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Sample records for plasma physics modern

  1. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    1961-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  2. FOREWORD: International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science. Sponsored by the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    2005-01-01

    The "International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Abdus Salam ICTP), Trieste, Italy during the period 5 16 July 2004. The workshop was organized by P K Shukla, R Bingham, S M Mahajan, J T Mendonça, L Stenflo, and others. The workshop enters into a series of previous biennial activities that we have held at the Abdus Salam ICTP since 1989. The scientific program of the workshop was split into two parts. In the first week, most of the lectures dealt with problems concerning astrophysical plasmas, while in the second week, diversity was introduced in order to address the important role of plasma physics in modern areas of science and technology. Here, attention was focused on cross-disciplinary topics including Schrödinger-like models, which are common in plasma physics, nonlinear optics, quantum engineering (Bose-Einstein condensates), and nonlinear fluid mechanics, as well as emerging topics in fundamental theoretical and computational plasma physics, space and dusty plasma physics, laser-plasma interactions, etc. The workshop was attended by approximately hundred-twenty participants from the developing countries, Europe, USA, and Japan. A large number of participants were young researchers from both the developing and industrial countries, as the directors of the workshop tried to keep a good balance in inviting senior and younger generations of theoretical, computational and experimental plasma physicists to our Trieste activities. In the first week, there were extensive discussions on the physics of electromagnetic wave emissions from pulsar magnetospheres, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical objects, different scale sizes turbulence and structures in astrophysics. The scientific program of the second week included five review talks (60 minutes) and about thirty invited topical lectures (30 minutes). In addition, during the two weeks, there

  3. Vol. 6: Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Problems of modern physics and the situation with physical research in Ukraine are considered. Programme of the conference includes scientific and general problems. Its proceeding are published in 6 volumes. The papers presented in this volume refer to plasma physics

  4. Principles of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, A K

    2014-01-01

    Principles of Modern Physics, divided into twenty one chapters, begins with quantum ideas followed by discussions on special relativity, atomic structure, basic quantum mechanics, hydrogen atom (and Schrodinger equation) and periodic table, the three statistical distributions, X-rays, physics of solids, imperfections in crystals, magnetic properties of materials, superconductivity, Zeeman-, Stark- and Paschen Back- effects, Lasers, Nuclear physics (Yukawa's meson theory and various nuclear models), radioactivity and nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, fusion and plasma, particle accelerators and detectors, the universe, Elementary particles (classification, eight fold way and quark model, standard model and fundamental interactions), cosmic rays, deuteron problem in nuclear physics, and cathode ray oscilloscope. NEW TO THE FOURTH EDITION: The CO2 Laser Theory of magnetic moments on the basis of shell model Geological dating Laser Induced fusion and laser fusion reactor. Hawking radiation The cosmological red ...

  5. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  6. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  7. Porting plasma physics simulation codes to modern computing architectures using the libmrc framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Abbott, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Available computing power has continued to grow exponentially even after single-core performance satured in the last decade. The increase has since been driven by more parallelism, both using more cores and having more parallelism in each core, e.g. in GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. Adapting existing plasma physics codes is challenging, in particular as there is no single programming model that covers current and future architectures. We will introduce the open-source libmrc framework that has been used to modularize and port three plasma physics codes: The extended MHD code MRCv3 with implicit time integration and curvilinear grids; the OpenGGCM global magnetosphere model; and the particle-in-cell code PSC. libmrc consolidates basic functionality needed for simulations based on structured grids (I/O, load balancing, time integrators), and also introduces a parallel object model that makes it possible to maintain multiple implementations of computational kernels, on e.g. conventional processors and GPUs. It handles data layout conversions and enables us to port performance-critical parts of a code to a new architecture step-by-step, while the rest of the code can remain unchanged. We will show examples of the performance gains and some physics applications.

  8. Introduction to modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, J.; Nir, S.

    1993-01-01

    The modern physics and its uses changed our world of concepts and ways of life. This book explains the basics of modern physics in a simple and extensive form. The main subjects included in the book are: The relativistic theory, quantum theory, the structure of the atom, the interaction of radiation with matter and nuclear physics. The book elaborates on some advanced subjects: The laser, Moessbauer effect, Nuclear magnetic Resonance and solids electric conductivity. The book is for natural sciences students, whose main subject is not physics. The book can be used also in high schools. (authors)

  9. Modern particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079874

    2013-01-01

    Unique in its coverage of all aspects of modern particle physics, this textbook provides a clear connection between the theory and recent experimental results, including the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. It provides a comprehensive and self-contained description of the Standard Model of particle physics suitable for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students studying experimental particle physics. Physical theory is introduced in a straightforward manner with full mathematical derivations throughout. Fully-worked examples enable students to link the mathematical theory to results from modern particle physics experiments. End-of-chapter exercises, graded by difficulty, provide students with a deeper understanding of the subject. Online resources available at www.cambridge.org/MPP feature password-protected fully-worked solutions to problems for instructors, numerical solutions and hints to the problems for students and PowerPoint slides and JPEGs of figures from the book

  10. Modern physics for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jasprit

    1999-01-01

    Linking physics fundamentals to modern technology-a highly applied primer for students and engineersReminding us that modern inventions-new materials, information technologies, medical technological breakthroughs-are based on well-established fundamental principles of physics, Jasprit Singh integrates important topics from quantum mechanics, statistical thermodynamics, and materials science, as well as the special theory of relativity. He then goes a step farther and applies these fundamentals to the workings of electronic devices-an essential leap for anyone interested in developing n

  11. Relativity in modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Deruelle, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook on relativity integrates Newtonian physics, special relativity and general relativity into a single book that emphasizes the deep underlying principles common to them all, yet explains how they are applied in different ways in these three contexts. Newton's ideas about how to represent space and time, his laws of dynamics, and his theory of gravitation established the conceptual foundation from which modern physics developed. Book I in this volume offers undergraduates a modern view of Newtonian theory, emphasizing those aspects needed for understanding quantum and relativistic contemporary physics. In 1905, Albert Einstein proposed a novel representation of space and time, special relativity. Book II presents relativistic dynamics in inertial and accelerated frames, as well as a detailed overview of Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism. This provides undergraduate and graduate students with the background necessary for studying particle and accelerator physics, astrophysics and ...

  12. Dialogues on modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sachs, Mendel

    1998-01-01

    In this book, important conceptual developments of the two major revolutions of modern physics - the quantum and relativity theories - are presented in a nonmathematical, dialectical form of dialogue. The implications of conflicting philosophical attitudes of these revolutions in physics and applications to topics such as cosmology/astrophysics and high energy physics are emphasized. It is argued that for any substantial progress in our understanding of 21st century physics, it will be necessary to resolve these 20th century conflicts. These richly rewarding dialogues provide a starting point

  13. Landau and modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, Valery L

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the history of the creation and further development of Landau's famous works on phase transitions, diamagnetism of electron gas (Landau levels), and quantum transitions at a level crossing (the Landau-Zener phenomenon), and its role in modern physics. (methodological notes)

  14. Plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the AEB - Natal University summer school on plasma physics held in Durban during January 1979. The following topics were discussed: Tokamak devices; MHD stability; trapped particles in tori; Tokamak results and experiments; operating regime of the AEB Tokamak; Tokamak equilibrium; high beta Tokamak equilibria; ideal Tokamak stability; resistive MHD instabilities; Tokamak diagnostics; Tokamak control and data acquisition; feedback control of Tokamaks; heating and refuelling; neutral beam injection; radio frequency heating; nonlinear drift wave induced plasma transport; toroidal plasma boundary layers; microinstabilities and injected beams and quasilinear theory of the ion acoustic instability

  15. Modern Physics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Douglas; Hiller, John R.; Moloney, Michael J.

    1995-10-01

    The Consortium for Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) has developed a comprehensive series of Nine Book/Software packages that Wiley will publish in FY `95 and `96. CUPS is an international group of 27 physicists, all with extensive backgrounds in the research, teaching, and development of instructional software. The project is being supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9014548), and it has received other support from the IBM Corp., Apple Computer Corp., and George Mason University. The Simulations being developed are: Astrophysics, Classical Mechanics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State, Thermal and Statistical, and Wave and Optics.

  16. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  17. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  18. Modern introductory physics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrow, Charles H; Amato, Joseph C; Galvez, Enrique; Parks, M. Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Modern Introductory Physics, 2nd Edition, by Charles H. Holbrow, James N. Lloyd, Joseph C. Amato, Enrique Galvez, and Beth Parks, is a successful innovative text for teaching introductory college and university physics. It is thematically organized to emphasize the physics that answers the fundamental question: Why do we believe in atoms and their properties?  The book provides a sound introduction to basic physical concepts with particular attention to the nineteenth- and twentieth-century physics underlying our modern ideas of atoms and their structure.  After a review of basic Newtonian mechanics, the book discusses early physical evidence that matter is made of atoms.  With a simple model of the atom Newtonian mechanics can explain the ideal gas laws, temperature, and viscosity.  Basic concepts of electricity and magnetism are introduced along with a more complicated model of the atom to account for the observed electrical properties of atoms. The physics of waves---particularly light and x-rays---an...

  19. Modern vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, Austin

    2005-01-01

    Modern Vacuum Physics presents the principles and practices of vacuum science and technology along with a number of applications in research and industrial production. The first half of the book builds a foundation in gases and vapors under rarefied conditions, The second half presents examples of the analysis of representative systems and describes some of the exciting developments in which vacuum plays an important role. The final chapter addresses practical matters, such as materials, components, and leak detection. Throughout the book, the author''s explanations are presented in terms of first principles and basic physics, augmented by illustrative worked examples and numerous figures.

  20. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  1. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  2. Methods of modern mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Michael

    1980-01-01

    This book is the first of a multivolume series devoted to an exposition of functional analysis methods in modern mathematical physics. It describes the fundamental principles of functional analysis and is essentially self-contained, although there are occasional references to later volumes. We have included a few applications when we thought that they would provide motivation for the reader. Later volumes describe various advanced topics in functional analysis and give numerous applications in classical physics, modern physics, and partial differential equations.

  3. History of modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biezunski, M.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents an history of the principal concepts of contemporary physics and their genesis from the great cleavages of the beginning of the century with some incursions in a more far-away past. The essential concepts are replaced in their creation context, especially relativity, quantum mechanics and particles physics. (A.B.)

  4. Modern physics in America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fickinger, W.; Kowalski, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: physics at higher energies and smaller distances: are there limits; reminiscences of my father; atoms, molecules and light; the life of the stars; neutrinos from the atmosphere and beyond; the search for gravitational waves: probing the dynamics of space-time; experimental gaze at nonlinear phenomena; a physicist's view of biology; strange insulators, strange semiconductors, strange metals: High T c as a case history in condensed-matter physics; grand challenges to computational science; the supercollider: assault on the summit; is the whole universe composed of superstrings; SN1987A: the supernovae of a lifetime; and the discovery and physics of superconductivity above 100 K

  5. Renormalization and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    A review is given of modern theories of statistical dynamics as applied to problems in plasma physics. The derivation of consistent renormalized kinetic equations is discussed, first heuristically, later in terms of powerful functional techniques. The equations are illustrated with models of various degrees of idealization, including the exactly soluble stochastic oscillator, a prototype for several important applications. The direct-interaction approximation is described in detail. Applications discussed include test particle diffusion and the justification of quasilinear theory, convective cells, E vector x B vector turbulence, the renormalized dielectric function, phase space granulation, and stochastic magnetic fields

  6. Renormalization and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    A review is given of modern theories of statistical dynamics as applied to problems in plasma physics. The derivation of consistent renormalized kinetic equations is discussed, first heuristically, later in terms of powerful functional techniques. The equations are illustrated with models of various degrees of idealization, including the exactly soluble stochastic oscillator, a prototype for several important applications. The direct-interaction approximation is described in detail. Applications discussed include test particle diffusion and the justification of quasilinear theory, convective cells, E vector x B vector turbulence, the renormalized dielectric function, phase space granulation, and stochastic magnetic fields.

  7. Modern Elementary Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Gordon

    2017-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Relativistic notation, Lagrangians, and interactions; 3. Gauge invariance; 4. Non-abelian gauge theories; 5. Dirac notation for spin; 6. The Standard Model Lagrangian; 7. The electroweak theory and quantum chromodynamics; 8. Masses and the Higgs mechanism; 9. Cross sections, decay widths, and lifetimes: W and Z decays; 10. Production and properties of W± and Zᴼ; 11. Measurement of electroweak and QCD parameters: the muon lifetime; 12. Accelerators - present and future; 13. Experiments and detectors; 14. Low energy and non-accelerator experiments; 15. Observation of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: is it the Higgs boson?; 16. Colliders and tests of the Standard Model: particles are pointlike; 17. Quarks and gluons, confinement and jets; 18. Hadrons, heavy quarks, and strong isospin invariance; 19. Coupling strengths depend on momentum transfer and on virtual particles; 20. Quark (and lepton) mixing angles; 21. CP violation; 22. Overview of physics beyond the Standard Model; 23. Grand unification; 24. Neutrino masses; 25. Dark matter; 26. Supersymmetry.

  8. Max Planck and modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Max Planck (1858-1947) is according to the words of Max von Laue the ''father of quantum physics''. This characteristic has until today continuance, although Planck stood for long time sceptically in front of his quantum hypothesis and so became a revolutionary in spite of his wishes. Eclipted by this pioneer role of the scholar for the foundation of the quantum theory are the numerous further works of the scholer, by which he has in many other fields provided eminent things. Starting with his fundamental contribution to thermodynamics, which make him to an excellent researcher of the field, until the works in the early history of relativity theory and the promotion of the young Einstein, which let him become also to a pioneer of the second central pillar of modern physics. The present collection attempts to show the whole spectrum of the physical works of Max Planck and his role in the formation of modern physics. [de

  9. Simulated experiments in modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirnini, Mahmud Hasan

    1981-01-01

    Author.In this thesis a number of the basic experiments of atomic and nuclear physics are simulated on a microcomputer interfaced to a chart recorder and CRT. These will induce the student to imagine that he is actually performing the experiments. He will collect data to be worked out. The thesis covers the relevant material to set up such experiments in the modern physics laboratory

  10. Physics of laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenchik, A.; Witkowski, S.

    1991-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of laser fusion plasma physics and contains the most up-to-date information on high density plasma physics and radiation transport, useful for astrophysicists and high density physicists

  11. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  12. Contemporary plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Tewari, D.P.; Subbarao, D.

    1983-01-01

    The book consists of review articles on some selected contemporary aspects of plasma physics. The selected topics present a panoramic view of contemporary plasma physics and applications to fusion, space and MHD power generation. Basic non-linear plasma theory is also covered. The book is supposed to be useful for M.S./M.Sc. students specialising in plasma physics and for those beginning research work in plasma physics. It will also serve as a valuable reference book for more advanced research workers. (M.G.B.)

  13. Rational reconstructions of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittelstaedt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Newton’s classical physics and its underlying ontology are loaded with several metaphysical hypotheses that cannot be justified by rational reasoning nor by experimental evidence. Furthermore, it is well known that some of these hypotheses are not contained in the great theories of Modern Physics, such as the theory of Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. This book shows that, on the basis of Newton’s classical physics and by rational reconstruction, the theory of Special Relativity as well as Quantum Mechanics can be obtained by partly eliminating or attenuating the metaphysical hypotheses. Moreover, it is shown that these reconstructions do not require additional hypotheses or new experimental results. In the second edition the rational reconstructions are completed with respect to General Relativity and Cosmology. In addition, the statistics of quantum objects is elaborated in more detail with respect to the rational reconstruction of quantum mechanics. The new material completes the approach of t...

  14. Experimental plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, H.; Banton, M.E.; Ingraham, J.C.; Wittman, F.; Wright, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    The Experimental Plasma Physics group's main efforts continue to be directed toward the understanding of the mechanisms of electromagnetic energy absorption in a plasma, and the resultant plasma heating and energy transport. The high-frequency spectrum of plasma waves parametrically excited by the microwave signal at high powers has been measured. The absorption of a small test microwave signal in a plasma made parametrically unstable by a separate high-power driver microwave signal was also studied

  15. Physical domains in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liboff, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Do the plasma in the sun's core and the electron-conduction plasma in a semiconductor behave in the same way? This question is both fundamental and practical, for plasma physics plays a role in a vast area of natural phenomena and in many engineering devices. Understanding the cosmos, or designing a computer chip or a thermonuclear fusion reactor, requires first of all a realization of equations of motion that are appropriate to the particular problem. Similar physical differences occur in engineered structures. The plasmas in most thermonuclear fusion devices are basically like the plasma in the core of the sun: weakly coupled and classical - that is, obeying Newton's laws and Maxwell's equations. The conduction electrons in a semiconductor, on the other hand, obey the laws of quantum mechanics

  16. Computations in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.; Killeen, J.

    1984-01-01

    A review of computer application in plasma physics is presented. Computer contribution to the investigation of magnetic and inertial confinement of a plasma and charged particle beam propagation is described. Typical utilization of computer for simulation and control of laboratory and cosmic experiments with a plasma and for data accumulation in these experiments is considered. Basic computational methods applied in plasma physics are discussed. Future trends of computer utilization in plasma reseaches are considered in terms of an increasing role of microprocessors and high-speed data plotters and the necessity of more powerful computer application

  17. Modern physics for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, John C

    2010-01-01

    Intended for a first course in modern physics, following an introductory course in physics with calculus, Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers begins with a brief and focused account of the historical events leading to the formulation of modern quantum theory, while later chapters delve into the underlying physics. Streamlined content, chapters on semiconductors, Dirac Equation and Quantum Field Theory, and a robust pedagogy and ancillary package including an accompanying website with computer applets assists students in learning the essential material.

  18. Applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Applied Plasma Physics is a major sub-organizational unit of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program. It includes Fusion Plasma Theory and Experimental Plasma Research. The Fusion Plasma Theory group has the responsibility for developing theoretical-computational models in the general areas of plasma properties, equilibrium, stability, transport, and atomic physics. This group has responsibility for giving guidance to the mirror experimental program. There is a formal division of the group into theory and computational; however, in this report the efforts of the two areas are not separated since many projects have contributions from members of both. Under the Experimental Plasma Research Program we are developing a neutral-beam source, the intense, pulsed ion-neutral source (IPINS), for the generation of a reversed-field configuration on 2XIIB. We are also studying the feasibility of using certain neutron-detection techniques as plasma diagnostics in the next generation of thermonuclear experiments

  19. Applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Applied Plasma Physics is a major sub-organizational unit of the MFE Program. It includes Fusion Plasma Theory and Experimental Plasma Research. The Fusion Plasma Theory group has the responsibility for developing theoretical-computational models in the general areas of plasma properties, equilibrium, stability, transport, and atomic physics. This group has responsibility for giving guidance to the mirror experimental program. There is a formal division of the group into theory and computational; however, in this report the efforts of the two areas are not separated since many projects have contributions from members of both. Under the Experimental Plasma Research Program, we are developing the intense, pulsed neutral-beam source (IPINS) for the generation of a reversed-field configuration on 2XIIB. We are also studying the feasibility of utilizing certain neutron-detection techniques as plasma diagnostics in the next generation of thermonuclear experiments

  20. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990

  2. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  3. The physics of non-ideal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2000-01-01

    This book is devoted to the physical properties of nonideal plasma which is compressed so strongly that the effects of interparticle interactions govern the plasma behavior. The interest in this plasma was generated by the development of modern technologies and facilities whose operations were based on high densities of energy. In this volume, the methods of nonideal plasma generation and diagnostics are considered. The experimental results are given and the main theoretical models of nonideal plasma state are discussed. The problems of thermodynamics, electro-physics, optics and dynamic stabi

  4. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the c...

  5. International conference on plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, V.P.; Sitenko, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    A brief report on the 6th International conference on plasma physics and on the 6th International Congress on plasma waves and plasma instabilities, which have taken place in summer 1984 in Losanne, is presented. Main items of the conference are enlightened, such as the general theory of a plasma, laboratory plasma, thermonuclear plasma, cosmic plasma and astrophysics

  6. Computing in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuehrenberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named conference. These concern numerical methods for astrophysical plasmas, the numerical simulation of reversed-field pinch dynamics, methods for numerical simulation of ideal MHD stability of axisymmetric plasmas, calculations of the resistive internal m=1 mode in tokamaks, parallel computing and multitasking, particle simulation methods in plasma physics, 2-D Lagrangian studies of symmetry and stability of laser fusion targets, computing of rf heating and current drive in tokamaks, three-dimensional free boundary calculations using a spectral Green's function method, as well as the calculation of three-dimensional MHD equilibria with islands and stochastic regions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  7. Symmetry and symmetry breaking in modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, M; Theophilou, A K

    2008-01-01

    In modern physics, the theory of symmetry, i.e. group theory, is a basic tool for understanding and formulating the fundamental principles of Physics, like Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and Particle Physics. In this work we focus on the relation between Mathematics, Physics and objective reality

  8. Numerical simulation in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarskii, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma physics is not only a field for development of physical theories and mathematical models but also an object of application of the computational experiment comprising analytical and numerical methods adapted for computers. The author considers only MHD plasma physics problems. Examples treated are dissipative structures in plasma; MHD model of solar dynamo; supernova explosion simulation; and plasma compression by a liner. (Auth.)

  9. Computational plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1975-08-01

    The behavior of a plasma confined by a magnetic field is simulated by a variety of numerical models. Some models used on a short time scale give detailed knowledge of the plasma on a microscopic scale, while other models used on much longer time scales compute macroscopic properties of the plasma dynamics. In the last two years there has been a substantial increase in the numerical modelling of fusion devices. The status of MHD, transport, equilibrium, stability, Vlasov, Fokker-Planck, and Hybrid codes is reviewed. These codes have already been essential in the design and understanding of low and high beta toroidal experiments and mirror systems. The design of the next generation of fusion experiments and fusion test reactors will require continual development of these numerical models in order to include the best available plasma physics description and also to increase the geometric complexity of the model. (auth)

  10. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  11. Vocabulary of CPH Theory and Modern Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, Hossein; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid; Daei Kasmaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Wherefore CPH theory was presented? There are various theories in physics, but nature is unique. This is not nature's problem that we have various theories; nature obeys simple and unique law. So, we should improve our understanding of physical phenomena and unify theories. There is a compare brief...... of CPH Theory (Creative Particles of Higgs Theory) and modern physics in this vocabulary....

  12. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cargill, P J

    2007-01-01

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, 'The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced topics. For

  13. Magnetospheric plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R.

    1989-09-01

    The discovery of the earth's radiation belts in 1957 by Van Allen marked the beginning of what is now known as magnetospheric physics. In this study of plasma physics in the magnetosphere, we shall take the magnetosphere to be that part of the earth's ionized atmosphere which is formed by the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's dipole-like magnetic field. It extends from approximately 100km above the earth's surface where the proton-neutral atom collision frequency is equal to the proton gyrofrequency to about ten earth radii (R E ∼ 6380km) in the sunward direction and to several hundred earth radii in the anti-sunward direction. The collision dominated region is called the ionosphere and is sometimes considered separate from the collisionless plasma region. In the ionosphere ion-neutral collisions are dominant and one may think of the ionosphere as a frictional boundary layer ∼ 1000km thick. Other planets are also considered. (author)

  14. Renormalization group in modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, D.V.

    1988-01-01

    Renormalization groups used in diverse fields of theoretical physics are considered. The discussion is based upon functional formulation of group transformations. This attitude enables development of a general method by using the notion of functional self-similarity which generalizes the usual self-similarity connected with power similarity laws. From this point of view the authors present a simple derivation of the renorm-group (RG) in QFT liberated from ultra-violet divergences philosophy, discuss the RG approach in other fields of physics and compare different RG's

  15. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  16. Basic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Sudan, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the chapters in this book are devoted to the theory of small amplitude perturbations which is the most well developed aspect of the subject. The remaining chapters are concerned with weak nonlinear waves, and collapse and self-focusing of Langmuir waves, two topics of widespread interest and application. A chapter on particle simulation has been included, as that numerical technique plays an essential role in the development an understanding of plasma physics

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  18. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  19. Philosophical problems of modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittelstaedt, P.

    1976-01-01

    This book treats the philosophical problems that have arisen in connection with the theories of relativity and quantum theory. The book begins with a discussion of the problems that were raised by the special theory of relativity; questions relating to the structure of space and time, especially the problem of the temporal sequence of events. Subsequently problems are considered that were raised by the general theory of relativity, and which question the validity and applicability of Euclidean geometry to empirical space. The physical results, and in particular the theory of the measuring process in quantum mechanics, are considered. Criticism of the concept of substance and of the law of causality in quantum theory are discussed. Finally, the validity and applicability of classical logic for the domain of quantum-theoretical propositions are dealt with. (B.R.H.)

  20. Modern physics for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, John C

    2015-01-01

    The second edition of Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers is intended for a first course in modern physics. Beginning with a brief and focused account of the historical events leading to the formulation of modern quantum theory, later chapters delve into the underlying physics. Streamlined content, chapters on semiconductors, Dirac equation and quantum field theory, as well as a robust pedagogy and ancillary package, including an accompanying website with computer applets, assist students in learning the essential material. The applets provide a realistic description of the energy levels and wave functions of electrons in atoms and crystals. The Hartree-Fock and ABINIT applets are valuable tools for studying the properties of atoms and semiconductors.

  1. Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma Physics Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Khanapara, ..... tic wave) to form a random collection of the nonlinear wave grains (like ... [8] M S Sodha and S Guha, in Advances in plasma phyiscs edited by A ...

  2. Nonequilibrium statistical physics a modern perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Livi, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Statistical mechanics has been proven to be successful at describing physical systems at thermodynamic equilibrium. Since most natural phenomena occur in nonequilibrium conditions, the present challenge is to find suitable physical approaches for such conditions: this book provides a pedagogical pathway that explores various perspectives. The use of clear language, and explanatory figures and diagrams to describe models, simulations and experimental findings makes the book a valuable resource for undergraduate and graduate students, and also for lecturers organizing teaching at varying levels of experience in the field. Written in three parts, it covers basic and traditional concepts of nonequilibrium physics, modern aspects concerning nonequilibrium phase transitions, and application-orientated topics from a modern perspective. A broad range of topics is covered, including Langevin equations, Levy processes, directed percolation, kinetic roughening and pattern formation.

  3. 1000 Solved Problems in Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kamal, Ahmad A

    2010-01-01

    This book basically caters to the needs of undergraduates and graduates physics students in the area of modern physics, specially particle and nuclear physics. Lecturers/tutors may use it as a resource book. The contents of the book are based on the syllabi currently used in the undergraduate courses in USA, U.K., and other countries. The book is divided into 10 chapters, each chapter beginning with a brief but adequate summary and necessary formulas, tables and line diagrams followed by a variety of typical problems useful for assignments and exams. Detailed solutions are provided at the end of each chapter.

  4. A modern course in statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Reichl, Linda E

    2016-01-01

    "A Modern Course in Statistical Physics" is a textbook that illustrates the foundations of equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical physics, and the universal nature of thermodynamic processes, from the point of view of contemporary research problems. The book treats such diverse topics as the microscopic theory of critical phenomena, superfluid dynamics, quantum conductance, light scattering, transport processes, and dissipative structures, all in the framework of the foundations of statistical physics and thermodynamics. It shows the quantum origins of problems in classical statistical physics. One focus of the book is fluctuations that occur due to the discrete nature of matter, a topic of growing importance for nanometer scale physics and biophysics. Another focus concerns classical and quantum phase transitions, in both monatomic and mixed particle systems. This fourth edition extends the range of topics considered to include, for example, entropic forces, electrochemical processes in biological syste...

  5. Plasma physics studies in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    1982-01-01

    We briefly outline the plasma physics research program being conducted in the Department of Physics of the National University of Singapore. The work places particular emphasis on open system end plugging, ion source development, and anomalous transport studies. (author)

  6. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  7. High-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics

  8. Plasma Physics Applied (New Book)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Crockett

    2007-03-01

    0.5cm Plasma physics applications are one of the most rapidly growing fields in engineering & applied science today. The last decade alone has seen the rapid emergence of new applications such as dusty plasmas in the semiconductor and microchip industries, and plasma TVs. In addition, this last decade saw the achievement of the 50-year Lawson breakeven condition for fusion. With new discoveries in space plasma physics and applications to spacecraft for worldwide communication and space weather, as well as new applications being discovered, this diversity is always expanding. The new book Plasma Physics Applied reviews developments in several of these areas. Chapter 1 reviews the content and its authors, and is followed by a more comprehensive review of plasma physics applications in general in Chapter 2. Plasma applications in combustion and environmental uses are presented in Chapter 3. Lightning effects in planetary magnetospheres and potential application are described in Chapter 4. The area of dusty plasmas in both industrial and space plasmas and their applications are reviewed in Chapter 5. The particular area of Coulomb clusters in dusty plasmas is presented in Chapter 6. The variety of approaches to plasma confinement in magnetic devices for fusion are laid out in Chapter 7. Finally, an overview of plasma accelerator developments and their applications are presented in Chapter 8.

  9. Introduction to dusty plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, PK

    2001-01-01

    Introduction to Dusty Plasma Physics contains a detailed description of the occurrence of dusty plasmas in our Solar System, the Earth''s mesosphere, and in laboratory discharges. The book illustrates numerous mechanisms for charging dust particles and provides studies of the grain dynamics under the influence of forces that are common in dusty plasma environments.

  10. Nonconservative stability problems of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirillov, Oleg N

    2013-01-01

    This work gives a complete overview on the subject of nonconservative stability from the modern point of view. Relevant mathematical concepts are presented, as well as rigorous stability results and numerous classical and contemporary examples from mechanics and physics.The book shall serve to present and prospective specialists providing the current state of knowledge in this actively developing field. The understanding of this theory is vital for many areas of technology, as dissipative effects in rotor dynamics orcelestial mechanics.

  11. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  12. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  13. Elements of modern X-ray physics

    CERN Document Server

    Als-Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Eagerly awaited, this second edition of a best-selling text comprehensively describes from a modern perspective the basics of x-ray physics as well as the completely new opportunities offered by synchrotron radiation. Written by internationally acclaimed authors, the style of the book is to develop the basic physical principles without obscuring them with excessive mathematics. The second edition differs substantially from the first edition, with over 30% new material, including: A new chapter on non-crystalline diffraction - designed to appeal to the large community wh

  14. Physical activity and modernization among Bolivian Amerindians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gurven

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a growing public health problem, and the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality. Conversely, indigenous populations living traditional lifestyles reportedly engage in vigorous daily activity that is protective against non-communicable diseases. Here we analyze physical activity patterns among the Tsimane, forager-horticulturalists of Amazonian Bolivia with minimal heart disease and diabetes. We assess age patterns of adult activity among men and women, test whether modernization affects activity levels, and examine whether nascent obesity is associated with reduced activity.A factorial method based on a large sample of behavioral observations was employed to estimate effects of age, sex, body mass index, and modernization variables on physical activity ratio (PAR, the ratio of total energy expenditure to basal metabolic rate. Accelerometry combined with heart rate monitoring was compared to the factorial method and used for nighttime sampling. Tsimane men and women display 24 hr physical activity level (PAL of 2.02-2.15 and 1.73-1.85, respectively. Little time was spent "sedentary", whereas most activity was light to moderate, rather than vigorous. Activity peaks by the late twenties in men, and declines thereafter, but remains constant among women after the early teens. Neither BMI, fat free mass or body fat percentage are associated with PAR. There was no negative effect of modernization on physical activity.Tsimane display relatively high PALs typical of other subsistence populations, but of moderate intensity, and not outside the range of developed populations. Despite rapidly increasing socioeconomic change, there is little evidence that total activity has yet been affected. Overweight and obesity are more prevalent among women than men, and Spanish fluency is associated with greater obesity in women. The lack of cardiovascular disease among Tsimane is unlikely caused by activity alone; further study of diet

  15. Physical activity and modernization among Bolivian Amerindians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Jaeggi, Adrian V; Kaplan, Hillard; Cummings, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a growing public health problem, and the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality. Conversely, indigenous populations living traditional lifestyles reportedly engage in vigorous daily activity that is protective against non-communicable diseases. Here we analyze physical activity patterns among the Tsimane, forager-horticulturalists of Amazonian Bolivia with minimal heart disease and diabetes. We assess age patterns of adult activity among men and women, test whether modernization affects activity levels, and examine whether nascent obesity is associated with reduced activity. A factorial method based on a large sample of behavioral observations was employed to estimate effects of age, sex, body mass index, and modernization variables on physical activity ratio (PAR), the ratio of total energy expenditure to basal metabolic rate. Accelerometry combined with heart rate monitoring was compared to the factorial method and used for nighttime sampling. Tsimane men and women display 24 hr physical activity level (PAL) of 2.02-2.15 and 1.73-1.85, respectively. Little time was spent "sedentary", whereas most activity was light to moderate, rather than vigorous. Activity peaks by the late twenties in men, and declines thereafter, but remains constant among women after the early teens. Neither BMI, fat free mass or body fat percentage are associated with PAR. There was no negative effect of modernization on physical activity. Tsimane display relatively high PALs typical of other subsistence populations, but of moderate intensity, and not outside the range of developed populations. Despite rapidly increasing socioeconomic change, there is little evidence that total activity has yet been affected. Overweight and obesity are more prevalent among women than men, and Spanish fluency is associated with greater obesity in women. The lack of cardiovascular disease among Tsimane is unlikely caused by activity alone; further study of diet, food intake and

  16. Constituting objectivity: Transcendental perspectives on modern physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    There is increasing interest in exploring Kantian approaches in the study of the history and philosophy of physics. The most well-known examples of this trend-Friedman's (2001), Ryckman's (2005) and DiSalle's (2006)-focus on Kantianism in the context of the development of the general theory of relativity. The edited collection Constituting Objectivity seeks to develop key Kantian insights-in the most part-in the context of later developments in physics: as well as discussing relativity the volume also provides Kantian interpretations of Bohr's development of quantum theory and continues to provide Kantian insight from later interpretations of quantum mechanics all the way through to considering noncommutative geometry and loop quantum gravity. The volume contains papers on a wide variety of subjects and offers an essential introduction to the breadth of Kantian trends in modern physics.

  17. Development of website for studying modern physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saehana, S.; Wahyono, U.; Darmadi, I. W.; Kendek, Y.; Widyawati, W.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to produce a website in modern physics courses in order to increase student interest in physics learning. To determine the feasibility level of learning media then feasibility test to the product. The feasibility test carried out on the product is divided into three parts: material feasibility test, media feasibility test, and student response test. Based on the results of the test conducted the material obtained an average score of 3.72 and categorized very well. The result of media test that was obtained got the average score of 3.25 and categorized well. The result of the analysis of student's response to the twenty students of class A (fifth semester) of physics education program FKIP UniversitasTadulako obtained an average score of 3.16 with the good category. The results showed that the website developed can be used as one of the learning media that can support the learning process of students.

  18. Plasma Physics. Lectures Presented at the Seminar on Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The International Seminar on Plasma Physics held in Trieste during 5- 1 October 1964 was the first major activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency's new International Centre for Theoretical Physics. In bringing together plasma physicists belonging to three distinct schools, the American, West European and the Soviet schools, the Seminar provided a unique opportunity for extended contacts between physicists in this field. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of permanent value in the literature of the subject

  19. Plasma Physics. Lectures Presented at the Seminar on Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-06-15

    The International Seminar on Plasma Physics held in Trieste during 5- 1 October 1964 was the first major activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency's new International Centre for Theoretical Physics. In bringing together plasma physicists belonging to three distinct schools, the American, West European and the Soviet schools, the Seminar provided a unique opportunity for extended contacts between physicists in this field. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of permanent value in the literature of the subject.

  20. The division of plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Guilhem, D.; Klepper, C.C.

    1990-07-01

    The investigations presented in the 31th meeting on plasma physics were: the main results and observations during the ergodic divertor experiments in Tore Supra tokamak; the modifications of power scrape-off-length and power deposition during various configurations in Tore Supra plasmas; the results of pressure measurements and particle fluxes in the Tore Supra pump limiter

  1. Development of quantum perspectives in modern physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Baily

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introductory undergraduate courses in classical physics stress a perspective that can be characterized as realist; from this perspective, all physical properties of a classical system can be simultaneously specified and thus determined at all future times. Such a perspective can be problematic for introductory quantum physics students, who must develop new perspectives in order to properly interpret what it means to have knowledge of quantum systems. We document this evolution in student thinking in part through pre- and post-instruction evaluations using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey. We further characterize variations in student epistemic and ontological commitments by examining responses to two essay questions, coupled with responses to supplemental quantum attitude statements. We find that, after instruction in modern physics, many students are still exhibiting a realist perspective in contexts where a quantum-mechanical perspective is needed. We further find that this effect can be significantly influenced by instruction, where we observe variations for courses with differing learning goals. We also note that students generally do not employ either a realist or a quantum perspective in a consistent manner.

  2. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC)

  3. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  4. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  5. Plasma physics and instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashmore-Davies, C.N.

    1981-01-01

    These lectures procide an introduction to the theory of plasmas and their instabilities. Starting from the Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, and Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy of kinetic equations, the additional concept of self-consistent fields leads to the fundamental Vlasov equation and hence to the warm two-fluid model and the one-fluid MHD, or cold, model. The properties of small-amplitude waves in magnetized (and unmagnetized) plasmas, and the instabilities to which they give rise, are described in some detail, and a complete chapter is devoted to Landau damping. The linear theory of plasma instabilities is illustrated by the current-driven electrostatic kind, with descriptions of the Penrose criterion and the energy principle of ideal MHD. There is a brief account of the application of feedback control. The non-linear theory is represented by three examples: quasi-linear velocity-space instabilities, three-wave instabilities, and the stability of an arbitrarily largeamplitude wave in a plasma. (orig.)

  6. The Six Core Theories of Modern Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charles F.

    1996-09-01

    Charles Stevens, a prominent neurobiologist who originally trained as a biophysicist (with George Uhlenbeck and Mark Kac), wrote this book almost by accident. Each summer he found himself reviewing key areas of physics that he had once known and understood well, for use in his present biological research. Since there was no book, he created his own set of notes, which formed the basis for this brief, clear, and self-contained summary of the basic theoretical structures of classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, statistical physics, special relativity, and quantum field theory. The Six Core Theories of Modern Physics can be used by advanced undergraduates or beginning graduate students as a supplement to the standard texts or for an uncluttered, succinct review of the key areas. Professionals in such quantitative sciences as chemistry, engineering, computer science, applied mathematics, and biophysics who need to brush up on the essentials of a particular area will find most of the required background material, including the mathematics.

  7. Solid State Physics Principles and Modern Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, John J

    2009-01-01

    Intended for a two semester advanced undergraduate or graduate course in Solid State Physics, this treatment offers modern coverage of the theory and related experiments, including the group theoretical approach to band structures, Moessbauer recoil free fraction, semi-classical electron theory, magnetoconductivity, electron self-energy and Landau theory of Fermi liquid, and both quantum and fractional quantum Hall effects. Integrated throughout are developments from the newest semiconductor devices, e.g. space charge layers, quantum wells and superlattices. The first half includes all material usually covered in the introductory course, but in greater depth than most introductory textbooks. The second half includes most of the important developments in solid-state researches of the past half century, addressing e.g. optical and electronic properties such as collective bulk and surface modes and spectral function of a quasiparticle, which is a basic concept for understanding LEED intensities, X ray fine struc...

  8. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  9. Physics of Space Plasma Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, N F

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a timely review of our present understanding of plasma phenomena in magnetized terrestrial and solar space plasmas. The author's emphasis is on the fluid and particle modeling and interpretation of observed active processes in space plasmas, i.e. 'the physical background of large plasma eruptions in space'. It is somewhat alarming for a plasma physicist to read that an emphasis on processes in spatially inhomogeneous plasmas means that the work '... excludes a considerable fraction of the available methods in space plasma physics, such as the theory of waves, instabilities and wave particle interactions on a homogeneous background', particularly in light of the fact that much of our knowledge of these plasmas is derived from observations of such waves. However, it is clear on reading the book that such a restriction is not a disadvantage, but allows the author to concentrate on the main theme of the book, namely the use of fluid and particle pictures to model the equilibrium and active states of space plasmas. There are many other books which cover the wave aspects of space plasmas, and would complement this book. The book's coverage is based on the extensive and profound research of the author and his colleagues in the area of fluid and particle modeling of space plasma structures. After an introduction to the physical setting of active plasmas, and a necessarily concise, but effective, discussion of the fluid and particle models to be used, the steady states of the magnetized plasmas of interest are treated, including the magnetosphere, solar plasmas and current sheets. Next the dynamics of unstable states is covered, including MHD and tearing instabilities, and nonlinear aspects, with a detailed discussion of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the models are applied to magnetospheric and solar observations. The book is attractively written and produced, and this reviewer managed to find a minimum number of errors. A particularly attractive

  10. Theoretical plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.; Vahala, G.

    1989-08-01

    During the past year we have studied stellarator equilibria with quasi-helical symmetry and the relation between the trajectories of the exact and the drift Hamiltonian. The relation between these trajectories is particularly important to issue of α particle confinement in a reactor. Work has also been done on the bootstrap current in the absence of symmetry, the effects of tearing modes on the current profile in a tokamak, and models of plasma turbulence. In addition, considerable time was spent during the year by Allen Boozer chairing the task force on Alternate Transport as part of the DoE transport initiative

  11. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this lecture note is to present the theories and experiments of plasma physics for recent activities of controlled fusion research for graduate and senior undergraduate students. Chapters 1-6 describe the basic knowledge of plasma and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). MHD instabilities limit the beta ratio (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure) of confined plasma. Chapters 7-9 provide the kinetic theory of hot plasma and discuss the wave heating and non-inductive current drive. The dispersion relation derived by the kinetic theory are used to discuss plasma waves and perturbed modes. Landau damping is the essential mechanism of plasma heating and the stabilization of perturbation. Landau inverse damping brings the amplification of waves and the destabilization of perturbed modes. Chapter 10 explains the plasma transport due to turbulence, which is the most important and challenging subject for plasma confinement. Theories and simulations including subject of zonal flow are introduced. Chapters 11, 12 and 13 describe the recent activities of tokamak including ITER as well as spherical tokamak, reversed field pinch (RFP) and stellarator including quasi-symmetric configurations. Emphasis has been given to tokamak research since it made the most remarkable progress and the construction phase of 'International Tokamak Experimental Reactor' called ITER has already started. (author)

  12. History of modern physics; Histoire de la physique moderne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biezunski, M

    1994-12-31

    This book presents an history of the principal concepts of contemporary physics and their genesis from the great cleavages of the beginning of the century with some incursions in a more far-away past. The essential concepts are replaced in their creation context, especially relativity, quantum mechanics and particles physics. (A.B.).

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Physics, 3rd edn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, David

    1999-09-01

    The number of broadly based physics texts written at a level corresponding to second year and above of UK physics degrees is limited. This is such a book thoroughly updated in a third edition, the first edition having been published 20 years ago. The book is unusual in that the reader is referred to the Freeman website www.whfreeman.com/physics for some additional sections. It will be interesting to see whether this proves to be an attractive feature. The coverage reflects the US emphasis on topics and contains both theoretical and experimental details. It should not be regarded as an introductory text although it is clearly written. Thus the first two chapters take the reader straight into relativity, concentrating mainly on special relativity but going on to general relativity. From here the reader is led to ideas of quantization of charge, light and energy, followed by an exploration of the nuclear atom, wavelike properties of particles and Schrödinger's equation. Solution of this equation for the hydrogen atom introduces a section on spectroscopy. The next chapter on statistical physics includes Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics and brings to a close Part 1, which concentrates on the theoretical groundwork. Consistent with its title, the book does not cover traditional aspects of thermodynamics and electromagnetic theory. Part 2 is entitled `Applications' and begins with a chapter on molecular structure and spectra. Lasers and masers are included here but geometrical, physical and nonlinear optics get limited or no coverage. Solid state physics follows but, despite the title of the book, there is little on modern devices, although the section on superconductivity mentions high temperature materials. The chapters on nuclear physics, fission, fusion reactors and medical applications and a chapter on particle physics are comprehensive. Finally a chapter on astrophysics and cosmology is referred to, but the reader must find this at the website. As this is

  14. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    40 papers are presented at this 21. conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics (JET). Titles are: effects of sawtooth crashes on beams ions and fusion product tritons; beta limits in H-modes and VH-modes; impurity induced neutralization of MeV energy protons in JET plasmas; lost α particle diagnostic for high-yield D-T fusion plasmas; 15-MeV proton emission from ICRF-heated plasmas; pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements; gamma-ray emission profile measurements during ICRH discharges; the new JET phase ICRH array; simulation of triton burn-up; parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles; detached divertor plasmas; excitation of global Alfven Eigenmodes by RF heating; mechanisms of toroidal rotation; effect of shear in the radial electric field on confinement; plasma transport properties at the L-H transition; numerical study of plasma detachment conditions in JET divertor plasmas; the SOL width and the MHD interchange instability; non linear magnetic reconnection in low collisionality plasmas; topology and slowing down of high energy ion orbits; sawtooth crashes at high beta; fusion performances and alpha heating in future JET D-T plasmas; a stable route to high-beta plasmas with non-monotonic q-profiles; theory of propagation of changes to confinement; spatial distribution of gamma emissivity and fast ions during ICRF heating; multi-camera soft X-ray diagnostic; radiation phenomena and particle fluxes in the X-event; local measurement of transport parameters for laser injected trace impurities; impurity transport of high performance discharges; negative snakes and negative shear; neural-network charge exchange analysis; ion temperature anisotropy in helium neutral beam fuelling; impurity line emission due to thermal charge exchange in edge plasmas; control of convection by fuelling and pumping; VH mode accessibility and global H-mode properties; ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission; LHCD/ICRH synergy

  15. Physical Education between the social project of solid modernity and the of liquid modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinei Pithan da Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Grounded on Bauman’s thought, the present paper focuses on the constitution of social legitimacy and identity of Physical Education in the context of transition from solid to liquid modernity. This thought favors the understanding of the nature of the crisis that has crossed the identity discourse of Physical Education. The text signals the limits and possibilities of both the modern and the post-modern educational discourses. In this context, it describes a modern scenario that is marked by two distinct moments, the one of modernity at its solid stage, and that of modernity at its liquid stage. The first one, of solid modernity, social condition of surveillance, rationalization and control, performs the functional / adaptive role of putting everyone under the same rigid order (managed society. The second one, of liquid modernity, of the social condition of insignificance and irrationalism, plays the functional role of putting and keeping everyone under the same flexible Market disorder. From the scientific, mechanic focus of both the body and the physical education in solid modernity we have moved to the relativist and esthetic focus of body and physical education in liquid modernity.

  16. Progress report : Plasma Physics Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyyengar, S.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1975-08-01

    The activities of the plasma physics section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India over the last five years (1970-75) are reported. The R and D programme of the section has been divided into four cells mainly i.e., (i) Thermal plasma (ii) Relativistic Electron Beam (iii) Energetics and (iv) Electron beam technology. The salient features of the development activities carried out in these cells are outlined. In the Thermal plasma group, considerable research work has been done in (a) fundamental plasma studies, (b) industrial plasma technology and (c) open cycle MHD power generation project. The relativistic electron beam group is engaged in improving the technology to realize high power lasers, and pulsed thermonuclear fusion. The energetics programme is oriented to develop high voltage d.c. generators and pulse generators. The electron beam techniques developed here are routinely used for melting refractory and reactive metals. The technical know-how of the welding machines developed has been transfered to industries. Equipment developed by this section, such as, (1) electron beam furnace, (2) plasma cutting torch, (3) impulse magnet charger etc. are listed. (A.K.)

  17. The Framework of Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    Plasma physics is a necessary part of our understanding of stellar and galactic structure. It determines the magnetospheric environment of the earth and other planets; it forms the research frontier in such areas as nuclear fusion, advanced accelerators, and high power lasers; and its applications to various industrial processes (such as computer chip manufacture) are rapidly increasing. It is thus a subject with a long list of scientific and technological applications. This book provides the scientific background for understanding such applications, but it emphasizes something else: the intrinsic scientific interest of the plasma state. It attempts to develop an understanding of this state, and of plasma behavior, as thoroughly and systematically as possible. The book was written with the graduate student in mind, but most of the material would also fit into an upper-level undergraduate course.

  18. Plasma formulary for physics, astronomy, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2013-01-01

    This collection of fundamental formulae, up-to-date references and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering. Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings, with extended coverage of fusion plasma, plasma in stellar winds, reaction rates, engineering plasma and many other topics. The text is also unique in treating astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline.

  19. Developments in plasma physics and controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    Some developments in plasma physics over the past twenty years are considered from the theoretical physics standpoint under the headings; oscillations, waves and instabilities, plasma turbulence, basic kinetic theory, and developments in fusion. (UK)

  20. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  1. Thoughts of Modern Women in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsbury, Liz; Heaney, Libby; Hodges, Vicki; Harkness, Laura; Russell, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Women in Physics Group of the Institute of Physics initiated the Very Early Career Woman Physicist of the Year Award. The award seeks to recognise the outstanding achievements of women physicists who are embarking on a career in physics and to promote the career opportunities open to people with physics qualifications. The prize is…

  2. Physics of plasma etching and plasma deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, D.C.; Hoog, de F.J.; Bisschops, T.J.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Howorka, F.; Lindinger, W.; Maerk, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the title processes are discussed on the basis of a model in which the plasma-surface system is subdivided into 5 regions: (I) plasma prodn., (II) plasma flow plus radicals, (III) gas adsorbed layer, (IV) modified surface, and (V) undisturbed solid (or liq.) state.

  3. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  4. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  5. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  6. Awareness and Use of Modern Contraceptives Among Physically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Abstract. This study assessed awareness and use of modern contraceptives among physically challenged in-school adolescents in Osun ... visually impaired respondents had significantly heard about modern contraceptives compared with females, younger ones and ..... Parker C, WP05 N. Adolescents and Emergency.

  7. Teaching and Understanding of Quantum Interpretations in Modern Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    Just as expert physicists vary in their personal stances on interpretation in quantum mechanics, instructors vary on whether and how to teach interpretations of quantum phenomena in introductory modern physics courses. In this paper, we document variations in instructional approaches with respect to interpretation in two similar modern physics…

  8. Theoretical plasma physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, G.; Tracy, E.

    1996-04-01

    During the past year, the authors have concentrated on (1) divertor physics, (2) thermo-lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) approach to turbulence, and (3) phase space techniques in gyro-resonance problems in collaboration with Dieter Sigmar (MIT), Sergei Krasheninnikov (MIT), Linda Vahala (ODU), Joseph Morrison (AS and M/NASA-Langley), Pavol Pavlo and Josef Preinhaelter (institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Allan Kaufman (LBL/U.C.Berkeley). Using a 2-equation compressible closure model with a 2D mean flow, the authors are investigating the effects of 3D neutral turbulence on reducing the heat load to the divertor plate by various toroidal cavity geometries. These studies are being extended to examine 3D mean flows. Thermal Lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) methods are being investigated to handle 3D turbulent flows in nontrivial geometries. It is planned to couple the TLBE collisional regime to the weakly collisional regime and so be able to tackle divertor physics. In the application of phase space techniques to minority-ion RF heating, resonance heating is treated as a multi-stage process. A generalization of the Case-van Kampen analysis is presented for multi-dimensional non-uniform plasmas. Effects such as particle trapping and the ray propagation dynamics in tokamak geometry can now be handled using Weyl calculus

  9. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  10. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    (full text) In 1997, theoretical studies mainly concerned the verification of physical models on the basis of experimental data, an analysis of plasma behaviour within regions close to electrode surfaces during quasi-continuous discharges induced by microwaves , as well as modelling of a discharge development within coaxial plasma injectors. Another direction of theoretical studies concerned elementary processes of importance for plasma research, and in particular those taking into consideration the role of spin within a classical model of proton - hydrogen atom collisions. Experimental studies comprised measurements of pulsed electron beams and effects of the polarization of X-rays emitted from Plasma Focus (PF) facilities, research on emission characteristics of different PF devices, as well as measurements of pulsed electron and ion-beams emitted from various devices of the PF and Z-Pinch type. An important direction of experimental studies concerned X-ray and ion measurements at a large PF-1000 facility. In the field of plasma diagnostics, efforts were devoted to an analysis of the results obtained from time-resolved measurements of nitrogen ions and deuterons within PF-type devices. Within a frame of diagnostics, a substantial achievement was also the design and construction of a new measuring equipment for studies of plasma dynamics and X-ray emissions. Particular attention was also paid to studies connected with the calibration of various solid-state nuclear track detectors (NTDs), particularly modern plastic detectors of the CR-39, PM-355 and PM-500 type. Studies in the field of fusion technology concerned the design and construction of a special pulse generator for the simulation of electromagnetic interference, as well as other efforts connected with research on electromagnetic compatibility of electronic and electrotechnical devices. Research on new types of HV pulse generators were carried out partially under contracts with industrial laboratories. In

  11. Physical processes in relativistic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, R.

    1984-01-01

    The continuum emission in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extend to 100 keV and beyond (e.g. Rothschild et al. 1983). In thermal models of the continuum emission this implies temperatures above 10 9 K or kT of order mc 2 . In such a plasma the electrons are at least mildly relativistic and furthermore the particles and the photons are energetic enough to produce electron-positron pairs. The physics of such hot plasmas has only recently been studied in any detail and here we review the results of those studies. Significant electron-positron pair production may also occur in non-thermal models of the continuum emission if the optical depth to photon-photon pair production is greater than unity. We review the few results obtained regarding this interesting but not very well studied possibility. First, however, we briefly discuss the processes taking place in relativistic plasmas and the standard models for the continuum emission from AGNs. We then summarize the effects pair production have on these models and the observational implications of the presence of electron-positron pairs. (orig./WL)

  12. Evaluating College Students' Conceptual Knowledge of Modern Physics: Test of Understanding on Concepts of Modern Physics (TUCO-MP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    In present paper, we propose a new diagnostic test to measure students' conceptual knowledge of principles of modern physics topics. Over few decades since born of physics education research (PER), many diagnostic instruments that measure students' conceptual understanding of various topics in physics, the earliest tests developed in PER are Force…

  13. Modern particle physics event generation with WHIZARD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J.; Bach, F.; Chokoufe, B.; Kilian, W.; Sekulla, M.; Ohl, T.; Weiss, C.; Siegen Univ.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis is given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development are discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  14. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, J.; Bach, F.; Chokoufé, B.; Kilian, W.; Ohl, T.; Sekulla, M.; Weiss, C.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  15. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J; Bach, F; Chokoufé, B; Weiss, C; Kilian, W; Sekulla, M; Ohl, T

    2015-01-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements. (paper)

  16. Modern fluid dynamics for physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Regev, Oded; Yecko, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    This book grew out of the need to provide students with a solid introduction to modern fluid dynamics. It offers a broad grounding in the underlying principles and techniques used, with some emphasis on applications in astrophysics and planetary science. The book comprehensively covers recent developments, methods and techniques, including, for example, new ideas on transitions to turbulence (via transiently growing stable linear modes), new approaches to turbulence (which remains the enigma of fluid dynamics), and the use of asymptotic approximation methods, which can give analytical or semi-analytical results and complement fully numerical treatments. The authors also briefly discuss some important considerations to be taken into account when developing a numerical code for computer simulation of fluid flows. Although the text is populated throughout with examples and problems from the field of astrophysics and planetary science, the text is eminently suitable as a general introduction to fluid dynamics. It...

  17. Particle modeling of plasmas computational plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, through the development of supercomputers, a powerful new method for exploring plasmas has emerged; it is computer modeling of plasmas. Such modeling can duplicate many of the complex processes that go on in a plasma and allow scientists to understand what the important processes are. It helps scientists gain an intuition about this complex state of matter. It allows scientists and engineers to explore new ideas on how to use plasma before building costly experiments; it allows them to determine if they are on the right track. It can duplicate the operation of devices and thus reduce the need to build complex and expensive devices for research and development. This is an exciting new endeavor that is in its infancy, but which can play an important role in the scientific and technological competitiveness of the US. There are a wide range of plasma models that are in use. There are particle models, fluid models, hybrid particle fluid models. These can come in many forms, such as explicit models, implicit models, reduced dimensional models, electrostatic models, magnetostatic models, electromagnetic models, and almost an endless variety of other models. Here the author will only discuss particle models. He will give a few examples of the use of such models; these will be taken from work done by the Plasma Modeling Group at UCLA because he is most familiar with work. However, it only gives a small view of the wide range of work being done around the US, or for that matter around the world

  18. Physical processes in hot cosmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, A.G.; Giovannelli, F.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of many high energy astrophysical phenomena relies on a detailed knowledge of radiation and transport processes in hot plasmas. The understanding of these plasma properties is one of the aims of terrestrial plasma physics. While the microscopic properties of astrophysical plasmas can hardly be determined experimentally, laboratory plasmas are more easily accessible to experimental techniques, but transient phenomena and the interaction of the plasma with boundaries often make the interpretation of measurements cumbersome. This book contains the talks given at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on astro- and plasma-physics in Vulcano, Sicily, May 29-June 2, 1989. The book focuses on three main areas: radiation transport processes in hot (astrophysical and laboratory) plasmas; magnetic fields; their generation, reconnection and their effects on plasma transport properties; relativistic and ultra-high density plasmas

  19. Solid state physics principles and modern applications

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, John J

    2018-01-01

    This book provides the basis for a two-semester graduate course on solid-state physics. The first half presents all the knowledge necessary for a one-semester survey of solid-state physics, but in greater depth than most introductory solid state physics courses. The second half includes most of the important research over the past half-century, covering both the fundamental principles and most recent advances. This new edition includes the latest developments in the treatment of strongly interacting two-dimensional electrons and discusses the generalization from small to larger systems. The book provides explanations in a class-tested tutorial style, and each chapter includes problems reviewing key concepts and calculations. The updated exercises and solutions enable students to become familiar with contemporary research activities, such as the electronic properties of massless fermions in graphene and topological insulators.

  20. The Universe Untangled; Modern physics for everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, Abigail

    2017-04-01

    Physics has always been a tricky subject for the general public. Millions are fascinated by the laws of the physical world, but there has been a lack of books written specifically for general readers. The Universe Untangled is for those who are curious; yet do not have an extensive mathematical background. It uses images, analogies and comprehensible language to cover popular topics of interest including the evolution of the Universe, fundamental forces, the nature of space and time, and the quest for knowing the unknown.

  1. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  2. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  3. Mark Thomson presents the book "Modern Particle Physics"

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday 5 November 2013 at 4 p.m. in the Library, Bldg. 52 1-052 This new textbook covers all the main aspects of modern particle physics, providing a clear connection between the theory and recent experimental results, including the recent discovery of a Higgs boson and the most recent developments in neutrino physics. It provides a comprehensive and self-contained description of the Standard Model of particle physics suitable for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students studying experimental particle physics. Physical theory is introduced in a relatively straightforward manner with step-by-step mathematical derivations. In each chapter, fully worked examples link the theory to central experimental results in contemporary particle physics. Modern Particle Physics, by Mark Thomson, Cambridge University Press, 2013, ISBN 9781107034266. *Coffee will be served from 3.30 p.m.*

  4. XXI symposium Modern chemical physics. Tuapse 2009. Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The materials of the XXI symposium Modern chemical physics, Tuapse 2009 (25 September - 6 October, 2009) are presented. Scientific program includes lectures, presentations and poster sessions on photochemistry and radiation chemistry, elementary processes, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. The problems of chemical reaction kinetics, quantum chemistry, chemical spectroscopy, macromolecular chemistry are discussed. Topics of chemical physics of surface, nanochemistry, nanophysics and nanotechnology are treated [ru

  5. The plasma physics of plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shohet, L.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma processing is used for producing new materials with unusual and superior properties, for developing new chemical compounds and processes, for machining, and for altering and refining materials and surfaces. It has direct applications to semiconductor fabrication, materials synthesis, welding, lighting, polymers, anti-corrosion coatings, machine tools, metallurgy, electrical and electronics devices, hazardous waste removal, high performance ceramics, and many other items in both high-technology and the more traditional industries. Plasma processing takes on a wide variety of apparently different forms in industry, but the techniques share many common characteristics and problems. Control of the generation and flux of ions, electrons and free radicals in the plasma and their incidence on a surface is vital. Diagnostics, sensors, modeling techniques, and associated statistical methods are needed. However, without an in-depth understanding of the variety of phenomena taking place and their application to the industrial environment, advances in this technology, and its efficient use, will occur at a diminishing rate

  6. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    In 2006 research activity of the P-V Department was concentrated on the continuation of previous studies in the field of plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion (CNF), but several new topics concerning plasma technology were also investigated. The main tasks of the research activities were as follows: 1. Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges producing dense magnetized plasma; 2. Development of methods and tools for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; 3. Research in the field of plasma technologies. In a frame of the first task particular attention was paid to studies of X-ray pulses and fast electron beams emitted from different Plasma-Focus (PF) facilities. The correlation of X-ray pulses with pulsed electron beams and other corpuscular emissions (i.e. accelerated primary ions and fusion reaction products) was investigated in the PF-360 device in Swierk. The X-ray and corpuscular emission was also studied in a PF-1000 facility at IPPLM in Warsaw. Separate efforts were devoted to the investigation of fast electrons escaping from Tokamak-type facilities. Such studies were carried out in a frame of the EURATOM program, using special Cerenkov-type detectors within the CASTOR tokamak, operated at IPP in Prague. Signals from the Cerenkov detector were recorded and interpreted. Other studies concerned the design and construction of a new 4-channel Cerenkov detection system for a TORE-SUPRA facility at CEA-Cadarache. Since thermal loads upon the Cerenkov probe within the TORE SUPRA facility can amount to 1 MW/cm 2 , it was necessary to perform detailed computations of heat transfer in various materials (i.e. diamond-radiators and the probe body). Some efforts were devoted to the calibration of new nuclear track detectors (NTD) and their application for measurements of fusion-produced protons emitted from PF-360 and PF-1000 facilities. In frame of the EURATOM program the calibrated NTD were also applied for measurements of fusion-protons in a TEXTOR

  7. Modernization of physical education of student youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Shuba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop and experimentally substantiate fitness technology for students taking into account their individual peculiarities. Material : The experiment was performed by girls (n=51, age 17-20 who were divided into experimental (n=25 and control (n=26 groups. Classes were held twice a week during the year: 66 hours in the hall and 95 hours of independent study. At the beginning and at the end of the study, all students met the control standards, which allowed to determine the level of development of physical qualities and level of physical fitness. Results : 8 exercise complexes were developed to implement our fitness technology. Complexes were taken into account: interests, age, individual characteristics and level of physical fitness of students. At the first lessons the loading was about 45-50%. In the future, the loading increases to 70-75% of the total time of classes. Conclusions : When constructing fitness technology using varieties of fitness it is necessary to take into account: the type and nature of exercises, the volume and intensity of exercises, the number of repetitions and the amount of weight, the frequency of training sessions and the duration of work, intervals of rest, the number and alternation of exercises.

  8. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    On JET results were presented on additional heating power, on a recently discovered regime of enhanced pellet performance (PEP), on low-density H-mode plasma confinement with hot ions, bounds on very high electric currents by material limiters, the first experiments on lower hybrid current drive, on the L-H transition threshold dependence on the direction of the gradient-B drift, and on alpha-particle physics issues. The TFTR presentations focused on transport. Particle loss ramifications of the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes were found to be small, while their threshold of excitation is lower than theoretically predicted. On DIII-D a scaling study of transport with gyroradius as the only variable was reported, with approximately Bohm scaling emerging; but the effective heat diffusivity scaling could not be established due to profile consistency effects. While beta-limit investigations with DIII-D generally confirm the ideal, MHD limit found by Troyon, evidence of a reduction of the accessible range for the internal inductance with the safety factor seems to favour current-density control in a steady-state D-T burner. Onset of strongly sheared poloidal rotation in a thin layer during the L-H mode transition was experimentally shown, while a new, so-called VH (''very high'') confinement mode was discovered by boronization of the wall. The JT-90 tokamak has recently been upgraded to JT-60-U. Presentations by the ASDEX team summarized the lack of agreement with theory of L-mode confinement. With TEXTOR, an improved mode (I-mode) of confinement was found by boronization. Finally, reviews are included on the status of impurity transport and helium removal in tokamaks, on stellarators, alternative magnetic confinement systems, inertial confinement, and non-fusion plasma physics. 2 tabs

  9. [The mission of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the following about Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: its mission; requirements and guidance documents for the QA program; architecture; assessment organization; and specific management issues

  10. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  11. Proceedings of the 1. Brazilian Congress on Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1. Brazilian Congress on Plasma Physics proceedings presents technical papers on magnetohydrodynamics, plasma diagnostic, plasma waves, plasma impurities, plasma instabilities, and astrophysics plasma. (L.C.J.A.)

  12. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tetsuya

    1993-05-01

    The report contains the proceedings of a conference on plasma physics. A fraction of topics included MHD instabilities, magnetic confinement and plasma heating in the field of fusion plasmas, in 8 papers falling in the INIS scope have been abstracted and indexed for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  13. Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav

    2017-10-01

    The Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation will provide an opportunity for Q&A about the variety of NSF programs and solicitations relevant to a broad cross-section of the academic plasma science community, from graduating college seniors to senior leaders in the field, and from plasma astrophysics to basic physics to plasma engineering communities. We will discuss recent NSF-hosted events, research awards, and multi-agency partnerships aimed at enabling the progress of science in plasma science and engineering. Future outlook for plasma physics and broader plasma science support at NSF, with an emphasis on how you can help NSF to help the community, will be speculated upon within the uncertainty of the federal budgeting process.

  14. Application of modern mathematical concepts to plasma confinement: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Progress in four research areas has been achieved. A second-order symplectic integration algorithm has been developed and tested. Use of this algorithm allows integration of systems of Hamiltonian equations of motion to be carried out with much less computation. Vacuum field optimization techniques have been improved. One result of this work is a simple method for calculating magnetic island widths. Studies of alpha particle transport in toroidal confinement systems were initiated. This has been used as a test bed for studies of symplectic integrators. Quantum modifications of separatrix crossing theory were calculated. In addition the principal investigator is organizing a US-Japan conference concerning the use of modern techniques for the study of plasma confinement. 14 refs

  15. Plasma physics aspects of ETF/INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.R.; Schmidt, J.A.; Cohn, D.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    In order to achieve their principle technical objectives, the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and the International Tokomak Reactor (INTOR) will require an ignited (or near ignited) plasma, sustained for pulse lengths of at least 100 secs at a high enough plasma pressure to provide a neutron wall loading of at least 1.3 MW/m 2 . The ignited plasma will have to be substantially free of impurities. Our current understanding of major plasma physics characters is summarized

  16. Very high plasma switches. Basic plasma physics and switch technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, H.J.; Roche, M.; Buzzi, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A review of some high power switches recently developed for very high power technology is made with a special attention to the aspects of plasma physics involved in the mechanisms, which determine the limits of the possible switching parameters

  17. Quantum theory. Foundations of modern physics. 5. upd. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingold, Gert-Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    In the december of the year 1900n the famous physicist Max Planck gave a lecture, which should be later called as the birth hour of quantum physics. Their statements and knowledges should revolutionize our picture of the world in a hardly thought possible radicality and form meanwhile a central base for our understanding of nature. This book mediates an experienced, compact survey about the most important elements of modern quantum physics and their amazing, our common experience seemingly contradicting consequences.

  18. Modern History and Problems of Physical Education in Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    片桐, 芳雄

    1993-01-01

    Japanese school is controlled under the strict rules, and student's individuality is often avoided. Going through this kind of schooling, character of most Japanese people devoting themselves to authority or total system has been build up. Physical education at Japanese school also has made one of the core of such education. That is essentially uniform and conservative. The physical education at school and sports in Japan were imported form the Western countries after modernization at the Mei...

  19. YoichiroNambu: Seer* ofModernPhysics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 6. Yoichiro Nambu: Seer of Modern Physics. N D Hari Dass. General Article Volume 14 Issue 6 June 2009 pp ... DAE Raja Ramanna Fellow, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Hon. Director, Poornaprajna Institute of Scientific ...

  20. XIII symposium. Modern chemical physics. Theses of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Materials of the thirteenth symposium on modern chemical physics are presented. They represent different directions of development of this field of knowledge, such as synthesis, structure, properties of metal-polymer compositions, radiation-chemical investigations in nanotechnology, problems of supercritical chemistry, calculations of kinetic parameters of catalytic systems [ru

  1. Edge plasma physical investigations of tokamak plasmas in CRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakos, J.; Ignacz, P.; Koltai, L.; Paszti, F.; Petravich, G.; Szigeti, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the measurements performed in the field of thermonuclear high temperature plasma physics in CRIP (Hungary) are summarized. In the field of the edge plasma physics solid probes were used to test the external zone of plasma edges, and atom beams and balls were used to investigate both the external and internal zones. The plasma density distribution was measured by laser blow-off technics, using Na atoms, which are evaporated by laser pulses. The excitation of Na atom ball by tokamak plasma gives information on the status of the plasma edge. The toroidal asymmetry of particle transport in tokamak plasma was measured by erosion probes. The evaporated and transported impurities were collected on an other part of the plasma edge and were analyzed by SIMS and Rutherford backscattering. The interactions in plasma near the limiter were investigated by a special limiter with implemented probes. Recycling and charge exchange processes were measured. Disruption phenomena of tokamak plasma were analyzed and a special kind of disruptions, 'soft disruptions' and the related preliminary perturbations were discovered. (D.Gy.) 10 figs

  2. DIFFICULTIES TO LEARN AND TO TEACH MODERN PHYSICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Antonowiski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Physics is engaged in scientific and technological development in several areas, however, its learning in high school has high failure rates that demonstrate a low level of use. It is a science that allows us to understand the nature of the macroscopic and atomic matter, but it is taught in a disjointed manner, upon presentation of concepts, laws and mathematical sentences, repetitive exercises that have taken the preparatory character for college entrance. Thus, the student gets stuck sentences featuring a partial knowledge and disposable. This study aimed to analyze the main difficulties that undergraduate students in Physics have in Modern Physics learning. Point out the difficulties in teaching and learning Physics is not an easy task and to identify them comes the difficulty of how to solve them. After analysis of several hypotheses we can conclude that there is no single factor responsible for the difficulty of the teaching and learning of Modern Physics. The lack of time to work and developed since middle school, stimulating the curiosity of students, adequately trained teachers, lack of structure offered by the government, parents' responsibilities and students in learning, among others, constitute a major challenge for successful teaching and learning of Modern Physics

  3. Introduction to burning plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momota, Hiromu

    1982-01-01

    The free energy of fusion-produced charged particles, the critical plasma Q-value for the thermal instability, and the Cherenkov's emission are discussed. The free energy of fusion-produced charged particles is large even in DT burning plasma. The primary role of fusion-produced energetic charged particles is the heating of fuel plasma. If the charged particle heating is large, burning may be thermally unstable. A zero dimensional analysis shows that the critical plasma Q-values for this thermal instability are nearly 5 for DT burning plasma of 14 keV and 1.6 for D-He 3 burning plasma of 60 keV. These critical plasma Q-values are small as compared to that required for commercial reactors. Then, some methods of burning-control should be introduced to fusion plasma. Another feature of energetic charged particles may be Cherenkov's emission of various waves in fusion plasma. The relationship between this micro-instability and transport phenomena may be the important problem to be clarified. The fusion-produced energetic charged particles have large Larmor radii, and they may have effects on balooning mode instability. (Kato, T.)

  4. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 the research activity in the Dept. P-V was concentrated upon studies in the field of high-temperature plasma physics, nuclear fusion, and plasma technology. The main topics were as follows: l. Analysis of selected problems of plasma theory, 2. Investigation of phenomena in high-current pulse discharges of the Plasma-Focus (PF) and Z-Pinch type, 3. Development of the selected methods and equipment for plasma diagnostics, 4. Research on technology of experimental facilities for basic studies and applications, 5. Studies of the modification of material surfaces by means of pulse plasma-ion streams. In a frame of theoretical studies the numerical modeling was continued for discharges in coaxial plasma accelerators. The second theoretical aim was the description of some elementary atomic processes in the quasi- classical approach. A paper on the electron scattering on the atoms and molecules was published. In the quasi- classical model, the electron spin was taken into account and trajectories of 2 electrons in the helium atom were analyzed. In the frame of experimental studies, various phenomena were investigated in PF and Z-Pinch systems. The emission of pulse electron beams and ions as well as polarized X-rays were investigated in the MAFA-PF facility. New data about polarization of selected X-ray lines were obtained (2 papers at conferences and 2 publications). Ion emission measurements performed in small-scale PF-devices at INFIP and IFAS (Argentina), and in the Micro-Capillary device at Ecole Politechnique (France), were elaborated (5 papers at conferences and 2 publications). New measurements were also performed in the Capillary Z-Pinch device at IPP in Prague. With partial support of a US research contract, studies of the optimization of a neutron yield were performed in the PF-360 facility with special cryogenic targets (made of h eavy ice'' layers) or deuterium-gas targets (10 presentations at conferences, 2 reports for EOARD, and 7 papers

  5. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fishbane, Paul M; Thornton, Stephen T

    2005-01-01

    This text is designed for a calculus-based physics course at the beginning university and college level. It is written with the expectation that students have either taken or are currently taking a beginning course in calculus. Students taking a physics course based on this book should leave with a solid conceptual understanding of the fundamental physical laws and how these laws can be applied to solve many problems. The key word for this edition is "understanding." The third edition of this text remains rigorous while including a number of new pedagogical elements which emphasize conceptual understanding.

  6. On the co-creation of classical and modern physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Richard

    2005-12-01

    While the concept of "classical physics" has long framed our understanding of the environment from which modern physics emerged, it has consistently been read back into a period in which the physicists concerned initially considered their work in quite other terms. This essay explores the shifting currency of the rich cultural image of the classical/ modern divide by tracing empirically different uses of "classical" within the physics community from the 1890s to 1911. A study of fin-de-siècle addresses shows that the earliest general uses of the concept proved controversial. Our present understanding of the term was in large part shaped by its incorporation (in different ways) within the emerging theories of relativity and quantum theory--where the content of "classical" physics was defined by proponents of the new. Studying the diverse ways in which Boltzmann, Larmor, Poincaré, Einstein, Minkowski, and Planck invoked the term "classical" will help clarify the critical relations between physicists' research programs and their use of worldview arguments in fashioning modern physics.

  7. Plasmas: from space to laboratory. 'Introduction to plasma physics' course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoini, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This course addresses the different basic concepts of plasma physics. After an introduction which addresses the plasma state, basic equations, the different theoretical approaches (orbitals, kinetic, multi-fluid, magnetohydrodynamics), and the different characteristic scales, waves are addressed and presented as a disordered electromagnetism: existence of plasma waves, generalities on waves, relationship of formal dispersion of plasmas, plasma without magnetic field (longitudinal, transverse, or low frequency wave), plasma with magnetic field (parallel, perpendicular, or arbitrary propagation). The next parts present various approaches: the particle-based approach (case of constant and uniform magnetic fields, case of non-uniform magnetic fields), the statistical approach (elements of kinetic theory, the collision phenomenon, the equilibrium state), and the fluid approach (fluid equations according to the multi-fluid theory, comparison with the particle-based approach, presentation of magnetohydrodynamics as the single-fluid model, validity of MHD)

  8. PREFACE: IX International Conference on Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnostics and their Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savjolov, A. S.; Dodulad, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    The IX Conference on ''Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnosis and their Application'' was held on 5 - 7 November, 2014 at National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI). The goal of the conference was an exchange of information on both high-temperature and low-temperature plasma diagnostics as well as deliberation and analysis of various diagnostic techniques and their applicability in science, industry, ecology, medicine and other fields. The Conference also provided young scientists from scientific centres and universities engaged in plasma diagnostics with an opportunity to attend the lectures given by the leading specialists in this field as well as present their own results and findings. The first workshop titled ''Modern problems of plasma diagnostics and their application for control of chemicals and the environment'' took place at Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MEPhI) in June 1998 with the support of the Section on Diagnostics of the Council of Russian Academic of Science on Plasma Physics and since then these forums have been held at MEPhI every two years. In 2008 the workshop was assigned a conference status. More than 150 specialists on plasma diagnostics and students took part in the last conference. They represented leading Russian scientific centres (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'', Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Belgium and Sweden. About 30 reports were made by young researchers, students and post-graduate students. All presentations during the conference were broadcasted online over the internet with viewers in Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities. The Conference was held within the framework of the Centre of Plasma, Laser Research and Technology supported by MEPhI Academic Excellence Project (Russian

  9. Physically self-consistent basis for modern cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlopov, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Cosmoparticle physics appeared as a natural result of internal development of cosmology seeking physical grounds for inflation, baryosynthesis, and nonbaryonic dark matter and of particle physics going outside the Standard Model of particle interactions. Its aim is to study the foundations of particle physics and cosmology and their fundamental relationship in the combination of respective indirect cosmological, astrophysical, and physical effects. The ideas on new particles and fields predicted by particle theory and on their cosmological impact are discussed, as well as the methods of cosmoparticle physics to probe these ideas, are considered with special analysis of physical mechanisms for inflation, baryosynthesis, and nonbaryonic dark matter. These mechanisms are shown to reflect the main principle of modern cosmology, putting, instead of formal parameters of cosmological models, physical processes governing the evolution of the big-bang universe. Their realization on the basis of particle theory induces additional model-dependent predictions, accessible to various methods of nonaccelerator particle physics. Probes for such predictions, with the use of astrophysical data, are the aim of cosmoarcheology studying astrophysical effects of new physics. The possibility of finding quantitatively definite relationships between cosmological and laboratory effects on the basis of cosmoparticle approach, as well as of obtaining a unique solution to the problem of physical candidates for inflation, mechanisms of baryogenesis, and multicomponent dark matter, is exemplified in terms of gauge model with broken family symmetry, underlying horizontal unification and possessing quantitatively definite physical grounds for inflation, baryosynthesis, and effectively multicomponent dark-matter scenarios

  10. Plasma physics via particle simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmas are studied by following the motion of many particles in applied and self fields, analytically, experimentally and computationally. Plasmas for magnetic fusion energy devices are very hot, nearly collisionless and magnetized, with scale lengths of many ion gyroradii and Debye lengths. The analytic studies of such plasmas are very difficult as the plasma is nonuniform, anisotropic and nonlinear. The experimental studies have become very expensive in time and money, as the size, density and temperature approach fusion reactor values. Computational studies using many particles and/or fluids have complemented both theories and experiments for many years and have progressed to fully three dimensional electromagnetic models, albeit with hours of running times on the fastest largest computers. Particle simulation methods are presented in some detail, showing particle advance from acceleration to velocity to position, followed by calculation of the fields from charge and current densities and then further particle advance, and so on. Limitations due to the time stepping and use of a spatial grid are given, to avoid inaccuracies and instabilities. Examples are given for an electrostatic program in one dimension of an orbit averaging program, and for a three dimensional electromagnetic program. Applications of particle simulations of plasmas in magnetic and inertial fusion devices continue to grow, as well as to plasmas and beams in peripheral devices, such as sources, accelerators, and converters. (orig.)

  11. The EPFL Plasma Physics Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Plasma Physics Research Centre (CRPP) is a non-departmental unit of the EPFL, and currently employs about 130 people, about 105 on the EPFL site and the rest at the Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, in Villigen, Switzerland. The CRPP is a National Competence Centre in the field of Plasma Physics. In addition to plasma physics teaching, its missions are primarily the pursuit of scientific research in the field of controlled fusion within the framework of the EURATOM-Swiss Confederation Association and the development of its expertise as well as technology transfer in the field of materials research. As the body responsible for all scientific work on controlled fusion in Switzerland, the CRPP plays a national role of international significance. This document of 6 pages presents the explanation of the Plasma Physics Research Centre' activities (CRPP). (author)

  12. On modern needs in nuclear physics and nuclear safety education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tom Loennroth

    2005-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear physics has a long history, particularly after the second world war, and the present author has 20 years of experience of teaching in that field. The research in nuclear physics has made major advances over the years, and the experiments become increasingly sophisticated. However, very often the university literature lags the development, as is, indeed, the case in all physics education. As a remedy of to-day, the didactic aspects are emphasized, especially at a basic level, while the curriculum content is. still left without upgrade. A standard textbook in basic nuclear physics is, while represent more modern theoretical treatises. The latter two, as their headings indicate, do not treat experimental methods, whereas has a presentation that illustrates methods and results with figures and references. However, they are from the 60 s and 70 s, they are old, and therefore cannot attract modern students of today. Consequently, one has the inevitable feeling that modern university teaching in nuclear physics, and the related area of nuclear safety, must be upgraded. A recent report in Finland, concluded that there is not sufficient nuclear safety education, but that on the other hand, it does not necessarily have to be connected with nuclear physics education, although this is recommendable. Further, the present Finnish university law states that 'The mission of the university shall be to promote free research and scientific and artistic education, to provide higher education based on research, and. to educate students to serve their country and humanity. In carrying out their mission, the universities shall interact with the surrounding society and promote the societal impact o research finding and artistic activities'. This mismatch between the curricula and the required 'societal impact' will be discussed, and examples of implications, usually not implemented, will be given. For nuclear physics specifically, the (lack of) connection between

  13. Modern devices the simple physics of sophisticated technology

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the principles of physics through applications of state-of-the-art technologies and advanced instruments. The authors use diagrams, sketches, and graphs coupled with equations and mathematical analysis to enhance the reader's understanding of modern devices. Readers will learn to identify common underlying physical principles that govern several types of devices, while gaining an understanding of the performance trade-off imposed by the physical limitations of various processing methods. The topics discussed in the book assume readers have taken an introductory physics course, college algebra, and have a basic understanding of calculus. * Describes the basic physics behind a large number of devices encountered in everyday life, from the air conditioner to Blu-ray discs * Covers state-of-the-art devices such as spectrographs, photoelectric image sensors, spacecraft systems, astronomical and planetary observatories, biomedical imaging instruments, particle accelerators, and jet engines * Inc...

  14. Observation, experiment and hypothesis in modern physical science

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaway, Owen

    1985-01-01

    These original contributions by philosophers and historians of science discuss a range of issues pertaining to the testing of hypotheses in modern physics by observation and experiment. Chapters by Lawrence Sklar, Dudley Shapere, Richard Boyd, R. C. Jeffrey, Peter Achinstein, and Ronald Laymon explore general philosophical themes with applications to modern physics and astrophysics. The themes include the nature of the hypothetico-deductive method, the concept of observation and the validity of the theoretical-observation distinction, the probabilistic basis of confirmation, and the testing of idealizations and approximations.The remaining four chapters focus on the history of particular twentieth-century experiments, the instruments and techniques utilized, and the hypotheses they were designed to test. Peter Galison reviews the development of the bubble chamber; Roger Stuewer recounts a sharp dispute between physicists in Cambridge and Vienna over the interpretation of artificial disintegration experiments;...

  15. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  16. Experimental high energy physics and modern computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, J.

    1988-06-01

    The paper examines how experimental High Energy Physics can use modern computer architectures efficiently. In this connection parallel and vector architectures are investigated, and the types available at the moment for general use are discussed. A separate section briefly describes some architectures that are either a combination of both, or exemplify other architectures. In an appendix some directions in which computing seems to be developing in the USA are mentioned. (author)

  17. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  18. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  19. Abstracts of the 23rd European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutych, I F; Gresillon, D; Sitenko, A G

    1997-12-31

    This document contains the abstracts of the invited and contributed papers presented at 23 EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. The main contents are: tokamaks, stellarators; alternative magnetic confinement; plasma edge physics; plasma heating and current drive; plasma diagnostics; basic collisionless plasma physics; high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement; low-temperature plasmas.

  20. Abstracts of the 23rd European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutych, I.F.; Gresillon, D.; Sitenko, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of the invited and contributed papers presented at 23 EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. The main contents are: tokamaks, stellarators; alternative magnetic confinement; plasma edge physics; plasma heating and current drive; plasma diagnostics; basic collisionless plasma physics; high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement; low-temperature plasmas

  1. Transport, chaos and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkadda, S.; Doveil, F.; Elskens, Y.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop made it possible to gather for the first time plasma physicists, dynamical systems physicists and mathematicians, around a general theme focusing on the characterisation of chaotic transport. The participations have been divided into 4 topics: - dynamical systems and microscopic models of chaotic transport, - magnetic fluctuations and transport in tokamaks, - drift wave turbulence, self-organisation and intermittency, and - Wave-particle interactions

  2. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The activities of the Department in 2007 continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma technology of surface engineering: · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges in the Plasma-Focus (PF) and RPI-IBIS facilities; · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Research on plasma technologies; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modelling. As for the experimental studies particular attention was paid to the analysis of the correlation of X-ray pulses with pulsed electron beams and other corpuscular emissions from different Plasma-Focus (PF) facilities. A collisional-radiative model, taking into account the Stark effect and strong electric fields in the so called '' hot- spot '' regions of a pinch, was applied in those analyses. The main aim of these studies was to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the emission during the PF-type discharges. The emitted protons were also measured with nuclear track detectors. The measurements made it possible to obtain images of the regions, where the D-D fusion reactions occurred, as well as to determine the angular distribution of the emitted protons. Pulsed plasma streams were also investigated by means of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and corpuscular diagnostics. In a frame of the EURATOM program, efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostic methods for tokamak-type facilities. Such studies include the design and construction of the 4-channel Cherenkov-type detection system for the TORE-SUPRA tokamak at CEA-Cadarache. In the meantime in order to collect some experience a new measuring head was especially prepared for experiments within small facilities. Other fusion- oriented efforts are connected with the application of the solid-state nuclear track detectors for investigation of protons from tokamak plasma and high-energy beams emitted from laser produced plasmas

  3. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maalampi, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise [de

  4. Handbook of Modern Sensors Physics, Designs, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fraden, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    This book is about devices commonly called sensors. Digital systems, however complex and intelligent they might be, must receive information from the outside world that is generally analog and not electrical. Sensors are interface devices between various physical values and the electronic circuits who "understand" only a language of moving electrical charges. In other words, sensors are the eyes, ears, and noses of silicon chips. Unlike other books on sensors, this book is organized according to the measured variables (temperature, pressure, position, etc.) that make it much more practical and easier to read. In this new edition recent ideas and developments have been added while less important and non-essential designs were dropped. Sections on practical designs and use of the modern micro-machining technologies have been revised substantially. This book is a reference text that can be used by students, researchers interested in modern instrumentation (applied physicists and engineers), sensor designers, app...

  5. THE PHYSICS OF MELTING IN EARLY MODERN LOVE POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brady

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melting is a familiar trope in early modern erotic poetry, where it can signify the desire to transform the beloved from icy chastity through the warmth of the lover’s passion. However, this Petrarchan convention can be defamiliarised by thinking about the experiences of freezing and melting in this period. Examining melting in the discourses of early modern meteorology, medicine, proverb, scientific experiments, and preservative technologies, as well as weather of the Little Ice Age and the exploration of frozen hinterlands, this essay shows that our understanding of seeming constants – whether they be the physical properties of water or the passions of love – can be modulated through attention to the specific histories of cognition and of embodiment.

  6. Modern methodic of power cardio training in students’ physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Osipov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: significant increase of students’ physical condition and health level at the account of application of modern power cardio training methodic. Material: 120 students (60 boys and 60 girls participated in the research. The age of the tested was 19 years. The research took one year. We used methodic of power and functional impact on trainees’ organism (HOT IRON. Such methodic is some systems of physical exercises with weights (mini-barbells, to be fulfilled under accompaniment of specially selected music. Results: we showed advantages of power-cardio and fitness trainings in students’ health improvement and in elimination obesity. Control tests showed experimental group students achieved confidently higher physical indicators. Boys demonstrated increase of physical strength and general endurance indicators. Girls had confidently better indicators of physical strength, flexibility and general endurance. Increase of control group students’ body mass can be explained by students’ insufficient physical activity at trainings, conducted as per traditional program. Conclusions: students’ trainings by power-cardio methodic with application HOT IRON exercises facilitate development the following physical qualities: strength and endurance in boys and strength, flexibility and endurance in girls. Besides, it was found that such systems of exercises facilitate normalization of boys’ body mass and correction of girls’ constitution.

  7. Modern physics letters A special issue on hadrontherapy

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    CERN Courier Review (Jul 8, 2016) : The applications of nuclear and particle physics to medicine have seen extraordinary development since the discovery of X-rays by Röntgen at the end of the 19th century. Medical imaging and oncologic therapy with photons and charged particles (specifically hadrons) are currently hot research topics. This special issue of Modern Physics Letters is dedicated to hadron therapy, which is the frontier of cancer radiation therapy, and aims at filling a gap in the current literature on medical physics. Through 10 invited review papers, the volume presents the basics of hadron therapy, along with the most recent scientific and technological developments in the field. The first part covers topics such as the history of hadron therapy, radiation biophysics, particle accelerators, dose-delivery systems and treatment planning. In the second part, more specific topics are treated, including dose and beam monitoring, proton computer tomography, innoacustics and microdosimetry. This vo...

  8. Millimetre waves and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: This talk is a review of the plasma-related presentations at the 23rd International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves held at the University of Essex, Colchester, UK 7-11 September 1998. Of most relevance to fusion is the development of high-power sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive. The requirements for ITER are a total of 50 MW at 170 GHz. The state of the art is illustrated by (a) high-power gyrotrons that deliver 1 MW for 1 s at 170 GHz, and (b) a free-electron maser that has generated millimetre waves for the first time, 730 kW at 200 GHz. A number of papers describe new technologies that allow high powers to be achieved; internal mode converters to convert the whispering-gallery mode generated in the gyrotron cavity into a gaussian beam, depressed collectors to raise the efficiency from 1/3 to better than 1/2, CVD diamond output windows and coaxial gyrotrons with improved mode purity. Other papers describe transmission lines and steerable mirrors. Several papers deal with millimetre-wave plasma diagnostics for fusion such as electron cyclotron emission measurements and reflectometry. (author)

  9. An introduction to boundary plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Takizuka, Tomonori

    2004-01-01

    History of tokamak experiments is briefly reviewed with a special focus on divertors. Two-point divertor model, which calculates plasma parameters up-stream and at the divertor plate for a given condition of particle flux and heat flux, is explained. The model is applied to ITER to discuss the heat flux onto the target plate. The important issues of divertor physics related to recycling, remote radiative cooling, detached plasma and MARFE are also introduced. (author)

  10. Nonlinear aspects of quantum plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Padma K; Eliasson, B

    2010-01-01

    Dense quantum plasmas are ubiquitous in planetary interiors and in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the interior of white dwarf stars, in magnetars, etc.), in semiconductors and micromechanical systems, as well as in the next-generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments and in quantum X-ray free-electron lasers. In contrast to classical plasmas, quantum plasmas have extremely high plasma number densities and low temperatures. Quantum plasmas are composed of electrons, positrons and holes, which are degenerate. Positrons (holes) have the same (slightly different) mass as electrons, but opposite charge. The degenerate charged particles (electrons, positrons, and holes) obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics. In quantum plasmas, there are new forces associated with (i) quantum statistical electron and positron pressures, (ii) electron and positron tunneling through the Bohm potential, and (iii) electron and positron angular momentum spin. Inclusion of these quantum forces allows the existence of very high-frequency dispersive electrostatic and electromagnetic waves (e.g., in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray regimes) with extremely short wavelengths. In this review paper, we present theoretical backgrounds for some important nonlinear aspects of wave-wave and wave-electron interactions in dense quantum plasmas. Specifically, we focus on nonlinear electrostatic electron and ion plasma waves, novel aspects of three-dimensional quantum electron fluid turbulence, as well as nonlinearly coupled intense electromagnetic waves and localized plasma wave structures. Also discussed are the phase-space kinetic structures and mechanisms that can generate quasistationary magnetic fields in dense quantum plasmas. The influence of the external magnetic field and the electron angular momentum spin on the electromagnetic wave dynamics is discussed. Finally, future perspectives of the nonlinear quantum plasma physics are highlighted. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter contains a report on the First South-North International Workshop on Fusion Theory, Tipaza, Algeria, 17-20 September, 1990; a report in the issuance of the ''Buenos Aires Memorandum'' generated during the IV Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, Argentina, July 1990, and containing a proposal that the IFRC establish a ''Steering Committee on North-South Collaboration in Controlled Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics Research''; the announcement that the 14th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion will be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, September 30 - October 7, 1992; a list of IAEA technical committee meetings for 1991; an item on ITER news; an article ''Long-Term Physics R and D Planning (for ITER)'' by F. Engelmann; in the planned sequence of ''Reports on National Fusion Programmes'' contributions on the Chinese and Yugoslav programmes; finally, the titles and contacts for two other newsletters of potential interest, i.e., the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training) Newsletter, and the IPG (International Physics Group-a sub-unit of the American Physical Society) Newsletter

  12. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter, no. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The fifth Plasma Physics Network Newsletter (IAEA, Vienna, Aug. 1992) includes the following topics: (1) the availability of a list of the members of the Third World Plasma Research Network (TWPRN); (2) the announcement of the fourteenth IAEA International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research to be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, from 30 Sep. to 7 Oct. 1992; (3) the announcement of a Technical Committee Meeting on research using small tokamaks, organized by the IAEA as a satellite meeting to the aforementioned fusion conference; (4) IAEA Fellowships and Scientific Visits for the use of workers in developing member states, and for which plasma researchers are encouraged to apply through Dr. D. Banner, Head, Physics Section, IAEA, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria; (5) the initiation in 1993 of a new Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Development of Software for Numerical Simulation and Data Processing in Fusion Energy Research', as well as a proposed CRP on 'Fusion Research in Developing Countries using Middle- and Small-Scale Plasma Devices'; (6) support from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) for meetings held in Third World countries; (7) a report by W. Usada on Fusion Research in Indonesia; (8) News on ITER; (9) the Technical Committee Meeting planned 8-12 Sep. 1992, Canada, on Tokamak Plasma Biasing; (10) software made available for the study of tokamak transport; (11) the electronic mail address of the TWPRN; (12) the FAX, e-mail, and postal address for contributions to this plasma physics network newsletter.

  13. Plasma physics network newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The fifth Plasma Physics Network Newsletter (IAEA, Vienna, August 1992) includes the following topics: (i) the availability of a list of the members of the Third World Plasma Research Network (TWPRN); (ii) the announcement of the fourteenth IAEA International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research to be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, from September 30 to October 7, 1992; (iii) the announcement of a Technical Committee Meeting on research using small tokamaks, organized by the IAEA as a satellite meeting to the aforementioned fusion conference; (iv) IAEA Fellowships and Scientific Visits for the use of workers in developing member states, and for which plasma researchers are encouraged to apply through Dr. D. Banner, Head, Physics Section, IAEA, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria; (v) the initiation in 1993 of a new Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Development of Software for Numerical Simulation and Data Processing in Fusion Energy Research'', as well as a proposed CRP on ''Fusion Research in Developing Countries using Middle- and Small-Scale Plasma Devices''; (vi) support from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) for meetings held in Third World countries; (vii) a report by W. Usada on Fusion Research in Indonesia; (viii) News on ITER; (ix) the Technical Committee Meeting planned September 8-12, 1992, Canada, on Tokamak Plasma Biasing; (x) software made available for the study of tokamak transport; (xi) the electronic mail address of the TWPRN; (xii) and the FAX, e-mail and postal address for contributions to this plasma physics network newsletter (FAX: (43-1)-234564)

  14. Computational plasma physics and supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.; McNamara, B.

    1984-09-01

    The Supercomputers of the 80's are introduced. They are 10 to 100 times more powerful than today's machines. The range of physics modeling in the fusion program is outlined. New machine architecture will influence particular codes, but parallel processing poses new coding difficulties. Increasing realism in simulations will require better numerics and more elaborate mathematics

  15. Actuality of transcendental æsthetics for modern physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitot, Jean

    1. The more mathematics and physics unify themselves in the physico-mathematical modern theories, the more an objective epistemology becomes necessary. Only such a transcendental epistemology is able to thematize correctly the status of the mathematical determination of physical reality. 2. There exists a transcendental history of the synthetic a priori and of the construction of physical categories. 3. The transcendental approach allows to supersed Wittgenstein's and Carnap's antiplatonist thesis according to which pure mathematics are physically applicable only if they lack any descriptive, cognitive or objective, content and reduce to mere prescriptive and normative devices. In fact, pure mathematics are prescriptive-normative in physics because: (i) the categories of physical objectivity are prescriptive-normative, and (ii) their categorial content is mathematically “constructed” through a Transcendental Aesthetics. Only a transcendental approach make compatible, in the one hand, a grammatical conventionalism of Wittgensteinian or Carnapian type and, on the other hand, a platonist realism of Gödelian type. Mathematics are not a grammar of the world but a mathematical hermeneutics of the intuitive forms and of the categorial grammar of the world.

  16. Fusion programs in Applied Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Applied Plasma Physics (APP) program at General Atomics (GA) described here includes four major elements: (a) Applied Plasma Physics Theory Program, (b) Alpha Particle Diagnostic, (c) Edge and Current Density Diagnostic, and (d) Fusion User Service Center (USC). The objective of the APP theoretical plasma physics research at GA is to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments and to significantly advance our ability to design a commercially-attractive fusion reactor. We categorize our efforts in three areas: magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria and stability; plasma transport with emphasis on H-mode, divertor, and boundary physics; and radio frequency (rf). The objective of the APP alpha particle diagnostic is to develop diagnostics of fast confined alpha particles using the interactions with the ablation cloud surrounding injected pellets and to develop diagnostic systems for reacting and ignited plasmas. The objective of the APP edge and current density diagnostic is to first develop a lithium beam diagnostic system for edge fluctuation studies on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The objective of the Fusion USC is to continue to provide maintenance and programming support to computer users in the GA fusion community. The detailed progress of each separate program covered in this report period is described in the following sections

  17. Physical aspects of laser applications to modern nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.

    2001-11-01

    This report has been presented by the author to obtain his HDR (accreditation to supervise research). After a brief presentation of his domain of skills, of his education, of his professional experience, and his awards, the author gives an overview of his work performed in the field of laser applications to modern nuclear technologies. Notably, he reports experimental studies dealing with the following topics: radiation source for uranium isotope separation by MLIS method, laser isotope separation in atom vapour, laser plasma diagnostics in strong magnetic field, laser ablation-time of flight mass spectrometry for low uranium isotope ratio measurements, laser ablation-optical emission spectroscopy for surface analysis. The report is completed by many published scientific articles

  18. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  19. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 the main activities of Department P-5 (until December 1996 known as the Department of Thermonuclear Research) were concentrated on 5 topics: 1. Selected problems of plasma theory, 2. Studies of phenomena within high-current plasma concentrators, 3. Development of plasma diagnostic methods, 4. Studies in the field of fusion technology, 5. Research on new plasma-ion technologies. Theoretical studies mainly concerned elementary processes occurring within a plasma, and particularly those within near-electrode regions of microwave discharges as well as those within near-wall layers (SOL) of tokamaks. We also developed computational packages for parameter identification and modelling of physical phenomena in pulse plasma coaxial accelerators. Experimental studies were concentrated on the generation of a dense magnetized plasma in different high-current PF (Plasma Focus) facilities and small Z-Pinch devices. We carried out investigations of X-rays, relativistic electron beams (REBs), accelerated primary ions, and fast products of fusion reactions for deuterium discharges. Research on plasma diagnostics comprised the development of methods and equipment for studies of X-ray emission, pulsed electron beams, and fast ions, using special Cherenkov-type detectors of electrons and solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) of ions. New diagnostic techniques were developed. Studies in the field of fusion technology concerned the design, construction, and testing of different high-voltage pulse generators. We also developed special opto-electronic systems for control and data transmission. Research on plasma-ion technology concentrated on the generation of pulsed high-power plasma-ion streams and their applications for the surface modification of semiconductors, pure metals and alloys. The material engineering studies were carried out in close collaboration with our P-9 Department and other domestic and foreign research centers

  20. A survey of dusty plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Two omnipresent ingredients of the Universe are plasmas and charged dust. The interplay between these two has opened up a new and fascinating research area, that of dusty plasmas, which are ubiquitous in different parts of our solar system, namely planetary rings, circumsolar dust rings, the interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, as well as in interstellar molecular clouds, etc. Dusty plasmas also occur in noctilucent clouds in the arctic troposphere and mesosphere, cloud-to-ground lightening in thunderstorms containing smoke-contaminated air over the United States, in the flame of a humble candle, as well as in microelectronic processing devices, in low-temperature laboratory discharges, and in tokamaks. Dusty plasma physics has appeared as one of the most rapidly growing fields of science, besides the field of the Bose-Einstein condensate, as demonstrated by the number of published papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings. In fact, it is a truly interdisciplinary science because it has many potential applications in astrophysics (viz. in understanding the formation of dust clusters and structures, instabilities of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation, decoupling of magnetic fields from plasmas, etc.) as well as in the planetary magnetospheres of our solar system [viz. Saturn (particularly, the physics of spokes and braids in the B and F rings), Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Mars] and in strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasmas. Since a dusty plasma system involves the charging and dynamics of massive charged dust grains, it can be characterized as a complex plasma system providing new physics insights. In this paper, the basic physics of dusty plasmas as well as numerous collective processes are discussed. The focus will be on theoretical and experimental observations of charging processes, waves and instabilities, associated forces, the dynamics of rotating and elongated dust grains, and some nonlinear structures (such as

  1. ICPP: Introduction to Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant Shukla, Padma

    2000-10-01

    Two omnipresent ingredients of the Universe are plasmas and charged dust. The interplay between these two has opened up a new and fascinating research area, that of dusty plasmas, which are ubiquitous in in different parts of our solar system, namely planetary rings, circumsolar dust rings, interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, interstellar molecular clouds, etc. Dusty plasmas also occur in noctilucent clouds in the arctic troposphere and mesosphere, cloud-to-ground lightening in thunderstorms containing smoke-contaminated air over the US, in the flame of humble candle, as well as in microelectronics and in low-temperature laboratory discharges. In the latter, charged dust grains are strongly correlated. Dusty plasma physics has appeared as one of the most rapidly growing field of science, besides the field of the Bose-Einstein condensate, as demonstrated by the number of published papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings. In fact, it is a truly interdisciplinary science because it has many potential applications in astrophysics (viz. in understanding the formation of dust clusters and structures, instabilities of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation, decoupling of magnetic fields from plasmas, etc.) as well as in the planetary magnetospheres of our solar system [viz. the Saturn (particularly, the physics of spokes and braids in B and F rings), Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Mars] and in strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasmas. Since dusty plasma system involves the charging and the dynamics of extremely massive charged dust particulates, it can be characterized as a complex plasma system with new physics insights. In this talk, I shall describe the basic physics of dusty plasmas and present the status of numerous collective processes that are relevant to space research and laboratory experiments. The focus will be on theoretical and experimental observations of novel waves and instabilities, various forces, and some

  2. A survey of dusty plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.

    2001-05-01

    Two omnipresent ingredients of the Universe are plasmas and charged dust. The interplay between these two has opened up a new and fascinating research area, that of dusty plasmas, which are ubiquitous in different parts of our solar system, namely planetary rings, circumsolar dust rings, the interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, as well as in interstellar molecular clouds, etc. Dusty plasmas also occur in noctilucent clouds in the arctic troposphere and mesosphere, cloud-to-ground lightening in thunderstorms containing smoke-contaminated air over the United States, in the flame of a humble candle, as well as in microelectronic processing devices, in low-temperature laboratory discharges, and in tokamaks. Dusty plasma physics has appeared as one of the most rapidly growing fields of science, besides the field of the Bose-Einstein condensate, as demonstrated by the number of published papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings. In fact, it is a truly interdisciplinary science because it has many potential applications in astrophysics (viz. in understanding the formation of dust clusters and structures, instabilities of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation, decoupling of magnetic fields from plasmas, etc.) as well as in the planetary magnetospheres of our solar system [viz. Saturn (particularly, the physics of spokes and braids in the B and F rings), Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Mars] and in strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasmas. Since a dusty plasma system involves the charging and dynamics of massive charged dust grains, it can be characterized as a complex plasma system providing new physics insights. In this paper, the basic physics of dusty plasmas as well as numerous collective processes are discussed. The focus will be on theoretical and experimental observations of charging processes, waves and instabilities, associated forces, the dynamics of rotating and elongated dust grains, and some nonlinear structures (such as

  3. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This is the first issue of a quarterly newsletter published by the International Atomic Energy Agency in order to provide news of potential interest of fusion scientists in developing countries. According to the foreword to this first issue, the purpose of the newsletter, as well as the organization called ''Third World Network'', is to ''start the process of unifying the developing country fusion community into some type of cohesive entity and to bring the efforts of the developing countries in the plasma physics research area to the attention of the world fusion community at large''. Furthermore, this first issue contains information about (i) Nuclear Fusion Research in Argentina, (ii) Chinese Fusion Efforts, (iii) Plasma and Fusion Physics in Egypt, (iv) Fusion Research in India, (v) Fusion Research in the Republic of Korea, (vi) Fusion Programmes in Malaysia, (vi) the Agency's Fusion Programme, (vii) a proposal for a workshop on computational plasma physics, sponsored by the Third World Plasma Research Network, (viii) the announcement of the formation of the ''Asian African Association for Plasma Training'', - for the promotion of the initiation/strengthening of plasma research, especially experimental, in developing countries in Asia and Africa, as well as the cooperation and sharing of technology among plasma physicists in the developing countries in the region; (ix) a communication entitled ''Fusion Research in ''Small'' Countries'', I.R. Jones, School of Physical Sciences, The Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, Australia, on the desirability of the pursuit of fusion research in ''small'' countries, i.e., those countries that do not have a national fusion research programme; (x) and, finally, a newsletter on the ITER project

  4. High-Latitude Space Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultqvist, B.; Hagfors, T.

    1983-01-01

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the Nobel Symposium No. 54 on High Latitude Magnetospheric/Ionospheric Plasma Physics. The main purpose of the symposium was to prepare for the European research effort in space plasma physics in the mid-1980's, in which two major constituents are the European Incoherent Scatter Association (EISCAT) facilities and the Swedish satellite Viking. The physics of the high-latitude ionosphere and how this part of near space is affected by the properties of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field are explored. A detailed discussion is provided on high-latitude magnetospheric physics at altitudes of 1-2 earth radii, the main focus of the Viking project. Specific topics considered include the role of the auroral ionosphere in magnetospheric substorms, the low altitude cleft, ionospheric modification and stimulated emissions, plasma physics on auroral field lines, solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling, cold plasma distribution above a few thousand kilometers at high latitudes, hot electrons in and above the auroral ionosphere, the correlation of auroral kilometric radiation with visual auroras and with Birkeland currents, electrostatic waves in the topside ionosphere, solitary waves and double layers, and an Alfven wave model of auroral arcs

  5. Plasma physics in noninertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; McClements, K. G.

    2009-01-01

    Equations describing the nonrelativistic motion of a charged particle in an arbitrary noninertial reference frame are derived from the relativistically invariant form of the particle action. It is shown that the equations of motion can be written in the same form in inertial and noninertial frames, with the effective electric and magnetic fields in the latter modified by inertial effects associated with centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations. These modifications depend on the particle charge-to-mass ratio, and also the vorticity, specific kinetic energy, and compressibility of the frame flow. The Newton-Lorentz, Vlasov, and Fokker-Planck equations in such a frame are derived. Reduced models such as gyrokinetic, drift-kinetic, and fluid equations are then derivable from these equations in the appropriate limits, using standard averaging procedures. The results are applied to tokamak plasmas rotating about the machine symmetry axis with a nonrelativistic but otherwise arbitrary toroidal flow velocity. Astrophysical applications of the analysis are also possible since the power of the action principle is such that it can be used to describe relativistic flows in curved spacetime.

  6. Plasma Physics Approximations in Ares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managan, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Lee & More derived analytic forms for the transport properties of a plasma. Many hydro-codes use their formulae for electrical and thermal conductivity. The coefficients are complex functions of Fermi-Dirac integrals, Fn( μ/θ ), the chemical potential, μ or ζ = ln(1+e μ/θ ), and the temperature, θ = kT. Since these formulae are expensive to compute, rational function approximations were fit to them. Approximations are also used to find the chemical potential, either μ or ζ . The fits use ζ as the independent variable instead of μ/θ . New fits are provided for A α (ζ ),A β (ζ ), ζ, f(ζ ) = (1 + e -μ/θ )F 1/2 (μ/θ), F 1/2 '/F 1/2 , F c α , and F c β . In each case the relative error of the fit is minimized since the functions can vary by many orders of magnitude. The new fits are designed to exactly preserve the limiting values in the non-degenerate and highly degenerate limits or as ζ→ 0 or ∞. The original fits due to Lee & More and George Zimmerman are presented for comparison.

  7. Yoshio Nishina father of modern physics in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Won

    2007-01-01

    Yoshio Nishina not only made a great contribution to the emergence of a research network that produced two Nobel prize winners, but he also raised the overall level of physics in Japan. Focusing on his roles as researcher, teacher, and statesman of science, Yoshio Nishina: Father of Modern Physics in Japan analyzes Nishina''s position in and his contributions to the Japanese physics community.After a concise biographical introduction, the book examines Nishina''s family, his early studies, the creation of RIKEN, and the greater Japanese physics community in the early twentieth century. It then focuses on Nishina''s work at the Cavendish Laboratory and at the University of Göttingen as well as his more fruitful research at Niels Bohr''s Institute of Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen. The book also describes the establishment of the Nishina Laboratory at RIKEN, the collaboration between its experimentalists and theoreticians, and the cosmic ray research of its scientists. The last two chapters discuss Nishina'...

  8. Mathematical physics a modern introduction to its foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Hassani, Sadri

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to expose the reader to the indispensable role that mathematics---often very abstract---plays in modern physics. Starting with the notion of vector spaces, the first half of the book develops topics as diverse as algebras, classical orthogonal polynomials, Fourier analysis, complex analysis, differential and integral equations, operator theory, and multi-dimensional Green's functions. The second half of the book introduces groups, manifolds, Lie groups and their representations, Clifford algebras and their representations, and fiber bundles and their applications to differential geometry and gauge theories. This second edition is a substantial revision of the first one with a complete rewriting of many chapters and the addition of new ones, including chapters on algebras, representation of Clifford algebras and spinors, fiber bundles, and gauge theories. The spirit of the first edition, namely the balance between rigor and physical application, has been maintained, as is the abundance...

  9. Handbook of modern sensors physics, designs, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fraden, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the theory (physical principles), design, and practical implementations of various sensors for scientific, industrial, and consumer applications. This latest edition focuses on the sensing technologies driven by the expanding use of sensors in mobile devices. These new miniature sensors will be described, with an emphasis on smart sensors which have embedded processing systems. The chapter on chemical sensors has also been expanded to present the latest developments. Digital systems, however complex and intelligent they may be, must receive information from the outside world that is generally analog and not electrical. Sensors are interface devices between various physical values and the electronic circuits that "understand" only a language of moving electrical charges. In other words, sensors are the eyes, ears, and noses of silicon chips. Unlike other books on sensors, the Handbook of Modern Sensors is organized according to the measured variables...

  10. VOA: a 2-d plasma physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltgroth, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    A 2-dimensional relativistic plasma physics code was written and tested. The non-thermal components of the particle distribution functions are represented by expansion into moments in momentum space. These moments are computed directly from numerical equations. Currently three species are included - electrons, ions and ''beam electrons''. The computer code runs on either the 7600 or STAR machines at LLL. Both the physics and the operation of the code are discussed

  11. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    1984-01-01

    This complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of this subject and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. In a wholly lucid manner the work covers single-particle motions, fluid equations for plasmas, wave motions, diffusion and resistivity, Landau damping, plasma instabilities and nonlinear problems. For students, this outstanding text offers a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly. This revised edition contains new material on kinetic effects, including Bernstein waves and the plasma dispersion function, and on nonlinear wave equations and solitons.

  12. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this classic text presents a complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, written by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field.  It offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of the subject matter and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. This outstanding text offers students a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly.  In a wholly lucid manner the second edition covered charged-particle motions, plasmas as fluids, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects.  For the third edition, two new chapters have been added to incorporate discussion of more recent advances in the field.  The new chapter 9 on Special Plasmas covers non-neutral plasmas, pure electron plasmas, solid and ultra-cold plasmas, pair-ion plasmas, d...

  13. Extended standard vector analysis for plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1982-02-01

    Standard vector analysis in 3-dimensional space, as found in most tables and textbooks, is complemented by a number of basic formulas that seem to be largely unknown, but are important in themselves and for some plasma physics applications, as is shown by several examples. (orig.)

  14. Abstracts of the fourth international conference on modern problems of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    The Fourth International Conference on modern problems of nuclear physics was held on 25-29 September, 2001 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of both fundamental and applied nuclear physics. More than 300 talks were presented in the meeting on the following subjects: particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei; applied nuclear physics; radiation solid state physics, condensed matter physics; activation analysis, radiochemistry, isotopes. (M.K.)

  15. What is Time in Some Modern Physics Theories: Interpretation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko Ivan A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of time in the context of several theories of modem physics. This fundamental concept inevitably arises in physical theories, but so far there is no adequate description of it in the philosophy of science. In the theory of relativity, quantum field theory. Standard Model of particle physics, theory of loop quantum gravity, superstring theory and other most recent theories the idea of time is shown explicitly or not. Sometimes, such as in the special theory of relativity, it plays a significant role and sometimes it does not. But anyway it exists and is implied by the content of the theory, which in some cases directly includes its mathematical tools. Fundamental difference of space-time processes in microcosm and macrocosm is of particular importance for solving the problem. In this regard, a need to understand the time in the way it appears in modem physics, to describe it in the language of philosophy arises (satisfactory for time description mathematical tools also do not exist. This will give an opportunity to get closer to the answer on question of time characteristics. And even if we do not obtain the exact answer, we will still be able to formulate the right question about its nature. For this purpose, the present research carries out analysis of the key theories of modern physics with regard to historical and scientific, historical and philosophical perspectives, hi some cases, this gives an opportunity to detect the succession of the associated with time perception ideas, their development, as well as the origination of fundamentally new ones. During the analysis, the conect characteristics of time are formulated from the point of view of physical theory and the attempt to state the nature of time is made. On the ground of conducted research, the conclusions about current state of the problem and its future solution perspectives are drawn.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, `The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced topics. For

  17. Modern methods in collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a compact yet comprehensive overview of recent developments in collisional-radiative (CR) modeling of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It describes advances across the entire field, from basic considerations of model completeness to validation and verification of CR models to calculation of plasma kinetic characteristics and spectra in diverse plasmas. Various approaches to CR modeling are presented, together with numerous examples of applications. A number of important topics, such as atomic models for CR modeling, atomic data and its availability and quality, radiation transport, non-Maxwellian effects on plasma emission, ionization potential lowering, and verification and validation of CR models, are thoroughly addressed. Strong emphasis is placed on the most recent developments in the field, such as XFEL spectroscopy. Written by leading international research scientists from a number of key laboratories, the book offers a timely summary of the most recent progress in this area. It ...

  18. Spring meeting of the scientific associations for atomic physics, high speed physics, mass spectrometry, molecular physics, plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The volume contains the abstracts of the contributions to the Spring Meeting in Rostock with aspects of atomic physics, molecular physics, high speed physics, plasma physics and mass spectrometry. (MM)

  19. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The IAEA Fellowship Programme providing for in general up to two years of training at a host laboratory or university is accessible for Member State scientists (contact the editor); so are IAEA research contracts (up to $ 5000 per year for up to 3 years). An overview of meetings on fusion or fusion-related topics is given for June-October 1990. It is announced that the full IFCR status report on fusion is due to be published in the September issues of Nuclear Fusion, and that the ''Third World Plasma Research Network'' (TWPRN) has been set up to ''provide an international forum for plasma research centres of the Third World countries'' to promote ''closer interactions among them'' and to strengthen their scientific programmes. The network also ''envisages active participation of small scale research programmes from developed countries that pursue basic plasma studies and development objectives''. Furthermore, this newsletter contains (1) the minutes of the steering committee meeting of the TWPRN, New Delhi, November 1989; (2) a contribution from A. Rodrigo, Argentina, entitled ''Collaboration and Scientific Exchange in Latin American Plasma Physics Laboratories'', listing for each country (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela) (i) key contact persons, (ii) main areas for collaboration/scientific exchange, and (iii) list of foreign laboratories having close contacts; (3) ''Plasma Research at the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology of Bangladesh'', by U.A. Mofiz, giving an overview of plasma research activities there; (4) A summary by P.K. Kaw and A. Sen of the 1989 International Conference on Plasma Physics held in New Delhi; (5) the announcement of the first South-North International Workshop on Fusion Theory, Tipaza, Algeria, September 16-23, 1990

  20. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section

  1. [Research programs in plasma physics]: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains a brief review of the work done in 1987 at New York University in plasma physics. Topics discussed in this report are: reduction and interpretation of experimental tokamak data, turbulent transport in tokamaks and RFP's, laminar flow transport, wave propagation in different frequency regimes, stability of flows, plasma fueling, magnetic reconnection problems, development of new numerical techniques for Fokker-Planck-like equations, and stability of shock waves. Outside of fusion there has been work in free electron lasers, heating of solar coronal loops and renormalized theory of fluid turbulence

  2. Abstracts of the third international conference on modern problems of nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The Third Uzbekistan Conference on modern problems of nuclear physics was held on 23-27 August, 1999 in Bukhara, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of both fundamental and applied nuclear physics. More than 300 talks were presented in the meeting on the following subjects: particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei; activation analysis, radiochemistry, isotopes, applied nuclear physics; radiation solid state physics. (A.A.D.)

  3. Abstracts of the fifth international conference on modern problems of nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    The Fifth Uzbekistan Conference on modern problems of nuclear physics was held on 12-15 August, 2003 in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of both fundamental and applied nuclear physics. More than 300 talks were presented in the meeting on the following subjects: particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei; activation analysis, radiochemistry, isotopes, applied nuclear physics; radiation solid state physics.

  4. Abstracts of the fifth international conference on modern problems of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Fifth Uzbekistan Conference on modern problems of nuclear physics was held on 12-15 August, 2003 in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of both fundamental and applied nuclear physics. More than 300 talks were presented in the meeting on the following subjects: particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei; activation analysis, radiochemistry, isotopes, applied nuclear physics; radiation solid state physics

  5. Spinning the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Mindset: A Modern Physics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughani, Bahram

    2010-04-01

    Topics in Modern Physics course from relativity to quantum mechanics were examined in the context of innovation as part of the recent Kettering University program on ``Entrepreneurship Across Curriculum-EAC.'' The main goals were (a) to introduce innovation and entrepreneurship without eliminating any topics from this course, (b) to use EAC as a vehicle for intentional education that produces graduates with innovative mindsets, (c) to enrich the students learning experience aligned with the desired educational outcomes, and (d) to highlight the impact of scientific innovation in the society, while encouraging students to re-think how entrepreneurship mindset could maximize their impact in the society through innovation. Ideas such as principles behind innovation and innovative ideas, disciplines of innovations, formation of innovation teams, and effective methods for analyzing innovative value propositions were introduced in this course. Most of the implementation were achieved through out of class activities, and communicated through in class presentations, papers or weekly laboratory reports.

  6. Comics in Modern Physics: Learning Blackbody Radiation through Quasi-History of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create a short comic story about historical emergence of Planck's explanation of blackbody radiation and to investigate what students learn from it and what they think about the usage of comics in modern physics course. The participants are a small group of undergraduate students studying at department of science…

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  8. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

  9. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  10. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  11. International Conference on Plasma Physics ICPP 1994. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanaka, P.H.; Tendler, M.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent the papers presented at the 1994 International Conference on Plasma Physics held in Foz do Iguacu, Brazil. The scope of the conference was broad and covered all aspects of plasma physics. Some of the topics discussed include space and astrophysical plasmas,fusion plasmas, small and large Tokamak plasmas, non-Tokamak plasmas, inertial confinement fusion plasmas, plasma based neutron sources and plasma applications. There are 60 papers in these proceedings and out of these, 35 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  12. Mathematics for plasma physics; Mathematiques pour la physique des plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, R. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-01-15

    The plasma physics is in the heart of the research of the CEA-DAM. Using mathematics in this domain is necessary, particularly for a precise statement of the partial differential equations systems which are on the basis of the numerical simulations. Examples are given concerning hydrodynamics, models for the thermal conduction and laser-plasma interaction. For the bi-temperature compressible Euler model, the mathematical study of the problem has allowed us to understand why the role of the energy equations dealing with ions on one hand and electrons on the other hand are not identical despite the symmetrical appearance of the system. The mathematical study is also necessary to be sure of the existence and uniqueness of the solution

  13. Brazilian programme for plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chian, A.C.L.; Reusch, M.F.; Nascimento, I.C.; Pantuso-Sudano, J.

    1992-01-01

    A proposal for a National Programme of Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in Brazil is presented, aimimg the dissemination of the researchers thought in plasma physics for the national authorities and the scientific community. (E.O.)

  14. Plasma Physics Department annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The main fields in which researches have been carried out during 1990 at the Wills Plasma Physics Department are briefly discussed. These include investigations of shear Alfven waves at frequencies above the ion cyclotron frequency; the use of submillimetre lasers to detect by far forward scattering density fluctuation associated with waves in Tortus during Alfven wave heating experiments; basic physics of laser induced fluorescence in plasma and in particular the process which determine the population of excited states, as well as magnetron discharge studies and application of the vacuum arc as ion sources for accelerators and as sputtering device for producing thin film coating. A list of publications and papers presented at various conferences by the members of the Department is given in the Appendix

  15. Physical processes in spin polarized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.J.; Cowley, S.

    1984-05-01

    If the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor is polarized, the nuclear reactions are modified in such a way as to enhance the reactor performance. We calculate in detail the modification of these nuclear reactions by different modes of polarization of the nuclear fuel. We also consider in detail the various physical processes that can lead to depolarization and show that they are by and large slow enough that a high degree of polarization can be maintained

  16. Physics options in the plasma code VOA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltgroth, P.G.

    1976-06-01

    A two dimensional relativistic plasma physics code has been modified to accomodate general electromagnetic boundary conditions and various approximations of basic physics. The code can treat internal conductors and insulators, imposed electromagnetic fields, the effects of external circuitry and non-equilibrium starting conditions. Particle dynamics options include a full microscopic treatment, fully relaxed electrons, a low frequency electron approximation and a combination of approximations for specified zones. Electromagnetic options include the full wave treatment, an electrostatic approximation and two varieties of magnetohydrodynamic approximations in specified zones

  17. Feyerabend's 'The concept of intelligibility in modern physics' (1948).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This essay introduces the transcription and translation of Paul Feyerabend's Der Begriff der Verständlichkeit in der modernen Physik [The concept of intelligibility in modern physics] (1948), which is an early essay written by Paul Feyerabend in 1948 on the topic of intelligibility (Verständlichkeit) and visualizability (Anschaulichkeit) of physical theories. The existence of such essay was likely. It is listed in his bibliography as his first publication. Yet the content of the essay was unknown, as no original or copy is extant in Feyerabend's Nachlass and no known published version was available to the community-until now. The essay has both historical and philosophical interest: it is, as far as our current knowledge goes, Feyerabend's earliest extant publication. It documents Feyerabend's philosophical interest as a physicist-to-be, in what he himself called his "positivist" phase; and it gives a rare if fragmentary insight into the early discussions of the 'Third Vienna Circle' and, more generally, the philosophical culture of discussion in Vienna. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Abstracts of the sixth international conference on modern problems of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuldashev, B.; Fazylov, M.; Ibragimova, E.; Salikhbaev, U.

    2006-09-01

    The Sixth International Conference on modern problems of nuclear physics was held on 19-22 September, 2006 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of both fundamental and applied nuclear physics. About 275 talks were presented in the meetingof on the following subjects: particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei; radiation physics of condenced matter; nuclear applications in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture; nuclear and radiation safety, non prolifaration issues. (K.M.)

  19. Abstracts of the sixth international conference on modern problems of nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuldashev, B; Fazylov, M; Ibragimova, E; Salikhbaev, U [eds.

    2006-09-15

    The Sixth International Conference on modern problems of nuclear physics was held on 19-22 September, 2006 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of both fundamental and applied nuclear physics. About 275 talks were presented in the meetingof on the following subjects: particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei; radiation physics of condenced matter; nuclear applications in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture; nuclear and radiation safety, non prolifaration issues. (K.M.)

  20. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.; Tang, X.Z.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of δf particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  1. Studies on laser–plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maheut, Y.; Batani, D.; Nicolai, Ph.; Antonelli, L.; Krouský, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 4 (2015), s. 325-336 ISSN 1042-0150 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shock ignition * plasma * hot electrons * shocks * fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2015

  2. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of

  3. A plasma formulary for physics, technology, and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2011-01-01

    Plasma physics has matured rapidly as a discipline, and now touches on many different research areas, including manufacturing processes. This collection of fundamental formulae and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering.Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings.The text treats astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline - a unique approach made pos

  4. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future

  5. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The second lecture will explore some of the key physics phenomena which govern the behaviour of magnetic fusion plasmas and which have been the subject of intense research during the past 50 years: plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and plasma-wall interactions encompass the major areas of plasma physics which must be understood to assemble an overall description of fusion plasma behaviour. In addition, as fusion plasmas approach the “burning plasma” regime, where internal heating due to fusion products dominates other forms of heating, the physics of the interaction between the α-particles produced by D-T fusion reactions and the thermal “background” plasma becomes significant. This lecture will also introduce the basic physics of fusion plasma production, plasma heating and current drive, and plasma measurements (“diagnostics”).

  6. Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.E.; Behrisch, R.

    1984-01-01

    In the areas of plasma physics, atomic physics, surface physics, bulk material properties and fusion experiments and theory, the following topics are presented: the plasma sheath; plasma flow in the sheath and presheath of a scrape-off layer; probes for plasma edge diagnostics in magnetic confinement fusion devices; atomic and molecular collisions in the plasma boundary; physical sputtering of solids at ion bombardment; chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation of carbon; ion backscattering from solid surfaces; implantation, retention and release of hydrogen isotopes; surface erosion by electrical arcs; electron emission from solid surfaces;l properties of materials; plasma transport near material boundaries; plasma models for impurity control experiments; neutral particle transport; particle confinement and control in existing tokamaks; limiters and divertor plates; advanced limiters; divertor tokamak experiments; plasma wall interactions in heated plasmas; plasma-wall interactions in tandem mirror machines; and impurity control systems for reactor experiments

  7. The proceedings of the 14th national symposium on atomic physics and nuclear physics and the 7th annual meeting on modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    It is the proceedings of the 14th national symposium on atomic physics and nuclear physics and the 7th annual meeting on modern physics. 27 theses are collected in these proceedings. Many of them are related with nuclear physics

  8. Recent developments in quantum plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of recent developments in nonlinear quantum plasma physics involving quantum hydrodynamics and effective nonlinear Schroedinger equation formalisms, for describing collective phenomena in dense quantum plasmas with degenerate electrons. As examples, we discuss simulation studies of the formation and dynamics of dark solitons and quantum vortices, and of nonlinear interactions between intense circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) in dense quantum-electron plasmas with immobile ions. The electron dynamics of dark solitons and quantum vortices is governed by a pair of equations comprising the nonlinear Schroedinger and Poisson system of equations. Both dark solitons and singly charged electron vortices are robust, and the latter tend to form pairs of oppositely charged vortices. The two-dimensional quantum-electron vortex pairs survive during collisions under the change of partners. The dynamics of the CPEM waves is governed by a nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which is nonlinearly coupled with the Schroedinger equation of the EPOs via the relativistic ponderomotive force, the relativistic electron mass increase in the CPEM field, and the electron density fluctuations. The present governing equations in one-spatial dimension admit stationary solutions in the form of dark solitons. The nonlinear equations also depict trapping of localized CPEM wave envelopes in the electron density holes that are associated with a positive potential profile.

  9. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    In situ measurements in the magnetospheres together with general advancement in plasma physics are now necessitating introduction of a number of effects that have been recently discovered or earlier neglected. Examples are: electric double layers (like in the lower magnetosphere); thin current layer (like in the magnetopause) giving space a cellular structure; current produced filaments (e.g., in prominences, solar corona and interstellar clouds). Further it is important to use the electric current (particle) description and to study the whole circuit in which the current flows. The pinch effect cannot be neglected as is now usually done. The critical velocity phenomenon is essential, for example for the band structure of solar system. Theory of dusty plasmas is important. The result is a change in so many theories in cosmic plasma physics that it is appropriate to speak of an introduction of a new paradigm. This should be based on empirical knowledge from magnetospheric and laboratory investigations. Its application to astrophysics in general, including cosmology, will necessarily lead to a revision of, e.g., the present theories of the formation of stars, planets and satellites. It is doubtful whether the big bang cosmology will survive. (Auth.)

  10. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-06-01

    In situ measurements in the magnetospheres together with general advancement in plasma physics are now necessitating introduction of a number of effects that have been recently discovered or earlier neglected. Examples are: 1) Electric double layers (like in the lower magnetosphere) 2) Thin current layer (like in the magnetopause) giving space a cellular structure. 3) Current produced filaments (e.g. in prominences, solar corona and interstellar clouds). 4) Further it is important to use the electric current (particle) description and to study the whole circuit in which the current flows. 5) The pinch effect cannot be neglected as is now usually done. 6) The critical velocity phenomenon is essential, for example for the band structure of solar systems. 7) Theory of dusty plasmas is important. The result is a change in so many theories in cosmic plasma physics that it is appropriate to speak of an introduction of a new paradigm. This should be based on empirical knowledge from magnetospheric and laboratory investigations. Its application to astrophysics in general, including cosmology, will necessarily lead to a revision of e.g. the present theories of the formation of stars, planets and satellites. It is doubtful whether the big bang cosmology will survive. (Author)

  11. Fearful Symmetry: The Search for Beauty in Modern Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrzewski, W J [Department of Mathematical Sciences Science Laboratory, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-11

    It is easy to see beauty in symmetry when we look at buildings like the Taj Mahal or natural objects such as snowflakes; it is much harder to explain to a non-expert the beauty of equations or of symmetry concepts in relativity or in particle theory. Tony Zee achieves this in a remarkable way, while he also manages to make many complicated concepts accessible to a reader who is genuinely interested and who has some basic/school knowledge of physics. To do this he invents various ordinary world analogies and exploits them in a masterful way. I liked, in particular, his analogy for the colour of quarks and the associated SU(3) symmetry provided by adding colour to ice-cream, which does not change its cost. Of course, sometimes real beauty is associated with a small breakdown of symmetry. We are all familiar with this in music or in art. Tony shows that such a breakdown also has a role in physics and that it is often associated with unexpected and very deep and important concepts (parity, CP violation or baryon assymetry). The book is an amazing achievement; although the main focus is on symmetry and beauty the author manages to explain most of the new and relevant concepts of modern physics, from quantum mechanics and relativity to superstrings and superbranes. And he does this with no equations and almost no mathematical symbols. So who is this book intended for? Who will enjoy reading it? Clearly, it will be appreciated by all theoretical physicists, who probably will be primarily impressed by the way the book makes accessible so many very difficult concepts. I was particularly struck by Tony's ability to explain things in simple terms and to find relevant analogies. It will be also greatly enjoyed by the non-specialist but 'interested' reader; (s)he may find some concepts hard to follow but (s)he will get the general gist of the arguments. It will be also be enjoyed by sixth-formers studying physics and quite possibly will attract some of them to

  12. Fearful Symmetry: The Search for Beauty in Modern Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, W J

    2008-01-01

    It is easy to see beauty in symmetry when we look at buildings like the Taj Mahal or natural objects such as snowflakes; it is much harder to explain to a non-expert the beauty of equations or of symmetry concepts in relativity or in particle theory. Tony Zee achieves this in a remarkable way, while he also manages to make many complicated concepts accessible to a reader who is genuinely interested and who has some basic/school knowledge of physics. To do this he invents various ordinary world analogies and exploits them in a masterful way. I liked, in particular, his analogy for the colour of quarks and the associated SU(3) symmetry provided by adding colour to ice-cream, which does not change its cost. Of course, sometimes real beauty is associated with a small breakdown of symmetry. We are all familiar with this in music or in art. Tony shows that such a breakdown also has a role in physics and that it is often associated with unexpected and very deep and important concepts (parity, CP violation or baryon assymetry). The book is an amazing achievement; although the main focus is on symmetry and beauty the author manages to explain most of the new and relevant concepts of modern physics, from quantum mechanics and relativity to superstrings and superbranes. And he does this with no equations and almost no mathematical symbols. So who is this book intended for? Who will enjoy reading it? Clearly, it will be appreciated by all theoretical physicists, who probably will be primarily impressed by the way the book makes accessible so many very difficult concepts. I was particularly struck by Tony's ability to explain things in simple terms and to find relevant analogies. It will be also greatly enjoyed by the non-specialist but 'interested' reader; (s)he may find some concepts hard to follow but (s)he will get the general gist of the arguments. It will be also be enjoyed by sixth-formers studying physics and quite possibly will attract some of them to study science at

  13. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In 2003, research activities in Dept. P-V embraced the continuation of previous studies in the field of high - temperature plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion. Some new investigations were developed, particularly in the field of plasma technology. The main topics of the research activities were as follows: 1. Selected problems of plasma theory; 2. Investigation of plasma phenomena in pulse discharges of the Plasma-Focus (PF) and Z-Pinch type; 3. Development of selected methods of plasma diagnostics; 4. Research on experimental facilities for basic studies and industrial applications; 5. Modification of material surfaces by means of pulsed plasma-ion streams. Theoretical studies concerned the numerical modeling of discharges in a coaxial plasma accelerator of the IPD type. The modification of a 2-D model concerned mainly a plasma flow along the current sheath surface, taking into consideration the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Several series of computations were performed and different parameters of the system were determined. As for experimental studies, we studied plasma phenomena which occur in high-current discharges of PF and Z-Pinch type. Measurements of pulsed electron beams, and their correlation with other plasma phenomena, were performed within the MAJA-PF device in Swierk and PF-1000 facility at IPPLM in Warsaw. Use was made of Cerenkov-type detectors and magnetic analyzers. It was confirmed that separate e-beams are generated in different hot-spots, and the electron energy spectrum ranges up to several hundreds keV (i.e. above the interelectrode voltage during the radial collapse phase). We also presented papers presenting results of previous research on polarization of X-ray lines emitted from the pinch column. Experimental studies of high-temperature plasma were also carried out within the PF-360 facility in Swierk. Several papers, describing the most important characteristics of this device and results of research

  14. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory, and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure in five different ways. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle-group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a long-standing question posed by Kruskal about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no adhoc elements, which is then applied to gyromotion. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A theory motivated by free electron lasers gives new restrictions on the change of area of projected parallelepipeds under canonical transformations

  15. "Physics Stories": How the Early Technologies of High Voltage and High Vacuum Led to "Modern Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2018-05-01

    Some of you may remember the 1979 television series "Connections" that was written and narrated by James Burke, a British science writer. Burke's technique was to choose a number of seemingly unrelated ideas and show how they led to developments in science and technology. This is an enjoyable business, even if some of the connections seem to be stretched at times, and led to a book by Burke. In a number of talks that I have given over the years, I have made somewhat less fanciful connections that suggest how the technologies of high vacuum and high voltage led to what used to be called "modern physics." Today we might limit the "modern" era to the years from 1890 to 1920 that gave the first workable theories of small-scale physics.

  16. Frontier of plasma physics. 'Research network on non-equilibrium and extreme state plasmas'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Fujisawa, Akihide; Kodama, Ryosuke; Sato, Motoyasu; Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2011-01-01

    Plasma physics and fusion science have been applied to a wide variety of plasmas such as nuclear fusion plasmas, high-energy-density plasmas, processing plasmas and nanobio- plasmas. They are pioneering science and technology frontiers such as new energy sources and new functional materials. A large project 'research network on non-equilibrium and extreme state plasmas' is being proposed to reassess individual plasma researches from a common view of the non-equilibrium extreme plasma and to promote collaboration among plasma researchers all over the country. In the present review, recent collaborative works related to this project are being introduced. (T.I.)

  17. Modern physics and engineering technology for the world year of physics 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xiangwan

    2005-01-01

    In the course of progress of the modern society, physics as part of fundamental science, and engineering technology, which is on the applied side of the scientific spectrum, have played different roles. However, there are strong correlation and close interactions between them. By examining the relations between physics and nuclear energy, laser technology, and astronautics, the paper shows that modern physics has taken a leading role in opening up new areas of engineering technology. And conversely, while directly raising productivity, engineering technology has also provided new conditions and environment and more powerful means with which the research of physical science has been explored both more vastly and deeply. The paper further stipulates that, while benefiting each other by mutual progress and interpenetration, physics and engineering technology work hand in hand with philosophy and other social sciences, jointly promoting economic and social development. Faced with lofty historical duties in the process of understanding and transforming the world, physicists and engineers are required to posses some common, good qualities. (author)

  18. Wills Plasma Physics Department annual report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the collaborative researches carried out during the 1989 at the Wills Plasma Physics Department is given. The main activities included the study of hydromagnetic surface waves and RF heating using the Tortus tokamak; the development of diagnostic techniques, particularly those based on submillimetre lasers and tunable gyrotrons; gas discharge studies and investigations of apparent cold nuclear fusion in deuterated palladium. The small research tokamak Tortus was upgraded during the year, thus enabling the machine to be routinely and reliably operated at toroidal currents around 40 kA. A list of papers published or presented at various conferences during the year is included in the Appendix

  19. Frontiers of Physics and Plasma Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prerana

    2017-01-01

    Preface to the conference proceedingsWe are very pleased to introduce the proceeding of FPPS-2016; the international conference “Frontiers of Physics and Plasma Science” that took place on 7 and 8 November, 2016 in the campus of Ujjain Engineering College, Ujjain (India). The goal of the meeting was to provide a broad prospective to the plasma science emphasizing physics with a new plasma technologies. The scientific program of the conference focused on the advancement of the all branches of physics in achieving all applications of the plasma science. The conference spans a wide range of topics, reporting experiments, techniques and ideas that advance the plasma science worldwide.There were 20 invited lectures and 04 oral presentations covering the different area of the conference. The keynote lecture was delivered by Dr. Rajdeep Singh Rawat (NTU, Singapore) on “Density plasma focus: novel high energy density plasma device”. Prof. Y.C. Saxena (IPR, Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad), Prof. R. P. Sharma (IIT, New Delhi), Prof. Fernando Haas (Brazil), Prof. Davoud Dorranian (Tehran, Iran), Dr. Raju Khanal (Tribhuwan University, Nepal), Prof. Avinash Khare (IIT, New Delhi), Dr. Navin Dwivedi (Israel), Prof. V.K. Tripathi (IIT New Delhi), Dr. J. Ghosh (IPR, Gandhinagar, Gujarat), Dr. Devendra Sharma (IPR, Gandhinagar, Gujarat), Prof. R.K. Thareja (IIT Kanpur), Dr. Vipul Arora (RRCAT, Indore), Prof. M. P. Bora (Gauhati University, Guwahati) and many more have delivered their lecture in the field of plasma science and its applications. The program was chaired in a professional and efficient way by the session chairmen who were selected for their international standing in the subject.The 165 abstracts that were presented in two days (during parallel poster session) formed a heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for the discussion. The 170 participants, 110 of whom were students had many fruitful discussions and exchange that contributed to the success of the

  20. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  1. Plasma physical aspects of the solar cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    Mass motions below the photosphere drive the solar cycle which is association with variations in the magnetic field structure and accompanying phenomena. In addition to semi-empirical models, dynamo theories have been used to explain the solar cycle. The emergence of magnetic field generated by these mechanisms and its expansions into the corona involves many plasma physical processes. Magnetic buoyancy aids the expulsion of magnetic flux. The corona may respond dynamically or by continually adjusting to a quasi-static force-free or pressure-balanced equilibrium. The formation and disruption of current sheets is significant for the overall structure of the coronal magnetic field and the physics of quiescent prominences. The corona has a fine structure consisting of magnetic loops. The structure and stability of these are important as they are one of the underlying elements which make up the corona. (Author)

  2. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p T physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B → J/Ψ production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation

  3. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p{sub T} physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B {yields} J/{psi} production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation.

  4. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This, fourth, issue of the Newsletter contains a (i) contribution in the series of reports on national fusion programmes from Algeria; (ii) a letter from Dr J.A.M. de Villiers, manager: fusion studies, at the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Limited, informing about the close-down of the small tokamak project there, and soliciting ways to use some manpower and supportive sources to salvage the wealth of information still left behind in the project, and offering, in the possible absence of such manpower and supportive sources, the entire facility for sale (specifications of the Tokoloshe Tokamak plus diagnostic systems are enclosed); (iii) the e-mail address of the Third World Plasma Research Network (TWPRN), namely: ''PLASNET.NERUS.PFC.MIT.EDU''; (iv) minutes of the TWPRN Steering Committee Meeting held in May 1991, at the I.C.T.P., Trieste, Italy; (v) a news item on the ITER Tokamak project; (vi) a reiteration of the announcement of the 14th IAEA International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, to be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, September 30 - October 7, 1992; (vii) a list of IAEA Technical Committee Meetings during 1991; (viii) the First Announcement of the V Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, to be held in Mexico City, July 21-30, 1992, accompanied with a call for papers; all correspondence on this conference should be addressed to: Dr. Julio Herrera, V LAWPP, ICN-UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-543, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. Mexico (e-mail: ''HERRE.UNAMVM1.BITNET''); (ix) the announcement for the Second South North International Workshop on Fusion Theory, Lisbon, Portugal, March 1993 (contact: Pr. Tito Mendonca, Centro de Electrodinamica, Instituto Superio Tecnico, 1096 Lisbon Codex, Portugal)

  5. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  6. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism

  7. Self-organization phenomena in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanduloviciu, M.; Popescu, S.

    2001-01-01

    The self-assembling in nature and laboratory of structures in systems away from thermodynamic equilibrium is one of the problems that mostly fascinates the scientists working in all branches of science. In this context a substantial progress has been obtained by investigating the appearance of spatial and spatiotemporal patterns in plasma. These experiments revealed the presence of a scenario of self-organization able to suggest an answer to the central problem of the 'Science of Complexity', why matter transits spontaneously from a disordered into an ordered state? Based on this scenario of self-organization we present arguments proving the possibility to explain the challenging problems of nonequilibrium physics in general. These problems refer to: (i) genuine origin of phase transitions observed in gaseous conductors and semiconductors; (ii) the elucidation of the role played by self-organization in the simulation of oscillations; (iii) the physical basis of anomalous transport of matter and energy with special reference to the possibilities of improving the economical performance of fusion devices; (iv) the possibility to use self-confined gaseous space charged configurations as an alternative to the magnetically confined plasma used at present in fusion devices. In other branches of sciences, as for instance in Biology, the self-organization scenario reveals a new insight into a mechanism able to explain the appearance of the simplest possible space charge configuration able to evolve, under suitable conditions, into prebiotic structures. Referring to phenomena observed in nature, the same self-organization scenario suggests plausible answers to the appearance of ball lightening but also to the origin of the flickering phenomena observed in the light emission of the Sun and stars. For theory the described self-organization scenario offers a new physical basis for many problems of nonlinear science not solved yet and also a new model for the so-called 'self

  8. Status of plasma physics research activities in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The status of plasma physics research activities in Egypt is reviewed. There are nine institutes with plasma research activities. The largest is the Atomic energy Authority (AEA), which has activities in fundamental plasma studies, fusion technology, plasma and laser applications, and plasma simulation. The experiments include Theta Pinches, a Z Pinch, a coaxial discharge, a glow discharge, a CO 2 laser, and the EGYPTOR tokamak. (author)

  9. Chapter 8: Plasma operation and control [Progress in the ITER Physics Basis (PIPB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribov, Y.; Humphreys, D.; Kajiwara, K.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lister, J.B.; Ozeki, T.; Portone, A.; Shimada, M.; Sips, A.C.C.; Wesley, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The ITER plasma control system has the same functional scope as the control systems in present tokamaks. These are plasma operation scenario sequencing, plasma basic control (magnetic and kinetic), plasma advanced control (control of RWMs, NTMs, ELMs, error fields, etc) and plasma fast shutdown. This chapter considers only plasma initiation and plasma basic control. This chapter describes the progress achieved in these areas in the tokamak experiments since the ITER Physics Basis (1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 2577) was written and the results of assessment of ITER to provide the plasma initiation and basic control. This assessment was done for the present ITER design (15 MA machine) at a more detailed level than it was done for the ITER design 1998 (21 MA machine) described in the ITER Physics Basis (1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 2577). The experiments on plasma initiation performed in DIII-D and JT-60U, as well as the theoretical studies performed for ITER, have demonstrated that, within specified assumptions on the plasma confinement and the impurity influx, ITER can produce plasma initiation in a low toroidal electric field (0.3 V m -1 ), if it is assisted by about 2 MW of ECRF heating. The plasma basic control includes control of the plasma current, position and shape-the plasma magnetic control, as well as control of other plasma global parameters or their profiles-the plasma performance control. The magnetic control is based on more reliable and simpler models of the control objects than those available at present for the plasma kinetic control. Moreover the real time diagnostics used for the magnetic control in many cases are more precise than those used for the kinetic control. Because of these reasons, the plasma magnetic control was developed for modern tokamaks and assessed for ITER better than the kinetic control. However, significant progress has been achieved in the plasma performance control during the last few years. Although the physics basis of plasma operation

  10. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  11. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005 research activities in Department P-V were concentrated on the continuation of previous studies in the field of plasma physics and CNF, but new investigations were also undertaken, particularly in the field of plasma technology. The main tasks were as follows: 1. Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges producing dense magnetized plasma; 2. Development of methods and tools for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; 3. Research in the field of plasma technologies. As to the first task, particular attention was paid to studies of X-ray pulses and pulsed electron beams, by means of different diagnostic techniques. Measurements of the polarization of the selected X-ray spectral lines and their correlation with pulsed e-beams were performed in the MAJA-PF facility. Taking into account microscopic irreproducibility of so-called 'hot-spots', particular efforts were devoted to the correlation of the X-ray emission from a single hot-spot with corresponding non-thermal electron pulses. Some observations of X-rays were performed also at the PF-1000 facility at IPPLM in Warsaw. Other studies concerned the correlation of fast-neutron pulses with X-rays and other corpuscular emissions. Results of experimental studies carried out in the IPJ-IPPLM collaboration were analyzed and summarized. New measurements, carried out in the MAJA-PF facility, determined the temporal correlation of X-rays pulses, fusion-neutrons, fast electron beams and high-energy ion beams. Other efforts concerned studies of fast (ripple-born) electrons in tokamaks. An analysis of the capability of special Cerenkov-type detectors (based on diamond-crystal radiators) was performed, and measuring heads for the CASTOR and TORE-SUPRA facilities have been designed. Concerning the development of plasma diagnostic techniques, characteristics of PM-355 nuclear track detectors were analyzed and the calibrated detectors (with appropriate absorption filters) were used for measurements of fast (> 3 Me

  12. Modern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Bagrov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of the most important problems of modern meteoric astronomy and briefly describes ways and methods of their solutions. Particular attention is paid to the construction and arrangement of meteoric video cameras intended for registration of the meteoric phenomena as the main method of obtaining reliable and objective observational data on the basis of which the solution of the described tasks is possible.

  13. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Full text: During the last decade, growing efforts have been devoted to studying the possible forms an electricity-producing thermonuclear reactor might take and the various technical problems that will have to be overcome. Previous IAEA Conferences took place in Salzburg (1961), Culham (1965), Novosibirsk (1968), Madison (1971), Tokyo (1974), Berchtesgaden (1976) and Innsbruck (1978) The exchange of information that has characterized this series of meetings is an important example of international co-operation and has contributed substantially to progress in controlled fusion research. The results of experiments in major research establishments, as well as the growing scientific insights in the field of plasma physics, give hope that the realization of nuclear fusion will be made possible on a larger scale and beyond the laboratory stage by the end of this century. The increase of the duration of existing tokamak discharges requires solution of the impurity control problem. First results from the new big machines equipped with the poloidal divertor recently came into operation. PDX (USA) and ASDEX (F.R. of Germany) show that various divertor configurations can be established and maintained and that the divertors function in the predicted manner. The reduction of high-Z impurities on these machines by a factor 10 was achieved. As a result of extensive research on radio-frequency (RF) plasma heating on tokamaks: PLT (USA), TFR (France), JFT-2 (Japan), the efficiency of this attractive method of plasma heating comparable to neutral beam heating was demonstrated. It was shown that the density of the input power of about 5-10 kW/cm 2 is achievable and this limit is high enough for application to reactor-like machines. One of the inspiring results reported at the conference was the achievement of value (the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure) of ∼ 3% on tokamaks T-11 (USSR) and ISX-B (USA). It is important to note that this value exceeds the

  14. Introduction to the basic concepts of modern physics special relativity, quantum and statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Becchi, Carlo Maria

    2016-01-01

    This is the third edition of a well-received textbook on modern physics theory. This book provides an elementary but rigorous and self-contained presentation of the simplest theoretical framework that will meet the needs of undergraduate students. In addition, a number of examples of relevant applications and an appropriate list of solved problems are provided.Apart from a substantial extension of the proposed problems, the new edition provides more detailed discussion on Lorentz transformations and their group properties, a deeper treatment of quantum mechanics in a central potential, and a closer comparison of statistical mechanics in classical and in quantum physics. The first part of the book is devoted to special relativity, with a particular focus on space-time relativity and relativistic kinematics. The second part deals with Schrödinger's formulation of quantum mechanics. The presentation concerns mainly one-dimensional problems, but some three-dimensional examples are discussed in detail. The third...

  15. Modern Gravitational Lens Cosmology for Introductory Physics and Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Paul; Field, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Recent and exciting discoveries in astronomy and cosmology have inspired many high school students to learn about these fields. A particularly fascinating consequence of general relativity at the forefront of modern cosmology research is gravitational lensing, the bending of light rays that pass near massive objects. Gravitational lensing enables…

  16. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics

  17. Physics through the 1990s: Plasmas and fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This survey of plasma physics and fluid physics briefly describes present activities and recent major accomplishments. It also identifies research areas that are likely to lead to advances during the next decade. Plasma physics is divided into three major areas: general plasma physics, fusion plasma confinement and heating, and space and astrophysical plasmas. Fluid physics is treated as one topic, although it is an extremely diverse research field ranging from biological fluid dynamics to ship and aircraft performance to geological fluid dynamics. Subpanels, chosen for their technical expertise and scientific breadth, reviewed each of the four areas. The entire survey was coordinated and supervised by an Executive Committee, which is also responsible for the Executive Summary of this volume. Wherever possible, input from recent Advisory Committees was used, e.g., from the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee, the Space Science Board, and the Astronomy Survey Committee. This volume is organized as follows: An Introduction and Executive Summary that outlines (1) major findings and recommendations; (2) significant research accomplishments during the past decade and likely areas of future research emphasis; and (3) a brief summary of present funding levels, manpower resources, and institutional involvement; and the subpanel reports constitute Fluid Physics, General Plasma Physics, Fusion Plasma Confinement and Heating, and Space and Astrophysical Plasmas. An important conclusion of this survey is that both plasma physics and fluid physics are scientifically and intellectually well developed, and both ares are broad subdisciplines of physics. We therefore recommend that future physics surveys have separate volumes on the physics of plasmas and the physics of fluids

  18. Twentyseventh European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igitkhanov, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The twentyseventh European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics was held in Budapest, 12-16 June 2000. About 10 invited papers were presented, covering a wide range of problems in plasma physics, including confinement and transport issues in fusion devices, astrophysics and industrial application of plasmas. More than 100 papers were presented on plasma theory and experiments from tokamaks and stellarators. Some of the ITER-relevant issues covered are described in this newsletter

  19. The physics of the low-temperature plasma in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracik, J.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of low-temperature plasma research in Czechoslovakia since 1954 and its main results are pointed out. In the first years, various processes in electric discharges and electromagnetic acceleration of plasma clusters were studied at Czechoslovak universities and in the Institute of Physics. In the study of ionization waves, Czechoslovak physicists achieved world priority. Later on, low-temperature plasma investigation began in the Institute of Plasma Physics, founded in 1959. The issues of plasma interaction with the solid state and plasma applications in plasma chemistry were studied mainly by its Department of Applied Plasma Physics. The main effort of this group, transferred recently to the Institute of Physics, is aimed at thin film production and plasma-surface interactions; similar experimental studies are also carried out at universities in Brno and Bratislava. Last but not least, arc spraying of powder materials using water-cooled plasmatrons is being developed by the Department of Plasma Technology of the Institute of Plasma Physics. (J.U.)

  20. MHD description of plasma: handbook of plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1980-10-01

    The basic sets of MHD equations for the description of a plasma in various limits are derived and their usefulness and limits of validity are discussed. These limits are: the one fluid collisional plasma, the two fluid collisional plasma, the Chew-Goldberger Low formulation of the guiding center limit of a collisionless plasma and the double-adiabatic limit. Conservation relations are derived from these sets and the mathematics of the concept of flux freezing is given. An example is given illustrating the differences between guiding center theory and double adiabatic theory

  1. The physics of collective neutrino-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Silva, L.O.; Dawson, J.M.; Bethe, H.; Bingham, R.; Stenflo, L.; Mendonca, J.T.; Dalhed, S.

    1999-01-01

    A review of recent work on collective neutrino-plasma interactions is presented. The basic physical concepts of this new field as well as some possible astrophysical problems where the physics of collective neutrino-plasma interactions can have a radical impact, are discussed. (author)

  2. Proceedings of the 1984 international conference on plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, M.Q.; Verbeek, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 ICPP, held in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the third biennial conference of the series ''International conferences on plasma physics''. A complete spectrum of current plasma physics from fusion devices to interstellar space was presented, even if most of the papers were of direct interest for fusion. This is the second part of the conference

  3. Overview of experimental research on nuclear structure in department of modern applied physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shengjiang

    1999-01-01

    The experimental research on nuclear structure in Department of Modern Applied Physics, Tsinghua University has been summarized. The main research results in high spin states of nuclear structure, as well as some low spin states, have been reported

  4. Edge Plasma Physics and Relevant Diagnostics on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckel, Jan; Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Martines, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Van Oost, G.; Hron, Martin; Ďuran, Ivan; Pánek, Radomír; Stejskal, Pavel; Adámek, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2004), s. 1-6 ISSN 1433-5581. [First Cairo Conference on Plasma Physics & Applications. Cairo, 11.10.2003-15.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0786; GA ČR GP202/03/P062 Keywords : tokamak * edge plasma * probe diagnostics * biasing * turbulence * polarization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  5. Fourth Latin-American workshop on plasma physics. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The main goal of this series of Workshops is to provide a periodic meeting place for Latin-American researchers in plasma physics together with colleagues from other countries around the world. This volume includes the contributed papers presented at the Workshop on Plasma Physics held in Buenos Aires in 1990. The scope of the Workshop can be synthesized in the following main subjects: Tokamak experiments and theory; alternative confinement systems and basic experiments; technology and applications; general theory; astrophysical and space plasmas

  6. Plasma physics: innovation in energy and industrial technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Plasmas-ionised gases-are truly ubiquitous. More than 99% of the matter in the universe is in the plasma state. All of the matter that comprises the Earth, and all of the energy that powers it, has been processed through plasma fusion reactions in stars. Plasmas also play a crucial role in the Earth's atmosphere, which screens out harmful radiation, and make long distance radio propagation possible. While the study of plasma physics was originally motivated by astrophysics, the discipline has grown to address terrestrial concerns. These include lighting, welding, the switching of large electrical currents, the processing of materials such as semiconductors, and the quest to build fusion power reactors artificial stars for low-emissions generation of electricity from hydrogen isotopes. Plasma physics is fundamentally multi-disciplinary. It requires understanding not only of the complex collective behaviour of ionised gases in unusual conditions, but also knowledge of the atomic and nuclear physics that determines how plasmas are formed and maintained, and the specialised engineering and instrumentation of the mechanical and electromagnetic containers needed to confine plasmas on Earth. These characteristics make plasma physics a fertile breeding ground for imagination and innovation. This paper draws together examples of innovation stimulated by plasma physics research in the areas of energy, materials, communications, and computation

  7. Space research and cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-08-01

    Scientific progress depends on the development of new instruments. The change from Ptolemaic to Copernican cosmology was to a large extent caused by the introduction of telescopes. Similarly, space research has changed our possibilities to explore our large scale environment so drastically that a thorough revision of cosmic physics is now taking place. A list is given of a large number of fields in which this revision is in progress or is just starting. The new view are based on in situ measurements in the magnetospheres. By extrapolating these measurments to more distant regions, also plasma astrophysics in general has to be reconsidered. In certain important fields the basic approach has to be changed. This applies to cosmogony (origin and evolution of the solar system) and to cosmology. New results from laboratory and magnetospheric measurements extrapolated to cosmogonic conditions give an increased reliability to our treatment of the origin and evolution of the Solar system. Especially the Voyager observations of the saturnian rings give us the hope that we may transfer cosmogony from a playground for more or less crazy ideas into a respectable science. (author)

  8. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  9. Introduction to the basic concepts of modern physics special relativity, quantum and statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Becchi, Carlo Maria

    2007-01-01

    These notes are designed as a text book for a course on the Modern Physics Theory for undergraduate students. The purpose is providing a rigorous and self-contained presentation of the simplest theoretical framework using elementary mathematical tools. A number of examples of relevant applications and an appropriate list of exercises and answered questions are also given. The first part is devoted to Special Relativity concerning in particular space-time relativity and relativistic kinematics. The second part deals with Schroedinger's formulation of quantum mechanics. The presentation concerns mainly one dimensional problems, in particular tunnel effect, discrete energy levels and band spectra. The third part concerns the application of Gibbs statistical methods to quantum systems and in particular to Bose and Fermi gasses.

  10. An introduction to the atomic and radiation physics of plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tallents, G J

    2018-01-01

    Plasmas comprise more than 99% of the observable universe. They are important in many technologies and are key potential sources for fusion power. Atomic and radiation physics is critical for the diagnosis, observation and simulation of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, and plasma physicists working in a range of areas from astrophysics, magnetic fusion, and inertial fusion utilise atomic and radiation physics to interpret measurements. This text develops the physics of emission, absorption and interaction of light in astrophysics and in laboratory plasmas from first principles using the physics of various fields of study including quantum mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and statistical physics. Linking undergraduate level atomic and radiation physics with the advanced material required for postgraduate study and research, this text adopts a highly pedagogical approach and includes numerous exercises within each chapter for students to reinforce their understanding of the key concepts.

  11. Modern hadron spectroscopy: a bridge between nuclear and particle physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2018-05-01

    In this talk I discuss aspects of hadron physics, which soon are expected to shed new light on the fundamental QCD phenomena. In the analysis of hadron reactions and their propertieds I emphasize similarities to the nuclear many body problem.

  12. Group theory, the new language of modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.M.W.

    1990-09-01

    This paper is a brief history of the applications of the methods of group theory to physics during 1830 to 1964 and is based mostly on the author's correspondence with Professor E.P. Wigner. 26 refs, 6 figs

  13. Lectures on torah and modern physics (the lectures in kabbalah series)

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburgh, Harav Yitzchak

    2013-01-01

    Modern physics has forever changed the way we view and understand physical reality. With a wide spectrum of theories, from general relativity to quantum mechanics, our conceptions of the very big and the very small are no longer intuitively obvious. Many philosophers, even scientists have expressed the opinion that the counterintuitive conclusions posited in modern physics are best understood using spiritual terminology. In the 11 lectures in this volume, Harav Ginsburgh, one of our generation's foremost scholars, innovators, and teachers of Kabbalah, reveals how modern physics reflects foundational concepts in the Torah's inner dimension. A wide range of topics from relativity (special and general), quantum mechanics, and string theory are addressed. Elegantly and gracefully, Harav Ginsburgh's exposition of the topics switches back and forth between the scientific and Torah perspectives. With his deep insight, Harav Ginsburgh gives even well-known physical concepts a refreshing and new treatment. Apart from ...

  14. Farewell to reality how modern physics has betrayed the search for scientific truth

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2013-01-01

    From acclaimed science author Jim Baggott, a pointed critique of modern theoretical physics. In this stunning new volume, Jim Baggott argues that there is no observational or experimental evidence for many of the ideas of modern theoretical physics: super-symmetric particles,super strings, the multiverse, the holographic principle,or the anthropic cosmological principle. These theories are not only untrue, it is not even science. It is fairy-tale physics: fantastical, bizarre and often outrageous, perhaps even confidence-trickery. This book provides a much-needed antidote. Informed,comprehensive, and balanced, it offers lay readers the latest ideas about the nature of physical reality while clearly distinguishing between fact and fantasy. With its engaging portraits of many central figures of modern physics, including Paul Davies, John Barrow, Brian Greene, Stephen Hawking, and Leonard Susskind, it promises to be essential reading for all readers interested in what we know and don’t know about the nature of...

  15. Dynacore Final Report , Plasma Physics prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Lourens, W.

    2000-01-01

    The generation and behaviour of plasma in a fusion device and its interaction with sur-rounding materials is studied by observing several phenomena that will accompany a plasma discharge. These phenomena are recorded by means of so called Diagnostics. These are instruments that comprise complex electronic equipment, coupled to various sensors. The generation of the plasma is also governed by electronic systems that control different parameters of the fusion device, the Tokamak, and of auxilia...

  16. 10. LAWPP: Latin American workshop on plasma physics; 7. EBFP: Brazilian meeting on plasma physics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental short communications are presented on plasma and fusion covering the following subjects: plasma production, confinement, plasma waves, diagnostics, heating, tokamak, impurities, astrophysics plasma and technological applications

  17. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. The concept of intelligibility in modern physics (1948).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Paul K

    2016-06-01

    This is an English translation of Paul Feyerabend's earliest extant essay "Der Begriff der Verständlichkeit in der modernen Physik" (1948). In it, Feyerabend defends positivism as a progressive framework for scientific research in certain stages of scientific development. He argues that in physics visualizability (Anschaulichkeit) and intelligibility (Verständlichkeit) are time-conditioned concepts: what is deemed visualizable in the development of physical theories is relative to a specific historical context and changes over time. He concludes that from time to time the abandonment of visualizability is crucial for progress in physics, as it is conducive to major theory change, illustrating the point on the basis of advances in atomic theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program

  20. Dynacore Final Report , Plasma Physics prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, W.

    2000-01-01

    The generation and behaviour of plasma in a fusion device and its interaction with sur-rounding materials is studied by observing several phenomena that will accompany a plasma discharge. These phenomena are recorded by means of so called Diagnostics. These are instruments that comprise complex

  1. Identification and optimization problems in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.C.

    1986-06-01

    Parameter identification of the current in a tokamak plasma is studied. Plasma equilibrium in a vacuum container with a diaphragm is analyzed. A variable metric method with reduced optimization with nonlinear equality constraints; and a quasi-Newton reduced optimization method with constraints giving priority to restoration are presented [fr

  2. Awareness and Use of Modern Contraceptives Among Physically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    impotence or lack of emotional/sexual feelings. A survey of disabled young people between 12 and. 18 years old in United ... shows there is possibility of more of unprotected ... of young people's health – physical, social, mental as well as ...

  3. Jorge Luis Borges and the New Physics: the Literature of Modern Science and the Science of Modern Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Mark Robert

    1992-01-01

    By examining the works of the Argentine writer, Jorge Luis Borges, and the parallels it has with modern physics, literature and science converge in their quest for truth regarding the structure and meaning of the universe. The classical perception of physics as a "hard" science--that of quantitative, rational thought which was established during the Newtonian era--has been replaced by the "new physics," which integrates the so-called "soft" elements into its paradigm. It presents us with a universe based not exclusively on a series of particle-like interactions, or a "billiard-ball" hypothesis where discrete objects have a measurable position and velocity in absolute space and time, but rather on a combination of these mechanistic properties and those that make up the non-physical side of nature such as intuition, consciousness, and emotion. According to physicists like James Jeans science has been "humanized" to the extent that the universe as a "great machine" has been converted into a "great thought.". In nearly all his collections of essays and short stories, Borges complements the new physics by producing a literature that can be described as "scientized." The abstract, metaphysical implications and concerns of the new world-view, such as space, time, language, consciousness, free will, determinism, etc., appear repeatedly throughout Borges' texts, and are treated in terms that are remarkably similar to those expressed in the scientific texts whose authors include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrodinger. As a final comparison, Borges and post-modern physicists address the question of the individual's ability to ever comprehend the universe. They share an attitude of incredulity toward all models and theories of reality simply because they are based on partial information, and therefore seen only as conjectures.

  4. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  5. Proceedings of the symposium on the foundations of modern physics, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following subjects: The Quantum Postulate and atomic theory; modern mathematics in formulation of basic laws of physics; uncertainty principles, Quantum systems; Niels Bohr's concept of reality; Quantum theory; language and reality in Quantum physics; Wolfgang Pauli's conception of reality; interpretation of Quantum mechanics; varieties of realism; and many-Hilbert-spaces theory of Quantum measurements

  6. Abstracts of 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006). Published in 2 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2006-01-01

    This report contains the presentation on the 13-th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006). Five main topics are covered: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas

  7. Abstracts of 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006). Published in 2 volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    2006-07-01

    This report contains the presentation on the 13-th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006). Five main topics are covered: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas.

  8. Modern elementary particle physics explaining and extending the standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    This book is written for students and scientists wanting to learn about the Standard Model of particle physics. Only an introductory course knowledge about quantum theory is needed. The text provides a pedagogical description of the theory, and incorporates the recent Higgs boson and top quark discoveries. With its clear and engaging style, this new edition retains its essential simplicity. Long and detailed calculations are replaced by simple approximate ones. It includes introductions to accelerators, colliders, and detectors, and several main experimental tests of the Standard Model are explained. Descriptions of some well-motivated extensions of the Standard Model prepare the reader for new developments. It emphasizes the concepts of gauge theories and Higgs physics, electroweak unification and symmetry breaking, and how force strengths vary with energy, providing a solid foundation for those working in the field, and for those who simply want to learn about the Standard Model.

  9. Abstracts of 7th Ukrainian conference on controlled nuclear fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This conference discussed the main directions of plasma physics development in Ukraine. The experimental and theoretical research on stellarators and theoretical results of physical processes in tokamak plasma studied. The investigation of spherical tokamaks were plasma physics began

  10. Cosmic Plasmas, Physics 418 Lecture 1: Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    2002-01-01

    Definition of a plasma; distinction from neutral gas. Debye length, plasma parameter; concept of shielding and quasi neutrality. Two types of description: particle kinetic vs continuum. Self-consistent field concept. Continuum equations for a neutral (ideal) gas. Continuum equations of motion for an ideal, quasi neutral plasma. These Lecture Notes are intended to provide a self-contained account of the material. Some topics are included for completeness and may be omitted on a first reading. They are so indicated, where appropriate. (author)

  11. Proceedings of republic scientific conference of young scientist and talented students 'Innovation development of Uzbekistan in the view of youth', 'The role of talented youth in the development of modern physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshchanov, B. Kh.; Tadzhibaev, I.U

    2010-04-01

    The National scientific conference on actual problems of modern physics and astronomy was held on 21 May, 2010 in Karshi, Uzbekistan. Scientists from universities and academic research institutes discussed various aspects of modern physics and astronomy including novation in teaching these subjects. More than 130 talks were presented in the meeting on the following subjects: atomic and molecular physics; physics of elementary particles; radiation physics of condensed matter; optics and plasma physics, nano technology; solar energy and solar energy conversion, astronomy and astrophysics. (K.M.)

  12. Fundamentals of plasma physics and controlled fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2000-10-01

    The present lecture note was written to fill a gap between text books for undergraduates and specific review articles written by specialists for their young colleagues. The note may be divided in three parts. The first part is on basic characteristics of a plasma in a magnetic field. The second part describes plasma confinement and heating with an emphasis on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. In addition, propagation of plasma waves, plasma heating by electromagnetic waves are given. The third part is devoted to various specific concepts of nuclear fusion. Emphases are placed on toroidal devices, especially on tokamak devices and stellarators. One might feel heavy mathematics glimpsing the present note, especially in the part treating magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. (author)

  13. Plasma Physics of the Subauroral Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-20

    or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report was cleared for...irregular subauroral regions create strong scintillations of UHF and GPS L1 band signals. Irregular structures in the plasmasphere guide VLF whistler waves ...drifts, substorm-injected plasma jets, SAID/SAPS-related plasma waves , plasmaspheric boundary layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  14. Cognition versus Constitution of Objects: From Kant to Modern Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Classical mechanics in phase space as well as quantum mechanics in Hilbert space lead to states and observables but not to objects that may be considered as carriers of observable quantities. However, in both cases objects can be constituted as new entities by means of invariance properties of the theories in question. We show, that this way of reasoning has a long history in physics and philosophy and that it can be traced back to the transcendental arguments in Kant’s critique of pure reason.

  15. Courses in Modern Physics for Non-science Majors, Future Science Teachers, and Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollman, Dean

    2001-03-01

    For the past 15 years Kansas State University has offered a course in modern physics for students who are not majoring in physics. This course carries a prerequisite of one physics course so that the students have a basic introduction in classical topics. The majors of students range from liberal arts to engineering. Future secondary science teachers whose first area of teaching is not physics can use the course as part of their study of science. The course has evolved from a lecture format to one which is highly interactive and uses a combination of hands-on activities, tutorials and visualizations, particularly the Visual Quantum Mechanics materials. Another course encourages biology students to continue their physics learning beyond the introductory course. Modern Miracle Medical Machines introduces the basic physics which underlie diagnosis techniques such as MRI and PET and laser surgical techniques. Additional information is available at http://www.phys.ksu.edu/perg/

  16. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1988. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Volume 3 of the proceedings of the twelfth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, held in Nice, France, 12-19 October, 1988, contains papers presented on inertial fusion. Direct and indirect laser implosion experiments, programs of laser construction, computer modelling of implosions and resulting plasmas, and light ion beam fusion experiments are discussed. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  18. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  19. Frontiers of plasma physics. III. The implications of nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardwell, S.

    1977-01-01

    In the first two articles of this series, Bardwell reviewed the experimental evidence that points to an inherent nonlinear quality in plasmas. Evidence from strongly turbulent plasmas, where the energy in the plasma's collective motions is comparable to the energy in random motion, leads to the speculation that high energy-density plasmas can provide insight into previously inaccessible regimes of physical behavior. Both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas show a marked tendency to generate self-ordered, large-scale structures; islands of self-generated magnetic field, circulation cells, vortices, and filaments are among the most remarkable of these. These self-ordered phenomena, Bardwell reports, challenge in a fundamental way the conceptual tools of physics as they are presently understood. In part two of this series, Bardwell draws on the connection between linearity and entropy, a topic also examined in Levitt's companion piece in the September 1976 FEF Newsletter, to conclude that these difficulties in plasma physics stem from the invalid extension of contemporary physics, which is basically linear, to high-energy density regimes of a plasma; contemporary physics in these cases is inapplicable. Readers without a background in mathematics should not be deterred by the mathematical formalism in the last section of the article; the text can be understood without a detailed mastery of the mathematical formulae

  20. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, V., E-mail: svoboda@fjfi.cvut.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Kocman, J.; Grover, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Krbec, J.; Stöckel, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: * Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes.* Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform.* More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Highlights: • Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. • Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform. • More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Abstract: The GOLEM tokamak at the Czech Technical University has been established as an educational tokamak device for domestic and foreign students. Remote participation in the scope of several laboratory practices, plasma physics schools and workshops has been successfully performed from abroad. A new enhancement allowing understandable remote control of vertical plasma position in two modes (i) predefined and (ii) feedback control is presented. It allows to drive the current in the stabilization coils in any time-dependent scenario, which can include as a parameter the actual plasma position measured by magnetic diagnostics. Arbitrary movement of the plasma column in a vertical direction, stabilization of the plasma column in the center of the tokamak vessel as well as prolongation/shortening of plasma life according to the remotely defined request are demonstrated.

  1. Sixth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Evgenia Benova et al 2016 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. VV The Sixth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'14) was organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizer PLASMER Foundation. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from June 30 to July 6, 2014. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology. The Workshop Plasma for Sustainable Environment was co-organized together with the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal. A special Workshop on Remote GOLEM operation was organized by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Prague, Czech Republic for the students and interested participants to work remotely with the Czech TOKAMAK GOLEM. As with the previous issues of this scientific meeting, its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 19 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants

  2. Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benova, Evgenia

    2016-01-01

    The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'12) was organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea coast, from June 25-30, 2012. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology . The 4 th edition of the Workshop Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organized together with the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal. A special Workshop on Remote GOLEM operation was organized by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Prague, Czech Republic for the students and interested participants to work remotely with the Czech TOKAMAK GOLEM. As in the previous issues of this scientific meeting its aim was to stimulate the development of and support a new generation of young scientists to further advance plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as ensuring an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 12 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed

  3. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X.

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  4. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  5. Hybrid computer modelling in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromadka, J; Ibehej, T; Hrach, R

    2016-01-01

    Our contribution is devoted to development of hybrid modelling techniques. We investigate sheath structures in the vicinity of solids immersed in low temperature argon plasma of different pressures by means of particle and fluid computer models. We discuss the differences in results obtained by these methods and try to propose a way to improve the results of fluid models in the low pressure area. There is a possibility to employ Chapman-Enskog method to find appropriate closure relations of fluid equations in a case when particle distribution function is not Maxwellian. We try to follow this way to enhance fluid model and to use it in hybrid plasma model further. (paper)

  6. Atomic physics in dense plasmas. Recent advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Angelo, P.; Ceccotti, T.; Derfoul, H.; Poquerusse, A.; Sauvan, P.; Oks, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents observations and simulations of novel density-dependent spectroscopic features in hot and dense plasmas. Both time-integrated and time-resolved results using ultra-high resolutions spectrometers are presented; they are justified within the standard spectral line shape theory or the quasi-molecular alternative treatment. A particular attention is paid to the impact of the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma on the experimental spectra. Satellite-like features and molecular lines in the cases of Flyβ, Heβ are discussed emphasizing their importance for the density diagnostics when ion-ion correlations are significant. (authors)

  7. Discrete or continuous? the quest for fundamental length in modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hagar, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The idea of infinity plays a crucial role in our understanding of the universe, with the infinite spacetime continuum perhaps the best-known example - but is spacetime really continuous? Throughout the history of science, many have felt that the continuum model is an unphysical idealization, and that spacetime should be thought of as 'quantized' at the smallest of scales. Combining novel conceptual analysis, a fresh historical perspective, and concrete physical examples, this unique book tells the story of the search for the fundamental unit of length in modern physics, from early classical electrodynamics to current approaches to quantum gravity. Novel philosophical theses, with direct implications for theoretical physics research, are presented and defended in an accessible format that avoids complex mathematics. Blending history, philosophy, and theoretical physics, this refreshing outlook on the nature of spacetime sheds light on one of the most thought-provoking topics in modern physics.

  8. Signposts to God how modern physics and astronomy point the way to belief

    CERN Document Server

    Bussey, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In Signposts to God particle physicist Peter Bussey introduces readers to the mysteries of modern physics and astronomy. Written in clear, accessible prose, Bussey provides a primer on topics such as the laws of nature, quantum physics, fine-tuning, and current cosmological models. He shows that despite the remarkable achievements of science, the latest research in these fields does not lead to simple physicalism in which physical processes are able to explain everything that exists. Bussey argues that, far from ruling out a divine Creator, modern physics and astronomy present us with compelling signposts to God. The more we know about the cosmos and our presence in it, the more plausible belief in God becomes. We can be intellectually satisfied in both science and the Christian faith. Written by someone who has worked for years in scientific research, Signposts to God is a timely and winsome response to a cultural stalemate.

  9. 10th International Conference and School on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2004-01-01

    About 240 abstracts by Ukrainian and foreign authors submitted to 10-th International Conference and School on Plasma Physics and Controlled fusion have been considered by Conference Program Committee members. All the abstracts have been divided into 8 groups: magnetic confinement systems: stellarators, tokamaks, alternative conceptions; ITER and Fusion reactor aspects; basic plasma physics; space plasma; plasma dynamics and plasma-wall interaction; plasma electronics; low temperature plasma and plasma technologies; plasma diagnostics

  10. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  11. The world-line. Albert Einstein and modern physics; Die Weltlinie. Albert Einstein und die moderne Physik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalampi, Jukka [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    This book is an entertaining and formula-free presentation of modern physics from the 19th century to present. The life of Albert Einstein and his scientific works are drawn as red fathom through the text. The author explains central terms and results of modern physics in populary-scientific form from the historical perspective. To the reader in humorous form an imagination is mediated how modern physics has been developed. We learn from the exciting effects of the ether, we hear from faraday and magnetic needles, from Maxwell's prediction of the electromagnetic waves, from heinrich Hertz and from the photoelectric effect. Was the Michelson-Morley experiment a measurement success or an unsuccess? Why has Einstein abandoned the ether? How has Einstein in the miraculous year 1905 revolutionated physics and why he has begged Newton for excusement? Exist atoms? What is motion? What is light and what is to be understood under ''now'' and ''here''? Light deviation or non-deviation? How act the tidal forces? And above all: How has Einstein answered these questions. We meet Poincare, Lorentz and Hilbert, Boltzmann and Bohr, Minkowski, Planck, de Broglie, Hubble and Weyl, Gamow, Hahn and Meitner, Kapiza and Landau, Fermi and many other famous scientists. What had Eddington against Chandrasekhar and what had Einstein against black holes? Why should space tourists and dream tourists make holiday not on the Loch Ness but on the safe side of a black hole? Why inveighed Pauli against Einstein? Is the concern with the atomic-bomb formula right? Smeared matter, big bang and cosmic background radiation, gravitational waves and double pulsars, the cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe are further themes, which keep the reader in breath and let no mental vacuum arise. [German] Das Buch ist eine unterhaltsame und formelfreie Darstellung der modernen Physik vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart. Das Leben Albert Einsteins

  12. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In 2002 research activities in Dept. P-V were concentrated upon the continuation of high-temperature plasma investigations. Some new studies were initiated, particularly in the field of plasma technology. The main topics were as follows: 1. Selected problems of plasma theory; 2. Investigation of plasma phenomena in pulse discharges of the Plasma-Focus (PF) and Z-Pinch; 3. Development of the selected methods of plasma diagnostics; 4. Research on experimental facilities for basic studies and industrial applications; 5. Modification of material surfaces by means of pulse plasma-ion streams. Within theoretical studies we continued the numerical modeling of discharges in a coaxial plasma accelerator of the IPD type. An analysis of results, as obtained during several small IPD experiments, was also performed. The second theoretical task was the modeling of ion motion within a pinch column formed during PF-type discharges. As for experimental studies, some phenomena occurring in high-current discharges of the PF and Z-Pinch type were investigated. In particular, the correlation of X-rays with pulsed electron- and ion-beams, emitted from micro-regions (hot spots) formed inside a PF pinch column, was studied. It was shown that the polarization of important X-ray lines depends considerably on the observation direction, also in the case when a single hot-spot is observed. It confirmed a thesis that there appear groups of fast electrons moving in the radial direction. It was also shown that X-ray pulses are strongly correlated with fast electron beams, which are emitted mostly in the upstream direction. Some electron beams were also detected at different angles to the z-axis. Experimental studies of high-temperature plasma were also carried out within a large PF-1000 facility operated at IFPiLM in Warsaw. Some new experiments with wire-type liners were performed within the collaboration with IFPiLM and CVUT in Prague (Czech Republic). Other experimental

  13. Review of plasma physics research in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1982-01-01

    The energy trends of Malaysia projected for the next few decades are briefly discussed as a background to the rationale for Malaysian research into new forms of energy including plasma fusion. The planning of this research started nearly two decades ago. Today research facilities at PLUM centre on two capacitor banks, one rated at 40 kV, 48 kJ, 2 MA short circuit current and the other at 60 kV, 40 kJ, 2 MA. Other equipment includes several smaller capacitor banks, vacuum systems, oscilloscopes, diagnostic systems, a screened room, a transient digitizer, an Imacon camera and a 100 MW pulsed ruby laser for discharge initiation and diagnostics. The research devices include two plasma focus machines, one vacuum fusion spark, a shock tube and minor experiments like the glow discharge. The main focus facility, the UMDPF1, was designed and built entirely by indigenous effort, using 40 kV capacitors donated by Britain under the Colombo Plan. Difficulties were encountered especially in the need to adapt what is locally available or readily importable to all phases of the design, construction, testing and measurement. Nevertheless, the focus group has achieved the following results: measurement, in 1973, of neutrons produced in the deuterium focus; current, voltage, magnetic field and pressure measurements to interpret plasma dynamics and focus mechanism and to compare with computer simulation of plasma trajectory and configuration; soft X-ray measurements to determine electron temperature; study of the effect on the focus of rotation and multiple ionization up to Argon XVIII; and optimization of focus performance as judged from neutron yield. In 1977 PLUM acquired the Juelich DPF1 which was reassembled as a fast focus, the UMDPF2. This device has been converted to operate as a vacuum spark with the aim of demonstrating the spark as a neutron source when using a deuterided anode. We have measured temperatures of 8 keV in the dense plasma spots. Plasma research work here has

  14. Polarization plasma spectroscopy (PPS) viewed from plasma physics and fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Recently the measurements of poloidal magnetic field become important in plasma physics and nuclear fusion research, since an improved confinement mode associating with a negative magnetic shear has been found. The polarization plasma spectroscopy is recognized to be a useful tool to measure poloidal magnetic field and pitch angle of magnetic field. (author)

  15. Alushta-2012. International Conference-School on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion and the Adjoint Workshop 'Nano-and micro-sized structures in plasmas'. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlaj, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Conference was devoted to a new valuable information about the present status of plasma physics and controlled fusion research. The main topics was : magnetic confinement systems; plasma heating and current drive; ITER and fusion reactor aspects; basic plasma physics; space plasma; plasma dynamics and plasma-wall interaction; plasma electronics; low temperature plasma and plasma technologies; plasma diagnostics; formation of nano-and micro-sized structures in plasmas; properties of plasmas with nano- and micro- objects

  16. Nonlinear diffusion problem arising in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.; Holland, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    In earlier studies of plasma diffusion with Okuda-Dawson scaling (D approx. n/sup -1/2/), perturbation theory indicated that arbitrary initial data should evolve rapidly toward the separation solution of the relevant nonlinear diffusion equation. Now a Lyapunov functional has been found which is strictly decreasing in time and bounded below. The rigorous proof that arbitrary initial data evolve toeard the separable solution is summarized. Rigorous bounds on the decay time are also presented

  17. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  18. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-08-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  19. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  20. Gaseous material capacity of open plasma jet in plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) process, emerging as a highly efficient hybrid approach, is based on two powerful technologies of both plasma spray and physical vapor deposition. The maximum production rate is affected by the material feed rate apparently, but it is determined by the material vapor capacity of transporting plasma actually and essentially. In order to realize high production rate, the gaseous material capacity of plasma jet must be fundamentally understood. In this study, the thermal characteristics of plasma were measured by optical emission spectrometry. The results show that the open plasma jet is in the local thermal equilibrium due to a typical electron number density from 2.1 × 1015 to 3.1 × 1015 cm-3. In this condition, the temperature of gaseous zirconia can be equal to the plasma temperature. A model was developed to obtain the vapor pressure of gaseous ZrO2 molecules as a two dimensional map of jet axis and radial position corresponding to different average plasma temperatures. The overall gaseous material capacity of open plasma jet, take zirconia for example, was further established. This approach on evaluating material capacity in plasma jet would shed light on the process optimization towards both depositing columnar coating and a high production rate of PS-PVD.

  1. The role of self-dependence in modern health improvemental technologies of physical students' education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumakov O.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A normative base is considered on the problems of physical education, physical culture and independent work of students. An analysis is conducted scientifically-methodical and special literature on issue of research. Basic features and modern going are selected near independent work in health technologies of physical education of students. A concept «Independent work» is examined as activity of man and as a teaching method. A teaching method plugs in itself independent employments by physical exercises. During correct organization they can substantially increase motive activity of students.

  2. Studies of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, O.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis consists of an introduction to the plasma physics of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) and a review of the results obtained by the author and co-workers including discussion of related work by others. The thesis begins with a theoretical discussion dealing with plasma physics relevant for the production of highly charged ions in ECR ion source plasmas. This is followed by an overview of different techniques, such as gas mixing and double frequency heating, that can be used to improve the performance of this type of ion source. The experimental part of the work consists of studies related to ECRIS plasma physics. The effect of the gas mixing technique on the production efficiency of different ion beams was studied with both gaseous and solid materials. It was observed that gas mixing improves the confinement of the heavier element while the confinement of the lighter element is reduced. When the effect of gas mixing on MIVOC-plasmas was studied with several mixing gases it was observed that applying this technique can reduce the inevitable carbon contamination by a significant factor. In order to understand the different plasma processes taking place in ECRIS plasmas, a series of plasma potential and emittance measurements was carried out. An instrument, which can be used to measure the plasma potential in a single measurement without disturbing the plasma, was developed for this work. Studying the plasma potential of ECR ion sources is important not only because it helps to understand different plasma processes, but also because the information can be used as an input parameter for beam transport simulations and ion source extraction design. The experiments performed have revealed clear dependencies of the plasma potential on certain source parameters such as the amount of carbon contamination accumulated on the walls of the plasma chamber during a MIVOC-run. It was also observed that gas mixing affects not only the production efficiency

  3. Transfer of physics detector models into CAD systems using modern techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, M.; Vuoskoski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Designing high energy physics detectors for future experiments requires sophisticated computer aided design and simulation tools. In order to satisfy the future demands in this domain, modern techniques, methods, and standards have to be applied. We present an interface application, designed and implemented using object-oriented techniques, for the widely used GEANT physics simulation package. It converts GEANT detector models into the future industrial standard, STEP. (orig.)

  4. A review on the “Modern and Contemporary Physics at High School” research area

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Moreira; Fernanda Ostermann

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature regarding the subject “Modern and Contemporary Physics (MCP) at secondary school level” based on research papers, textbooks, master’s and doctoral’s dissertations, curriculum projects, and internet papers, approaching this topic. This review focus on publications targeting the teaching of physics and includes the first studies in this line of research published in the late seventies. Six large categories of studies were identified. Among them, it...

  5. Ideas of the Natural Philosophy of Ancient Times in Modern Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 8. Ideas of the Natural Philosophy of Ancient Times in Modern Physics. Classics Volume 9 Issue 8 August 2004 pp 99-104. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/08/0099-0104 ...

  6. 6-33 Optimization of ARP System in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Yongping[1; Gou; Shizhe[1; Yuan; Chao[1; Yue; Min[1; Ma; Yuan[1

    2015-01-01

    The Academia Resource Planning (hereafter abbreviated as ARP) of the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) was launched in 2005. It is an important scientific research management system of CAS. In order to meet the multiple dimensions and levels application requirements, the second phase of ARP has gradually formed ten management systems, two application platforms and four application projects.

  7. Complete chemical analysis of produced water by modern inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G M; Sorbie, K S; Johnston, A; Boak, L S

    1997-12-31

    ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) spectroscopy is recognised as a very effective tool for monitoring ion compositions in many different waters. It has also been used by a number of laboratories to determine residual levels of phosphonate (PH) scale inhibitors in produced waters, based on phosphorus content. Until recently, it had not been used effectively to monitor phosphino-polycarboxylate (PPCA) returns. Large errors had frequently been observed where it had been applied. The poor detection limits and accuracy obtained for PPCA inhibitors relates to much lower amount of phosphorus present when compared with a typical phosphonate inhibitor. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of IPC detection for PPCA and other phosphorus containing inhibitors by the use of modern instruments without the need of pre-treatment. 6 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation

  9. On the physical mechanism at the origin of multiple double layers appearance in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriu, D.G.; Gurlui, S.; Aflori, M.; Ivan, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Double layers (DLs) in plasma are nonlinear potential structures consisting of two adjacent layers of positive and negative space charge, respectively. Between these layers a potential jump exists, creating an electric field. A common way to obtain a DL structure is to positively bias an electrode immersed in asymptotic stable plasma. In this way, a complex space charge structure (CSCS) in form of a positive 'nucleus' surrounded by a nearly spherical DL is obtained. Under certain experimental conditions (gas nature and pressure, plasma density, electron temperature) a more complex structure in form of two or more subsequent DLs was observed, which was called multiple double layers (MDL). It appears as several bright and concentric plasma shells attached to the electrode. The successive DLs are located at the abrupt changes of luminosity between two adjacent plasma shells. Probe measurements emphasized that the axial profile of the plasma potential has a stair steps shape, with potential jumps close to the ionization potential of the used gas. Experimental results clarify the essential role of excitation and ionization electron-neutral collisions for the generation and dynamics of MDL structures. However, if the electrode is large, the MDL structure appears non-concentrically, as a network of plasma spheres, near each other, almost equally distributed on the electrode surface. Each of the plasma spots is a CSCS as described above. Here, we will present experimental result on concentric and non-concentric MDL, which prove that the same physical mechanism is at the origin of their appearance in plasma. In this mechanism the electron-neutral impact excitations and ionizations play the key role. A simultaneously generation of both types of MDL was recorded. The dynamics of the MDL structures was analyzed by using the modern methods provided by the nonlinear dynamics. In this way, a scenario of transition to chaos by torus breakdown was emphasized, related with the

  10. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998 research activities were mostly continuations of previous studies, but we also undertook some new research aims. Theoretical studies comprised a development of the model of processes occurring at electrodes within a plasma system with magnetron discharges. Also developed was an improved model of phenomena within coaxial plasma injectors. Within a framework of the collaboration with the Warsaw Technical University we analyzed plasma dynamics in the coaxial gun used for the IPD process. We also carried out theoretical studies of proton-atom collisions, different atomic experiments, and X-ray spectra. It was shown that some effects, interpreted so far on the basis of quantum mechanics, could be explained by the interaction of electrons moving along ''rosette-type'' trajectories. Experimental studies of phenomena within PF-type discharges were concentrated on measurements of particle emission and polarization effects within the MAJA-PF device in Swierk (in cooperation with the Kurchatov Institute). Also performed were studies of ions, neutrons, fast electrons and X-rays within the PF-360 facility in Swierk, an analysis of low-energy deuterons within PF-II device at INFIP in Buenos Aires, as well as studies of ion beams with the PACO-PF device at IFAS in Tandil. Within the framework of studies within the large PF-1000 facility at IFPiLM in Warsaw, we continued experiments with a thin liner compressed by a collapsing current sheath, optimization tests of PF discharges and measurements of emission characteristics. We performed measurements of VR with high-speed cameras, studies of X-rays with pinhole cameras and crystal spectrometers, as well as high-energy ion measurements with nuclear track-detectors (NTDs). In collaboration with the CVUT and IPP CzAS in Prague we initiated new Filamentary Z-Pinch experiments within the large PF-1000 facility. Studies connected with the development of plasma diagnostic methods concerned the calibration of new types of NTDs with

  11. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Research on controlled nuclear fusion was first disclosed at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, held at Geneva in 1958. From the information given, it was evident that a better understanding of the behaviour of hot dense plasmas was needed before the goal of economic energy release from nuclear fusion could be reached. The fact that research since then has been most complex and costly has enhanced the desirability of international co-operation and exchange of information and experience. Having organized its First Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research at Salzburg in 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency again provided the means for such cooperation in organizing its Second Conference on this subject on 6-10 September, 1965, at Culham, Abingdon, Berks, England. The meeting was arranged with the generous help of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at their Culham Laboratory, where the facilities and assistance of the staff were greatly appreciated. At the meeting, which was attended by 268 participants from 26 member states and three international organizations, significant results from many experiments, including those from the new and larger machines, became available. It has now become feasible to intercorrelate data obtained from a number of similar machines; this has led to a more complete understanding of plasma behaviour. No breakthrough was reported nor had been expected towards the economical release of the energy from fusion, but there was increased understanding of the problems of production, control and containment of high-density and high-temperature plasmas

  12. Wills Plasma Physics Department annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The experimental program on the research tokamak TORTUS has concentrated on fundamental studies of hydromagnetic waves in toroidal geometry, on preliminary experiments for an Alfven wave heating program, and on further development of diagnostics and data acquisition equipment. Highlights of the work were the observation of magnetically guided Alfven wave packets in toroidal geometry and of strong toroidal effects in the loading of a half-turn loop antenna in the low frequency Alfven wave regime. In work on the linear SUPPER IV machine magnetically guided Alfven and acoustic waves were observed. Theoretical work on plasma waves supported the experimental studies. The development of laser diagnostic techniques is also reported

  13. Science and society the history of modern physical science in the twentieth century

    CERN Document Server

    Gordin, Michael; Kaiser, David

    2001-01-01

    Modern science has changed every aspect of life in ways that cannot be compared to developments of previous eras. This four volume set presents key developments within modern physical science and the effects of these discoveries on modern global life. The first two volumes explore the history of the concept of relativity, the cultural roots of science, the concept of time and gravity before, during, and after Einstein's theory, and the cultural reception of relativity. Volume three explores the impact of modern science upon global politics and the creation of a new kind of war, and Volume four details the old and new efforts surrounding the elucidation of the quantum world, as well as the cultural impact of particle physics. The collection also presents the historical and cultural context that made these scientific innovations possible. The transformation of everyday concepts of time and space for the individual and for society, the conduct of warfare, and the modern sense of mastering nature are all issues d...

  14. Plasma physics group progress report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the continuing experimental programme on the Lt-3 tokamak, the completion of the new LT-4 tokamak and newly developed diagnostic techniques. Experimental work on LT-3 was generally aimed at invest-igating aspects of the disruptive instability. Magnetic probe measurements were made to obtain radial profiles of the toroidal electric field and an electrostatic probe was used to identify high frequency fluctuations in the plasma at the time of the disruption. Further measurements were also made of local variations in the poloidal magnetic field due to the development of tearing MHD modes. Some preliminary work was done in an investigation of the development of the plasma current profile as operating parameters were varied. During the initial operation of LT-4 (I) diagnostics were limited to standard electrical measurements, spectroscopic and magnetic field observations. Thomson scattering measurements are included in the longer term programme and a ruby laser system has been ordered. New diagnostic techniques used with LT-3 include a variation of the swept Langmuir probe and a method for abelisation of spectroscopic observations in toroidal geometry. (J.R.)

  15. Comprehensive physical models and simulation package for plasma/material interactions during plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) from plasma instabilities remains a major obstacle to a successful tokamak concept. The extent of the damage depends on the detailed physics of the disrupting plasma, as well as on the physics of plasma-material interactions. A comprehensive computer package called high energy interaction with general heterogeneous target systems (HEIGHTS) has been developed and consists of several integrated computer models that follow the beginning of a plasma disruption at the scrape-off layer (SOL) through the transport of the eroded debris and splashed target materials to nearby locations as a result of the deposited energy. The package can study, for the first time, plasma-turbulent behavior in the SOL and predict the plasma parameters and conditions at the divertor plate. Full two-dimensional (2-D) comprehensive radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models are coupled with target thermodynamics and liquid hydrodynamics to evaluate the integrated response of plasma-facing materials. Factors that influence the lifetime of plasma-facing and nearby components, such as loss of vapor cloud confinement and vapor removal due to MHD effects, damage to nearby components due to intense vapor radiation, melt splashing, and brittle destruction of target materials, are also modeled and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Comprehensive physical models and simulation package for plasma/material interactions during plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1998-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFCS) from plasma instabilities remains a major obstacle to a successful tokamak concept. The extent of the damage depends on the detailed physics of the disrupting plasma, as well as on the physics of plasma-material interactions. A comprehensive computer package called High Energy Interaction with General Heterogeneous Target Systems (HEIGHTS) has been developed and consists of several integrated computer models that follow the beginning of a plasma disruption at the scrape-off layer (SOL) through the transport of the eroded debris and splashed target materials to nearby locations as a result of the deposited energy. The package can study, for the first time, plasma-turbulent behavior in the SOL and predict the plasma parameters and conditions at the divertor plate. Full two-dimensional (2-D) comprehensive radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models are coupled with target thermodynamics and liquid hydrodynamics to evaluate the integrated response of plasma-facing materials. Factors that influence the lifetime of plasma-facing and nearby components, such as loss of vapor-cloud confinement and vapor removal due to MHD effects, damage to nearby components due to intense vapor radiation, melt splashing, and brittle destruction of target materials, are also modeled and discussed

  17. Physics and application of plasmas based on pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Eiki; Ozaki, Tetsuo

    2012-04-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'Physics and Application of Plasmas Based on Pulsed Power Technology' held on December 21-22, 2010 at National Institute of Fusion Science are collected. The papers in this proceeding reflect the current status and progress in the experimental and theoretical researches on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  18. 1984 Review of the Applied Plasma Physics Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report describes the present and planned programs of the Division of Applied Plasma Physics (APP), Office of Fusion Energy. The major activities of the division include fusion theory, experimental plasma research, advanced fusion concepts, and the magnetic fusion energy computer network. The planned APP program is consistent with the recently issued Comprehensive Program Management Plan for Magnetic Fusion Energy, which describes the overall objectives and strategy for the development of fusion energy

  19. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1990. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research contains papers given in two of the sessions: A and E. Session A contains the Artsimovich Memorial Lecture and papers on tokamaks; session E papers on plasma heating and current drive. The titles and authors of each paper are listed in the Contents. Abstracts accompany each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. On the physics of electron beams in space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the main physical processes related to the injection, the propagation and the radiation of electron beams in space plasmas as the Earth's ionosphere. The physical mechanisms are shortly explained and illustrated with several examples of experimental results provided by various space missions. In a first part, we discuss important physical processes connected with the response of the ambient space plasma to the beam injection, and in particular, with the mechanisms of electric charge neutralization of the electron beam and of the payload carrying the injector, with the widely studied phenomenon of beam-plasma discharge as well as with the physical features of the spatio-temporal evolution and the dynamic structure of the beam in its interaction with the plasma and the emitted waves. In a second part, the main processes governing the wave emission by electron beams in space are examined; in particular, we focus on the physical linear and nonlinear mechanisms involved in the generation, the stabilization and the saturation of the electromagnetic waves excited by the beams in wide frequency ranges. and the radiation of electron beams in space plasmas as the Earth's ionosphere. The physical mechanisms are shortly explained and illustrated with several examples of experimental results provided by various space missions. In a first part, we discuss important physical processes connected with the response of the ambient space plasma to the beam injection, and in particular, with the mechanisms of electric charge neutralization of the electron beam and of the payload carrying the injector, with the widely studied phenomenon of beam-plasma discharge as well as with the physical features of the spatio-temporal evolution and the dynamic structure of the beam in its interaction with the plasma and the emitted waves. In a second part, the main processes governing the wave emission by electron beams in space are examined; in particular, we focus on the

  1. CSSP implementation plan for space plasma physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Williams, D.J.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD)

    1985-01-01

    The Committee on Solar and Space Physics (CSSP) has provided NASA with guidance in the areas of solar, heliospheric, magnetospheric, and upper atmospheric research. The budgetary sitation confronted by NASA has called for a prioritized plane for the implementation of solar and space plasma physics programs. CSSP has developed the following recommendations: (1) continue implementation of both the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and Solar Optical Telescope programs; (2) initiate the International Solar Terrestrial Physics program; (3) plan for later major free-flying missions and carry out the technology development they require; (4) launch an average of one solar and space physics Explorer per yr beginning in 1990; (5) enhance current Shuttle/Spacelab programs; (6) develop facility-class instrumentation; (7) augment the solar terrestrial theory program by FY 1990; (8) support a compute modeling program; (9) strengthen the research and analysis program; and (10) maintain a stable suborbital program for flexible science objectives in upper atmosphere and space plasma physics

  2. photon-plasma: A modern high-order particle-in-cell code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugbølle, Troels; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Nordlund, Åke

    2013-01-01

    We present the photon-plasma code, a modern high order charge conserving particle-in-cell code for simulating relativistic plasmas. The code is using a high order implicit field solver and a novel high order charge conserving interpolation scheme for particle-to-cell interpolation and charge deposition. It includes powerful diagnostics tools with on-the-fly particle tracking, synthetic spectra integration, 2D volume slicing, and a new method to correctly account for radiative cooling in the simulations. A robust technique for imposing (time-dependent) particle and field fluxes on the boundaries is also presented. Using a hybrid OpenMP and MPI approach, the code scales efficiently from 8 to more than 250.000 cores with almost linear weak scaling on a range of architectures. The code is tested with the classical benchmarks particle heating, cold beam instability, and two-stream instability. We also present particle-in-cell simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and new results on radiative collisionless shocks

  3. Proceedings of the 1984 International Conference on plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, M.Q.; Verbeek, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 ICPP, held in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the third biennial conference of the series ''International conferences on plasma physics''. A complete spectrum of current plasma physics from fusion devices to interstellar space was presented, even if most of the papers were of direct interest for fusion. The conference stressed the important role that ''basic plasma physics'' must play in fusion research. Recent theoretical and experimental developments in tokamaks, stellarators, mirrors, reversed field pinches, and other fusion devices were reported. The successful operation of two newly-built large tokamak devices, JET and TFTR, holds the promise that a host of new results of decisive importance for fusion research will become available in the next few years. This is the first part of the conference

  4. Computational plasma physics and supercomputers. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.; McNamara, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Supercomputers of the 80's are introduced. They are 10 to 100 times more powerful than today's machines. The range of physics modeling in the fusion program is outlined. New machine architecture will influence particular models, but parallel processing poses new programming difficulties. Increasing realism in simulations will require better numerics and more elaborate mathematical models

  5. Plasma physics program at TEXTOR-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samm, U.

    1995-01-01

    After upgrading the transformer of the tokamak TEXTOR in order to obtain an enhanced magnetic flux swing, the experimental potential of the device, now called TEXTOR-94, increased significantly and, together with other measures and achievements, opens now a wide field of research. For the physics program coherent concepts for energy- and particle exhaust provide a guideline

  6. Department of Plasma Physics and Material Engineering - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In 2010 the activities of the Department continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma engineering: · · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges in the Plasma-Focus (PF), RPI-IBIS, and Impulse Plasma Deposition (IPD) facilities; · Research on plasma technologies; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modeling. In the frame of the EURATOM program, efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostics methods for tokamak-type facilities. In 2010 Cherenkov detectors were applied in the ISTTOK and TORE SUPRA facilities to detect energetic electrons (of energy > 60 keV), to determine their spatial and temporal behavior and to estimate their energy spectra. Attention was also paid to measurements of hard X rays emitted from ISTTOK and to their correlations with run-away electrons. The new data on fast electrons, collected within the TORE-SUPRA machine in 2010, confirmed the appearance of intense electron streams (possible ripple-born and runaway ones), which have a similar character to the electron signals recorded by means of other diagnostic techniques. Other fusion-oriented efforts are connected with the application of solid-state nuclear track detectors to detect fast alpha particles in tokamak experiments. As for experimental studies, particular attention was paid to the investigation of fast ion- and electron-beams emitted from high-current plasma discharges in PF and RPI facilities. Ion streams from discharges were studied by means of nuclear track detector, corpuscular diagnostic techniques, and particularly of a miniature Thompson-type mass-spectrometer. A field of research activity was related to plasma technology. Efforts were undertaken to improve the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) deposition of thin superconducting layers, e.g. pure niobium film on the surface of copper resonant cavities

  7. Organization of health at physical training lessons in the modern school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Gorodysky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify and outline the necessary conditions aimed at a healthy lifestyle, refusal of bad habits, providing health care of students at physical education classes. Material & Methods: theoretical and practical achievements of modern scientists, authors experience in conducting physical education classes; analysis of scientific literature on selected issues, systematization of received theoretical results and acquired sports and teaching experience, generalization of acquired scientific data to formulate conclusions of the article. Results: in solving the problem of defining the role of the designated teacher who seeks to convince students in healthy lifestyles. Conclusions: ensuring longevity in modern conditions of life requires public awareness about the need for healthy lifestyles and instilling in youth the love for the physical training and sports.

  8. Parallel computing in plasma physics: Nonlinear instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohn, E.; Kamelander, G.; Shoucri, M.

    2000-01-01

    A Vlasov-Poisson-system is used for studying the time evolution of the charge-separation at a spatial one- as well as a two-dimensional plasma-edge. Ions are advanced in time using the Vlasov-equation. The whole three-dimensional velocity-space is considered leading to very time-consuming four-resp. five-dimensional fully kinetic simulations. In the 1D simulations electrons are assumed to behave adiabatic, i.e. they are Boltzmann-distributed, leading to a nonlinear Poisson-equation. In the 2D simulations a gyro-kinetic approximation is used for the electrons. The plasma is assumed to be initially neutral. The simulations are performed at an equidistant grid. A constant time-step is used for advancing the density-distribution function in time. The time-evolution of the distribution function is performed using a splitting scheme. Each dimension (x, y, υ x , υ y , υ z ) of the phase-space is advanced in time separately. The value of the distribution function for the next time is calculated from the value of an - in general - interstitial point at the present time (fractional shift). One-dimensional cubic-spline interpolation is used for calculating the interstitial function values. After the fractional shifts are performed for each dimension of the phase-space, a whole time-step for advancing the distribution function is finished. Afterwards the charge density is calculated, the Poisson-equation is solved and the electric field is calculated before the next time-step is performed. The fractional shift method sketched above was parallelized for p processors as follows. Considering first the shifts in y-direction, a proper parallelization strategy is to split the grid into p disjoint υ z -slices, which are sub-grids, each containing a different 1/p-th part of the υ z range but the whole range of all other dimensions. Each processor is responsible for performing the y-shifts on a different slice, which can be done in parallel without any communication between

  9. Enhanced confinement phenomenology in magnetic fusion plasmas: Is it unique in physics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendy, R.O.

    2002-01-01

    There is substantial experimental evidence that simple diffusive models for turbulent transport are insufficient to produce all the confinement phenomena observed in tokamaks. This paper reports on the emerging linkage between rapid, nonlocal, nondiffusive transport and overall confinement phenomenology including edge pedestals, enhanced confinement, ELMs, and internal transport barriers. Modern statistical physics techniques are used to construct simple models that generate many of the distinctive elements of global tokamak confinement phenomenology. The similarities are deep and are quantified. These results imply that current observations of avalanching transport in tokamaks may be deeply linked to the fundamental global features of tokamak plasma confinement. (author)

  10. Knocking on heaven's door. How physics and scientific thinking illuminate the universe and the modern world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    In her new book the Harvard professor and bestseller author Lisa Randall tells excitingly and somewhat ''from the front'' of the inner workings of science: What matters go to physicists? Which role play such gigantic apparatuses like the particle accelerator at CERN? What's the deal with the search for the Higgs boson itself? How applied and theoretical physics are connected? Lisa Randall designs clearly and excitingly the picture of contemporary physics in all its facets and lets become concrete, how the modern basic research works. An entertaining, instructive insight into the fascinating world of physics and simultaneously a praise of the creative powers of the human mind and the science.

  11. The planning of Mechanics and Modern Physics teaching activities for blind students: difficulties and alternatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Pires de Camargo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We report here partial outcomes of a study aimed to verify future High School teachers performance when, during the development of a called “TeachingPractice” undergraduate course, were asked to plan Mechanics and Modern Physics topics to a students class which included visual handicapped pupils. Data analyzed show that the main difficulties presented by the future Physics High School teachers are related to the approach to know physics phenomena as dependent of vision. By other hand, as alternatives, future teachers showed creativity in order to surpass passive aptitudes related to this educational problem and working out methodological strategies deprived of the relation knowing/seeing.

  12. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Cicogna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-invariant solutions, and the symmetry classification of a nonlinear PDE.

  13. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics : the Impact of Jim Dungey’s Research

    CERN Document Server

    Southwood, David; Mitton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book makes good background reading for much of modern magnetospheric physics. Its origin was a Festspiel for Professor Jim Dungey, former professor in the Physics Department at Imperial College on the occasion of his 90th birthday, 30 January 2013. Remarkably, although he retired 30 years ago, his pioneering and, often, maverick work in the 50’s through to the 70’s on solar terrestrial physics is probably more widely appreciated today than when he retired. Dungey was a theoretical plasma physicist. The book covers how his reconnection model of the magnetosphere evolved to become the standard model of solar-terrestrial coupling. Dungey’s open magnetosphere model now underpins a holistic picture explaining not only the magnetic and plasma structure of the magnetosphere, but also its dynamics which can be monitored in real time. The book also shows how modern day simulation of solar terrestrial coupling can reproduce the real time evolution of the solar terrestrial system in ways undreamt of in 1961 w...

  14. PlasmaPy: initial development of a Python package for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas; Leonard, Andrew J.; Stańczak, Dominik; Haggerty, Colby C.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Huang, Yu-Min; PlasmaPy Community

    2017-10-01

    We report on initial development of PlasmaPy: an open source community-driven Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy seeks to provide core functionality that is needed for the formation of a fully open source Python ecosystem for plasma physics. PlasmaPy prioritizes code readability, consistency, and maintainability while using best practices for scientific computing such as version control, continuous integration testing, embedding documentation in code, and code review. We discuss our current and planned capabilities, including features presently under development. The development roadmap includes features such as fluid and particle simulation capabilities, a Grad-Shafranov solver, a dispersion relation solver, atomic data retrieval methods, and tools to analyze simulations and experiments. We describe several ways to contribute to PlasmaPy. PlasmaPy has a code of conduct and is being developed under a BSD license, with a version 0.1 release planned for 2018. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement, so anyone interested in contributing to this project should contact the authors. This work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, K.M.; Batha, S.

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I i ) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I i discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed

  16. Physics in Brazil in the next decade: atomic, molecular and optical physics, biological, chemical and medical physics, physics teaching and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is an overview of physics in Brazil in the next decade. It is specially concerned with atomic, molecular and optical physics, biological chemical and medical physics, and also teaching of physics and plasma physics. It presents the main research groups in Brazil in the above mentioned areas. It talks as well, about financing new projects and the costs involved to improve these areas. (A.C.A.S.)

  17. LENR/"Cold Fusion" and Modern Physics: A Crisis Within a Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallove, Eugene F. E.

    2004-03-01

    The primary theorists in the field of Cold Fusion/LENR have generally assumed that the excess heat phenomena is commensurate with nuclear ash (such as helium), whether already identified or presumed to be present but not yet found, and moreover that it can be explained by hydrided metal lattice structures acting coherently. Though this was an excellent initial hypothesis, the commensurate nuclear ash hypothesis has not been proved, and appears to be approximately correct in only a few experiments. At the same time, compelling evidence has also emerged for other microphysical sources of energy that were unexpected by accepted physics. The exemplars have been the work Dr. Randell Mills and his colleagues at BlackLight Power Corporation and Dr. Paulo and Alexandra Correa in Canada.This has led to a crisis within a crisis: Neither "cold fusion" nor "Modern Physics" will be able to explain the full range of experimental data now available---not even the data within "mainstream" cold fusion/LENR per se--- by insisting that the fundamental paradigms of Modern Physics are without significant flaw. The present crisis is of magnitude comparable to the Copernican Revolution. Neither Modern Physics nor Cold Fusion/LENR will survive in their present forms when this long delayed revolution has run its course.

  18. Department of Plasma Physics and Material Engineering - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In April 2009 the Department of Materials Studies was united with the Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, This action followed twenty years of close cooperation in the implementation of high-intensity ion-beam pulses for the implantation of materials. In 2009 the activities of the new Department continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma engineering: · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges at the Plasma-Focus and RPI-IBIS facilities; · Research on plasma technologies, search for new methods of surface engineering; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modelling. In the framework of the EURATOM program. efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostics methods for tokamak-type facilities. Such studies included the elaboration of a special detection system based on a Cherenkov-type detector. Other fusion-oriented efforts were connected with the application of activation methods to the investigation of neutrons from the JET tokamak. Also. solid-state nuclear track detectors of the PM-355 type were used for measurements of energetic protons emitted from ultra-intense laser produced plasmas. In our continuing experimental studies, particular attention was paid to the development and application of optical spectroscopy for diagnostics of high-temperature plasma within the RPI-IBIS device and Plasma-Focus facilities. Fast ions escaping from the plasma were studied with nuclear track detectors, The interaction of plasma-ion streams with different targets was also investigated. A field of research activity was related to plasma technology. Efforts were undertaken to improve the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) deposition of thin superconducting layers. c.g. pure niobium film on the surface of copper resonant cavities of accelerators. The vacuum arc deposition technique was also applied to

  19. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Romano, F. P.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Massimi, C.

    2017-07-01

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as 7Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment ( e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and 7Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Landé factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry.

  20. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, D.; Gammino, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Musumarra, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania (Italy); Leone, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania (Italy); INAF-OACT, Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM, Catania (Italy); Galata, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Massimi, C. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as {sup 7}Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment (e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and {sup 7}Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Lande factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry. (orig.)

  1. 28. Zvenigorod conference on the plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis. Theses of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Theses of reports, presented at the 28th Conference on the plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis (Zvenigorod, 19-23 February 2001) are published. 246 reports were heard at the following sections: magnetic confinement, theory and experiments; inertial thermonuclear synthesis; plasma processes and physics of gas-discharge plasma; physical bases of plasma technologies. 17 reports had the summarizing character [ru

  2. A physical model of Mirnov oscillations and plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.C.

    1983-07-01

    A physical model is proposed which accounts for the general behaviour of Mirnov oscillations and plasma disruptions in tokamak devices. The model also accounts for the stability of those devices which operate with edge safety factors less than 1.5. The model is based on the propagation of localized torsional Alfven and ion acoustic wavepackets. These packets remain phase coherent for considerable distances and are guided along helical field lines in toroidal plasmas, leading to the formation of standing waves on those field lines which close on themselves after one or more toroidal revolutions. Standing waves are driven resonantly on the rational surfaces by fluctuations in the poloidal field, causing localized heating and hence filamentation of the plasma current. This model indicates that Mirnov oscillations are produced by standing acoustic waves, while plasma disruptions occur as a result of the formation of MHD unstable current filaments

  3. Physics and chemistry of plasma pollution control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J S

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous pollution control technologies for acid gases (NO x , SO x , etc), volatile organic compounds, greenhouse gases, ozone layer depleting substances, etc have been commercialized based on catalysis, incineration and adsorption methods. However, non-thermal plasma techniques based on electron beams and corona discharges are becoming significant due to advantages such as lower costs, higher removal efficiency and smaller space volume. In order to commercialize this new technology, the pollution gas removal rate, energy efficiency of removal, pressure drop of reactors and useable by-product production rates must be improved and identification of major fundamental processes and optimizations of reactor and power supply for an integrated system must be investigated. In this work, the chemistry and physics of plasma pollution control are discussed and the limitation of this type of plasma is outlined based on the plasma parameters.

  4. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  5. Toward the automated analysis of plasma physics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1989-04-01

    A program (CALC) is described, which carries out nontrivial plasma physics calculations, in a manner intended to emulate the approach of a human theorist. This includes the initial process of gathering the relevant equations from a plasma knowledge base, and then determining how to solve them. Solution of the sets of equations governing physics problems, which in general have a nonuniform,irregular structure, not amenable to solution by standardized algorithmic procedures, is facilitated by an analysis of the structure of the equations and the relations among them. This often permits decompositions of the full problem into subproblems, and other simplifications in form, which renders the resultant subsystems soluble by more standardized tools. CALC's operation is illustrated by a detailed description of its treatment of a sample plasma calculation. 5 refs., 3 figs

  6. IPP Max Planck Institute of Plasma of Physics at Garching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The cost accounting system of the IPP Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics at Garching is described with all details as there are cost class accounting, cost centers, cost units and resulting overall cost summary. Detailed instructions are given about the implementation of this cost accounting system into the organisational structure of the IPP. (A.N.)

  7. TELEMATICS APPLICATIONS REMOT: Description of the intended plasma physics demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmerling, G.; van der Meer, E.; Ephraïm, M.; Balke, C.; Lourens, W.; Korten, M.

    2012-01-01

    This document presents the intended plasma physics demonstator in the REMOT Project. Due to the complexity of the system the demonstrator should be kept as simple as possible without sacrificing flexibility. The demonstrator should be made in such a way that it can easily be modified and expanded.

  8. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-01-01

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma

  9. Introduction to Gyrokinetic Theory with Applications in Magnetic Confinement Research in Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present lecture provides an introduction to the subject of gyrokinetic theory with applications in the area of magnetic confinement research in plasma physics--the research arena from which this formalism was originally developed. It was presented as a component of the ''Short Course in Kinetic Theory within the Thematic Program in Partial Differential Equations'' held at the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science (24 March 2004). This lecture also discusses the connection between the gyrokinetic formalism and powerful modern numerical simulations. Indeed, simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential modern tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was enabled by two key factors: (i) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (ii) access to powerful new computational resources

  10. 7th International Conference on Physics of Liquid Matter : Modern Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chalyi, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    This book presents a collection of selected lectures discussing current problems in molecular physics and reviews the main cutting-edge advances in condensed and soft matter physics. It offers deep insights and a powerful basis for scientists and engineers to study complicated problems in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The unification of experimental, theoretical, and computational methods allows milestone results to be achieved in areas such as ionic and ionic-electronic liquids, magnetic liquid systems, liquid systems with nanoparticles, structural phase transitions and critical phenomena, and small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering in liquids and liquid systems.   The lectures selected for this book were held at the 7th International Conference “Physics of Liquid Matter: Modern Problems” (PLMMP-2016), 27–31 May in Kiev, Ukraine.

  11. Physics and applications of plasmas produced by pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Tetsuo; Katsuki, Sunao

    2013-10-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'Physics and Applications of Plasmas Produced by Pulsed Power Technology' held on March 27-28, 2012 at the National Institute for Fusion Science are collected in these proceedings. The papers in these proceedings reflect the current status and progress in the experimental and theoretical research on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. This issue is the collection of 22 papers presented at the entitled meeting. Ten of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. Physics Teachers Programme or how to bring modern physics to school

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A new programme for teachers took place last weekend at CERN. Fifty high school teachers sacrificed their weekend and plunged into CERN physics to find new inspirations for exciting physics lessons.   The fifty participants in the Physics Teachers programme in the Microcosm garden. High school students are often convinced that physics is a boring and useless subject, and physics teachers have a hard time presenting interesting lessons. To help them, CERN has inaugurated the Physics Teachers Programme, whose goal is to present CERN and its activities, so that teachers can get an idea of what kind of physics research is going on at the frontier of science. 'Our philosophy is to show them today what they will read in textbooks of the future', says Antonella Del Rosso, responsible for this course, 'so that they can inspire their pupils'. This programme can be considered the younger brother of the High School Teachers Programme, since it has a similar aim, but instead of being three-weeks long, it las...

  13. Laboratory Experiments in Physics for Modern Astronomy With Comprehensive Development of the Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Golden, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This book presents experiments which will teach physics relevant to astronomy. The astronomer, as instructor, frequently faces this need when his college or university has no astronomy department and any astronomy course is taught in the physics department. The physicist, as instructor, will find this intellectually appealing when faced with teaching an introductory astronomy course. From these experiments, the student will acquire important analytical tools, learn physics appropriate to astronomy, and experience instrument calibration and the direct gathering and analysis of data. Experiments that can be performed in one laboratory session as well as semester-long observation projects are included. This textbook is aimed at undergraduate astronomy students.

  14. Fundamentals of plasma physics and controlled fusion. The third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2011-06-01

    Primary objective of this lecture note is to provide a basic text for the students to study plasma physics and controlled fusion researches. Secondary objective is to offer a reference book describing analytical methods of plasma physics for the researchers. This was written based on lecture notes for a graduate course and an advanced undergraduate course those have been offered at Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo. In ch.1 and 2, basic concept of plasma and its characteristics are explained. In ch.3, orbits of ion and electron are described in several magnetic field configurations. Chapter 4 formulates Boltzmann equation of velocity space distribution function, which is the basic relation of plasma physics. From ch.5 to ch.9, plasmas are described as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid. MHD equation of motion (ch.5), equilibrium (ch.6) and diffusion and confinement time of plasma (ch.7) are described by the fluid model. Chapters 8 and 9 discuss problems of MHD instabilities whether a small perturbation will grow to disrupt the plasma or will damp to a stable state. The basic MHD equation of motion can be derived by taking an appropriate average of Boltzmann equation. This mathematical process is described in appendix A. The derivation of useful energy integral formula of axisymmetric toroidal system and the analysis of high n ballooning mode are described in app. B. From ch.10 to ch.14, plasmas are treated by kinetic theory. This medium, in which waves and perturbations propagate, is generally inhomogeneous and anisotropic. It may absorb or even amplify the wave. Cold plasma model described in ch.10 is applicable when the thermal velocity of plasma particles is much smaller than the phase velocity of wave. Because of its simplicity, the dielectric tensor of cold plasma can be easily derived and the properties of various wave can be discussed in the case of cold plasma. If the refractive index becomes large and the phase velocity of the

  15. Insertion of Contemporary and Modern Physics in classroom: a teaching learning sequence on radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre dos Santos Batista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available After more than two decades of justifications on the insertion of Modern and Contemporary Physics in the high school Education, the current challenge regards to how this content can be inserted in the classroom in an interesting and innovative way. Recent research reveals that despite a significant accumulation of recent academic research, whose purpose is to assist teachers pedagogically, few are grounded and proposed theoretically seeking to investigate how this integration happens. In this sense, we present a teaching-learning sequence on the topic of radioactivity, forged in the theoretical and methodological assumptions of Design-Based Research and a Teaching-Learning Sequence that, when implemented in public schools in the south of Bahia, produced the relevant knowledge to be shared with the community on teaching physics. Forged in our assumptions, the proposal allows teachers and researchers to understand questions about how, when and why, in fact, the inclusion of Modern and Contemporary Physics can occur in a non-traditional way. Therefore, the importance of this proposal is revealed to the high school of physics as it translates its ability to transform the theoretical demands on the curriculum and methodological innovation in the practical interventions in the classroom. We add that the availability of the necessary sources to find lesson plans, quizzes, texts, videos of teaching-learning sequence, shows the contribution of this work for teachers and researchers, in particular, to improve the scientific learning of students in the Basic Education.

  16. Abstracts of the 6. Brazilian meeting on plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental short communications are presented on the following subjects: plasma, ionized gases, plasma waves and instability, plasma diagnostic and heating, probes, magnetic confinements and plasma instability

  17. Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava [University New Hampshire- Durham

    2012-02-16

    Recent developments in experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection hold promise for providing solutions to outstanding problems in laboratory and space plasma physics. Examples include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth’s Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recently, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density plasmas. In each of these examples, a common and long-standing challenge has been to explain why fast reconnection proceeds rapidly from a relatively quiescent state. In this talk, we demonstrate the advantages of viewing these problems and their solutions from a common perspective. We focus on some recent, surprising discoveries regarding the role of secondary plasmoid instabilities of thin current sheets. Nonlinearly, these instabilities lead to fast reconnection rates that are very weakly dependent on the Lundquist number of the plasma.

  18. Quasiparticle lifetimes and infrared physics in QED and QCD plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, J.P. [CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-09-22

    The perturbative calculation of the lifetime of fermion excitations in a QED plasma at high temperature is plagued with infrared divergences which are not eliminated by the screening corrections. The physical processes responsible for these divergences are the collisions involving the exchange of longwavelength, quasistatic, magnetic photons, which are not screened by plasma effects. The leading divergences can be resummed in a non-perturbative treatment based on a generalization of the Bloch-Nordsieck model at finite temperature. The resulting expression of the fermion propagator is free of infrared problems, and exhibits a non-exponential damping at large times: S{sub R}(t) {approx} exp(-{alpha}T t ln{omega}{sub p}t), where {omega}{sub p} = eT/3 is the plasma frequency and {alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}.

  19. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmer, R.

    1997-01-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied wthin linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). mercury within the MHNC scheme via effective ion-ion potentials which are derived from the polarization function within an extended RPA. The optical properties of dense plasmas, the shift

  20. Dancer Perceptions of the Cognitive, Social, Emotional, and Physical Benefits of Modern Styles of Partnered Dancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D.; Marvin, Shesha; Rowley, Jessica; Nicolas, Malia San; Arastoo, Sara; Viray, Leo; Orozco, Amanda; Jurnak, Fran

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study dancers’ perceptions of the physical, cognitive, affective, and social benefits of partnered dancing. Method 225 dancers (71% female) were recruited through a community ballroom dance center and completed an online survey designed to measure their perceptions of the physical, cognitive, affective, and social benefits of modern, partnered dance styles (swing, Lindy Hop, and ballroom dancing). Subgroups were formed for analyses. For one set of analyses, groups based on length of dance participation were formed: experienced (dancing for more than 2 years) or novice (dancing for less than a year) dancers. For another set of analyses, groups based on frequency of dance practice were formed: committed (dancing at least one or more times per week) or occasional (dancing two or fewer times per month). Results The majority of participants reported perceived benefits in physical fitness, cognition, affect, and social functioning. Experienced dancers reported significantly greater self-perceived physical, social, and cognitive benefits than novice dancers. Committed dancers were more likely than occasional dancers to report improvements in physical fitness, U = 6,942, z = 2.38, r = .16, p dance participation significantly predicted perceived physical benefits [X2 (1,6) = 35.463, p dance styles is associated with perceived improvements in physical fitness, cognitive functioning, social functioning, mood, and self-confidence, and that perceived benefits may increase as individuals dance more frequently and over longer periods of time. PMID:27261991

  1. Fusion plasma physics research on the H-1 national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Australia has a highly leveraged fusion plasma research program centred on the H-1 National Facility device at the ANU. H-1 is a heliac, a novel helical axis stellarator that was experimentally pioneered in Australia, but has a close correlation with the worldwide research program on toroidal confinement of fusion grade plasma. Experiments are conducted on H-1 by university researchers from the Australian Fusion Research Group (comprising groups from the ANU, the Universities of Sydney, Western Sydney, Canberra, New England, and Central Queensland University) under the aegis of AINSE; the scientists also collaborate with fusion researchers from Japan and the US. Recent experiments on H-1 have focused on improved confinement modes that can be accessed at very low powers in H-1, but allow the study of fundamental physics effects seen on much larger machines at higher powers. H-1 is now being upgraded in magnetic field and heating power, and will be able to confine hotter plasmas beginning in 1999, offering greatly enhanced research opportunities for Australian plasma scientists and engineers, with substantial spillover of ideas from fusion research into other areas of applied physics and engineering

  2. Exploring extreme plasma physics in the laboratory and in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L. O.; Grismayer, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Cruz, F.; Gaudio, F. D.; Martins, J. L.; Vieira, J.; Vranic, M.

    2017-10-01

    The interaction of ultra intense fields with plasmas is at the confluence of several sub-fields ranging from QED, and nuclear physics to high energy astrophysics, and fundamental plasma processes. It requires novel theoretical tools, highly optimised numerical codes and algorithms tailored to these complex scenarios, where physical mechanisms at very disparate temporal and spatial scales are self-consistently coupled in multidimensional geometries. The key developments implemented in Osiris will be presented along with some examples of problems, relevant for laboratory or astrophysical scenarios, that are being addressed resorting to the combination of massively parallel simulations with theoretical models. The relevance for near future experimental facilities such as ELI will also be presented. Work supported by the European Research Council (ERC-AdG-2015 InPairs Grant No. 695088).

  3. Multi-Level iterative methods in computational plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, D.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Brackbill, J.U.; Chacon, L.; Lapenta, G.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma physics phenomena occur on a wide range of spatial scales and on a wide range of time scales. When attempting to model plasma physics problems numerically the authors are inevitably faced with the need for both fine spatial resolution (fine grids) and implicit time integration methods. Fine grids can tax the efficiency of iterative methods and large time steps can challenge the robustness of iterative methods. To meet these challenges they are developing a hybrid approach where multigrid methods are used as preconditioners to Krylov subspace based iterative methods such as conjugate gradients or GMRES. For nonlinear problems they apply multigrid preconditioning to a matrix-few Newton-GMRES method. Results are presented for application of these multilevel iterative methods to the field solves in implicit moment method PIC, multidimensional nonlinear Fokker-Planck problems, and their initial efforts in particle MHD

  4. Introduction to Plasma Physics: With Space and Laboratory Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, P K

    2005-01-01

    A new textbook on plasma physics must be very welcome, as this will encourage the teaching of courses on the subject. This book is written by two experts in their fields, and is aimed at advanced undergraduate and postgraduate courses. There are of course many other plasma physics textbooks available. The niche which this particular book fills is really defined by its subtitle: that is, 'with space and laboratory applications'. This differs from most other books which tend to emphasise either space or fusion applications (but not both) or to concentrate only on general theory. Essentially, the emphasis here is on fundamental plasma physics theory, but applications are given from time to time. For example, after developing Alfven wave theory, observations of Alfven waves in the solar wind and in the Jovian magnetosphere are presented; whilst ion acoustic cylcotron waves are illustrated by data from a laboratory Q machine. It is fair to say that examples from space seem to predominate. Nevertheless, the approach of including a broad range of applications is very good from an educational point of view, and this should help to train a generation of students with a grasp of fundamental plasma physics who can work in a variety of research fields. The subject coverage of the book is fairly conventional and there are no great surprises. It begins, inevitably, with a discussion of plasma parameters (Debye length etc) and of single particle motions. Both kinetic theory and magnetohydrodynamics are introduced. Waves are quite extensively discussed in several chapters, including both cold and hot plasmas, magnetised and unmagnetised. Nonlinear effects - a large subject! - are briefly discussed. A final chapter deals with collisions in fully ionised plasmas. The choice of contents of a textbook is always something of a matter of personal choice. It is easy to complain about what has been left out, and everyone has their own favourite topics. With that caveat, I would question

  5. Laboratory space physics: Investigating the physics of space plasmas in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Gregory G.

    2018-05-01

    Laboratory experiments provide a valuable complement to explore the fundamental physics of space plasmas without the limitations inherent to spacecraft measurements. Specifically, experiments overcome the restriction that spacecraft measurements are made at only one (or a few) points in space, enable greater control of the plasma conditions and applied perturbations, can be reproducible, and are orders of magnitude less expensive than launching spacecraft. Here, I highlight key open questions about the physics of space plasmas and identify the aspects of these problems that can potentially be tackled in laboratory experiments. Several past successes in laboratory space physics provide concrete examples of how complementary experiments can contribute to our understanding of physical processes at play in the solar corona, solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, and the outer boundary of the heliosphere. I present developments on the horizon of laboratory space physics, identifying velocity space as a key new frontier, highlighting new and enhanced experimental facilities, and showcasing anticipated developments to produce improved diagnostics and innovative analysis methods. A strategy for future laboratory space physics investigations will be outlined, with explicit connections to specific fundamental plasma phenomena of interest.

  6. Structure-preserving geometric algorithms for plasma physics and beam physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Standard algorithms in the plasma physics and beam physics do not possess the long-term accuracy and fidelity required in the study of multi-scale dynamics, because they do not preserve the geometric structures of the physical systems, such as the local energy-momentum conservation, symplectic structure and gauge symmetry. As a result, numerical errors accumulate coherently with time and long-term simulation results are not reliable. To overcome this difficulty, since 2008 structure-preserving geometric algorithms have been developed. This new generation of algorithms utilizes advanced techniques, such as interpolating differential forms, canonical and non-canonical symplectic integrators, and finite element exterior calculus to guarantee gauge symmetry and charge conservation, and the conservation of energy-momentum and symplectic structure. It is our vision that future numerical capabilities in plasma physics and beam physics will be based on the structure-preserving geometric algorithms.

  7. ITER-EDA physics design requirements and plasma performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Galambos, J.; Wesley, J.; Boucher, D.; Perkins, F.; Post, D.; Putvinski, S.

    1996-01-01

    Physics design guidelines, plasma performance estimates, and sensitivity of performance to changes in physics assumptions are presented for the ITER-EDA Interim Design. The overall ITER device parameters have been derived from the performance goals using physics guidelines based on the physics R ampersand D results. The ITER-EDA design has a single-null divertor configuration (divertor at the bottom) with a nominal plasma current of 21 MA, magnetic field of 5.68 T, major and minor radius of 8.14 m and 2.8 m, and a plasma elongation (at the 95% flux surface) of ∼1.6 that produces a nominal fusion power of ∼1.5 GW for an ignited burn pulse length of ≥1000 s. The assessments have shown that ignition at 1.5 GW of fusion power can be sustained in ITER for 1000 s given present extrapolations of H-mode confinement (τ E = 0.85 x τ ITER93H ), helium exhaust (τ* He /τ E = 10), representative plasma impurities (n Be /n e = 2%), and beta limit [β N = β(%)/(I/aB) ≤ 2.5]. The provision of 100 MW of auxiliary power, necessary to access to H-mode during the approach to ignition, provides for the possibility of driven burn operations at Q = 15. This enables ITER to fulfill its mission of fusion power (∼ 1--1.5 GW) and fluence (∼1 MWa/m 2 ) goals if confinement, impurity levels, or operational (density, beta) limits prove to be less favorable than present projections. The power threshold for H-L transition, confinement uncertainties, and operational limits (Greenwald density limit and beta limit) are potential performance limiting issues. Improvement of the helium exhaust (τ* He /τ E ≤ 5) and potential operation in reverse-shear mode significantly improve ITER performance

  8. Plasma physics modeling and the Cray-2 multiprocessor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of computer modeling in the magnetic fusion energy research program is discussed. The need for the most advanced supercomputers is described. To meet the demand for more powerful scientific computers to solve larger and more complicated problems, the computer industry is developing multiprocessors. The role of the Cray-2 in plasma physics modeling is discussed with some examples. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Technology and Plasma Physics Developments needed for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.

    2006-01-01

    Although no universally agreed definition of the next step after ITER exists at present it is commonly accepted that significant progress beyond the ITER base-line operating physics modes and the technologies employed in it are needed. We first review the role of DEMO in the different proposed fusion road maps and derive from them the corresponding performance requirements. A fast track to commercial fusion implies that DEMO is already close to a first of a kind power plant in all aspects except average availability. Existing power plant studies give therefore also a good approximation to the needs of DEMO. We outline the options for achieving the needed physics progress in the different characteristic parameters, and the implications for the experimental programme of ITER and accompanying satellite devices. On the time scale of the operation of ITER and of the planning DEMO, ab-initio modelling of fusion plasmas is also expected to assume a qualitatively new role. Besides the mapping of the reactor regime of plasma physics and the integration of a burning plasma with the principal reactor technologies on ITER, the development of functional and structural materials capable of handling the high power fluxes and neutron fluences, respectively is also on the critical path to DEMO. Finally we discuss the potential contributions of other confinement concepts (stellarators and spherical tokamaks) to the design of DEMO. (author)

  10. Physics and astrophysics of quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-06-15

    The quark gluon plasma - matter too hot or dense for quarks to crystallize into particles - played a vital role in the formation of the Universe. Efforts to recreate and understand this type of matter are forefront physics and astrophysics, and progress was highlighted in the Second International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma (ICPA-QGP 93), held in Calcutta from 19-23 January. (The first conference in the series was held in Bombay in February 1988). Although primarily motivated towards enlightening the Indian physics community in this new and rapidly evolving area, in which India now plays an important role, the conference also catered for an international audience. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of quark gluon plasma in astrophysics and cosmology. While Charles Alcock of Lawrence Livermore looked at a less conventional picture giving inhomogeneous ('clumpy') nucleosynthesis, David Schramm (Chicago) covered standard big bang nucleosynthesis. The abundances of very light elements do not differ appreciably for these contrasting scenarios; the crucial difference between them shows up for heavier elements like lithium-7 and -8 and boron-11. Richard Boyd (Ohio State) highlighted the importance of accurate measurements of the primordial abundances of these elements for clues to the cosmic quark hadron phase transition. B. Banerjee (Bombay) argued, on the basis of lattice calculations, for only slight supercooling in the cosmic quark phase transition - an assertion which runs counter to the inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis scenario.

  11. Physics and astrophysics of quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The quark gluon plasma - matter too hot or dense for quarks to crystallize into particles - played a vital role in the formation of the Universe. Efforts to recreate and understand this type of matter are forefront physics and astrophysics, and progress was highlighted in the Second International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma (ICPA-QGP 93), held in Calcutta from 19-23 January. (The first conference in the series was held in Bombay in February 1988). Although primarily motivated towards enlightening the Indian physics community in this new and rapidly evolving area, in which India now plays an important role, the conference also catered for an international audience. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of quark gluon plasma in astrophysics and cosmology. While Charles Alcock of Lawrence Livermore looked at a less conventional picture giving inhomogeneous ('clumpy') nucleosynthesis, David Schramm (Chicago) covered standard big bang nucleosynthesis. The abundances of very light elements do not differ appreciably for these contrasting scenarios; the crucial difference between them shows up for heavier elements like lithium-7 and -8 and boron-11. Richard Boyd (Ohio State) highlighted the importance of accurate measurements of the primordial abundances of these elements for clues to the cosmic quark hadron phase transition. B. Banerjee (Bombay) argued, on the basis of lattice calculations, for only slight supercooling in the cosmic quark phase transition - an assertion which runs counter to the inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis scenario

  12. Advances of dense plasma physics with particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, GSI-Darmstadt, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D. [DarmstadtTechnische Univ., Institut fur Kernphysik (Germany); Jacoby, J. [Frankfurt Univ., Institut fur Angewandte Physik (Germany); Zioutas, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Patras Univ., Dept. of Physics (Greece); Sharkov, B.Y. [Institut for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    High intensity particle beams from accelerators induce high energy density states in bulk matter. The SIS-18 heavy ion synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) now routinely delivers intense Uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Due to the specific nature of the ion-matter interaction a volume of matter is heated uniformly with low gradients of temperature and pressure in the initial phase, depending on the pulse structure of the beam with respect to space and time. The new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. One special piece of accelerator equipment a superconducting high field dipole magnet, developed for the LHC at CERN is now serving as a key instrument to diagnose the dense plasma of the sun interior plasma, thus providing an extremely interesting combination of accelerator physics, plasma physics and particle physics. (authors)

  13. Advances of dense plasma physics with particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Jacoby, J.; Zioutas, K.; Sharkov, B.Y.

    2006-01-01

    High intensity particle beams from accelerators induce high energy density states in bulk matter. The SIS-18 heavy ion synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) now routinely delivers intense Uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Due to the specific nature of the ion-matter interaction a volume of matter is heated uniformly with low gradients of temperature and pressure in the initial phase, depending on the pulse structure of the beam with respect to space and time. The new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. One special piece of accelerator equipment a superconducting high field dipole magnet, developed for the LHC at CERN is now serving as a key instrument to diagnose the dense plasma of the sun interior plasma, thus providing an extremely interesting combination of accelerator physics, plasma physics and particle physics. (authors)

  14. The quantum mechanics solver. How to apply quantum theory to modern physics. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Quantum Mechanics Solver uniquely illustrates the application of quantum mechanical concepts to various fields of modern physics. It aims at encouraging the reader to apply quantum mechanics to research problems in fields such as molecular physics, condensed matter physics or laser physics. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students will find a rich and challenging source of material for further exploration. This book consists of a series of problems concerning present-day experimental or theoretical questions on quantum mechanics. All of these problems are based on actual physical examples, even if sometimes the mathematical structure of the models under consideration is simplified intentionally in order to get hold of the physics more rapidly. The new edition features new themes, such as the progress in measuring neutrino oscillations, quantum boxes, the quantum thermometer etc. Secondly, it includes a brief summary on the basics of quantum mechanics and the formalism we use. Finally, the problems under three main themes: Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms; Quantum Entanglement and Measurement; and Complex Systems. (orig.)

  15. 6th International Conference on Physics of Liquid Matter : Modern Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings comprise invited and contributed papers presented at PLMMP-2014, addressing modern problems in the fields of liquids, solutions and confined systems, critical phenomena, as well as colloidal and biological systems. The book focuses on state-of-the-art developments in contemporary physics of liquid matter. The papers presented here are organized into four parts: (i) structure of liquids in confined systems, (ii) phase transitions, supercritical liquids and glasses, (iii) colloids, and (iv) medical and biological aspects and cover the most recent developments in the broader field of liquid state including interdisciplinary problems.

  16. Modern computer hardware and the role of central computing facilities in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharov, V.

    1981-01-01

    Important recent changes in the hardware technology of computer system components are reviewed, and the impact of these changes assessed on the present and future pattern of computing in particle physics. The place of central computing facilities is particularly examined, to answer the important question as to what, if anything, should be their future role. Parallelism in computing system components is considered to be an important property that can be exploited with advantage. The paper includes a short discussion of the position of communications and network technology in modern computer systems. (orig.)

  17. PREFACE: 2nd International Symposium on the Modern Physics of Compact Stars and Relativistic Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvard Chubaryan, Professor; Aram Saharian, Professor; Armen Sedrakian, Professor

    2014-03-01

    The international conference ''The Modern Physics of Compact Stars and Relativistic Gravity'' took place in Yerevan, Armenia, from 18-21 September 2013. This was the second in a series of conferences which aim to bring together people working in astrophysics of compact stars, physics of dense matter, gravitation and cosmology, observations of pulsars and binary neutron stars and related fields. The conference was held on the occasion of 100th birthday of the founder of the Theoretical Physics Chair at the Department of Physics of Yerevan State University and prominent Armenian scientist Academician Gurgen S Sahakyan. The field of compact stars has seen extraordinary development since the discovery of pulsars in 1967. Even before this discovery, pioneering work of a number of theoretical groups had laid the foundation for this development. A pioneer of this effort was Professor G S Sahakyan who, together with Professor Victor Ambartsumyan and a group of young scientists, started in the early sixties their fundamental work on the properties of superdense matter and on the relativistic structure of compact stellar objects. This conference explored the vast diversity of the manifestations of compact stars, including the modern aspects of the equation of state of superdense matter, its magnetic and thermal properties, rotational dynamics, superfluidity and superconductivity, phase transition from hadronic to quark matter, etc. The articles on these subjects collected in this volume are evidence of liveliness of the field and of the continuous feedback between theory and the experiment. A part of this volume is devoted to the cosmology and the theories of gravity — the subfields of astrophysics that are of fundamental importance to our understanding of the universe. The reader will find here articles touching on the most diverse aspects of these fields such as modern problems in Einstein's classical theory of gravity and its alternatives, string theory motivated

  18. The influence of instructional interactions on students’ mental models about the quantization of physical observables: a modern physics course case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didiş Körhasan, Nilüfer; Eryılmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Şakir

    2016-01-01

    Mental models are coherently organized knowledge structures used to explain phenomena. They interact with social environments and evolve with the interaction. Lacking daily experience with phenomena, the social interaction gains much more importance. In this part of our multiphase study, we investigate how instructional interactions influenced students’ mental models about the quantization of physical observables. Class observations and interviews were analysed by studying students’ mental models constructed in a modern physics course during an academic semester. The research revealed that students’ mental models were influenced by (1) the manner of teaching, including instructional methodologies and content specific techniques used by the instructor, (2) order of the topics and familiarity with concepts, and (3) peers.

  19. Determination of composition and physical properties of partially ionized plasmas in the function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporowski, B.

    1992-01-01

    The investigations of various kinds of partially ionized plasma were conducted for the pressure of 0.1 MPa and in the range of temperature of 298.15 K to 24000 K. The physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma depend mainly of their composition and temperature. The composition of particular kinds of partially ionized plasmas varies also in the function of temperature. Simultaneous going on of physical and chemical processes in plasma is the reason of difficulties in the calculations of plasma's physical properties. The use of the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics for the calculations of physical properties of partially ionized plasma is impossible. There are enough exact methods for measuring of physical properties of partially ionized plasma. For these reasons the theoretical method using the base of statistic physics was used to calculate the composition and physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  20. THE PROSPECT OF MODERN TECHNOLOGY IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM: THE WAY TO OVERCOME OVERWEIGHT PROBLEMS IN IRAQ

    OpenAIRE

    Fathil Bakir Allami; Mohdsofian Omar-Fauzee; Ishak Sin

    2016-01-01

    The overweight problem in Iraq has been a great issue that needs to be solved by government to ensure a better well-being. The purpose of this paper is to explore the need of the modern technology in physical education in order to overcome the issues of overweight in Iraq. The methodology used in this paper is through library research which focuses on issues of overweight and modern technology application in physical education programs. It can be concluded that the use of modern technology in...

  1. International school of plasma physics course on instabilities and confinement in toroidal plasmas. Varenna (Italy), September 27-October 9, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-11-01

    The lectures of a Varenna Summer School about the theme Instabilities and Confinement in toroidal Plasmas are given. The topics included are: high-beta toroidal pinches, non-MHD instabilities and anomalous transport, analogy between turbulent transfer in velocity space and plasma collisioned transport in real space, the magnetohydrodynamic approach of plasma confinement in closed magnetic configurations, properties of isodynamical equilibrium configurations and their generalization, transport theory for toroidal plasmas, plasma physics, low-β toroidal machines, the neoclassical theory of transit time magnetic pumping, radio frequency heating of toroidal plasmas, plasma heating at lower hybrid frequency, RF-plasma heating with L-structures, numerical simulation, dynamical stabilization of low frequency waves in inhomogeneous plasmas, dynamic and feedback stabilization of plasmas and problems with nuclear fusion reactors

  2. Geodesics without differential equations: general relativistic calculations for introductory modern physics classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, D R

    2006-01-01

    Introductory courses covering modern physics sometimes introduce some elementary ideas from general relativity, though the idea of a geodesic is generally limited to shortest Euclidean length on a curved surface of two spatial dimensions rather than extremal aging in spacetime. It is shown that Epstein charts provide a simple geometric picture of geodesics in one space and one time dimension and that for a hypothetical uniform gravitational field, geodesics are straight lines on a planar diagram. This means that the properties of geodesics in a uniform field can be calculated with only a knowledge of elementary geometry and trigonometry, thus making the calculation of some basic results of general relativity accessible to students even in an algebra-based survey course on physics

  3. 12th Czechoslovak seminar on plasma physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The 12th Czechoslovak seminar on plasma physics and technology was oriented mainly to the problems of high-temperature plasmas and controlled thermonuclear fusion. The proceedings contain 27 invited papers and communications presented in three sections: 1) Inertial controlled fusion, 2) Tokamaks, 3) Theory and miscellaneous topics. The first group of papers deals with various problems of electron-beam, ion-beam, and laser fusion, including physical processes in fusion targets. The tokamak section discusses the latest experimental results achieved in the Russian tokamaks FT-2, Tuman 2-a, T-7 and T-10, in the Czechoslovak tokamak TM-1-MH, and in the Hungarian tokamak MT-1. A detailed survey is presented of work on neutral atom injectors in Novosibirsk. In the third section several papers on theoretical studies of nonlinear and turbulent processes in a hot plasma are presented together with a simulation study of a hybrid tokamak reactor. Several contributions on special diagnostic methods are presented. (J.U.)

  4. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model

  5. Neoclassical Physics for Current Drive in Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthoit, F.X.

    2012-03-01

    The Lie transform formalism is applied to charged particle dynamics in tokamak magnetic topologies, in order to build a Fokker-Planck type operator for Coulomb collisions usable for current drive. This approach makes it possible to reduce the problem to three dimensions (two in velocity space, one in real space) while keeping the wealth of phase-space cross-term coupling effects resulting from conservation of the toroidal canonical momentum (axisymmetry). This kinetic approach makes it possible to describe physical phenomena related to the presence of strong pressure gradients in plasmas of an unspecified form, like the bootstrap current which role will be paramount for the future ITER machine. The choice of coordinates and the method used are particularly adapted to the numerical resolution of the drift kinetic equation making it possible to calculate the particle distributions, which may present a strong variation with respect to the Maxwellian under the effect of an electric field (static or produced by a radio-frequency wave). This work, mainly dedicated to plasma physics of tokamaks, was extended to those of space plasmas with a magnetic dipole configuration. (author)

  6. Experiments on Plasma Physics : Experience is the Mother of Wisdom 5.What We Expect with Nonneutral Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwamoto, Yasuhito

    The present status of nonneutral plasma science is reviewed with a particular interest in the pursuit of a new frontier for plasma physicists engaged in basic researches. The author does not intend to be exhaustive nor well balanced in the description, but tries to discuss where we are positioned and what we might be able to do to fruitfully enjoy plasma physics and extend its field of activity. Leaving most of topics to the cited references, the author describes characteristic features of nonneutral plasmas appearing in distinct confinement properties, equilibria, transport, nonlinear evolution of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and fluid echo phenomena. These examples may convey the significance of nonneutral plasma science as one of newly-rising branches of plasma physics and as a potentially relevant channel through which plasma physics could explore new dimensions.

  7. Real-time control of Tokamak plasmas: from control of physics to physics-based control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felici, F. A. A.

    2011-11-01

    Stable, high-performance operation of a tokamak requires several plasma control problems to be handled simultaneously. Moreover, the complex physics which governs the tokamak plasma evolution must be studied and understood to make correct choices in controller design. In this thesis, the two subjects have been merged, using control solutions as experimental tool for physics studies, and using physics knowledge for developing new advanced control solutions. The TCV tokamak at CRPP-EPFL is ideally placed to explore issues at the interface between plasma physics and plasma control, by combining a digital realtime control system with a flexible and powerful set of actuators, in particular the electron cyclotron heating and current drive system (ECRH/ECCD). This experimental platform has been used to develop and test new control strategies for three plasma physics instabilities: sawtooth, edge localized mode (ELM) and neoclassical tearing mode (NTM). The period of the sawtooth crash, a periodic MHD instability in the core of a tokamak plasma, can be varied by localized deposition of ECRH/ECCD near the q = 1 surface (q: safety factor). A sawtooth pacing controller was developed which is able to control the time of appearance of the next sawtooth crash. Each individual sawtooth period can be controlled in real-time. A similar scheme is applied to H-mode plasmas with type-I ELMs, where it is shown that pacing regularizes the ELM period. The regular, reproducible and therefore predictable sawtooth crashes have been used to study the relationship between sawteeth and NTMs. Postcrash MHD activity can provide the ‘seed’ island for an NTM, which then grows under its neoclassical bootstrap drive. The seeding of 3/2 NTMs by long sawtooth crashes can be avoided by preemptive, crash-synchronized EC power injection pulses at the q = 3/2 rational surface location. NTM stabilization experiments in which the ECRH deposition location is moved in real-time with steerable mirrors have

  8. plasmaFoam: An OpenFOAM framework for computational plasma physics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Verma, Abhishek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    As emphasized in the 2012 Roadmap for low temperature plasmas (LTP), scientific computing has emerged as an essential tool for the investigation and prediction of the fundamental physical and chemical processes associated with these systems. While several in-house and commercial codes exist, with each having its own advantages and disadvantages, a common framework that can be developed by researchers from all over the world will likely accelerate the impact of computational studies on advances in low-temperature plasma physics and chemistry. In this regard, we present a finite volume computational toolbox to perform high-fidelity simulations of LTP systems. This framework, primarily based on the OpenFOAM solver suite, allows us to enhance our understanding of multiscale plasma phenomenon by performing massively parallel, three-dimensional simulations on unstructured meshes using well-established high performance computing tools that are widely used in the computational fluid dynamics community. In this talk, we will present preliminary results obtained using the OpenFOAM-based solver suite with benchmark three-dimensional simulations of microplasma devices including both dielectric and plasma regions. We will also discuss the future outlook for the solver suite.

  9. Concerning rather modern organizational innovations in the system of physical education of student youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilij Sutula

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: studying of attitude of students to the existing system of physical education in higher educational institutions of Ukraine and an assessment of possible consequences of implementation of the order of MES of January 26, 2015 No. 47 and the corresponding explanations and recommendations to it which are stated in the letter of MES No. 1/9-1126 of 13.03.2015. Material & Methods: the poll of students of 1–4 courses (n=757 of one of the faculties of Law University named after Yaroslav the Wise (NLU was conducted for the achievement of the stated purpose. Health cards of students, log-books of educational work on physical training of students, log-books of work of sports and improving sections were also analyzed. Results: interest in classes by physical exercises decreases at the vast majority of students during training in higher educational institutions. 88,6% of students note a need of carrying out classes on discipline "Physical education" for higher educational institutions. The majority of them (80,2% will choose discipline "Physical education" if it will be optionally, and 71,9% understand that they need to be engaged in physical exercises 4-6 hours per week for maintenance of the appropriate level of their physical health. Conclusions: the positive result of functioning of the existing system of physical training of student’s youth will be shown that interest in classes by physical exercises decreases at the vast majority of students during training. The effective modernization of the system of physical training of student youth is possible, first, due to use of the existing gender distinctions in interests in classes by physical exercises at students. Secondly, due to properly organized classes with the students who are for health reasons to preparatory (10,9%, special (19,1% medical groups and MPC groups (3,4%. The considerable issues will appear with visit of such classes by students in case of a removal of classes on physical

  10. Promoting Plasma Physics as a Career: A Generational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James

    2005-10-01

    A paradigm shift is occurring in education physics programs. Educators are shifting from the traditional teaching focus to concentrate on student learning. Students are unaware of physics as a career, plasma physics or the job opportunities afforded to them with a physics degree. The physics profession needs to promote itself to the younger generations, or specifically the millennial generation (Born in the 1980's-2000's). Learning styles preferred by ``Millennials'' include a technological environment that promotes learning through active task performance rather than passive attendance at lectures. Millennials respond well to anything experiential and will be motivated by opportunities for creativity and challenging learning environments. The open-ended access to information, the ability to tailor learning paths, and continuous and instantaneous performance assessment offer flexibility in the design of curricula as well as in the method of delivery. Educators need to understand the millennial generation, appeal to their motivations and offer a learning environment designed for their learning style. This poster suggests promoting a physics career by focusing on generational learning styles and preferences.

  11. XXX Zvenigorod conference on plasma physics and CTS. Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Summaries of reports made at the 30th Zvenigorod conference on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis are presented. The conference took place February 24-28, 2003. The recent results of investigations on plasma physics in tokamak devices are considered. The problems of the magnetic confinement of high-temperature plasma in thermonuclear devices and inertial thermonuclear synthesis are discussed. The particular attention is given to physical essentials of plasma and beam technologies [ru

  12. XXXII Zvenigorod conference on the plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis. Theses of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Theses of the reports, presented at the XXXII International conference on the plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis (Zvenigorod, 14-18 February 2005) are published. The total number of reports is 322, including 16 summarizing ones. The other reports are distributed by the following sections: magnetic confinement of high-temperature plasma (88 reports), inertial thermonuclear fusion (65), physical processes in low-temperature plasma (99) and physical bases of the plasma and beam technologies (54) [ru

  13. Hamiltonian reductions in plasma physics about intrinsic gyrokinetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillebon de Resnes, L. de

    2013-01-01

    Gyrokinetic is a key model for plasma micro-turbulence, commonly used for fusion plasmas or small-scale astrophysical turbulence, for instance. The model still suffers from several issues, which could imply to reconsider the equations. This thesis dissertation clarifies three of them. First, one of the coordinates caused questions, both from a physical and from a mathematical point of view; a suitable constrained coordinate is introduced, which removes the issues from the theory and explains the intrinsic structures underlying the questions. Second, the perturbative coordinate transformation for gyrokinetic was computed only at lowest orders; explicit induction relations are obtained to go arbitrary order in the expansion. Third, the introduction of the coupling between the plasma and the electromagnetic field was not completely satisfactory; using the Hamiltonian structure of the dynamics, it is implemented in a more appropriate way, with strong consequences on the gyrokinetic equations, especially about their Hamiltonian structure. In order to address these three main points, several other results are obtained, for instance about the origin of the guiding-center adiabatic invariant, about a very efficient minimal guiding center transformation, or about an intermediate Hamiltonian model between Vlasov-Maxwell and gyrokinetic, where the characteristics include both the slow guiding-center dynamics and the fast gyro-angle dynamics. In addition, various reduction methods are used, introduced or developed, e.g. a Lie-transform of the equations of motion, a lifting method to transfer particle reductions to the corresponding Hamiltonian field dynamics, or a truncation method related both to Dirac's theory of constraints and to a projection onto a Lie-subalgebra. Besides gyrokinetic, this is useful to clarify other Hamiltonian reductions in plasma physics, for instance for incompressible or electrostatic dynamics, for magnetohydrodynamics, or for fluid closures including

  14. Modernization of the physical protection system of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, F.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The plans of physical protection of nuclear facilities must be reviewed and updated every two years. A general study of the physical protection system was carried out in order to review and to update the plan of physical protection of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Important alterations accomplished at the institute were considered in the study, as the installation of a cyclotron 30 MeV and the new operation conditions for the nuclear research reactor IEA-RI, that include the increase of its operation power from two to five megawatts and the establishment of the continuous operation by 72 hours weekly. The area of IPEN-CNEN/SP is 478,000 m 2 (101,850 m 2 built area of 107 constructions). The group responsible for the study investigated the performance of the physical protection system and detected some points that could be reinforced at inner and protected areas. The initial step was the evaluation, in loco, of the constructions and physical barriers of inner and protected areas. The performance of the security force personnel on the conventional procedures, as access control to the facilities, control of material flow, area monitoring and patrol, as well as its response for special situation procedures in the case of a physical protection emergency, were evaluated too. The study also focused the communication means used by the security force, as the extension phone lines that are located in each entrance area and in the huts, and the portable VHP radios that are used by the guards. In order to elaborate a programme of modernization of the physical protection system, using the results of the study as basis, an internal committee composed of specialists in physical protection, nuclear safety, operation of reactors and engineering areas was created. The programme elaborated by the committee strengthens the physical protection system by applying the defense in depth concept. At the same time, it attempts to propitiate a balanced protection to minimize the consequences for

  15. Dynamical energy systems and modern physics: fostering the science and spirit of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, G E; Russek, L G

    1997-05-01

    When systems theory is carefully applied to the concept of energy, some novel and far-reaching implications for modern physics and complementary medicine emerge. The heart of systems theory is dynamic interactions: systems do not simply act on systems, they interact with them in complex ways. By definition, systems at any level (e.g., physical, biological, social, ecological) are open to information, energy, and matter to varying degrees, and therefore interact with other systems to varying degrees. We first show how resonance between two tuning forks, a classic demonstration in physics, can be seen to reflect synchronized dynamic interactions over time. We then derive how the dynamic interaction of systems in mutual recurrent feedback relationships naturally create dynamic "memories" for their interactions over time. The mystery of how a photon (or electron) "knows" ahead of time whether to function as a particle or wave in the single slit/double slit quantum physics paradigm is potentially solved when energetic interactions inherent in the experimental system are recognized. The observation that energy decreases with the square of distance is shown not to be immutable when viewed from a dynamical energy systems perspective. Implications for controversial claims in complementary and alternative medicine, such as memory for molecules retained in water (homeopathy), remote diagnosis, and prayer and healing, are considered. A dynamical energy systems framework can facilitate the development of what might be termed "relationship consciousness," which has the potential to nurture both the science and spirit of complementary medicine and might help to create integrated medicine.

  16. Meeting the physics design challenges of modern LWRs being inducted into the Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, V.; Pal, Usha; Karthikeyan, R.; Raj, Devesh; Srivastava, Argala; Khan, Suhail Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme started with the two Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of 210 MWe capacity at Tarapur. Two VVER-1000 MWe reactors which are Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) of Russian design are being constructed at Kudankulam, Tamilnadu and are expected to be commissioned by end 2008. There may be also a possibility of inducting some western PWRs in future. These reactors belong to the category of light water reactors (LWR). The LWRs are compact and have complex physical characteristics distinctly different from those of the Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) which, currently form the mainstay of our indigenous nuclear power programme. The physics design and analysis capability for the modern LWRs (BWR, PWR and VVER) has been developed at Light Water Reactors Physics Section, BARC. This paper presents the current state of art in this key technology area to meet the physics design and operation challenges when LWRs would be inducted in a major way into the Indian nuclear power programme and commence operating in the coming decades. (author)

  17. Reforming a large lecture modern physics course for engineering majors using a PER-based design

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    We have reformed a large lecture modern physics course for engineering majors by radically changing both the content and the learning techniques implemented in lecture and homework. Traditionally this course has been taught in a manner similar to the equivalent course for physics majors, focusing on mathematical solutions of abstract problems. Based on interviews with physics and engineering professors, we developed a syllabus and learning goals focused on content that was more useful to our actual student population: engineering majors. The content of this course emphasized reasoning development, model building, and connections to real world applications. In addition we implemented a variety of PER-based learning techniques, including peer instruction, collaborative homework sessions, and interactive simulations. We have assessed the effectiveness of reforms in this course using pre/post surveys on both content and beliefs. We have found significant improvements in both content knowledge and beliefs compared with the same course before implementing these reforms and a corresponding course for physics majors.

  18. Applications of modern statistical methods to analysis of data in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, James Eric

    Modern methods of statistical and computational analysis offer solutions to dilemmas confronting researchers in physical science. Although the ideas behind modern statistical and computational analysis methods were originally introduced in the 1970's, most scientists still rely on methods written during the early era of computing. These researchers, who analyze increasingly voluminous and multivariate data sets, need modern analysis methods to extract the best results from their studies. The first section of this work showcases applications of modern linear regression. Since the 1960's, many researchers in spectroscopy have used classical stepwise regression techniques to derive molecular constants. However, problems with thresholds of entry and exit for model variables plagues this analysis method. Other criticisms of this kind of stepwise procedure include its inefficient searching method, the order in which variables enter or leave the model and problems with overfitting data. We implement an information scoring technique that overcomes the assumptions inherent in the stepwise regression process to calculate molecular model parameters. We believe that this kind of information based model evaluation can be applied to more general analysis situations in physical science. The second section proposes new methods of multivariate cluster analysis. The K-means algorithm and the EM algorithm, introduced in the 1960's and 1970's respectively, formed the basis of multivariate cluster analysis methodology for many years. However, several shortcomings of these methods include strong dependence on initial seed values and inaccurate results when the data seriously depart from hypersphericity. We propose new cluster analysis methods based on genetic algorithms that overcomes the strong dependence on initial seed values. In addition, we propose a generalization of the Genetic K-means algorithm which can accurately identify clusters with complex hyperellipsoidal covariance

  19. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  20. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In November 2006, ministers representing the world’s major fusion research communities signed the agreement formally establishing the international project ITER. Sited at Cadarache in France, the project involves China, the European Union (including Switzerland), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a critical step in the development of fusion energy: its role is to confirm the feasibility of exploiting magnetic confinement fusion for the production of energy for peaceful purposes by providing an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant. The ITER tokamak is designed to study the “burning plasma” regime in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas by achieving a fusion amplification factor, Q (the ratio of fusion output power to plasma heating input power), of 10 for several hundreds of seconds with a nominal fusion power output of 500MW. It is also intended to allow the study of steady-state plasma operation at Q≥5 by me...

  1. Assessment of Student Learning in Modern Experiments in the Introductory Calculus-Based Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodahl, Brian; Ross, John; Lang, Sarah; Scott, Derek; Williams, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    With the advent of newer microelectronic sensors it's now possible to modernize introductory physics labs with the latest technology and this may allow for enhanced student participation/learning in the experiments. For example, force plate sensors can digitize and record the force on an object, later it can be analyzed in detail (i.e, impulse from force vs. time). Small 3-axis accelerometers can record 3-dim, time-dependent acceleration of objects undergoing complex motions. These devices are small, fairly easy to use, and importantly, are likely to enhance student learning by ``personalizing'' data collection, i.e. making the student an active part of the measurement process and no longer a passive observer. To assess whether these new high-tech labs enhance student learning, we have implemented pre- and post- test sessions to measure the effectiveness of student learning. Four of our calculus-based lab sections were used: Two sections the control group, using the previous ``old technology'' labs, the other two, the experimental group, using the new ``modern technology'' labs. Initial returns of assessment data offer some surprising insight.

  2. International School of Physics Enrico Fermi : Course 190 : Frontiers in Modern Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Dudley, J; Clerici, M

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 was designated by the United Nations General Assembly as the Year of Light and Light-based Technologies, and also marks the anniversaries of a number of significant historical events related to light. In 1015, Ibn Al-Haytham published his book of optics; in 1815, Fresnel first proposed the notion that light is actually a wave; James Clerk Maxwell then firmly established this concept with his electromagnetic theory of light propagation; and Einstein announced his discovery of the photoelectric effect, demonstrating that light is made of photons in 1905, followed in 1915 by his general theory of relativity, in which light plays a central role. This book presents lectures from the International School of Physics Enrico Fermi summer school: Frontiers in Modern Optics, held in Varenna, Italy, in June and July 2014. The school attempted to give a broad and modern overview of the field of optics in a series of lectures addressing ongoing topics of research. Subject areas include: nonlinear optics; lig...

  3. Brownian motion in complex fluids: venerable field and frontier of modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcarra-Rendon, A.; Medina-Noyola, M.; Ruiz-Estrada, H.; Arauz-Lara, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of tracer-diffusion phenomena in colloidal suspensions. This is the most direct observation of the Brownian motion executed by labelled Brownian particles interacting with the rest of colloidal particles in a suspension. The fundamental description of this phenomenon constitutes today one of the most relevant problems in the process of understanding the dynamic properties of this important class of complex fluids, from the experimental and theoretical perspective of physical research. This paper describes the recent developments in the extension of the classical theory of Brownian motion and its application to the description of the effects of direct and hydrodynamic interactions among colloidal particles. As a result, a coherent pictured has emerged in which the agreement between theory and experiment from nature fields of physics. The moral of the paper is that the use of well established concepts as statistical physics, assisted by modern experimental techniques, are contributing to transform complex fluids into a more amialbe class of materials from the point of view of the physicist. (Author)

  4. Estimation of physical development of young sportsmen from traditional and modern positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khor'yakov V.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of evaluation of anthropometric status of young sportsmen is examined with the use of method of indexes and modern pictures of somatic health of man. In research young boxers took part 10-11 (n=41, 12-13 (n=48 and 14-16 years (n=39. Contradiction and ambiguousness of estimations of physical development of children and teenagers is rotined by means of traditional indexes of Erismana, Quetelet, Pin'e, sthenic and development of thorax. It is marked that an estimation of physical development of children and teenagers with the use of standard deviation of selection is not productive, because in most cases distributing of the studied signs falls short of a normal law. A concept «norm» is recommended to replace a concept «norm» as an obligatory requirement of the state to the level of somatic health of children and teenagers of different regions of country. It is marked that it is expedient to examine physical development of individuals as a structural element of bodily condition the major components of which are indexes of power and capacity of mechanisms of energy supply.

  5. Investigating plasma-rotation methods for the Space-Plasma Physics Campaign at UCLA's BAPSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, S. M.; Koepke, M. E.; Reynolds, E. W.

    2006-10-01

    In D'Angelo et al., JGR 79, 4747 (1974), rigid-body ExB plasma flow was inferred from parabolic floating-potential profiles produced by a spiral ionizing surface. Here, taking a different approach, we report effects on barium-ion azimuthal-flow profiles using either a non-emissive or emissive spiral end-electrode in the WVU Q-machine. Neither electrode produced a radially-parabolic space-potential profile. The emissive spiral, however, generated controllable, radially-parabolic structure in the floating potential, consistent with a second population of electrons having a radially-parabolic parallel-energy profile. Laser-induced-fluorescence measurements of spatially resolved, azimuthal-velocity distribution functions show that, for a given flow profile, the diamagnetic drift of hot (>>0.2eV) ions overwhelms the ExB-drift contribution. Our experiments constitute a first attempt at producing controllable, rigid-body, ExB plasma flow for future experiments on the LArge-Plasma-Device (LAPD), as part of the Space-Plasma Physics Campaign (at UCLA's BAPSF).

  6. The gatekeepers of modern physics: periodicals and peer review in 1920s Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Imogen

    2015-03-01

    This essay analyzes the processes behind the publication of physics papers in two British journals in the 1920s: the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Series A and the Philosophical Magazine. On the surface, it looked as though the Philosophical Magazine was managed very informally, while the Proceedings had in place a seemingly rigid system of committee approval and peer review. This essay shows, however, that in practice the two journals were both influenced by networks of expertise that afforded small groups of physicists considerable control over the content of these prestigious scientific publications. This study explores the nature of peer review, suggesting how a historical approach can contribute to contemporary debates. In studying these relationships, the essay also considers the interplay of "classical" and "modern" ideas and physicists in 1920s Britain and cautions against an anachronistic approach to this classification.

  7. Modern Physics in High School: Space time in Einstein’s comic strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Caruso

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A   brief   summary   of   the  impact  of   Einstein's   contribution  concerning  concepts  like  space,  time,  simultaneity,  mass  and  energy is presented. Some of the main purposes of an education project through comics are sketched. The present work is inserted in this project and it shows a set of seven original comic strips which can be used by High School teachers to talk about one of Einstein’s  revolutionary  contributions  to  Modern  Physics:  Relativity.

  8. [Modern approaches to the use of neurotropic physical therapy in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, E M; Konchugova, T V; Kul'chitskaya, D B; Korchazhkina, N B; Egorova, L A; Chuich, N G

    2016-01-01

    The development and introduction into clinical practice of non-pharmacological methods for the prevention and treatment of arterial hypertension is a primary objective of modern physical therapy, especially as regards the neurotropic influences. This article was designed to report the results of the investigation into the hypotensive effect of transcerebral magnetic therapy obtained during the treatment of 60 patients presenting with arterial hypertension. The study included the comparative examination of two randomly formed groups containing 30 patients each. The patients of the main group received transcerebral magnetic therapy (to the frontal region) while those in the group of comparison were given magnetotherapy at the collar region. The study has demonstrated that transcerebral magnetic therapy given to the patients of the main group was a more efficient treatment than magnetotherapy at the collar region since it produced a more pronounced hypotensive effect irrespective of the initial hemodynamic type.

  9. Dusty Plasma Physics Facility for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John; Hahn, Inseob

    2015-09-01

    The Dusty Plasma Physics Facility (DPPF) is an instrument planned for the International Space Station (ISS). If approved by NASA, JPL will build and operate the facility, and NASA will issue calls for proposals allowing investigators outside JPL to carry out research, public education, and outreach. Microgravity conditions on the ISS will be useful for eliminating two unwanted effects of gravity: sedimentation of dust particles to the bottom of a plasma chamber, and masking weak forces such as the ion drag force that act on dust particles. The DPPF facility is expected to support multiple scientific users. It will have a modular design, with a scientific locker, or insert, that can be exchanged without removing the entire facility. The first insert will use a parallel-plate radio-frequency discharge, polymer microspheres, and high-speed video cameras. This first insert will be designed for fundamental physics experiments. Possible future inserts could be designed for other purposes, such as engineering applications, and experimental simulations of astrophysical or geophysical conditions. The design of the facility will allow remote operation from ground-based laboratories, using telescience.

  10. Plasma physics and the 2013-2022 decadal survey in solar and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. National Academies established in 2011 a steering committee to develop a comprehensive strategy for solar and space physics research. This updated and extended the first (2003) solar and space physics decadal survey. The latest decadal study implemented a 2008 Congressional directive to NASA for the fields of solar and space physics, but also addressed research in other federal agencies. The new survey broadly canvassed the fields of research to determine the current state of the discipline, identified the most important open scientific questions, and proposed the measurements and means to obtain them so as to advance the state of knowledge during the years 2013-2022. Research in this field has sought to understand: dynamical behaviour of the Sun and its heliosphere; properties of the space environments of the Earth and other solar system bodies; multiscale interaction between solar system plasmas and the interstellar medium; and energy transport throughout the solar system and its impact on the Earth and other solar system bodies. Research in solar and space plasma processes using observation, theory, laboratory studies, and numerical models has offered the prospect of understanding this interconnected system well enough to develop a predictive capability for operational support of civil and military space systems. We here describe the recommendations and strategic plans laid out in the 2013-2022 decadal survey as they relate to measurement capabilities and plasma physical research. We assess progress to date. We also identify further steps to achieve the Survey goals with an emphasis on plasma physical aspects of the program.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    Professor Kenro Miyamoto, already well known for his textbook Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1976; revised edition 1989), has now published a new book entitled Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Iwanami Book Service Center, Tokyo, 1997). To a large extent, the new book is a somewhat shortened and well reorganized version of its predecessor. The style, concise and matter of fact, clearly shows the origin of the text in lectures given by the author to graduate students. As announced by the title, the book is divided into two parts: the first part (about 250 pages) is a general introduction to the physics of plasmas, while the second, somewhat shorter, part (about 150 pages), is devoted to a description of the most important experimental approaches to achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion. Even in the first part, moreover, the choice of subjects is consistently oriented towards the needs of fusion research. Thus, the introduction to the behaviour of charged particles (particle motion, collisions, etc.) and to the collective description of plasmas is quite short, although the reader will get a flavour of all the most important topics and will find a number of examples chosen for their relevance to fusion applications (only the presentation of the Vlasov equation, in the second section of Chapter 4, might be criticized as so concise as to be almost misleading, since the difference between microscopic and macroscopic fields is not even mentioned). Considerably more space is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of equilibrium and stability. This part includes the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for circular tokamaks, a brief discussion of Pfirsch-Schlüter, neoclassical and anomalous diffusion, and two relatively long chapters on the most important ideal and resistive MHD instabilities of toroidal plasmas; drift and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are also briefly presented. The

  12. First Glossary of Modern Physics and Ionising Radiation Protection in Croatian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodilo, M.; Petkovic, T.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation and encouragement for the Glossary were given as the research theme for the joint seminar between the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing and Rudjer Boskovic Institute, within a postgraduate course subject ''Detectors and electronic instrumentation for particle physics''. A basic motivation is due to a lack of specialized literature in Croatian language in the field of protection of ionising radiation as well as the incompleteness of Croatian terminology in the same field. That is a general problem all over the World because the most glossaries are usually connected either with nuclear power plants or with an application of ionising radiation in medicine. On the other hand, a necessity for the specialized literature for radiation protection which follows a development of modern particle physics and its detection technique is rapidly growing up. A work and development on the Glossary were faced with serious difficulties, since various translations of foreign words and acronyms have already been used by various authors in Croatian literature. Different interpretations of the same term or concept, from diverse sources, had to be very often reconciled. However, the biggest challenge was finding proper Croatian words for the foreign terms, concepts, properties, and quantities which have not yet been commonly used so far in Croatian papers or/and Croatian legislative acts. According to our knowledge this seems to be the first comprehensive Glossary, describing the field of ionising radiation protection and bringing of 300 related entries (terms and guidelines). That is, certainly, the first characteristic Thesaurus in Croatian which includes background of modern physics and chemistry, particle phenomenology and its measurement, all dedicated to the radiological protection of workers, environment and people of the World. A Glossary brings a wide spectrum of terms of broad area of chemistry, radiation protection, nuclear and particle physics. A

  13. Contributions to the 20. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-15

    The Conference covers research on different aspects of plasma physics and fusion technology, like technical aspects of Tokamak devices; plasma instabilities and impurities, development and testing of materials for fusion reactors etc.

  14. Invited and contributed papers presented at the 22. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    In this report one invited and fifteen contributed papers by researchers of the `Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas`, Lausanne, to the 22. EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics are assembled. figs., tabs., refs.

  15. A prospect at 11th international Toki conference. Plasma physics, quo vadis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-01-01

    A prospect of plasma physics at the turn of next century is discussed. The theme of this conference identifies the future direction of the research related with plasmas. Main issue is the potential and structure formation in plasmas; More specifically, structures which are realized through the interaction of electromagnetic fields, in particular that with electric fields, in non-equilibrium state. An emphasis is made to clarify the fundamental physics aspects of the plasma physics in fusion research as well as that in the basic research of plasmas. The plasma physics will give an important contribution to the solution of the historical enigma, i.e., all things flow. Having an impact on human recognition of nature and showing a beauty in a law, the plasma physics/science will demonstrate to be a leading science in the 21st century. (author)

  16. Bookshelf (Conceptual Foundations of Modern Particle Physics, by Robert E. Marshak)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1994-01-01

    Particle physics really began as an independent scientific discipline after the Second World War. Robert Marshak was one of its pioneers on the theoretical front, starting out his career with important contributions on meson theory (together with Hans Bethe). The life of Marshak, who died in December 1992, was intimately interwoven with the post-war development of particle physics. His work on weak interaction theory was an important step towards the formulation of the V-A theory, the main pillar on which the modern electroweak theory rests erected. He is also remembered as the founder of the biennial 'Rochester' conference series (March 1993, page 24). Just before his death Robert Marshak finished writing his book on the concepts of particle physics. The book starts out with an historical account of the development of the field. He divides it into the startup period (1945-60) - the period of meson physics, the physics of strange particles, parity violation etc; the heroic period (1960-1975) when the Standard Model of the electroweak and strong interactions was developed; and finally the period of consolidation and speculation (since 1975). Marshak's recollection of the development of particle physics represents a personal view, worth reading by young researchers, although it does not attempt to provide a complete picture. After the historical chapter Marshak introduces the reader to the basics of quantum field theory (space-time symmetries, global internal symmetries and their breaking, gauge symmetries). Later he turns to a description of QCD and the gauge theory of the electroweak interactions. A whole chapter is devoted to the problems related to anomalies. In the last part of the book Marshak discusses various hypotheses of unifying the strong and electroweak interactions, especially the various facets of the SO(10) theory, followed by a long discussion of the fermion generation problem and of preon models. The book concludes with an extensive

  17. Physics of high performance JET plasmas in D-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    JET has recently operated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures, carried out an ITER physics campaign in hydrogen, deuterium, D-T and tritium, installed the Mark IIGB ''Gas Box'' divertor fully by remote handling and started physics experiments with this more closed divertor. The D-T experiments set records for fusion power (16.1 MW), ratio of fusion power to plasma input power (0.62, and 0.95±0.17 if a similar plasma could be obtained in steady-state) and fusion duration (4 MW for 4 s). A large scale tritium supply and processing plant, the first of its kind, allowed the repeated use of the 20 g tritium on site to supply 99.3 g of tritium to the machine. The H-mode threshold power is significantly lower in D-T, but the global energy confinement time is practically unchanged (no isotope effect). Dimensionless scaling ''Wind Tunnel'' experiments in D-T extrapolate to ignition with ITER parameters. The scaling is close to gyroBohm, but the mass dependence is not correct. Separating the thermal plasma energy into core and pedestal contributions could resolve this discrepancy (leading to proper gyroBohm scaling for the core) and also account for confinement degradation at high density and at high radiated power. Four radio frequency heating schemes have been tested successfully in D-T, showing good agreement with calculations. Alpha particle heating has been clearly observed and is consistent with classical expectations. Internal transport barriers have been established in optimised magnetic shear discharges for the first time in D-T and steady-state conditions have been approached with simultaneous internal and edge transport barriers. First results with the newly installed Mark IIGB divertor show that the in/out symmetry of the divertor plasma can be modified using differential gas fuelling, that optimised shear discharges can be produced, and that krypton gas puffing is effective in restoring L-mode edge conditions and establishing an internal transport barrier in

  18. Physics of high performance jet plasmas in D-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    JET has recently operated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures, carried out an ITER physics campaign in hydrogen, deuterium, D-T and tritium, installed the Mark IIGB 'Gas Box' divertor fully by remote handling and started physics experiments with this more closed divertor. The D-T experiments set records for fusion power (16.1 MW), ratio of fusion power to plasma input power (0.62, and 0.95±0.17 if a similar plasma could be obtained in steady-state) and fusion duration (4 MW for 4 s). A large scale tritium supply and processing plant, the first of its kind, allowed the repeated use of the 20 g tritium on site to supply 99.3 g of tritium to the machine. The H-mode threshold power is significantly lower in D-T, but the global energy confinement time is practically unchanged (no isotope effect). Dimensionless scaling 'Wind Tunnel' experiments in D-T extrapolate to ignition with ITER parameters. The scaling is close to gyroBohm, but the mass dependence is not correct. Separating the thermal plasma energy into core and pedestal contributions could resolve this discrepancy (leading to proper gyroBohm scaling for the core) and also account for confinement degradation at high density and at high radiated power. Four radio frequency heating schemes have been tested successfully in D-T, showing good agreement with calculations. Alpha particle heating has been clearly observed and is consistent with classical expectations. Internal transport barriers have been established in optimised magnetic shear discharges for the first time in D-T and steady-state conditions have been approached with simultaneous internal and edge transport barriers. First results with the newly installed Mark IIGB divertor show that the in/out symmetry of the divertor plasma can be modified using differential gas fuelling, that optimised shear discharges can be produced, and that krypton gas puffing is effective in restoring L-mode edge conditions and establishing an internal transport barrier in such

  19. Modeling of physical processes in radio-frequency plasma thrusters

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This Thesis presents an investigation of the plasma-wave interaction in Helicon Plasma Thrusters (HPT). The HPT is a new concept of electric space propulsion, which generates plasmas with RF heating and provides thrust by the electrodeless acceleration of plasmas in a magnetic nozzle. An in-depth and extensive literature review of the state of the art of the models and experiments of plasma-wave interaction in helicon plasma sources and thrusters is carried out. Then, a theoret...

  20. Women in Physics in Australia as the Expectations of the Modern Researcher Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, C. P.

    2009-04-01

    Publicly funded science, which employs the majority of research scientists in Australia, has since 1988 had significant shifts in the basis for funding with the expectation that all research, regardless of how fundamental, should have a plan or potential for impact for the community's benefit. This may be solving major problems for Australia (e.g., climate change and provision of water and energy) to creating new technologies and industries to boost the Australian economy. At the same time, there has been some improvement in the status of women in science in Australia. There is recognition that women bring diversity to research teams, making teams more effective, and this is being embraced. However, other issues are still creating difficulties for women from the drop in the quality of child care while its costs increase; the need to juggle family and career, particularly balancing the need for travel; the poorly paid maternity leave provisions; and the difficulty in restarting a career in science if time is taken out for child rearing. The changing expectations of the modern researcher, the status of women in Australian physics as a specific example, and the issues that are limiting women's opportunities in a ``well meaning'' culture that does not realize the limitations it is creating are reported, along with what the Australian Institute of Physics is doing to overcome them.

  1. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  2. Next Generation Driver for Attosecond and Laser-plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, D E; Borot, A; Cardenas, D E; Marcus, G; Gu, X; Herrmann, D; Xu, J; Tan, J; Kormin, D; Ma, G; Dallari, W; Tsakiris, G D; Földes, I B; Chou, S-W; Weidman, M; Bergues, B; Wittmann, T; Schröder, H; Tzallas, P; Charalambidis, D; Razskazovskaya, O; Pervak, V; Krausz, F; Veisz, L

    2017-07-12

    The observation and manipulation of electron dynamics in matter call for attosecond light pulses, routinely available from high-order harmonic generation driven by few-femtosecond lasers. However, the energy limitation of these lasers supports only weak sources and correspondingly linear attosecond studies. Here we report on an optical parametric synthesizer designed for nonlinear attosecond optics and relativistic laser-plasma physics. This synthesizer uniquely combines ultra-relativistic focused intensities of about 10 20  W/cm 2 with a pulse duration of sub-two carrier-wave cycles. The coherent combination of two sequentially amplified and complementary spectral ranges yields sub-5-fs pulses with multi-TW peak power. The application of this source allows the generation of a broad spectral continuum at 100-eV photon energy in gases as well as high-order harmonics in relativistic plasmas. Unprecedented spatio-temporal confinement of light now permits the investigation of electric-field-driven electron phenomena in the relativistic regime and ultimately the rise of next-generation intense isolated attosecond sources.

  3. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas

  4. On coupling fluid plasma and kinetic neutral physics models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The coupled fluid plasma and kinetic neutral physics equations are analyzed through theory and simulation of benchmark cases. It is shown that coupling methods that do not treat the coupling rates implicitly are restricted to short time steps for stability. Fast charge exchange, ionization and recombination coupling rates exist, even after constraining the solution by requiring that the neutrals are at equilibrium. For explicit coupling, the present implementation of Monte Carlo correlated sampling techniques does not allow for complete convergence in slab geometry. For the benchmark case, residuals decay with particle number and increase with grid size, indicating that they scale in a manner that is similar to the theoretical prediction for nonlinear bias error. Progress is reported on implementation of a fully implicit Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov coupling scheme. The present block Jacobi preconditioning method is still sensitive to time step and methods that better precondition the coupled system are under investigation.

  5. Plasma Physics Calculations on a Parallel Macintosh Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decyk, Viktor; Dauger, Dean; Kokelaar, Pieter

    2000-03-01

    We have constructed a parallel cluster consisting of 16 Apple Macintosh G3 computers running the MacOS, and achieved very good performance on numerically intensive, parallel plasma particle-in-cell simulations. A subset of the MPI message-passing library was implemented in Fortran77 and C. This library enabled us to port code, without modification, from other parallel processors to the Macintosh cluster. For large problems where message packets are large and relatively few in number, performance of 50-150 MFlops/node is possible, depending on the problem. This is fast enough that 3D calculations can be routinely done. Unlike Unix-based clusters, no special expertise in operating systems is required to build and run the cluster. Full details are available on our web site: http://exodus.physics.ucla.edu/appleseed/.

  6. Proceedings of the 21st symposium on plasma physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulhanek, P.; Rezac, K.; Smetana, M.

    2004-01-01

    The supplement contains 159 papers out of the 229 papers presented at the conference; these papers were selected through the review process of the Czechoslovak Journal of Physics. The papers are divided into 5 categories corresponding to the main topics of the symposium, which covered all kinds of plasma research and associated applications: tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices; short lived plasmas (plasma focus, z-pinch, X-ray sources); laser plasma; low temperature plasma; and plasma technology. All 22 papers dealing with tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices were submitted to INIS as well as all 31 papers discussing short lived plasmas. (A.K.)

  7. A perspective on the contributions of Ronald C. Davidson to plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2016-10-01

    Starting in the 1960s and continuing for half a century, Ronald C. Davidson made fundamental theoretical contributions to a wide range of areas of pure and applied plasma physics. Davidson was one of the founders of nonneutral plasma physics and a pioneer in developing and applying kinetic theory and nonlinear stability theorems to collective interaction processes and nonlinear dynamics of nonneutral plasmas and intense charged particle beams. His textbooks on nonneutral plasmas are the classic references for the field and educated generations of graduate students. Davidson was a strong advocate for applying the ideas of plasma theory to develop techniques that benefit other branches of science. For example, one of the major derivative fields enabled by nonneutral plasmas is the study of antimatter plasmas and the synthesis of antihydrogen. This talk will review a few highlights of Ronald Davidson's impact on plasma physics and related fields of science.

  8. The third international workshop on the physics and modern applications of lasers 8-20 August, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The document contains 31 abstracts and 7 papers on lasers and optical fibers presented at the 3. international workshop on the physics and modern applications of lasers. The main topics covered include: basics in lasers, geometrical, physical and quantum optics; optical techniques for research, education and development in Africa; application of lasers in optical fibre communication, environmental studies, bio medicine, chemistry, agriculture, engineering and industry. A list of lecturers, participants and programme of activities are also given. (EAA)

  9. Numerical simulation and optimal control in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.

    1989-01-01

    The topics covered in this book are: A free boundary problem: the axisymmetric equilibrium of the plasma in a Tokamak; Static control of the plasma boundary by external currents; Existence and control of a solution to the equilibrium problem in a simple case; Study of equilibrium solution branches and application to the stability of horizontal displacements; Identification of the plasma boundary and plasma current density from magnetic measurements; Evolution of the equilibrium at the diffusion time scale; Evolution of the equilibrium of a high aspect-ratio circular plasma; Stability and control of the horizontal displacement of the plasma

  10. Beam-plasma coupling physics in support of active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Delzanno, G. L.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2017-12-01

    The recent development of compact relativistic accelerators might open up a new era of active experiments in space, driven by important scientific and national security applications. Examples include using electron beams to trace magnetic field lines and establish causality between physical processes occurring in the magnetosphere and those in the ionosphere. Another example is the use of electron beams to trigger waves in the near-Earth environment. Waves could induce pitch-angle scattering and precipitation of energetic electrons, acting as an effective radiation belt remediation scheme. In this work, we revisit the coupling between an electron beam and a magnetized plasma in the framework of linear cold-plasma theory. We show that coupling can occur through two different regimes. In the first, a non-relativistic beam radiates through whistler waves. This is well known, and was in fact the focus of many rockets and space-shuttle campaigns aimed at demonstrating whistler emissions in the eighties. In the second regime, the beam radiates through extraordinary (R-X) modes. Nonlinear simulations with a highly-accurate Vlasov code support the theoretical results qualitatively and demonstrate that the radiated power through R-X modes can be much larger than in the whistler regime. Test-particle simulations in the wave electromagnetic field will also be presented to assess the efficiency of these waves in inducing pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions. Finally, the implications of these results for a rocket active experiment in the ionosphere and for a radiation belt remediation scheme will be discussed.

  11. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  12. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    in hollow cathode dicharges is presented by R Djulgerova (Sofia, Boulgaria). Modelling and experimental results for surface plasmas with an aim to study the kinetics of dissociation are given by V Guerra (Lisboa, Portugal). L Campbell (Adelaide, Australia) describes modelling of a similar kinetics, albeit for a significantly larger ionized gas in his study of electron induced processes in the upper atmosphere. Atmospheric pressure discharges is also the topic of the work of T Gans (Belfast, Northern Ireland andBochum, Germany) but his experiments with atmospheric plasma jet are carried out at sea level and therefore the pressures are significantly higher than those for usual non-equilibrium plasmas. Higher still are the densities in plasmas generated in liquids (for medical purposes) as described in the paper of W Graham (Belfast, Northern Ireland). Another very applied aspect of non-equilibrium plasma is highlighted in a comprehensive review given by S Radovanov (Gloucester, USA) of the basic physics of the non-equilibrium plasma source for implantation of boron (for doping in the manufacture of integrated circuits) . A topical review of diagnostics of dusty particles in rf plasmas is given by I Stefanović, J Winter and colleagues (Bochum, Germany) and includes implications for plasma processing, nanotechnologies and all the way to astrophysics. Transport of particles of similar sizes in the atmosphere and its influence on the pollution of the human environment is presented in the paper by M Tasić (Belgrade, Serbia). Finally a paper that connects both aspects of the workshop, plasma physics and environment, is the review of M Radetić (Belgrade, Serbia) which covers application of low pressure non-equilibrium plasmas in treatment of textiles, not only to reduce the cost and environmental impact of the technology but also to produce filters to purify waters used in the process and in general. The broad range of topics indicates that modern plasma physics is driven

  13. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas

  14. Plasma sheath physics and dose uniformity in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liuhe; Li Jianhui; Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the multiple-grid particle-in-cell code, an advanced simulation model is established to study the sheath physics and dose uniformity along the sample stage in order to provide the theoretical basis for further improvement of enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. At t=7.0 μs, the expansion of the sheath in the horizontal direction is hindered by the dielectric cage. The electron focusing effect is demonstrated by this model. Most of the ions at the inside wall of the cage are implanted into the edge of the sample stage and a relatively uniform ion fluence distribution with a large peak is observed at the end. Compared to the results obtained from the previous model, a higher implant fluence and larger area of uniformity are disclosed.

  15. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  16. WE-G-213-01: Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprawls, P. [Sprawls Educational Foundation (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  17. WE-G-213-01: Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprawls, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics – Perry Sprawls Wilhelm Roentgen is well known for his discovery of x-radiation. What is less known and appreciated is his intensive research following the discovery to determine the characteristics of the “new kind of radiation” and demonstrate its great value for medical purposes. In this presentation we will imagine ourselves in Roentgen’s mind and follow his thinking, including questions and doubts, as he designs and conducts a series of innovative experiments that provided the foundation for the rapid growth of medical physics. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the personal characteristics and work of Prof. Roentgen that establishes him as an inspiring model for the medical physics profession. Observe the thought process and experiments that determined and demonstrated the comprehensive characteristics of x-radiation. The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who were they and what did they do? – Lawrence N. Rothenberg William David Coolidge (1873–1975) William Coolidge was born in Hudson, NY in 1873. He obtained his BS at the Massacusetts Institute of Technology in 1896. Coolidge then went to the University of Leipzig, Germany for graduate study with physicists Paul Drude and Gustave Wiedemann and received a Ph.D. in 1899. While in Germany he met Wilhelm Roentgen. Coolidge returned to the US to teach at MIT where he was associated with Arthur A. Noyes of the Chemistry Department, working on the electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Willis R. Whitney, under whom Coolidge had worked before going to Germany, became head of the newly formed General Electric Research Laboratory and he invited Coolidge to work with him. In 1905, Coolidge joined the staff of the GE laboratory and was associated with it for the remainder of his life. He developed ductile tungsten filaments to replace fragile carbon filaments as the material for electric light

  18. Adaptive plasma for cancer therapy: physics, mechanism and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2017-10-01

    One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is the cancer therapy. The uniqueness of plasma is in its ability to change composition in situ. Plasma self-organization could lead to formation of coherent plasma structures. These coherent structures tend to modulate plasma chemistry and composition, including reactive species, the electric field and charged particles. Formation of coherent plasma structures allows the plasma to adapt to external boundary conditions, such as different cells types and their contextual tissues. In this talk we will explore possibilities and opportunities that the adaptive plasma therapeutic system might offer. We shall define such an adaptive system as a plasma device that is able to adjust the plasma composition to obtain optimal desirable outcomes through its interaction with cells and tissues. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types such as lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin has been demonstrated. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. Recently mechanism of plasma selectivity based on aquaporin hypothesis has been proposed. Aquaporins (AQPs) are the confirmed membrane channels of H2O2 and other large molecules. We have demonstrated that the anti-cancer capacity of plasma could be inhibited by silencing the expression of AQPs. Additional possible cell feedback mechanism was recently discovered. It is associated with production of reactive species during direct CAP treatment by cancer cells. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide by different cells can lead to adaptation of chemistry at the plasma-cell interface based on the cellular input. In particular we have found that the discharge voltage is an important factor affecting the ratio of reactive oxygen species to reactive nitrogen species in the gas phase and this correlates well with effect of hydrogen peroxide production by cells. This work was

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for FY2003. Annual Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carol A.; DeMeo, Anthony R.

    2004-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports at pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  20. The Science on Saturday Program at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, N.; Lamarche, P.; Lagin, L.; Ritter, C.; Carroll, D. L.

    1996-11-01

    The Science on Saturday Program at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory consists of a series of Saturday morning lectures on various topics in science by scientists, engineers, educators, and others with an interesting story. This program has been in existence for over twelve years and has been advertised to and primarily aimed at the high school level. Topics ranging from superconductivity to computer animation and gorilla conservation to pharmaceutical design have been covered. Lecturers from the staff of Princeton, Rutgers, AT and T, Bristol Meyers Squibb, and many others have participated. Speakers have ranged from Nobel prize winners, astronauts, industrialists, educators, engineers, and science writers. Typically, there are eight to ten lectures starting in January. A mailing list has been compiled for schools, science teachers, libraries, and museums in the Princeton area. For the past two years AT and T has sponsored buses for Trenton area students to come to these lectures and an effort has been made to publicize the program to these students. The series has been very popular, frequently overfilling the 300 seat PPPL auditorium. As a result, the lectures are videotaped and broadcast to a large screen TV for remote viewing. Lecturers are encouraged to interact with the audience and ample time is provided for questions.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  2. Remote handling needs of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiltnieks, V.

    1982-07-01

    This report is the result of a Task Force study commissioned by the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP) to investigate the remote handling requirements at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and identify specific areas where CFFTP could offer a contractual or collaborative participation, drawing on the Canadian industrial expertise in remote handling technology. The Task Force reviewed four areas related to remote handling requirements; the TFTR facility as a whole, the service equipment required for remote maintenance, the more complex in-vessel components, and the tritium systems. Remote maintenance requirements both inside the vacuum vessel and around the periphery of the machine were identified as the principal areas where Canadian resources could effectively provide an input, initially in requirement definition, concept evaluation and feasibility design, and subsequently in detailed design and manufacture. Support requirements were identified in such areas as the mock-up facility and a variety of planning studies relating to reliability, availability, and staff training. Specific tasks are described which provide an important data base to the facility's remote handling requirements. Canadian involvement in the areas is suggested where expertise exists and support for the remote handling work is warranted. Reliability, maintenance operations, inspection strategy and decommissioning are suggested for study. Several specific components are singled out as needing development

  3. Conference on atomic processes in high temperature plasmas: a topical conference of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts are included for approximately 100 of the papers presented at the meeting. The following sessions were held at the conference: (1) electron ionization and excitation rates, (2) radiation from low density plasmas, (3) electron-ion cross sections and rates, (4) oscillator strengths and atomic structure, (5) spectroscopy and atomic structure, (6) astrophysical plasmas, (7) particle transport, (8) ion-atom cross sections and rates, (9) wall effects in laboratory plasmas, (10) spectroscopy and photoionization, and (11) radiation from high density plasmas

  4. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  5. Annual review of the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, for fiscal 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Activities of Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, from April 1978 to March 1979, are described in individual short summaries. As a main project, the JIPP T-II program aims at confinement and heating of hot plasmas in a tokamak/stellarator hybrid system. The STP-3 system for high beta pinch plasma has now almost been completed. Installation of the RFC-XX is now complete with the delivery of two rf oscillators for point cusp plugs. In high energy beam experiment, toroidal magnetic configurations maintained by intense relativistic currents were demonstrated. The Nagoya Bumpy Torus is a race track convertible to a circular torus. In parallel with the above research projects, there continued experiments on basic plasma physics, laser-produced plasma, the atomic processes and the surface physics related to the plasma-wall interaction. Theoretical and computational divisions worked in close collaboration with the above. (J.P.N.)

  6. Reinforcing the protection against ionizing radiation in medical uses through following the progress in modern medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junzheng; Li Junli

    2008-01-01

    The medical application of ionizing radiation has the longest history, the most extensive uses and the strongest effect among the multiple applications of ionizing radiation technology. With the development of diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, for instances, the radiology, the interventional radiology, the nuclear medicine, and the radiation oncology; the infrastructures and teambuilding of medical physics in China has been becoming more and more important and urgent. Fortunately, people in relevant fields have already recognized this situation and made lots of progresses in the recent years, for example, the 221 st Xiangshan Science Conference took 'The Development of Medical Physics' as its main topic in 2004; in recent years, a series of regulations and national standards regarding to the quality assurance and radiological protection of medical exposure and the teambuilding of the relevant departments in hospital have been successively issued; the subject of Medical Physics was opened as both undergraduate and graduated courses in more and more universities (Tsinghua University, Peking University etc); the Committee on Medical Physics was enrolled as a new member of the Chinese Physical Society. Modern medical physics should include 4 parts, medical imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, radiation oncology physics, and health physics. Protection against ionizing radiation needs to fully cover the development of medical physics, which includes the protection against ianizing radiation in medical uses. This article emphasizes the improvement of the ionizing radiation protection in medical uses, for marking of 30th anniversary of the Journal of Radiation Protection. (authors)

  7. Theoretical solid-state physics. From the classical models to modern themes of research. 3. upd. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czycholl, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    This book gives an introduction in methods, contents, and results of modern solid-state physics. It is based on the fundamental course of theoretical physics, i. e. presupposed are knowledges in classical mechanics, electrodynamics, and especially quantum mechanics and statistical physics, as they are mediated in the at all German-speaking universities usual course in theoretical physics generally until the end of the 6th special semester. The especially for the treatment of many-body effects unavoidable formalism of the 2nd quantization (occupation number representation) is introduced and used in the book. The content reaches from the classical fields of solid-state physics (phonons and electrons in the periodic potentia, Bloch theorem, Hartree-Fock approximation, electron-phonon interactions) through fields of applications as superconductivity and magnetism until fields, which are actual object of research (for instance quantum Hall effect, high-temperature superconductivity). The third editions was comprehensively revised [de

  8. Students’ attitude to the possibility of applying modern information and communication technologies in the educational process in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Ilnitskaya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the problem of the formation of students’ attitudes toward physical education classes and the application of information and communication technologies in physical education in higher education institutions. Material: in the survey participated 245 students. Results: it was found that according to students in physical education classes with the use of modern technologies are more efficient than traditional occupations (52% are more emotional nature, help to improve mood (28%, helps to provide students the latest up to date information relative health (26 % contribute to increased power consumption of an organism (8%. Conclusion: the need for the development and application of information and communication technologies and non-traditional forms of physical education to improve the effectiveness of the educational process in physical education in higher education institutions.

  9. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  10. Children's Physic: Medical Perceptions and Treatment of Sick Children in Early Modern England, c. 1580-1720.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Hannah

    2010-12-01

    Historians of medicine, childhood and paediatrics have often assumed that early modern doctors neither treated children, nor adapted their medicines to suit the peculiar temperaments of the young. Through an examination of medical textbooks and doctors' casebooks, this article refutes these assumptions. It argues that medical authors and practising doctors regularly treated children, and were careful to tailor their remedies to complement the distinctive constitutions of children. Thus, this article proposes that a concept of 'children's physic' existed in early modern England. This term refers to the notion that children were physiologically distinct, requiring special medical care. Children's physic was rooted in the ancient traditions of Hippocratic and Galenic medicine: it was the child's humoral make-up that underpinned all medical ideas about children's bodies, minds, diseases and treatments. Children abounded in the humour blood, which made them humid and weak, and in need of medicines of a particularly gentle nature.

  11. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  13. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  14. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89)

  15. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

  16. About numerical analysis of a plasma physics problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Cipolatti, R. de

    1985-01-01

    A numerical study on macroscopic equilibrium of a plasma at interior of a tokamak device, considering boundary problems for the case which f(s)=sis presented. The abstract Dirichlet problem enumerating main results which is applied to plasma model is studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Multi-physics modeling of plasma-material interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Ane; Green, David; Canik, John; Younkin, Timothy; Blondel, Sophie; Wirth, Brian; Drobny, Jon; Curreli, Davide

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-material interactions (PMI) can degrade both plasma and material properties. Often, PMI modeling focuses on either the plasma or surface. Here, we present an integrated model with high-fidelity codes coupled within the IPS framework that self-consistently addresses PMI. The model includes, calculation of spatially resolved influx of plasma and impurities to the surface and their implantation; surface erosion and roughening; evolution of implanted species and sub-surface composition; and transport of eroded particles across the plasma and their re-deposition. The model is applied and successfully compared to dedicated PISCES linear device experiments, where a tungsten (W) target was exposed to helium (He) plasma. The present contribution will focus on the analysis of W erosion, He retention and sub-surface gas bubble and surface composition evolution, under the different He plasma conditions across the surface that are calculated by impurity transport modeling. Impact of code coupling, reflected as interplay between surface erosion, fuel / impurity implantation and retention, and evolution of target composition, as well as sensitivity of these processes to plasma exposure conditions is also analyzed in detail. This work is supported by the US DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  18. Field-matter interaction in atomic and plasma physics, from fluctuations to the strongly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benisti, D.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript provides a theoretical description, sometimes illustrated by experimental results, of several examples of field-matter interaction in various domains of physics, showing how the same basic concepts and theoretical methods may be used in very different physics situations. The issues addressed here are nonlinear field-matter interaction in plasma physics within the framework of classical mechanics (with a particular emphasis on wave-particle interaction), the linear analysis of beam-plasma instabilities in the relativistic regime, and the quantum description of laser-atom interaction, including quantum electrodynamics. Novel methods are systematically introduced in order to solve some very old problems, like the nonlinear counterpart of the Landau damping rate in plasma physics, for example. Moreover, our results directly apply to inertial confinement fusion, laser propagation in an atomic vapor, ion acceleration in a magnetized plasma and the physics of the Reversed Field Pinch for magnetic fusion. (author)

  19. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  20. Plasma edge physics in an actively cooled tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.P.; Adamek, A.; Boucher, C.

    2005-01-01

    Tore Supra is a large tokamak with a plasma of circular cross section (major radius 2.4 m and minor radius 0.72 m) lying on a toroidal limiter. Tore Supra's main mission is the development of technology to inject up to 25 MW of microwave heating power and extract it continuously for up to 1000 s in steady state without uncontrolled overheating of, or outgassing from, plasma-facing components. The entire first wall of the tokamak is actively cooled by a high pressure water loop and special carbon fiber composite materials have been designed to handle power fluxes up to 10 MW/m 2 . The edge plasma on open magnetic flux surfaces that intersect solid objects plays an important role in the overall behaviour of the plasma. The transport of sputtered impurity ions and the fueling of the core plasma are largely governed by edge plasma density, temperature, and flow profiles. Measurements of these quantities are becoming more reliable and frequent in many tokamaks, and it has become clear that we do not understand them very well. Classical two-dimensional fluid modelling fails to reproduce many aspects of the experimental observations such as the significant thickness of the edge plasma, and the near-sonic flows that occur where none should be expected. It is suspected that plasma turbulence is responsible for these anomalies. In the Tore Supra tokamak, various kinds of Langmuir probes are used to characterize the edge plasma. We will present original measurements that demonstrate the universality of many phenomena that have been observed in X-point divertor tokamaks, especially concerning the ion flows. As in the JET tokamak, surprisingly large values of parallel Mach number are measured midway between the two strike zones, where one would expect to find nearly stagnant plasma if the particle source were poloidally uniform. We will present results of a novel experiment that provides evidence for a poloidally localized particle and energy source on the outboard midplane of

  1. Theses of the reports of the XXXI Zvenigorod conference on the plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovrizhnykh, L.M.; Ivanov, V.A.; Nagaeva, M.L.; Aleksandrov, A.F.; Vorob'ev, V.S.; Ivanenkov, G.V.; Meshcheryakov, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    Theses of the reports of the 31th Zvenigorod Conference on the physics and controlled thermonuclear synthesis, presented by Russian and foreign scientists, are published. The total number of reports is 258, namely, summarizing ones 16, magnetic confinement of high temperature plasma - 98, inertial thermonuclear synthesis - 44, physical processes in low temperature plasma - 58, physical bases of plasma and beam technologies - 42 [ru

  2. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion; Physique des plasmas thermonucleaires: la fusion par confinement inertiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D

    2001-07-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  3. Laser-plasma interaction physics in the context of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Depierreux, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Baldis, H.A.; Pesme, D.; Myatt, J.; Huller, S.; Laval, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    2000-01-01

    Of vital importance for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are the understanding and control of the nonlinear processes which can occur during the propagation of the laser pulses through the underdense plasma surrounding the fusion capsule. The control of parametric instabilities has been studied experimentally, using LULI six-beam laser facility, and also theoretically and numerically. New results based on the direct observation of plasma waves with Thomson scattering of a short wavelength probe beam have revealed the occurrence of the Langmuir decay instability. This secondary instability may play an important role in the saturation of stimulated Raman scattering. Another mechanism for inducing the growth of the scattering instabilities is the so-called 'plasma-induced incoherence'. Namely, recent theoretical studies have shown that the propagation of laser beams through the underdense plasma can increase their spatial and temporal incoherence. This plasma-induced beam smoothing can reduce the levels of parametric instabilities. One signature of this process is a large increase of the spectral width of the laser light after propagation through the plasma. Comparison of the experimental results with numerical propagation through the plasma. Comparison of the experimental results with numerical simulations shows an excellent agreement between the observed and calculated time-resolved spectra of the transmitted laser light at various laser intensities. (authors)

  4. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  5. Wills Plasma Physics Department annual progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the experimental program using the research tokamak TORTUS is presented. The main thrust of the program is the study of the characteristics of hydromagnetic waves in tokamak plasmas and in the use of such waves in r.f. heating. Work on runaway electron production, on wave propagation in collisional plasmas and on hydromagnetic shock wave studies is reported. Diagnostic techniques and equipment described include a laser interferometer system and techniques based on the observation of resonance fluorescence and near-resonant scattering of a laser beam from atomic species in a plasma

  6. Physics of electron internal transport barrier in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Toda, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.; Diamond, P.H.

    2006-10-01

    The role of zonal flows in the formation of the transport barrier in the helical plasmas is analyzed using the transport code. A set of one-dimensional transport equations is analyzed, including the effect of zonal flows. The turbulent transport coefficient is shown to be suppressed when the plasma state changes from the weak negative radial electric field to the strong positive one. This bifurcation of the turbulent transport is newly caused by the change of the damping rate of zonal flows. It is theoretically demonstrated that the damping rate of zonal flows governs the global confinement in toroidal plasmas. (author)

  7. François Delsarte and Modern Dance: an encounter in physical expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Teixeira de Souza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses François Delsarte’s system of expression, known as Applied Aesthetics. It presents data related to François Delsarte’s career, such as personal and professional life and his theoretical background. It discusses the laws of gestural expression formulated by Delsarte – Trinity Law, the Law of Correspondence and the Nine Laws of Motion – as well as their dissemination and utilization in modern dance; this discussion mentions some pioneers of modern dance, such as Isadora Duncan, Ruth Saint Denis, Ted Shawn, Vaslav Nijinsky, Rudolf Laban and Mary Wigman.

  8. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  9. Wills Plasma Physics Department annual progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Progess is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following areas: comissioning of the TORTUS research tokamak, plasma diagnostics, non-linear hydromagnetic waves and shock waves, and laser and gyrotron diagnostics

  10. Physics and technology of large plasma focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the plasma focus (PF) which produces a high temperature (0,5 to 1 keV), high density (5 · 10 18 cm -3 ), short living (up to 500 ns) fusion plasma in a very simple and cheap device. In the focus plasma, fusion processes take place with an energy efficiency which is not surpassed even by large Tokamak or Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. But this fusion efficiency and the high fusion neutron yield are not the only impetus to PF research. Due to the high energy density in the focus plasma (j ≥ 10 6 A/cm 2 exclamation point), many very interesting, mostly nonlinear phenomena take place which led to high intensity electron, ion and radiation emission. Micro- and macro instabilities, turbulence and selforganization processes develop. Most of these phenomena are not or only poorly understood

  11. Perspectives in Quantum Physics: Epistemological, Ontological and Pedagogical--An Investigation into Student and Expert Perspectives on the Physical Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, with Implications for Modern Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A common learning goal for modern physics instructors is for students to recognize a difference between the experimental uncertainty of classical physics and the fundamental uncertainty of quantum mechanics. Our studies suggest this notoriously difficult task may be frustrated by the intuitively "realist" perspectives of introductory…

  12. Progress report: Plasma Physics Division (July 1985 to March 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Thakur, A.V.; Viswanadam, C.

    1991-01-01

    The report summarizes the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period July 1985 to March 1990. The R and D activites are reported under the headings: 1) Thermal Plasma, 2) Electron Beam Technology, and 3) Industrial Design Section. A list of scientific and technical staff working in the different sections of the Division is also given. (author)

  13. Unmatter Plasma Discovered (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The electron-positron beam plasma was generated in the laboratory in the beginning of 2015. This experimental fact shows that unmatter, a new form of matter that is formed by matter and antimatter bind together (mathematically predicted a decade ago really exists. That is the electron-positron plasma experiment of 2015 is the experimentum crucis verifying the mathematically predicted unmatter.

  14. The BEAR program NRL plasma physics instrumentation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.N.; Baumback, M.M.; Haas, D.G.; Rodriguez, P.; Siefring, C.L.; Doggett, R.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1989-11-15

    The BEAR program was a joint effort to launch, and demonstrate the feasibility of operating, a 1 MeV 10 ma Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) accelerator from a space platform. The accelerator design and manufacture were the responsibility of Los Alamos National Lab (LANL); diagnostics associated with accelerator operation and beam-plasma effects were also to be undertaken by LANL and NRL. Payload Integration and Telemetry was provided by the Air Force Geophysical Lab (AFGL) and Northeastern University (NEU). Beam effects on the local plasma in addition to accelerator produced vehicle effects (e.g., charging) were the responsibility of NRL as outlined herein. The BEAR rocket was launched successfully during the early morning hours of July 13 from White Sands Missile Range, White Sands, N.M. The NRL contribution to this effort included three instrument packages designed to diagnose beam-plasma and vehicle-plasma interactions. The instruments included: (1) Langmuir probe (LP) design consisting of 4 separate sensors; (2) High voltage (HIV) Langmuir Probe designed to monitor vehicle charging through current polarity changes; and (3) Plasma Wave Receive (PWR) designed to characterize the plasma wave emissions covering a broad frequency range from near DC to 50 MHz.

  15. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  16. Annual review of Plasma Physics Laboratory, Kyoto University, April, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The devices for additionally heating joul-heated plasma in the Heliotron E, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating and neutral beam injection, were in operation in 1982. In the ECRH experiment, the microwaves of 200 kW at 28 GHz were generated by a gyrotron, but the pulse width was extended from 10 ms to 40 ms this year. By this, a currentless plasma of Te-1 keV was achieved. In the NB1 experiment, the neutral beam of about 1.5 MW was injected into joule-heated plasma, and the plasma of Ti(O)-950 eV, Te(O)-800 eV and Ne = 3 x 10 19 /m 3 was attained. The first experiment to inject neutral beam into ECRH currentless plasma was carried out. By this method, the density of the plasma increased as well as the ion temperature and electron temperature. As to the theory, a critical beta was calculated by using stellarator expansion, which should be 3 to 7 % in the Heliotron E. Two gyrotrons of 200 kW at 53 GHz each and an ion cyclotron resonance heating equipment of 1.5 MW at 26.7 MHz are prepared. As to the reactor study, the design of Heliotron H in the first phase was completed. The location of impurity sources in NB1 ion sources and beam lines was found. (Kako, I.)

  17. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010) both agreed to hold this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, considering the celebration of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of its official program, within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial activities. This event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project `Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4', supported by the National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya in 1980, and was followed by: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006) and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss recent progress and outlooks in plasma science, covering fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, plasma applications, etc. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005) and Caracas (2007). The purpose of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is to provide a forum in which the achievements of the Latin American plasma physics communities can be displayed, as well as to foster collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The Program of ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included

  18. Proceedings of the 20th symposium on plasma physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The supplement contains 133 papers from those presented at the conference; these papers were selected through the review process of the Czechoslovak Journal of Physics. The papers are divided into 5 categories corresponding to the main topics of the symposium, which covered all kinds of plasma research and associated applications: tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices; short lived plasmas (plasma focus, z-pinch, particle beamplasma interaction, Xray sources); laser plasma and research at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS); low temperature plasma; and plasma technology. All 10 papers dealing with tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices were submitted to INIS, as were 17 papers out of the 28 papers discussing short lived plasmas. (A.K.)

  19. Using packaged software for solving two differential equation problems that arise in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Experience in using packaged numerical software for solving two related problems that arise in Plasma physics is described. These problems are (i) the solution of the reduced resistive MHD equations and (ii) the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation

  20. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.