The influence of these parameters on the generated plasma and the measured electron density is discussed.

  10. Laser Plasmas : Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debarati Bhattacharya

    2000-11-01

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ambient background of argon gas. Spectroscopic observations can, in general, be used to analyse plume structure with respect to an appropriate theoretical plasma model. The plume expansion dynamics in this case could be explained through a shock wave propagation model wherein, the experimental observations made were seen to fit well with the theoretical predictions. Spectral information derived from measurement of peak intensity and line width determined the parameters, electron temperature (e) and electron number density e, typically used to characterise laser produced plasma plume emission. These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  11. Oxygen plasma flow properties deduced from laser-induced fluorescence and probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhle, Stefan; Eichhorn, Christoph; Steinbeck, Andreas; Lein, Sebastian; Herdrich, Georg; Röser, Hans-Peter; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2008-04-01

    Estimation of the local dissociation degree and the local mass-specific enthalpy of a pure oxygen plasma flow determined mainly from laser-induced fluorescence measurements are reported. Measurements have been conducted for several generator parameters in an inductively heated plasma wind tunnel. Additional probe measurements of total pressure together with the deduced translational temperature are used to estimate the local mass-specific enthalpy. For a reference condition, full dissociation has been measured. The measured translational temperature of atomic oxygen for this condition is T = 3500 K. Subsequently, the local mass-specific enthalpy has been derived using these local density and temperature measurements. For the reference condition the estimated value of h = 27 MJ/kg is in good agreement with the probe measurements and results from diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Indirect determination of the electric field in plasma discharges using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudolon, J., E-mail: julien.vaudolon@cnrs-orleans.fr; Mazouffre, S., E-mail: stephane.mazouffre@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS - ICARE (Institut de Combustion Aérothermique Réactivité et Environnement), 1 C Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2014-09-15

    The evaluation of electric fields is of prime interest for the description of plasma characteristics. In this work, different methods for determining the electric field profile in low-pressure discharges using one- and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements are presented and discussed. The energy conservation, fluid, and kinetic approaches appear to be well-suited for the electric field evaluation in this region of the plasma flow. However, the numerical complexity of a two-dimensional kinetic model is penalizing due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved, making the computation of the electric field subject to large error bars. The ionization contribution which appears in the fluid model makes it unattractive on an experimental viewpoint. The energy conservation and 1D1V kinetic approaches should therefore be preferred for the determination of the electric field when LIF data are used.

  13. LDPE Surface Modifications Induced by Atmospheric Plasma Torches with Linear and Showerhead Configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, Sami Abou; Leroy, Perrine; Reniers, François; Nittler, Laurent; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) surfaces have been plasma modified to improve their nanostructural and wettability properties. These modifications can significantly improve the deposition of subsequent layers such as films with specific barrier properties. For this purpose, we compare the treatments induced by two atmospheric plasma torches with different configurations (showerhead vs. linear). The modifications of LDPE films in terms of chemical surface composition and surface morphology are evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectro-scopy, water contact angles measurements, and atomic force microscopy. A comparison between the two post-discharge treatments is achieved for several torch-to-substrate distances (gaps), treatment times, and oxygen flow rates in terms of etching rate, roughening rate, diffusion of oxygen into the subsur-face and hydrophilicity. By correlating these results with the chemical composition of the post-discharges, we identify and compare the 'species which are responsible for the chemi...

  14. The Role of Plasma Shielding in Double-Pulse Femtosecond Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Penczak, John S; Bar, Ilana; Gordon, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that optical emission produced by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown on a surface may be enhanced by using a pair of laser pulses separated by a suitable delay. Here we elucidate the mechanism for this effect both experimentally and theoretically. Using a bilayer sample consisting of a thin film of Ag deposited on an Al substrate as the ablation target and measuring the breakdown spectrum as a function of fluence and pulse delay, it is shown experimentally that the enhanced signal is not caused by additional ablation initiated by the second pulse. Rather, particle-in-cell calculations show that the plasma produced by the first pulse shields the surface from the second pulse for delays up to 100 ps. These results indicate that the enhancement is the result of excitement of particles entrained in the plasma produced by the first pulse.

  15. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  16. Analysis of time phase of characteristic rad iation in plasma induced by laser ablating aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With time- and space-resolved technique, we have recorde d time-resolved spectra of irradiation of the plasma induced by Nd: YAG laser a blating metal Aluminum in Ar, in which, laser pulse-energy was set up to 145 mJ /pulse and the buffer pressure 100 kpa. The continuum radiation and special emis sion of Aluminum plasma were studied based on the records. According to time dis tribution of Al Ⅰ396.15 nm emission, we analyzed the time differences between c haracteristic and continuum radiation evolving. We tried to explain the time pha ses of characteristic radiation evolving with traditional theoretical model of a tomic transition. As the result, we found that it was difficult to explain our e xperimental results with the model. In order to explain our experimental results , we need new model or to improve the traditional theoretical model of atomic tr ansition.

  17. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  18. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming, E-mail: qmzhang@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 10{sup 3 }K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively.

  19. Polyphenols from Berries of Aronia melanocarpa Reduce the Plasma Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Ziprasidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dietrich-Muszalska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxidative stress in schizophrenia may be caused partially by the treatment of patients with antipsychotics. The aim of the study was to establish the effects of polyphenol compounds derived from berries of Aronia melanocarpa (Aronox on the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by ziprasidone in vitro. Methods. Lipid peroxidation was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS. The samples of plasma from healthy subjects were incubated with ziprasidone (40 ng/ml; 139 ng/ml; and 250 ng/ml alone and with Aronox (5 ug/ml; 50 ug/ml. Results. We observed a statistically significant increase of TBARS level after incubation of plasma with ziprasidone (40 ng/ml; 139 ng/ml; and 250 ng/ml (after 24 h incubation: P=7.0 × 10−4, P=1.6 × 10−3, and P=2.7 × 10−3, resp. and Aronox lipid peroxidation caused by ziprasidone was significantly reduced. After 24-hour incubation of plasma with ziprasidone (40 ng/ml; 139 ng/ml; and 250 ng/ml in the presence of 50 ug/ml Aronox, the level of TBARS was significantly decreased: P=6.5 × 10−8, P=7.0 × 10−6, and P=3.0 × 10−5, respectively. Conclusion. Aronox causes a distinct reduction of lipid peroxidation induced by ziprasidone.

  20. Stress-induced changes of neurosteroid profiles in rat brain and plasma under immobilized condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myeong Hyeon; Rehman, Shaheed Ur; Kim, In Sook; Choi, Min Sun; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2017-05-10

    In this study, various neurosteroids in brain and plasma were simultaneously determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and their profile changes in a stress-induced rats were investigated. The investigated neurosteroids are as follows: progesterone (P4), 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5α-DHP), 5β-dihydroprogesterone, estrone, androstenedione (AE), cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone (CORT), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnanolone (3α,5β-THP), allopregnanolone (ALLO), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), 11-deoxycortisol, pregnenolone (PREG), and 5α/5β-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (5α/5β-THDOC). Brain and plasma samples were processed using solid-phase extraction with methanol and acetic acid (99:1), and derivatized with a hydroxylamine reagent. Separation was achieved within 13min at a flow rate of 0.4mL/min with a C18 column (3.0×50mm, 2.7μm). The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in the positive electrospray ionization mode. Using this method, the neurosteroid level variation was quantitated and investigated in the brain and plasma upon immobilization stress in rats. As a result, AE, CORT, DOC, P4, 5α-DHP, 5α/5β-THDOC, DHEA, 3α,5β-THP, ALLO, and PREG levels were significantly altered in both the brain and plasma samples when stress was induced. These findings demonstrated that stress leads to the alteration of the GABAergic neurosteroid profile. The present results will be helpful for furthering an understanding of the role of neurosteroids in stressed conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced efficiency of plasma acceleration in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badziak, J.; Rosiński, M.; Jabłoński, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Rączka, P.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.

    2015-01-01

    Among various methods for the acceleration of dense plasmas the mechanism called laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) is capable of achieving the highest energetic efficiency. In the LICPA scheme, a projectile placed in a cavity is accelerated along a guiding channel by the laser-induced thermal plasma pressure or by the radiation pressure of an intense laser radiation trapped in the cavity. This arrangement leads to a significant enhancement of the hydrodynamic or electromagnetic forces driving the projectile, relative to standard laser acceleration schemes. The aim of this paper is to review recent experimental and numerical works on LICPA with the emphasis on the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles and dense ion beams. The main experimental part concerns the research carried out at the kilojoule sub-nanosecond PALS laser facility in Prague. Our measurements performed at this facility, supported by advanced two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, have demonstrated that the LICPA accelerator working in the long-pulse hydrodynamic regime can be a highly efficient tool for the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles to hyper-velocities and the generation of ultra-high-pressure (>100 Mbar) shocks through the collision of the macroparticle with a solid target. The energetic efficiency of the macroparticle acceleration and the shock generation has been found to be significantly higher than that for other laser-based methods used so far. Using particle-in-cell simulations it is shown that the LICPA scheme is highly efficient also in the short-pulse high-intensity regime and, in particular, may be used for production of intense ion beams of multi-MeV to GeV ion energies with the energetic efficiency of tens of per cent, much higher than for conventional laser acceleration schemes.

  2. Spectral Characteristics of Laser-Induced Graphite Plasma in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinmei; Zheng, Peichao; Liu, Hongdi; Fang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    An experimental setup of laser-induced graphite plasma was built and the spectral characteristics and properties of graphite plasma were studied. From the temporal behavior of graphite plasma, the duration of CN partials (B2 Σ+ → X2 Σ+) emission was two times longer than that of atomic carbon, and all intensities reached the maximum during the early stage from 0.2 μs to 0.8 μs. The electron temperature decreased from 11807 K to 8755 K, the vibration temperature decreased from 8973 K to 6472 K, and the rotational temperature decreased from 7288 K to 4491 K with the delay time, respectively. The effect of the laser energy was also studied, and it was found that the thresholds and spectral characteristics of CN molecular and C atomic spectroscopy presented great differences. At lower laser energies, the electron excited temperature, the electron density, the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature of CN partials increased rapidly. At higher laser energies, the increasing of electron excited temperature and electron density slow down, and the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature even trend to saturation due to plasma shielding and dissociation of CN molecules. The relationship among the three kinds of temperatures was Telec>Tvib>Trot at the same time. The electron density of the graphite plasma was in the order of 1017 cm-3 and 1018 cm-3. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61205149), Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars of State Education Ministry, Science Research Funds of Chongqing Municipal Education Commission (KJ1500436), Scientific and Technological Talents Training Project of Chongqing (CSTC2013kjrc-qnrc40002), Key Project of Foundation and Advanced Technology Research Project of Chongqing (CSTC2015jcyjB0358), Visiting Scholarship of State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment & System Security and New Technology (2007DA10512714409)

  3. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters can su er from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA)[4], shown in Fig. 1 is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that is able to operate at lower pulse energies by partially ionizing propellant with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside a conical inductive coil whose geometry serves to potentially increase propellant and plasma plume containment relative to at coil geometries. The ECR plasma is created with the use of permanent mag- nets arranged to produce a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation and, in turn, current sheet formation to areas of high magnetic coupling to the driving coil.

  4. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, J.J. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L., E-mail: luis.diaz@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ramirez, S. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, J.O. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, Cuidad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1–0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C{sup +}, C{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, Mg{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, N{sup +}, N{sup 2+}, Ca{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup 2+} species and molecular band systems of CN(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}), C{sub 2}(d{sup 3}Π{sub g}–a{sup 3}Π{sub u}), CH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup −}–X{sup 2}Π; A{sup 2}Δ–X{sup 2}Π), NH(A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}), OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2} Σ{sup +}), and CaOH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}; A{sup 2}Π–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated. - Highlights: • LIBS of swine muscle tissue sample generated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been done for the first time. • Average velocities of some plasma species have been calculated from spatial and temporally resolved 2D OES images. • Electron density (~ 9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) has been studied with spatial and temporal resolution. • Temporal evolution of the plasma temperature has been calculated by means of Boltzmann plots.

  5. Roles of charged particles and reactive species on cell membrane permeabilization induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hokari, Yutaro; Tominami, Kanako; Mokudai, Takayuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-07-01

    As factors that influence cell membrane permeabilization during direct and indirect atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation, charged particle influx, superoxide anion radicals (O2 -•), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plasma-irradiated solution were evaluated. These are the three strong candidate factors and might multiply contribute to cell membrane permeabilization. In particular, a shorter plasma diffusion distance leads to the enhancement of the direct effects such as charged particle influx and further increase cell membrane permeability. In addition, O2 -• dissipates over time (a life span of the order of minutes) in plasma-irradiated water, and the deactivation of a plasma-irradiated solution in term of cell membrane permeabilization occurs in a life span of the same order. These results could promote the understanding of the mechanism of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization.

  6. The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Grimsvötn ash plumes as seen by GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapenthin, R.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The injection of a volcanic plume introduces a dynamic, localized, short-term heterogeneity in the atmosphere. Satellite-imagery based remote sensing techniques provide good spatial coverage for the detection of such plumes, but slow satellite repeat times (>30 minutes) and cloud cover can delay, if not entirely prevent, the detection. GPS, in turn, provides excellent temporal coverage, but requires favorable satellite-station-geometry such that the signal propagates through the plume if it is to be used for plume detection and analysis. Two methods exist to detect / analyze ash plumes with GPS: (a) Ash-heavy plumes result in signal dispersion and hence a lowered signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A lowered SNR, recorded by some receivers, can provide useful information about the plume, such as location and velocity of ascent. These data can be evaluated directly as they are recorded by the receiver; without the need of solving for a receiver's position. (b) Wet plumes refract the GPS signals piercing the plume and hence induce a propagation delay. When solving for a receiver position GPS analysis tools do not model this localized phase delay effect and solutions for plume-piercing satellites do not fit the data well. This can be exploited for plume analysis such as the estimation of changes to the atmospheric refractivity index. We analyze GPS data of the ~2 month 2010 Eyafjallajökull erption and the week-long 2011 Grímsvötn eruption to infer a first order estimate of plume geometry and its progression. Using SNR and phase delay information, we evaluate the evolution of the partitioning of wet versus dry parts of the plume. During the GPS processing we iteratively solve for phase-delay and position and fix other parameters, hence reducing the mapping of least-squares misfit into position estimates and other parameters. Nearly continuous webcam imagery provides independent observations of first-order plume characteristics for the Eyafjallajökull event.

  7. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much

  8. Extraction of selectively ionised atomic isotopes from a laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Maruyama, Y.; Shiba, K. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki. Tokai Research Establishment)

    1982-10-14

    A laser-induced plasma of alkali atoms was studied with a view to efficient recovery of isotope ions, with small charge exchange losses. The electron temperature was measured by the double-probe method for several kinds of excitation schemes, which gave the relationship between temperature and the energy given to ions by laser photons. A charge exchange process between lithium isotopes was also studied in an electromagnetic field. It was shown that optimum electrostatic and magnetic field strength exist which maximise the 'separative power'.

  9. Physical controls on mixing and transport within rising submarine hydrothermal plumes: A numerical simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Breier, John A.

    2014-10-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the turbulent flow and species transport of deep-sea high temperature hydrothermal plumes. The model solves numerically the density weighted unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation and the species transport equation. Turbulent entrainment and mixing is modeled by a k-ε turbulence closure model. The CFD model explicitly considers realistic vent chimney geometry, vent exit fluid temperature and velocity, and background stratification. The model uses field measurements as model inputs and has been validated by field data. These measurements and data, including vent temperature and plume physical structure, were made in the ABE hydrothermal field of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center. A parametric sensitivity study based on this CFD model was conducted to determine the relative importance of vent exit velocity, background stratification, and chimney height on the mixing of vent fluid and seawater. The CFD model was also used to derive several important scalings that are relevant to understanding plume impact on the ocean. These scalings include maximum plume rise height, neutrally buoyant plume height, maximum plume induced turbulent diffusivity, and total plume vertically transported water mass flux. These scaling relationships can be used for constructing simplified 1-dimensional models of geochemistry and microbial activity in hydrothermal plumes. Simulation results show that the classical entrainment assumptions, typically invoked to describe hydrothermal plume transport, only apply up to the vertical level of ~0.6 times the maximum plume rise height. Below that level, the entrainment coefficient remains relatively constant (~0.15). Above that level, the plume flow consists of a pronounced lateral spreading flow, two branches of inward flow immediately above and below the lateral spreading, and recirculation flanking the plume cap region. Both turbulent kinetic energy

  10. In situ physical and chemical characterisation of the Eyjafjallajökull aerosol plume in the free troposphere over Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Decesari, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Chiari, M.; Calzolai, G.; Canepari, S.; Perrino, C.; Facchini, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous measurements of physical and chemical properties at the Mt. Cimone (Italy) GAW-WMO (Global Atmosphere Watch, World Meteorological Organization) Global Station (2165 m a.s.l.) have allowed the detection of the volcanic aerosol plume resulting from the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland) eruption of spring 2010. The event affected the Mt. Cimone site after a transport over a distance of more than 3000 km. Two main transport episodes were detected during the eruption period, showing a volcanic fingerprint discernible against the free tropospheric background conditions typical of the site, the first from April 19 to 21 and the second from 18 to 20 May 2010. This paper reports the modification of aerosol characteristics observed during the two episodes, both characterised by an abrupt increase in fine and, especially, coarse mode particle number. Analysis of major, minor and trace elements by different analytical techniques (ionic chromatography, particle induced X-ray emission-particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIXE-PIGE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) were performed on aerosols collected by ground-level discrete sampling. The resulting database allows the characterisation of aerosol chemical composition during the volcanic plume transport and in background conditions. During the passage of the volcanic plume, the fine fraction was dominated by sulphates, denoting the secondary origin of this mode, mainly resulting from in-plume oxidation of volcanic SO2. By contrast, the coarse fraction was characterised by increased concentration of numerous elements of crustal origin, such as Fe, Ti, Mn, Ca, Na, and Mg, which enter the composition of silicate minerals. Data analysis of selected elements (Ti, Al, Fe, Mn) allowed the estimation of the volcanic plume's contribution to total PM10, resulting in a local enhancement of up to 9.5 μg m-3, i.e. 40% of total PM10 on 18 May, which was the most intense of the two episodes. These results appear

  11. Plasma levels of cAMP, cGMP and CGRP in sildenafil-induced headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Frandsen, E; Schifter, S;

    2004-01-01

    Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determin...... an important role of these signalling molecules, the present study questions whether cAMP and cGMP in peripheral blood can be used for monitoring pathophysiological events in headache and migraine mechanisms.......Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determine...... whether the pain-inducing effects of sildenafil would be reflected in plasma levels of important signalling molecules in migraine: cGMP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Ten healthy subjects (four women, six men) and 12 patients (12 women) suffering from...

  12. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangwijit, K. [Biotechnology Unit, University of Phayao, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Sarapirom, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Bang Khen, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Pitakrattananukool, S. [School of Science, University of Phayao, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Biotechnology Unit, University of Phayao, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 12} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  13. On the great plume debate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaoling Niu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introductory note Geological processes are ultimately consequences of Earth's thermal evolution. Plate tectonic theory, which explains geological phenomena along plate boundaries, elegantly illustrates this concept. For example, the origin of oceanic plates at ocean ridges, the movement and growth of these plates, and their ultimate consumption back into the Earth's deep interior through subduction zones provide an efficient mechanism to cool the earth's mantle, leading to large-scale mantle convection. Mantle plumes, which explain another set of global geological phenomena such as within-plate volcanism, cool the earth's deep interior (probably the Earth's core) and represent another mode of Earth's thermal convection. Plate tectonic theory and mantle plume hypothesis thus complement each other to explain much of the whole picture of Earth processes and phenomena.

  14. Changes in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol levels induced by intracerebroventricular injection of histamine and its related compounds in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, S; Kamei, C; Yoshida, T; Tasaka, K

    1993-08-01

    Changes in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels induced by intracerebroventricular injection of histamine (H(i)) were studied in dogs. Intracerebroventricular administration of Hi at doses of 5 and 10 micrograms/kg caused a significant increase in plasma ACTH, while more rapid and more marked increase in plasma cortisol was noticed after Hi injection at doses of 2-10 micrograms/kg. Similar results were obtained when 2-methylhistamine was injected; remarkable increases in both plasma ACTH and cortisol levels were observed at doses of 25 and 50 micrograms/kg. However, no such effect was elicited by 4-methylhistamine even at a dose of 50 micrograms/kg. The rate of plasma cortisol increase induced by either Hi or 2-methylhistamine was significantly faster than that of plasma ACTH. Simultaneous application of pyrilamine (intracerebroventricularly) with H(i) resulted in the significant inhibition of H(i)-induced hormone secretions, but in similar administration neither ACTH nor cortisol were affected by cimetidine. In hypophysectomized dogs, a significant increase in plasma cortisol level was also observed after H(i) injection at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg. Intravenous infusion of hexamethonium continued before and after H(i) injection failed to inhibit the increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol levels induced by H(i). From these findings, it can be concluded that intracerebroventricular injection of H(i) caused an increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol levels via H1-receptor, and it is suggested that to some extent, the cortisol release elicited by H(i) is certainly produced without participation of ACTH.

  15. Mapping of plume deposits and surface composition on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Scipioni, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Clark, R. N.,; Hand, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    A major result of the Cassini mission was the discovery that the small mid-sized moon Enceladus is presently geological active[Dougherty et al., 2006; Porco et al., 2006; Spencer et al., 2006; Hansen et al., 2008]. This activity results in plumes of water vapor and ice emanating from a series of fractures ("Tiger Stripes") at the moon's South Pole. Some fraction of plume material escapes the moon's gravity and populates the E-ring as well as ultimately providing a source of fresh plasma in the Saturnian magnetosphere [Pontius and Hill, 2006; Kempf et al., 2010]. However, a significant portion of plume material is redeposited on Enceladus and thus provides a source of surface contaminants. By studying the near-infrared spectral signatures of these contaminants we may put new constraints on the composition of the plumes and, ultimately, their source, which is currently believed to be Enceladus's global sub-surface ocean [Iess et al., 2014]. Here we present preliminary results from our analysis of observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [Brown et al., 2005] onboard Cassini and mapping of plume deposits across the surface of Enceladus. We have investigated the global variation of the water ice Fresnel peak at 3.1 μm, which may be used as an indicator of ice crystallinity [Hansen & McCord, 2004; Jaumann et al., 2008; Newman et al., 2008]. We have also investigated the slope of the 1.11-2.25 μm spectral region, which serves as an indicator of water ice grain size for small grains (< 100 μm) as well as the presence of contaminants [e.g. Filacchione et al., 2010]. Finally, we have identified and mapped an absorption feature centered at 3.25 μm that may be related to organic contaminants, represented by the band depth of the fundamental C-H stretch [e.g. Cruikshank et al., 2014; Scipioni et al., 2014].

  16. Effects of pirenzepine on Dai-kenchu-to-induced elevation of the plasma neuropeptide levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuhki; Inoue, Shin; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Itoh, Hiroki; Takeyama, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Dai-kenchu-to has been used for the treatment of abdominal obstructions, including bowel obstructions and a feeling of coldness in the abdomen. We reported that Dai-kenchu-to increases plasma neuropeptide [motilin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), serotonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and substance P]-like immunoreactive substances (IS) levels and that its pharmacologic effects on the gastrointestine are due to changes in gastrointestinal mucosa-regulatory peptide levels. We examined the effects of the selective M(1) muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine on the elevation of Dai-kenchu-to-induced plasma neuropeptide (gastrin, motilin, somatostatin, VIP, CGRP, substance P)-IS levels in human volunteers and the area under the plasma neuropeptide concentration-time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC(0-->240 min)), which were calculated from the plasma neuropeptide concentration-time curves from each volunteers. Oral pretreatment with pirenzepine reduced the Dai-kenchu-to-induced elevation of plasma motilin and VIP-IS levels and AUC(0-->240 min). Combined treatment with Dai-kenchu-to and pirenzepine increased plasma somatostatin-IS levels and decreased plasma gastrin-IS levels and had no effects on plasma CGRP- and substance P-IS levels and AUC(0-->240 min) compared with administration of Dai-kenchu-to alone. Dai-kenchu-to appeared to induce the release of motilin and VIP into plasma mainly through the activation of M(1) muscarinic receptors, and pirenzepine may affect the pharmacologic action of Dai-kenchu-to by elevation of plasma motilin and VIP levels.

  17. Citrinin-induced fluidization of the plasma membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskó, Ágnes; Mike, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Gazdag, Zoltán; Czibulya, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Lívia; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Pesti, Miklós

    2013-09-01

    Citrinin (CTN) is a toxic fungal metabolite that is a hazardous contaminant of foods and feeds. In the present study, its acute toxicity and effects on the plasma membrane of Schizosaccharomyces pombe were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CTN against the yeast cells proved to be 500 μM. Treatment with 0, 250, 500 or 1000 μM CTN for 60 min resulted in a 0%, 2%, 21% or 100% decrease, respectively, in the survival rate of the cell population. Treatment of cells with 0, 100, 500 or 1000 μM CTN for 20 min induced decrease in the phase-transition temperature of the 5-doxylstearic acid-labeled plasma membrane to 16.51, 16.04, 14.18 or 13.98°C, respectively as measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. This perturbation was accompanied by the efflux of essential K⁺ from the cells. The existence of an interaction between CTN and glutathione was detected for the first time by spectrofluorometry. Our observations may suggest a direct interaction of CTN with the free sulfhydryl groups of the integral proteins of the plasma membrane, leading to dose-dependent membrane fluidization. The change in fluidity disturbed the ionic homeostasis, contributing to the death of the cells, which is a novel aspect of CTN cytotoxicity.

  18. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Giuffrida, L; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Kravarik, J; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Szydlowski, A; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    A 10(16) W∕cm(2) Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD(2) targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD(2) targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  19. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kravarik, J. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Electro-Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 23 Hery Str., 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    A 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD{sub 2} targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD{sub 2} targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  20. The Effect of Temperature on the Spectral Emission of Plasma Induced in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Charfi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical modeling investigation of the spectral emission of laser-induced plasma in MgCl2-NaCl aqueous solution has been presented. A model based on equilibrium equations has been developed for the computation of the plasma composition and excited levels population. Physical interpretation is presented to comment on firstly the evolution of atomic species number densities, and secondly on the population of the excited species emitting MgII and NaI resonant lines for temperatures ranging from 3000 K to 20 000 K. It is shown that MgII line reach a maximum of population on the issuing level, at norm temperature of 13800 K. Whereas, NaI line presents two norm temperatures, evaluated at 3300 K and 11700 K. This splitting of the NaI norm temperature is explained by the low-ionization potential and weak concentration of the sodium atom in this aqueous solution. Thus, the proposed model can be useful to predict the optimal plasma temperature for the detection of given chemical element, which is not easy to reveal experimentally.

  1. Kinetic aspects of the formation of aluminium oxide by use of a microwave-induced plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, A; Steffen, H; Hippler, R; Wulff, H

    2002-10-01

    The oxidation of thin aluminium layers in a microwave plasma has been investigated to determine the kinetics of oxide growth. Thin Al-coatings were oxidized by means of a variety of gas mixtures, characterized by different partial pressures of oxygen, in microwave-induced plasmas of different power. To study the whole kinetic process the Al-metal and the oxide formed were investigated by means of a combination of grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD). XPS and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of stoichiometric Al(2)O(3). The alumina formed is X-ray amorphous. Quantitative description of oxide formation was achieved indirectly by determination of the decrease in the integrated intensity of the Al(111)-peak and the total thickness of the whole coating. These values enabled calculation of kinetic data. It was found that oxide growth was a combination of two simultaneous processes - diffusion and sputter processes. The diffusion coefficient D (cm(2) s(-1)) and the sputter rate S (nm s(-1)) were determined. The effect of the composition of the gas mixture, microwave power, and concentration of activated oxygen species on the oxidation process will be discussed. For calculation of the activation energy, E(A), of this plasma-enhanced diffusion process the temperature-dependence of D was investigated.

  2. Wakefield-Induced Ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de la Ossa, A Martinez; Streeter, M J V; Osterhoff, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ($I_b^0\\gtrsim 8.5~\\mathrm{kA}$) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ($k_p\\sigma_z \\sim k_p\\epsilon_n \\sim 0.1$). In additi...

  3. Emission properties of plasmas induced by near IR laser pulses in the far VUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    Influence of pulsed laser energy on emission characteristics of laser plasmas induced in various inert atmospheres and pressures is demonstrated by emission spectroscopy in the far vacuum UV zone (around 100 nm). In this context, argon and helium were employed and their pressures were controlled in the range 0.005-5.0 mbar. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser emitting in the near IR at 1064 nm was employed in the experiments. The laser energy was varied between 200 and 800 mJ and focused onto a reference steel sample within a vacuum-tight chamber. The radiation emitted from the line plasmas generated was recorded from a section located 2.5 mm from the target surface. Under any gas composition and pressure studied, line and background emission intensities as well as signal-to-background ratios showed significant dependence on the laser energy. For example, at 800 mJ the highest spectral line intensity was obtained in argon atmosphere at a pressure of about 0.5 mbar, while helium at the same pressure produced the largest signal-to-background ratio using lower laser pulse energy of 400 mJ. In any case, the nature and characteristics of laser plasma-based emission in the far vacuum UV are similar to those recorded in the UV-visible range.

  4. Laser-induced optogalvanic signal oscillations in miniature neon glow discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K

    2013-06-20

    Laser-induced optogalvanic (OG) signal oscillations detected in miniature neon glow discharge plasma are investigated using a discharge equivalent-circuit model. The damped oscillations in OG signal are generated when a pulsed dye laser is tuned to a specific neon transition (1s5→2p2) at 588.2 nm under the discharge conditions where dynamic resistance changes its sign. Penning ionization via quasi-resonant energy transfer collisions between neon gas atoms in metastable state and sputtered electrode atoms in ground state is discussed to explain the negative differential resistance properties of discharge plasma that are attributed to oscillations in the OG signal. The experimentally observed results are simulated by analyzing the behavior of an equivalent discharge-OG circuit. Good agreement between theoretically calculated and experimental results is observed. It is found that discharge plasma is more sensitive and less stable in close vicinity to dynamic resistance sign inversion, which can be useful for weak-optical-transition OG detection.

  5. A laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for obtaining neutral hydrogen densities in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.Z.; Yang, T.F.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The resonance fluorescence of neutral hydrogen illuminated by {ital H}{sub {alpha}} radiation has been used as a technique for the spatially and temporally resolved density measurements of neutral hydrogen in high temperature plasmas, such as in the tokamak and magnetic mirror plasma fusion devices. The fluorescence signal, usually very weak and buried in the background of stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission, is very difficult to extract and its measurements are inaccurate. This paper discusses the improvement of the signal extraction using two optical path laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. One optical path carries the fluorescence signal and the background (the stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission), whereas the other path carries only the background signal. By combining these two signals, a clean fluorescence signal can be isolated by subtracting out the background using a differential amplifier. The measurement is obtained instantaneously from these two signals which are taken simultaneously in one pulse rather than being extracted from two separate spectra taken in two sequential pulses (double pulses). This method, therefore, makes a significant improvement on the double pulse technique in terms of the accuracy of the measurement and the time resolution. Using this LIF technique the measurement of the neutral density profile in the exhaust of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion device is obtained and presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Enhancement of photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2 induced by plasma doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Sungjin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Guo, L Jay; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-05-27

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides hold promise for making ultrathin-film photovoltaic devices with a combination of excellent photovoltaic performance, superior flexibility, long lifetime, and low manufacturing cost. Engineering the proper band structures of such layered materials is essential to realize such potential. Here, we present a plasma-assisted doping approach for significantly improving the photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2. In this work, we fabricated and characterized photovoltaic devices with a vertically stacked indium tin oxide electrode/multilayer MoS2/metal electrode structure. Utilizing a plasma-induced p-doping approach, we are able to form p-n junctions in MoS2 layers that facilitate the collection of photogenerated carriers, enhance the photovoltages, and decrease reverse dark currents. Using plasma-assisted doping processes, we have demonstrated MoS2-based photovoltaic devices exhibiting very high short-circuit photocurrent density values up to 20.9 mA/cm(2) and reasonably good power-conversion efficiencies up to 2.8% under AM1.5G illumination, as well as high external quantum efficiencies. We believe that this work provides important scientific insights for leveraging the optoelectronic properties of emerging atomically layered two-dimensional materials for photovoltaic and other optoelectronic applications.

  7. Reconfigurable designs for electromagnetically induced transparency in solid state plasma metamaterials with multiple transmission windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Kun; Mo, Jin-Jun; Yu, Zhi-Yang; Shi, Wei; Li, Hai-Ming; Bian, Bo-Rui

    2016-05-01

    A reconfigurable metamaterial analog electromagnetically-induced-transparency-like (EIT-like) effect is theoretically and numerically demonstrated in this paper. The unit cell is composed of a stimulated circular loop element and an unstimulated arc slot element, which are both constructed by semiconductor. The interaction between the two elements of the unit cell leads to a transparency window, resembling a special quantum optical phenomenon as electromagnetic (EM) induced transparency. The proposed designs can realize a continuously tunable EIT-like effect in a broad frequency range from 2.2 GHz to 3.6 GHz by changing the arc slot angle, while the number of EIT-like transmission windows can be configured by increasing the number of arc slots. This scheme which is constructed by solid state plasma (SSP) metamaterial provides an alternative way to realize the tunable plasmonic sensing and make new kinds of reconfigurable devices.

  8. The Role of Free Radicals in Hemolytic Toxicity Induced by Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Youn Baik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP has received attention due to its generation of various kinds of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. The controllability, as well as the complexity, is one of the strong points of APP in various applications. For biological applications of this novel method, the cytotoxicity should be estimated at various levels. Herein, we suggest red blood cell (RBC as a good cell model that is simpler than nucleated cells but much more complex than other lipid model systems. Air and N2 gases were compared to verify the main ROS/RNS in cytotoxicity, and microscopic and spectroscopic analyses were performed to estimate the damages induced on RBCs. The results shown here will provide basic information on APP-induced cytotoxicity at cellular and molecular levels.

  9. Reactions of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions exposed to non-thermal plasma: limitations of spin trapping of the plasma induced species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Stehling, Nicola; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature (‘cold’) atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained much attention in recent years due to their biomedical effects achieved through the interactions of plasma-induced species with the biological substrate. Monitoring of the radical species in an aqueous biological milieu is usually performed via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using various nitrone spin traps, which form persistent radical adducts with the short-lived radicals. However, the stability of these nitroxide radical adducts in the plasma-specific environment is not well known. In this work, chemical transformations of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions using a model nitroxide 4-oxo-TEMPO were studied using EPR and LC-MS. The kinetics of the nitroxide decay when the solution was exposed to plasma were assessed, and the reactive pathways proposed. The use of different scavengers enabled identification of the types of reactive species which cause the decay, indicating the predominant nitroxide group reduction in oxygen-free plasmas. The 2H adduct of the PBN spin trap (PBN-D) was shown to decay similarly to the model molecule 4-oxo-TEMPO. The decay of the spin adducts in plasma-treated solutions must be considered to avoid rendering the spin trapping results unreliable. In particular, the selectivity of the decay indicated the limitations of the PTIO/PTI nitroxide system in the detection of nitric oxide.

  10. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on plasma membrane permeabilization and fluidization induced by chlorpromazine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruoka, Nobuyuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Omata, Naoto; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Wada, Yuji

    2008-03-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play a key role in most research on antipsychotic drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on the plasma membrane in the central nervous system. Therefore, we investigated whether chlorpromazine (CPZ), a typical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug, affects the plasma membrane integrity in the rat brain, and if so, whether these membrane alterations can be prevented by dietary supplementation with vitamin E, which has been shown to be an antioxidant and also a membrane-stabilizer. Leakage of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([(18)F]FDG)-6-phosphate from rat striatal slices and decrease in 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy were used as indexes for plasma membrane permeabilization and fluidization, respectively. CPZ induced leakage of [(18)F]FDG-6-phosphate from striatal slices, and the leakage was delayed in the vitamin E-supplemented group compared to that in the normal diet group. The decrease in plasma membrane anisotropy induced by CPZ was significantly attenuated by vitamin E supplementation. Chronic treatment with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a free radical scavenger, had no effect on CPZ-induced plasma membrane permeabilization, and the treatment with CPZ did not induce lipid peroxidation. CPZ can reduce plasma membrane integrity in the brain, and this reduction can be prevented by vitamin E via its membrane-stabilizing properties, not via its antioxidant activity.

  11. Esculetin reduces leukotriene B4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Rzodkiewicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin is a natural coumarin with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity. It acts as a potent inhibitor of lipoxygenases (5-LOX and 12-LOX and decreases the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Because both inhibition of lipoxygenases and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases are effective strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated whether esculetin may be effective in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Material and methods : The study was performed on male Lewis rats, in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Rats were divided into two groups: control (treated with 1% methylcellulose and experimental (treated with esculetin – 10 mg/kg ip.. The tested compound was administered for 5 consecutive days starting on the 21st day after induction of arthritis. Each group consisted of 7 animals. After 5 days of treatment, rats were anesthetized. The concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4 in plasma was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results : The LTB4 level in plasma of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis is increased in comparison to rats without inflammation (362 ±34 vs. 274 ±15 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively. Five-day treatment with esculetin in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats decreases the LTB4 level to a level comparable with rats without inflammation (284 ±23 pg/ml, p < 0.01. Conclusions : LTB4 is the most potent chemotactic agent influencing neutrophil migration into the joint. It is known that its level in serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis is increased and correlates with disease severity. Some other lipoxygenase inhibitors have already been tested as potential drug candidates in clinical and preclinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis (Zileuton, PF-4191834. Because esculetin decreases the LTB4 level in plasma of rats in adjuvant-induced arthritis, it may also be considered as an attractive

  12. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption in experimental peritonitis-induced septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykora, Roman; Chvojka, Jiri; Krouzecky, Ales; Radej, Jaroslav; Kuncova, Jitka; Varnerova, Veronika; Karvunidis, Thomas; Novak, Ivan; Matejovic, Martin

    2009-05-01

    The coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) was developed as an adsorptive hemopurification method aimed at nonselective removal of circulating soluble mediators potentially involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis. We hypothesized that this nonselective hemopurification could protect from detrimental consequences of long-term, volume-resuscitated porcine septic shock. In 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented pigs, the hyperdynamic septic shock secondary to peritonitis was induced by intraperitoneally inoculating feces and maintained for 22 h with fluid resuscitation and norepinephrine infusion as needed to maintain MAP above 65 mmHg. After 12 h of peritonitis, animals were randomized to receive either supportive treatment (control, n = 8) or CPFA treatment (CPFA, n = 8). Systemic, hepatosplanchnic, and renal hemodynamics; oxygen exchange; energy metabolism (lactate/pyruvate and ketone body ratios); ileal mucosal and renal cortex microcirculation; systemic inflammation (TNF-alpha, IL-6); nitrosative/oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrates + nitrites); and endothelial/coagulation dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine, von Willebrand factor, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, platelet count) were assessed before and 12, 18, and 22 h of peritonitis. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption neither delayed the development of hypotension nor reduced the dose of norepinephrine. The treatment failed to attenuate sepsis-induced alterations in microcirculation, surrogate markers of cellular energetics, endothelial injury, and systemic inflammation. Similarly, CPFA did not protect from lung and liver dysfunction and even aggravated sepsis-induced disturbances in coagulation and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In this porcine model of septic shock, the early treatment with CPFA was not capable of reversing the sepsis-induced disturbances in various biological pathways and organ systems. Both the efficacy and safety of this method

  13. Heme protein-induced tubular cytoresistance: expression at the plasma membrane level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zager, R A

    1995-05-01

    Following experimental rhabdomyolysis, animals become resistant to heme protein-induced acute renal failure (ARF). The goals of this study were to: (a) ascertain whether this resistance, previously documented only in vivo, is expressed directly at the proximal tubular cell level; (b) determine whether heme proteinuria (vs. other consequences of rhabdomyolysis) is its trigger; and (c) ascertain some of its subcellular determinants. Rats were injected with a borderline toxic dose of glycerol and 24 hours later proximal tubular segments (PTS) were isolated for study. Their vulnerability to diverse forms of injury (FeSO4-induced oxidant stress, hypoxia, Ca2+ ionophore, cytochalasin D, PLA2) was compared to that found in normal PTS. Post-glycerol PTS manifested significant resistance to each insult (decreased lactate dehydrogenase +/- N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase release). Protection against FeSO4 was virtually complete and it was associated with a 50% decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation. No decrease in hydroxyl radical generation was noted during the FeSO4 challenge (salicylate trap assessment), suggesting a primary increase in membrane resistance to attack. That PLA2 addition caused less deacylation, plasma membrane enzyme (alanine aminopeptidase) release, and LDH leakage from post-glycerol versus normal tubules supported this hypothesis. To test whether cytoresistance was specifically triggered by heme proteins (vs. being a non-specific filtered protein effect, or a result of endotoxin cascade activation), rats were injected with purified myoglobin, non-heme containing filterable proteins, or endotoxin. Only myoglobin induced cytoresistance. In vivo heme oxygenase inhibition (tin-protoporphyrin) did not block the emergence of cytoresistance and it was expressed despite Na,K-ATPase inhibition (ouabain) or cytoskeletal disruption (cytochalasin D). In vivo heat shock failed to protect. In conclusion, (1) rhabdomyolysis induces broad based proximal tubular

  14. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  15. The role of plasma coating on the permeation of cytokine-inducing substances through dialyser membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnemann, G; Schindler, R; Lufft, V; Mahiout, A; Shaldon, S; Koch, K M

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effects of coating of dialyser membranes with plasma proteins on the permeation of bacteria-derived cytokine-inducing substances (CIS). An in vitro dialysis circuit using polysulphone (PS) or modified cellulose triacetate (mCT) dialysers was used. Precoating of the dialysers was performed by recirculation of 10% normal human plasma for 30 min in the blood compartment and subsequent rinse with pyrogen-free saline. Samples from the blood compartment were tested for induction of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) at various time points after challenging the dialysate with sterile culture supernatants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Contamination of the dialysate resulted in the appearance of CIS in the blood compartment of both polysuphone modified cellulose triacetate (IL-1 alpha: PS, time 0: 81 +/- 11 pg/ml, time 60 min: 4747 +/- 1822 pg/ml, P < 0.05; mCT, time 0: 235 +/- 141 pg/ml, time 60 min: 1632 +/- 531 pg/ml, P < 0.05). The plasma protein layer reduced the penetration of CIS significantly only for polysulphone (IL-1 alpha: PS, time 60: 4747 +/- 1822 versus 880 +/- 525 pg/ml, P < 0.05; modified cellulose triacetate, time 60 min: 1632 +/- 531 pg/ml versus 930 +/- 326 pg/ml). Samples from the blood compartment contained < 6 pg/ml LAL-reactive material at all time points. We conclude that plasma coating of polysulphone dialysers reduces the permeability for CIS derived from Pseudomonas, either by reducing the effective pore size or by adsorption of proteins that bind CIS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Kinetic model of stimulated emission created by resonance pumping of aluminum laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornushkin, I. B.; Kazakov, A. Ya.

    2017-06-01

    Stimulated emission observed experimentally in an aluminum laser induced plasma is modeled via a kinetic approach. The simulated emission at several cascade transitions is created by a pump laser guided through the plasma at several microseconds after its creation and tuned in resonance with the strong 3s23p-3s24s transition at 266 nm. A two-dimensional space-time collisional radiative plasma model explains the creation of the population inversion and lasing at wavelengths of 2100 n m and 396.1 nm. The population inversion for lasing at 2100 n m is created by depopulation of the ground 3s23p state and population of the 3s25s state via the absorption of the resonant radiation at 266 nm. The population inversion for lasing at 396.1 nm occurs during the laser pulse via the decay of the population of the pumped 3s25s state to the excited 3s24s state via cascade transitions driven optically and by collisions. In particular, efficient are the mixing transitions between neighboring states separated by small gaps on the order of k T at plasma temperatures of 5000-10 000 K. The model predicts that the population inversion and corresponding gain may reach high values even at very moderate pump energy of several μJ per pulse. The efficiency of lasing at 2100 n m and 396.1 nm is estimated to be ˜3% and 0.05%, correspondingly with respect to the pump laser intensity. The gain for lasing at 396.1 nm can reach as high as ˜40 cm-1. The polarization effect that the pump radiation at 266 nm imposes on the stimulated emission at 396.1 nm is discussed. The calculated results are favorably compared to experimental data.

  17. Curve of growth methodology applied to laser-induced plasma emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornushkin, I. B.; Anzano, J. M.; King, L. A.; Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1999-04-01

    The curve-of-growth (COG) method was applied to a laser-induced plasma. The plasma was produced by a Nd:YAG laser on the surface of steel samples containing 0.007-1.3% of Cr. The emission was collected from the top of the plasma by means of a 45° pierced mirror and aligned onto an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) with a gate width of 1 μs and a variable delay time. The resonance 425.4 nm Cr line was used for construction of the COG. The temperature of the plasma (˜8000 K at 5-μs delay) was determined from a Boltzmann plot. The damping constant a, proportional to the ratio of the Lorentzian to the Doppler line widths, was found from the best fit of a series of calculated COG to the experimental data points and was 0.20±0.05. The number density of neutral Cr atoms which corresponded to the transition between low and high optical densities, was ≈6.5·10 12 cm -3. The cross-section for broadening collisions of Cr atoms with atmospheric species (presumably N 2) was calculated to be (66±16) Å. The shape of the 425.4-nm Cr line was additionally checked by scanning an ultra-narrow cw Ti:Sapphire laser across the atomic transition and found to be in agreement with preliminary estimates. The potential of the COG method for laser breakdown spectroscopy is discussed.

  18. [Determination of minor elements in stainless steel by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, Shi-Ding; Zhang, Jian-Qiu; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2008-04-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is characterized by its non-contact and real-time analysis. Its application to the determination of steel composition can meet the need of high-speed, continuous and automatic production in large steel companies. In the present article the minor elements concentrations of aluminum, manganese, cobalt, molybdenum, and titanium in a series of stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti samples were determinate by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy, based on a Nd : YAG Q-switched solid laser with wavelength 1 064 nm as an exciting source and ICCD as detector. In the experiment the working delay time and gate time of ICCD were set suitably to get high signal-to-noise ratio emission spectral lines, and the internal standardization method related to matrix effect was used to deal with spectral data. Experiment results show that the concentration ratios of all the measured elements versus the reference element ferrum have a good linear relationship with the intensity ratios of them, the detection limits of the five tested elements are within 150 microg x g(-1).

  19. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  20. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, S., E-mail: surabhijaiswal73@gmail.com; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2016-08-15

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  1. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves (DASW) in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi$ shaped DC glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a m...

  2. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32°C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30°C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32°C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14°C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32°C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase. PMID:16665545

  3. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma on CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Injury in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hesami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been of great concern to the scientists and doctors who are involved in wound healing and regenerative medicine which focuses on repairing and replacing damaged cells and tissues. Growth factors of platelet-rich plasma are cost-effective, available, and is more stable than recombinant human growth factors. Given these valuable properties, we decided to assess the effect of PRP on CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity on rats. The rats received CCl4 (1 mL/kg, i.p. 1 : 1 in olive oil twice per week for 8 weeks. Five weeks after CCl4 injection, the rats also received PRP (0.5 mL/kg, s.c. two days a week for three weeks. Twenty-four hours after last CCl4 injection, the animals bled and their livers dissected for biochemical and histopathological studies. Blood analysis was performed to evaluate enzyme activity. The results showed that PRP itself was not toxic for liver and could protect the liver from CCl4-induced histological damages and attenuated oxidative stress by increase in glutathione content and decrease in lipid peroxidative marker of liver tissue. The results of the present study lend support to our beliefs in hepatoprotective effects of PRP.

  4. The use of laser-induced plasma spectroscopy technique for the characterization of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolas, G. [Universidad de A Coruna, Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)], E-mail: gines@cdf.udc.es; Mateo, M.P.; Yanez, A. [Universidad de A Coruna, Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)

    2007-12-15

    The present work focuses on the characterization of boiler tube walls using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy technique with visual inspection by optical and scanning electron microscopy of the cross-sections of these tubes. In a watertube boiler, water runs through tubes that are surrounded by a heating source. As a result, the water is heated to very high temperatures, causing accumulation of deposits on the inside surfaces of the tubes. These deposits play an important role in the efficiency of the boiler tube because they produce a reduction of the boiler heat rate and an increase in the number of tube failures. The objectives are to determine the thickness and arrangement of deposits located on the highest heat area of the boiler and compare them with tube parts where the heat flux is lower. The major deposits found were copper and magnetite. These deposits come mainly from the boiler feedwater and from the reaction between iron and water, and they do not form on the tube walls at a uniform rate over time. Their amount depends on the areas where they are collected. A Nd:YAG laser operating at 355 nm has been used to perform laser-induced plasma spectra and depth profiles of the deposits.

  5. Evidence that plasma concentration rather than dose per kilogram body weight predicts ribavirin-induced anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, K; Schvarcz, R; Bruchfeld, A; Ståhle, L

    2004-01-01

    Ribavirin in combination with interferon alpha-2 or pegylated interferon is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The current dosage recommendations for ribavirin are based on body weight (bw). Ribavirin is mainly eliminated by the kidneys and we have recently shown that ribavirin plasma concentrations are determined primarily by renal function. It is therefore reasonable to hypothesize that side-effects of ribavirin, i.e. anaemia, should be more closely related to plasma concentrations of ribavirin than to the dose per kg bw. A total of 108 consecutive patients eligible for treatment of chronic hepatitis C were studied. Ribavirin concentrations in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV after solid-phase extraction in trough samples taken 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the treatment commenced. A total of 213 samples were obtained and the change in the haemoglobin level and the creatinine concentration was measured in addition to ribavirin. The dose of ribavirin per kg bw did not correlate with the drop in haemoglobin level induced by ribavirin. The concentration of ribavirin was non-linearly related to the drop in the haemoglobin level as revealed by fitting a standard Hill equation type dose-response curve. The half maximal drop in haemoglobin was obtained at 4.4 microm. The results from this study suggest that the anaemia induced by ribavirin depends primarily on the concentration of ribavirin, and not on the dose per kg bw. This lends further support to the idea that ribavirin should be dosed according to renal function.

  6. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koban, Ina; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Kocher, Thomas [Unit of Periodontology, Dental School, University of Greifswald, Rotgerberstr. 8, 17475 Greifswald (Germany); Matthes, Rutger; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Kramer, Axel [Institute for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, University of Greifswald, Walther-Rathenau-Str. 49 a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Sietmann, Rabea [Institute of Microbiology, University of Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 15, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter, E-mail: ina.koban@uni-greifswald.d [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log{sub 10} reduction factor of 1.5, the log{sub 10} reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  7. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  8. Phenylarsine Oxide Inhibits the Fusicoccin-Induced Activation of Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivari, Claudio; Albumi, Cristina; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which fusicoccin (FC) induces the activation of the plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase, we used phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a known inhibitor of protein tyrosine-phosphatases. PAO was supplied in vivo in the absence or presence of FC to radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings and cultured Arabidopsis cells prior to PM extraction. Treatment with PAO alone caused a slight decrease of PM H+-ATPase activity and, in radish, a decrease of PM-associated 14-3-3 proteins. When supplied prior to FC, PAO drastically inhibited FC-induced activation of PM H+-ATPase, FC binding to the PM, and the FC-induced increase of the amount of 14-3-3 associated with the PM. On the contrary, PAO was completely ineffective on all of the above-mentioned parameters when supplied after FC. The H+-ATPase isolated from PAO-treated Arabidopsis cells maintained the ability to respond to FC if supplied with exogenous, nonphosphorylated 14-3-3 proteins. Altogether, these results are consistent with a model in which the dephosphorylated state of tyrosine residues of a protein(s), such as 14-3-3 protein, is required to permit FC-induced association between the 14-3-3 protein and the PM H+-ATPase. PMID:10677439

  9. Peptidome profiling of umbilical cord plasma associated with gestational diabetes-induced fetal macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Lan; Ding, Hongjuan; Huo, Ran; Shi, Zhonghua

    2016-04-29

    Fetal macrosomia, defined as a birth weight ≥4000g, may affect 15-45% of newborns of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The associations between endogenous peptides and gestational diabetes-induced macrosomia have not been investigated extensively by peptidome analysis. Here, we analyzed the umbilical cord plasma by combining ultrafiltration using molecular weight cut-off filters and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to investigate potential associations of GDM with macrosomia. As macrosomic babies have increased susceptibility to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in later life, we also aimed to identify specific biomarkers to detect these future diseases. Thirty pairs of GDM mothers and controls were randomly divided into three subgroups. We identified 235 peptides of around 1000-3000Da, originating from 115 proteins. Analyzing the cleavage sites revealed that these peptides were cleaved in regulation, which may reflect the protease activity and distribution in umbilical cord plasma. Four identified peptides, of 2471.7, 1077.2, 1446.5 and 2372.7Da, were significantly differentially expressed in the GDM macrosomia groups compared with controls, whose precursors may play a critical role in developing GDM macrosomia. We provide for the first time a validated GDM macrosomia peptidome profile and identify potential biomarkers linking the effects of macrosomia to later-life diseases. Fetal macrosomia is the predominant adverse outcome of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is a frequent medical condition during pregnancy. Till now, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying gestational diabetes-induced macrosomia are still not elucidated. With high detection sensitivity and high throughput of peptidome technology, it is now possible to systemically identify peptides possibly involved in the umbilical cord plasma of GDM induced macrosomia cases. With LC-MS/MS based quantification, totally, we identified 235

  10. Calcium influx through TRP channels induced by short-lived reactive species in plasma-irradiated solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-05-12

    Non-equilibrium helium atmospheric-pressure plasma (He-APP), which allows for a strong non-equilibrium chemical reaction of O2 and N2 in ambient air, uniquely produces multiple extremely reactive products, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), in plasma-irradiated solution. We herein show that relatively short-lived unclassified reactive species (i.e., deactivated within approximately 10 min) generated by the He-APP irradiation can trigger physiologically relevant Ca(2+) influx through ruthenium red- and SKF 96365-sensitive Ca(2+)-permeable channel(s), possibly transient receptor potential channel family member(s). Our results provide novel insight into understanding of the interactions between cells and plasmas and the mechanism by which cells detect plasma-induced chemically reactive species, in addition to facilitating development of plasma applications in medicine.

  11. Lipid asymmetry in plant plasma membranes: phosphate deficiency-induced phospholipid replacement is restricted to the cytosolic leaflet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjällström, H; Hellgren, Lars; Wieslander, Å;

    2010-01-01

    barrier) and rafts both contain only trace amounts of DGDG, we conclude that this lipid class is not compatible with membrane functions requiring a high degree of lipid order. By not replacing phospholipids site specifically with DGDG, negative functional effects of this lipid in the plasma membrane...... are avoided.-Tjellström, H., Hellgren, L. I., Wieslander, A., Sandelius, A. S. Lipid asymmetry in plant plasma membranes: phosphate deficiency-induced phospholipid replacement is restricted to the cytosolic leaflet.......As in other eukaryotes, plant plasma membranes contain sphingolipids, phospholipids, and free sterols. In addition, plant plasma membranes also contain sterol derivatives and usually 5 mol% DGDG was included. As both the apoplastic plasma membrane leaflet (probably the major water permeability...

  12. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Meropenem, Administered at 500 Milligrams Every 8 Hours, in Plasma and Cantharidin-Induced Skin Blister Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Maglio, Dana; Teng, Renli; Thyrum, Per T.; Nightingale, Charles H.; Nicolau, David P.

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic disposition of meropenem, administered at 500 mg every 8 h, in plasma and cantharidin-induced blister fluid is described. Peak meropenem concentrations in blister fluid lagged behind peak meropenem concentrations in plasma, while a lower elimination rate from blister fluid was also noted. The mean penetration of meropenem into blister fluid was 67%. The pharmacokinetic profile of meropenem in blister fluid supports the utility of this dose in the management of skin and sof...

  13. Pharmacokinetic profile of meropenem, administered at 500 milligrams every 8 hours, in plasma and cantharidin-induced skin blister fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Dana; Teng, Renli; Thyrum, Per T; Nightingale, Charles H; Nicolau, David P

    2003-05-01

    The pharmacokinetic disposition of meropenem, administered at 500 mg every 8 h, in plasma and cantharidin-induced blister fluid is described. Peak meropenem concentrations in blister fluid lagged behind peak meropenem concentrations in plasma, while a lower elimination rate from blister fluid was also noted. The mean penetration of meropenem into blister fluid was 67%. The pharmacokinetic profile of meropenem in blister fluid supports the utility of this dose in the management of skin and soft tissue infections.

  14. Titanium surface modification by using microwave-induced argon plasma in various conditions to enhance osteoblast biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Seon, Gyeung Mi; Seo, Hyok Jin; Kwon, Soon Young; Lee, Mi Hee; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Min Sung; Koo, Min-Ah; Park, Bong Joo; Park,Jong-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Titanium is a well proven implantable material especially for osseointegratable implants by its biocompatibility and anti-corrosive surface properties. Surface characteristics of the implant play an important role for the evolution of bone tissue of the recipient site. Among the various surface modification methods, plasma treatment is one of the promising methods for enhance biocompatibility. We made microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure to improve in titanium sur...

  15. Chemical conversion of aircraft emissions in the dispersing plume: Calculation of effective emission indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, H. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Hendricks, J. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Moellhoff, M. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Lippert, E. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Meier, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Ebel, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie; Sausen, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-06-01

    A box model representative for a mesoscale volume and three different plume models are used to estimate the chemical conversion of exhaust species of a subsonic aircraft at cruise altitude. Clearly deviating results have been obtained for instantaneous mixing of the exhaust in a box and gradual dispersion of a plume. The effect of varying daytime of release as well as the impact of changing dispersion time is studied with emphasis on the aircraft induced O{sub 3} production. Effective emission indices are calculated which enable a correction for expanding plume effects in global or mesoscale models. (orig.)

  16. Mechanism of platelet activation induced by endocannabinoids in blood and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantl, S Annette; Khandoga, Anna L; Siess, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis, and circulating endocannabinoids might modulate platelet function. Previous studies concerning effects of anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) on platelets, mainly performed on isolated cells, provided conflicting results. We therefore investigated the action of three main endocannabinoids [anandamide, 2-AG and virodhamine (arachidonoylethanolamine)] on human platelets in blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). 2-AG and virodhamine induced platelet aggregation in blood, and shape change, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in PRP. The EC50 of 2-AG and virodhamine for platelet aggregation in blood was 97 and 160 µM, respectively. Lower concentrations of 2-AG (20 µM) and virodhamine (50 µM) synergistically induced aggregation with other platelet stimuli. Platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine resembled arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation: shape change, the first platelet response, ATP secretion and aggregation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine were all blocked by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or the specific thromboxane A2 (TXA2) antagonist daltroban. In addition, platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine in blood and PRP were inhibited by JZL184, a selective inhibitor of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). In contrast to 2-AG and virodhamine, anandamide, a substrate of fatty acid amidohydrolase, was inactive. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) agonists lacked stimulatory as well as inhibitory platelet activity. We conclude that 2-AG and virodhamine stimulate platelets in blood and PRP by a MAGL-triggered mechanism leading to free AA and its metabolism by platelet cyclooxygenase-1/thromboxane synthase to TXA2. CB1, CB2 or non-CB1/CB2 receptors are not involved. Our results imply that ASA and MAGL inhibitors will protect platelets from activation by high endocannabinoid levels, and that

  17. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  18. Elevated plasma free fatty acids increase cardiovascular risk by inducing plasma biomarkers of endothelial activation, myeloperoxidase and PAI-1 in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cusi Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CVD in obesity and T2DM are associated with endothelial activation, elevated plasma vascular inflammation markers and a prothrombotic state. We examined the contribution of FFA to these abnormalities following a 48-hour physiological increase in plasma FFA to levels of obesity and diabetes in a group of healthy subjects. Methods 40 non-diabetic subjects (age = 38 ± 3 yr, BMI = 28 ± 1 kg/m2, FPG = 95 ± 1 mg/dl, HbA1c = 5.3 ± 0.1% were admitted twice and received a 48-hour infusion of normal saline or low-dose lipid. Plasma was drawn for intracellular (ICAM-1 and vascular (VCAM-1 adhesion molecules-1, E-selectin (sE-S, myeloperoxidase (MPO and total plasminogen inhibitor-1 (tPAI-1. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a hyperglycemic clamp (M/I. Results Lipid infusion increased plasma FFA to levels observed in obesity and T2DM and reduced insulin sensitivity by 27% (p = 0.01. Elevated plasma FFA increased plasma markers of endothelial activation ICAM-1 (138 ± 10 vs. 186 ± 25 ng/ml, VCAM-1 (1066 ± 67 vs. 1204 ± 65 ng/ml and sE-S (20 ± 1 vs. 24 ± 1 ng/ml between 13-35% and by ≥ 2-fold plasma levels of myeloperoxidase (7.5 ± 0.9 to 15 ± 25 ng/ml, an inflammatory marker of future CVD, and tPAI-1 (9.7 ± 0.6 to 22.5 ± 1.5 ng/ml, an indicator of a prothrombotic state (all p ≤ 0.01. The FFA-induced increase was independent from the degree of adiposity, being of similar magnitude in lean, overweight and obese subjects. Conclusions An increase in plasma FFA within the physiological range observed in obesity and T2DM induces markers of endothelial activation, vascular inflammation and thrombosis in healthy subjects. This suggests that even transient (48-hour and modest increases in plasma FFA may initiate early vascular abnormalities that promote atherosclerosis and CVD.

  19. Properties of plasma induced by pulsed CO2 laser on a copper target under different ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Rankovic, D.; Savovic, J.; Milovanovic, D.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Pavlovic, M. S.; Trtica, M.

    2014-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma induced by a nanosecond transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of the background gas (air, Ar, He and N2) and pressure (1-25 mbar) on plasma formation was examined. The plasma shielding effect was more pronounced for background gases with lower ionization potential than for He. The increase of He pressure from 1 to 25 mbar resulted in fivefold increase of Cu atomic line intensity.

  20. Artesunate prevents rats from the clozapine-induced hepatic steatosis and elevation in plasma triglycerides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yanmei Li,1,2 Ruibing Su,3 Shuqin Xu,2 Qingjun Huang,1 Haiyun Xu1,2 1The Mental Health Center, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Forensics and Pathology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic with therapeutic efficacy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients and low incidence of extrapyramidal side effects. However, the use of clozapine has been limited by its adverse effects on metabolism. Artesunate is a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin and was shown to decrease the plasma cholesterol and triglyceride in rabbits and rats in recent studies. The aim of this study was to examine possible effects of artesunate on the clozapine-induced metabolic alterations in rats given saline, clozapine, artesunate, or clozapine plus artesunate for 6 weeks. The clozapine group showed significantly high plasma levels of triglyceride, hepatic steatosis, and fibrosis along with high levels of C-reactive protein, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase compared to the saline group. But the treatment had no effect on weight gain and caused no hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and behavioral changes in the rats. More significantly, these clozapine-induced changes were not seen in rats coadministered with clozapine plus artesunate. These results added evidence supporting psychiatrists to try add-on treatment of artesunate in schizophrenia patients to ameliorate clozapine-induced adverse metabolic effects. Keywords: artesunate, clozapine, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, schizophrenia 

  1. The influence of ns- and fs-LA plume local conditions on the performance of a combined LIBS/LA-ICP-MS sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2016-01-01

    Both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are well-established analytical techniques with their own unique advantages and disadvantages. The combination of the two analytical methods is a very promising way to overcome the challenges faced by each method individually. We made a comprehensive comparison of local plasma conditions between nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) laser ablation (LA) sources in a combined LIBS and LA-ICP-MS system. The optical emission spectra and ICP-MS signal were recorded simultaneously for both ns- and fs-LA and figures of merit of the system were analyzed. Characterization of the plasma was conducted by evaluating temperature and density of the plume under various irradiation conditions using optical emission spectroscopy, and correlations to ns- and fs-LIBS and LA-ICP-MS signal were made. The present study is very useful for providing conditions for a multimodal system as well as giving insight into how laser ablation plume parameters are related to LA-ICP-MS and LIBS results for both ns- and fs-LA.

  2. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks that require a Rad51-mediated homologous recombination for repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Kangil; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Non-thermal plasma generated under atmospheric pressure produces a mixture of chemically reactive molecules and has been developed for a number of biomedical applications. Recently, plasma jet has been proposed as novel cancer therapies based on the observation that free radicals generated by plasma jet induce mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. We show here that air plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeast chromosomes leading to genomic instability and loss of viability, which are alleviated by Rad51, the yeast homolog of Escherichiacoli RecA recombinase, through DNA damage repair by a homologous recombination (HR) process. Hypersensitivity of rad51 mutant to air plasma was not restored by antioxidant treatment unlike sod1 mutant that was highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenge, suggesting that plasma jet induces DSB-mediated cell death independent of ROS generation. These results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of air plasma jet-induced cell death.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor-Induced Electromagnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Mario J.-E.

    Spontaneous electromagnetic fields can be important to the dynamic evolution of a plasma by directing heat flow as well as providing additional pressures on the conducting fluids through the Lorentz force. Electromagnetic fields are predicted to affect fluid behavior during the core-collapse of supernovae through generation of fields due to hydrodynamic instabilities. In the coronae of stars, self-generated magnetic fields lead to filamentary structure in the hot plasma. Recent experiments by Gregori et al. investigated sources of protogalactic magnetic fields generated by laser-produced shock waves. In inertial confinement fusion experiments, self-generated electromagnetic fields can also play a role and have recently become of great interest to the community. Present day laser facilities provide a unique opportunity to study spontaneous field-generation in these extreme environments under controlled conditions. Instability-induced electromagnetic fields were investigated using a novel monoenergetic-proton radiography system. Fusion protons generated by an 'exploding-pusher' implosion were used to probe laser-irradiated plastic foils with various preimposed surface perturbations. Imaging protons are sensitive to electromagnetic fields and density modulations in the plasma through the Lorentz force and Coulomb collisions, respectively. Corresponding x-ray radiographs of these targets provided mass density distributions and Coulomb effects on protons were assessed using a Monte Carlo code written using the Geant4 framework. Proton fluence distributions were recorded on CR-39 detectors and Fourier analyzed to infer path-integrated field strengths. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of preimposed surface perturbations generated magnetic fields by the RT-induced Biermann battery and were measured for the first time. Good data were obtained during linear growth and when compared to ideal calculations, demonstrated that field diffusion near the source played an important role

  4. Single dose of intra-muscular platelet rich plasma reverses the increase in plasma iron levels in exercise-induced muscle damage:A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zekine Punduk; Onur Oral; Nadir Ozkayin; Khalid Rahman; Rana Varol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Platelet rich plasma (PRP) therapy is widely used in enhancing the recovery of skeletal muscle from injury. However, the impact of intramuscular delivery of PRP on hematologic and biochemical responses has not been fully elucidated in exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this investigation the effects of intramuscular delivery of PRP on hematologic and biochemical responses and recovery strategy muscle damage induced by high intensity muscle exercise (exercise-induced muscle damage, EIMD). Methods: Moderately active male volunteers participated in this study and were assigned to a control group (control, n=6) and PRP administration group (PRP, n=6). The subjects performed exercise with a load of 80%one repetition maximum (1RM) maximal voluntary contraction of the elbow flexors until point of exhaustion of the non-dominant arm was reached. The arms were treated with saline or autologous PRP post-24 h EIMD. Venous blood samples were obtained in the morning to establish a baseline value and 1–4 days post-exercise and were analyzed for serum ferritin, iron, iron binding capacity (IBC), creatinine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Results: The baseline levels of plasma iron, ferritin, IBC, CK, LDH, AST, and ALT were similar in both the control and PRP groups. However, 24-h following exercise a significant increase in these parameters was observed in both groups between 1 and 4 days during the recovery period. Interestingly, PRP administration decreased plasma iron levels compared to the control on the second day post-exercise. Plasma IBC increased in PRP group from Days 2 to 4 post-exercise compared to the control group whilst PRP administration had no effect on plasma ferritin, CK, AST, ALT, or LDH. Conclusion: Acute exhaustive exercise increased muscle damage markers, including plasma iron, IBC, and ferritin levels, indicating muscle damage induced by exercise. PRP

  5. Identification of plasma APE1/Ref-1 in lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemic rats: implication of serological biomarker for an endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Soo; Lee, Yu Ran; Choi, Sunga; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Cho, Eun Jung; Kim, Cuk Seong; Park, Jin Bong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-06-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in base excision DNA repair and in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. We investigated whether APE1/Ref-1 increased in plasma of endotoxemic rats. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used to induce endotoxemia in rats. Administration of LPS (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly induced plasma nitrite production and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). A 37 kDa immunoreactive band was detected in cell-free plasma of LPS-treated rats using anti-APE1/Ref-1, which reached a maximum at 12 h after the LPS injection. The 37 kDa immunoreactive band was identified as rat APE1/Ref-1 by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Interestingly, treatment with recombinant human APE1/Ref-1 protein (2-5 μg/ml for 18 h) inhibited TNF-α-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, the level of plasma APE1/Ref-1 increased in LPS-induced endotoxemic rats, suggesting that plasma APE1/Ref-1 might serve as a serological biomarker for endotoxemia.

  6. STUDIES OF TWO-PHASE PLUMES IN STRATIFIED ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott A. Socolofsky; Brian C. Crounse; E. Eric Adams

    1998-11-18

    Two-phase plumes play an important role in the more practical scenarios for ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}--i.e. dispersing CO{sub 2} as a buoyant liquid from either a bottom-mounted or ship-towed pipeline. Despite much research on related applications, such as for reservoir destratification using bubble plumes, our understanding of these flows is incomplete, especially concerning the phenomenon of plume peeling in a stratified ambient. To address this deficiency, we have built a laboratory facility in which we can make fundamental measurements of plume behavior. Although we are using air, oil and sediments as our sources of buoyancy (rather than CO{sub 2}), by using models, our results can be directly applied to field scale CO{sub 2} releases to help us design better CO{sub 2} injection systems, as well as plan and interpret the results of our up-coming international field experiment. The experimental facility designed to study two-phase plume behavior similar to that of an ocean CO{sub 2} release includes the following components: 1.22 x 1.22 x 2.44 m tall glass walled tank; Tanks and piping for the two-tank stratification method for producing step- and linearly-stratified ambient conditions; Density profiling system using a conductivity and temperature probe mounted to an automated depth profiler; Lighting systems, including a virtual point source light for shadowgraphs and a 6 W argon-ion laser for laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging; Imaging system, including a digital, progressive scanning CCD camera, computerized framegrabber, and image acquisition and analysis software; Buoyancy source diffusers having four different air diffusers, two oil diffusers, and a planned sediment diffuser; Dye injection method using a Mariotte bottle and a collar diffuser; and Systems integration software using the Labview graphical programming language and Windows NT. In comparison with previously reported experiments, this system allows us to extend the parameter range of

  7. Repeated applications of cold atmospheric pressure plasma does not induce resistance in Staphylococcus aureus embedded in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthes, Rutger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: The increasing microbial resistance against antibiotics complicates the therapy of bacterial infections. Therefore new therapeutic options, particularly those causing no resistance, are of high interest. Cold atmospheric plasma is one possible option to eradicate multidrug resistant microorganisms, and so far no resistance development against physical plasma is known.Method: We tested 6-fold repeated plasma applications on a strain embedded in biofilm and compared the reduction of the colony forming units between the different treatment periods to asses a possible development of resistance.Result: For all treatment periods, the control biofilms were reduced by plasma in average by 1.7 log CFU, and decreased from 7.6 to 5.8 log (CFU/cm within 5 hours. The results demonstrated that repeated plasma doses not induce resistance or habituation against plasma applied within short time periods.Conclusion: The repeated application of cold plasma is a promising option for the treatment of infected wounds without the risk of development of resistance against plasma.

  8. Relationship between plume and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchkov, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between plate- and plume-tectonics is considered in view of the growth and breakdown of supercontinents, active rifting, the formation of passive volcanic-type continental margins, and the origin of time-progressive volcanic chains on oceanic and continental plates. The mantle wind phenomenon is described, as well as its effect on plume morphology and anisotropy of the ambient mantle. The interaction of plumes and mid-ocean ridges is discussed. The principles and problems of plume activity analysis in subduction- and collision-related foldbelts are considered and illustrated with examples.

  9. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  10. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  11. Ouabain Modulates the Lipid Composition of Hippocampal Plasma Membranes from Rats with LPS-induced Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Israel José Pereira; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Scavone, Cristoforo; Mignaco, Julio Alberto; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto de Oliveira; Santos, Hérica de Lima

    2015-12-01

    The effects of ouabain (OUA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo on hippocampal membranes (RHM) of Wistar male rats aged 3 months were analyzed. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of OUA only, LPS only, OUA plus LPS, or saline, the content of proteins, phospholipids, cholesterol and gangliosides from RHM was analyzed. The total protein and cholesterol contents of RHM were not significantly affected by OUA or LPS for the experimentally paired groups. In contrast, total phospholipids and gangliosides were strongly modulated by either OUA or LPS treatments. LPS reduced the total phospholipids (roughly 23 %) and increased the total gangliosides (approximately 40 %). OUA alone increased the total phospholipids (around 23 %) and also the total gangliosides (nearly 34 %). OUA pretreatment compensated the LPS-induced changes, preserving the total phospholipids and gangliosides around the same levels of the control. Thus, an acute treatment with OUA not only modulated the composition of hippocampal membranes from 3-month-old rats, but also was apparently able to counteract membrane alterations resulting from LPS-induced neuroinflammation. This study demonstrates for the first time that the OUA capacity modulates the lipid composition of hippocampal plasma membranes from rats with LPS-induced neuroinflammation.

  12. Quasi-steady multiple flux tubes induced by localized current perturbation in toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Gunsu

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-steady helical modes with dual, triple, or more flux tubes are easily produced by localized current drive in the core of sawtoothing plasma on the KSTAR tokamak. Individual flux tubes have m / n = 1 / 1 helicity, co-rotate around the magnetic axis, and later merge into a single m = 1 mode. The merged mode eventually crashes with rapid collapse of the core pressure and the next cycle repeats the same pattern, exhibiting sawtooth-like oscillations in the core pressure. The generation mechanism of multiple flux tubes (MFTs) has been studied in two different approaches to understand the observed trend that the number of flux tubes increases as the current drive location moves away from the magnetic axis up to about the magnetic surface of the safety factor q = 1 at the mode collapse: (1) nonlinear reduced MHD simulation with a localized current source modeling the time-varying interaction between the current source and flux tubes and (2) linear MHD simulation with a prescribed q profile with a radially localized current blip. Both studies show that MFTs can be produced only in plasmas with nearly flat q profile close to unity, suggesting the collapse of the m = 1 mode (i.e., sawtooth crash) is complete. Recent observation of long-lived MFTs induced by localized current drive in non-sawtoothing plasma suggests that q profile evolution toward lower- m instability is required for the merging and crash of MFTs. Work supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea, US D.O.E., and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  13. Application of laser-induced double ablation of plasma for enhanced macroparticle acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Borrielli, A.; Dareshwar, L.; Foldes, I. B.; Kasperczuk, A.; Krousky, E.; Laska, L.; Masek, K.; Mezzasalma, A.; Parys, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Suchanska, R.; Suta, T.; Torrisi, L.; Ullschmied, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the studies was to demonstrate that using laser-induced double plasma ablation (created by the laser light and the X-rays from a high-Z dopant introduced to a low-Z target) it is possible to increase significantly the kinetic energy of a macroparticle accelerated by a laser. In the experiments, the high-intensity (1014 — 1015W/cm2), high-energy (up to 120J) sub-ns 3ω beam of the PALS laser interacted with various (with and without high-Z dopant) thin foil targets. The laser-driven foil (the 'macroparticle') collided with a massive (A1) target producing crater, the volume of which was a measure of the foil kinetic energy released to the foil. Parameters of the accelerated foil and the ablated plasma were determined using three-frame interferometry, ion diagnostics, soft and hard X-ray diagnostics as well as the measurements of the crater dimensions. The results of investigations for low-Z foil targets; for undoped (homogenous) and for ones with high-Z dopants, were compared. It was found that the X-ray yield from the foil target with high-Z dopant is a few times higher than that from the undoped target and the ablating plasma flow is faster and more collimated. It results in an increase in kinetic energy of the accelerated foil (the crater volume is up to 80% larger) provided that the foil is sufficiently thick (20μm). Higher increase in the kinetic energy seems to be possible when using foils with a higher amount of a high-Z dopant and the foil thickness is well matched to the laser beam parameters.

  14. Application of laser-induced double ablation of plasma for enhanced macroparticle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolowski, J; Badziak, J; Kasperczuk, A; Parys, P; Pisarczyk, T; Rosinski, M; Ryc, L; Suchanska, R; Pisarczyk, P [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, EURATOM Association, Warsaw (Poland); Borrielli, A; Mezzasalma, A; Torrisi, L [University of Messina, Faculty of Physics, Messina (Italy); Dareshwar, L [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Foldes, I B; Suta, T [KFKI-Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Krousky, E; Laska, L; Masek, K; Pfeifer, M; Ullschmied, J [PALS Research Centre, ASCR (Czech Republic)], E-mail: wolowski@ifpilm.waw.pl

    2008-05-15

    The objective of the studies was to demonstrate that using laser-induced double plasma ablation (created by the laser light and the X-rays from a high-Z dopant introduced to a low-Z target) it is possible to increase significantly the kinetic energy of a macroparticle accelerated by a laser. In the experiments, the high-intensity (10{sup 14} - 10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2}), high-energy (up to 120J) sub-ns 3{omega} beam of the PALS laser interacted with various (with and without high-Z dopant) thin foil targets. The laser-driven foil (the 'macroparticle') collided with a massive (A1) target producing crater, the volume of which was a measure of the foil kinetic energy released to the foil. Parameters of the accelerated foil and the ablated plasma were determined using three-frame interferometry, ion diagnostics, soft and hard X-ray diagnostics as well as the measurements of the crater dimensions. The results of investigations for low-Z foil targets; for undoped (homogenous) and for ones with high-Z dopants, were compared. It was found that the X-ray yield from the foil target with high-Z dopant is a few times higher than that from the undoped target and the ablating plasma flow is faster and more collimated. It results in an increase in kinetic energy of the accelerated foil (the crater volume is up to 80% larger) provided that the foil is sufficiently thick (20{mu}m). Higher increase in the kinetic energy seems to be possible when using foils with a higher amount of a high-Z dopant and the foil thickness is well matched to the laser beam parameters.

  15. Whistler wave-induced ionospheric plasma turbulence: Source mechanisms and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, R.; Rooker, L. A.; Whitehurst, L. N.; Lee, M. C.; Ross, L. M.; Sulzer, M. P.; Gonzalez, S.; Tepley, C.; Aponte, N.; See, B. Z.; Hu, K. P.

    2013-10-01

    We report a series of experiments conducted at Arecibo Observatory in the past, aimed at the investigation of 40.75 kHz whistler wave interactions with ionospheric plasmas and the inner radiation belts at L=1.35. The whistler waves are launched from a Naval transmitter (code-named NAU) operating in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico at the frequency and power of 40.75 kHz and 100 kW, respectively. Arecibo radar, CADI, and optical instruments were used to monitor the background ionospheric conditions and detect the induced ionospheric plasma effects. Four-wave interaction processes produced by whistler waves in the ionosphere can excite lower hybrid waves, which can accelerate ionospheric electrons. Furthermore, whistler waves propagating into the magnetosphere can trigger precipitation of energetic electrons from the radiation belts. Radar and optical measurements can distinguish wave-wave and wave-particle interaction processes occurring at different altitudes. Electron acceleration by different mechanisms can be verified from the radar measurements of plasma lines. To facilitate the coupling of NAU-launched 40.75 kHz whistler waves into the ionosphere, we can rely on naturally occurring spread F irregularities to serve as ionospheric ducts. We can also use HF wave-created ducts/artificial waveguides, as demonstrated in our earlier Arecibo experiments and recent Gakona experiments at HAARP. The newly constructed Arecibo HF heater will be employed in our future experiments, which can extend the study of whistler wave interactions with the ionosphere and the magnetosphere/radiation belts as well as the whistler wave conjugate propagation between Arecibo and Puerto Madryn, Argentina.

  16. Is therapeutic plasma exchange indicated for patients with gemcitabine-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Ethan McCaleb; Jones, Benjamin Scott; Marques, Marisa B

    2009-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) has been described as an uncommon complication of gemcitabine. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis of gemcitabine-induced aHUS (GiHUS) and the published experience with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). To illustrate GiHUS, we present a patient who developed hypertension and peripheral edema while receiving gemcitabine and subsequently was found to have thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and normal ADAMTS-13 activity. Although laboratory parameters improved on suspending gemcitabine, they worsened after reinstitution of the drug. Thrombocytopenia and hemolysis ceased once the drug was permanently discontinued without therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). The pathological characteristics of GiHUS suggest damage of the glomeruli endothelial lining, leading to occlusion by fibrin-rich thrombi. Among 26 patients described in the literature not treated with TPE, 56% recovered from GiHUS, whereas only 30% of 18 patients treated with TPE did. The difference in recovery rate may have been confounded by the severity of GiHUS as suggested by the rate of dialysis in each group: 10/26 (38%) patients who did not receive TPE were dialyzed compared with 11/18 (61%) of those who had plasma exchange. Thus, although the currently available evidence is not decisive for use or non use of TPE, we suggest that the most important therapeutic intervention in GiHUS is discontinuation of the drug. Apheresis medicine specialists should be aware of this specific type of aHUS and provide treatment advice based on the currently available evidence.

  17. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  18. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened w

  19. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  20. Laser-induced plasma electron number density: Stark broadening method versus the Saha-Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnab, Sarkar; Manjeet, Singh

    2017-02-01

    We report spectroscopic studies on plasma electron number density of laser-induced plasma produced by ns-Nd:YAG laser light pulses on an aluminum sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of different laser energy and the effect of different laser wavelengths were compared. The experimentally observed line profiles of neutral aluminum have been used to extract the excitation temperature using the Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density has been determined from the Stark broadened as well as using the Saha-Boltzmann equation (SBE). Each approach was also carried out by using the Al emission line and Mg emission lines. It was observed that the SBE method generated a little higher electron number density value than the Stark broadening method, but within the experimental uncertainty range. Comparisons of N e determined by the two methods show the presence of a linear relation which is independent of laser energy or laser wavelength. These results show the applicability of the SBE method for N e determination, especially when the system does not have any pure emission lines whose electron impact factor is known. Also use of Mg lines gives superior results than Al lines.

  1. Reactive Control of Boundary Layer Streaks Induced by Freestream Turbulence Using Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouder, Kevin; Naguib, Ahmed; Lavoie, Philippe; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few years we have carried out a systematic series of investigations aimed at evaluating the capability of a plasma-actuator-based feedforward-feedback control system to weaken streaks induced ``synthetically'' in a Blasius boundary layer via dynamic roughness elements. This work has been motivated by the delay of bypass boundary layer transition in which the streaks form stochastically beneath a freestream with turbulence of intensity of more than approximately 1%. In the present work, we carry forward the knowhow from our previous research in a first attempt to control such naturally occurring streaks. The experimental setup consists of a turbulence-generating grid upstream of a flat plate with a sharp leading edge. At the freestream velocity of the experiment, turbulent spot formation is observed to start at a streamwise location of x ~ 350 mm from the leading edge. The control system is implemented within a streamwise domain stretching from x = 150 mm to 300mm, where the streaks exhibit linear growth. At the upstream and downstream end of the domain a feedforward and a feedback wall-shear-stress sensors are utilized. The output from the sensors is fed to appropriately designed controllers which drive two plasma actuators providing positive and negative wall-normal forcing to oppose naturally occurring high- and low-speed streaks respectively. The results provide an assessment of the viability of the control approach to weaken the boundary layer streaks and to delay transition.

  2. Model-independent determination of the astrophysical S-factor in laser-induced fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lattuada, D; Bonasera, A; Bang, W; Quevedo, H J; Warren, M; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Andreoli, P; Kimura, S; Dyer, G; Bernstein, A C; Hagel, K; Barbui, M; Schmidt, K; Gaul, E; Donovan, M E; Natowitz, J B; Ditmire, T

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a new and general method for measuring the astrophysical S-factor of nuclear reactions in laser-induced plasmas and we apply it to d(d,n)$^{3}$He. The experiment was performed with the Texas Petawatt laser, which delivered 150-270 fs pulses of energy ranging from 90 to 180 J to D$_{2}$ or CD$_{4}$ molecular clusters. After removing the background noise, we used the measured time-of-flight data of energetic deuterium ions to obtain their energy distribution. We derive the S-factor using the measured energy distribution of the ions, the measured volume of the fusion plasma and the measured fusion yields. This method is model-independent in the sense that no assumption on the state of the system is required, but it requires an accurate measurement of the ion energy distribution especially at high energies and of the relevant fusion yields. In the d(d,n)$^{3}$He and $^{3}$He(d,p)$^{4}$He cases discussed here, it is very important to apply the background subtraction for the energetic ions ...

  3. Fraunhofer-type absorption line splitting and polarization in confocal double-pulse laser induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagli, Lev, E-mail: nagli@post.tau.ac.il; Gaft, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Strong line splitting and polarization are observed in Fraunhofer-type absorption lines in Pb, Sn, Si, Cd, In, and Zn in confocal double-pulse laser induced plasma (DP-LIP) experiments. This effect is detectable using medium laser power densities: (∼ 1–2) × 10{sup 13} W/m{sup 2} for the first laser pulse and 1 × 10{sup 14} W/m{sup 2} for the second laser pulse. Polarization and splitting effects exist only during the second laser pulse (∼ 7 ns). Absorption line polarization and splitting phenomena may be explained by a high overall magnetic field and motional Stark effect caused by the second laser pulse inside the laser plasma created by the first pulse. - Highlights: • Certain Fraunhofer absorption lines in DP LIBS are polarized. • Certain Fraunhofer absorption lines in DP LIBS are split. • Those effects exist during laser pulse. • Effects take place in elements with ns{sup 2}np{sup 2} and ns{sup 2} electron ground state.

  4. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Claudia; Cornelsen, Matthias; Quade, Antje; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Rebl, Henrike; Weißmann, Volker; Seitz, Hermann; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA - improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds - is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Observation and Simulation of Ion Flow Stagnation in the Enceladus Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Omidi, N.; Averkamp, T.; Wang, Z.; Gurnett, D. A.; Thomsen, M. F.; Crary, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) detected freshly-produced water-group ions (O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+) and heavier charged water clusters (HxO2)+ very close to Enceladus within and outside of the south polar plume, see (1). The data were obtained during close flybys of Enceladus in 2008 and 2009 (E3, E5, E7) when CAPS viewing of the ion plasma was favorable. The ions are observed in CAPS detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction and close to the ram kinetic energy, indicative of a nearly stagnant (at rest with respect to Enceladus) plasma flow in the plume. In this study these CAPS observations are compared with 3D hybrid simulations of the Enceladus interaction (2). The primary goal is to simulate the spatial extent of the ion flow stagnation in and near the plume observed by CAPS. The simulations include not only plume water vapor undergoing charge exchange with the ambient ion flow but also heavy plume dust that acquires a negative charge. The neutral dust spatial distribution is modeled using particle impact rates obtained from Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) data while plasma fluid parameters during the encounters are obtained from CAPS. The dust is a second heavy particle component in the simulation that is followed in the same manner as the positive ions. The dust absorption of electrons mass-loads the plasma producing flow deceleration observable by CAPS over the high impact regions measured by RPWS. This deceleration is compared with that due to the charge exchange process. 1.)Tokar,R.L. et al. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L13203, doi:10.1029/2009GL038923, 2009. 2.)Omidi,N. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 115, A05212, doi:10.1029/2009JA014391, 2010.

  6. The critical distance in laser-induced plasmas: an operative definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, D.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method to estimate a precise value for the critical distance Lcr after which three-body recombination stops to produce charge losses in an expanding laser-induced plasma. We show in particular that the total charge collected has a ``reversed sigmoid'' shape as a function of the target-to-detector distance. Fitting the total charge data with a logistic related function, we could consider as Lcr the intercept of the tangent to this curve in its inflection point. Furthermore, this value scales well with theoretical predictions. From the application point of view, this could be of great practical interest, since it provide a reliable way to precisely determine the geometry of the extraction system in Laser Ion Sources.

  7. Al-Induced Crystallization Growth of Si Films by Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-Shuai; WANG Jin-Xiao; YIN Min; GAO Ping-Qi; HE De-Yan

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) films are in situ grown on Al-coated glass substrates by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition at a temperature as low as 350 C. Compared to the traditional annealing crystallization of amorphous Si/Al-layer structures, no layer exchange is observed and the resultant poly-Si film is much thicker than Al layer. By analysing the depth profiles of the elemental composition, no remains of Al atoms are detected in Si layer within the limit (< 0.01 at. %) of the used evaluations. It is indicated that the poly-Si material obtained by Al-induced crystallization growth has more potential applications than that prepared by annealing the amorphous Si/Al-layer structures.

  8. Study of laser-induced plasma shock waves by the probe beam deflection technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Qian; Jian Lu; Xiaowu Ni

    2009-01-01

    Laser probe beam deflection technique is used for the analysis of laser-induced plasma shock waves in air and distilled water.The temporal and spatial variations of the parameters on shock fronts are studied as funotions of focal lens position and laser energy.The influences of the characteristics of media are investigated on the well-designed experimental setup.It is found that the shock wave in distilled water attenuates to an acoustic wave faster than in air under the same laser energy.Good agreement is obtained between our experimental results and those attained with other techniques.This technique is versatile,economic,and simple to implement,being a pronmising diagnostic tool for pulsed laser processing.

  9. Diffusion-induced parametric dispersion and amplification in doped semiconductor plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Yadav; S Ghosh

    2007-01-01

    Using the hydrodynamic model of semiconductor plasma, the diffusion-induced nonlinear current density and the consequent second-order effective susceptibility are obtained under off-resonant laser irradiation. The analysis deals with the qualitative behaviour of the anomalous parametric dispersion and the gain profile with respect to the excess doping concentration and pump electric field. The analysis suggests that a proper selection of doping level and pump field may lead to either positive or negative enhanced parametric dispersion, which can be of great use in the generation of sequeezed states. It is found that gain maximizes at moderate doping concentration level, which may drastically reduce the fabrication cost of parametric amplifier based on this interaction.

  10. Elemental speciation analysis by multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Pereiro, I; Schmitt, V O; Lobiński, R

    1997-12-01

    Multicapillary column gas chromatography (MC-GC)/microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP AES) was developed for fast speciation analysis of organotin compounds in the environment. Ethylated butyltin compounds could be separated isothermally within less than 30 s (instead of ∼5-10 min) without sacrificing either the resolution or the sample capacity of conventional capillary GC with oven temperature gradient programming. Careful optimization of the pressure and temperature GC program allowed a comprehensive organotin speciation analysis including phenyltin compounds within less than 2.5 min, increasing the sample throughput 6-fold. Compatibility of MC-GC with an MIP atomic emission detector (MIP-AED) was discussed. MC-GC/MIP-AES was validated for the analysis of sediment (PACS-1 and BCR 462) and biological (NIES11) certified reference materials.

  11. Exploring the electron density in plasmas induced by extreme ultraviolet radiation in argon

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Osorio, E A; Banine, V Y

    2015-01-01

    The new generation of lithography tools use high energy EUV radiation which ionizes the present background gas due to photoionization. To predict and understand the long term impact on the highly delicate mirrors It is essential to characterize these kinds of EUV-induced plasmas. We measured the electron density evolution in argon gas during and just after irradiation by a short pulse of EUV light at 13.5 nm by applying microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Dependencies on EUV pulse energy and gas pressure have been explored over a range relevant for industrial applications. Our experimental results show that the maximum reached electron density depends linearly on pulse energy. A quadratic dependence - caused by photoionization and subsequent electron impact ionization by free electrons - is found from experiments where the gas pressure is varied. This is demonstrated by our theoretical estimates presented in this manuscript as well.

  12. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ernst, D. R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  13. Collective modes of an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma induced by relativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Mahatsab

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the characteristics of collective modes induced by relativistic jets in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma(AQGP). Assuming a tsunami-like initial jet distribution, it is found that the dispersion relations for both the stable and unstable modes are modified substantially due to the passage of jet compared to the case when there is no jet. It has also been shown that the growth rate of instability first increases compared to the no jet case and then completely turned into damping except the case when the jet velocity is perpendicular to the wave vector in which case the instability always grows. Thus, the introduction of the jet in the AQGP, in general, might to faster isotropization for the special case when the wave vector is parallel to the anisotropy axis.

  14. Charged Polymer-Coated Separators by Atmospheric Plasma-Induced Grafting for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mina; Kim, Dong-Won; Kim, Yeong-Cheol

    2016-10-05

    A simple and fast method of atmospheric plasma-induced grafting was applied over a polyethylene membrane to enhance its performance as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The process of grafting has formed a thin, durable, and uniform layer on the surface of the porous membrane. The charges of grafted polymers affected the performance of batteries in many ways besides the change of hydrophilicity. Negative charges in polymers improve the capacity retention of batteries and the uniformity of the SEI layer. On the other hand, the electrostatic attraction between different charges contributed to small increases of thermal stability and mechanical strength of separators. Polyampholyte was grafted by using the mixtures of monomers, and the composition of the grafted layer was optimized. The formation of stable uniform SEI layers and the marked improvement in capacity retention were observed in the full cell tests of the lithium battery with the polyampholyte-grafted separators when the polyampholyte has a negative net charge.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  16. Degradation of polyethylene induced by plasma in oxidizing atmospheres; Degradacion de polietileno inducido por plasma en atmosferas oxidantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, E.; Olayo, M.G.; Cruz, G.J. [Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, Av. Tollocan y Colon, 50000 Toluca (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The garbage of polyethylene is not easily degradable in normal environmental conditions . The indiscriminate use of this polymer and the enormous quantity of garbage which is generated carries a damage to the environment due to its long life as waste. The objective of this work is to study the conditions in which can be carried out the degradation of polyethylene. A form of accelerating the degradation is exposing it to plasma with reactive atmospheres. In this work a study of surface modification of polyethylene by plasmas with discharges of direct current of oxygen and nitrogen is presented. (Author)

  17. Evaluation of plasma H2S levels and H2S synthesis in streptozotocin induced Type-2 diabetes-an experimental study based on Swietenia macrophylla seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moumita Dutta

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: Although considering a small sample size, it can conclude that the fasting blood glucose levels are inversely related to plasma H2S levels as well as H2S synthesis activity in plasma and the extract of S. macrophylla is associated with increased plasma H2S levels with effective lowering of blood glucose in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

  18. Acute application of antioxidants protects against hyperoxia-induced reduction of plasma nitrite concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucinovic, Zoran; Duplancic, Darko; Seselja-Perisin, Ana; Kukoc-Modun, Lea; Gunjaca, Grgo; Radman, Maja; Vukovic, Jonatan; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Poljak, Kolja; Modun, Darko

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of acute intake of antioxidants on hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress, reduction of plasma nitrite and change in arterial stiffness. Twelve healthy males randomly consumed either placebo or an oral antioxidant cocktail (vitamin C, 1000 mg; vitamin E, 600 IU; alpha-lipoic acid, 600 mg). Every therapy was consumed once, a week apart, in a cross-over design, 30 min before the experiment. The volunteers breathed 100% normobaric oxygen between 30th and 60th min of 1-h study protocol. Plasma levels of nitrite, lipid peroxides (LOOH) and vitamin C, arterial stiffness (indicated by augmentation index, AIx) and arterial oxygen (Ptc O2 ) pressure were measured before and after hyperoxia. Exposure to oxygen caused a similar increase of Ptc O2 in both placebo and antioxidants groups, confirming comparable exposure to hyperoxia (438 ± 100 versus 455 ± 83 mm Hg). Vitamin C was increased in the antioxidants group confirming successful application of antioxidants (69 ± 14 versus 57 ± 15 μm). Hyperoxia resulted in increased AIx and LOOH and decreased nitrite in placebo (-32 ± 11 versus -47 ± 13%, 72 ± 7 versus 62 ± 6 μm H2 O2 and 758 ± 184 versus 920 ± 191 nm, respectively), but not in the antioxidants group (-42 ± 13 versus -50 ± 13%, 64 ± 9 versus 61 ± 8 μm H2 O2 and 847 ± 156 versus 936 ± 201 nm, respectively). The acute intake of selected antioxidants was effective in preserving bioavailabity of ˙NO and vascular function, against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The role of viscosity contrast on plume structure in laboratory modeling of mantle convection

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Vivek N; Arakeri, Jaywant H

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted laboratory experiments to model important aspects of plumes in mantle convection. We focus on the role of the viscosity ratio U (between the ambient fluid and the plume fluid) in determining the plume structure and dynamics. In our experiments, we are able to capture geophysical convection regimes relevant to mantle convection both for hot spots (when U > 1) and plate-subduction (when U < 1) regimes. The planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is used for flow visualization and characterizing the plume structures. The convection is driven by compositional buoyancy generated by the perfusion of lighter fluid across a permeable mesh and the viscosity ratio U is systematically varied over a range from 1/300 to 2500. The planform, near the bottom boundary for U=1, exhibits a well-known dendritic line plume structure. As the value of U is increased, a progressive morphological transition is observed from the dendritic-plume structure to discrete spherical plumes, accompanied with th...

  20. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  1. Variability and Composition of Io's Pele Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, K. L.; Spencer, J.; Yelle, R.

    2004-11-01

    The Pele plume is one of the largest and most dynamic of the plumes on Io. While sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas was always assumed to be a constituent of this plume, spectral observations obtained in 1999 were the first to positively identify elemental sulfur (S2) (Spencer et al. 2000) within the Pele plume. The S2/SO2 ratio derived from this observation provided a critical component necessary for the constraint of the magma chemistry and vent conditions of the Pele plume (Zolotov and Fegley 1998). But, because the Pele plume has long been known to be variable in its eruptive behavior, it is not likely that the vent conditions are invariant. Consequently, additional observations were needed to constrain the extent of the variability of the plume's composition and gas abundances. To this end, in February 2003, March 2003 and January 2004 we obtained spectra of Pele with Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in transit of Jupiter, using the 0.1 arcsec slit, for the wavelength region extending from 2100-3100 Å. Contemporaneous with the spectral data we also obtained UV and visible-wavelength images of the plume in reflected sunlight with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) prior to Jupiter transit, in order to constrain plume dust abundance. The newly acquired STIS data show both the S2 and SO2 absorption signatures, and provide concrete evidence of temporal variability in the abundance of these gases. Likewise, the degree of dust scattering recorded in the ACS data varied as a function of the date of observation. We will present preliminary constraints on the composition and variability of the gas abundances of the Pele plume as recorded within the STIS data. We will also give a brief overview of the variability of the plume dust signatures relative to the gas signatures as a function of time.

  2. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  3. Changes in red blood cell osmotic fragility induced by total plasma and plasma fractions obtained from rats bearing progressive and regressive variants of the Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcanti T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two variants (A and B of the widely employed Walker 256 rat tumor cells are known. When inoculated sc, the A variant produces solid, invasive, highly metastasizing tumors that cause severe systemic effects and death. We have obtained a regressive variant (AR whose sc growth is slower, resulting in 70-80% regression followed by development of immunity against A and AR variants. Simultaneously with the beginning of tumor regression, a temporary anemia developed (~8 days duration, accompanied by marked splenomegaly (~300% and changes in red blood cell osmotic fragility, with mean corpuscular fragility increasing from 4.1 to 6.5 g/l NaCl. The possibility was raised that plasma factors associated with the immune response induced these changes. In the present study, we identify and compare the osmotic fragility increasing activity of plasma fractions obtained from A and AR tumor bearers at different stages of tumor development. The results showed that by day 4 compounds precipitating in 60% (NH42SO4 and able to increase red blood cell osmotic fragility appeared in the plasma of A and AR tumor bearers. Later, these compounds disappeared from the plasma of A tumor bearers but slightly increased in the plasma of AR tumor bearers. Furthermore, by day 10, compounds precipitating between 60 and 80% (NH42SO4 and with similar effects appeared only in plasma of AR tumor bearers. The salt solubility, production kinetics and hemolytic activity of these compounds resemble those of the immunoglobulins. This, together with their preferential increase in rats bearing the AR variant, suggest their association with an immune response against this tumor.

  4. Physics and Chemistry of MW Laser-induced Discharge in Gas Flows and Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    can be quasi-stationary coaxial plasma accelerators (MPC). This type of accelerators generates plasma jets of different gases (H2, He, N2, Ar) with...gas is ionizing and accelerating in discharge processing. For this regime the plasma gun generates the plasma jets of different gases3 (H2, He, N2...spectrometers. Spectrometers 1 and 2 are used for measuring of time behavior of single spectral lines, emitting in the focus area of plasma gun . Usually

  5. Proceedings of plumes, plates and mineralisation symposium: an introduction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hatton, CJ

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available of plume-theory. Mechanisms of magma formation are identified and plume positions and distances to their surface expression considered. Mantle plumes are considered as a heat and fluid source for the Witwatersrand gold deposits....

  6. The Characteristic Research of ・OH Induced by Water on an Argon Plasma Jet%氩气等离子体射流诱导水生成OH自由基的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘坤; 廖华; 郑培超; 王琛颖; 刘红弟; Dobrynin Danil

    2015-01-01

    ・OH plays a crucial role in many fields ,having aroused wide public concern in the world .Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet ,which can be achieved by portable device due to working without the vacuum environment ,has the advantages of high concentration of reactive species ,high electron temperature and low gas temperature .It has become an important research topic in the field of gas discharge with a strong prospect .Especially ,how to induce plasma jet to produce ・OH has become a new hotpot in the field of low‐temperature plasma .It has been reported that mass ・OH can be induced successfully when water vapor is added to the working gas ,but it will be unstable when the concentrate of water reaches a certain degree .Thus ,a device of argon plasma jet with a Ring‐to‐Ring Electrode Configuration has been designed to interact with water in the surrounding air to generate ・OH under atmospheric pressure .In order to increase the production of ・OH ,ultrasonic atomizing device is intro‐duced to promote water concentration around the plasma plume .The generating rule of OH (A2Σ+ ) induced by water has been extensively studied under different voltages and flow rate .・OH output induced by the plasma has been tested by emission spec‐trometry ,and at the meanwhile ,Ar atomic spectral lines at 810.41 and 811.48 nm are also recorded in order to calculate the electron temperature in argon plasma plume .The results show that the water surrounding the plasma plume can be induced to produce ・OH ,and OH(A2Σ+ ) output increases with the electrode voltage rising from 20 to 28 kV .When the flow rate increa‐ses from 100 to 200 L・h-1 ,the OH(A2Σ+ ) output increases ,but from 200 to 600 L・h-1 ,it decreases .The production rules of OH(A2Σ+ ) is the same as that of electron temperature .Therefore ,the presumption is proved that ・OH output mainly af‐fected by electron temperature .%・OH在众多领域中具有非常重要的作用,在国际上引起

  7. Observation of High-speed Outflow on Plume-like Structures of the Quiet Sun and Coronal Holes with SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Habbal, Shadia Rifal; He, Jiansen

    2011-01-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s-1 at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun regions. Outflows are also visible in the "interplume" regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the quiet Sun and coronal holes, and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mas...

  8. Fabrication of internal diffraction gratings in planar fluoride glass using low-density plasma formation induced by a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung-Hak [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)], E-mail: shcho@kimm.re.kr; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Goo [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Ryul [Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jong Wook [Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2008-12-30

    The fabrication of internal diffraction gratings with photo-induced refractive index modification in planar fluoride plates was demonstrated using low-density plasma formation excited by a high-intensity femtosecond (130 fs) Ti:sapphire laser ({lambda}{sub p} = 790 nm). The refractive index modifications with diameters ranging from 350 nm to 5 {mu}m were photoinduced after plasma formation occurred upon irradiation with peak intensities of more than 1 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The graded refractive index profile was fabricated to be a symmetric around from the center of the point at which low-density plasma occurred. The maximum refractive index change ({delta}n) was estimated to be 1.3 x 10{sup -2}. The low-density plasma formation (n{sub c} < 1.79 x 10{sup 27} m{sup -3}]) causes the increase of the refractive index modification with fluoride glass.

  9. Plasma cytokine concentration changes induced by the antitumor agents dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate (DCP) and related calcium pterins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moheno, Phillip; Pfleiderer, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of plasma cytokine concentration changes determined that oral dosing with the antitumor agent (1:4 mol:mol) calcium pterin (CaPterin) increased plasma IL-10, decreased plasma IL-6, and decreased plasma IFN-gamma concentrations in nude mice with MDA-MB-231 xenograph tumors [Moheno, P., Pfleiderer, W., Dipasquale, A.G., Rheingold, A.L., Fuchs, D., 2008. Cytokine and IDO metabolite changes effected by calcium pterin during inhibition of MDA-MB-231 xenograph tumors in nude mice. Int. J. Pharm. 355, 238-248]. A further analysis, reported here, of plasma cytokine concentration changes in nude mice with the same tumor xenographs treated with dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate (DCP), (1:2 mol:mol) calcium pterin, and CaCl(2).2H(2)O has been carried out. The measured cytokines included: IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. The major preliminary findings from the analyses of these data are that (1) the overall relative tumor volumes for the treatments correlated significantly with a full study antitumor plasma cytokine pattern (fsAPCP), a composite measure consisting of decreased plasma IL-6 and increased IL-4 concentrations, and (2) DCP induces a significant threshold antitumor response strongly correlated to a derived DCP antitumor plasma cytokine pattern (DCP/APCP) consisting of plasma IL-12, IL-6, and IL-4 concentration changes. This DCP/APCP composite measure identifies plasma IL-12 concentration increases, plasma IL-6 concentration decreases, and plasma IL-4 concentration increases correlated to relative tumor volume decreases caused by DCP dosing. The finding that the novel calcium pterins and CaCl(2).2H(2)O treatments decrease plasma IL-6 concentrations corroborates the previous finding that CaPterin dosing decreases plasma IL-6 concentrations in this mouse/tumor system [Moheno, P., Pfleiderer, W., Dipasquale, A.G., Rheingold, A.L., Fuchs, D., 2008. Cytokine and IDO metabolite changes effected by calcium pterin during inhibition

  10. Surface-mediated molecular events in material-induced blood-plasma coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kaushik

    Coagulation and thrombosis persist as major impediments associated with the use of blood-contacting medical devices. We are investigating the molecular mechanism underlying material-induced blood-plasma coagulation focusing on the role of the surface as a step towards prospective development of improved hemocompatible biomaterials. A classic observation in hematology is that blood/blood-plasma in contact with clean glass surface clots faster than when in contact with many plastic surfaces. The traditional biochemical theory explaining the underlying molecular mechanism suggests that hydrophilic surfaces, like that of glass, are specific activators of the coagulation cascade because of the negatively-charged groups on the surface. Hydrophobic surfaces are poor procoagulants or essentially "benign" because they lack anionic groups. Further, these negatively-charged surfaces are believed to not only activate blood factor XII (FXII), the key protein in contact activation, but also play a cofactor role in the amplification and propagation reactions that ultimately lead to clot formation. In sharp contrast to the traditional theory, our investigations indicate a need for a paradigm shift in the proposed sequence of contact activation events to incorporate the role of protein adsorption at the material surfaces. These studies have lead to the central hypothesis for this work proposing that protein adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces attenuates the contact activation reactions so that poorly-adsorbent hydrophilic surfaces appear to be stronger procoagulants relative to hydrophobic surfaces. Our preliminary studies measuring the plasma coagulation response of activated FXII (FXIIa) on different model surfaces suggested that the material did not play a cofactor role in the processing of this enzyme dose through the coagulation pathway. Therefore, we focused our efforts on studying the mechanism of initial production of enzyme at the procoagulant surface. Calculations for the

  11. Preliminary design of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G; Martin, M Z; Martin, R; Biewer, T M

    2014-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for measuring surface matter composition. LIBS is performed by focusing laser radiation onto a target surface, ablating the surface, forming a plasma, and analyzing the light produced. LIBS surface analysis is a possible diagnostic for characterizing plasma-facing materials in ITER. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has enabled the initial installation of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic on the prototype Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), which strives to mimic the conditions found at the surface of the ITER divertor. This paper will discuss the LIBS implementation on Proto-MPEX, preliminary design of the fiber optic LIBS collection probe, and the expected results.

  12. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Hirofumi, E-mail: kurita@ens.tut.ac.jp, E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira, E-mail: kurita@ens.tut.ac.jp, E-mail: mizuno@ens.tut.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-thermal plasma.

  13. Use of molecular beacons for the rapid analysis of DNA damage induced by exposure to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Miyachika, Saki; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-12-01

    A rapid method for evaluating the damage caused to DNA molecules upon exposure to plasma is demonstrated. Here, we propose the use of a molecular beacon for rapid detection of DNA strand breaks induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) irradiation. Scission of the molecular beacon by APPJ irradiation leads to separation of the fluorophore-quencher pair, resulting in an increase in fluorescence that directly correlates with the DNA strand breaks. The results show that the increase in fluorescence intensity is proportional to the exposure time and the rate of fluorescence increase is proportional to the discharge power. This simple and rapid method allows the estimation of DNA damage induced by exposure to a non-th