WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma physics space

  1. Space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  2. Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. James L. Horwitz and R. Hugh Comfort's studies with the high altitude TIDE data have been progressing well. We concluded a study on the relationship of polar cap ion properties observed by TIDE near apogee with solar wind and IMF conditions. We found that in general H+ did not correlate as well as O+ with solar wind and IMF parameters. O+ density correlated(sub IMF), and Kp. At lower solar wind speeds, O+ density decreased with increasing latitude, but this trend was not observed at higher solar wind speeds. By comparing these results with results from other studies of O+ in different parts of the magnetosphere, we concluded that O+ ions often leave the ionosphere near the foot point of the cusp/cleft region, pass through the high-altitude polar cap lobes, and eventually arrive in the plasma sheet. We found that H+ outflows are a persistent feature of the polar cap and are not as dependent on the geophysical conditions; even classical polar wind models show H+ ions readily escaping owing to their low mass. Minor correlations with solar wind drivers were found; specifically, H+ density correlated best with IMF By, V(sub sw)B(sub IMF), and ESW(sub sw).

  3. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  4. Space plasma physics: I - Stationary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    The physics of stationary processes in space plasmas is examined theoretically in an introduction intended for graduate students. The approach involves the extensive use of numerical simulations. Chapters are devoted to fundamental principles, small-amplitude waves, and the stationary solar plasma system; typical measurement data and simulation results are presented graphically.

  5. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  6. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  7. Space plasma physics results from Spacelab 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Spacelab 1 payload carried several instrument systems which together investigated a number of space plasma phenomena. These experiments used the Space Shuttle Orbiter as a platform for making controlled particle-beam, plasma and neutral gas inputs to the ionosphere and magnetosphere and for observing the outputs produced. Spacelab 1 space-plasma investigations included the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams (PICPAB), Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) and the Low Energy Electron Spectrometer and Magnetometer. Among the major phenomena investigated both singly and jointly by these experiments are vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma and wave-particle interactions, anomalous ionization phenomena produced by neutral-gas and plasma injections and several phenomena induced by modulated particle beam injections.

  8. Computerized tomographic imaging for space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Coplan, Michael A.; Moore, John H.; Berenstein, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of plasma electron velocity distribution functions as a problem in imaging and image reconstruction is considered. A model instrument that measures the integral of the distribution function along lines in velocity space is presented. This allows the use of the powerful mathematical and numerical methods that have recently been so successful in other areas of imaging. It is found that this approach leads to classes of instruments that are qualitatively different from contemporary designs. An investigation of different methods of reconstruction of the distribution function from integral measurements reveals that the mathematical tools appropriate to one particular imaging problem may be very different from those required to deal with another.

  9. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Contributions to Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-l970's, the Space Plasma Physics Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has contributed critical instrumentation to numerous satellite and sounding rocket missions exploring the plasmas of near-Earth space. This talk will review major discoveries in Earth's ionosphere, plasmasphere, and magnetosphere directly attributable to the researchers of the Space Plasma Physics Group and the significance of these discoveries to the field of plasma physics.

  10. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  11. Plasma Physics of the Subauroral Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-20

    observations near the magnetic equator and in the ionosphere, we specified their features and space weather effects. Near substorm onsets, highly...SAID events As the fast timescale is characteristic of propagation of substorm injection fronts, we focus on the observations near substorm onsets...magnetosphere data, respectively. The main initial tusk is to identify events near the magnetic equator following the onsets of substorms and Approved for

  12. The role of magnetohydrodynamics in heliospheric space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, Murray; Smith, Zdenka Kopal; Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a fairly recent extension of the field of fluid mechanics. While much remains to be done, it has successfully been applied to the contemporary field of heliospheric space plasma research to evaluate the 'macroscopic picture' of some vital topics via the use of conducting fluid equations and numerical modeling and simulations. Some representative examples from solar and interplanetary physics are described to demonstrate that the continuum approach to global problems (while keeping in mind the assumptions and limitations therein) can be very successful in providing insight and large scale interpretations of otherwise intractable problems in space physics.

  13. Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava [University New Hampshire- Durham

    2012-02-16

    Recent developments in experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection hold promise for providing solutions to outstanding problems in laboratory and space plasma physics. Examples include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth’s Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recently, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density plasmas. In each of these examples, a common and long-standing challenge has been to explain why fast reconnection proceeds rapidly from a relatively quiescent state. In this talk, we demonstrate the advantages of viewing these problems and their solutions from a common perspective. We focus on some recent, surprising discoveries regarding the role of secondary plasmoid instabilities of thin current sheets. Nonlinearly, these instabilities lead to fast reconnection rates that are very weakly dependent on the Lundquist number of the plasma.

  14. Plasma physics and the 2013-2022 decadal survey in solar and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. National Academies established in 2011 a steering committee to develop a comprehensive strategy for solar and space physics research. This updated and extended the first (2003) solar and space physics decadal survey. The latest decadal study implemented a 2008 Congressional directive to NASA for the fields of solar and space physics, but also addressed research in other federal agencies. The new survey broadly canvassed the fields of research to determine the current state of the discipline, identified the most important open scientific questions, and proposed the measurements and means to obtain them so as to advance the state of knowledge during the years 2013-2022. Research in this field has sought to understand: dynamical behaviour of the Sun and its heliosphere; properties of the space environments of the Earth and other solar system bodies; multiscale interaction between solar system plasmas and the interstellar medium; and energy transport throughout the solar system and its impact on the Earth and other solar system bodies. Research in solar and space plasma processes using observation, theory, laboratory studies, and numerical models has offered the prospect of understanding this interconnected system well enough to develop a predictive capability for operational support of civil and military space systems. We here describe the recommendations and strategic plans laid out in the 2013-2022 decadal survey as they relate to measurement capabilities and plasma physical research. We assess progress to date. We also identify further steps to achieve the Survey goals with an emphasis on plasma physical aspects of the program.

  15. Space plasma physics at the Applied Physics Laboratory over the past half-century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potemra, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of space-plasma experiments conducted at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) at Johns Hopkins University including observational campaigns and the instrumentation developed. Specific space-plasma experiments discussed include the study of the radiation environment in the Van Allen radiation belt with solid-state proton detectors. Also described are the 5E-1 satellites which acquired particle and magnetic-field data from earth orbit. The Triad satellite and its magnetometer system were developed for high-resolution studies of the earth's magnetic field, and APL contributions to NASA's Interplanetary Monitoring Platforms are listed. The review mentions the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Atmosphere Explorer mission, and the Active Magnetic Particle Tracer Explorers mission. Other recent programs reviewed include a high-latitude satellite, contributions to the Voyager mission, and radar studies of space plasmas.

  16. Overview of Space Station attached payloads in the areas of solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. T.; Kropp, J.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines the currently planned utilization of the Space Station to perform investigations in solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma physics. The investigations and instrumentation planned for the Solar Terrestrial Observatory (STO) and its associated Space Station accommodation requirements are discussed as well as the planned placement of the STO instruments and typical operational scenarios. In the area of plasma physics, some preliminary plans for scientific investigations and for the accommodation of a plasma physics facility attached to the Space Station are outlined. These preliminary experiment concepts use the space environment around the Space Station as an unconfined plasma laboratory. In solar physics, the initial instrument complement and associated accommodation requirements of the Advanced Solar Observatory are described. The planned evolutionary development of this observatory is outlined, making use of the Space Station capabilities for servicing and instrument reconfiguration.

  17. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  18. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  19. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  20. The expansion of a plasma into a vacuum - Basic phenomena and processes and applications to space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1983-01-01

    In this review attention is called to basic phenomena and physical processes involved in the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, or the expansion of a plasma into a more tenuous plasma, in particular the fact that upon the expansion, ions are accelerated and reach energies well above their thermal energy. Also, in the process of the expansion a rarefaction wave propagates into the ambient plasma, an ion front moves into the expansion volume, and discontinuities in plasma parameters occur. The physical processes which cause the above phenomena are discussed, and their possible application is suggested for the case of the distribution of ions and electrons (hence plasma potential and electric fields) in the wake region behind artificial and natural obstacles moving supersonically in a rarefied space plasma. To illustrate this, some in situ results are reexamined. Directions for future work in this area via the utilization of the Space Shuttle and laboratory work are also mentioned.

  1. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  2. Dynamics of magnetically trapped particles foundations of the physics of radiation belts and space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    This book is a new edition of Roederer’s classic Dynamics of Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, updated and considerably expanded. The main objective is to describe the dynamic properties of magnetically trapped particles in planetary radiation belts and plasmas and explain the physical processes involved from the theoretical point of view. The approach is to examine in detail the orbital and adiabatic motion of individual particles in typical configurations of magnetic and electric fields in the magnetosphere and, from there, derive basic features of the particles’ collective “macroscopic” behavior in general planetary environments. Emphasis is not on the “what” but on the “why” of particle phenomena in near-earth space, providing a solid and clear understanding of the principal basic physical mechanisms and dynamic processes involved. The book will also serve as an introduction to general space plasma physics, with abundant basic examples to illustrate and explain the physical origin of diff...

  3. Recent advances in numerical simulation of space-plasma-physics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulations have become an increasingly popular, important and insightful tool for studying space plasmas. This review describes MHD and particle simulations, both of which treat the plasma and the electromagnetic field in which it moves in a self consistent fashion but on drastically different spatial and temporal scales. The complementary roles of simulation, observations and theory are stressed. Several examples of simulations being carried out in the area of magnetospheric plasma physics are described to illustrate the power, potential and limitations of the approach.

  4. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  5. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  6. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  7. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  8. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  9. Spacelab 1 - Scientific objectives, life sciences, space plasma physics, astronomy and solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the accomplishments of the Spacelab 1 complement to the Shuttle mission of Nov. 28, 1983, is presented. Consideration is given to scientific results in the fields of life sciences, materials sciences, atmospheric physics, and earth observations. A table is given which lists the scientific objectives and the percentage of objectives accomplished in each field.

  10. Physical simulation of the long-term dynamic action of a plasma beam on a space debris object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, Valentin A.; Gorev, Nikolai. B.; Tokmak, Nikolai A.; Kochubei, Galina S.

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed for physical (laboratory) simulation of the long-term dynamic action of plasma beam high-energy ions on a space debris object with the aim of removing it to a lower orbit followed by its burning in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodology is based on the use of a criterion for the equivalence of two plasma beam exposure regimes (in the Earth' ionosphere and in laboratory conditions) and an accelerated test procedure in what concerns space debris object material sputtering and space debris object erosion by a plasma beam in the Earth's ionosphere. The space debris coating material (blanket thermal insulation) sputtering yield and normal and tangential momentum transfer coefficients are determined experimentally as a function of the ion energy and the ion beam incidence angle.

  11. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  12. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  13. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  14. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  15. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolobov, Vladimir [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA and The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Arslanbekov, Robert [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Frolova, Anna [Computing Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-09

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  16. Reviews of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    "Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24," edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence

  17. Reviews of plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafranov, Vitalii Dmitrievich (ed.); Bakunin, Oleg G. (comps.) [Rossijskij Nauchnyj Tsentr ' ' Kurchatovskij Inst.' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Fusion Inst.; Rozhansky, V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24, edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence (orig.)

  18. Technical issues in the conduct of large space platform experiments in plasma physics and geoplasma sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    Large, permanently-manned space platforms can provide exciting opportunities for discoveries in basic plasma and geoplasma sciences. The potential for these discoveries will depend very critically on the properties of the platform, its subsystems, and their abilities to fulfill a spectrum of scientific requirements. With this in mind, the planning of space station research initiatives and the development of attendant platform engineering should allow for the identification of critical science and technology issues that must be clarified far in advance of space station program implementation. An attempt is made to contribute to that process, with a perspective that looks to the development of the space station as a permanently-manned Spaceborne Ionospheric Weather Station. The development of this concept requires a synergism of science and technology which leads to several critical design issues. To explore the identification of these issues, the development of the concept of an Ionospheric Weather Station will necessarily touch upon a number of diverse areas. These areas are discussed.

  19. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of phase space zonal structures and energetic particle physics in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zonca, Fulvio; Briguglio, Sergio; Fogaccia, Giuliana; Vlad, Gregorio; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A general theoretical framework for investigating nonlinear dynamics of phase space zonal structures is presented in this work. It is then, more specifically, applied to the limit where the nonlinear evolution time scale is smaller or comparable to the wave-particle trapping period. In this limit, both theoretical and numerical simulation studies show that non-adiabatic frequency chirping and phase locking could lead to secular resonant particle transport on meso- or macro-scales. The interplay between mode structures and resonant particles then provides the crucial ingredient to properly understand and analyze the nonlinear dynamics of Alfv\\'en wave instabilities excited by non-perturbative energetic particles in burning fusion plasmas. Analogies with autoresonance in nonlinear dynamics and with superradiance in free electron lasers are also briefly discussed.

  1. AMITIS: A 3D GPU-Based Hybrid-PIC Model for Space and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Shahab; Poppe, Andrew R.; Delory, Gregory T.; Farrell, William M.

    2017-05-01

    We have developed, for the first time, an advanced modeling infrastructure in space simulations (AMITIS) with an embedded three-dimensional self-consistent grid-based hybrid model of plasma (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) that runs entirely on graphics processing units (GPUs). The model uses NVIDIA GPUs and their associated parallel computing platform, CUDA, developed for general purpose processing on GPUs. The model uses a single CPU-GPU pair, where the CPU transfers data between the system and GPU memory, executes CUDA kernels, and writes simulation outputs on the disk. All computations, including moving particles, calculating macroscopic properties of particles on a grid, and solving hybrid model equations are processed on a single GPU. We explain various computing kernels within AMITIS and compare their performance with an already existing well-tested hybrid model of plasma that runs in parallel using multi-CPU platforms. We show that AMITIS runs ∼10 times faster than the parallel CPU-based hybrid model. We also introduce an implicit solver for computation of Faraday’s Equation, resulting in an explicit-implicit scheme for the hybrid model equation. We show that the proposed scheme is stable and accurate. We examine the AMITIS energy conservation and show that the energy is conserved with an error < 0.2% after 500,000 timesteps, even when a very low number of particles per cell is used.

  2. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  3. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  5. Solar Physics - Plasma Physics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Sturrock, P. A.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings of a conference whose purpose was to explore plasma physics problems which arise in the study of solar physics is provided. Sessions were concerned with specific questions including the following: (1) whether the solar plasma is thermal or non-themal; (2) what spectroscopic data is required; (3) what types of magnetic field structures exist; (4) whether magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (5) whether resistive or non-magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (6) what mechanisms of particle acceleration have been proposed; and (7) what information is available concerning shock waves. Very few questions were answered categorically but, for each question, there was discussion concerning the observational evidence, theoretical analyses, and existing or potential laboratory and numerical experiments.

  6. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : Space and astrophysical plasmas: Pervasive problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Uberoi

    2000-11-01

    The observations and measurements given by Earth orbiting satellites, deep space probes, sub-orbital systems and orbiting astronomical observatories point out that there are important physical processes which are responsible for a wide variety of phenomena in solar-terrestrial, solar-system and astrophysical plasmas. In this review these topics are exemplified both from an observational and a theoretical point of view.

  7. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  8. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  9. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  10. Theoretical plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. H.; Vahala, G. M.

    1992-05-01

    Work during the past year in the areas of classical and anomalous transport, three-dimensional equilibria, divertor physics, and diagnostic techniques using waves is reported. Although much work was done on classical transport, the validity of the guiding-center drift equations, which are the basis of much of the theory, has received little attention. The limitations of the drift approximation are being studied. Work on three-dimensional equilibria, which shows that quasi-helical symmetry is broken in third order in the inverse aspect ratio, on the modification of the current profile due to tearing modes was completed. This work is relevant to the maintenance of a steady-state tokamak by the bootstrap current. Divertor physics is a primary area that required development for ITER. One of the few methods by which the physics of the divertor can be modified or controlled is magnetic perturbations. The effect of magnetic perturbations on the divertor scrapeoff layer in collaboration with Hampton University is being studied. The evolution of magnetic field embedded in a moving plasma is a dynamics problem of potential importance. Renormalization techniques gave important insights first in the theory of phase transitions. The applications of these techniques has extended to many areas of physics, including turbulence in fluids and plasmas. Essentially no diagnostics for magnetic fluctuations inside a fusion-grade plasma exist. A collaborative program with Old Dominion University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to develop such a diagnostic based on the conversion of electromagnetic waves from the ordinary to the extraordinary mode is underway.

  11. Nonthermal plasma chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meichsner, Jurgen; Schneider, Ralf; Wagner, Hans-Erich

    2013-01-01

    In addition to introducing the basics of plasma physics, Nonthermal Plasma Chemistry and Physics is a comprehensive presentation of recent developments in the rapidly growing field of nonthermal plasma chemistry. The book offers a detailed discussion of the fundamentals of plasma chemical reactions and modeling, nonthermal plasma sources, relevant diagnostic techniques, and selected applications.Elucidating interconnections and trends, the book focuses on basic principles and illustrations across a broad field of applications. Expert contributors address environmental aspects of plasma chemist

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  13. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  14. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  15. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  16. The Framework of Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Steven

    There have been relatively few good textbooks on plasma physics. Most become simple reference books that might be titled, “Plasma Physics Recipes.” Despite their utility such books do not make good textbooks. For teaching, one needs a book that shows how the basic results and models are part of a coherent whole. Richard Hazeltine and Francois Waelbroeck have written such a textbook: The Framework of Plasma PhysicsAn this book, plasma physics is developed carefully and logically from basic physics principles. The book is not, however, overly formal; physical arguments are used to reduce mathematical complexity.

  17. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  18. Nonextensivity, Complexity and Nonlinearity in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, G. P.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental time series, extracted from many and different space plasma systems corresponding to, solar wind, magnetospheric and other space plasma systems reveal common dynamical, geometrical, or statistical characteristics. Such characteristics are the low dimensionality, the typical intermittent turbulence multifractality, the temporal or spatial multiscale correlations and power laws scale invariance, non Gaoussianity and others. This universal aspect of experimental time series profiles was understood in the past as the chaos or SOC universality. However, after two or three decades of theoretical development in understanding of the nonlinearity and complexity, we can give a more compact theoretical description of the underline universal physical processes that produce the experimental time series complexity. Finally, in this study, we present and explain the modern complex set of theoretical concepts from the point of view of physics as the unification theory of nonlinear theory of non-equilibrium plasma systems as well as the presupposed theoretical framework of time series analysis of space plasma charachteristics.

  19. Space Plasma Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Herraiz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper summarizes the activities carried out by WP 3.1 of WG 3 of COST 296 action. The Work Package

    deals mostly with medium and large ionospheric structures that impacts on GNSS signals. In the research done

    by this European team, particular attention was given to the ionosphere/space weather monitoring, to the analysis

    of the variability of the ionospheric plasma during quiet and disturbed conditions and to the characterization

    of the behavior of low latitudes ionospheric depletions or bubbles and the spatial and temporal gradients of total electron contet.


  20. Cluster and SOHO - A joint endeavor by ESA and NASA to address problems in solar, heliospheric, and space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rudolf; Domingo, Vicente; Shawhan, Stanley D.; Bohlin, David

    1988-01-01

    The NASA/ESA Solar-Terrestrial Science Program, which consists of the four-spacecraft cluster mission and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), is examined. It is expected that the SOHO spacecraft will be launched in 1995 to study solar interior structure and the physical processes associated with the solar corona. The SOHO design, operation, data, and ground segment are discussed. The Cluster mission is designed to study small-scale structures in the earth's plasma environment. The Soviet Union is expected to contribute two additional spacecraft, which will be similar to Cluster in instrumentation and design. The capabilities, mission strategy, spacecraft design, payload, and ground segment of Cluster are discussed.

  1. Nongyrotropic particle distributions in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Motschmann

    Full Text Available In nonstationary, strong inhomogeneous or open plasmas particle orbits are rather complicated. If the nonstationary time scale is smaller than the gyration period, if the inhomogeneity scale is smaller than the gyration radius, i.e. at magnetic plasma boundaries, or if the plasma has sources and sinks in phase space, then nongyrotropic distribution functions occur. The stability of such plasma configurations is studied in the framework of linear dispersion theory. In an open plasma nongyrotropy drives unstable waves parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field, whereas in the gyrotropic limit the plasma is stable. In nonstationary plasmas nongyrotropy drives perpendicular unstable waves only. Temporal modulation couples a seed mode with its side lobes and thus it renders unstable wave growth more difficult. As an example of an inhomogeneous plasma a magnetic halfspace is discussed. In a layer with thickness of the thermal proton gyroradius a nongyrotropic distribution is formed which may excite unstable parallel and perpendicular propagating waves.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence · Ionosphere (plasma waves and instabilities · Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities

  2. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  3. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  4. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  5. Micro- to macroscale perspectives on space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is the most accessible of natural collisionless plasma environments; an astrophysical plasma 'laboratory'. Magnetospheric physics has been in an exploration phase since its origin 35 years ago but new coordinated, multipoint observations, theory, modeling, and simulations are moving this highly interdisciplinary field of plasma science into a new phase of synthesis and understanding. Plasma systems are ones in which binary collisions are relatively negligible and collective behavior beyond the microscale emerges. Most readily accessible natural plasma systems are collisional and nearest-neighbor classical interactions compete with longer-range plasma effects. Except for stars, most space plasmas are collisionless, however, and the effects of electrodynamic coupling dominate. Basic physical processes in such collisionless plasmas occur at micro-, meso-, and macroscales that are not merely reducible to each other in certain crucial ways as illustrated for the global coupling of the Earth's magnetosphere and for the nonlinear dynamics of charged particle motion in the magnetotail. Such global coupling and coherence makes the geospace environment, the domain of solar-terrestrial science, the most highly coupled of all physical geospheres.

  6. A Science Strategy for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report by the Committee on Solar and Space Physics and the Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research recommends the major directions for scientific research in space physics for the coming decade. As a field of science, space physics has passed through the stage of simply looking to see what is out beyond Earth's atmosphere. It has become a 'hard' science, focusing on understanding the fundamental interactions between charged particles, electromagnetic fields, and gases in the natural laboratory consisting of the galaxy, the Sun, the heliosphere, and planetary magnetospheres, ionospheres, and upper atmospheres. The motivation for space physics research goes far beyond basic physics and intellectual curiosity, however, because long-term variations in the brightness of the Sun virtually affect the habitability of the Earth, while sudden rearrangements of magnetic fields above the solar surface can have profound effects on the delicate balance of the forces that shape our environment in space and on the human technology that is sensitive to that balance. The several subfields of space physics share the following objectives: to understand the fundamental laws or processes of nature as they apply to space plasmas and rarefied gases both on the microscale and in the larger complex systems that constitute the domain of space physics; to understand the links between changes in the Sun and the resulting effects at the Earth, with the eventual goal of predicting the significant effects on the terrestrial environment; and to continue the exploration and description of the plasmas and rarefied gases in the solar system.

  7. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  8. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  9. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  10. Physics through the 1990s: Plasmas and fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume contains recommendations for programs in, and government support of, plasma and fluid physics. Four broad areas are covered: the physics of fluids, general plasma physics, fusion, and space and astrophysical plasmas. In the first section, the accomplishments of fluid physics and a detailed review of its sub-fields, such as combustion, non-Newtonian fluids, turbulence, aerodynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are described. The general plasma physics section deals with the wide scope of the theoretical concepts involved in plasma research, and with the machines; intense beam systems, collective and laser-driven accelerators, and the associated diagnostics. The section on the fusion plasma research program examines confinement and heating systems, such as Tokamaks, magnetic mirrors, and inertial-confinement systems, and several others. Finally, theory and experiment in space and astrophysical plasma research is detailed, ranging from the laboratory to the solar system and beyond. A glossary is included.

  11. Variational Integrators in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Variational integrators are a special kind of geometric discretisation methods applicable to any system of differential equations that obeys a Lagrangian formulation. In this thesis, variational integrators are developed for several important models of plasma physics: guiding centre dynamics (particle dynamics), the Vlasov-Poisson system (kinetic theory), and ideal magnetohydrodynamics (plasma fluid theory). Special attention is given to physical conservation laws like conservation of energy and momentum. Most systems in plasma physics do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended towards nonvariational differential equations by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of integrating factors and adjoint equations. It allows us to find a Lagrangian for all ordinary and partial differential equations and systems thereof. Consequently, the applicability of variational integrators is extended to a much larger family of syst...

  12. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  13. Research in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  14. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2006-01-01

    Resulting from ongoing, international research into fusion processes, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a major step in the quest for a new energy source.The first graduate-level text to cover the details of ITER, Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics introduces various aspects and issues of recent fusion research activities through the shortest access path. The distinguished author breaks down the topic by first dealing with fusion and then concentrating on the more complex subject of plasma physics. The book begins with the basics of controlled fusion research, foll

  15. From Physical Space to Visual Image Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Zetian; LIN Hui; LIU Xianlin

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical framework of visual simulation in virtual reality is discussed. The new concept of visual image space is supposed. On the basis of visual image space, in visual perceptive sense, VR is considered as a spatial simulation. The objective of the spatial simulation is to transform physical space to visual image space.Last, the prototype system, surveying & mapping virtual Reality (SMVR),is developed, and the space simulation above is realized. By use of SMVR,the real 3D representation, 3D visual analysis, virtual plan and designs can be implemented.

  16. [Reflections on physical spaces and mental spaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Yi

    2013-08-01

    This article analyzes certain reciprocal impacts from physical spaces to mental spaces. If the epistemological construction and the spatial imagination from the subject of cogito or the social collectivities are able to influence the construction and creation of the physical spaces of that subject, then the context of that physical space may also affect the cognitive or social subject's mental cognition. This article applies the methodology of iconology from art history (E. Panofsky) and sociology (P. Bourdieu) to explore correlations between the creation of imaginative and physical spaces from the collective consciousness and mental cognition. The author uses Gilles Deleuses's opinion regarding the 17th-century Baroque style and contemporary social collective symptoms as an explanation. From these theoretical studies, the author analyzes the differences of spatial epistemology generated by Taiwan's special geological text. Finally, the author applies Michel Foucault's studies on spatial context to assess the possible application of this thesis of reciprocal impacts from mental spaces to physical spaces in a nursing context.

  17. Active probing of space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang; Silevitch, Michael B.; Villalon, Elena

    1989-09-01

    During the course of the research period our efforts were focused on the following areas: (1) An examination of stochastic acceleration mechanisms in the ionosphere; (2) A study of nonequilibrium dynamics of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system; and (3) Laboratory studies of active space experiments. Reprints include: Dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body -- Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation; Laboratory study of the electron temperature in the near wake of a conducting body; New model for auroral breakup during substorms; Substorm breakup on closed field lines; New model for substorm on sets -- The pre-breakup and triggering regimes; Model of the westward traveling surge and the generation of Pi 2 pulsations; Ionospheric electron acceleration by electromagnetic waves near regions of plasma resonances; Relativistic particle acceleration by obliquely propagating electromagnetic fields; Some consequences of intense electromagnetic wave injection into space plasmas.

  18. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    New discoveries in cosmic plasma physics are described, and their applications to solar, interstellar, galactic, and cosmological problems are discussed. The new discoveries include the existence of double layers in magnetized plasmas and in the low magnetosphere, and energy transfer by electric current in the auroral circuit. It is argued that solar flares and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction should not be interpreted in terms of magnetic merging theories, and that electric current needs to be explicitly taken account of in understanding these phenomena. The filamentary structure of cosmic plasmas may be caused by electric currents in space, and the pinch effect may have a central role to play in the evolutionary history of interstellar clouds, stars, and solar systems. Space may have a cellular structure, with the cell walls formed by thin electric current layers. Annihilation may be the source of energy for quasars and the Hubble expansion, and the big bang cosmology may well be wrong.

  19. Logic for physical space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aiello, Marco; Bezhanishvili, Guram; Bloch, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    of mathematical tools developed to represent and work with space. Here we take a special look at this evolution by considering the perspective of Logic. From the initial axiomatic efforts of Euclid, we revisit the major milestones in the logical representation of space and investigate current trends. In doing so......, we do not only consider classical logic, but we indulge ourselves with modal logics. These present themselves naturally by providing simple axiomatizations of different geometries, topologies, space-time causality, and vector spaces....

  20. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  1. Space as an open plasma laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2011-10-01

    Ionospheric heaters supplemented by ground and space based diagnostic instruments have for a long time being used to conduct plasma physics, geophysical and radio science investigations. The recently completed HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP), far exceeds the capabilities of previous ionospheric heaters and allows for new frontier research in plasma physics, geophysics and radio science. The transmitter radiates 3.6 MW of HF power in the 2.8-10.0 MHz frequency range. The beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in Effective Radiating Power (ERP) between.36-4.0 GW. The antenna can point to any direction in a cone of 30 degrees from the vertical, with a reposition time of 15 degrees in 15 microseconds resulting in super-luminous scanning speeds. The transmitter can synthesize essentially any desired waveform in linear and circular polarization. We present a number of HAARP experiments that used space as an open plasma laboratory. The experiments cover the areas of (i) Artificial ULF/ELF/VLF generation and injection in the magnetosphere (ii) Studies of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere (iii) Langmuir turbulence, parametric instabilities, electron acceleration and optical emissions (iv) Artificial ionization. Ionospheric heaters supplemented by ground and space based diagnostic instruments have for a long time being used to conduct plasma physics, geophysical and radio science investigations. The recently completed HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP), far exceeds the capabilities of previous ionospheric heaters and allows for new frontier research in plasma physics, geophysics and radio science. The transmitter radiates 3.6 MW of HF power in the 2.8-10.0 MHz frequency range. The beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in Effective Radiating Power (ERP

  2. Flux quanta, magnetic field lines, merging – some sub-microscale relations of interest in space plasma physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We clarify the notion of magnetic field lines in plasma by referring to sub-microscale (quantum mechanical particle dynamics. It is demonstrated that magnetic field lines in a field of strength B carry single magnetic flux quanta Φ0=h/e. The radius of a field line in the given magnetic field B is calculated. It is shown that such field lines can merge and annihilate only over the length ℓ of their strictly anti-parallel sections, for which case we estimate the power generated. The length ℓ becomes a function of the inclination angle θ of the two merging magnetic flux tubes (field lines. Merging is possible only in the interval 12πθ≤π. This provides a sub-microscopic basis for "component reconnection" in classical macro-scale reconnection. We also find that the magnetic diffusion coefficient in plasma appears in quanta D0m=eΦ0/me=h/me. This lets us conclude that the bulk perpendicular plasma resistivity is limited and cannot be less than η0⊥0eΦ0/me0h/me~10−9 Ohm m. This resistance is an invariant.

  3. Plasma and Field Boundaries in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnerup, B. U.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the most important and intriguing phenomena in a space plasma occur at the boundaries between regions containing plasmas of different thermodynamic and flow properties, and different magnetization. In this lecture, I will describe and discuss a few of the observed effects and their proposed interpretations, with emphasis on the earth’s magnetopause as well as on certain magnetic discontinuities and structures seen in the solar wind. Among the physical phenomena is magnetic reconnection and associated current filamentation, as well as Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and waves. A primary tool for the illustration and interpretation of local structure within and near these boundaries will be reconstruction based on various versions of the MHD equations. These new methods produce field/flow maps in two dimensions of a narrow region of space surrounding the path of an observing spacecraft as it passes through the structure.

  4. Space Weather- Physics and Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmer, Volker

    2007-01-01

    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the physics of space weather and on space weather impacts on human technology, including manned spaceflight. With contributions from a team of international experts, this comprehensive work covers all aspects of space weather physical processes, and all known aspects of space hazards from humans, both in space and on Earth. Space Weather - Physics and Effects provides the first comprehensive, scientific background of space storms caused by the sun and its impact on geospace focuses on weather issues that have become vital for the development of nationwide technological infrastructures explains magnetic storms on Earth, including the effects of EUV radiation on the atmosphere is an invaluable aid in establishing real-time weather forecasts details the threat that solar effects might have on modern telecommunication systems, including national power grid systems, aircraft and manned spaceflight.

  5. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  6. Extraordinary Matter: Visualizing Space Plasmas and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, S. B.; Bartolone, L.; Christian, E.; Thieman, J.; Eastman, T.; Lewis, E.

    2011-09-01

    Atoms and sub-atomic particles play a crucial role in the dynamics of our universe, but these particles and the space plasmas comprised of them are often overlooked in popular scientific and educational resources. Although the concepts are pertinent to a wide range of topics, even the most basic particle and plasma physics principles are generally unfamiliar to non-scientists. Educators and public communicators need assistance in explaining these concepts that cannot be easily demonstrated in the everyday world. Active visuals are a highly effective aid to understanding, but resources of this type are currently few in number and difficult to find, and most do not provide suitable context for audience comprehension. To address this need, our team is developing an online multimedia reference library of animations, visualizations, interactivities, and videos resources - Extraordinary Matter: Visualizing Space Plasmas and Particles. The site targets grades 9-14 and the equivalent in informal education and public outreach. Each ready-to-use product will be accompanied by a supporting explanation at a reading level matching the educational level of the concept. It will also have information on relevant science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational standards, activities, lesson plans, related products, links, and suggested uses. These products are intended to stand alone, making them adaptable to the widest range of uses, including scientist presentations, museum displays, educational websites and CDs, teacher professional development, and classroom use. This project is funded by a NASA Education and Public Outreach in Earth and Space Science (EPOESS) grant.

  7. Learning physical space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2002-01-01

    The article argues that cultural learning is a useful concept in analysing how neophytes learn from reactions and other forms of social designation. Through the newcomers learning process a concrete physical place takes on new cultural meaning. The specific example deals with first year students...... who have to learn that certain physical places, acts and objects are imbued with a cultural significance as the act of sitting on a chair or wearing a short dress takes on a new symbolic meaning in a cultural context where inclusion and exclusion are a constant concern. By following and analysing what...

  8. Learning physical space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2002-01-01

    The article argues that cultural learning is a useful concept in analysing how neophytes learn from reactions and other forms of social designation. Through the newcomers learning process a concrete physical place takes on new cultural meaning. The specific example deals with first year students...

  9. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    : Fundamentals of Plasma Physics, Fusion Plasmas, Plasmas in Astrophysics and Space Physics, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Complex Plasmas, High Energy Density Plasmas, Quantum Plasmas, Laser-Plasma Interaction and among others. A total of 180 delegates from 34 different countries took part in the ICPP-LAWPP-2010. Sixty delegates received economical assistance from the local organized committee, thanks to the support of the International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 Program was elaborated by the following Program Committee: Carlos Alejaldre, ITER Maria Virginia Alves, Brazil Julio Herrera, Mexico Günter Mank, IAEA George Morales, USA Padma Kant Shukla, Germany Guido Van Oost, Belgium Leopoldo Soto, Chile (Chairman) This Program Committee was formed by selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP and by selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the LAWPP. In particular, Plenary Lectures and Invited Topical Lectures were selected by the Program Committee from a list of nominated presentations by the International Advisory Committees of both ICPP and LAWPP. Also, the classification of oral and poster presentations was elaborated by the Program Committee. The congress included: 15 invited plenary talks, 33 invited topical talks, 45 oral contributions, and 160 poster contributions. A major part of the plenary and topical lectures were published in a special issue of the Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, IOP Publishing (Plasma Phys. Control Fusion Volume 53, Number 7, July 2011: http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/7). The papers were refereed according to the standards of the journal Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. An large number of the participants sent their contributions articles to this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, IOP Publishing. The articles received were reviewed by the local organizing committee and by

  10. Dimension of Physical Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quznetsov G.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Each vector of state has its own corresponing element of the CayleyDickson algebra. Properties of a state vector require that this algebra was a normalized division algebra. By the Hurwitz and Frobenius theorems maximal dimension of s uch algebra is 8. Con- sequently, a dimension of corresponding complex state vectors is 4, and a dimension of the Clifford set elements is 4 × 4. Such set contains 5 matrices — among them — 3-diagonal. Hence, a dimension of the dot events space is equal to 3 + 1.

  11. Plasma physics via computer simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Birdsall, CK

    2004-01-01

    PART 1: PRIMER Why attempting to do plasma physics via computer simulation using particles makes good sense Overall view of a one dimensional electrostatic program A one dimensional electrostatic program ES1 Introduction to the numerical methods used Projects for ES1 A 1d electromagnetic program EM1 Projects for EM1 PART 2: THEORY Effects of the spatial grid Effects of the finitw time ste Energy-conserving simulation models Multipole models Kinetic theory for fluctuations and noise; collisions Kinetic properties: theory, experience and heuristic estimates PART 3: PRACTIC

  12. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  13. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  14. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Space physics and plasma physics experiments that can be performed from the space shuttle were identified. Potential experiment concepts were analyzed to derive requirements for a spaceborne experiment facility. The laboratory, known as the Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory consists of a 33-foot pallet of instruments connected to a 25-foot pressurized control module. Two 50-meter booms, two subsatellites, a high power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator array, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform are the primary systems deployed from the pallet. The pressurized module contains all the control and display equipment required to conduct the experiments, and life support and power subsystems.

  15. A Space Physics Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M. B.; Doxas, I.

    2006-12-01

    A Space Physics concept inventory project has been begun using a large lecture Introduction to Space Weather General Education course for non-science majors at UCLA. Students submit brief 150-250 word essays prior to material be discussed in class through Eds Tool-web-based system developed at the University of Colorado under the Biology Concept Inventory project. Eds Tool enables science education specialists to identify key concepts within the essays and classify them based on their occurrence and type. Initial results based on a class of 74 students taught Winter 2006 show common misconceptions found in understanding intro astronomy occur in Space Physics. This includes confusion between the heliosphere, solar system, galaxy and universe (students often use these terms interchangeably). Space Physics specific misconceptions include confusion between the IMF spiral pattern and the radially flowing solar wind (students often have the idea that the solar wind flows along IMF field lines, instead of the solar wind and IMF flowing out together and hence describe the radial solar wind flow as spiral). Students also have misconceptions regarding multiple step physical mechanisms such as the flow of energy from the solar wind into the Earth's ionosphere through currents or the cause of the aurora. Students will often simplify these processes into a one-step process (solar wind electrons flow directly along the Earth's field line to cause the aurora). This talk will describe our methodology and initial results.

  16. Cosmic perspectives in space physics

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Sukumar

    2000-01-01

    In the early years of the twentieth century, Victor Hess of Germany flew instruments in balloons and so discovered in 1912 that an extra-~errestial radiation of unknown origin is incident on the earth with an almost constant intensity at all times. These penetrating non­ solar radiations which were called Cosmic Rays by Millikan, USA, opened the new frontier of space physics and many leading scientists were attracted to it. At the end of World War II a number of space vehicles, e.g. stratospheric balloons, rockets and satellites were developed. In 1950 and onwards, these vehicles enabled spectacular advances in space physics and space astrophysics. New horizons were opened in the explorations of cosmic rays, the earth's magnetosphere, the Sun and the heliosphere, the moon and the planets. Using space-borne instruments, exciting discoveries were made of stars, and galaxies in the infra-red, ultra violet, x-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. In this text book these fascinating new findings are presented in depth a...

  17. Report of the Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental work in plasma physics is summarized. Technological and engineering aspects of plasma experiments in the SPICA, TORTUR 2, and RINGBOOG 2 reactors are discussed with emphasis on screw pinch, turbulent heating, and gas blankets. The free boundary equilibrium in high beta Tokamak plasma, wave dynamics, and transport problems were investigated.

  18. The physics of non-ideal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2000-01-01

    This book is devoted to the physical properties of nonideal plasma which is compressed so strongly that the effects of interparticle interactions govern the plasma behavior. The interest in this plasma was generated by the development of modern technologies and facilities whose operations were based on high densities of energy. In this volume, the methods of nonideal plasma generation and diagnostics are considered. The experimental results are given and the main theoretical models of nonideal plasma state are discussed. The problems of thermodynamics, electro-physics, optics and dynamic stabi

  19. PlasmaPy: beginning a community developed Python package for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Huang, Yi-Min; PlasmaPy Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, researchers in several disciplines have collaborated on community-developed open source Python packages such as Astropy, SunPy, and SpacePy. These packages provide core functionality, common frameworks for data analysis and visualization, and educational tools. We propose that our community begins the development of PlasmaPy: a new open source core Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy could include commonly used functions in plasma physics, easy-to-use plasma simulation codes, Grad-Shafranov solvers, eigenmode solvers, and tools to analyze both simulations and experiments. The development will include modern programming practices such as version control, embedding documentation in the code, unit tests, and avoiding premature optimization. We will describe early code development on PlasmaPy, and discuss plans moving forward. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement and a welcoming and inclusive environment, so anyone interested in joining this collaboration should contact the authors.

  20. Landau damping in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Summers, Danny

    1991-01-01

    The Landau damping of electrostatic Langmuir waves and ion-acoustic waves in a hot, isotropic, nonmagnetized, generalized Lorentzian plasma is analyzed using the modified plasma dispersion function. Numerical solutions for the real and imaginary parts of the wave frequency omega sub 0 - (i)(gamma) have been obtained as a function of the normalized wave number (k)(lambda sub D), where lambda sub D is the electron Debye length. For both particle distributions the electrostatic modes are found to be strongly damped at short wavelengths. At long wavelengths, this damping becomes less severe, but the attenuation of Langmuir waves is much stronger for a generalized Lorentzian plasma than for a Maxwellian plasma. It is concluded that Landau damping of ion-acoustic waves is only slightly affected by the presence of a high energy tail, but is strongly dependent on the ion temperature.

  1. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p{sub T} physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B {yields} J/{psi} production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation.

  2. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  3. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  4. Plasma Physics of Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Certain classes of astrophysical objects, namely magnetars and central engines of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are characterized by extreme physical conditions not encountered elsewhere in the Universe. In particular, they possess magnetic fields that exceed the critical quantum field of 44 teragauss. Figuring out how these complex ultra-magnetized systems work requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). However, an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying physics to such an extent that many relevant plasma-physical problems call for building QED-based relativistic quantum plasma physics. In this review, after describing the extreme astrophysical systems of interest and identifying the key relevant plasma-physical problems, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We discuss how a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and outline the basic theoretical framework f...

  5. Reaction-diffusion problems in the physics of hot plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmsson, H

    2000-01-01

    The physics of hot plasmas is of great importance for describing many phenomena in the universe and is fundamental for the prospect of future fusion energy production on Earth. Nontrivial results of nonlinear electromagnetic effects in plasmas include the self-organization and self-formation in the plasma of structures compact in time and space. These are the consequences of competing processes of nonlinear interactions and can be best described using reaction-diffusion equations. Reaction-Diffusion Problems in the Physics of Hot Plasmas is focused on paradigmatic problems of a reaction-diffusion type met in many branches of science, concerning in particular the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic fields with plasmas.

  6. Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We invite you to the Town Meeting on the role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in supporting basic and applied research in Plasma Physics in the U.S. The overarching goal of NSF is to promote the progress of science and to enable training of the next generation of scientists and engineers at US colleges and universities. In this context, the role of the NSF Physics Division in leading the nearly 20 year old NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering serves as an example of the long history of NSF support for basic plasma physics research. Yet, the NSF interest in maintaining a healthy university research base in plasma sciences extends across the Foundation. A total of five NSF Divisions are participating in the most recent Partnership solicitation, and a host of other multi-disciplinary and core programs provide opportunities for scientists to perform research on applications of plasma physics to Space & Solar Physics, Astrophysics, Accelerator Science, Material Science, Plasma Medicine, and many sub-disciplines within Engineering. This Town Meeting will provide a chance to discuss the full range of relevant NSF funding opportunities, and to begin a conversation on the present and future role of NSF in stewarding basic plasma science and engineering research at US colleges and universities. We would like to particularly encourage early career scientists and graduate students to participate in this Town Meeting, though everyone is invited to join what we hope to be a lively discussion.

  7. Space dusty plasmas: recent developments, advances, and unsolved problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popel, Sergey; Zelenyi, Lev

    2016-07-01

    The area of space dusty plasma research is a vibrant subfield of plasma physics that belongs to frontier research in physical sciences. This area is intrinsically interdisciplinary and encompasses astrophysics, planetary science, and atmospheric science. Dusty plasmas are ubiquitous in the universe; examples are proto-planetary and solar nebulae, molecular clouds, supernovae explosions, interplanetary medium, circumsolar rings, and asteroids. Within the solar system, we have planetary rings (e.g., Saturn and Jupiter), Martian atmosphere, cometary tails and comae, dust at the Moon, etc. Dust and dusty plasmas are also found in the vicinity of artificial satellites and space stations. The present review covers the main aspects of the area of space dusty plasma research. Emphasis is given to the description of dusty plasmas at the Moon which is important from the viewpoint of the future lunar missions and lunar observatory. This work was supported in part by the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences (under Fundamental Research Program No. 7, "Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Solar System Objects and Stellar Planet Systems. Transient Explosion Processes in Astrophysics" and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project No. 15-02-05627-a).

  8. Testing Plasma Physics in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    TESTING PLASMA PHYSICS IN THE IONOSPHERE K. Papadopoulos University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Ionospheric heaters supplemented by ground and space based diagnostic instruments, such as radars, optical cameras and photometers, HF/VLF/ELF/ULF receivers and magnetometers, radio beacons, riometers and ionosondes have for a long time being used to conduct plasma physics, geophysical and radio science investigations. The latest entry to ionospheric heating, the HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP), was completed in February 2007. The transmitter consists of 180 antenna elements spanning 30.6 acres and can radiate 3.6 MW of HF power in the 2.8-10.0 MHz frequency range. With increasing frequency the beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in Effective Radiating Power (ERP) between .36 - 4.0 GW. The antenna can point to any direction in a cone of 30 degrees from the vertical, with a reposition time of 15 degrees in 15 microseconds resulting in super-luminous scanning speeds. The transmitter can synthesize essentially any desired waveform within the regulatory allowed bandwidth in linear and circular polarization. These capabilities far exceed those of previous ionospheric heaters and allow for new frontier research in plasma physics, geophysics and radio science. Following a brief discussion of the relationship of the new capabilities of the facility with thresholds of physical processes that could not be achieved previously, the presentation will discuss recent results in the areas of ULF/ELF/VLF generation and propagation and wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere acquired with the completed facility. The presentation will conclude with a detailed discussion of possible frontier science experiments in the areas of Langmuir turbulence, parametric instabilities, electron acceleration, optical emissions and field aligned striations and duct generation, made

  9. Low-Frequency Waves in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiling, Andreas; Lee, Dong-Hun; Nakariakov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency waves in space plasmas have been studied for several decades, and our knowledge gain has been incremental with several paradigm-changing leaps forward. In our solar system, such waves occur in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of planets, and around our Moon. They occur in the solar wind, and more recently, they have been confirmed in the Sun's atmosphere as well. The goal of wave research is to understand their generation, their propagation, and their interaction with the surrounding plasma. Low-frequency Waves in Space Plasmas presents a concise and authoritative up-to-date look on where wave research stands: What have we learned in the last decade? What are unanswered questions? While in the past waves in different astrophysical plasmas have been largely treated in separate books, the unique feature of this monograph is that it covers waves in many plasma regions, including: Waves in geospace, including ionosphere and magnetosphere Waves in planetary magnetospheres Waves at the Moon Waves in the solar wind Waves in the solar atmosphere Because of the breadth of topics covered, this volume should appeal to a broad community of space scientists and students, and it should also be of interest to astronomers/astrophysicists who are studying space plasmas beyond our Solar System.

  10. Plasma Cathode Electron Sources Physics, Technology, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oks, Efim

    2006-01-01

    This book fills the gap for a textbook describing this kind of electron beam source in a systematic and thorough manner: from physical processes of electron emission to examples of real plasma electron sources and their applications.

  11. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Already while making his famous contributions in uncontrolled nuclear fusion for wartime uses, Edward Teller contemplated how the abundant energy release through nuclear fusion might serve peacetime uses as well. His legacy in controlled nuclear fusion, and the associated physics of plasmas, spans both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. His contributions in plasma physics, both the intellectual and the administrative, continue to impact the field.

  12. Dual relations in physical and cyber space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of computer, communication, and sensing technology, our living space has been transformed from physical space into a space shared by physical space and cyberspace. In the light of this fact and based on analyzing the characteristics of physical and cyberspace, respectively, this paper proposed that there are dual relations between physical space and cyberspace. Establishing dual relations is realized in the following two processes: the process of information extraction, analysis and structurization from physical space to cyberspace and the process of providing the information services from cyberspace to physical space by means of inferring the intention, state and demand of users, as well. HCI (Human Cyberspace Interaction) in dual space means to establish the dual relations, which embodied the human centered HCI, i.e. the interaction is carried out in the way accustomed to users and without distracting their attention.

  13. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  14. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  15. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  16. Report on the solar physics-plasma physics workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes discussions held between solar physicists and plasma physicists on the interface between solar and plasma physics, with emphasis placed on the question of what laboratory experiments, or computer experiments, could be pursued to test proposed mechanisms involved in solar phenomena. Major areas discussed include nonthermal plasma on the sun, spectroscopic data needed in solar plasma diagnostics, types of magnetic field structures in the sun's atmosphere, the possibility of MHD phenomena involved in solar eruptive phenomena, the role of non-MHD instabilities in energy release in solar flares, particle acceleration in solar flares, shock waves in the sun's atmosphere, and mechanisms of radio emission from the sun.

  17. Physics of quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, A V

    1997-01-01

    In this lecture, we give a brief review of what theorists now know, understand, or guess about static and kinetic properties of quark--gluon plasma. A particular attention is payed to the problem of physical observability, i.e. the physical meaningfulne ss of various characteristics of QGP discussed in the literature.

  18. A note on dust grain charging in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Central to the study of dust-plasma interactions in the solar system is the electrostatic charging of dust grains. While previous calculations have generally assumed that the distributions of electrons and ions in the plasma are Maxwellian, most space plasmas are observed to have non-Maxwellian tails and can often be fit by a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution. Here we use such a distribution to reevaluate the grain potential, under the condition that the dominant currents to the grain are due to electron and ion collection, as is the case in certain regions of space. The magnitude of the grain potential is found to be larger than that in a Maxwellian plasma as long as the electrons are described by a kappa distribution: this enhancement increased with ion mass and decreasing electron kappa. The modification of the grain potential in generalized Lorentzian plasmas has implications for both the physics (e.g., grain growth and disruption) and the dynamics of dust in space plasmas. These are also briefly discussed.

  19. Basic Studies in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    close to a Maxwellian parametrized by a temperature T and mean velocity u which satisfy certain non -linear equations, which are the macroscopic equations...Simulations with Particle-to-Grid Methods 17 E. Microscopic-Shock Profiles: Exact Solution of a Non -Equilibrium System 18 IV. List of Publications...Investigator ABSTRACT An improved understanding of equilibrium and non -equilibrium properties of plasmas is central to many areas of basic science as

  20. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  1. Space Physics: a new undergraduate program in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Brian; Smith, Darrel; Anz-Meador, Phillip

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a new undergraduate physics program entitled ``Space Physics.'' Graduate programs in space physics have been around since 1959, however, this is the first undergraduate program of its kind. The B.S. in Space Physics offers the traditional core of physics courses along with four areas of concentration: Astrophysics, Particle Physics & Cosmology, Exotic Propulsion, and Remote Sensing. The program has over 90 students with the first senior class graduating this Spring 2007. The students are actively engaged in undergraduate research projects that prepare them for careers in the aerospace industry as well as graduate school in physics or space physics. The positive employer feedback from student internships already indicates that our upper-division students are prepared to move onto careers in the aerospace industry. The demographics as well as the details of undergraduate research projects will be presented in this paper.

  2. Progress in Anisotropic Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Romatschke, P; Romatschke, Paul; Strickland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In 1959 Weibel demonstrated that when a QED plasma has a temperature anisotropy there exist unstable transverse magnetic excitations which grow exponentially fast. In this paper we will review how to determine the growth rates for these unstable modes in the weak-coupling and ultrarelativistic limits in which the collective behavior is describable in terms are so-called "hard-loops". We will show that in this limit QCD is subject to instabilities which are analogous to the Weibel instability in QED. The presence of such instabilities dominates the early time evolution of a highly anisotropic plasma; however, at longer times it is expected that these instabilities will saturate (condense). I will discuss how the presence of non-linear interactions between the gluons complicates the determination of the saturated state. In order to discuss this I present the generalization of the Braaten-Pisarski isotropic hard-thermal-loop effective action to a system with a temperature anisotropy in the parton distribution fu...

  3. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  4. Dusty plasma as a unique object of plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The self-consistency and basic openness of dusty plasma, charge fluctuations, high dissipation and other features of dusty plasma system lead to the appearance of a number of unusual and unique properties of dusty plasma. “Anomalous” heating of dusty particles, anisotropy of temperatures and other features, parametric resonance, charge fluctuations and interaction potential are among these unique properties. Study is based on analytical approach and numerical simulation. Mechanisms of “anomalous” heating and energy transfer are proposed. Influence of charge fluctuations on the system properties is discussed. The self-consistent, many-particle, fluctuation and anisotropic interparticle interaction potential is studied for a significant range of gas temperature. These properties are interconnected and necessary for a full description of dusty plasmas physics.

  5. Collisionless shocks in space plasmas structure and accelerated particles

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves are an important feature of solar system plasmas, from the solar corona out to the edge of the heliosphere. This engaging introduction to collisionless shocks in space plasmas presents a comprehensive review of the physics governing different types of shocks and processes of particle acceleration, from fundamental principles to current research. Motivated by observations of planetary bow shocks, interplanetary shocks and the solar wind termination shock, it emphasises the physical theory underlying these shock waves. Readers will develop an understanding of the complex interplay between particle dynamics and the electric and magnetic fields that explains the observations of in situ spacecraft. Written by renowned experts in the field, this up-to-date text is the ideal companion for both graduate students new to heliospheric physics and researchers in astrophysics who wish to apply the lessons of solar system shocks to different astrophysical environments.

  6. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  7. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  8. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  9. Plasma Physics Approximations in Ares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Managan, R. A.

    2015-01-08

    Lee & More derived analytic forms for the transport properties of a plasma. Many hydro-codes use their formulae for electrical and thermal conductivity. The coefficients are complex functions of Fermi-Dirac integrals, Fn( μ/θ ), the chemical potential, μ or ζ = ln(1+e μ/θ ), and the temperature, θ = kT. Since these formulae are expensive to compute, rational function approximations were fit to them. Approximations are also used to find the chemical potential, either μ or ζ . The fits use ζ as the independent variable instead of μ/θ . New fits are provided for Aα (ζ ),Aβ (ζ ), ζ, f(ζ ) = (1 + e-μ/θ)F1/2(μ/θ), F1/2'/F1/2, Fcα, and Fcβ. In each case the relative error of the fit is minimized since the functions can vary by many orders of magnitude. The new fits are designed to exactly preserve the limiting values in the non-degenerate and highly degenerate limits or as ζ→ 0 or ∞. The original fits due to Lee & More and George Zimmerman are presented for comparison.

  10. Solar terrestrial coupling through space plasma processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, J. [and others

    2000-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project investigates plasma processes that govern the interaction between the solar wind, charged particles ejected from the sun, and the earth's magnetosphere, the region above the ionosphere governed by the terrestrial magnetic field. Primary regions of interest are the regions where different plasma populations interact with each other. These are regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, associated with magnetic flux and energy transfer and dynamic energy release. The investigations concerned charged particle transport and energization, and microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. The approaches combined space data analysis with theory and computer simulations.

  11. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  12. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    1984-01-01

    This complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of this subject and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. In a wholly lucid manner the work covers single-particle motions, fluid equations for plasmas, wave motions, diffusion and resistivity, Landau damping, plasma instabilities and nonlinear problems. For students, this outstanding text offers a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly. This revised edition contains new material on kinetic effects, including Bernstein waves and the plasma dispersion function, and on nonlinear wave equations and solitons.

  13. Beyond relativity and quantum mechanics: space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Henry H.

    2011-09-01

    Albert Einstein imposed an observer-based epistemology upon physics. Relativity and Quantum Mechanics limit physics to describing and modeling the observer's sensations and measurements. Their "underlying reality" consists only of ideas that serve to model the observer's experience. These positivistic models cannot be used to form physical theories of Cosmic phenomena. To do this, we must again remove the observer from the center of physics. When we relate motion to Cosmic space instead of to observers and we attempt to explain the causes of Cosmic phenomena, we are forced to admit that Cosmic space is a substance. We need a new physics of space. We can begin by replacing Relativity with a modified Lorentzian-Newtonian model of spatial flow, and Quantum Mechanics with a wave-based theory of light and electrons. Space physics will require the reinterpretation of all known phenomena, concepts, and mathematical models.

  14. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this classic text presents a complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, written by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field.  It offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of the subject matter and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. This outstanding text offers students a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly.  In a wholly lucid manner the second edition covered charged-particle motions, plasmas as fluids, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects.  For the third edition, two new chapters have been added to incorporate discussion of more recent advances in the field.  The new chapter 9 on Special Plasmas covers non-neutral plasmas, pure electron plasmas, solid and ultra-cold plasmas, pair-ion plasmas, d...

  15. Physics of liquid and crystalline plasmas: Future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.

    It has been shown that under certain conditions "complex plasmas" (plasma containing ions, electrons and charged microspheres) may undergo spontaneous phase changes to become liquid and crystalline, without recombination of the charge components. Hence these systems may be regarded as new plasma states "condensed plasmas". The ordering forces are mainly electrostatic, but dipolar effects, anisotropic pressure due shielding, ion flow focussing etc. may all play a role, too. Complex plasmas are of great interest from a fundamental research point of view because the individual particles of one plasma component (the charged microspheres) can be visualised and hence the plasma can be studied at the kinetic level. Also, the relevant time scales (e.g. 1/plasma frequency) are of order 0.1 sec, the plasma processes occur practically in "slow motion". We will discuss some physical processes (e.g. wave propagation, shocks, phase transitions) of these systems and outline the potential of the research for the understanding of strongly coupled systems. Technologically, it is expected that colloidal plasmas will also become very important, because both plasma technology and colloid technology are widely developed already. In this overview first the basic forces between the particles are discussed, then the phase transitions, the lattice structures and results from active experiments will be presented. Finally the future perspectives will be discussed, from the scientific potential point of view and the experimental approaches in the laboratory and in space. Experiments under microgravity conditions are of great importance, because the microspheres are 10's of billions times heavier than the ions.

  16. Educational software for the visualization of space plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Le, G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Littlefield, B.

    1995-01-01

    The UCLA Space Physics Group has developed educational software composed of a series of modules to assist students with understanding basic concepts of space plasmas and charged particle motion. Present modules cover planetary magnetospheres, charged particle motion, cold plasma waves, collisionless shock waves, and solar wind. The software is designed around the principle that students can learn more by doing rather than by reading or listening. The programs provide a laboratory-like environment in which the student can control, observe, and measure complex behavior. The interactive graphics environment allows the student to visualize the results of his or her experimentation and to try different parameters as desired. The current version of the software runs on UNIX-based operating systems in an X-Windows environment. It has been used in a classroom setting at both UCLA and the University of California at San Diego.

  17. Configuration Spaces in Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2015-01-01

    I consider configuration spaces for $N$-body problems, gauge theories and for GR in both geometrodynamical and Ashtekar variables forms, including minisuperspace and inhomogeneous perturbations thereabout in the former case. These include many interesting spaces of shapes (with and without whichever of local or global notions of scale). In considering reduced configuration spaces, stratified manifolds arise. Three strategies to deal with these are `excise', `unfold' and `accept'. I show that spaces of triangles arising from various interpretations of 3-body problems already serve as model arena for all three. I furthermore argue in favour of the `accept' strategy on relational grounds. Sheaf methods then become relevant in this case, as does the stratifold construct that pairs some well-behaved stratified manifolds with sheaves. I apply arguing against `excise' and `unfold' to GR's superspace and thin sandwich, and to the removal of collinear configurations in mechanics. Non-redundant configurations are also ...

  18. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is developed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations field ( 10 m) and mid field ( 10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  19. The plasma physics of shock acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    The history and theory of shock acceleration is reviewed, paying particular attention to theories of parallel shocks which include the backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure. The work that computer simulations, both plasma and Monte Carlo, are playing in revealing how thermal ions interact with shocks and how particle acceleration appears to be an inevitable and necessary part of the basic plasma physics that governs collisionless shocks is discussed. Some of the outstanding problems that still confront theorists and observers in this field are described.

  20. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  2. Multiscale, Intermittent, Turbulent Fluctuations in Space Plasmas and Their Influence on the Interscale Behavior of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    Belgium Institute of Spatial Aeronomy and Center of Excellence in Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 2010. Invited Lectures: 1. Invited Lecturer, (ROMA...NM 87545, USA 4Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy , 1180 Brussels, Belgium 5Institute for Space Sciences, 077125 Bucharest, Romania 6Plasma and

  3. Fractal structures in nonlinear plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R L; da Silva, E C; Kroetz, T; Caldas, I L; Roberto, M; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-01-28

    Fractal structures appear in many situations related to the dynamics of conservative as well as dissipative dynamical systems, being a manifestation of chaotic behaviour. In open area-preserving discrete dynamical systems we can find fractal structures in the form of fractal boundaries, associated to escape basins, and even possessing the more general property of Wada. Such systems appear in certain applications in plasma physics, like the magnetic field line behaviour in tokamaks with ergodic limiters. The main purpose of this paper is to show how such fractal structures have observable consequences in terms of the transport properties in the plasma edge of tokamaks, some of which have been experimentally verified. We emphasize the role of the fractal structures in the understanding of mesoscale phenomena in plasmas, such as electromagnetic turbulence.

  4. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  5. Flat space physics from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, R

    2004-01-01

    We point out that aspects of quantum mechanics can be derived from the holographic principle, using only a perturbative limit of classical general relativity. In flat space, the covariant entropy bound reduces to the Bekenstein bound. The latter does not contain Newton's constant and cannot operate via gravitational backreaction. Instead, it is protected by - and in this sense, predicts - the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

  6. Physics of Tokamak Plasma Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    This tutorial describes and reviews the state-of-art in tokamak plasma start-up and its importance to next step devices such as ITER, a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility and a Tokamak/ST demo. Tokamak plasma start-up includes breakdown of the initial gas, ramp-up of the plasma current to its final value and the control of plasma parameters during those phases. Tokamaks rely on an inductive component, typically a central solenoid, which has enabled attainment of high performance levels that has enabled the construction of the ITER device. Optimizing the inductive start-up phase continues to be an area of active research, especially in regards to achieving ITER scenarios. A new generation of superconducting tokamaks, EAST and KSTAR, experiments on DIII-D and operation with JET's ITER-like wall are contributing towards this effort. Inductive start-up relies on transformer action to generate a toroidal loop voltage and successful start-up is determined by gas breakdown, avalanche physics and plasma-wall interaction. The goal of achieving steady-sate tokamak operation has motivated interest in other methods for start-up that do not rely on the central solenoid. These include Coaxial Helicity Injection, outer poloidal field coil start-up, and point source helicity injection, which have achieved 200, 150 and 100 kA respectively of toroidal current on closed flux surfaces. Other methods including merging reconnection startup and Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) plasma start-up are being studied on various devices. EBW start-up generates a directed electron channel due to wave particle interaction physics while the other methods mentioned rely on magnetic helicity injection and magnetic reconnection which are being modeled and understood using NIMROD code simulations.

  7. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1997-10-09

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, General Vector Analysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  8. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  9. Physics issues in long pulse plasma confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Toda, Shinichiro; Sanuki, Heiji [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I; Yagi, Masatoshi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Physics in the steady-state or long time discharge are illustrated from the view point of generic toroidal plasmas. Issues include physics process with very long time scale, dynamical phenomena of various time scales, transition nature under very slow temporal variations of parameters, statistical occurrence of transition and life time and identification of minimum circulating power. Nonlinear dependencies of transport properties of density, temperature, current, electric field and poloidal magnetic field cause self-organized dynamics. A picture of stationary oscillatory states is presented from a unified picture of nonlinear limit cycle dynamics. It is emphasized that the long time asymptotics are determined by the structure formation mechanisms. The sustainment needs a circulating power, and the circulating power in steady state plasma is also discussed. (author)

  10. A Review of Nonlinear Low Frequency (LF) Wave Observations in Space Plasmas: On the Development of Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    As the lead-off presentation for the topic of nonlinear waves and their evolution, we will illustrate some prominent examples of waves in space plasmas. We will describe recent observations detected within planetary foreshocks, near comets and in interplanetary space. It is believed that the nonlinear LF plasma wave features discussed here are part of and may be basic to the development of plasma turbulence. In this sense, this is one area of space plasma physics that is fundamental, with applications to fusion physics and astrophysics as well. It is hoped that the reader(s) will be stimulated to study nonlinear wave development themselves, if he/she is not already involved.

  11. Using Space as a Nonlinear Plasma Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-11-01

    Ionospheric heaters have been an important tool of plasma physics investigations. The extent that non-linear plasma phenomena can be triggered and observed depends critically on the heater power, its Effective Radiative Power (ERP) and its scanning capability. Increasing these parameters allows us to reach thresholds associated with effects that were not previously observed. The latest entry to ionospheric heating, the HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP) was completed in June 2007. The transmitter consists of 180 antenna elements spanning 30.6 acres and can radiate 3.6 MW of HF power (a factor of almost 4 higher than any previous heater) in the 2.8-10.0 MHz range. With increasing frequency the beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in ERP between 1-5 GW. The antenna can point to any direction in a cone 30 degrees from the vertical, with reposition time of 15 microseconds resulting in superluminal scanning speeds. The transmitter can synthesize essentially any waveform and transmit any polarization. These capabilities far exceed those of any previous heater and allow for new frontier research in non-linear plasma physics. The presentation will focus first on the relationship of the new capabilities of the facility with thresholds of physical processes that had not been achieved previously. It will then present new spectacular results that have been achieved during the last year. They include whistler injection and amplification, injection of shear and magnetosonic waves in the magnetosphere, Langmuir turbulence, upper hybrid waves and thermal instabilities, electron acceleration, optical emissions and formation of artificial ducts for whistler propagation. The presentation will also discuss future experiments made possible for the first time by the new transmitter capabilities, large bandwidth and high ERP.

  12. An implementation plan for priorities in solar-system space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Athay, R. Grant; Baker, Daniel; Fisk, Lennard A.; Fredricks, Robert W.; Harvey, John W.; Jokipii, Jack R.; Kivelson, Margaret; Mendillo, Michael; Nagy, Andrew F.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific objectives and implementation plans and priorities of the Space Science Board in areas of solar physics, heliospheric physics, magnetospheric physics, upper atmosphere physics, solar-terrestrial coupling, and comparative planetary studies are discussed and recommended programs are summarized. Accomplishments of Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission, Nimbus-7, and 11 other programs are highlighted. Detailed mission plans in areas of solar and heliospheric physics, plasma physics, and upper atmospheric physics are also described.

  13. Mathematics for plasma physics; Mathematiques pour la physique des plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, R. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-01-15

    The plasma physics is in the heart of the research of the CEA-DAM. Using mathematics in this domain is necessary, particularly for a precise statement of the partial differential equations systems which are on the basis of the numerical simulations. Examples are given concerning hydrodynamics, models for the thermal conduction and laser-plasma interaction. For the bi-temperature compressible Euler model, the mathematical study of the problem has allowed us to understand why the role of the energy equations dealing with ions on one hand and electrons on the other hand are not identical despite the symmetrical appearance of the system. The mathematical study is also necessary to be sure of the existence and uniqueness of the solution

  14. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-COORDINATE VOCABULARY, PLASMA PHYSICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LERNER, RITA G.

    DESCRIBED IS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A THESAURUS FOR THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS, SIMILAR TO THE ONE PREVIOUSLY DEVELOPED FOR CHEMICAL PHYSICS, FOR USE WITH COMPUTER-ORIENTED RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS. AN EXPERT IN THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS SELECTED TERMS IMPORTANT TO THE INFORMATION USER FROM THE PLASMA LITERATURE. THE HIERARCHY OF CLASSIFICATION UTILIZES…

  16. Solar Physics in the Space Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, Phil D.; And Others

    This amply illustrated booklet provides a physical description of the sun as well as present and future tasks for solar physics study. The first chapter, an introduction, describes the history of solar study, solar study in space, and the relevance of solar study. The second chapter describes the five heliographic domains including the interior,…

  17. Origins and properties of kappa distributions in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-07-01

    Classical particle systems reside at thermal equilibrium with their velocity distribution function stabilized into a Maxwell distribution. On the contrary, collisionless and correlated particle systems, such as the space and astrophysical plasmas, are characterized by a non-Maxwellian behavior, typically described by the so-called kappa distributions. Empirical kappa distributions have become increasingly widespread across space and plasma physics. However, a breakthrough in the field came with the connection of kappa distributions to the solid statistical framework of Tsallis non-extensive statistical mechanics. Understanding the statistical origin of kappa distributions was the cornerstone of further theoretical developments and applications, some of which will be presented in this talk: (i) The physical meaning of thermal parameters, e.g., temperature and kappa index; (ii) the multi-particle description of kappa distributions; (iii) the phase-space kappa distribution of a Hamiltonian with non-zero potential; (iv) the Sackur-Tetrode entropy for kappa distributions, and (v) the new quantization constant, h _{*}˜10 ^{-22} Js.

  18. Plasma physics analysis of SERT-2 operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the major plasma processes involved in the SERT 2 spacecraft experiments was conducted to aid in the interpretation of recent data. A plume penetration model was developed for neutralization electron conduction to the ion beam and showed qualitative agreement with flight data. In the SERT 2 configuration conduction of neutralization electrons between thrusters was experimentally demonstrated in space. The analysis of this configuration suggests that the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields was an important factor in the observed results. Specifically, the opposed field orientation appeared to provide a high conductivity channel between thrusters and a barrier to the ambient low energy electrons in space. The SERT 2 neutralizer currents with negative neutralizer biases were up to about twice the theoretical prediction for electron collection by the ground screen. An explanation for the higher experimental values was a possible conductive path from the neutralizer plume to a nearby part of the ground screen. Plasma probe measurements of SERT 2 gave the clearest indication of plasma electron temperature, with normal operation being near 5 eV and discharge only operation near 2 eV.

  19. Statistical Physics Experiments Using Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John

    2016-10-01

    Compared to other areas of physics research, Statistical Physics is heavily dominated by theory, with comparatively little experiment. One reason for the lack of experiments is the impracticality of tracking of individual atoms and molecules within a substance. Thus, there is a need for a different kind of experimental system, one where individual particles not only move stochastically as they collide with one another, but also are large enough to allow tracking. A dusty plasma can meet this need. A dusty plasma is a partially ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. These micron-size particles gain thousands of electronic charges by collecting more electrons than ions. Their motions are dominated by Coulomb collisions with neighboring particles. In this so-called strongly coupled plasma, the dust particles self-organize in much the same way as atoms in a liquid or solid. Unlike atoms, however, these particles are large and slow, so that they can be tracked easily by video microscopy. Advantages of dusty plasma for experimental statistical physics research include particle tracking, lack of frictional contact with solid surfaces, and avoidance of overdamped motion. Moreover, the motion of a collection of dust particles can mimic an equilibrium system with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, even though the dust particles themselves are not truly in thermal equilibrium. Nonequilibrium statistical physics can be studied by applying gradients, for example by imposing a shear flow. In this talk I will review some of our recent experiments with shear flow. First, we performed the first experimental test to verify the Fluctuation Theorem for a shear flow, showing that brief violations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics occur with the predicted probabilities, for a small system. Second, we discovered a skewness of a shear-stress distribution in a shear flow. This skewness is a phenomenon that likely has wide applicability in nonequilibrium steady states

  20. A plasma formulary for physics, technology, and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2011-01-01

    Plasma physics has matured rapidly as a discipline, and now touches on many different research areas, including manufacturing processes. This collection of fundamental formulae and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering.Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings.The text treats astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline - a unique approach made pos

  1. Physical Vacuum Properties and Internal Space Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbatenko, M V

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses matrix spaces, whose properties and dynamics are determined by Dirac matrices in Riemannian spaces of different dimension and signature. Among all Dirac matrix systems there are such ones, which nontrivial scalar, vector or other tensors cannot be made up from. These Dirac matrix systems are associated with the vacuum state of the matrix space. The simplest vacuum system realization can be ensured using the orthonormal basis in the internal matrix space. This vacuum system realization is not however unique. The case of 7-dimensional Riemannian space of signature 7(-) is considered in detail. In this case two basically different vacuum system realizations are possible: (1) with using the orthonormal basis; (2) with using the oblique-angled basis, whose base vectors coincide with the simple roots of algebra E_{8}. Considerations are presented, from which it follows that the least-dimension space bearing on physics is the Riemannian 11-dimensional space of signature 1(-)& 10(+). The consi...

  2. Philosophy of physics space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Maudlin, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This concise book introduces nonphysicists to the core philosophical issues surrounding the nature and structure of space and time, and is also an ideal resource for physicists interested in the conceptual foundations of space-time theory. Tim Maudlin's broad historical overview examines Aristotelian and Newtonian accounts of space and time, and traces how Galileo's conceptions of relativity and space-time led to Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Maudlin explains special relativity using a geometrical approach, emphasizing intrinsic space-time structure rather than coordinate systems or reference frames. He gives readers enough detail about special relativity to solve concrete physical problems while presenting general relativity in a more qualitative way, with an informative discussion of the geometrization of gravity, the bending of light, and black holes. Additional topics include the Twins Paradox, the physical aspects of the Lorentz-FitzGerald contraction, the constancy of the speed...

  3. Space Matters: Physical-Digital and Physical-Virtual Codesign in inSpace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, D.; Voida, S.; McKeon, M.

    2010-01-01

    The physical and social cues on which we rely during collaboration can vanish in the digital realm. inSpace focuses on physical-digital codesign, leveraging an approach grounded in social behavior patterns.......The physical and social cues on which we rely during collaboration can vanish in the digital realm. inSpace focuses on physical-digital codesign, leveraging an approach grounded in social behavior patterns....

  4. EDITORIAL: Interrelationship between plasma phenomena in the laboratory and in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Mark

    2008-07-01

    special issue serve to synthesise our current understanding of processes related to the coupling and feedback at disparate scales. Categories of topics included here are (1) ionospheric physics and (2) Alfvén-wave physics, both of which are related to the particle acceleration responsible for auroral displays, (3) whistler-mode triggering mechanism, which is relevant to radiation-belt dynamics, (4) plasmoid encountering a barrier, which has applications throughout the realm of space and astrophysical plasmas, and (5) laboratory investigations of the entire magnetosphere or the plasma surrounding the magnetosphere. The papers are ordered from processes that take place nearest the Earth to processes that take place at increasing distances from Earth. Many advances in understanding space plasma phenomena have been linked to insight derived from theoretical modeling and/or laboratory experiments. Observations from space-borne instruments are typically interpreted using theoretical models developed to predict the properties and dynamics of space and astrophysical plasmas. The usefulness of customized laboratory experiments for providing confirmation of theory by identifying, isolating, and studying physical phenomena efficiently, quickly, and economically has been demonstrated in the past. The benefits of laboratory experiments to investigating space-plasma physics are their reproducibility, controllability, diagnosability, reconfigurability, and affordability compared to a satellite mission or rocket campaign. Certainly, the plasma being investigated in a laboratory device is quite different from that being measured by a spaceborne instrument; nevertheless, laboratory experiments discover unexpected phenomena, benchmark theoretical models, develop physical insight, establish observational signatures, and pioneer diagnostic techniques. Explicit reference to such beneficial laboratory contributions is occasionally left out of the citations in the space-physics literature in

  5. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2005-01-01

    The primary objectives of this book are, firstly, to present the essential theoretical background needed to understand recent fusion research and, secondly, to describe the current status of fusion research for graduate students and senior undergraduates. It will also serve as a useful reference for scientists and engineers working in the related fields. In Part I, Plasma Physics, the author explains the basics of magneto-hydrodynamics and kinetic theory in a simple and compact way and, at the same time, covers important new topics for fusion studies such as the ballooning representation, instabilities driven by energetic particles and various plasma models for computer simulations. Part II, Controlled Nuclear Fusion, attempts to review the "big picture" in fusion research. All important phenomena and technologies are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the topics of most concern in current research.

  6. Space Physics & Aeronomy: Space Science Decadal Surveys Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    The final, edited texts of two recent advisory committee reports are now available upon request from the National Research Council's Space Studies Board. The reports, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, the report of the Solar System Exploration Survey (Michael J. S. Belton, Belton Space Exploration Initiatives, chair) and The Sun to the Earth-and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, the report of the Solar and Space Physics Survey (Louis J. Lanzerotti, Lucent Technologies, chair) are available in a variety of media as follows: New Frontiers in the Solar System: Currently available as a book, a CD-ROM, or online at http://books.nap.edu/html/newfrontiers/0309084954.pdf. We are also taking advanced orders for copies of New Frontiers in Solar System Exploration, a 32-page, full-color booklet describing for a popular audience the principal mission recommendations of the Solar System Exploration Survey.

  7. Astronautics:the physics of space flight

    OpenAIRE

    McClintock, P. V. E.

    2012-01-01

    Space flight provides beautiful examples of the Newtonian dynamics that teachers of physics have always wanted to demonstrate for their students – the consequences of Newton’s Laws and gravitation writ large, and with the effect of dissipation also coming in at the launch of the spacecraft and (especially) duringmits re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. For physicists, the basic principles of space flight are self-evident, but how best to apply them is far less obvious.

  8. Particle physics software aids space and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, M G

    2002-01-01

    Geant4 is a showcase example of technology transfer from particle physics to other fields such as space and medical science. Geant4 was first used for space applications by ESA in 1999, when ESA and NASA each launched an X-ray telescope. Geant4's extended set of physics models, which handle both electromagnetic and hadronic interactions, can be used to address a range of medical applications from conventional photon-beam radiotherapy to brachytherapy (using radioactive sources), hadron therapy and boron neutron capture therapy. The tools for describing geometries, materials and electromagnetic fields can precisely model diverse real-life configurations.

  9. Programmable physical parameter optimization for particle plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a scheme for interactive and programmable optimization of physical parameters for plasma simulations. The simulation code Object-Oriented Plasma Device 1-D (OOPD1) has been adapted to a Python interface, allowing sophisticated user or program interaction with simulations, and detailed numerical analysis via numpy. Because the analysis/diagnostic interface is the same as the input mechanism (the Python programming language), it is straightforward to optimize simulation parameters based on analysis of previous runs and automate the optimization process using a user-determined scheme and criteria. An example use case of the Child-Langmuir space charge limit in bipolar flow is demonstrated, where the beam current is iterated upon by measuring the relationship of the measured current and the injected current.

  10. Complex and Dusty Plasmas From Laboratory to Space

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2009-01-01

    Dusty or complex plasmas are plasmas containing solid or liquid charged particles referred to as dust. Naturally occurring in space, on earth dust plays a key role in plasma applications associated with etching technologies in microelectronics. International in scope, this volume covers theoretical and application research.

  11. Aligning Pedagogy with Physical Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.; McKenney, Susan; Cullinan, Dominic; Heuer, Jos

    2017-01-01

    The quality of education suffers when pedagogies are not aligned with physical learning spaces. For example, the architecture of the triple-decker Victorian schools across England fits the information transmission model that was dominant in the industrial age, but makes it more difficult to implement student-centred pedagogies that better fit a…

  12. Physical Space and the Teaching of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the arrangements and use of physical space in the art classroom is discussed. Settings can be purposefully designed to suggest certain meanings as well as exert control over the amount and kind of communication that will occur within them. (Author/RM)

  13. Aligning pedagogy with physical learning spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merriënboer, Jeroen J.G.; McKenney-Jensh, Susan E.; Cullinan, Dominic; Heuer, Jos

    2017-01-01

    The quality of education suffers when pedagogies are not aligned with physical learning spaces. For example, the architecture of the triple-decker Victorian schools across England fits the information transmission model that was dominant in the industrial age, but makes it more difficult to

  14. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions. PMID:28176862

  15. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  16. Plasma Liner Research for MTF at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Eskridge, R.; Lee, M.; Martin, A.; Smith, J.; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Knapp, C. E.; Turchi, P. J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The current research effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in MTF is directed towards exploring the critical physics issues of potential embodiments of MTF for propulsion, especially standoff drivers involving plasma liners for MTF. There are several possible approaches for forming plasma liners. One approach consists of using a spherical array of plasma jets to form a spherical plasma shell imploding towards the center of a magnetized plasma, a compact toroid. Current experimental plan and status to explore the physics of forming a 2-D plasma liner (shell) by merging plasma jets are described. A first-generation coaxial plasma guns (Mark-1) to launch the required plasma jets have been built and tested. Plasma jets have been launched reproducibly with a low jitter, and velocities in excess of 50 km/s for the leading edge of the plasma jet. Some further refinements are being explored for the plasma gun, Successful completion of these single-gun tests will be followed by an experimental exploration of the problems of launching a multiple number of these jets simultaneously to form a cylindrical plasma liner.

  17. Magnetic fluctuations in anisotropic space plasmas: The effect of the plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, J. A.; Toledo, B. A.; Gallo, N.; Muñoz, V.; Rogan, J.; Stepanova, M.; Moya, P. S.; Navarro, R. E.; Viñas, A. F.; Araneda, J.; López, R. A.; Díaz, M.

    2016-11-01

    The observations in the solar wind, which are usually organized in a beta-anisotropy diagram, seem to be constrained by linear instability thresholds. Unexpectedly, under these quasi-stable conditions, there is a finite level of electromagnetic fluctuations. A relevant component of these fluctuations can be understood in terms of the electromagnetic fields produced by the thermal motion of the charged particles. For the simple case of parallel propagating fields in an electron-proton plasma, we study the effect of the parameter ωpp /Ωc that characterizes the different space physics environments, and can affect the continuum spectrum produced by these fluctuations, which in turn may be used to understand the relevance of these processes occurring in a specific plasma environment.

  18. Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    From the interior of the Sun, to the upper atmosphere and near-space environment of Earth, and outward to a region far beyond Pluto where the Sun's influence wanes, advances during the past decade in space physics and solar physics the disciplines NASA refers to as heliophysics have yielded spectacular insights into the phenomena that affect our home in space. This report, from the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee for a Decadal Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, is the second NRC decadal survey in heliophysics. Building on the research accomplishments realized over the past decade, the report presents a program of basic and applied research for the period 2013-2022 that will improve scientific understanding of the mechanisms that drive the Sun's activity and the fundamental physical processes underlying near-Earth plasma dynamics, determine the physical interactions of Earth's atmospheric layers in the context of the connected Sun-Earth system, and enhance greatly the capability to provide realistic and specific forecasts of Earth's space environment that will better serve the needs of society. Although the recommended program is directed primarily to NASA (Science Mission Directorate -- Heliophysics Division) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Directorate for Geosciences -- Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences) for action, the report also recommends actions by other federal agencies, especially the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) those parts of NOAA charged with the day-to-day (operational) forecast of space weather. In addition to the recommendations included in this summary, related recommendations are presented in the main text of the report.

  19. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  20. Exploring Transitions of Space Plasmas Out of Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Space plasmas from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres and the outer heliosphere are systems in stationary states out of equilibrium. Empirical kappa distributions, which naturally emerge from Tsallis Statistics, successfully describe these space plasmas. The Tsallis formalism offers a solid statistical foundation and provides a set of proven tools for understanding these distributions, including a consistent definition of temperature—the physical temperature, which characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. Here, we develop a measure of the "thermodynamic distance" of stationary states away from equilibrium. The stationary states are labeled by the value of the entropic q-index, lying in a spectrum from q = 1 (equilibrium) to the maximum value of q, which specifies the furthest possible stationary state from equilibrium. We call this the "q-frozen state," because as a system approaches this state, it behaves analogously to when its temperature approaches absolute zero. We also introduce a novel isothermal procedure that describes a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the q-index, and show how the variation of temperature can be realized using an "iso-metastability" procedure, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state. These innovations allow a generalization of the zeroth law of thermodynamics to cover stationary states out of equilibrium. By expressing the entropy in terms of the q-index, we show the detailed paths by which the transition of stationary states evolves toward equilibrium following the dynamics of a characteristic difference equation along the q-indices. This naturally exhibits certain stationary states out of equilibrium that are frequently observed in space plasmas.

  1. Exploring Space Physics Concepts Using Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM), a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the National Science Foundation, has the goal of developing a suite of integrated physics based computer models of the space environment that can follow the evolution of a space weather event from the Sun to the Earth. In addition to the research goals, CISM is also committed to training the next generation of space weather professionals who are imbued with a system view of space weather. This view should include an understanding of both helio-spheric and geo-space phenomena. To this end, CISM offers a yearly Space Weather Summer School targeted to first year graduate students, although advanced undergraduates and space weather professionals have also attended. This summer school uses a number of innovative pedagogical techniques including devoting each afternoon to a computer lab exercise that use results from research quality simulations and visualization techniques, along with ground based and satellite data to explore concepts introduced during the morning lectures. These labs are suitable for use in wide variety educational settings from formal classroom instruction to outreach programs. The goal of this poster is to outline the goals and content of the lab materials so that instructors may evaluate their potential use in the classroom or other settings.

  2. Physical vacuum properties and internal space dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatenko, M. V.; Pushkin, A. V.

    2005-10-01

    The paper addresses matrix spaces, whose properties and dynamics are determined by Dirac matrices in Riemannian spaces of different dimension and signature. Among all Dirac matrix systems there are such ones, which nontrivial scalar, vector or other tensors cannot be made up from. These Dirac matrix systems are associated with the vacuum state of the matrix space. The simplest vacuum system realization can be ensured using the orthonormal basis in the internal matrix space. This vacuum system realization, however, is not unique. The case of 7-dimensional Riemannian space of signature 7(-) is considered in detail. In this case two basically different vacuum system realizations are possible: (1) with using the orthonormal basis; (2) with using the oblique-angled basis, whose base vectors coincide with the simple roots of the Lie algebra E 8. Considerations are presented, from which it follows that the least-dimen-si-on space bearing on physics is the Riemannian 11-dimensional space of signature 1(-)& 10(+). The considerations consist in the condition of maximum vacuum energy density and vacuum fluctuation energy density.

  3. Space Drive Physics: Introduction and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, M. G.

    Research toward the visionary goal of propellantless ``space drives'' is introduced, covering key physics issues and a listing of roughly 2-dozen approaches. The targeted advantage of a space drive is to circumvent the propellant constraints of rockets and the maneuvering limits of light sails by using the interactions between the spacecraft and its surrounding space for propulsion. At present, the scientific foundations from which to engineer a space drive have not been discovered and, objectively, might be impossible. Although no propulsion breakthroughs appear imminent, the subject has matured to where the relevant questions have been broached and are beginning to be answered. The critical make-break issues include; conservation of momentum, uncertain sources of reaction mass, and the net-external thrusting requirement. Note: space drives are not necessarily faster- than-light devices. Speed limits are a separate, unanswered issue. Relevant unsolved physics includes; the sources and mechanisms of inertial frames, coupling of gravitation and electromagnetism, and the nature of the quantum vacuum. The propulsion approaches span mostly stages 1 through 3 of the scientific method (defining the problem, collecting data, and articulating hypotheses), while some have matured to stage 4 (testing hypotheses). Nonviable approaches include `stiction drives,' `gyroscopic antigravity,' and `lifters.' No attempt is made to gauge the prospects of the remaining approaches. Instead, a list of next-step research questions is derived from the examination of these goals, unknowns, and concepts.

  4. Physics Research on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is orbiting Earth at an altitude of around 400 km. It has been manned since November 2000 and currently has a permanent crew of six. On-board ISS science is done in a wide field of sciences, from fundamental physics to biology and human physiology. Many of the experiments utilize the unique conditions of weightlessness, but also the views of space and the Earth are exploited. ESA’s (European Space Agency) ELIPS (European Programme Life and Physical sciences in Space) manages some 150 on-going and planned experiments for ISS, which is expected to be utilized at least to 2020. This presentation will give a short introduction to ISS, followed by an overview of the science field within ELIPS and some resent results. The emphasis, however, will be on ISS experiments which are close to the research performed at CERN. Silicon strip detectors like ALTEA are measuring the flux of ions inside the station. ACES (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space) will provide unprecedented global ti...

  5. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  6. AMS-02 in Space: Physics Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a particle physics experiment designed to study origin and nature of Galactic Cosmic Rays (CRs) up to TeV energies from space. With its high sensitivity, long exposure and excellent identification capabilities, AMS is conducting a unique mission of fundamental physics research in space. To date, more than 60 billion CR events have been collected by AMS. The new results on CR leptons and the analysis and light-nuclei are presented and discussed. The new leptonic data indicate the existence of new sources of high-energy CR leptons, that may arise either by dark-matter particles annihilation or by nearby astrophysical sources of $e^{\\pm}$ pairs. Future data at higher energies and forthcoming measurements on the antiproton spectrum and the boron-to-carbon ratio will be crucial in providing the discrimination among the different scenario.

  7. Towards testing quantum physics in deep space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    MAQRO is a proposal for a medium-sized space mission to use the unique environment of deep space in combination with novel developments in space technology and quantum technology to test the foundations of physics. The goal is to perform matter-wave interferometry with dielectric particles of up to 10^{11} atomic mass units and testing for deviations from the predictions of quantum theory. Novel techniques from quantum optomechanics with optically trapped particles are to be used for preparing the test particles for these experiments. The core elements of the instrument are placed outside the spacecraft and insulated from the hot spacecraft via multiple thermal shields allowing to achieve cryogenic temperatures via passive cooling and ultra-high vacuum levels by venting to deep space. In combination with low force-noise microthrusters and inertial sensors, this allows realizing an environment well suited for long coherence times of macroscopic quantum superpositions and long integration times. Since the original proposal in 2010, significant progress has been made in terms of technology development and in refining the instrument design. Based on these new developments, we submitted/will submit updated versions of the MAQRO proposal in 2015 and 2016 in response to Cosmic-Vision calls of ESA for a medium-sized mission. A central goal has been to address and overcome potentially critical issues regarding the readiness of core technologies and to provide realistic concepts for further technology development. We present the progress on the road towards realizing this ground-breaking mission harnessing deep space in novel ways for testing the foundations of physics, a technology pathfinder for macroscopic quantum technology and quantum optomechanics in space.

  8. Energetic particles in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClements, K. G.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Some recent studies of energetic particles in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas are discussed, and a number of common themes identified. Such comparative studies can elucidate the underlying physical processes. For example microwave bursts observed during edge localised modes (ELMs) in the mega amp spherical tokamak (MAST) can be attributed to energetic electrons accelerated by parallel electric fields associated with the ELMs. The very large numbers of electrons known to be accelerated in solar flares must also arise from parallel electric fields, and the demonstration of energetic electron production during ELMs suggests close links at the kinetic level between ELMs and flares. Energetic particle studies in solar flares have focussed largely on electrons rather than ions, since bremsstrahlung from deka-keV electrons provides the best available explanation of flare hard x-ray emission. However ion acceleration (but not electron acceleration) has been observed during merging startup of plasmas in MAST with dimensionless parameters similar to those of the solar corona during flares. Recent measurements in the Earth’s radiation belts demonstrate clearly a direct link between ion cyclotron emission (ICE) and fast particle population inversion, supporting the hypothesis that ICE in tokamaks is driven by fast particle distributions of this type. Shear Alfvén waves in plasmas with beta less than the electron to ion mass ratio have a parallel electric field that, in the solar corona, could accelerate electrons to hard x-ray-emitting energies; an extension of this calculation to plasmas with Alfvén speed arbitrarily close to the speed of light suggests that the mechanism could play a role in the production of cosmic ray electrons.

  9. Planetary plasma data analysis and 3D visualisation at the French Plasma Physics Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Michel; Génot, Vincent; Cecconi, Baptiste; Andre, Nicolas; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Jourdane, Nathanaël; Dufourg, Nicolas; Beigbeider, Laurent; Toniutti, Jean-Philippe; Durand, Joelle

    2016-10-01

    The CDPP (the French plasma physics data center http://cdpp.eu/) is engaged for nearly two decades in the archiving and dissemination of plasma data products from space missions and ground-based observatories. Besides these activities, the CDPP developed services like AMDA (http://amda.cdpp.eu/) and 3DView (http://3dview.cdpp.eu/). AMDA enables in depth analysis of a large amount of data through dedicated functionalities such as: visualisation, data mining, cataloguing. 3DView provides immersive visualisations in planetary environments: spacecraft position and attitude, ephemerides. Magnetic field models (Cain, Tsyganenko), visualisation of cubes, 2D cuts as well as spectra or time series along spacecraft trajectories are possible in 3Dview. Both tools provide a joint access to outputs of simulations (MHD or Hybrid models) in planetary sciences as well as planetary plasma observational data (from AMDA, CDAWeb, Cluster Science Archive, ...). Some of these developments were funded by the EU IMPEx project, and some of the more recent ones are done in the frame of Europlanet 2020 RI project. The role of CDPP in the analysis and visualisation of planetary data and mission support increased after a collaboration with the NASA/PDS which resulted in the access in AMDA to several planetary datasets like those of GALILEO, MESSENGER, MAVEN, etc. In 2014, AMDA was chosen as the quicklook visualisation tool for the Rosetta Plasma Consortium through a collaboration with Imperial College, London. This presentation will include several use cases demonstrating recent and new capabilities of the tools.

  10. Cross-Scale: Multi-Scale Coupling in Space Plasma, Assessment Study Report

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Steve; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hellinger, Petr; Kessel, Mona; Le, Guan; Liu, William; Louarn, Philippe; Mann, Ian; Nakamura, Rumi; Owen, Chris; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Vaivads, Andris; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the support and interest of the international space plasma community to examine simultaneous physical plasma scales and their interactions, the Cross-Scale Mission concept was submitted and accepted as an ESA Cosmic Vision M-class candidate mission. This report presents an overview of the assessment study phase of the 7 ESA spacecraft Cross-Scale mission. Where appropriate, discussion of the benefit of international collaboration with the SCOPE mission, as well as other interested parties, is included.

  11. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  12. Surface waves on a quantum plasma half-space

    CERN Document Server

    Lázár, M; Smolyakov, A

    2007-01-01

    Surface modes are coupled electromagnetic/electrostatic excitations of free electrons near the vacuum-plasma interface and can be excited on a sufficiently dense plasma half-space. They propagate along the surface plane and decay in either sides of the boundary. In such dense plasma models, which are of interest in electronic signal transmission or in some astrophysical applications, the dynamics of the electrons is certainly affected by the quantum effects. Thus, the dispersion relation for the surface wave on a quantum electron plasma half-space is derived by employing the quantum hydrodynamical (QHD) and Maxwell-Poison equations. The QHD include quantum forces involving the Fermi electron temperature and the quantum Bohm potential. It is found that, at room temperature, the quantum effects are mainly relevant for the electrostatic surface plasma waves in a dense gold metallic plasma.

  13. Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, William I.

    2016-05-01

    Graduate students in the natural sciences - including not only geophysics and space physics but also atmospheric and planetary physics, ocean sciences, and astronomy - need a broad-based mathematical toolbox to facilitate their research. In addition, they need to survey a wider array of mathematical methods that, while outside their particular areas of expertise, are important in related ones. While it is unrealistic to expect them to develop an encyclopedic knowledge of all the methods that are out there, they need to know how and where to obtain reliable and effective insights into these broader areas. Here at last is a graduate textbook that provides these students with the mathematical skills they need to succeed in today's highly interdisciplinary research environment. This authoritative and accessible book covers everything from the elements of vector and tensor analysis to ordinary differential equations, special functions, and chaos and fractals. Other topics include integral transforms, complex analysis, and inverse theory; partial differential equations of mathematical geophysics; probability, statistics, and computational methods; and much more. Proven in the classroom, Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics features numerous exercises throughout as well as suggestions for further reading. * Provides an authoritative and accessible introduction to the subject * Covers vector and tensor analysis, ordinary differential equations, integrals and approximations, Fourier transforms, diffusion and dispersion, sound waves and perturbation theory, randomness in data, and a host of other topics * Features numerous exercises throughout * Ideal for students and researchers alike * An online illustration package is available to professors

  14. Space charge physics for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and controlling the physics of space charge effects in linear and circular proton and ion accelerators are essential to their operation, and to future high-intensity facilities. This book presents the status quo of this field from a theoretical perspective, compares analytical approaches with multi-particle computer simulations and – where available – with experiments. It discusses fundamental concepts of phase space motion, matched beams and modes of perturbation, along with mathematical models of analysis – from envelope to Vlasov-Poisson equations. The main emphasis is on providing a systematic description of incoherent and coherent resonance phenomena; parametric instabilities and sum modes; mismatch and halo; error driven resonances; and emittance exchange due to anisotropy, as well as the role of Landau damping. Their distinctive features are elaborated in the context of numerous sample simulations, and their potential impacts on beam quality degradation and beam loss are discussed....

  15. Space instrumentation: physics and astronomy in harmony?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aderin, M [Surrey Satellite Technology Centre, Sevenoaks Enterprise Centre, Sevenoaks, Kent, TN14 5LJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.aderin@sstl.co.uk

    2008-03-01

    Surrey Satellite Technology Limited was formed as a company in 1985 and has been involved in 23 small satellite missions, making it the most successful and experienced small satellite supplier in the world. The challenge of getting a satellite into space takes a dedicated multidisciplinary team of physicists and engineers working together to achieve a common goal. In this paper the author will look at the breakdown of the teams for a number of space projects including NigeriaSAT1; one of the satellites that make up the Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), which produces high quality commercial images for monitoring agriculture and the environment as well as dedicating a proportion of it's time to disaster monitoring. Commercial projects like this will be contrasted to instruments such as the Integral Field Unit (IFU) for the NIRSpec instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST is the replacement for the Hubble Space telescope). Although both projects have been running through commercial contracts at SSTL, how does the final goal of the instrument influence the synergy between the physics and the engineering needed to make it, and what, if any, economic differences are seen?.

  16. Physical space and long-tail markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Madsen, Mark E.; Ormerod, Paul

    2009-03-01

    The Internet is known to have had a powerful impact on on-line retailer strategies in markets characterised by long-tail distribution of sales [C. Anderson, Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More, Hyperion, New York, 2006]. Such retailers can exploit the long tail of the market, since they are effectively without physical limit on the number of choices on offer. Here we examine two extensions of this phenomenon. First, we introduce turnover into the long-tail distribution of sales. Although over any given period such as a week or a month, the distribution is right-skewed and often power law distributed, over time there is considerable turnover in the rankings of sales of individual products. Second, we establish some initial results on the implications for shelf-space and physical retailers in such markets.

  17. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  18. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton University, NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Laboratory; Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    Professor Kenro Miyamoto, already well known for his textbook Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1976; revised edition 1989), has now published a new book entitled Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Iwanami Book Service Center, Tokyo, 1997). To a large extent, the new book is a somewhat shortened and well reorganized version of its predecessor. The style, concise and matter of fact, clearly shows the origin of the text in lectures given by the author to graduate students. As announced by the title, the book is divided into two parts: the first part (about 250 pages) is a general introduction to the physics of plasmas, while the second, somewhat shorter, part (about 150 pages), is devoted to a description of the most important experimental approaches to achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion. Even in the first part, moreover, the choice of subjects is consistently oriented towards the needs of fusion research. Thus, the introduction to the behaviour of charged particles (particle motion, collisions, etc.) and to the collective description of plasmas is quite short, although the reader will get a flavour of all the most important topics and will find a number of examples chosen for their relevance to fusion applications (only the presentation of the Vlasov equation, in the second section of Chapter 4, might be criticized as so concise as to be almost misleading, since the difference between microscopic and macroscopic fields is not even mentioned). Considerably more space is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of equilibrium and stability. This part includes the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for circular tokamaks, a brief discussion of Pfirsch-Schlüter, neoclassical and anomalous diffusion, and two relatively long chapters on the most important ideal and resistive MHD instabilities of toroidal plasmas; drift and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are also briefly presented. The

  20. Dusty Plasma Research under Microgravity: from the Orbital Station ``Mir'' to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    Dusty, or complex plasmas are composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles. Dust and dusty plasmas are ubiquitous in space -- they are present in planetary rings, cometary tails, interplanetary and interstellar clouds, the mesosphere, thunderclouds, they are found in the vicinity of artificial satellites and space stations, etc. Dusty plasmas formed by micronsize particles are actively investigated in many laboratories. This research has many interesting applications like nanomaterial synthesis, nanoparticle handling or particle waste removal just to mention a few. But, the most interesting application of dusty plasmas is the use as model systems for fundamental physics. It allows investigation on the most fundamental -- the kinetic level and provides insights into physics of solids and liquids with a precision not achievable in natural systems. Experiments performed on Earth are always altered or even hindered by gravity. Microgravity conditions are necessary to make investigations of large homogeneous 3-dimensional dusty plasma systems. Here we present the survey of results of the dusty plasma physics investigations under microgravity conditions with the help of experimental installations ``Plasma Crystal-1'' (PK-1) and ``PK-2'' used on the Orbital Station ``Mir'', and the unique experimental installations ``PK-3'' and ``PK-3 Plus'' used on the International Space Station. The use of these installations has given a possibility to obtain new knowledge on the dusty plasma properties. The phase transition from the isotropic liquid dusty plasma system to the so-called electrorheological plasma has been performed. The transition is the isotropic one and is fully reversible. The other interesting phenomenon is an interpenetration of two clouds of microparticles of different sizes. When a velocity of the penetrating particles is rather high the lane formation has been observed. This phenomenon is the non-equilibrium transition, depends upon peculiarities

  1. Kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.P. [Plasma Simulation Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Sachin, E-mail: dynamicalfven@gmail.co [Plasma Simulation Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016, New Delhi (India)

    2010-07-26

    This work presents the derivation of nonlinear coupled equations for the evolution of solar wind turbulence. These equations are governing the coupled dynamics of kinetic Alfven wave and ion acoustic wave. Numerical simulation of these equations is also presented. The ponderomotive nonlinearity is incorporated in the wave dynamics. Filamentation of kinetic Alfven wave and the turbulent spectra are presented in intermediate-{beta} plasmas at heliocentric distances (0.3 AU{<=}r<1.0 AU). The growing filaments and steeper turbulent spectra (of power law k{sup -S}, 5/3{<=}S{<=}3) can be responsible for plasma heating and particle acceleration in solar wind.

  2. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technology for Decontamination of Space Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Thoma, Markus; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia; Müller, Meike; Semenov, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technology is very fast and effective in inactivation of all kinds of pathogens. It is used in hygiene and especially in medicine, since the plasma treatment can be applied to sensitive surfaces, like skin, too. In a first study to use CAP for the decontamination of space equipment we could show its potential as a quite promising alternative to the standard "dry heat" and H2O2 methods [Shimizu et al. Planetary and Space Science, 90, 60-71. (2014)]. In a follow-on study we continue the investigations to reach high application level of the technology. First, we redesign the actual setup to a plasma-gas circulation system, increasing the effectivity of inactivation and the sustainability. Additionally, we want to learn more about the plasma chemistry processes involved in the inactivation. Therefore, we perform detailed plasma and gas measurements and compare them to numerical simulations. The latter will finally be used to scale the decontamination system to sizes useful also for larger space equipment. Typical materials relevant for space equipment will be tested and investigated on surface material changes due to the plasma treatment. Additionally, it is planned to use electronic boards and compare their functionality before and after the CAP expose. We will give an overview on the status of the plasma decontamination project funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economics.

  3. Dynacore Final Report , Plasma Physics prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, W.

    2001-01-01

    The generation and behaviour of plasma in a fusion device and its interaction with sur-rounding materials is studied by observing several phenomena that will accompany a plasma discharge. These phenomena are recorded by means of so called Diagnostics. These are instruments that comprise complex elec

  4. Space Physics Data Facility Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, Robert M.; Harris, Bernard T.; Chimiak, Reine A.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Web services provides a distributed programming interface to a portion of the SPDF software. (A general description of Web services is available at http://www.w3.org/ and in many current software-engineering texts and articles focused on distributed programming.) The SPDF Web services distributed programming interface enables additional collaboration and integration of the SPDF software system with other software systems, in furtherance of the SPDF mission to lead collaborative efforts in the collection and utilization of space physics data and mathematical models. This programming interface conforms to all applicable Web services specifications of the World Wide Web Consortium. The interface is specified by a Web Services Description Language (WSDL) file. The SPDF Web services software consists of the following components: 1) A server program for implementation of the Web services; and 2) A software developer s kit that consists of a WSDL file, a less formal description of the interface, a Java class library (which further eases development of Java-based client software), and Java source code for an example client program that illustrates the use of the interface.

  5. Fundamental physics in space: The French contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon-Hirtz, Sylvie

    2003-08-01

    This paper outlines the space Fundamental Physics projects developped under CNES responsability together with the french scientific community, either in the national french programme or in the french contribution to the ESA programme, mainly: -the MICROSCOPE project which aims at testing the Equivalence Principle between inertial mass and gravitational mass at a high level of precision, on a microsatellite of the MYRIADE series developped by CNES, -the PHARAO cold-atom clock which is part of the ACES project of ESA, located on an external pallett of the International Space Station, together with a swiss H-MASER and a micro-wave link making comparison with ground clocks, aimed at relativistic tests and measurement of universal constants, -the T2L2 optical link allowing to compare ultra-stable and ultra-precise clocks, -a contribution to the AMS spectrometer which searches for cosmic antimatter, on the external part of the International Space Station, -a contribution to the LISA mission of ESA for direct detection and measurement of gravitational waves by interferometry, -ground-based studies on cold-atom interferometers which could be part of the HYPER project submitted to ESA.

  6. Role of magnetospheric plasma physics for understanding cosmic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra M. L.

    Cosmic phenomena occur in the remote regions of space where in situ observations are not possible. For a proper understanding of these phenomena, laboratory experiments are essential, but in situ observations of magnetospheric plasma provide an even better background to test various hypothesis of cosmic interest. This is because the ionospheric-magnetospheric plasma and the solar wind are the only cosmic plasmas accessible to extensive in situ observations and experiments.

  7. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  8. Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentration in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Cicchella, Antonio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Lätt, Evelin; Haljaste, Kaja; Purge, Pritt; Hamra, Jena; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration after onset of puberty in girls. In addition, we also examined the association of fasting plasma ghrelin concentration with various plasma biochemical, body composition, and aerobic capacity variables in healthy adolescent girls. Fifty healthy schoolgirls ages 11 to 16 yr were divided either into a physically active (N = 25) or a physically inactive (N = 25) group. The physically active group consisted of swimmers who had trained on an average of 6.2 +/- 2.0 h.wk(-1) for the last 2 yr, whereas the inclusion criterion for the physically inactive group was the participation in physical education classes only. The subjects were matched for age (+/- 1 yr) and body mass index (BMI; +/- 2 kg.m(-2)). Maturation I group (14 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 2 and 3, and maturation II group (11 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 4 and 5. Physically active girls had significantly higher (P ghrelin levels than the physically inactive girls (maturation I: 1152.1 +/- 312.9 vs 877.7 +/- 114.8 pg.mL(-1); maturation II: 1084.0 +/- 252.5 vs 793.4 +/- 164.9 pg.mL(-1)). Plasma ghrelin concentration was negatively related to percent body fat, fat mass, peak oxygen consumption per kilogram of body mass, leptin, estradiol, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (r > -0.298; P ghrelin concentration using the variables that were significantly associated with ghrelin concentration demonstrated that plasma IGF-I was the most important predictor of plasma ghrelin concentration (beta = -0.396; P = 0.008). Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentrations in girls with different pubertal maturation levels. Plasma IGF-I concentration seems to be the main determinant of circulating ghrelin in healthy, normal-weight adolescent girls.

  9. On the dynamics of space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Jay; Chan, Chung; Silevitch, Michael; Villalon, Elena

    1992-09-01

    The research was focused into three related areas. These were: (1) an examination of stochastic electron acceleration mechanisms in the ionosphere and the resulting dynamics of magnetospheric (i.e., Radiation Belt) particles and waves; (2) a study of nonadiabatic particle orbits and the electrodynamic structure of the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere auroral arc system; (3) an experimental investigation of the wake signatures created by a solid body immersed in a flowing plasma.

  10. Laser Plasma Physics - Forces and Nonlinear Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    This work is an electronic pre-publication of a book manuscript being under consideration in order to provide information to interested researchers about a review of mechanical forces in plasmas by electro-dynamic fields. Beginning with Kelvin's ponderomotive force of 1845 in electrostatics, the hydrodynamic force in a plasma is linked with quadratic force quantities of electric and magnetic fields. Hydrodynamics is interlinked with single particle motion of plasma particles electric field generation and double layers and sheaths due to properties of inhomogeneous plasmas. Consequences relate to laser driven particle acceleration and fusion energy. Beyond the very broad research field of fusion using nanosecond laser pulses based on thermodynamics, the new picosecond pulses of ultrahigh power opened a categorically different non-thermal interaction finally permitting proton-boron fusion with eliminating problems of nuclear radiation.

  11. Fundamentals of plasma physics and controlled fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2000-10-01

    The present lecture note was written to fill a gap between text books for undergraduates and specific review articles written by specialists for their young colleagues. The note may be divided in three parts. The first part is on basic characteristics of a plasma in a magnetic field. The second part describes plasma confinement and heating with an emphasis on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. In addition, propagation of plasma waves, plasma heating by electromagnetic waves are given. The third part is devoted to various specific concepts of nuclear fusion. Emphases are placed on toroidal devices, especially on tokamak devices and stellarators. One might feel heavy mathematics glimpsing the present note, especially in the part treating magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. (author)

  12. Ionosphere Plasma State Determination in Low Earth Orbit from International Space Station Plasma Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    A plasma diagnostic package is deployed on the International Space Station (ISS). The system - a Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) - is used by NASA to monitor the electrical floating potential of the vehicle to assure astronaut safety during extravehicular activity. However, data from the unit also reflects the ionosphere state and seems to represent an unutilized scientific resource in the form of an archive of scientific plasma state data. The unit comprises a Floating Potential probe and two Langmuir probes. There is also an unused but active plasma impedance probe. The data, at one second cadence, are collected, typically for a two week period surrounding extravehicular activity events. Data is also collected any time a visiting vehicle docks with ISS and also when any large solar events occur. The telemetry system is unusual because the package is mounted on a television camera stanchion and its data is impressed on a video signal that is transmitted to the ground and streamed by internet to two off center laboratory locations. The data quality has in the past been challenged by weaknesses in the integrated ground station and distribution systems. These issues, since mid-2010, have been largely resolved and the ground stations have been upgraded. Downstream data reduction has been developed using physics based modeling of the electron and ion collecting character in the plasma. Recursive algorithms determine plasma density and temperature from the raw Langmuir probe current voltage sweeps and this is made available in real time for situational awareness. The purpose of this paper is to describe and record the algorithm for data reduction and to show that the Floating probe and Langmuir probes are capable of providing long term plasma state measurement in the ionosphere. Geophysical features such as the Appleton anomaly and high latitude modulation at the edge of the Auroral zones are regularly observed in the nearly circular, 51 deg inclined, 400 km

  13. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  14. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : Ionospheric plasma by VHF waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Patel; Abhay Kumar Singh; R P Singh

    2000-11-01

    The amplitude scintillations of very high frequency electromagnetic wave transmitted from geo-stationary satellite at 244.168 MHz have been recorded at Varanasi (geom. lat. 14° 55'N) during 1991 to 1999. The data are analyzed to determine the statistical features of overhead ionospheric plasma irregularities which are mostly of small duration < 30 minutes and are predominant during pre-midnight period. The increase of solar activity generally increases the depth of scintillation. The auto-correlation functions and power spectra of scintillations predict that the scale length of these irregularities varies from 200–500 m having velocity of movement between 75 m/sec to 200 m/sec. These results agree well with the results obtained by other workers.

  15. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    WL-TR-92-2087 PLASMA PHYSICS ISSUES IN GAS DISCHARGE LASER DEVELOPMENT AD-A257 735 ALAN GARSCADDEN MARK J. KUSNER J. GARY EDEN WL/POOC-3 WRIGHT...LASERS INFRARED MOLECULAR jAS LASERS UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development Alan Garscadden...the close coupling between body of work was not generally useful in laser development . vibrationally excited nitrogen and CO or CO2 . In fact. the First

  16. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Cicogna; Francesco Ceccherini; Francesco Pegoraro

    2006-01-01

    The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-...

  17. Hilbert Space Operators in Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, Jiří; Havlíček, Miloslav

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of this course-tested book provides a detailed and in-depth discussion of the foundations of quantum theory as well as its applications to various systems. The exposition is self-contained; in the first part the reader finds the mathematical background in chapters about functional analysis, operators on Hilbert spaces and their spectral theory, as well as operator sets and algebras. This material is used in the second part to a systematic explanation of the foundations, in particular, states and observables, properties of canonical variables, time evolution, symmetries and various axiomatic approaches. In the third part, specific physical systems and situations are discussed. Two chapters analyze Schrödinger operators and scattering, two others added in the second edition are devoted to new important topics, quantum waveguides and quantum graphs. Some praise for the previous edition: "I really enjoyed reading this work. It is very well written, by three real experts in the field. It stands...

  18. Plasma separation: physical separation at the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Rax, Jean-Marcel; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Separation techniques are usually divided in two categories depending on the nature of the discriminating property: chemical or physical. Further to this difference, physical and chemical techniques differ in that chemical separation typically occurs at the molecular level, while physical separation techniques commonly operate at the macroscopic scale. Separation based on physical properties can in principle be realized at the molecular or even atomic scale by ionizing the mixture. This is in essence plasma based separation. Due to this fundamental difference, plasma based separation stands out from other separation techniques, and features unique properties. In particular, plasma separation allows separating different elements or chemical compounds based on physical properties. This could prove extremely valuable to separate macroscopically homogeneous mixtures made of substances of similar chemical formulation. Yet, the realization of plasma separation techniques' full potential requires identifying and controlling basic mechanisms in complex plasmas which exhibit suitable separation properties. In this paper, we uncover the potential of plasma separation for various applications, and identify the key physics mechanisms upon which hinges the development of these techniques.

  19. Driven phase space vortices in plasmas with nonextensive velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of chirp-driven electrostatic waves in unmagnetized plasmas is numerically investigated by using a one-dimensional (1D) Vlasov-poisson solver with periodic boundary conditions. The initial velocity distribution of the 1D plasma is assumed to be governed by nonextensive q distribution [C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. For an infinitesimal amplitude of an external drive, we investigate the effects of chirp driven dynamics that leads to the formation of giant phase space vortices (PSV) for both Maxwellian (q = 1) and non-Maxwellian ( q ≠ 1 ) plasmas. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the formation of giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities is shown to be dependent on the strength of "q". Novel features such as "shark"-like and transient "honeycomb"-like structures in phase space are discussed. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with previous work.

  20. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    , amongst others, the following topics: fundamentals of plasma physics, fusion plasmas, plasmas in astrophysics and space physics, plasma applications and technologies, complex plasmas, high energy density plasmas, quantum plasmas and laser-plasma interaction. A total of 180 delegates from 34 different countries took part in ICPP-LAWPP-2010, and 60 delegates received financial assistance from the Local Organizing Committee, thanks to the support granted by the International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by CCHEN. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 Program was established by the following Program Committee: • Carlos Alejaldre, ITER • Maria Virginia Alves, Brazil • Julio Herrera, Mexico • Günter Mank, IAEA • George Morales, USA • Padma Kant Shukla, Germany • Guido Van Oost, Belgium • Leopoldo Soto, Chile (Chairman) This Program Committee was formed of selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP and from the International Advisory Committee of the LAWPP (http://www.icpp-lawpp-2010.cl/page/committees.php). In particular, plenary lectures and invited topical lectures were selected by the Program Committee from a list of nominated lectures presented by the International Advisory Committees of both ICPP and LAWPP. Also, the classification of oral and poster presentations was established by the Program Committee. The Congress included 15 invited plenary talks, 33 invited topical talks, 45 oral contributions, and 160 poster contributions. Most of the plenary and topical lectures are published in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The papers were refereed according to the usual standards of the journal. Prior to ICPP-LAWPP 2010, an important activity usually associated with the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics took place. This activity was the LAWPP School on Plasma Physics, which was open to participants from all over the world, providing basic training to students and young researchers. The School was

  1. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  2. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  3. Plasma Interaction with International Space Station High Voltage Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, John W.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is presently being assembled in low-earth orbit (LEO) operating high voltage solar arrays (-160 V max, -140 V typical with respect to the ambient atmosphere). At the station's present altitude, there exists substantial ambient plasma that can interact with the solar arrays. The biasing of an object to an electric potential immersed in plasma creates a plasma "sheath" or non-equilibrium plasma around the object to mask out the electric fields. A positively biased object can collect electrons from the plasma sheath and the sheath will draw a current from the surrounding plasma. This parasitic current can enter the solar cells and effectively "short out" the potential across the cells, reducing the power that can be generated by the panels. Predictions of collected current based on previous high voltage experiments (SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment), PASP+ (Photovoltaic Array Space Power) were on the order of amperes of current. However, present measurements of parasitic current are on the order of several milliamperes, and the current collection mainly occurs during an "eclipse exit" event, i.e., when the space station comes out of darkness. This collection also has a time scale, t approx. 1000 s, that is much slower than any known plasma interaction time scales. The reason for the discrepancy between predictions and present electron collection is not understood and is under investigation by the PCU (Plasma Contactor Unit) "Tiger" team. This paper will examine the potential structure within and around the solar arrays, and the possible causes and reasons for the electron collection of the array.

  4. A space-charge-neutralizing plasma for beam drift compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Coleman, J. E.; Gilson, E. P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Sefkow, A. B.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a ˜10-cm-long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter ˜5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8 T field. Measured plasma density of ⩾1×10 13 cm -3 meets the challenge of np/ Znb>1, where np and nb are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the beam ions.

  5. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  6. Multipoint observations of plasma phenomena made in space by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Escoubet, P.; Hwang, K.-Joo; Wendel, D. E.; Viñas, A.-F.; Fung, S. F.; Perri, S.; Servidio, S.; Pickett, J. S.; Parks, G. K.; Sahraoui, F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Matthaeus, W.; Weygand, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas are ubiquitous in nature, surround our local geospace environment, and permeate the universe. Plasma phenomena in space give rise to energetic particles, the aurora, solar flares and coronal mass ejections, as well as many energetic phenomena in interstellar space. Although plasmas can be studied in laboratory settings, it is often difficult, if not impossible, to replicate the conditions (density, temperature, magnetic and electric fields, etc.) of space. Single-point space missions too numerous to list have described many properties of near-Earth and heliospheric plasmas as measured both in situ and remotely (see http://www.nasa.gov/missions/#.U1mcVmeweRY for a list of NASA-related missions). However, a full description of our plasma environment requires three-dimensional spatial measurements. Cluster is the first, and until data begin flowing from the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), the only mission designed to describe the three-dimensional spatial structure of plasma phenomena in geospace. In this paper, we concentrate on some of the many plasma phenomena that have been studied using data from Cluster. To date, there have been more than 2000 refereed papers published using Cluster data but in this paper we will, of necessity, refer to only a small fraction of the published work. We have focused on a few basic plasma phenomena, but, for example, have not dealt with most of the vast body of work describing dynamical phenomena in Earth's magnetosphere, including the dynamics of current sheets in Earth's magnetotail and the morphology of the dayside high latitude cusp. Several review articles and special publications are available that describe aspects of that research in detail and interested readers are referred to them (see for example, Escoubet et al. 2005 Multiscale Coupling of Sun-Earth Processes, p. 459, Keith et al. 2005 Sur. Geophys. 26, 307-339, Paschmann et al. 2005 Outer Magnetospheric Boundaries: Cluster Results, Space Sciences Series

  7. PREFACE: First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgenia; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    The First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'05) organized by The Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia and the Foundation `Theoretical and Computational Physics and Astrophysics' was dedicated to the World Year of Physics 2005 and held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 8--12 June 2005. The aim of the workshop was to bring together scientists from various branches of plasma physics in order to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations. Another important task was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for the further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 31 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion research, kinetics and transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, MHD waves and instabilities in the solar atmosphere, dc and microwave discharge modelling, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are Masters or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will stimulate readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at Sofia University, Dr Ivan Bogorov Publishing house, and Artgraph2 Publishing house. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited lecturers who were willing to pay the participation fee. In this way, in addition to the intellectual support they provided by means of their excellent lectures, they also supported the school

  8. Plasma properties. Annual report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzner, H

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: MHD equilibrium and stability; MHD transport; statistical analysis; edge physics studies; wave propagation; basic plasma physics; and, space plasma physics.

  9. Kappa distributions: theory and applications in space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V

    2010-01-01

    Particle velocity distribution functions (VDF) in space plasmas often show non Maxwellian suprathermal tails decreasing as a power law of the velocity. Such distributions are well fitted by the so-called Kappa distribution. The presence of such distributions in different space plasmas suggests a universal mechanism for the creation of such suprathermal tails. Different theories have been proposed and are recalled in this review paper. The suprathermal particles have important consequences concerning the acceleration and the temperature that are well evidenced by the kinetic approach where no closure requires the distributions to be nearly Maxwellians. Moreover, the presence of the suprathermal particles take an important role in the wave-particle interactions.

  10. Physics of High Temperature, Dense Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    34Investigation of the High-Energy Acceleration Mode in the Coaxial Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S28, (1964). I. 9. Dattner, A. and Eninger J...34Studies of a Coaxial Plasma Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S41, (1964). II. 10. Wilcox, J. M., Pugh, E., Dattner, A. and Eninger , J., "Experimental Study of

  11. Research in Pulsed Power Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    constraints will preclude the use of channels with much with a Tesla coil. Nor is uniformity improved by the use of larger wall radii. a 3 kA prepulse. Driving...Oliphant. 12C. Bruno, J. Delvaux. A. Nicolas . and M. Roche, IEEE Trans. Plasma and P. F. Ottinger. App!. Phys. Lett. 45. 1043 (1984).ISci. PS-IS, 686

  12. Physical properties of erupting plasma associated with coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Reeves, K. K.; Moon, Y.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties (temperature, density, and mass) of erupting plasma observed in X-rays and EUV, which are all associated with coronal mass ejections observed by SOHO/LASCO. The erupting plasmas are observed as absorption or emission features in the low corona. The absorption feature provides a lower limit to the cold mass while the emission feature provides an upper limit to the mass of observed plasma in X-ray and EUV. We compare the mass constraints for each temperature response and find that the mass estimates in EUV and XRT are smaller than the total mass in the coronagraph. Several events were observed by a few passbands in the X-rays, which allows us to determine the temperature of the eruptive plasma using a filter ratio method. The temperature of one event is estimated at about 8.6 MK near the top of the erupting plasma. This measurement is possibly an average temperature for higher temperature plasma because the XRT is more sensitive at higher temperatures. In addition, a few events show that the absorption features of a prominence or a loop change to emission features with the beginning of their eruptions in all EUV wavelengths of SDO/AIA, which indicates the heating of the plasma. By estimating the physical properties of the erupting plasmas, we discuss the heating of the plasmas associated with coronal mass ejections in the low corona.

  13. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  14. Structure Formation in Complex Plasma - Quantum Effects in Cryogenic Complex Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Plasma Physics , Magneto-optical imaging , Space Plasma Physics , Multiscale Phenomena 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT... plasma is rich research field to understand basic physics of various phenomena through the observation of dust particles by naked eyes with the help of...TERMS Plasma Physics , Magneto-optical imaging , Space Plasma Physics , Multiscale Phenomena 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.

  15. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-08-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  16. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  17. Space Station Freedom solar array panels plasma interaction test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald F.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Power System will make extensive use of photovoltaic (PV) power generation. The phase 1 power system consists of two PV power modules each capable of delivering 37.5 KW of conditioned power to the user. Each PV module consists of two solar arrays. Each solar array is made up of two solar blankets. Each solar blanket contains 82 PV panels. The PV power modules provide a 160 V nominal operating voltage. Previous research has shown that there are electrical interactions between a plasma environment and a photovoltaic power source. The interactions take two forms: parasitic current loss (occurs when the currect produced by the PV panel leaves at a high potential point and travels through the plasma to a lower potential point, effectively shorting that portion of the PV panel); and arcing (occurs when the PV panel electrically discharges into the plasma). The PV solar array panel plasma interaction test was conceived to evaluate the effects of these interactions on the Space Station Freedom type PV panels as well as to conduct further research. The test article consists of two active solar array panels in series. Each panel consists of two hundred 8 cm x 8 cm silicon solar cells. The test requirements dictated specifications in the following areas: plasma environment/plasma sheath; outgassing; thermal requirements; solar simulation; and data collection requirements.

  18. Spacecraft charging and plasma interaction implications for large space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E.; Stauber, M.; Rossi, M.; Fischbein, W.

    1978-01-01

    Specific discharge mechanisms, plasma interactions, and scale effects associated with very large spacecraft are studied. The large area, low density character, and extensive use of non-conducting materials is thought to have a major impact on the performance and survivability of many large space systems.

  19. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  20. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-02-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  1. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  2. "Space of physics journals": in search of journals of quality

    CERN Document Server

    Katchanov, Yurij L

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the problem of scientific quality of physics journals. The main assumption is that the quality of a physics journal exists only in reference to other journals. Instead of constructing new indicators of scientific quality, we identify a physical journal with corresponding empirical distribution function of citations. From our relational point of view, the space of physics journals is only a system of differences between empirical distribution functions of citations. Using data from Web of Science Core Collection we consider the space of physics journals and the space of scientific publishers. The first provides an objective basis for the grouping of physics journals on the basis of a whole range of indicators (citation statistics, country, publisher, etc.). The second reveals the "competitors' triangle" of regional publishers, transnational publishers and professional physical societies. These findings have prompted us to advance the hypothesis that the structure of the space of physics jou...

  3. Activities report of the National Space Research Institute Plasma Laboratory for the period 1988/1989; Relatorio de atividades do Laboratorio Associado de Plasma do INPE no bienio 88/89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto

    1990-11-01

    This report describes the activities performed in the period 1988/1989 by the National Space Research Institute (INPE/SCT) Plasma Laboratory (LAP). The report presents the main results in the following research lines: plasma physics, plasma technology, and controlled thermonuclear fusion. (author). 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  5. Use of international space station for fundamental physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, U.; Lee, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's research plans aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are discussed. Experiments in low temperature physics and atomic physics are planned to commence in late 2005. Experiments in gravitational physics are planned to begin in 2007. A low temperature microgravity physics facility is under development for the low temperature and gravitation experiments.

  6. Physical investigation of a quad confinement plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Aaron; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Quad magnetic confinement plasma sources are novel magnetized DC discharges suitable for applications in a broad range of fields, particularly space propulsion, plasma etching and deposition. These sources contain a square discharge channel with magnetic cusps at the four lateral walls, enhancing plasma confinement and electron residence time inside the device. The magnetic field topology is manipulated using four independent electromagnets on each edge of the channel, tuning the properties of the generated plasma. We characterize the plasma ejected from the quad confinement sources using a combination of traditional electrostatic probes and non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics. Measurements show a strong ion acceleration layer located 8 cm downstream of the exit plane, beyond the extent of the magnetic field. The ion velocity field is investigated with different magnetic configurations, demonstrating how ion trajectories may be manipulated. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  7. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  8. EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

    2007-05-01

    The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The

  9. Enhancement of space plasma images by complex wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vitor Moura; Domingues, Margarete Oliveira; Mendes, Odim, E-mail: vitor.souza@inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pagamisse, Aylton [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Fav. de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Stenborg, Guilhermo Adrian [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The Sun is a natural laboratory for plasma processes. A myriad of instruments aboard satellites and on ground record(ed) the plasma emission in different ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum to help understand such processes. In particular, in the outer part of the solar atmosphere, the solar corona, we can observe a multitude of electrodynamical phenomena. There, the faint corona emission and the associated dynamic plasma structures (e.g., coronal mass ejections - CMEs) recorded in white light images can be used as basis for some insight of this physical scenario. In order to characterize the dynamics and morphology of such structures in a better way, it seems crucial that some features of those images should be enhanced. To deal with this need, a new approach using a complex wavelet transform methodology was developed. With the proposed methodology, we can highlight the plasma ejections improving the identification of those structures. (author)

  10. Coherent phase space matching for staging plasma and traditional accelerator using longitudinally tailored plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Hogan, M J

    2014-01-01

    For the further development of plasma based accelerators, phase space matching between plasma acceleration stages and between plasma stages and traditional accelerator components becomes a very critical issue for high quality high energy acceleration and its applications in light sources and colliders. Without proper matching, catastrophic emittance growth in the presence of finite energy spread may occur when the beam propagating through different stages and components due to the drastic differences of transverse focusing strength. In this paper we propose to use longitudinally tailored plasma structures as phase space matching components to properly guide the beam through stages. Theoretical analysis and full 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are utilized to show clearly how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Very good agreements between theory and simulations are obtained.

  11. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickeler, D.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2011-12-01

    To understand complex space plasma systems like the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, we need to have a good knowledge of the slowly evolving equilibrium state. The slow change of external constraints on the system (for example boundary conditions or other external parameters) lead in many cases to the formation of current sheets. These current sheets can trigger micro-instabilities, which cause resistivity on fluid scales. Consequently resistive instabilities like magnetic reconnection can occur and the systems evolves dynamically. Therefore such a picture of quasi-magneto-hydro-static changes can explain the quasy-static phase of many space plasma before an eruption occurs. Within this work we extend the theory by the inclusion of a nonlinear stationary plasma flows. Our analysis shows that stationary plasma flows with strong flow gradients (for example the solar wind magnetosphere coupling) can be responsible for the existence or generation of current sheets.

  12. Space-based research in fundamental physics and quantum technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Turyshev, S G; Shao, M; Yu, N; Kusenko, A; Wright, E L; Everitt, C W F; Kasevich, M A; Lipa, J A; Mester, J C; Reasenberg, R D; Walsworth, R L; Ashby, N; Gould, H; Paik, H -J

    2007-01-01

    Space-based experiments today can uniquely address important questions related to the fundamental laws of Nature. In particular, high-accuracy physics experiments in space can test relativistic gravity and probe the physics beyond the Standard Model; they can perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for precision investigations in cosmology and astroparticle physics. In addition, atomic physics has recently shown substantial progress in the development of optical clocks and atom interferometers. If placed in space, these instruments could turn into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current status of space-based research in fundamental physics, its discovery potential, and its importance for modern science. We offer a set of recommendations to be considered by the upcoming National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics. In our opinion, the Decadal Survey should include space-based research ...

  13. Structure and structure-preserving algorithms for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P. J.

    2016-10-01

    Conventional simulation studies of plasma physics are based on numerically solving the underpinning differential (or integro-differential) equations. Usual algorithms in general do not preserve known geometric structure of the physical systems, such as the local energy-momentum conservation law, Casimir invariants, and the symplectic structure (Poincaré invariants). As a consequence, numerical errors may accumulate coherently with time and long-term simulation results may be unreliable. Recently, a series of geometric algorithms that preserve the geometric structures resulting from the Hamiltonian and action principle (HAP) form of theoretical models in plasma physics have been developed by several authors. The superiority of these geometric algorithms has been demonstrated with many test cases. For example, symplectic integrators for guiding-center dynamics have been constructed to preserve the noncanonical symplectic structures and bound the energy-momentum errors for all simulation time-steps; variational and symplectic algorithms have been discovered and successfully applied to the Vlasov-Maxwell system, MHD, and other magnetofluid equations as well. Hamiltonian truncations of the full Vlasov-Maxwell system have opened the field of discrete gyrokinetics and led to the GEMPIC algorithm. The vision that future numerical capabilities in plasma physics should be based on structure-preserving geometric algorithms will be presented. It will be argued that the geometric consequences of HAP form and resulting geometric algorithms suitable for plasma physics studies cannot be adapted from existing mathematical literature but, rather, need to be discovered and worked out by theoretical plasma physicists. The talk will review existing HAP structures of plasma physics for a variety of models, and how they have been adapted for numerical implementation. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  14. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Cicogna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-invariant solutions, and the symmetry classification of a nonlinear PDE.

  15. Space Plasma Science as a Motivator for Education & Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Education and public outreach (EPO) continue to play an important role in how science is funded by the federal government. The plasma science community has a responsibility to share their exciting science with the American public. Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences, and Neal Lane, former head of NSF, are on record as strong advocates of scientists becoming more actively and effectively engaged in K-12 science education reform. In addition, research directorates of funding agencies like NASA and NSF are increasingly encouraging (and in some cases requiring) the integration of science and education and greater scientist involvement in EPO. How does plasma science and scientists fit into this broader political and social landscape? How well does the public understand our science and technology? Are there ways to effectively engage the public that provide good visibility for plasma science? These questions and more will be addressed in this talk. The Space Science Institute (SSI), a nonprofit organization in Colorado, provides national leadership in developing innovative ways to translate the activities and resources of space and earth science research into exciting and effective K-12 and museum education programs. SSI’s mission is to link its space science research enterprise with its education programs. SSI has active programs in curriculum and exhibit development and professional development for both scientists about education and for educators about science. I will share with you one exhibit project and one curriculum project whose goals are to raise public understanding of space plasmas and by extension all of plasma science.

  16. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  17. Unique variable polarity plasma arc welding for space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Plasma Arc Torch in 1955 and subsequent to the work at Boeing in the 1960's, significant improvements crucial to success have been made in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Process at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Several very important advantages to this process are given, and the genesis of PA welding, the genesis of VPPA welding, special equiment requirements, weld property development, results with other aluminum alloys, and the eventual successful VPPA transition to production operations are discussed.

  18. Space-Based Research in Fundamental Physics and Quantum Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Israelsson, Ulf E.; Shao, Michael; Yu, Nan; Kusenko, Alexander; Wright, Edward L.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Kasevich, Mark; Lipa, John A.; Mester, John C.; Reasenberg, Robert D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ashby, Neil; Gould, Harvey; Paik, Ho Jung

    Space offers unique experimental conditions and a wide range of opportunities to explore the foundations of modern physics with an accuracy far beyond that of ground-based experiments. Space-based experiments today can uniquely address important questions related to the fundamental laws of Nature. In particular, high-accuracy physics experiments in space can test relativistic gravity and probe the physics beyond the Standard Model; they can perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for investigations in precision cosmology and astroparticle physics. In addition, atomic physics has recently shown substantial progress in the development of optical clocks and atom interferometers. If placed in space, these instruments could turn into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current status of space-based research in fundamental physics, its discovery potential, and its importance for modern science. We offer a set of recommendations to be considered by the upcoming National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics. In our opinion, the Decadal Survey should include space-based research in fundamental physics as one of its focus areas. We recommend establishing an Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee's interagency "Fundamental Physics Task Force" to assess the status of both ground- and space-based efforts in the field, to identify the most important objectives, and to suggest the best ways to organize the work of several federal agencies involved. We also recommend establishing a new NASA-led interagency program in fundamental physics that will consolidate new technologies, prepare key instruments for future space missions, and build a strong scientific and engineering community. Our goal is to expand NASA's science objectives in space by including "laboratory research in fundamental physics" as an element in the agency's ongoing space research efforts.

  19. Plasma Physics Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have motivated many physics majors to continue their studies at the graduate level. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY Geneseo, a primarily undergraduate institution, recognizes this simple reality and is committed to ensuring research opportunities are available to interested majors beginning as early as their freshman year. Every year for more than a decade, as many as two dozen students and 8 faculty members have worked on projects related to high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion during the summer months and the academic year. By working with their research sponsors, it has been possible to identify an impressive number of projects suitable for an institution such as Geneseo. These projects tend to be hands-on and require teamwork and innovation to be successful. They also take advantage of in-house capabilities such as the 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, a scanning electron microscope, a duoplasmatron ion deposition system and a 64 processor computing cluster. The end products of their efforts are utilized at the sponsoring facilities in support of nationally recognized programs. In this talk, I will discuss a number of these projects and point out what made them attractive and appropriate for an institution like Geneseo, the direct and indirect benefits of the research opportunities for the students and faculty, and how the national programs benefited from the cost-effective use of undergraduate research. In addition, I will discuss the importance of exposure for both students and faculty mentors to the larger scientific community through posters presentations at annual meetings such as the DPP and DNP. Finally, I will address the need for even greater research opportunities for undergraduate students in the future and the importance of establishing longer ``educational pipelines'' to satisfy the ever growing need for top-tier scientists and engineers in industry, academia and the

  20. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  1. Physics of High Performance Dueterium-Tritium Plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K. M.; White, R.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Batha, S.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Belov, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mika, R.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Dorland, W.; Phillips, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Herrmann, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hogan, G. R.; Hosea, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production,isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high -li) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF-heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-li discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier.It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  2. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  3. Thin current sheets caused by plasma flow gradients in space and astrophysical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Nickeler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Strong gradients in plasma flows play a major role in space and astrophysical plasmas. A typical situation is that a static plasma equilibrium is surrounded by a plasma flow, which can lead to strong plasma flow gradients at the separatrices between field lines with different magnetic topologies, e.g., planetary magnetospheres, helmet streamers in the solar corona, or at the boundary between the heliosphere and interstellar medium. Within this work we make a first step to understand the influence of these flows towards the occurrence of current sheets in a stationary state situation. We concentrate here on incompressible plasma flows and 2-D equilibria, which allow us to find analytic solutions of the stationary magnetohydrodynamics equations (SMHD. First we solve the magnetohydrostatic (MHS equations with the help of a Grad-Shafranov equation and then we transform these static equilibria into a stationary state with plasma flow. We are in particular interested to study SMHD-equilibria with strong plasma flow gradients perpendicular to separatrices. We find that induced thin current sheets occur naturally in such situations. The strength of the induced currents depend on the Alfvén Mach number and its gradient, and on the magnetic field.

  4. Hearts, Minds, and the Library's Physical Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2010-01-01

    The digital era has revolutionized society's perception of space. Even so, against this backdrop, the struggle to preserve and enhance library space is a battle for the hearts and minds of the communities. It is ongoing, and it will never end. In this article, the author explores two characteristics of successful drives to revitalize physical…

  5. Role of Fundamental Physics in Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava

    2004-01-01

    This talk will discuss the critical role that fundamental physics research plays for the human space exploration. In particular, the currently available technologies can already provide significant radiation reduction, minimize bone loss, increase crew productivity and, thus, uniquely contribute to overall mission success. I will discuss how fundamental physics research and emerging technologies may not only further reduce the risks of space travel, but also increase the crew mobility, enhance safety and increase the value of space exploration in the near future.

  6. CERN and ESA examine future fundamental physics research in space

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    A special workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space and related topics will be held at CERN in Geneva from 5 to 7 April 2000. Remarkable advances in technology and progress made in reliability and cost effectiveness of European space missions in recent years have opened up exciting new directions for such research. The workshop provides a forum for sharing expertise gained in high energy physics research with colleagues working in research in space.

  7. New Outreach Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Greco, Shannon; Ortiz, Deedee; Delooper, John

    2015-11-01

    In FY15, PPPL concentrated its efforts on a portfolio of outreach activities centered around plasma science and fusion energy that have the potential to reach a large audience and have a significant and measurable impact. The overall goal of these outreach activities is to expose the public (within New Jersey, the US and the world) to the Department of Energy's scientific endeavors and specifically to PPPL's research regarding fusion and plasma science. The projects include several new activities along with upgrades to existing ones. The new activities include the development of outreach demos for the plasma physics community and the upgrade of the Internet Plasma Physics Experience (IPPEX). Our first plasma demo is a low cost DC glow discharge, suitable for tours as well as for student laboratories (plasma breakdown, spectroscopy, probes). This has been field tested in a variety of classes and events. The upgrade to the IPPEX web site includes a new template and a new interactive virtual tokamak. Future work on IPPEX will provide users limited access to data from NSTX-U. Finally, our Young Women's Conference was expanded and improved. These and other new outreach activities will be presented.

  8. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  9. Vasyliunas-Cairns distribution function for space plasma species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, A. A.; Ali, S.; Du, J.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    A more generalized form of non-Maxwellian distribution function (that can be named as Vasyliunas-Cairns distribution function) is introduced. Its basic properties are numerically analyzed by the variation of two important parameters, namely, α (which shows the amount of energetic particles present in the plasma system) and κ (which shows the superthermality of the plasma species). It has been observed that (i) for α → 0 ( κ → ∞ ), the Vasyliunas-Cairns distribution function reduces to the Vasyliunas or κ (Cairns or nonthermal) distribution function; (ii) for α → 0 and κ → ∞ , it reduces to the Maxwellian distribution function; and (iii) the effect of the parameter α (κ) significantly modifies the basic properties of the Vasyliunas (Cairns) distribution function. The applications of this generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Vasyliunas-Cairns distribution function) in different space plasma situations are briefly discussed.

  10. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Romano, F. P.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Massimi, C.

    2017-07-01

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as 7Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment ( e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and 7Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Landé factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry.

  11. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  12. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiationhydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of selfheating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  13. Physics of Colloids in Space: Microgravity Experiment Launched, Installed, and Activated on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment is a Microgravity Fluids Physics investigation that is presently located in an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack on the International Space Station. PCS was launched to the International Space Station on April 19, 2001, activated on May 31, 2001, and will continue to operate about 90 hr per week through May 2002.

  14. Applied physics: Optical trapping for space mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, David

    2014-02-27

    Might it be possible to create mirrors for space telescopes, using nothing but microscopic particles held in place by light? A study that exploits a technique called optical binding provides a step towards this goal.

  15. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : High energy universe – Satellite missions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinod Krishan

    2000-11-01

    A variety of satellite missions to observe the high energy universe are currently operating and some more with more versatility and capability are on the anvil. In this paper, after giving a brief introduction to the constituents of the high energy universe and the related plasma physical problems, general as well as specific features of the current and future x-ray and gamma-ray satellite missions are described.

  16. Is level of neighbourhood green space associated with physical activity in green space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Katherine; Mitchell, Richard; Pearce, Jamie

    2013-11-13

    There is accumulating evidence that greater availability of green space in a neighbourhood is associated with health benefits for the local population. One mechanism proposed for this association is that green space provides a venue for, and therefore encourages, physical activity. It has also been suggested that socio-economic health inequalities may be narrower in greener areas because of the equalised opportunity for physical activity green spaces provide. However, research exploring associations between the availability of green space and physical activity has produced mixed results. Limits to the assessment of the type and amount of physical activity which occurs specifically in green space may account for these mixed findings. This observational study was therefore concerned with the extent to which green space is a venue for physical activity and whether this could account for narrower socio-economic health inequalities in greener neighbourhoods. Secondary analysis of cross sectional data on 3679 adults (16+) living in urban areas across Scotland matched with a neighbourhood level measure of green space availability. Associations between green space availability and both total physical activity, and activity specifically within green space, were explored using logistic regression models. Interactions between socio-economic position and physical activity were assessed. All models adjusted for age, sex and household income. The availability of green space in a neighbourhood was not associated with total physical activity or that specifically in green space. There was no evidence that income-related inequalities in physical activity within green space were narrower in greener areas of Scotland. Physical activity may not be the main mechanism explaining the association between green space and health in Scotland. The direct effect of perceiving a natural environment on physiological and psychological health may offer an alternative explanation.

  17. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P; Lucky, Z; Drandell, M; Leneman, D; Maggs, J; Vincena, S; Van Compernolle, B; Tripathi, S K P; Morales, G; Carter, T A; Wang, Y; DeHaas, T

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  18. TEBPP: Theoretical and Experimental study of Beam-Plasma-Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H. R.; Bernstein, W.; Linson, L. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Hallinan, T. J.; Leinbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of an electron beam (0 to 10 keV, 0 to 1.5 Amp) with the plasma and neutral atmospheres at 200 to 400 km altitude is studied with emphasis on applications to near Earth and cosmical plasmas. The interaction occurs in four space time regions: (1) near electron gun, beam coming into equilibrium with medium; (2) equilibrium propagation in ionosphere; (3) ahead of beam pulse, temporal and spatial precursors; (4) behind a beam pulse. While region 2 is of the greatest interest, it is essential to study Region 1 because it determines the characteristics of the beam as it enters 2 through 4.

  19. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  20. To Mars and beyond, fast! how plasma propulsion will revolutionize space exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Chang Díaz, Franklin

    2017-01-01

    As advanced space propulsion moves slowly from science fiction to achievable reality, the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket, or VASIMR, is a leading contender for making 'Mars in a month' a possibility. Developed by Ad Astra Rockets, which was founded by astronaut Franklin Chang-Diaz and backed by NASA, its first commercial tests are imminent. VASIMR heats plasma to extreme temperatures using radio waves. Strong magnetic fields then funnel this plasma out the back of the engine, creating thrust. The continuous propulsion may place long, fast interplanetary journeys within reach in the near future. While scientists dream of the possibilities of using fusion or well-controlled matter-antimatter interactions to propel spacecraft fast and far, that goal is still some way over the horizon. VASIMR provides a more attainable propulsion technology that is based on the matter-antimatter concept. The book describes a landmark technology grounded in plasma physics and offering a practical technological solu...

  1. International Space Station -- Fluid Physics Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The optical bench for the Fluid Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown in its operational configuration. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  2. Phase Space Dynamics of Ionization Injection in Plasma Based Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of beam phase space in ionization-induced injection into plasma wakefields is studied using theory and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The injection process causes special longitudinal and transverse phase mixing leading initially to a rapid emittance growth followed by oscillation, decay, and eventual slow growth to saturation. An analytic theory for this evolution is presented that includes the effects of injection distance (time), acceleration distance, wakefield structure, and nonlinear space charge forces. Formulas for the emittance in the low and high space charge regimes are presented. The theory is verified through PIC simulations and a good agreement is obtained. This work shows how ultra-low emittance beams can be produced using ionization-induced injection.

  3. Space weather circulation model of plasma clouds as background radiation medium of space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, A. E.

    A model for Space Weather (SW) Circulation with Plasma Clouds as background radiation medium of Space Environment has been proposed and discussed. Major characteristics of the model are outlined and the model assumes a baroclinic Space Environment in view of observed pronounced horizontal electron temperature gradient with prevailing weak vertical temperature gradient. The primary objective of the study is to be able to monitor and realistically predict on real- or near real-time SW and Space Storms (SWS) affecting human economic systems on Earth as well as the safety and Physiologic comfort of human payload in Space Environment in relation to planned increase in human space flights especially with reference to the ISS Space Shuttle Taxi (ISST) Programme and other prolonged deep Space Missions. Although considerable discussions are now available in the literature on SW issues, routine Meteorological operational applications of SW forecast data and information for Space Environment are still yet to receive adequate attention. The paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature of SW. The paper examines the sensitivity and variability in 3-D continuum of Plasmas in response to solar radiation inputs into the magnetosphere under disturbed Sun condition. Specifically, the presence of plasma clouds in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is stressed as a major source of danger to Space crews, spacecraft instrumentation and architecture charging problems as well as impacts on numerous radiation - sensitive human economic systems on Earth. Finally, the paper considers the application of model results in the form of effective monitoring of each of the two major phases of manned Spaceflights - take-off and re-entry phases where all-time assessment of spacecraft transient ambient micro-incabin and outside Space Environment is vital for all manned Spaceflights as recently evidenced by the loss of vital information during take-off of the February 1, 2003 US Columbia

  4. Spaced resolved analysis of suprathermal electrons in dense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinard A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the hot electron fraction is a crucial topic for high energy density laser driven plasmas: first, energy losses and radiative properties depend strongly on the hot electron fraction and, second, in ICF hohlraums suprathermal electrons preheat the D-T-capsule and seriously reduce the fusion performance. In the present work we present our first experimental and theoretical studies to analyze single shot space resolved hot electron fractions inside dense plasmas via optically thin X-ray line transitions from autoionizing states. The benchmark experiment has been carried out at an X-pinch in order to create a dense, localized plasma with a well defined symmetry axis of hot electron propagation. Simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution in the X-ray spectral range has been obtained with a spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal. The high performance of the X-ray diagnostics allowed to identify space resolved hot electron fractions via the X-ray spectral distribution of multiple excited states.

  5. Space- and ground-based particle physics meet at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The fourth international conference on Particle and Fundamental Physics in Space (SpacePart12) will take place at CERN from 5 to 7 November. The conference will bring together scientists working on particle and fundamental physics in space and on ground, as well as space policy makers from around the world.   One hundred years after Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays using hot air balloons, the experimental study of particle and fundamental physics is still being pursued today with extremely sophisticated techniques: on the ground, with state-of-the-art accelerators like the LHC; and in space, with powerful observatories that probe, with amazing accuracy, the various forms of cosmic radiation, charged and neutral, which are messengers of the most extreme conditions of matter and energy. SpacePart12 will be the opportunity for participants to exchange views on the progress of space-related science and technology programmes in the field of particle and fundamental physics in space. SpacePar...

  6. Controlled Electron Injection into Plasma Accelerators and SpaceCharge Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fubiani, Gwenael G.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Plasma based accelerators are capable of producing electron sources which are ultra-compact (a few microns) and high energies (up to hundreds of MeVs) in much shorter distances than conventional accelerators. This is due to the large longitudinal electric field that can be excited without the limitation of breakdown as in RF structures.The characteristic scale length of the accelerating field is the plasma wavelength and for typical densities ranging from 1018 - 1019 cm-3, the accelerating fields and scale length can hence be on the order of 10-100GV/m and 10-40 μm, respectively. The production of quasimonoenergetic beams was recently obtained in a regime relying on self-trapping of background plasma electrons, using a single laser pulse for wakefield generation. In this dissertation, we study the controlled injection via the beating of two lasers (the pump laser pulse creating the plasma wave and a second beam being propagated in opposite direction) which induce a localized injection of background plasma electrons. The aim of this dissertation is to describe in detail the physics of optical injection using two lasers, the characteristics of the electron beams produced (the micrometer scale plasma wavelength can result in femtosecond and even attosecond bunches) as well as a concise estimate of the effects of space charge on the dynamics of an ultra-dense electron bunch with a large energy spread.

  7. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  8. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, Ronald

    1997-04-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied within linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). This linear response method is applied to partially ionized systems such as dense, low-temperature plasmas. Here, the conductivity changes from nonmetallic values up to those typical for

  9. Quasiparticle lifetimes and infrared physics in QED and QCD plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, J.P. [CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-09-22

    The perturbative calculation of the lifetime of fermion excitations in a QED plasma at high temperature is plagued with infrared divergences which are not eliminated by the screening corrections. The physical processes responsible for these divergences are the collisions involving the exchange of longwavelength, quasistatic, magnetic photons, which are not screened by plasma effects. The leading divergences can be resummed in a non-perturbative treatment based on a generalization of the Bloch-Nordsieck model at finite temperature. The resulting expression of the fermion propagator is free of infrared problems, and exhibits a non-exponential damping at large times: S{sub R}(t) {approx} exp(-{alpha}T t ln{omega}{sub p}t), where {omega}{sub p} = eT/3 is the plasma frequency and {alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}.

  10. Playful Interactions Stimulating Physical Activity in Public Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Janienke; Bekker, Tilde; Vanden Abeele, Vero;

    In this position paper we describe our vision on designing playful interactions to persuade people to be physically active in public spaces. Social embeddedness and playful interaction are the core elements of this vision. We illustrate how our design vision is incorporated into innovative concepts...... to motivate each other to be physically active by creating challenges for each other. Designing playful solutions for public spaces asks for low-threshold solutions that support easy stepping in and stepping out solutions....

  11. Cross-scale energy transport in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. W.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind is a supersonic magnetized plasma streaming far into the heliosphere. Although cooling as it flows, it is rapidly heated upon encountering planetary obstacles. At Earth, this interaction forms the magnetosphere and its sub-regions. The present paper focuses on particle heating across the boundary separating the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. The cross-scale energy transport between these scales is a compelling and fundamental problem of plasma physics. Here, we present evidence of the energy transport between fluid and ion scales: free energy is provided in terms of a velocity shear generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We show the unambiguous observation of an ion-scale magnetosonic wave packet, inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex, with sufficient energy to account for observed ion heating. The present finding has universal consequences in understanding cross-scale energy transport, applicable to environments experiencing velocity shears during comparable plasma regimes.

  12. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  13. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  14. Overcoming the physical barriers to urban green spaces in Kumasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To enhance the sustainability of urban green spaces, the study recommends that there should be the .... value flowing from physical resources (e.g. minerals, energy, renewable resources, water ... enhancing eco-tourism (Cilliers et al., 2013). ... The literature on green spaces (Djibril et al., 2012; Addo-Fordwuor,. 2014 ...

  15. Time and Space: Undergraduate Mexican Physics in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Antonia

    2010-01-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the trajectories and itineraries of undergraduate physics students at a Mexican university. In this work learning is understood as being able to move oneself and, other things (cultural tools), through the space-time networks of a discipline (Nespor in Knowledge in motion: space, time and curriculum in…

  16. Logic for physical space : From antiquity to present days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiello, Marco; Bezhanishvili, Guram; Bloch, Isabelle; Goranko, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Since the early days of physics, space has called for means to represent, experiment, and reason about it. Apart from physicists, the concept of space has intrigued also philosophers, mathematicians and, more recently, computer scientists. This longstanding interest has left us with a plethora of ma

  17. Model of strong stationary vortex turbulence in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the macroscopic consequences of nonlinear solitary vortex structures in magnetized space plasmas by developing theoretical model of plasma turbulence. Strongly localized vortex patterns contain trapped particles and, propagating in a medium, excite substantial density fluctuations and thus, intensify the energy, heat and mass transport processes, i.e., such vortices can form strong vortex turbulence. Turbulence is represented as an ensemble of strongly localized (and therefore weakly interacting vortices. Vortices with various amplitudes are randomly distributed in space (due to collisions. For their description, a statistical approach is applied. It is supposed that a stationary turbulent state is formed by balancing competing effects: spontaneous development of vortices due to nonlinear twisting of the perturbations' fronts, cascading of perturbations into short scales (direct spectral cascade and collisional or collisionless damping of the perturbations in the short-wave domain. In the inertial range, direct spectral cascade occurs through merging structures via collisions. It is shown that in the magneto-active plasmas, strong turbulence is generally anisotropic Turbulent modes mainly develop in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field. It is found that it is the compressibility of the local medium which primarily determines the character of the turbulent spectra: the strong vortex turbulence forms a power spectrum in wave number space. For example, a new spectrum of turbulent fluctuations in k−8/3 is derived which agrees with available experimental data. Within the framework of the developed model particle diffusion processes are also investigated. It is found that the interaction of structures with each other and particles causes anomalous diffusion in the medium. The effective coefficient of diffusion has a square root dependence on the stationary level of noise.

  18. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  19. Association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D with physical performance in physically active children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrati, Ikram; Hammami, Raouf; Ben Fradj, Mohamed Kacem; Martone, Domenico; Padulo, Johnny; Feki, Moncef; Chaouachi, Anis; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2016-11-01

    Vitamin D is thought to regulate skeletal muscle function and boost physical performance. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between vitamin D and physical performance in physically active children. This cross-sectional study included 125 children who practice football as a leisure activity. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was assessed using a chemiluminescence immunoassay method. Vitamin D inadequacy was defined as 25-OHD D inadequacy may limit exercise performance. Further research should verify whether correction of vitamin D deficiency enhances physical performance.

  20. PHYSICAL CONCEPT APPLIED TO SPACE OBSERVATION BY LANDASAT 7 TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C TOUMIAT

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical concept has been applied to space observation by using images and data of LANDASAT 7 in order to  to extract quantitative information  about the studied areas facilitate . The final product should respect a norm in presenting a list of physical indicators or minimal reference classes.

  1. Putting Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Services to Good Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project provides heliophysics science-enabling information services and is the most widely used single access point to heliophysics science data and orbits from NASA's solar-heliospheric satellite missions. Our emphasis has been on active service of the best digital data products and key ancillary information with graphics, listings and production of subsetted or merged files (mass downloads or parameter-specific selections). Our services today include the: (1) Heliophysics Resource Gateway (HRG) data finding service (also known as the Virtual Space Physics Observatory or VSPO); (2) Data services including the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb), OMNIweb compilation of interplanetary parameters (mapped to the Earth's bow shock) and related indices, and their large underlying collection of datasets; (3) Orbit information and display services including the Satellite Situation Center (SSCweb) and the 4D Orbit Viewer interactive Java client; and the (4) Common Data Format (CDF) software library and file format and science file format translation suite. (5) Upcoming is the Heliospheric Event List Manager (HELM) to coordinate lists of interesting events and provide a mechanism for tying together the above services and others. We describe several research projects that heavily used SPDF's services and resulted in publications. Although not actually all used at once, the following research scenario shows how SPDF and VxO services can be combined for studying solar events that produce energetic particles and effects at Earth: use the HRG/VPSO to locate data of interest, perhaps query OMNIWeb for times when energetic particle solar activity is high and query the SSCWeb orbit location service for when Cluster, Geotail, Polar/IMAGE are in position to measure the cusp, magnetotail and the Earth's aurora, respectively. Also query SSCweb for times when Polar and magnetometer ground stations are on the same field lines. Using these times

  2. Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and in Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Mark E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Funds were expended to offset the travel costs of three students and three postdoctoral research associates to participate in and present work at the 2015 International Workshop on the Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and in Space (IPELS2015), 23-28 August 2015, Pitlochry, Scotland, UK. Selection was priority-ranked by lab-space engagement, first, and topic relevance, second. Supplementary selection preference was applied to under-represented populations, applicants lacking available travel-resources in their home research group, applicants unusually distant from the conference venue, and the impact of the applicant’s attendance in increasing the diversity of conference participation. One support letter per student was required. The letters described the specific benefit of IPELS2015 to the student dissertation or the postdoc career development, and document the evidence for the ordering criteria.

  3. Classical-physics applications for Finsler $b$ space

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The classical propagation of certain Lorentz-violating fermions is known to be governed by geodesics of a four-dimensional pseudo-Finsler $b$ space parametrized by a prescribed background covector field. This work identifies systems in classical physics that are governed by the three-dimensional version of Finsler $b$ space and constructs a geodesic for a sample non-constant choice for the background covector. The existence of these classical analogues demonstrates that Finsler $b$ spaces possess applications in conventional physics, which may yield insight into the propagation of SME fermions on curved manifolds.

  4. Beam Phase Space of an Intense Ion Beam in a Neutralizing Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Bazouin, Guillaume; Beneytout, Alice; Lidia, Steven M.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P.

    2011-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I) generates high intensity ion beams to explore warm dense matter physics. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with an 8-Tesla, 10-cm long pulsed solenoid magnet combined with a background neutralizing plasma to effectively cancel the space charge field of the ion beam. We report on phase space measurements of the beam before the neutralization channel and of the focused ion beam at the target plane. These are compared to WARP particle-in-cell simulations of the ion beam propagation through the focusing system and neutralizing plasma. Due to the orientation of the plasma sources with respect to the focusing magnet, the plasma distribution within the final focusing lens is strongly affected by the magnetic field, an effect which can influence the peak intensity at the target and which is included in the model of the experiment. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, LBNL under Contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  5. Plasma Hazards and Acceptance for International Space Station Extravehicular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Extravehicular activity(EVA) is accepted by NASA and other space faring agencies as a necessary risk in order to build and maintain a safe and efficient laboratory in space. EVAs are used for standard construction and as contingency operations to repair critical equipment for vehicle sustainability and safety of the entire crew in the habitable volume. There are many hazards that are assessed for even the most mundane EVA for astronauts, and the vast majority of these are adequately controlled per the rules of the International Space Station Program. The need for EVA repair and construction has driven acceptance of a possible catastrophic hazard to the EVA crewmember which cannot currently be controlled adequately. That hazard is electrical shock from the very environment in which they work. This paper describes the environment, causes and contributors to the shock of EVA crewmembers attributed to the ionospheric plasma environment in low Earth orbit. It will detail the hazard history, and acceptance process for the risk associated with these hazards that give assurance to a safe EVA. In addition to the hazard acceptance process this paper will explore other factors that go into the decision to accept a risk including criticality of task, hardware design and capability, and the probability of hazard occurrence. Also included will be the required interaction between organizations at NASA(EVA Office, Environments, Engineering, Mission Operations, Safety) in order to build and eventually gain adequate acceptance rationale for a hazard of this kind. During the course of the discussion, all current methods of mitigating the hazard will be identified. This paper will capture the history of the plasma hazard analysis and processes used by the International Space Station Program to formally assess and qualify the risk. The paper will discuss steps that have been taken to identify and perform required analysis of the floating potential shock hazard from the ISS environment

  6. ISS And Space Environment Interactions Without Operating Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Ferguson, Dale; Suggs,Rob; McCollum, Matt

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will be the largest, highest power spacecraft placed in orbit. Because of this the design of the electrical power system diverged markedly from previous systems. The solar arrays will operate at 160 V and the power distribution voltage will be 120 V. The structure is grounded to the negative side of the solar arrays so under the right circumstances it is possible to drive the ISS potential very negative. A plasma contactor has been added to the ISS to provide control of the ISS structure potential relative to the ambient plasma. The ISS requirement is that the ISS structure not be greater than 40 V positive or negative of local plasma. What are the ramifications of operating large structures with such high voltage power systems? The application of a plasma contactor on ISS controls the potential between the structure and the local plasma, preventing degrading effects. It is conceivable that there can be situations where the plasma contactor might be non-functional. This might be due to lack of power, the need to turn it off during some of the build-up sequences, the loss of functionality for both plasma contactors before a replacement can be installed, similar circumstances. A study was undertaken to understand how important it is to have the contactor functioning and how long it might be off before unacceptable degradation to ISS could occur. The details of interaction effects on spacecraft have not been addressed until driven by design. This was true for ISS. If the structure is allowed to float highly negative impinging ions can sputter exposed conductors which can degrade the primary surface and also generate contamination due to the sputtered material. Arcing has been known to occur on solar arrays that float negative of the ambient plasma. This can also generate electromagnetic interference and voltage transients. Much of the ISS structure and pressure module surfaces exposed to space is anodized aluminum. The anodization

  7. Hollow cathode heater development for the Space Station plasma contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.

    1993-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been selected for use on the Space Station. During the operation of the plasma contactor, the hollow cathode heater will endure approximately 12000 thermal cycles. Since a hollow cathode heater failure would result in a plasma contactor failure, a hollow cathode heater development program was established to produce a reliable heater design. The development program includes the heater design, process documents for both heater fabrication and assembly, and heater testing. The heater design was a modification of a sheathed ion thruster cathode heater. Three heaters have been tested to date using direct current power supplies. Performance testing was conducted to determine input current and power requirements for achieving activation and ignition temperatures, single unit operational repeatability, and unit-to-unit operational repeatability. Comparisons of performance testing data at the ignition input current level for the three heaters show the unit-to-unit repeatability of input power and tube temperature near the cathode tip to be within 3.5 W and 44 degrees C, respectively. Cyclic testing was then conducted to evaluate reliability under thermal cycling. The first heater, although damaged during assembly, completed 5985 ignition cycles before failing. Two additional heaters were subsequently fabricated and have completed 3178 cycles to date in an on-going test.

  8. Magnetic Reconnection: A Fundamental Process in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael

    2010-01-01

    For many years, collisionless magnetic reconnect ion has been recognized as a fundamental process, which facilitates plasma transport and energy release in systems ranging from the astrophysical plasmas to magnetospheres and even laboratory plasma. Beginning with work addressing solar dynamics, it has been understood that reconnection is essential to explain solar eruptions, the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere, and the dynamics of the magnetosphere. Accordingly, the process of magnetic reconnection has been and remains a prime target for space-based and laboratory studies, as well as for theoretical research. Much progress has been made throughout the years, beginning with indirect verifications by studies of processes enabled by reconnection, such as Coronal Mass Ejections, Flux Transfer Events, and Plasmoids. Theoretical advances have accompanied these observations, moving knowledge beyond the Sweet-Parker theory to the recognition that other, collisionless, effects are available and likely to support much faster reconnect ion rates. At the present time we are therefore near a break-through in our understanding of how collisionless reconnect ion works. Theory and modeling have advanced to the point that two competing theories are considered leading candidates for explaining the microphysics of this process. Both theories predict very small spatial and temporal scales. which are. to date, inaccessible to space-based or laboratory measurements. The need to understand magnetic reconnect ion has led NASA to begin the implementation of a tailored mission, Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS), a four spacecraft cluster equipped to resolve all relevant spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation, we present an overview of current knowledge as well as an outlook towards measurements provided by MMS.

  9. Space, body, time and relationship experiences of recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    and relations revealed several key factors influencing their recess physical activity: perceived classroom safety, indoor cosiness, lack of attractive outdoor facilities, bodily dissatisfaction, bodily complaints, tiredness, feeling bored, and peer influence. CONCLUSION: We found that the four existential...... the classroom as a space for physical activity, designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces and varied facilities, improving children's self-esteem and body image, e.g., during physical education, and creating teacher organised play activities during recess.......BACKGROUND: Increasing recess physical activity has been the aim of several interventions, as this setting can provide numerous physical activity opportunities. However, it is unclear if these interventions are equally effective for all children, or if they only appeal to children who are already...

  10. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E. [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model.

  11. Promoting Plasma Physics as a Career: A Generational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James

    2005-10-01

    A paradigm shift is occurring in education physics programs. Educators are shifting from the traditional teaching focus to concentrate on student learning. Students are unaware of physics as a career, plasma physics or the job opportunities afforded to them with a physics degree. The physics profession needs to promote itself to the younger generations, or specifically the millennial generation (Born in the 1980's-2000's). Learning styles preferred by ``Millennials'' include a technological environment that promotes learning through active task performance rather than passive attendance at lectures. Millennials respond well to anything experiential and will be motivated by opportunities for creativity and challenging learning environments. The open-ended access to information, the ability to tailor learning paths, and continuous and instantaneous performance assessment offer flexibility in the design of curricula as well as in the method of delivery. Educators need to understand the millennial generation, appeal to their motivations and offer a learning environment designed for their learning style. This poster suggests promoting a physics career by focusing on generational learning styles and preferences.

  12. Near Earth space plasma monitoring under COST 296

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Bremer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    This review paper presents the main achievements of the near Earth space plasma monitoring under COST 296

    Action. The outputs of the COST 296 community making data, historical and real-time, standardized and available to the ionospheric community for their research, applications and modeling purposes are presented. The contribution of COST 296 with the added value of the validated data made possible a trusted ionospheric monitoring for research and modeling purposes, and it served for testing and improving the algorithms producing real-time

    data and providing data users measurement uncertainties. These value added data also served for calibration and

    validation of space-borne sensors. New techniques and parameters have been developed for monitoring the near Earth space plasma, as time dependent 2D maps of vertical total electron content (vTEC, other key ionospheric parameters and activity indices for distinguishing disturbed ionospheric conditions, as well as a technique for improving the discrepancies of different mapping services. The dissemination of the above products has been developed by COST 296 participants throughout the websites making them available on-line for real-time applications.


  13. Time and space: undergraduate Mexican physics in motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Antonia

    2010-09-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the trajectories and itineraries of undergraduate physics students at a Mexican university. In this work learning is understood as being able to move oneself and, other things (cultural tools), through the space-time networks of a discipline (Nespor in Knowledge in motion: space, time and curriculum in undergraduate physics and management. Routledge Farmer, London, 1994). The potential of this socio-cultural perspective allows an analysis of how students are connected through extended spaces and times with an international core discipline as well as with cultural features related to local networks of power and construction. Through an example, I show that, from an actor-network-theory (Latour in Science in action. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1987), that in order to understand the complexities of undergraduate physics processes of learning you have to break classroom walls and take into account students' movements through complex spatial and temporal traces of the discipline of physics. Mexican professors do not give classes following one textbook but in a moment-to-moment open dynamism tending to include undergraduate students as actors in classroom events extending the teaching space-time of the classroom to the disciplinary research work of physics. I also find that Mexican undergraduate students show initiative and display some autonomy and power in the construction of their itineraries as they are encouraged to examine a variety of sources including contemporary research articles, unsolved physics problems, and even to participate in several physicists' spaces, as for example being speakers at the national congresses of physics. Their itineraries also open up new spaces of cultural and social practices, creating more extensive networks beyond those associated with a discipline. Some economic, historical and cultural contextual features of this school of sciences are analyzed in order to help understanding the particular

  14. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  15. Dust in the planetary system: Dust interactions in space plasmas of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Czechowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic dust particles are small solid objects observed in the solar planetary system and in many astronomical objects like the surrounding of stars, the interstellar and even the intergalactic medium. In the solar system the dust is best observed and most often found within the region of the orbits of terrestrial planets where the dust interactions and dynamics are observed directly from spacecraft. Dust is observed in space near Earth and also enters the atmosphere of the Earth where it takes part in physical and chemical processes. Hence space offers a laboratory to study dust-plasma interactions and dust dynamics. A recent example is the observation of nanodust of sizes smaller than 10 nm. We outline the theoretical considerations on which our knowledge of dust electric charges in space plasmas are founded. We discuss the dynamics of the dust particles and show how the small charged particles are accelerated by the solar wind that carries a magnetic field. Finally, as examples for the space observation of cosmic dust interactions, we describe the first detection of fast nanodust in the solar wind near Earth orbit and the first bi-static observations of PMSE, the radar echoes that are observed in the Earth ionosphere in the presence of charged dust.

  16. plasmaFoam: An OpenFOAM framework for computational plasma physics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Verma, Abhishek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    As emphasized in the 2012 Roadmap for low temperature plasmas (LTP), scientific computing has emerged as an essential tool for the investigation and prediction of the fundamental physical and chemical processes associated with these systems. While several in-house and commercial codes exist, with each having its own advantages and disadvantages, a common framework that can be developed by researchers from all over the world will likely accelerate the impact of computational studies on advances in low-temperature plasma physics and chemistry. In this regard, we present a finite volume computational toolbox to perform high-fidelity simulations of LTP systems. This framework, primarily based on the OpenFOAM solver suite, allows us to enhance our understanding of multiscale plasma phenomenon by performing massively parallel, three-dimensional simulations on unstructured meshes using well-established high performance computing tools that are widely used in the computational fluid dynamics community. In this talk, we will present preliminary results obtained using the OpenFOAM-based solver suite with benchmark three-dimensional simulations of microplasma devices including both dielectric and plasma regions. We will also discuss the future outlook for the solver suite.

  17. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  18. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  19. Contributions of plasma physics to chaos and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, D. F.

    2016-11-01

    This topical review focusses on the contributions of plasma physics to chaos and nonlinear dynamics bringing new methods which are or can be used in other scientific domains. It starts with the development of the theory of Hamiltonian chaos, and then deals with order or quasi order, for instance adiabatic and soliton theories. It ends with a shorter account of dissipative and high dimensional Hamiltonian dynamics, and of quantum chaos. Most of these contributions are a spin-off of the research on thermonuclear fusion by magnetic confinement, which started in the fifties. Their presentation is both exhaustive and compact. [15 April 2016

  20. ITER-EDA physics design requirements and plasma performance assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Galambos, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wesley, J.; Boucher, D.; Perkins, F.; Post, D.; Putvinski, S. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Physics design guidelines, plasma performance estimates, and sensitivity of performance to changes in physics assumptions are presented for the ITER-EDA Interim Design. The overall ITER device parameters have been derived from the performance goals using physics guidelines based on the physics R&D results. The ITER-EDA design has a single-null divertor configuration (divertor at the bottom) with a nominal plasma current of 21 MA, magnetic field of 5.68 T, major and minor radius of 8.14 m and 2.8 m, and a plasma elongation (at the 95% flux surface) of {approximately}1.6 that produces a nominal fusion power of {approximately}1.5 GW for an ignited burn pulse length of {ge}1000 s. The assessments have shown that ignition at 1.5 GW of fusion power can be sustained in ITER for 1000 s given present extrapolations of H-mode confinement ({tau}{sub E} = 0.85 {times} {tau}{sub ITER93H}), helium exhaust ({tau}*{sub He}/{tau}{sub E} = 10), representative plasma impurities (n{sub Be}/n{sub e} = 2%), and beta limit [{beta}{sub N} = {beta}(%)/(I/aB) {le} 2.5]. The provision of 100 MW of auxiliary power, necessary to access to H-mode during the approach to ignition, provides for the possibility of driven burn operations at Q = 15. This enables ITER to fulfill its mission of fusion power ({approximately} 1--1.5 GW) and fluence ({approximately}1 MWa/m{sup 2}) goals if confinement, impurity levels, or operational (density, beta) limits prove to be less favorable than present projections. The power threshold for H-L transition, confinement uncertainties, and operational limits (Greenwald density limit and beta limit) are potential performance limiting issues. Improvement of the helium exhaust ({tau}*{sub He}/{tau}{sub E} {le} 5) and potential operation in reverse-shear mode significantly improve ITER performance.

  1. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  2. NASA/JPL Plans for Fundamental Physics Research in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaelsson, Ulf E.; Lee, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, about 100 researchers met twice to develop plans for the future in this research area. The results of these meetings have been collected in a package titled "A Roadmap for Fundamental Physics in Space". A summary of the Roadmap will be presented along with an overview of the current program. Research is being performed in Low Temperature and Condensed Matter Physics, Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics, and Gravitational and Relativistic Physics. There are currently over 50 investigators in the program of which 8 are being evaluated as potential flight experiments. The number of investigators is expected to grow further during the next selection cycle, planned to start toward the end of this year. In the near future, our investigators will be able to take advantage of long duration experimentation in Space using a suite of different carriers under development.

  3. Universal Teichm\\"uller space in geometry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pekonen, O P

    1995-01-01

    Lipman Bers' universal Teichm\\"uller space, classically denoted by $T(1)$, plays a significant role in Teichm\\"uller theory, because all the Teichm\\"uller spaces $T(G)$ of Fuchsian groups $G$ can be embedded into it as complex submanifolds. Recently, $T(1)$ has also become an object of intensive study in physics, because it is a promising geometric environment for a non-perturbative version of bosonic string theory. We provide a non-technical survey of what is currently known about the geometry of $T(1)$ and what is conjectured about its physical meaning.

  4. Semantic e-Science in Space Physics - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T.; Yoon, V.; Merka, J.; Szabo, A.

    2009-05-01

    Several search and retrieval systems for space physics data are currently under development in NASA's heliophysics data environment. We present a case study of two such systems, and describe our efforts in implementing an ontology to aid in data discovery. In doing so we highlight the various aspects of knowledge representation and show how they led to our ontology design, creation, and implementation. We discuss advantages that scientific reasoning allows, as well as difficulties encountered in current tools and standards. Finally, we present a space physics research project conducted with and without e-Science and contrast the two approaches.

  5. Reduced Pseudoneglect for Physical Space, but Not Mental Representations of Space, for Adults with Autistic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Michael C.; Maybery, Murray T.; Visser, Troy A.

    2017-01-01

    Neurotypical individuals display a leftward attentional bias, called pseudoneglect, for physical space (e.g. landmark task) and mental representations of space (e.g. mental number line bisection). However, leftward bias is reduced in autistic individuals viewing faces, and neurotypical individuals with autistic traits viewing "greyscale"…

  6. Physics issues associated with low-beta plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic aspects of MHD generators are explored by examining the propagation of dense, low-beta streams of plasma. Three situations are considered: the basic principles of plasma-stream propagation, the propagation of plasma streams into vacuum, and the propagation of plasma streams into ambient plasmas. These three situations are analogous to plasma generators, plasma generators with vacuum loads, and plasma generators with plasma loads. Kinetic (microphysics) aspects include oscillations of the generator plasma, the effects of diocotron instabilities, the acceleration of particles, the starvation of current systems, and plasma-wave production.

  7. Magnetic Null Points in Kinetic Simulations of Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  8. Magnetic null points in kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind; and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and lunar magnetic ano...

  9. Brief Introduction to the Foundation of CAI Shidong Award for Plasma Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Zhengming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The late Academician Professor CAI Shidong was an outstanding plasma physicist who had made seminal contributions in both fundamental plasma theories and controlled thermonuclear fusion energy research.Professor CAI was also one of the pioneers in China's plasma physics research.In 1973,Professor CAI decided to leave U.S.and return to China in order to help pushing forward plasma physics research in China.Professor CAI formed a research group consisting of young scientists and carried out high-level works in this important physics discipline.He worked tirelessly,set examples by his own deeds,and made outstanding contributions in plasma physics research,educating younger generations of plasma physicists,as well as establishing collaborations with plasma scientists in other Asian-African developing nations.In short,Professor CAI devoted the best years of his life to China's plasma physics research.

  10. In Support of Physics: Redesigning library collections, spaces, and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Kathleen

    2014-03-01

    In order to improve support for physics learning, teaching, and research at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, the Physics Library personnel have implemented important changes over the past three years. Updates in collection-building practices, changes to physical spaces, and developments of new services have all been made so the Physics Library is more useful to students and faculty. In terms of collection management, all patrons - students, staff, and faculty - have been encouraged to make suggestions for additions to the library collection. The print collections were rearranged to encourage circulation. Spaces within the library have been designated as either group study or silent study, and teaching assistants are encouraged to use the space for their office hours. Library services have also been taken directly to undergraduate physics lab sections to make library information easily accessible for more students. The Physics Library, along with the other branch libraries on campus, has been highlighted in conjunction with the library campaign promoting subject librarians and introducing undergraduate students to ``their'' librarian. Trends in circulation, research questions, and door count statistics will be presented alongside explanations of the implemented changes.

  11. A Plasma Aerocapture and Entry System for Manned Missions and Planetary Deep Space Orbiters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Plasma Magnetoshell is based on demonstrated experimental results and the successful implementation would dramatically decrease mission risk, launch cost, mass,...

  12. The physics of positively biased conductors surrounded by dielectrics in contact with a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Daniel E.; Chang, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    The physics of a positively biased conductor surrounded by dielectrics in contact with plasma is investigated. It is shown that because of the presence of secondary emission from the surrounding dielectrics, the voltage of the surfaces near the conductor has three solutions. The high- and low-voltage solutions are stable, while the intermediate-voltage solution is unstable. This theory is applied to explain the snapover effect observed on high-voltage solar arrays that involve the use of highly biased surfaces in contact with the space environment.

  13. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is actually the first state of Nature. The great fireball, the Sun, entirely decides the existence of our tiny planet immersed in the ocean of cosmic plasma. Mankind has also learnt how to produce and use plasma under terrestrial conditions, though it is not at all easy to domesticate this unstable ionized medium. Plasma finds countless applications that improve the quality of our daily life. Some of them, such as fluorescent light tubes, are so obvious to us that we do not give any thought to the processes underlying colourful neon signs. Another vast field is the production of materials with tailored-to-demand properties: mechanical, chemical, optical, electrical, magnetic, etc. Thin layers formed on solid surfaces by various plasma--material interactions play important roles in present-day computer technology, communication, space research, machinery and even many decorative items. However, the most demanding challenge in using plasma is to harness on Earth the processes that power stars. The endeavour is to confine and stabilize hot plasmas and to achieve the ultimate goal: to benefit from the might of thermonuclear reactions for environmentally benign energy production. The goal is clear, as the demand for energy is unquestionable. But the challenges are also enormous. Two basic plasma confinement schemes have been explored: inertial (using ultra-strong laser pulses or ion beams), and magnetic confinement (using strong magnetic fields). Hot plasma must be maintained in a vacuum vessel. The temperature gradients between the plasma and the surrounding wall are probably the greatest in the Universe. The history of fusion research began in the 1940s. Since then we have observed significant progress in fusion science and technology. We have come to the point when it has been decided to construct a reactor-class device. ITER International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will be built by seven co-operating parties: the EU, Japan

  14. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between High-Density Pulsed Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interactions studies (plasma too cold and too “dirty.”) We have built and tested a new, gas -fed, non- ablative, rep-rated capillary plasma source for our...those encountered in space propulsion devices including Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT), Magneto-Plasma Dynamic (MPD) thrusters and capillary plasma...based thrusters . The ongoing research work brings together a team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) and the University of

  15. The Sun to the Earth - and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    in processes observed in solar and space plasmas. Challenge 5: Developing a near-real-time predictive capability for understanding and quantifying the impact on human activities of dynamical processes at the Sun, in the interplanetary medium, and in Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. This report summarizes the state of knowledge about the total heliospheric system, poses key scientific questions for further research, and presents an integrated research strategy, with prioritized initiatives, for the next decade. The recommended strategy embraces both basic research programs and targeted basic research activities that will enhance knowledge and prediction of space weather effects on Earth. The report emphasizes the importance of understanding the Sun, the heliosphere, and planetary magnetospheres and ionospheres as astrophysical objects and as laboratories for the investigation of fundamental plasma physics phenomena.

  16. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (1/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In November 2006, ministers representing the world’s major fusion research communities signed the agreement formally establishing the international project ITER. Sited at Cadarache in France, the project involves China, the European Union (including Switzerland), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a critical step in the development of fusion energy: its role is to confirm the feasibility of exploiting magnetic confinement fusion for the production of energy for peaceful purposes by providing an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant. The ITER tokamak is designed to study the “burning plasma” regime in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas by achieving a fusion amplification factor, Q (the ratio of fusion output power to plasma heating input power), of 10 for several hundreds of seconds with a nominal fusion power output of 500MW. It is also intended to allow the study of steady-state plasma operation at Q≥5 by me...

  17. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  18. Space, Time, Matter, and Form Essays on Aristotle's Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bostock, David

    2006-01-01

    Space, Time, Matter, and Form collects ten of David Bostock's essays on themes from Aristotle's Physics, four of them published here for the first time. The first five papers look at issues raised in the first two books of the Physics, centred on notions of matter and form, and the idea of substance as what persists through change. They also range over other of Aristotle's scientific works, such as his biology and psychology and the account of change in his De Generatione et Corruptione. The volume's remaining essays examine themes in later books of the Physics, including infinity, place, time

  19. Transport processes in space physics and astrophysics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dosch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

     This is the problems and solution manual for the graduate text with the same title and published as Lecture Notes in Physics Vol 877 which provides the necessary mathematical and physics background to understand the transport of gases, charged particle gases, energetic charged particles, turbulence, and radiation in an astrophysical and space physics context. The very detailed and self-contained problems and solutions will be an essential part of the training of any graduate student wishing to enter and pursuing research in this field. .

  20. Earth's magnetosphere - Global problems in magnetospheric plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetospheric physics is presently in a transition from the exploratory stage to one in which satellite missions and ground-based observations are planned with the specific object of achieving a global understanding and self-consistent quantitative description of the cause-and-effect relationship among the principal dynamic processes involved. Measurements turn to lower and lower energies and to higher ion mass species, in order to encompass the entire particle population, and to a broader range of the frequency spectrum of magnetic and electric field variations. In the present paper, the current status of our knowledge on magnetospheric plasma physics is reviewed, with particular reference of such fundamental advances as the discovery of layers of streaming plasma in the magnetosphere beneath its boundary surface, the identification of the terrestrial magnetosphere as a celestial source of kilometric radiation and relativistic particles, the identification of parallel electric field regions within the magnetosphere and their role in auroral particle acceleration, and the discovery of large fluxes of energetic heavy ions trapped in the magnetosphere.

  1. A journey from particle physics to outer space

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Particle physics can take you a long way - even into space! Astronaut Christer Fuglesang recently jetted into orbit on his first space mission, 14 years after he left CERN to join the European Space Agency. Christer Fuglesang near the launch pad area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida, in preparation for the STS-116 mission. (photo: ESA, S.Corvaja)Christer Fuglesang in space (photo: NASA). In CERN's years of efforts to explore the fundamentals of the Universe, it has not yet sent anyone beyond planet Earth. On 10 December 2006, Christer Fuglesang boldly went where no CERN scientist had ever gone before. The 49-year-old ex-CERN physicist-turned-astronaut embarked on his first mission on board space shuttle Discovery. Originally from Stockholm, he also had the honour of being the first Swedish national in space. Christer Fuglesang is an astronaut with the European Space Agency (ESA), a partner of the International Space Station (ISS) - a research facility that is being assembled in orbit around the Earth...

  2. The use and misuse of statistics in space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several statistical techniques most commonly used in space physics, including Fourier analysis, linear correlation, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectral density and superimposed epoch analysis, and presents tests to assess the significance of the results. New techniques such as bootstrapping and jackknifing are presented. When no test of significance is in common usage, a plausible test is suggested.

  3. Geant4 electromagnetic physics updates for space radiation effects simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John; Karamitos, Mathiew

    The Geant4 toolkit is used in many applications including space science studies. The new Geant4 version 10.0 released in December 2013 includes a major revision of the toolkit and offers multi-threaded mode for event level parallelism. At the same time, Geant4 electromagnetic and hadronic physics sub-libraries have been significantly updated. In order to validate the new and updated models Geant4 verification tests and benchmarks were extended. Part of these developments was sponsored by the European Space Agency in the context of research aimed at modelling radiation biological end effects. In this work, we present an overview of results of several benchmarks for electromagnetic physics models relevant to space science. For electromagnetic physics, recently Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, and Rayleigh scattering models have been improved and extended down to lower energies. Models of ionization and fluctuations have also been improved; special micro-dosimetry models for Silicon and liquid water were introduced; the main multiple scattering model was consolidated; and the atomic de-excitation module has been made available to all models. As a result, Geant4 predictions for space radiation effects obtained with different Physics Lists are in better agreement with the benchmark data than previous Geant4 versions. Here we present results of electromagnetic tests and models comparison in the energy interval 10 eV - 10 MeV.

  4. Development of a Renormalization Group Approach to Multi-Scale Plasma Physics Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    with important kinetic non - Maxwellian particle distributions. These plasmas exhibit a range of length and time scales, making accurate simulation a...the plasmas ’ phase space for accurate reproduction of natural phenomena. These four goals offer an interlocking plan of attack to reach a full...anisotropic bimodal intermittent turbulence in space plasmas ” Phys. Plasmas . 11 (2004) 1287-1299.] to describe phenomena such as the scaling of the

  5. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. The Plasma Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist, chaired this, the eighth seminar in the Administrator's Seminar Series. She introduced the NASA Administrator, Daniel S. Goldin, who, in turn, introduced the subject of plasma. Plasma, an ionized gas, is a function of temperature and density. We ve learned that, at Jupiter, the radiation is dense. But, Goldin asked, what else do we know? Dr. Cordova then introduced Dr. James Van Allen, for whom the Van Allen radiation belt was named. Dr. Van Allen, a member of the University of Iowa faculty, discussed the growing interest in practical applications of space physics, including radiation fields and particles, plasmas and ionospheres. He listed a hierarchy of magnetic fields, beginning at the top, as pulsars, the Sun, planets, interplanetary medium, and interstellar medium. He pointed out that we have investigated eight of the nine known planets,. He listed three basic energy sources as 1) kinetic energy from flowing plasma such as constitutional solar wind or interstellar wind; 2) rotational energy of the planet, and 3) orbital energy of satellites. He believes there are seven sources of energetic particles and five potential places where particles may go. The next speaker, Dr. Ian Axford of New Zealand, has been associated with the Max Planck Institut fuer Aeronomie and plasma physics. He has studied solar and galactic winds and clusters of galaxies of which there are several thousand. He believes that the solar wind temperature is in the millions of degrees. The final speaker was Dr. Roger Blanford of the California Institute of Technology. He classified extreme plasmas as lab plasmas and cosmic plasmas. Cosmic plasmas are from supernovae remnants. These have supplied us with heavy elements and may come via a shock front of 10(sup 15) electron volts. To understand the physics of plasma, one must learn about x-rays, the maximum energy of acceleration by supernova remnants, particle acceleration and composition of cosmic

  6. Playful Interactions Stimulating Physical Activity in Public Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Janienke; Bekker, Tilde; Vanden Abeele, Vero

    that stimulate physical activity for various user groups and in various use contexts, and present some general findings on the basis of these cases. New technologies such as mobile networks and social media provide new opportunities for creating location-independent solutions that support groups of people......In this position paper we describe our vision on designing playful interactions to persuade people to be physically active in public spaces. Social embeddedness and playful interaction are the core elements of this vision. We illustrate how our design vision is incorporated into innovative concepts...... to motivate each other to be physically active by creating challenges for each other. Designing playful solutions for public spaces asks for low-threshold solutions that support easy stepping in and stepping out solutions....

  7. A prospect at 11th international Toki conference. Plasma physics, quo vadis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-01-01

    A prospect of plasma physics at the turn of next century is discussed. The theme of this conference identifies the future direction of the research related with plasmas. Main issue is the potential and structure formation in plasmas; More specifically, structures which are realized through the interaction of electromagnetic fields, in particular that with electric fields, in non-equilibrium state. An emphasis is made to clarify the fundamental physics aspects of the plasma physics in fusion research as well as that in the basic research of plasmas. The plasma physics will give an important contribution to the solution of the historical enigma, i.e., all things flow. Having an impact on human recognition of nature and showing a beauty in a law, the plasma physics/science will demonstrate to be a leading science in the 21st century. (author)

  8. Irregularities Associated with Artificially Created Dusty Plasmas in the near Earth Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordikar, M. R.; Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Fu, H.

    2009-12-01

    A natural dust layer formed by tons of meteoric dust spans the altitude range between 80 and 100 kilometers of the earth’s upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere which forms Noctilucent Clouds NLCs. These dust layers are charged due to collection of electrons and ions from the earth’s ionosphere. Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes are radar echoes which result from scattering from the irregularities in the electron density above the NLC altitude. An alternate approach to understanding natural dust layers is to perform active space experiments in which a dust cloud is artificially created in a controlled manner in the upper atmosphere. The goal of Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE) is to investigate similarity in plasma irregularity associated with natural and artificial dust layers. This presentation will address some of the physical processes expected to be important during the early time phase after creation of an artificial dust cloud in the earth’s ionosphere. Of major importance will be the production of plasma irregularities which may lead to radar echoes and the possibility of their relationship to PMSEs observed from natural dusty space plasmas. The objective is to investigate the production of electron irregularities due to growth of plasma instabilities driven by inhomogeneities in the boundary between the background plasma and the expanding charged dust layer. First, a two dimensional plasma simulation model will be described that may be used for examining early time evolution after expansion of an artificial dust cloud across the magnetic field in the ionosphere. The model considers a three species system with fluid electrons and ions and Particle-In-Cell PIC charged dust grains in which the dust charge on the grains varies in time according to the standard charging model. The electrons are magnetized and the algorithm incorporates the parallel electron dynamics while the ions are assumed to be unmagnetized. Simulations runs were made to

  9. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA), KU Leuven (Belgium); Deca, Jan [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Divin, Andrey [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano, E-mail: sya@mao.kiev.ua [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  10. Modeling physical chemistry of the Io plasma torus in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper, M.; Delamere, P. A.; Overcast-Howe, K.

    2016-07-01

    Periodicities in the Io plasma illustrate the rich complexity of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in space plasmas. The confounding System IV period (slower than the rotation of Jupiter's magnetic field ≡ System III) remains a mystery of the torus. Common to both System III and IV are modulations of the superthermal electron population. The small fraction (<1%) of hot electrons plays a vital role in torus physical and chemical properties, modulating the abundance and temperature of ion species. Building on previous models of torus physical chemistry, we have developed a two-dimensional model that includes azimuthal and radial transport (diffusion equation) while averaging chemical processes in latitude. This paper presents initial results of the model, demonstrating the role of hot electrons in forming a single-peaked torus structure. The effect of azimuthal shear is investigated as plasma is transported radially outward, showing how the torus properties evolve during transport from a chemically dominated regime (inner torus) to a transport dominated regime (outer torus). Surprisingly, we find that hot electron populations influence torus properties at all radial distances. While many of our results are preliminary, suggestions for future modeling experiments are suggested to provide additional insight into the origin of the ubiquitous superthermal electrons.

  11. Physics and chemistry of plasma-assisted combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-08-13

    There are several mechanisms that affect a gas when using discharge plasma to initiate combustion or to stabilize a flame. There are two thermal mechanisms-the homogeneous and inhomogeneous heating of the gas due to 'hot' atom thermalization and vibrational and electronic energy relaxation. The homogeneous heating causes the acceleration of the chemical reactions. The inhomogeneous heating generates flow perturbations, which promote increased turbulence and mixing. Non-thermal mechanisms include the ionic wind effect (the momentum transfer from an electric field to the gas due to the space charge), ion and electron drift (which can lead to additional fluxes of active radicals in the gradient flows in the electric field) and the excitation, dissociation and ionization of the gas by e-impact, which leads to non-equilibrium radical production and changes the kinetic mechanisms of ignition and combustion. These mechanisms, either together or separately, can provide additional combustion control which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition engines, among others. Despite the lack of knowledge in mechanism details, non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications.

  12. A thin column of dense plasma for space-charge neutralization of intense ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Greenway, W.; Sefkow, A. B.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    Typical ion driven warm dense matter experiment requires a plasma density of 10^14/cm^3 to meet the challenge of np>nb, where np, and nb are the number densities of plasma and beam, respectively. Plasma electrons neutralize the space charge of an ion beam to allow a small spot of about 1-mm radius. In order to provide np>nb for initial warm, dense matter experiments, four cathodic arc plasma sources have been fabricated, and the aluminum plasma is focused in a focusing solenoid (8T field). A plasma probe with 37 collectors was developed to measure the radial plasma profile inside the solenoid. Results show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter ˜7mm along the solenoid axis. The magnetic mirror effect, plasma condensation, and the deformation of the magnetic field due to eddy currents are under investigation. Data on plasma parameters and ion beam neutralization will be presented.

  13. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  14. The technology of Plasma Spray Physical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Góral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The deposition of thermal barrier coatings is currently the most effective means of protecting the surface of aircraft engine turbine blades from the impact of aggressive environment of combustion gases. The new technologies of TBC depositions are required.Design/methodology/approach: The essential properties of the PS-PVD process have been outlined, as well as recent literature references. In addition, the influence of a set process condition on the properties of the deposited coatings has been described.Findings: The new plasma-spraying PS-PVD method is a promising technology for the deposition of modern thermal barrier coatings on aircraft engine turbine blades.Research limitations/implications: The constant progress of engine operating temperatures and increasing pollution restrictions determine the intensive development of heat-resistant coatings, which is directed to new deposition technologies and coating materials.Practical implications: The article presents a new technology of thermal barrier coating deposition - LPPS Thin Film and Plasma Spray - Physical Vapour Deposition.Originality/value: The completely new technologies was described in article.

  15. Application of nuclear-physics methods in space materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, L. S.; Voronina, E. N.; Galanina, L. I.; Chirskaya, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    The brief history of the development of investigations at the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) in the field of space materials science is outlined. A generalized scheme of a numerical simulation of the radiation impact on spacecraft materials and elements of spacecraft equipment is examined. The results obtained by solving some of the most important problems that modern space materials science should address in studying nuclear processes, the interaction of charged particles with matter, particle detection, the protection from ionizing radiation, and the impact of particles on nanostructures and nanomaterials are presented.

  16. The physics origin of the hierarchy of bodies in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, A.; Wagstaff, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    Here we show that bodies of the same size suspended uniformly in space constitute a system (a "suspension") in a state of uniform volumetric tension because of mass-to-mass forces of attraction. The system "snaps" hierarchically, and evolves faster to a state of reduced tension when the bodies coalesce spontaneously nonuniformly, i.e., hierarchically, into few large and many small bodies suspended in the same space. Hierarchy, not uniformity, is the design that emerges, and it is in accord with the constructal law. The implications of this principle of physics in natural organization and evolution are discussed.

  17. Team of three JGR-Space Physics editors appointed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three editors from the United States, Europe, and Asia have been appointed to lead JGR-Space Physics into the new millennium. This new team will recognize and foster the substantial contributions that scientists from the international community make to the journal. Janet Luhmann, a Senior Fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, will serve as Senior Editor. Luhmann will play a coordinating role for the regional editors, which will be especially important as the Union moves into electronic publishing and adopts new ways of using the technology to publish research findings.

  18. InfoGallery: Informative Arts Services for Physical Library Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Rohde, Anne; Sundararajah, Balasuthas

    2006-01-01

    Much focus in digital libraries research has been devoted to new online services rather than services for the visitors in the physical library. This paper describes InfoGallery, which is a web-based infrastructure for enriching the physical library space with informative art "exhibitions" of digi...... structure, an editor application and a variety of display clients. The paper discusses the design of the infrastructure and its utilization of RSS, podcasts and manually edited news. Applications in the library domain are described and the experiences are discussed....

  19. EDITORIAL: Stability and nonlinear dynamics of plasmas: A symposium celebrating Professor Robert Dewar's accomplishments in plasma physics Stability and nonlinear dynamics of plasmas: A symposium celebrating Professor Robert Dewar's accomplishments in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2012-01-01

    covered in the talks at the Symposium. The paper by David Barmaz and coworkers published in this issue discusses the problem diamagnetic stabilization of ballooning instabilities in stellarators. It is not surprising that Bob's work on ballooning modes shows an accomplished master of WKB theory at work, for it is the culmination of a process that began many years earlier. His involvement in applications of WKB theory to problems involving instability and turbulence began in 1970, when he was a graduate student. At this time he wrote a very influential paper, discussed at the Symposium, on the interaction between hydromagnetic waves and a timedependent inhomogeneous medium. This paper is widely cited, especially in the astrophysical and space plasma literature, for it gives a rigorous method of evaluating the effects of lowfrequency hydromagnetic fluctuations on a slowly varying background medium. The method has found use in problems as diverse as the self-sustainment of molecular clouds, the heating and acceleration of the solar wind, and the effect of cosmic rays on the interplanetary medium. Attentive readers will note that Bob has been drafted as a co-author and participant in about half of the publications in this issue. This is a reflection of Bob's continued and tireless involvement in a wide spectrum of research problems that have their genesis in his fundamental contributions to plasma physics, as well as the eagerness with which we all welcome his involvement in our own projects. We hope to have this continue for many years to come.

  20. EDITORIAL: The Third Nordic Symposium on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecseli, Hans; Trulsen, Jan

    2006-02-01

    The Third Nordic Symposium on Plasma Physics was organized at Lysebu, Oslo, Norway on 4 7 October 2004, under the auspices of the Norwegian Centre for Advanced Study (CAS). The arrangement was preceded by two similar meetings organized at the Risø National Laboratory in Denmark by one of us (HP): Nonlinear Waves in Plasmas, 13 16 August 1985, and The Second Nordic Symposium on Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas and Related Topics, 8 12 August 1988. The proceedings from these two previous meetings were published as Physica Scripta Reprint Series No. 2, and RS 16 (with a few copies still being available). The idea of `Nordic' in the title of this latest meeting was interpreted somewhat liberally, by including also scientific organizations in northern Germany, where a collaboration facing Nordic countries comes naturally, and indeed has solid historical roots pointing also to ongoing activities. We hope that this series of meetings can continue, suggesting that the interval should be kept to a minimum of three years to ensure that all participants present new results. (We hope not to have to wait 16 years until next time, though!) The aim of our meetings is to stimulate collaboration among plasma physicists by creating a forum where the participants can exchange ideas and seek inspiration under relaxed conditions. We have the distinct impression that the meeting was very successful in this respect. Many Nordic institutes have widespread international collaborations, and we were happy to welcome also foreign representatives for some of these activities. Altogether 28 contributed talks were presented by 30 participants. The abstracts of all talks were distributed at the meeting. The present proceedings cover a selection of the contributions. One participant had to cancel, but the contribution is included in these proceedings. All the papers have been refereed according to the usual standards of the journal We, the organizers, thank CAS for the generous financial support

  1. Using semantics to extend the space physics data environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T. W.; Szabo, A.; Merka, J.

    2009-04-01

    The space physics data environment is evolving with the advent of virtual observatories. With the primary function of most virtual observatories being data search and retrieval, an emphasis has been placed on providing value-added data processing services. That is, creating web services that take discovered data and provide common and routine processing such as coordinate transformations and data sub-setting. As these services proliferate, finding, accessing and using them no longer becomes a trivial task. This paper discusses a semantic registry that enables the searching of these services via ontology. We discuss the benefits of such a registry and illustrate how the web and application programming interfaces benefit the space physics community.

  2. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  3. Fluid Physics Research on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corban, Robert

    2000-01-01

    This document is a presentation in viewgraph format which reviews the laboratory facilities and their construction for the International Space Station(ISS). Graphic displays of the ISS are included, with special interest in the facilities available on the US Destiny module and other modules which will be used in the study of fluid physics on the ISS. There are also pictures and descriptions of various components of the Fluids and Combustion Facility.

  4. Space Physics for Graduate Students: An Activities-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Arge, N.; Bruntz, R.; Burns, A. G.; Hughes, W. J.; Knipp, D.; Lyon, J.; McGregor, S.; Owens, M.; Siscoe, G.; Solomon, S. C.; Wiltberger, M.

    2009-01-01

    The geospace environment is controlled largely by events on the Sun, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which generate significant geomagnetic and upper atmospheric disturbances. The study of this Sun-Earth system, which has become known as space weather, has both intrinsic scientific interest and practical applications. Adverse conditions in space can damage satellites and disrupt communications, navigation, and electric power grids, as well as endanger astronauts. The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM), a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (see http://www.bu.edu/cism/), is developing a suite of integrated physics-based computer models that describe the space environment from the Sun to the Earth for use in both research and operations [Hughes and Hudson, 2004, p. 1241]. To further this mission, advanced education and training programs sponsored by CISM encourage students to view space weather as a system that encompasses the Sun, the solar wind, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere/thermosphere. This holds especially true for participants in the CISM space weather summer school [Simpson, 2004].

  5. Space-weather assets developed by the French space-physics community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillard, A. P.; Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.; Briand, C.; Bourdarie, S.; Dudok De Wit, T.; Amari, T.; Blelly, P.-L.; Buchlin, E.; Chambodut, A.; Claret, A.; Corbard, T.; Génot, V.; Guennou, C.; Klein, K. L.; Koechlin, L.; Lavarra, M.; Lavraud, B.; Leblanc, F.; Lemorton, J.; Lilensten, J.; Lopez-Ariste, A.; Marchaudon, A.; Masson, S.; Pariat, E.; Reville, V.; Turc, L.; Vilmer, N.; Zucarello, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a short review of space-weather tools and services developed and maintained by the French space-physics community. They include unique data from ground-based observatories, advanced numerical models, automated identification and tracking tools, a range of space instrumentation and interconnected virtual observatories. The aim of the article is to highlight some advances achieved in this field of research at the national level over the last decade and how certain assets could be combined to produce better space-weather tools exploitable by space-weather centres and customers worldwide. This review illustrates the wide range of expertise developed nationally but is not a systematic review of all assets developed in France.

  6. Fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F. T.; Abramson, H. N.; Angrist, S. W.; Catton, I.; Churchill, S. W.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Otrach, S.; Schwartz, S. H.; Sengers, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    An overstudy committee was formed to study and recommend fundamental experiments in fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer for experimentation in orbit, using the space shuttle system and a space laboratory. The space environment, particularly the low-gravity condition, is an indispensable requirement for all the recommended experiments. The experiments fell broadly into five groups: critical-point thermophysical phenomena, fluid surface dynamics and capillarity, convection at reduced gravity, non-heated multiphase mixtures, and multiphase heat transfer. The Committee attempted to assess the effects of g-jitter and other perturbations of the gravitational field on the conduct of the experiments. A series of ground-based experiments are recommended to define some of the phenomena and to develop reliable instrumentation.

  7. Theory and Observations of Plasma Waves Excited Space Shuttle OMS Burns in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Pfaff, R. F.; Schuck, P. W.; Hunton, D. E.; Hairston, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of artificial plasma turbulence were obtained during two Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiments (SEITE) conducted during the flights of the Space Shuttle (STS-127 and STS-129). Based on computer modeling at the NRL PPD and Laboratory for Computational Physics & Fluid Dynamics (LCP), two dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) engines were scheduled to produce 200 to 240 kg exhaust clouds that passed over the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Communications, Navigation, and Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. This operation required the coordination by the DoD Space Test Program (STP), the NASA Flight Dynamics Officer (FDO), the C/NOFS payload operations, and the C/NOFS instrument principal investigators. The first SEITE mission used exhaust from a 12 Second OMS burn to deposit 1 Giga-Joules of energy into the upper atmosphere at a range of 230 km from C/NOFS. The burn was timed so C/NOFS could fly though the center of the exhaust cloud at a range of 87 km above the orbit of the Space Shuttle. The first SEITE experiment is important because is provided plume detection by ionospheric plasma and electric field probes for direct sampling of irregularities that can scatter radar signals. Three types of waves were detected by C/NOFS during and after the first SEITE burn. With the ignition and termination of the pair of OMS engines, whistler mode signals were recorded at C/NOFS. Six seconds after ignition, a large amplitude electromagnetic pulse reached the satellite. This has been identified as a fast magnetosonic wave propagating across magnetic field lines to reach the electric field (VEFI) sensors on the satellite. Thirty seconds after the burn, the exhaust cloud reach C/NOFS and engulfed the satellite providing very strong electric field turbulence along with enhancements in electron and ion densities. Kinetic modeling has been used to track the electric field turbulence to an unstable velocity

  8. Summary Talk of the X Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Opher, R

    2004-01-01

    Of the many important topics that were discussed at the workshop, I summarize and comment on 25 presentations, which I found to be particularly interesting. They fall into all of the areas covered in the conference: basic plasma phenomena, space and astrophysical plasmas, technological applications of plasma, and thermonuclear fusion.

  9. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  10. Space and Time Ontology: New Models for New Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lumbreras Sancho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel proposes a model for movement – and in general, for change – in which each instant in time (characterized as the set of real numbers is assigned to one point in a configuration space. As much as this model seems to intuitively fit to our experience, it implies a number of assumptions about the nature of space and time that are interesting to explore. Different perspectives have been developed across History, and it could well be that the next scientific revolution is set in motion by an innovative conception of space and time. One of this alternative perspectives was proposed by Julian Barbour, who has developed a new model of Physics where time does not exist [Barbour, 1999]. This paper reviews not only this concept but also other similarly provocative ideas that might prove useful for improving our understanding of the universe. Prior to this, the relevance of the philosophy of space and time will be briefly outlined and its history reviewed to provide some background for the discussed models. Finally, an approach where space and time are only defined by convention will be considered.

  11. Space Commercial Opportunities for Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavert, R.

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity research at NASA has been an undertaking that has included both science and commercial approaches since the late 80s and early 90s. The Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena community has been developed, through NASA's science grants, into a valuable base of expertise in microgravity science. This was achieved through both ground and flight scientific research. Commercial microgravity research has been primarily promoted thorough NASA sponsored Centers for Space Commercialization which develop cost sharing partnerships with industry. As an example, the Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP)at Northeastern University has been working with cost sharing industry partners in developing Zeolites and zeo-type materials as an efficient storage medium for hydrogen fuel. Greater commercial interest is emerging. The U.S. Congress has passed the Commercial Space Act of 1998 to encourage the development of a commercial space industry in the United States. The Act has provisions for the commercialization of the International Space Station (ISS). Increased efforts have been made by NASA to enable industrial ventures on-board the ISS. A Web site has been established at http://commercial/nasa/gov which includes two important special announcements. One is an open request for entrepreneurial offers related to the commercial development and use of the ISS. The second is a price structure and schedule for U.S. resources and accommodations. The purpose of the presentation is to make the Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena community, which understands the importance of microgravity experimentation, aware of important aspects of ISS commercial development. It is a desire that this awareness will be translated into a recognition of Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena application opportunities coordinated through the broad contacts of this community with industry.

  12. Drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1992-01-01

    Drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities of a finite-beta plasma in equilibrium electric and magnetic fields which are perpendicular to each other are studied using two fluid equations. Three types of these instabilities are considered including the magnetosonic instability of a finite beta-homogeneous plasma, the electrostatic drift instability of an inhomogeneous low-beta plasma, and the magneto-acoustic instability of a high-beta inhomogeneous isothermal plasma. It is shown that the electric field has either stabilizing or destabilizing effect depending on conditions under consideration.

  13. Physics of Boundaries and their Interactions in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Nojan; Karimabadi, Homayoun; Krauss-Verban, Dietmar

    1999-01-01

    In the following, we provide a summary of our most significant research accomplishments resulting from this contract. For the sake of brevity, most of the projects are explained in a paragraph length, highlighting only pertinent results.

  14. Relevant parameter space and stability of spherical tokamaks with a plasma center column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampugnani, L. G.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Farengo, R.

    2017-02-01

    A spherical tokamak (ST) with a plasma center column (PCC) can be formed inside a simply connected chamber via driven magnetic relaxation. From a practical perspective, the ST-PCC could overcome many difficulties associated with the material center column of the standard ST reactor design. Besides, the ST-PCC concept can be regarded as an advanced helicity injected device that would enable novel experiments on the key physics of magnetic relaxation and reconnection. This is because the concept includes not only a PCC but also a coaxial helicity injector (CHI). This combination implies an improved level of flexibility in the helicity injection scheme required for the formation and sustainment phases. In this work, the parameter space determining the magnetic structure of the ST-PCC equilibria is studied under the assumption of fully relaxed plasmas. In particular, it is shown that the effect of the external bias field of the PCC and the CHI essentially depends on a single parameter that measures the relative amount of flux of these two entities. The effect of plasma elongation on the safety factor profile and the stability to the tilt mode are also analyzed. In the first part of this work, the stability of the system is explained in terms of the minimum energy principle, and relevant stability maps are constructed. While this picture provides an adequate insight into the underlying physics of the instability, it does not include the stabilizing effect of line-tying at the electrodes. In the second part, a dynamical stability analysis of the ST-PCC configurations, including the effect of line-tying, is performed by numerically solving the magnetohydrodynamic equations. A significant stability enhancement is observed when the PCC contains more than the 70% of the total external bias flux, and the elongation is not higher than two.

  15. Leucine-based receptor sorting motifs are dependent on the spacing relative to the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Dietrich, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1998-01-01

    amino acid, is constitutively active. In this study, we have investigated how the spacing relative to the plasma membrane affects the function of both types of leucine-based motifs. For phosphorylation-dependent leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 7 residues between the plasma membrane...... and the phospho-acceptor was required for phosphorylation and thereby activation of the motifs. For constitutively active leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 6 residues between the plasma membrane and the acidic residue was required for optimal activity of the motifs. In addition, we found that the acidic...

  16. Understanding space weather with new physical, mathematical and philosophical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateev, Lachezar; Velinov, Peter; Tassev, Yordan

    2016-07-01

    The actual problems of solar-terrestrial physics, in particular of space weather are related to the prediction of the space environment state and are solved by means of different analyses and models. The development of these investigations can be considered also from another side. This is the philosophical and mathematical approach towards this physical reality. What does it constitute? We have a set of physical processes which occur in the Sun and interplanetary space. All these processes interact with each other and simultaneously participate in the general process which forms the space weather. Let us now consider the Leibniz's monads (G.W. von Leibniz, 1714, Monadologie, Wien; Id., 1710, Théodicée, Amsterdam) and use some of their properties. There are total 90 theses for monads in the Leibniz's work (1714), f.e. "(1) The Monad, of which we shall here speak, is nothing but a simple substance, which enters into compounds. By 'simple' is meant 'without parts'. (Theod. 10.); … (56) Now this connexion or adaptation of all created things to each and of each to all, means that each simple substance has relations which express all the others, and, consequently, that it is a perpetual living mirror of the universe. (Theod. 130, 360.); (59) … this universal harmony, according to which every substance exactly expresses all others through the relations it has with them. (63) … every Monad is, in its own way, a mirror of the universe, and the universe is ruled according to a perfect order. (Theod. 403.)", etc. Let us introduce in the properties of monads instead of the word "monad" the word "process". We obtain the following statement: Each process reflects all other processes and all other processes reflect this process. This analogy is not formal at all, it reflects accurately the relation between the physical processes and their unity. The category monad which in the Leibniz's Monadology reflects generally the philosophical sense is fully identical with the

  17. Asymptotic-Preserving methods and multiscale models for plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of Asymptotic-Preserving methods for multiscale plasma simulations by addressing three singular perturbation problems. First, the quasi-neutral limit of fluid and kinetic models is investigated in the framework of non magnetized as well as magnetized plasmas. Second, the drift limit for fluid descriptions of thermal plasmas under large magnetic fields is addressed. Finally efficient numerical resolutions of anisotropic elliptic or diffusion equations arising in magnetized plasma simulation are reviewed.

  18. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  19. PREFACE: International Symposium on Physical Sciences in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andreas; Egry, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    ISPS is the major international scientific forum for researchers in physics utilizing the space environment, in particular microgravity. It is intended to inspire and encourage cross-cutting discussions between different scientific communities working in the same environment. Contributions discussing results of experiments carried out on drop towers, parabolic aircraft flights, sounding rockets, unmanned recoverable capsules and, last but not least, the International Space Station ISS, are the backbone of this conference series, complemented by preparatory ground-based work, both experimentally and theoretically. The first International Symposium on Physical Sciences in Space (ISPS) sponsored by the International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group (IMSPG) took place in 2000 in Sorrento, Italy. IMSPG seeks to coordinate the planning of space for research in physical sciences by space agencies worldwide. AEB (Brazil), ASI (Italy), CNES (France), CSA (Canada), DLR (Germany), ESA (Europe), JAXA (Japan), NASA (USA), NSAU (Ukraine) and RSA (Russia) are members, and CNSA (China) and ISRO (India) are also invited to join IMSPG meetings. ISPS-4 was the fourth symposium in that series, following ISPS-2 organized by CSA in 2004 in Toronto, Canada, and ISPS-3 organized in 2007 by JAXA in Nara, Japan. ISPS-4 was jointly organized by ESA and DLR on behalf of the IMSPG and was held in Bonn from 11-15 July 2011. 230 participants from 17 different countries attended ISPS-4. Recent microgravity experiments were presented, analysed, and set in context to results from Earth bound experiments in 16 plenary and 68 topical talks. Lively discussions continued during two dedicated poster sessions and at the exhibition booths of space industry and research centers with new flight hardware on display. The oral presentations at ISPS4 were selected exclusively on the basis of scientific merit, as evidenced through the submitted abstracts. The selection was performed by the International

  20. Plasma physics abstracts, 1 January - 31 December, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Dangelo, N.; Goertz, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: ion-cyclotron waves; plasma waves; solar wind lithium releases; bow shock; Pi2 wave bursts; auroral kilometric radiation; ion energization; magnetic field corrections; electric fields; magnetospheric processes; electron acceleration; inner heliosphere; nightside auroral zone; computerized simulation; plasma wave turbulence; and magnetohydrodynamic waves in plasma sheets.

  1. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  2. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the d...

  3. Physical-Chemical Characterization of Nanodispersed Powders Produced by a Plasma-Chemical Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. GEORGIEVA; G. VISSOKOV; Iv. GRANCHAROV

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a review on the physical-chemical properties and characteristics of plasma-chemically produced nanodispersed powders (NDP), such as metals, oxides, nitrides, carbides, and catalysts. The plasma-chemical preparation of the powders was carried out in thermal plasma (TP) created by means of high-current electric arcs, plasma jets, high-frequency (HF) discharges, etc. We also discuss certain properties and characteristics of the NDPs, which are determined largely by the conditions of preparation.

  4. Physics and optimization of plasma startup in the RFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, W.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Ko, J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Morton, L.; Munaretto, S.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Brower, D. L.; Liu, W.

    2015-05-01

    In the tokamak and reversed-field pinch (RFP), inductively driven toroidal plasma current provides the confining poloidal magnetic field and ohmic heating power, but the magnitude and/or duration of this current is limited by the available flux swing in the poloidal field transformer. A portion of this flux is consumed during startup as the current is initiated and ramped to its final target value, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding startup and minimizing the amount of flux consumed. Flux consumption can be reduced during startup in the RFP by increasing the toroidal magnetic field, Bti, applied to initiate the discharge, but the underlying physics is not yet entirely understood. Toward increasing this understanding, we have for the first time in the RFP employed advanced, non-invasive diagnostics on the Madison Symmetric Torus to measure the evolution of current, magnetic field, and kinetic profiles during startup. Flux consumption during startup is dominantly inductive, but we find that the inductive flux consumption drops as Bti increases. The resistive consumption of flux, while relatively small, apparently increases with Bti due to a smaller electron temperature. However, the ion temperature increases with Bti, exceeding the electron temperature and thus reflecting non-collisional heating. Magnetic fluctuations also increase with Bti, corresponding primarily to low-n modes that emerge sequentially as the safety factor profile evolves from tokamak-like to that of the RFP.

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  6. A family for miniature, easily reconfigurable particle sensors for space plasma measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, M.; Barabash, S.

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 15 years the Swedish Institute of Space Physics developed a line of miniaturized ion mass analyzers for space plasma studies with masses of 400-600 g and highly compact and dense design to minimize the volume. The sensors cover an energy range from few eV up to 15 keV and reach an angular coverage up to hemispherical and mass resolution up to 7, depending on application. The experience with this line of sensors demonstrates that a sensor mass of 400-600 g is a limit in the trade-off between scientifically valuable performance and the sensor mass. The Solar Wind Monitor (SWIM), part of the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) on board of the Indian Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon, was the first sensor in the line. A number of instruments derived from SWIM were built, each using the same basic architecture but adapted for the needs of the corresponding mission: the Miniature Ion Precipitation Analyzer (MIPA) on the European Space Agency's BepiColombo mission to Mercury, the Detector for Ions at Mars (DIM) for the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission and the Yinghuo Plasma Package Ion sensor (YPPi) for the Chinese Yinghuo-1 spacecraft (both to Mars), the Prisma Ion Mass Analyzer (PRIMA) for the Swedish PRISMA spacecraft to Earth orbit, the eXtra Small Analyzer of Neutrals (XASN) for the Russian Luna-Glob lander, and the Laboratory Ion Scattering Analyzer (LISA) used for laboratory studies. We review architecture, design, performance, and fields of application of the instruments in this family and give and outlook in future developments.

  7. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  8. 'Plasma Camp': A Different Approach to Professional Development for Physics Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Post-Zwicker and Nicholas R. Guilbert

    1998-12-01

    The Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Institute ('Plasma Camp') was inaugurated in 1998 as a way to address two areas of concern in the professional development of high-school physics teachers: involving teachers in the theory and methods of a current area of research in physics and connecting the research experience back into the classroom. The Institute, run jointly by a scientist and a teacher, immersed high-school teachers from across the country in laboratory investigations and in pedagogical projects for two weeks at Princeton University's Plasma Physics Laboratory. The goals, structure, and initial outcomes of the Institute are discussed.

  9. Physical sciences research plans for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    The restructuring of the research capabilities of the International Space Station has forced a reassessment of the Physical Sciences research plans and a re-targeting of the major scientific thrusts. The combination of already selected peer-reviewed flight investigations with the initiation of new research and technology programs will allow the maximization of the ISS scientific and technological potential. Fundamental and applied research will use a combination of ISS-based facilities, ground-based activities, and other experimental platforms to address issues impacting fundamental knowledge, industrial and medical applications on Earth, and the technology required for human space exploration. The current flight investigation research plan shows a large number of principal investigators selected to use the remaining planned research facilities. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wireless avionics for space applications of fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linna; Zeng, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental physics (FP) research in space relies on a strong support of spacecraft. New types of spacecraft including reusable launch vehicles, reentry space vehicles, long-term on-orbit spacecraft or other new type of spacecraft will pave the way for FP missions. In order to test FP theories in space, flight conditions have to be controlled to a very high precision, data collection and handling abilities have to be improved, real-time and reliable communications in critical environments are needed. These challenge the existing avionics of spacecraft. Avionics consists of guidance, navigation & control, TT&C, the vehicle management, etc. Wireless avionics is one of the enabling technologies to address the challenges. Reasons are expatiated of why it is of great advantage. This paper analyses the demands for wireless avionics by reviewing the FP missions and on-board wireless systems worldwide. Main types of wireless communication are presented. Preliminary system structure of wireless avionics are given. The characteristics of wireless network protocols and wireless sensors are introduced. Key technologies and design considerations for wireless avionics in space applications are discussed.

  11. Space, Time, and Spacetime Physical and Philosophical Implications of Minkowski's Unification of Space and Time

    CERN Document Server

    Petkov, Vesselin

    2010-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to the centennial anniversary of Minkowski's discovery of spacetime. It contains selected papers by physicists and philosophers on the Nature and Ontology of Spacetime. The first six papers, comprising Part I of the book, provide examples of the impact of Minkowski's spacetime representation of special relativity on the twentieth century physics. Part II also contains six papers which deal with implications of Minkowski's ideas for the philosophy of space and time. The last part is represented by two papers which explore the influence of Minkowski's ideas beyond the philosophy of space and time.

  12. The distribution of radio plasma in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Katherine M

    2005-03-15

    The influence of jet-ejected plasma has been an important theme of this meeting; I draw attention to the prevalence of jet-ejected plasma, in particular that which has not been properly accounted for in the past. There are three strands to this paper: important emission which is prominent only at the lowest radio frequencies; relic radio plasma which must exist if even the most basic aspects of radio source evolutionary models are correct; and evidence that some 'radio-quiet' quasars could be FR-I radio sources.

  13. CDPP activities: Promoting research and education in space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genot, V. N.; Andre, N.; Cecconi, B.; Gangloff, M.; Bouchemit, M.; Dufourg, N.; Pitout, F.; Budnik, E.; Lavraud, B.; Rouillard, A. P.; Heulet, D.; Bellucci, A.; Durand, J.; Delmas, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Briand, C.; Biegun, A.

    2015-12-01

    The French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/) addresses for more than 15 years all issues pertaining to natural plasma data distribution and valorization. Initially established by CNES and CNRS on the ground of a solid data archive, CDPP activities diversified with the advent of broader networks and interoperability standards, and through fruitful collaborations (e.g. with NASA/PDS): providing access to remote data, designing and building science driven analysis tools then became at the forefront of CDPP developments. For instance today AMDA helps scientists all over the world accessing and analyzing data from ancient to very recent missions (from Voyager, Galileo, Geotail, ... to Maven, Rosetta, MMS, ...) as well as results from models and numerical simulations. Other tools like the Propagation Tool or 3DView allow users to put their data in context and interconnect with other databases (CDAWeb, MEDOC) and tools (Topcat). This presentation will briefly review this evolution, show technical and science use cases, and finally put CDPP activities in the perspective of ongoing collaborative projects (Europlanet H2020, HELCATS, ...) and future missions (Bepicolombo, Solar Orbiter, ...).

  14. Phase-space diffusion in turbulent plasmas: The random acceleration problem revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, H.L.; Trulsen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Phase-space diffusion of test particles in turbulent plasmas is studied by an approach based on a conditional statistical analysis of fluctuating electrostatic fields. Analytical relations between relevant conditional averages and higher-order correlations, , and triple...

  15. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  16. Theoretical and experimental studies of space-related plasma wave propagation and resonance phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, F. W.

    1975-01-01

    A ten year summary was given of university research on the nature and characteristics of space related plasma resonance phenomena, whistler propagation in laboratory plasmas, and theoretical and experimental studies of plasma wave propagation. Data are also given on long delayed echoes, low frequency instabilities, ionospheric heating, and backscatter, and pulse propagation. A list is included of all conference papers, publications, and reports resulting from the study.

  17. Plasma density fluctuations observed during Space Shuttle Orbiter water releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; D'Angelo, N.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the Langmuir probe on the Plasma Diagnostics Package flown as part of the Spacelab 2 mission in the summer of 1985 show a strong increase in the level of turbulence near the Shuttle Orbiter during operations in which liquid water is released. The spectrum of the plasma density fluctuations peaks at the lowest frequencies measured (a few Hz) and extends up to a few kHz, near the lower hybrid frequency. Two potential mechanisms for generating the plasma turbulence are suggested which are both based on the production of water ions as a result of charge exchange with the ambient oxygen ions in the ionosphere. The first mechanism proposed is the ion-plasma instability which arises from the drift of the contaminant with respect to the ambient oxygen ions. The other mechanism proposed is the Ott-Farley instability, which is a result of the ring distribution formed by the 'pick-up' water ions.

  18. Physics-Based Computational Algorithm for the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    Riemann solver for the two-fluid plasma model. Journal of Computational Physics , 187(2):620–638, 2003. [23] Jeffrey P. Freidberg. Ideal...Computational Physics , 141(2):199–224, 1998. [52] P. L. Roe. Approximate Riemann solvers, parameter vectors and difference schemes. Journal of...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0310 PHYSICS -BASED COMPUTATIONAL ALGORITHM FOR THE MULTIFLUID PLASMA MODEL Uri Shumlak UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Final Report 10

  19. Gas plasma sterilization--application of space-age technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, S; Smith, J H

    1995-08-01

    Gas plasma sterilization is new to the healthcare field. The first such sterilizer has been manufactured by Advanced Sterilization Products (J&J, Irvine, CA). The system uses hydrogen peroxide as the substrate gas and radio frequency emissions to generate plasma. This system is a low-temperature, quick-acting process with no toxic residues. It appears that this sterilizer system holds promise in the healthcare field and could help to reduce the use of ethylene oxide.

  20. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    from many different standpoints. A special case of non-equilibrium is that of non-neutral plasmas, i.e. plasmas devoid of ions, as described in the lecture and paper by J Marler (Appleton, USA). Physics of swarms (the low space charge limit of ionized gases) is similar to the previous study in the fact that we may have only one group of charged particles electrons (or ions). But the difference is that the latter has a much higher pressure and therefore number of collisions. In the lecture on one aspect of the application of swarm data (transport coefficients) to determine the electron scattering cross sections R White (Townsville, Australia) addresses a long standing controversy in the vibrational excitation of H2 of an unacceptable discrepancy between swarm results and binary collision experiments and theories, (a problem that has been of particular importance to the host Laboratory). The lecture of N Dyatko (Troitsk, Russian Federation) tackles one of the most interesting recent problems in the transport theory of ionized gases, that of the negative absolute conductivity and attempts to translate it to solid state physics where the stakes are much higher. The swarm studies were always based on excellent experimental data and the leading experimental group today is that of J de Urquijo (Cuernavaca, Mexico) who presents a review of a wide range of transport data that his group obtained in fluorinated gases. The gas breakdown in dc and high frequency fields was addressed by M Radmilović-Rađenović (Belgrade, Serbia) by applying a detailed secondary electron production model in Particle in Cell (PIC) code and comparing the results to a broad range of experimental data. The hybrid (fluid-Monte Carlo) model has been applied in the study by Z Donko and K Kutasi (Budapest, Hungary) of low pressure obstructed glow discharges to decribe the effect of fast neutrals on gas discharges. A study of kinetics of negative ions of hydrogen in glow discharges with positive column and

  1. Physical limitations in ferromagnetic inductively coupled plasma sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Yury P; Slutsker, Yakov Z

    2012-01-01

    The Ferromagnetic Inductively Coupled Plasma (FICP) source, which is a version of the common inductively coupled plasma sources, has a number of well known advantages such as high efficiency, high level of ionization, low minimal gas pressure, very low required driver frequency, and even a possibility to be driven by single current pulses. We present an experimental study of such an FICP source which showed that above a certain value of the driving pulse power the properties of this device changed rather drastically. Namely, the plasma became non-stationary and non-uniform contrary to the stationary and uniform plasmas typical for this kind of plasma sources. In this case the plasma appeared as a narrow dense spike which was short compared to the driving pulse. The local plasma density could exceed the neutral atoms density by a few orders of magnitude. When that happened, the afterglow plasma decay time after the end of the pulse was long compared to an ordinary case with no plasma spike. Experiments were pe...

  2. Immunoelectron microscopic evidence for Tetherin/BST2 as the physical bridge between HIV-1 virions and the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hammonds

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST2 was identified in 2008 as the cellular factor responsible for restricting HIV-1 replication at a very late stage in the lifecycle. Tetherin acts to retain virion particles on the plasma membrane after budding has been completed. Infected cells that express large amounts of tetherin display large strings of HIV virions that remain attached to the plasma membrane. Vpu is an HIV-1 accessory protein that specifically counteracts the restriction to virus release contributed by tetherin. Tetherin is an unusual Type II transmembrane protein that contains a GPI anchor at its C-terminus and is found in lipid rafts. The leading model for the mechanism of action of tetherin is that it functions as a direct physical tether bridging virions and the plasma membrane. However, evidence that tetherin functions as a physical tether has thus far been indirect. Here we demonstrate by biochemical and immunoelectron microscopic methods that endogenous tetherin is present on the viral particle and forms a bridge between virion particles and the plasma membrane. Endogenous tetherin was found on HIV particles that were released by partial proteolytic digestion. Immunoelectron microscopy performed on HIV-infected T cells demonstrated that tetherin forms an apparent physical link between virions and connects patches of virions to the plasma membrane. Linear filamentous strands that were highly enriched in tetherin bridged the space between some virions. We conclude that tetherin is the physical tether linking HIV-1 virions and the plasma membrane. The presence of filaments with which multiple molecules of tetherin interact in connecting virion particles is strongly suggested by the morphologic evidence.

  3. Space and Astrophysical Plasmas : Sun–Earth connection: Boundary layer waves and auroras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Lakhina; B T Tsurutani; J K Arballo; C Galvan

    2000-11-01

    Boundary layers are the sites where energy and momentum are exchanged between two distinct plasmas. Boundary layers occurring in space plasmas can support a wide spectrum of plasma waves spanning a frequency range of a few mHz to 100 kHz and beyond. The main characteristics of the broadband plasma waves (with frequencies > 1 Hz) observed in the magnetopause, polar cap, and plasma sheet boundary layers are described. The rapid pitch angle scattering of energetic particles via cyclotron resonant interactions with the waves can provide sufficient precipitated energy flux to the ionosphere to create the diffused auroral oval. The broadband plasma waves may also play an important role in the processes of local heating/acceleration of the boundary layer plasma.

  4. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  5. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  7. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  8. On physics at the Planck scale: Space as a network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, L. V.

    2007-05-01

    It is shown that the one-dimensional quantum field theory can be modeled as a chain of classical oscillators in a thermal bath provided that the Gibbs measure is identified with the phase-space volume measure, the chain being in a nonequilibrium state. Quantized strings and p-branes are also modeled by ordered systems of oscillators. The model of a one-dimensional superspace is constructed. It is shown that the Ramond-Neveu-Schwarz superstring is modeled by a helix formed of a bosonic-string in a multidimensional space. The physical 3D space is represented by a superstring structure (3D “network”), which is described by some Lagrangian. Thus, the unified description of all interactions including gravity is achieved because the superstring excitations involve all fields. In view of the discrete character of the initial structure, the theory is free of ultraviolet divergences. The essential element of the model is the occurrence of the cosmological constant in the gravity equations. A black hole model giving reasonable values for its temperature and entropy is proposed.

  9. Rotating space elevators: Physics of celestial scale spinning strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Steven; Golubović, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    We explore classical and statistical mechanics of a novel dynamical system, the Rotating Space Elevator (RSE) (L. Golubović, S. Knudsen, EPL 86, 34001 (2009)). The RSE is a double rotating floppy string reaching extraterrestrial locations. Objects sliding along the RSE string (climbers) do not require internal engines or propulsion to be transported far away from the Earth's surface. The RSE thus solves a major problem in space elevator science, which is how to supply energy to the climbers moving along space elevator strings. The RSE can be made in various shapes that are stabilized by an approximate equilibrium between the gravitational and inertial forces acting in a double rotating frame associated with the RSE. This dynamical equilibrium is achieved by a special ("magical") form of the RSE mass line density derived in this paper. The RSE exhibits a variety of interesting dynamical phenomena explored here by numerical simulations. Thanks to its special design, the RSE exhibits everlasting double rotating motion. Under some conditions, however, we find that the RSE may undergo a morphological transition to a chaotic state reminiscent of fluctuating directed polymers in the realm of the statistical physics of strings and membranes.

  10. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, L.; Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, S.; Popova, I.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Serova, L.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the aminoacid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this recovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues.

  11. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  12. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

  13. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasmas give extensive information in 5D on turbulence and transport. This paper highlights a few of these challenging physics in global, flux driven simulations using experimental inputs from Tore Supra shot TS45511. The electrostatic gyrokinetic code GYSELA is used for these simulations. The 3D structure of avalanches indicates that these structures propagate radially at localised toroidal angles and then expand along the field line at sound speed to form the filaments. Analysing the poloidal mode structure of the potential fluctuations (at a given toroidal location), one finds that the low modes m = 0 and m = 1 exhibit a global structure; the magnitude of the m = 0 mode is much larger than that of the m = 1 mode. The shear layers of the corrugation structures are thus found to be dominated by the m = 0 contribution, that are comparable to that of the zonal flows. This global mode seems to localise the m = 2 mode but has little effect on the localisation of the higher mode numbers. However when analysing the pulsation of the latter modes one finds that all modes exhibit a similar phase velocity, comparable to the local zonal flow velocity. The consequent dispersion like relation between the modes pulsation and the mode numbers provides a means to measure the zonal flow. Temperature fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux are localised between the corrugation structures. Temperature fluctuations are found to exhibit two scales, small fluctuations that are localised by the corrugation shear layers, and appear to bounce back and forth radially, and large fluctuations, also readily observed on the flux, which are associated to the disruption of the corrugations. The radial ballistic velocity of both avalanche events if of the order of 0.5ρ∗c0 where ρ∗ = ρ0/a, a being the tokamak minor radius and ρ0 being the characteristic Larmor radius, ρ0 = c0/Ω0. c0 is the reference ion thermal velocity and Ω0 = qiB0/mi the reference

  14. Mathematical methods in physics distributions, Hilbert space operators, variational methods, and applications in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook presents the basic mathematical knowledge and skills that are needed for courses on modern theoretical physics, such as those on quantum mechanics, classical and quantum field theory, and related areas.  The authors stress that learning mathematical physics is not a passive process and include numerous detailed proofs, examples, and over 200 exercises, as well as hints linking mathematical concepts and results to the relevant physical concepts and theories.  All of the material from the first edition has been updated, and five new chapters have been added on such topics as distributions, Hilbert space operators, and variational methods.   The text is divided into three main parts. Part I is a brief introduction to distribution theory, in which elements from the theories of ultradistributions and hyperfunctions are considered in addition to some deeper results for Schwartz distributions, thus providing a comprehensive introduction to the theory of generalized functions. P...

  15. Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic Waves In The Collisionless Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Staude, J.

    2007-12-01

    The instability of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) waves in an anisotropic, collisionless, rarefied hot plasma is studied. Anisotropy properties of such a plasma are caused by a strong magnetic field, when the thermal gas pressures across and along the field become unequal. Moreover, there appears an anisotropy of the thermal fluxes. The study of the anisotropy features of the plasma are motivated by observed solar coronal data. The 16 moments equations derived from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation are used. These equations strongly differ from the usual isotropic MHD case. For linear disturbances the wave equations in homogenous anisotropic plasma are deduced. The general dispersion relation for the incompressible wave modes is derived, solved and analyzed. It is shown that a wide wave spectrum with stable and unstable behavior is possible, in contrast to the usual isotropic MHD case. The dependence of the instability on magnetic field, pressure anisotropy, and heat fluxes is investigated. The general instability condition is obtained. The results can be applied to the theory of solar and stellar coronal heating, to wind models and in other modeling, where the collisionless approximation is valid.

  16. Space Plasma Studies by In-Situ and Remote Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Awarded by Lenin Prize (highest in USSR). 1962 Plasma experiments aboard KOSMOS 2, evidence of the lack of charged particles thermodynamic equilibrium...ionosphere of Venus. 1970- 1979 Ionospheric experiments aboard COSMOS 378, INTERCOSMOS 8,10,12,14,18,19 and KOSMOS 900. 1970- 1981 Series of in

  17. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  18. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhir, Dass, E-mail: dass.sudhir@iter-india.org; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29 GIDC, Sec-25, Gandhinagar, 382016 Gujarat (India)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  19. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  20. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  1. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  2. Relativity Based on Physical Processes Rather Than Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Albrecht

    2013-09-01

    Physicists' understanding of relativity and the way it is handled is at present dominated by the interpretation of Albert Einstein, who related relativity to specific properties of space and time. The principal alternative to Einstein's interpretation is based on a concept proposed by Hendrik A. Lorentz, which uses knowledge of classical physics to explain relativistic phenomena. In this paper, we will show that on the one hand the Lorentz-based interpretation provides a simpler mathematical way of arriving at the known results for both Special and General Relativity. On the other hand, it is able to solve problems which have remained open to this day. Furthermore, a particle model will be presented, based on Lorentzian relativity, which explains the origin of mass without the use of the Higgs mechanism, based on the finiteness of the speed of light, and which provides the classical results for particle properties that are currently only accessible through quantum mechanics.

  3. Multilayer Scintillation Detector for Nuclear Physics Monitoring of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mayorov, Andrey; Koldashov, Sergey; Batischev, Alexey; Lapushkin, Sergey; Gurov, Yury

    The physical characteristics of the multilayer scintillation spectrometer for identification and energy measurement of cosmic electrons, positrons and nuclei are considered in this presentation. The nuclei energy measurement range is 3-100 MeV/nucleon. This spectrometer is planning for space weather monitoring and investigation of solar-magnetospheric and geophysics effects on satellite. These characteristics were estimated by means of computer simulation. The ionization loss fluctuations, ion charge exchange during pass through detector and, especially, scintillation quenching effect (Bircs effect) were taken into account in calculations. The main results are: 1.) Ions mass identification is possible for hydrogen and helium isotopes 2.) Ions charge identification without mass identification is possible for nuclei from lithium to oxygen The preliminary estimation indicate, that including to spectrometer of thin semiconductor detector (SCD) as first layer makes possible charge identification for Z>8. This may be done by means of comparison of ion range in spectrometer with its energy loss in SCD.

  4. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-18

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security.

  5. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security.

  6. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  7. Submicron CMOS technologies for high energy physics and space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, G; Faccio, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, Pierre; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Marchioro, A; Moreira, P; Snoeys, W

    2001-01-01

    The radiation environment present in some of today's High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments and in space has a detrimental influence on the integrated circuits working in these environments. Special technologies, called radiation hardened, have been used in the past to prevent the radiation-induced degradation. In the last decades, the market of these special technologies has undergone a considerable shrinkage, rendering them less reliably available and far more expensive than today's mainstream technologies. An alternative approach is to use a deep submicron CMOS technology. The most sensitive part to radiation effects in a MOS transistor is the gate oxide. One way to reduce the effects of ionizing radiation in the gate oxide is to reduce its thickness, which is a natural trend in modern technologies. Submicron CMOS technologies seem therefore a good candidate for implementing radiation-hardened integrated circuits using a commercial, inexpensive technology. Nevertheless, a certain number of radiation-induced...

  8. The Clifford algebra of physical space and Dirac theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Jayme, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    The claim found in many textbooks that the Dirac equation cannot be written solely in terms of Pauli matrices is shown to not be completely true. It is only true as long as the term β \\psi in the usual Dirac factorization of the Klein-Gordon equation is assumed to be the product of a square matrix β and a column matrix ψ. In this paper we show that there is another possibility besides this matrix product, in fact a possibility involving a matrix operation, and show that it leads to another possible expression for the Dirac equation. We show that, behind this other possible factorization is the formalism of the Clifford algebra of physical space. We exploit this fact, and discuss several different aspects of Dirac theory using this formalism. In particular, we show that there are four different possible sets of definitions for the parity, time reversal, and charge conjugation operations for the Dirac equation.

  9. Hamiltonian and physical Hilbert space in polymer quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, A; Zapata, R J A; Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a version of polymer quantum mechanics, which is inspired by loop quantum gravity, is considered and shown to be equivalent, in a precise sense, to the standard, experimentally tested, Schroedinger quantum mechanics. The kinematical cornerstone of our framework is the so called polymer representation of the Heisenberg-Weyl (H-W) algebra, which is the starting point of the construction. The dynamics is constructed as a continuum limit of effective theories characterized by a scale, and requires a renormalization of the inner product. The result is a physical Hilbert space in which the continuum Hamiltonian can be represented and that is unitarily equivalent to the Schroedinger representation of quantum mechanics. As a concrete implementation of our formalism, the simple harmonic oscillator is fully developed.

  10. Attendees “roasted” at Space Physics and Aeronomy dinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy Section's annual dinner was held during the Fall AGU meeting in December at San Francisco's Wu Kong restaurant. The Planetology section joined the SPA section for this year's event, but that's not why tickets for the dinner sold out so early this year; it was because of the many members hoping to receive one of the prestigious awards presented at the dinner each year.The first award presented was a serious one. The Fred Scarf award—which recognizes the year's most outstanding Ph.D. thesis—was received by UCLA's Vassilis Angelopoulos, who did his undergraduate work at the University of Thessaloniki in Greece [Angelopoulos, 1993]. SPA President Janet Luhmann also deserves congratulations for being able to pronounce Thessaloniki.

  11. The Development of Plasma Thrusters and Its Importance for Space Technology and Science Education at University of Brasilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Calvoso, Lui; Gessini, Paolo; Ferreira, Ivan

    Since 2004 The Plasma Physics Laboratory of University of Brasilia (Brazil) is developing Hall Plasma Thurusters for Satellite station keeping and orbit control. The project is supported by CNPq, CAPES, FAP DF and from The Brazillian Space Agency-AEB. The project is part of The UNIESPAÇO Program for Space Activities Development in Brazillian Universities. In this work we are going to present the highlights of this project together with its vital contribution to include University of Brasilia in the Brazillian Space Program. Electric propulsion has already shown, over the years, its great advantages in being used as main and secondary thruster system of several space mission types. Between the many thruster concepts, one that has more tradition in flying real spacecraft is the Hall Effect Thruster (HET). These thrusters, first developed by the USSR in the 1960s, uses, in the traditional design, the radial magnetic field and axial electric field to trap electrons, ionize the gas and accelerate the plasma to therefore generate thrust. In contrast to the usual solution of using electromagnets to generate the magnetic field, the research group of the Plasma Physics Laboratory of University of Brasília has been working to develop new models of HETs that uses combined permanent magnets to generate the necessary magnetic field, with the main objective of saving electric power in the final system design. Since the beginning of this research line it was developed and implemented two prototypes of the Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster (PMHT). The first prototype, called P-HALL1, was successfully tested with the using of many diagnostics instruments, including, RF probe, Langmuir probe, Ion collector and Ion energy analyzer. The second prototype, P-HALL2, is currently under testing, and it’s planned the increasing of the plasma diagnostics and technology analysis, with the inclusion of a thrust balance, mass spectroscopy and Doppler broadening. We are also developing an

  12. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in H-mode on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jernigan, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased non-linearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was {le} 3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density {approximately} 1.5 {times} Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flattop. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks.

  13. Some problems of pulsar physics. [magnetospheric plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theories of particle acceleration along polar field lines are reviewed, and the total energization of the charge separated plasma is summarized, when pair creation is absent. The application of these theories and plasma supply to pulsars is discussed, with attention given to the total amount of electron-positron plasma created and its momentum distribution. Various aspects of radiation emission and transport are analyzed, based on a polar current flow model with pair creation, and the phenomenon of marching subpulses is considered. The coronation beaming and the relativistically expanding current sheet models for pulsar emission are also outlined, and the paper concludes with a brief discussion of the relation between the theories of polar flow with pair plasma and the problem of the energization of the Crab Nebula.

  14. Study of the interaction between space plasma and high voltage solar array

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, Minoru; TANAKA, KOJI; Sasaki, Susumu; ODAWARA, OSAMU; 岩佐 稔; 田中 孝治; 佐々木 進; 小田原 修

    2006-01-01

    We are studying the problems associated with high voltage power systems in space. Especially we are interested in the potential distribution of the solar array that is resistant to the electrical discharge. We have carried out experiment on the interaction between the space plasma and the high voltage solar array. An array of electrodes distributed on a dielectric material was used to simulate the inter-connectors of the solar array panel in space environment. One of major concerns in the usa...

  15. Low Cost Balloon programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has launched 89 Missions to near space using single or multiple weather balloons or very light plastic balloons. Basic goal was to capitalize miniaturization of equipments in modern ages. Our typical payload of less than 4kg weight consists of GPS, video camera, cosmic ray detectors, Attitude measurement unit, sunsensor and most importantly a 50-100sqcm X-ray/Gamma-ray detector (usually a scintillator type). The main purpose of the latter is to study spectra of secondary cosmic ray spectra (till our ceiling altitude of 36-42km) over the years and their seasonal variation or variation with solar cycle. We also study solar X-ray spectra, especially of solar flares. We have detected a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) and pulsars. Our observation of black hole candidates did not yield satisfactory result yet mainly because of poor collimation (~ 10 deg x 10 deg) by lead collimator which introduces strong background also. Our effort with multiple balloon flights enabled us to have long duration flights. We believe that our procedure is very futuristic and yet at an affordable cost.

  16. Teacher education physical education: In search of a hybrid space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Lynch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that a learning environment underpinned by a strengths-based collaborative approach between universities and schools offers extended pre-service teacher learning opportunities and subsequently enhanced preparation. The term “hybrid space” describes the ideal environment of shared partnership where knowledge is jointly created, and consequently, as too is collaborative egalitarianism between stakeholders. This study investigates a possible “hybrid space” course within Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE in the UK. While much literature discusses the advantages of the “hybrid space” ideal across education disciplines, high-quality research into PETE hybrid spaces is limited, if not non-existent. Hence, the particular course was chosen for data collection as it advocates intricate connections with schools in the local community. Furthermore, the course was awarded “Outstanding” by the national regulatory authority, England and Wales Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted, one of the major reasons explicitly stated was for its community connections. A qualitative, interpretive study using a case study methodology was adopted to examine the successful primary PETE course. The findings offer insights into the ideal of hybrid spaces in PETE, which appear to benefit various stakeholders within communities. The study is significant as it assists teacher educators from around the world, challenged to rethink their connections between university courses and school field experiences through illustrating a highly successful example.

  17. Exact relativistic kinetic theory of an electron beam-plasma system: hierarchy of the competing modes in the system parameter space

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A; Benisti, D; Lefebvre, E

    2008-01-01

    Besides being one of the most fundamental basic issues of plasma physics, the stability analysis of an electron beam-plasma system is of critical relevance in many areas of physics. Surprisingly, decades of extensive investigation had not yet resulted in a realistic unified picture of the multidimensional unstable spectrum within a fully relativistic and kinetic framework. All attempts made so far in this direction were indeed restricted to simplistic distribution functions and/or did not aim at a complete mapping of the beam-plasma parameter space. The present paper comprehensively tackles this problem by implementing an exact linear model. We show that three kinds of modes compete in the linear phase, which can be classified according to the direction of their wavenumber with respect to the beam. We then determine their respective domain of preponderance in a three-dimensional parameter space. All these results are supported by multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  18. Nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in space plasmas: From Alfvén waves to kinetic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Li, B.; He, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    The nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in plasma media has been an attractive and challenge problem in space physics as well as in basic plasma physics. A wide continuous spectrum of Alfvénic turbulence from large MHD-scale Alfvén waves (AWs) in the inertial turbulence regime to small kinetic-scale kinetic AWs (KAWs) in the dissipation turbulence regime is a typical paradigm of plasma turbulence. The incorporation of current remote observations of AWs in the solar atmosphere, in situ satellite measurements of Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind, and experimental investigations of KAWs on large plasma devices in laboratory provides a chance synthetically to study the physics nature of plasma turbulence, dissipation, and heating. A session entitled "Nature of Turbulence, Dissipation, and Heating in Space Plasmas: From Alfvén Waves to Kinetic Alfvén Waves" was held as a part of the twelfth Asia Oceania Geosciences Society Annual Meeting, which took place in Singapore between 2 and 7 August 2015. This special section is organized based on the session.

  19. Working group report: Heavy-ion physics and quark-gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Munshi G Mustafa; Sudhir Raniwala; T Awes; B Rai; R S Bhalerao; J G Contreras; R V Gavai; S K Ghosh; P Jaikumar; G C Mishra; A P Mishra; H Mishra; B Mohanty; J Nayak; J-Y Ollitrault; S C Phatak; L Ramello; R Ray; P K Sahu; A M Srivastava; D K Srivastava; V K Tiwari

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of Heavy Ion Physics and Quark-Gluon Plasma at WHEPP-09 which was part of Working Group-4. Discussion and work on some aspects of quark-gluon plasma believed to have created in heavy-ion collisions and in early Universe are reported.

  20. Contributed papers presented at the 24. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    In the report thirteen papers are compiled which were presented by members of the Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasma, Lausanne, at the 24th EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. They mainly deal with problems of the confinement and are based on studies performed in the TCV tokamak. figs., tabs., refs.

  1. Physical activity affects plasma coenzyme Q10 levels differently in young and old humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesús; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabet; Ballesteros-Simarro, Manuel; Navas-Enamorado, Ignacio; Tung, Bui Thanh; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is a key lipidic compound for cell bioenergetics and membrane antioxidant activities. It has been shown that also has a central role in the prevention of oxidation of plasma lipoproteins. Q has been associated with the prevention of cholesterol oxidation and several aging-related diseases. However, to date no clear data on the levels of plasma Q during aging are available. We have measured the levels of plasmatic Q10 and cholesterol in young and old individuals showing different degrees of physical activity. Our results indicate that plasma Q10 levels in old people are higher that the levels found in young people. Our analysis also indicates that there is no a relationship between the degree of physical activity and Q10 levels when the general population is studied. However, very interestingly, we have found a different tendency between Q10 levels and physical activity depending on the age of individuals. In young people, higher activity correlates with lower Q10 levels in plasma whereas in older adults this ratio changes and higher activity is related to higher plasma Q10 levels and higher Q10/Chol ratios. Higher Q10 levels in plasma are related to lower lipoperoxidation and oxidized LDL levels in elderly people. Our results highlight the importance of life habits in the analysis of Q10 in plasma and indicate that the practice of physical activity at old age can improve antioxidant capacity in plasma and help to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  2. The physical space as a barrier to school inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênnea Martins Almeida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The architecture and organization of school buildings can be facilitators or barriers in implementing the process of school inclusion, and the assessment for their suitability composes an important part of the role that the rehabilitation team plays in this process. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical accessibility of public schools in a municipality of Minas Gerais state, Brazil. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study with evaluation of the physical spaces of 14 schools, especially the areas of access, circulation, furniture, restrooms and parking, according to the criteria described in the Brazilian Standard 9050/2004. The results were presented in the form of descriptive statistics. Of the 493 items evaluated, 85.6% were considered inadequate. In the sector of access, circulation and furniture, 81.4% of the items were inadequate. In the health sector, 94.6% of the items were inadequate, and no restrooms contemplating all accessibility standards were found. In the parking sector, 83.4% of the items were inadequate. It was possible to identify that none of the state schools assessed in the municipality studied is prepared to make the inclusion of children with special needs with regard to accessibility.

  3. Space-time and physical fields inside a black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Novikov, I.D.

    1978-01-01

    Physical fields and the perturbations of the space-time metric inside a slowly rotating and weakly charged black hole are investigated. It is shown that in the Schwarzschild coordinates r and t for r ..infinity in accordance with the asymptotic law Phi =D/sub 1/t/sup( -2l/+1)+D/sub 2/t/sup( -2l/+3) ln r. Here, D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ are constants and l is the multipole order. Fields with nonzero spin (including the gravitational field) increase as r..-->..0 in proportion to a power of r, and not ln r, as in the case of a scalar field. Thus, at a fixed distance r=const from the singularity, the physical fields and all radiatable perturbations of the metric are damped in a power-law fashion with respect to the coordinate t, which is the radial coordinate inside the black hole. Fields of external sources inside the black hole are also considered.

  4. Magnetic null points in kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind; and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral n...

  5. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  6. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, E. E., E-mail: escime@wvu.edu; Keesee, A. M.; Elliott, D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G. [Advanced Research Corporation, White Bear Lake, Minnesota 55110 (United States); Barrie, A.; Rager, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  7. A micro-scale plasma spectrometer for space and plasma edge applications (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scime, E. E.; Keesee, A. M.; Dugas, M.; Ellison, S.; Tersteeg, J.; Wagner, G.; Barrie, A.; Rager, A.; Elliott, D.

    2016-11-01

    A plasma spectrometer design based on advances in lithography and microchip stacking technologies is described. A series of curved plate energy analyzers, with an integrated collimator, is etched into a silicon wafer. Tests of spectrometer elements, the energy analyzer and collimator, were performed with a 5 keV electron beam. The measured collimator transmission and energy selectivity were in good agreement with design targets. A single wafer element could be used as a plasma processing or fusion first wall diagnostic.

  8. JINA Workshop Nuclear Physics in Hot Dense Dynamic Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Libby, S; Chen, M; Wilson, B; Knauer, J; Mcnabb, D; Caggiano, J; Bleauel, D; Weideking, M; Kozhuharov, C; Brandau, C; Stoehlker, T; Meot, V; Gosselin, G; Morel, P; Schneider, D; Bernstein, L A

    2011-03-07

    Measuring NEET and NEEC is relevant for probing stellar cross-sections and testing atomic models in hot plasmas. Using NEEC and NEET we can excite nuclear levels in laboratory plasmas: (1) NIF: Measure effect of excited nuclear levels on (n,{gamma}) cross-sections, 60% and never been measured; (2) Omega, Test cross-sections for creating these excited levels via NEEC and NEET. Will allow us to test models that estimate resonance overlap of atomic states with the nucleus: (1) Average Atom model (AA) (CEA&LLNL), single average wave-function potential; (2) Super Transition Array (STA) model (LLNL), More realistic individual configuration potentials NEET experimental data is scarce and not in a plasma environment, NEEC has not yet been observed.

  9. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-09

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion.

  10. Numerical analysis of the effect of electrode spacing on deposition rate profiles in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-12-01

    The effect of reactor dimension on deposition rate profiles is analyzed with a two-dimensional (2D) fluid simulation of a capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film with a SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture. We focus on the complex function of electrode spacing to reveal the physical relation between reactor geometry and deposition rate profiles. The simulation demonstrates that the localization of electron density is concentrated close to the powered electrode periphery for electrode spacing of 9 mm. However, the plasma distribution becomes bulk dominated with electrode spacing of 15 mm by relaxing the localization. As a result, the increase in the electrode spacing creates a more uniform electron power density profile, and the deposition rate profile of SiN x H y film changes from convex to concave in a radial direction. The change in the deposition rate profile is validated through comparison with the experimental observation, which agrees well with the simulation results with errors of less than 5%. The deposition rate profile with electrode spacing of 9 mm is very sensitive to the non-uniform gas density condition applied to the showerhead inlet. However, the deposition rate profile with electrode spacing of 15 mm is not sensitive to the inlet gas profile because of the increasing residence time. The increase of the electrode spacing promotes molecule-molecule gas phase reactions and consequently weakens the effect of the inlet boundary condition.

  11. Analysis of Physics Processes in the AC Plasma Torch Discharge under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronov, A. A.; Vasilieva, O. B.; Dudnik, J. D.; E Kuznetsov, V.; Kuchina, J. A.; Shiryaev, V. N.; Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of electrophysical processes in the electric discharge generated by a three-phase AC plasma torch when using a high pressure inert working gas. AC plasma torch design with end electrodes intended for work on inert gases at pressures up to 81 bar is studied. Current-voltage characteristics for different gas flow rates and pressures are presented. Physical processes characteristics of the arising voltage ripples which depend on various working parameters of the plasma torch have been investigated. Arc burning processes in the electric discharge chamber of the three-phase AC plasma torch at various working parameters were photographed.

  12. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Livadiotis, George

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the difference of the derived temperature as a function of the kappa index. We further consider the concept of using a forward model of a typical plasma instrument to fit its observations. We find that the relative error of the derived temperature is highly depended on the kappa index and occasionally on the instrument's field of view and response.

  13. Space-dependent characterization of laser-induced plasma plume during fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xianfeng; Song, Lijun; Xiao, Wenjia; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-12-01

    The role of a plasma plume in high power fiber laser welding is of considerable interest due to its influence on the energy transfer mechanism. In this study, the space-dependent plasma characteristics including spectrum intensity, plasma temperature and electron density were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy technique. The plasma temperature was calculated using the Boltzmann plot of atomic iron lines, whereas the electron density was determined from the Stark broadening of the Fe I line at 381.584 nm. Quantitative analysis of plasma characteristics with respect to the laser radiation was performed. The results show that the plasma radiation increases as the laser power increases during the partial penetration mode, and then decreases sharply after the initiation of full penetration. Both the plasma temperature and electron density increase with the increase of laser power until they reach steady state values after full penetration. Moreover, the hottest core of the plasma shifts toward the surface of the workpiece as the penetration depth increases, whereas the electron density is more evenly distributed above the surface of the workpiece. The results also indicate that the absorption and scattering of nanoparticles in the plasma plume is the main mechanism for laser power attenuation.

  14. Concept Study of Radio Frequency (RF Plasma Thruster for Space Propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Theodora ANDREESCU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric thrusters are capable of accelerating ions to speeds that are impossible to reach using chemical reaction. Recent advances in plasma-based concepts have led to the identification of electromagnetic (RF generation and acceleration systems as able to provide not only continuous thrust, but also highly controllable and wide-range exhaust velocities. For Future Space Propulsion there is a pressing need for low pressure, high mass flow rate and controlled ion energies. This paper explores the potential of using RF heated plasmas for space propulsion in order to mitigate the electric propulsion problems caused by erosion and gain flexibility in plasma manipulation. The main key components of RF thruster architecture are: a feeding system able to provide the required neutral gas flow, plasma source chamber, antenna/electrodes wrapped around the discharge tube and optimized electromagnetic field coils for plasma confinement. A preliminary analysis of system performance (thrust, specific impulse, efficiency is performed along with future plans of Space Propulsion based on this new concept of plasma mechanism.

  15. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M.

    2015-11-01

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  16. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Tantawy, S. A., E-mail: samireltantawy@yahoo.com; El-Awady, E. I., E-mail: eielawady@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Tribeche, M., E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  17. Some consequences of intense electromagnetic wave injection into space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena; Rothwell, Paul L.; Silevitch, Michael

    1986-10-01

    The future possibility of actively testing the current understanding of how energetic particles may be accelerated in space or dumped from the radiation belts using intense electromagnetic energy from ground based antennas is discussed. The ground source of radiation is merely a convenience. A space station source for radiation that does not have to pass through the atmosphere and lower ionosphere, is an attractive alternative. The text is divided into two main sections addressing the possibilities of: (1) accelerating electrons to fill selected flux tubes above the Kennel-Petscheck limit for stably trapped fluxes, and (2) using an Alfven maser to cause rapid depletion of energetic protons or electrons from the radiation belts.

  18. Spaced-Resolved Electron Density of Aluminum Plasma Produced by Frequency-Tripled Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Boqian; Han Shensheng; Zhang Jiyan; Zheng Zhijian; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiaming; Li Jun; Wang Yan

    2005-01-01

    By using the space-resolved spectrograph, the K-shell emission from laser-produced plasma was investigated. Electron density profiles along the normal direction of the target surface in aluminum laser-plasmas were obtained by two different diagnostic methods and compared with the profiles from the theoretical simulation of hydrodynamics code MULTI1D. The results corroborate the feasibility to obtain the electron density above the critical surface by the diagnostic method based on the Stark-broadened wings in the intermediately coupled plasmas.

  19. Magnetic reconnection rate in space plasmas: a fractal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Massimo; Consolini, Giuseppe

    2007-10-26

    Magnetic reconnection is generally discussed via a fluid description. Here, we evaluate the reconnection rate assuming a fractal topology of the reconnection region. The central idea is that the fluid hypothesis may be violated at the scales where reconnection takes place. The reconnection rate, expressed as the Alfvén Mach number of the plasma moving toward the diffusion region, is shown to depend on the fractal dimension and on the sizes of the reconnection or diffusion region. This mechanism is more efficient than prediction of the Sweet-Parker model and even Petschek's model for finite magnetic Reynolds number. A good agreement also with rates given by Hall MHD models is found. A discussion of the fractal assumption on the diffusion region in terms of current microstructures is proposed. The comparison with in-situ satellite observations suggests the reconnection region to be a filamentary domain.

  20. Nonextensive entropy approach to space plasma fluctuations and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Leubner, M P; Baumjohann, W

    2006-01-01

    Spatial intermittency in fully developed turbulence is an established feature of astrophysical plasma fluctuations and in particular apparent in the interplanetary medium by in situ observations. In this situation the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs extensive thermo-statistics, applicable when microscopic interactions and memory are short ranged, fails. Upon generalization of the entropy function to nonextensivity, accounting for long-range interactions and thus for correlations in the system, it is demonstrated that the corresponding probability distributions (PDFs) are members of a family of specific power-law distributions. In particular, the resulting theoretical bi-kappa functional reproduces accurately the observed global leptokurtic, non-Gaussian shape of the increment PDFs of characteristic solar wind variables on all scales. Gradual decoupling is obtained by enhancing the spatial separation scale corresponding to increasing kappa-values in case of slow solar wind conditions where a Gaussian is approached i...

  1. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shanhong, E-mail: liushanhong108098@163.com; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Institute of High Voltage Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tie, Weihao [Xi' an Electrical Engineering Research Institute, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from “plasmoid” to “plasma flow,” and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through “cloud,” “core-cloud,” and “branch” in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted “U”-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the “branch” channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%–90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  2. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Tie, Weihao; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2016-06-01

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from "plasmoid" to "plasma flow," and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through "cloud," "core-cloud," and "branch" in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted "U"-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the "branch" channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%-90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  3. Examining the Effects of Oxygen Plasma on Physical and Dyeing Properties of Some Cellulose Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilara KOCAK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cotton, Agava Americana and artichoke fibers were treated with plasma with oxygen gas in Diener Vacuum Plasma for 1, 3 and 5 minutes, with 40 kHz low frequency and at 0.3 mbar pressure. After the plasma treatment, fibers' weight loss %, tensile strength, elongation, fiber diameter, surface topography (SEM, colour changes, and light and washing fastness properties were investigated. A positive increase was observed for mechanical and fastness properties after 5 min plasma treatment. The effects of plasma treatments on dyeing properties of fibers were studied. Dyeing properties of plasma treated fibers were improved after 3 min. treatment. SEM results were also proved the improved physical properties and colour changes due to the rough surface structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9368

  4. Morrow, Reiff, Receive 2013 Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington Awards: Citation for Cherilynn Ann Morrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ramon

    2014-08-01

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington (SPARC) Education and Public Outreach Award for Cherilynn Morrow recognizes years of pioneering work on behalf of the space science community in the area of education and public outreach (E/PO).

  5. Augmentation of Virtual Space Physics Observatory Services to Expand Data Access Capabilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquilent, Inc. proposes to support the effort of Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) by developing services to expand the VSPO search capabilities, developing...

  6. On the topology of wall turbulence in physical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardu, Sedat

    2017-02-01

    The topological features dominating the different sublayers of the near wall turbulence are revisited through direct numerical simulations performed in large computational domains up to the Karman number of 1100. The averages of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor, conditioned by fixed magnitudes of the velocity components, are adequately performed. In the physical space, the dominating topology in the viscous sublayer is the stable focus stretching cohabiting with the unstable node/saddle/saddle points. The stable and unstable focuses mostly populate the inner layer with equal importance, while the former become predominant in the meso and outer layers. Eddies within the low speed streaks with intense streamwise negative velocity of very high shear stress are located near the zero-discriminant facets. The enstrophy and straining prevails the stable focus stretching and the unstable compressing, respectively. The Eulerian velocity field conditioned by a given topology seen by an observer moving with the local velocity is also considered. It is found that the wall normal velocity marks the stretching line of the unstable saddles and the compressing line of the stable nodes/saddles/saddles. The conditional velocity fields linked to the unstable focuses compressing and stable focuses stretching are closely similar.

  7. VIDARS: Towards Painless Access to Space Physics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, B.; Vega, R.; Raeder, J.

    2006-12-01

    Space physics data sets are notoriously difficult to access, in particular if one wants to combine data sets from different sources. Part of the problem is finding the data. A myriad of different formats and containers poses another problem. Attempts to consolidate data in centers has not solved the problem. We present the prototype of a system (VIDARS, virtual data access and retrieval system) that addresses these issues. Data remain with their originators, but data sets are given unique names, called UDI (Universal Data Identifier), akin to Internet host names or e-mail addresses. The UDIs are known (registered) to one central server where they and associated meta data can be searched. Data access occurs completely transparent to a user such that for a requested UDI the central server returns the IP address of the data provider where the data can be retrieved using simple XML based protocols. This requires some cooperation from the data providers who need to register their data and implement the data server protocol, which is, however, very simple. The data access API allows for a wide variety of clients, ranging from simple ASCII dumps to sophisticated graphical and data mining applications, where the client never needs to know where the data actually reside.

  8. A new Differential Equation for Anomalous Diffusion with Potential Applications to Nonlinear Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, N. W.; Credgington, D.; Sanchez, R.; Chapman, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Since the 1960s Mandelbrot has advocated the use of fractals for the description of the non-Euclidean geometry of many aspects of nature. In particular he proposed two kinds of model to capture persistence in time (his Joseph effect, common in hydrology and with fractional Brownian motion as the prototpe) and/or prone to heavy tailed jumps (the Noah effect, typical of economic indices, for which he proposed Lévy flights as an exemplar). Both effects are now well demonstrated in space plasmas, notably in indices quantifying Earth's auroral currents and in the turbulent solar wind. Models have, however, typically emphasised one of the Noah and Joseph parameters (the Lévy exponent μ and the temporal exponent β) at the other's expense. I will describe recent work [1] in which we studied a simple self-affine stable model-linear fractional stable motion, LFSM, which unifies both effects. I will discuss how this resolves some contradictions seen in earlier work. Such Noah-Joseph hybrid ("ambivalent" [2]) behaviour is highly topical in physics but is typically studied in the paradigm of the continuous time random walk (CTRW) [2,3] rather than LFSM. I will clarify the physical differences between these two pictures and present a recently-derived diffusion equation for LFSM. This replaces the second order spatial derivative in the equation of fBm [4] with a fractional derivative of order μ, but retains a diffusion coefficient with a power law time dependence rather than a fractional derivative in time (c.f. [2,3]). Intriguingly the self-similarity exponent extracted from the CTRW differs from that seen in LFSM. In the CTRW it is the ratio of μ to a temporal exponent, in LFSM it is an additive function of them. I will also show work in progress using an LFSM model and simple analytic scaling arguments to study the problem of the area between an LFSM curve and a threshold-related to the burst size measure introduced by Takalo and Consolini into solar- terrestrial physics

  9. The physics of plasma injection events. [during magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Kaye, S. M.; Southwood, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, plasma injection is defined as an increase of particle flux in a detector of finite bandwidth. Injection can result from dynamic processes or from spacecraft penetration of a quasi-static spatial structure produced by a steady magnetospheric convection pattern. ATS-5 particle spectrograms are found to provide examples of plasma injection events of both sorts. Dynamic injection occurs both with and without local magnetic signatures. For events not associated with clear local magnetic signatures, convection theory with a steady or a time-varying uniform electric field can account for the energy dispersion of injected particles with energy less than 50 keV. The paper concludes with a discussion of the way in which the convection boundaries are related to the substorm injection boundary of Mauk and McIlwain. Several alternative expressions for the local time and K(p) dependence of the injection boundary are given.

  10. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  11. Laser plasma simulations of the generation processes of Alfven and collisionless shock waves in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopov, P. A.; Zakharov, Yu P.; Tishchenko, V. N.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Melekhov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Terekhin, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Generation of Alfven waves propagating along external magnetic field B0 and Collisionless Shock Waves propagating across B0 are studied in experiments with laser- produced plasma and magnetized background plasma. The collisionless interaction of interpenetrating plasma flows takes place through a so-called Magnetic Laminar Mechanism (MLM) or Larmor Coupling. At the edge of diamagnetic cavity LP-ions produce induction electric field Eφ which accelerates BP-ions while LP-ions rotate in opposite direction. The ions movement generates sheared azimuthal magnetic field Bφ which could launches torsional Alfven wave. In previous experiments at KI-1 large scale facility a generation of strong perturbations propagating across B0 with magnetosonic speed has been studied at a moderate value of interaction parameter δ∼0.3. In the present work we report on experiments at conditions of 5∼R2 and large Alfven-Mach number MA∼10 in which strong transverse perturbations traveling at a scale of ∼1 m in background plasma at a density of ∼3*1013 cm-3 is observed. At the same conditions but smaller MA ∼ 2 a generation, the structure and dynamic of Alfven wave with wavelength ∼0.5 m propagating along fields B0∼100÷500 G for a distance of ∼2.5 m is studied.

  12. Spacecraft Proximity Operations Used to Estimate the Dynamical & Physical Properties of a Resident Space Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Document, 2006. 26. D. Mehrholz, W. Flury R. Jehn H. Klinkrad M. Landgraf, L. Leushacke. “De- tecting, Tracking and Imaging Space Debris ”. Eurpean Space ...SPACECRAFT PROXIMITY OPERATIONS USED TO ESTIMATE THE DYNAMICAL & PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A RESIDENT SPACE OBJECT THESIS Abraham Franz Brunner, First...OPERATIONS USED TO ESTIMATE THE DYNAMICAL & PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A RESIDENT SPACE OBJECT THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and

  13. Energy Efficient Transient: Plasma Ignition: Physics and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-30

    Wang from the University of Southern California on modeling the TPI-assisted combustion. The ethylene data taken on the PDE is intended to assist this...production of said species will assist in the development of a model for transient plasma ignition greatly. The plan for a two week experiment is to...Back-Lighted Thyratron ," 27th International Power Modulator Conference 2006, Washington, D.C., 14-18 May 2006. P.I. - Martin A. Gundersen "Energy

  14. Innovative research of plasma physics for life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyawan, D.

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) for the medical treatment is a new field in plasma application, called plasma medicine. CAP contains mix of excited atoms and molecules, UV photons, charged particles as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Typical species in air-CAPs are O3, OH, NxOx, and HNOx. The current developments in this field have fuelled the hope that CAP could be an interesting new therapeutic approach in the treatment of cancer. CAP apparently demonstrated effect on cancer cell apoptosis which did not induce cell necrosis or disruption. Moreover, CAP seemed to be selective for cancer cells since it was more effective in tumor cells than in normal non-neoplastic cells. In bioscience, dentistry and veterinary medicine : Since CAP, is delivered at room temperature, which results in less damaging effects on living tissue, while still has the efficiency in disinfection and sterilization. Recent studies proved that it is able to inactivate gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, fungi, virus, spore, various parasites, and foreign organisms or pathogens without harming tissue. Moreover, cold plasma has been used effectively in medical field such as dental use, inducing apoptosis of malignant cells, stopping bleeding, promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Sericin hydrolysates, originating from silkworm is found support cell proliferation, expand cell adhesion and increase cell yield. The covalent linkage between a bioactive protein molecule and polystyrene dish surface via a carbon intermediate layer can slow down the release rate of protein compound into the phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. We found that a-C films and a-C:N2 films show good attachment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). All of carbon modified-Polystyrene(PS) dishes revealed the less release rate of sericin molecules into PBS solution than PS control.

  15. The contribution of Nikola Tesla to plasma physics and current status of plasmas that he studied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Zoran Lj.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main Interests in science of Nikola Tesla were gas discharges plasmas, their application in lighting and in production of ozone as well as their role in conduction of electricity through the atmosphere. In particular Tesla is well known as the first person to produce rf plasmas. Such plasmas in the present day constitute the main technology required to produce integrated circuits (IC and have been essential in the revolution that resulted from IC technologies. In addition Tesla participated in studies of arcs especially arcs used as a source of light, corona discharges required to induce plasma chemical reactions and produce ozone and was involved in various aspects of gas breakdown and gaseous dielectrics. His ideas, level of his understanding and current status of these fields are discussed in this review.

  16. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010 The Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'10) is organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from July 5 to July 10, 2010. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007), IWSSPP'08, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 207 (2010), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 34 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing

  17. Kinematic dust viscosity effect on linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves in space dusty plasmas with nonthermal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Hanbaly, A. M.; Sallah, M., E-mail: msallahd@mans.edu.eg [Mansoura University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K. [Taibah University Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Department of Physics (Saudi Arabia); Darweesh, H. F. [Mansoura University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    Linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves are studied in a collisionless, unmagnetized and dissipative dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains, Boltzmann-distributed electrons, and nonthermal ions. The normal mode analysis is used to obtain a linear dispersion relation illustrating the dependence of the wave damping rate on the carrier wave number, the dust viscosity coefficient, the ratio of the ion temperature to the electron temperatures, and the nonthermal parameter. The plasma system is analyzed nonlinearly via the reductive perturbation method that gives the KdV-Burgers equation. Some interesting physical solutions are obtained to study the nonlinear waves. These solutions are related to soliton, a combination between a shock and a soliton, and monotonic and oscillatory shock waves. Their behaviors are illustrated and shown graphically. The characteristics of the DA solitary and shock waves are significantly modified by the presence of nonthermal (fast) ions, the ratio of the ion temperature to the electron temperature, and the dust kinematic viscosity. The topology of the phase portrait and the potential diagram of the KdV-Burgers equation is illustrated, whose advantage is the ability to predict different classes of traveling wave solutions according to different phase orbits. The energy of the soliton wave and the electric field are calculated. The results in this paper can be generalized to analyze the nature of plasma waves in both space and laboratory plasma systems.

  18. Performance of a space-based wavelet compressor for plasma count data on the MMS Fast Plasma Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, A. C.; Smith, S. E.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Yeh, P.; Schiff, C.; Avanov, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Data compression has been a staple of imaging instruments for years. Recently, plasma measurements have utilized compression with relatively low compression ratios. The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on board the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission generates data roughly 100 times faster than previous plasma instruments, requiring a higher compression ratio to fit within the telemetry allocation. This study investigates the performance of a space-based compression standard employing a Discrete Wavelet Transform and a Bit Plane Encoder (DWT/BPE) in compressing FPI plasma count data. Data from the first 6 months of FPI operation are analyzed to explore the error modes evident in the data and how to adapt to them. While approximately half of the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) maps had some level of loss, it was found that there is little effect on the plasma moments and that errors present in individual sky maps are typically minor. The majority of Dual Ion Spectrometer burst sky maps compressed in a lossless fashion, with no error introduced during compression. Because of induced compression error, the size limit for DES burst images has been increased for Phase 1B. Additionally, it was found that the floating point compression mode yielded better results when images have significant compression error, leading to floating point mode being used for the fast survey mode of operation for Phase 1B. Despite the suggested tweaks, it was found that wavelet-based compression, and a DWT/BPE algorithm in particular, is highly suitable to data compression for plasma measurement instruments and can be recommended for future missions.

  19. Redox Stimulation of Human THP-1 Monocytes in Response to Cold Physical Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In plasma medicine, cold physical plasma delivers a delicate mixture of reactive components to cells and tissues. Recent studies suggested a beneficial role of cold plasma in wound healing. Yet, the biological processes related to the redox modulation via plasma are not fully understood. We here used the monocytic cell line THP-1 as a model to test their response to cold plasma in vitro. Intriguingly, short term plasma treatment stimulated cell growth. Longer exposure only modestly compromised cell viability but apparently supported the growth of cells that were enlarged in size and that showed enhanced metabolic activity. A significantly increased mitochondrial content in plasma treated cells supported this notion. On THP-1 cell proteome level, we identified an increase of protein translation with key regulatory proteins being involved in redox regulation (hypoxia inducible factor 2α, differentiation (retinoic acid signaling and interferon inducible factors, and cell growth (Yin Yang 1. Regulation of inflammation is a key element in many chronic diseases, and we found a significantly increased expression of the anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 and of the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8. Together, these results foster the view that cold physical plasma modulates the redox balance and inflammatory processes in wound related cells.

  20. Plasmakristall-4: New complex (dusty) plasma laboratory on board the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustylnik, M Y; Fink, M A; Nosenko, V; Antonova, T; Hagl, T; Thomas, H M; Zobnin, A V; Lipaev, A M; Usachev, A D; Molotkov, V I; Petrov, O F; Fortov, V E; Rau, C; Deysenroth, C; Albrecht, S; Kretschmer, M; Thoma, M H; Morfill, G E; Seurig, R; Stettner, A; Alyamovskaya, V A; Orr, A; Kufner, E; Lavrenko, E G; Padalka, G I; Serova, E O; Samokutyayev, A M; Christoforetti, S

    2016-09-01

    New complex-plasma facility, Plasmakristall-4 (PK-4), has been recently commissioned on board the International Space Station. In complex plasmas, the subsystem of μm-sized microparticles immersed in low-pressure weakly ionized gas-discharge plasmas becomes strongly coupled due to the high (10(3)-10(4) e) electric charge on the microparticle surface. The microparticle subsystem of complex plasmas is available for the observation at the kinetic level, which makes complex plasmas appropriate for particle-resolved modeling of classical condensed matter phenomena. The main purpose of PK-4 is the investigation of flowing complex plasmas. To generate plasma, PK-4 makes use of a classical dc discharge in a glass tube, whose polarity can be switched with the frequency of the order of 100 Hz. This frequency is high enough not to be felt by the relatively heavy microparticles. The duty cycle of the polarity switching can be also varied allowing to vary the drift velocity of the microparticles and (when necessary) to trap them. The facility is equipped with two videocameras and illumination laser for the microparticle imaging, kaleidoscopic plasma glow observation system and minispectrometer for plasma diagnostics and various microparticle manipulation devices (e.g., powerful manipulation laser). Scientific experiments are programmed in the form of scripts written with the help of specially developed C scripting language libraries. PK-4 is mainly operated from the ground (control center CADMOS in Toulouse, France) with the support of the space station crew. Data recorded during the experiments are later on delivered to the ground on the removable hard disk drives and distributed to participating scientists for the detailed analysis.

  1. Plasmakristall-4: New complex (dusty) plasma laboratory on board the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustylnik, M. Y.; Fink, M. A.; Nosenko, V.; Antonova, T.; Hagl, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Zobnin, A. V.; Lipaev, A. M.; Usachev, A. D.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Rau, C.; Deysenroth, C.; Albrecht, S.; Kretschmer, M.; Thoma, M. H.; Morfill, G. E.; Seurig, R.; Stettner, A.; Alyamovskaya, V. A.; Orr, A.; Kufner, E.; Lavrenko, E. G.; Padalka, G. I.; Serova, E. O.; Samokutyayev, A. M.; Christoforetti, S.

    2016-09-01

    New complex-plasma facility, Plasmakristall-4 (PK-4), has been recently commissioned on board the International Space Station. In complex plasmas, the subsystem of μm-sized microparticles immersed in low-pressure weakly ionized gas-discharge plasmas becomes strongly coupled due to the high (103-104 e) electric charge on the microparticle surface. The microparticle subsystem of complex plasmas is available for the observation at the kinetic level, which makes complex plasmas appropriate for particle-resolved modeling of classical condensed matter phenomena. The main purpose of PK-4 is the investigation of flowing complex plasmas. To generate plasma, PK-4 makes use of a classical dc discharge in a glass tube, whose polarity can be switched with the frequency of the order of 100 Hz. This frequency is high enough not to be felt by the relatively heavy microparticles. The duty cycle of the polarity switching can be also varied allowing to vary the drift velocity of the microparticles and (when necessary) to trap them. The facility is equipped with two videocameras and illumination laser for the microparticle imaging, kaleidoscopic plasma glow observation system and minispectrometer for plasma diagnostics and various microparticle manipulation devices (e.g., powerful manipulation laser). Scientific experiments are programmed in the form of scripts written with the help of specially developed C scripting language libraries. PK-4 is mainly operated from the ground (control center CADMOS in Toulouse, France) with the support of the space station crew. Data recorded during the experiments are later on delivered to the ground on the removable hard disk drives and distributed to participating scientists for the detailed analysis.

  2. Public open space, physical activity, urban design and public health: Concepts, methods and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Mavoa, Suzanne; Villanueva, Karen; Sugiyama, Takemi; Badland, Hannah; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Owen, Neville; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2015-05-01

    Public open spaces such as parks and green spaces are key built environment elements within neighbourhoods for encouraging a variety of physical activity behaviours. Over the past decade, there has been a burgeoning number of active living research studies examining the influence of public open space on physical activity. However, the evidence shows mixed associations between different aspects of public open space (e.g., proximity, size, quality) and physical activity. These inconsistencies hinder the development of specific evidence-based guidelines for urban designers and policy-makers for (re)designing public open space to encourage physical activity. This paper aims to move this research agenda forward, by identifying key conceptual and methodological issues that may contribute to inconsistencies in research examining relations between public open space and physical activity.

  3. On the coupling of fields and particles in accelerator and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In accelerator and plasma physics it is generally accepted that there is no need to solve the dynamical equations for particles motion in manifestly covariant form, that is by using the coordinate-independent proper time to parameterize particle world-lines in space-time. In other words, in order to describe the dynamical processes in the laboratory frame there is no need to use the laws of relativistic kinematics. It is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particles momentum on the velocity in the second Newton's law. Therefore, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of result from particle dynamics treated according to Newton's laws in terms of the relativistic three-momentum and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell's equations in standard form. In previous papers we argued that this is a misconception. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail how to calculate the coupling between fields and particles in a correct way and how to develop a new algorithm for a particle tracking code in agreement with the use of Maxwell's equations in their standard form. Advanced textbooks on classical electrodynamics correctly tell us that Maxwell's equations in standard form in the laboratory frame and charged particles are coupled by introducing particles trajectories as projections of particles world-lines onto coordinates of the laboratory frame and by subsequently using the laboratory time to parameterize the trajectory curves. For the first time we showed a difference between conventional and covariant particle tracking results in the laboratory frame. This essential point has never received attention in the physical community. Only the solution of the dynamical equations in covariant form gives the correct coupling between field equations in standard form and particles trajectories in the laboratory frame. We conclude that previous theoretical and simulation results in

  4. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  5. Physics of hot hadronic matter and quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-07-01

    This Introductory talk contains a brief review of the current status of theoretical and experimental activities related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we discuss latest lattice results on the phase transition, recent progress in chiral symmetry physics based on the theory of interacting instantons, new in the theory of QGP and of hot hadronic matter, mean p{sub t} and collective flow, the shape of p{sub t} distribution, strangeness production, J/{psi} suppression and {phi} enhancement, two puzzles connected with soft pion and soft photon enhancements, and some other ultrasoft'' phenomena. 56 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Transient dynamics of secondary radiation from an HF pumped magnetized space plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norin, L.; Grach, S. M.; Thide, B.; Sergeev, E. N.; Leyser, T. B.

    2007-01-01

    In order to systematically analyze the transient wave and radiation processes that are excited when a high-frequency (HF) radio wave is injected into a magnetized space plasma, we have measured the secondary radiation, or stimulated electromagnetic emission ( SEE), from the ionosphere, preconditione

  7. Recent results from studies of electron beam phenomena in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Torsten; Banks, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines selected results from experiments, performed in 1980s, involving the ejection of beams of electrons from spacecraft. Special attention is given to the basic processes associated with the spacecraft charging, passive current collection, beam-atmosphere interactions, beam-plasma interactions, and neutral gas emission. Consideration is also given to future experiments on active electron beam ejections in space.

  8. Ignition of beam plasma discharge in the electron beam experiment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    An ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) in space was observed in a neutral gas-electron beam interaction experiment by Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 in 1983. An electron beam of 8 kV 100 mA was injected into a high dense nitrogen gas cloud of 10 to the 23rd molecules which was released during 100 msec from the Orbiter. The appearance of the beam and its surroundings observed by a low-light-level TV camera showed a local ignition of the beam plasma discharge in the gas cloud. The enhanced plasma production, generation of auroral emission, and associated wave emission were also detected by onboard diagnostic instruments.

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters achieved in experimental devices for fiscal year 1992; tokamak fusion test reactor; princeton beta experiment-modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; tokamak physics experiment/steady-state advanced tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; plasma processing: Deposition and etching of thin films; pure electron plasma experiments; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; high-field magnet project; engineering department; environment, safety, and health and quality assurance; technology transfer; office of human resources and administration; PPPL invention disclosures for fiscal year 1992; office of resource management; graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: program in plasma science and technology; and science education program.

  10. Theoretical study of nonlinear waves and shock-like phenomena in hot plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B. D.; Banos, A., Jr.; Kennel, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    Summaries are presented of research in basic plasma physics. Nonlinear waves and shock-like phenomena were studied which are pertinent to space physics applications, and include specific problems of magnetospheric and solar wind plasma physics.

  11. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  12. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  13. Contributions to 28th European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics (Madeira Tecnopolo, Funchal, Portugal, 18-22 June 2001) from LHD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The LHD experimental group has presented nineteen papers at the 28th European Physical Society Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics (Madeira Tecnopolo, Funchal, Portugal, 18-22 June 2001). The contributed papers are collected in this report. (author)

  14. Paradigm Changes in High Temperature Plasma Physics Research and Implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon K. Park

    2008-02-22

    Significant high temperature plasma research in both the magnetic and inertial confinement regimes led to the official launching of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project which is aimed at challenging controlled fusion power for human kind. In particular, such an endeavor originated from the fruitful research outcomes from the world wide magnetic confinement devices (primarily based on the Tokamak approach) mainly in advanced countries (US, EU, and Japan). In recent years, all new steady state capable Tokamak devices are operated and/or constructed in Asian countries and incidentally, the majority of the ITER consortium consists of Asian countries. This provides an opportunity to revisit the unresolved essential physics issues and/or extend the understanding of the transient physics to the required steady state operation so that ITER can benefit from these efforts. The core physics of a magnetically confined hot plasma has two essential components; plasma stability and cross-field energy transport physics. Complete understanding of these two areas is critical for the successful operation of ITER and perhaps, Demo reactor construction. In order to have stable high beta plasmas with a sufficiently long confinement time, the physics of an abrupt disruption and sudden deterioration of the energy transport must be understood and conquered. Physics issues associated with transient harmful MHD behavior and turbulence based energy transport are extremely complicated and theoretical understanding needs a clear validation and verification with a new research approach such as a multi-dimensional visualization.

  15. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  16. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-09-01

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  17. Further observations of Space Shuttle plasma-electrodynamic effects from OSS-1/STS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, N. H.; Hwang, K. S.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Samir, U.; Murphy, G. B.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent analyses of ion measurements obtained from the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) on the deployed Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) during the OSS-1/STS-3 mission have provided an additional insight into the plasma-electrodynamics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter: (1) Measured ion flow directions and energies suggest that the disturbance created in the ionospheric plasma by the Shuttle Orbiter may be confined to an interaction region that extends on the order of 10 m in the forward direction and has a boundary thickness of about 2 m. (2) A correlation between the DIFP and pressure gauge measurements indicates a direct, local proportionality between the neutral gas and ion densities. (3) Preliminary results from a theoretical model of the possible interaction between measured secondary, high inclination ion streams and the ambient plasma indicate the generation of broad-band electrostatic noise such as that observed by wave instruments on the PDP.

  18. Long-lived laboratory plasmas sustained by a free-space microwave beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Remington

    2015-11-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory is developing a laboratory experiment to study the free-space interaction of microwave beams with low temperature, low density plasmas. A 10 kW, 4.5 GHz beam is passed through a vacuum chamber outfitted with pressure windows that are transparent to 4.5 Ghz radiation. The pressure windows are approximately 1m in diameter, allowing for minimal interaction between the beam and the chamber. The entire experiment is housed inside an anechoic chamber to minimize reflections. Plasmas generated by the beam have been observed to be stable for more than 10s. A series of optical and microwave diagnostics are being developed to measure the plasma properties, and to quantify the interaction of the plasma and the background neutral gas.

  19. Numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the Tethered-Satellite-System and space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Bharat I.

    1992-01-01

    The first Tethered-Satellite-System (TSS-1), scheduled for a flight in late 1992, is expected to provide relevant information related to the concept of generating an emf in a 20-km-long (or longer) conducting wire. This paper presents numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the TSS system and space plasma, using a 2D and 3D models of the system. The 2D case code simulates the motion of a long cylinder past a plasma, which is composed of electrons and H(+) ions. The system is solved by allowing the plasma to flow past the cylinder with an imposed magnetic field. The more complex 3D case is considered to study the dynamics in great detail. Results of 2D simulation show that the interaction of a satellite with plasma flowing perpendicularly to the magnetic field results in an enhancement in the current collection.

  20. Physics: A Career for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Inst. of Physics, New York, NY.

    Information is provided for students who may be interested in pursuing a career in physics. This information includes the type of work done and areas studied by physicists in the following areas: nuclear physics, solid-state physics, elementary-particle physics, atomic/molecular/electron physics, fluid/plasma physics, space/planetary physics,…