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Sample records for plasma oxidation-reduction potential

  1. Oxidation-reduction potentials of different chlorophylls in methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.; Horreus de Haas, G.H.; Schuller, P.

    1958-01-01

    It was found that the reversible decolorisation of some chlorophylls upon the subsequent addition of ferric and ferrous salts, as originally measured by Rabinowtich and Weiss for chlorophyll a, proceeded at a reproducible oxidation-reduction potential. A marked difference was found to occur

  2. Oxidation-reduction potentials of different chlorophylls in methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.; Horreus de Haas, G.H.; Schuller, P.

    1958-01-01

    It was found that the reversible decolorisation of some chlorophylls upon the subsequent addition of ferric and ferrous salts, as originally measured by Rabinowtich and Weiss for chlorophyll a, proceeded at a reproducible oxidation-reduction potential. A marked difference was found to occur between

  3. Selected constants oxidation-reduction potentials of inorganic substances in aqueous solution

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G; Marchon, M J C

    2013-01-01

    Selected Constants: Oxidation-reduction Potentials of Inorganic Substances in Aqueous Solution presents tables that will aid chemists in finding the best or most probable value of the normal or formal oxidation-reduction potential of oxidation-reduction systems. The book first presents numerical calculations that show the degree of oxidation and real oxidation-reduction systems, including the value of the potential, temperature, nature and composition of the medium, and the method of determination used. The text then takes a look at the choice of data, as well as intensity/potential curves an

  4. Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Stagos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP and capacity ORP (cORP oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  5. Assessment of eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress using oxidation-reduction potential markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  6. ANAEROBIC DDT BIOTRANSFORMATION: ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF SURFACTANTS AND LOW OXIDATION REDUCTION POTENTIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhancement of anaerobic DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane) biotransformation by mixed cultures was studied with application of surfactants and oxidation reduction potential reducing agents. Without amendments, DDT transformation resulted mainly in the pr...

  7. Oxidation-reduction potential and its influence on Cheddar cheese quality

    OpenAIRE

    Caldeo, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction (redox) potential is a fundamental physicochemical parameter that affects the growth of microorganisms in dairy products and contributes to a balanced flavour development in cheese. Even though redox potential has an important impact on the quality of dairy products, it is not usually monitored in dairy industry. The aims of this thesis were to develop practical methods for measuring redox potential in cheese, to provide detailed information on changes in redox potential d...

  8. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B. Bjugstad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI. Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP. Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p≤0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS. Antioxidant capacity (icORP on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p<0.05. Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients’ response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  9. Standard test method for measurement of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure and related test equipment for measuring oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil samples removed from the ground. 1.2 The procedure in Section 9 is appropriate for field and laboratory measurements. 1.3 Accurate measurement of oxidation-reduction potential aids in the analysis of soil corrosivity and its impact on buried metallic structure corrosion rates. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. Development of Linear Irreversible Thermodynamic Model for Oxidation Reduction Potential in Environmental Microbial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong-Bang; Kumar, Mathava; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2007-01-01

    Nernst equation has been directly used to formulate the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of reversible thermodynamic conditions but applied to irreversible conditions after several assumptions and/or modifications. However, the assumptions are sometimes inappropriate in the quantification of ORP in nonequilibrium system. We propose a linear nonequilibrium thermodynamic model, called microbial related reduction and oxidation reaction (MIRROR Model No. 1) for the interpretation of ORP in biological process. The ORP was related to the affinities of catabolism and anabolism. The energy expenditure of catabolism and anabolism was directly proportional to overpotential (η), straight coefficient of electrode (LEE), and degree of coupling between catabolism and ORP electrode, respectively. Finally, the limitations of MIRROR Model No. 1 were discussed for expanding the applicability of the model. PMID:17496027

  11. Estimation of the Postmortem Interval by Measuring Blood Oxidation-reduction Potential Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuqing Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI is an important task in forensic practice. In the last half-century, the use of postmortem biochemistry has become an important ancillary method in determining the time of death. The present study was carried out to determine the correlation between blood oxidation-reduction potential (ORP values and PMIs, and to develop a three-dimensional surface equation to estimate the PMI under various temperature conditions. A total of 48 rabbits were placed into six groups and sacrificed by air embolism. Blood was obtained from the right ventricle of each rabbit, and specimens were stored at 10°C, 15°C, 20°C, 25°C, 30°C, and 35°C. At different PMIs (once every 4 h, the blood ORP values were measured using a PB-21 electrochemical analyzer. Statistical analysis and curve fitting of the data yielded cubic polynomial regression equations and a surface equation at different temperatures. Result: The results showed that there was a strong positive correlation between the blood ORP values at different temperatures and the PMI. This study provides another example of using a three-dimensional surface equation as a tool to estimate the PMI at various temperature conditions.

  12. Influence of protein interactions on oxidation/reduction midpoint potentials of cofactors in natural and de novo metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed throughout this special issue, oxidation and reduction reactions play critical roles in the function of many organisms. In photosynthetic organisms, the conversion of light energy drives oxidation and reduction reactions through the transfer of electrons and protons in order to create energy-rich compounds. These reactions occur in proteins such as cytochrome c, a heme-containing water-soluble protein, the bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction center, and photosystem II where water is oxidized at the manganese cluster. A critical measure describing the ability of cofactors in proteins to participate in such reactions is the oxidation/reduction midpoint potential. In this review, the basic concepts of oxidation/reduction reactions are reviewed with a summary of the experimental approaches used to measure the midpoint potential of metal cofactors. For cofactors in proteins, the midpoint potential not only depends upon the specific chemical characteristics of cofactors but also upon interactions with the surrounding protein, such as the nature of the coordinating ligands and protein environment. These interactions can be tailored to optimize an oxidation/reduction reaction carried out by the protein. As examples, the midpoint potentials of hemes in cytochromes, bacteriochlorophylls in reaction centers, and the manganese cluster of photosystem II are discussed with an emphasis on the influence that protein interactions have on these potentials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  13. Soil Oxidation-Reduction Potential and Plant Photosynthetic Capacity in the Northern Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathuilliere, M. J.; Johnson, M. S.; Dalmagro, H. J.; Pinto Junior, O. B.; Couto, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Plant communities of the Pantanal wetland are able to survive long periods of climatic and physiological stress in the dry and wet seasons. During inundation, soil oxygen demand increases dramatically as reducing soil conditions create stress in the root system with possible impacts on photosynthetic capacity of plants. We look at inundation cycles of a tree island (locally known as a cordilheira) in the Northern Pantanal near Poconé, Mato Grosso, and relate soil oxidation-reduction potential and soil oxygen depletion to the photosynthetic capacity of two plant communities of flooded scrub forest (Vochysia divergens and Curatela americana). Results show a drop in soil oxidation-reduction potential of over 400 mV, to levels below the absolute value of -200 mV, following inundation around the tree island. Both plant species showed increased carbon assimilation at highest soil oxygen demand despite a change in stomatal conductance, suggesting adaptation to the inundated environment. Absolute values of soil oxidation-reduction potential also allow for the determination of specific soil chemical reactions characteristic of the tree island environment, namely the reduction of iron(III), or carbon dioxide which in turn produces methane. Our combined analysis of soil chemistry with plant ecophysiology allows for a better understanding of soil-plant interactions in the Pantanal, specifically the drivers of biogeochemical processes between inundation periods.

  14. On the Significance of a Carbon-Rich Background in Plasma-Based Graphene Oxide Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    backgrounds; electron-ion recombination (e.g. H2+ + e-  2H) in the bulk plasma adds an additional loss channel when molecular gases are introduced...relatively low H2 neutral density, a significant amount ionic H-containing species (as well as reactive neutrals) will be produced and delivered to the

  15. Requirement of low oxidation-reduction potential for photosynthesis in a blue-green alga (Phormidium sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, D; Doemel, W; Brock, T D

    1975-06-20

    Photosynthesis in a Phormidium species which forms dense conical-shaped structures in thermal springs is strongly inhibited by aeration but is stimulated by sulfide and other agents (cysteine, thioglycolate, sulfite) which lower the oxidation-reduction potential. The compact structures which this alga forms in nature may restrict oxygen penetration from the enviroment so that the anaerobic or microaerophilic conditions necessary ofr photosynthesis can develop. The alga may be defective in a regulatory mechanism that controls the reoxidation of reduced pyridine nucleotides formed during photosynthesis. It is suggested that other mat-forming and benthic blue-green algae may also prefer anaerobib conditions for growth and photosynthesis.

  16. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  17. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  18. [Growth and proton-potassium exchange in Enterococcus hirae: protonophore effect and the role of oxidation-reduction potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poladian, A; Kirakosian, G; Trchunian, A

    2006-01-01

    Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 are able to grow under anaerobic conditions during the fermentation of sugars (pH 8.0) in the presence of the protonophore carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone at a lesser specific growth rate. As bacteria grow, the acidification of the external medium and a drop in the redox potential from positive to negative (up to -220 mV) values occur. The reducer dithiothreitol, which maintains the negative values of the redox potential, increases the growth rate and acidification of the medium, recovering thereby the effect of the protonophore (without interacting with it). Conversely, the impermeable oxidizer ferricyanide, while maintaining positive values of the redox potential, inhibits the bacterial growth. These results indicate the role of the proton-motive force and importance of reducing processes in bacterial growth. The proton-potassium exchange is inhibited by carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydazone but is restored with dithiothreitol. Dithiothreiol is able to substitute the proton-motive force; however, ferricyanide and dithiothreitol may also directly affect the bacterial membrane.

  19. Cholesterol-lowering and lipid oxidation reduction potentials of traditional seasonings in Salchichon dry-fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Pil-Nam; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Ga-Young; Cho, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Yoon-Seok; Kang, Sun-Moon; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Park, Beom-Young; Van-Ba, Hoa

    2016-08-01

    Five different natural/traditional seasonings including doenjang (fermented soybean paste), gochu-jang (red pepper paste), fresh medium-hot and hot peppers, and garlic were used, and 1 % (w/w) each was incorporated into formulations of Salchichon fermented sausage type. After ripening for 51 days, the products were assessed for quality parameters, lipid oxidation, cholesterol content and sensory characteristics. In general, incorporation of the seasonings did not cause color or texture defects whereas it had beneficial effects on improvement of product's quality; however the effects differed depending on each type of seasonings added. Noticeably, most treatments with the seasonings significantly reduced the lipid oxidation. Additionally, incorporating doenjang, gochu-jang, medium-hot peppers, hot peppers and garlic resulted in reduction of 32.03, 28.96, 36.30, 19.53 and 33.03 mg cholesterol/100 g sample, corresponding to 26.78, 24.21, 30.35, 16.33 and 27.61 %, respectively. Higher scores for the sensory traits such as aroma, taste, color and acceptability were also observed for the samples with seasonings. The current work demonstrated that the tested seasonings represent potentially natural ingredients for producing healthier Salchichon fermented sausages.

  20. Oxidation reduction potential as a parameter to regulate micro-oxygen injection into anaerobic digester for reducing hydrogen sulphide concentration in biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Long D; Manassa, Patrick; Dawson, Marcia; Fitzgerald, Shona K

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) to regulate the injection of a small amount of oxygen into an anaerobic digester for reducing H2S concentration in biogas. The results confirm that micro-oxygen injection can be effective for controlling H2S formation during anaerobic digestion without disturbing the performance of the digester. Biogas production, composition, and the removal of volatile solids (VS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were monitored to assessment the digester's performance. Six days after the start of the micro-oxygen injection, the ORP values increased to between -320 and -270 mV, from the natural baseline value of -485 mV. Over the same period the H2S concentration in the biogas decreased from over 6000 ppm to just 30 ppm. No discernible changes in the VS and COD removal rates, pH and alkalinity of the digestate or in the biogas production or composition were observed.

  1. Oxidation-reduction potential and lipid oxidation in ready-to-eat blue mussels in red sauce: criteria for package design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Kanishka; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Rasco, Barbara; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2017-01-01

    Ready-to-eat in-package pasteurized blue mussels in red sauce requires refrigerated storage or in combination with an aerobic environment to prevent the growth of anaerobes. A low barrier packaging may create an aerobic environment; however, it causes lipid oxidation in mussels. Thus, evaluation of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) (aerobic/anaerobic nature of food) and lipid oxidation is essential. Three packaging materials with oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of 62 (F-62), 40 (F-40) and 3 (F-3) cm(3) m(-2) day(-1) were selected for this study. Lipid oxidation was measured by color changes in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 532 nm (TBARS@532) and 450 nm (TBARS@450). Significantly higher (P packaged in higher OTR film. TBARS@450 in mussels packaged with F-62 and F-40 gradually increased during refrigerated storage (3.5 ± 0.5 °C), but remained constant after 20 days of storage for mussels packaged with F-3. The Eh of pasteurized sauce was not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by OTR and remained negative (packaged with higher OTR film. Mussels packed with high OTR film showed higher lipid oxidation, indicating that high barrier film is required for packaging of mussels. Pasteurized mussels must be kept in refrigerated storage to prevent growth of anaerobic proteolytic C. botulinum spores under temperature abuse. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Outer cell surface components essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica A; Lovley, Derek R; Tremblay, Pier-Luc

    2013-02-01

    Geobacter species are important Fe(III) reducers in a diversity of soils and sediments. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction have been studied in detail in Geobacter sulfurreducens, but a number of the most thoroughly studied outer surface components of G. sulfurreducens, particularly c-type cytochromes, are not well conserved among Geobacter species. In order to identify cellular components potentially important for Fe(III) oxide reduction in Geobacter metallireducens, gene transcript abundance was compared in cells grown on Fe(III) oxide or soluble Fe(III) citrate with whole-genome microarrays. Outer-surface cytochromes were also identified. Deletion of genes for c-type cytochromes that had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxides and/or were detected in the outer-surface protein fraction identified six c-type cytochrome genes, that when deleted removed the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Several of the c-type cytochromes which were essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens have homologs in G. sulfurreducens that are not important for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Other genes essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction included a gene predicted to encode an NHL (Ncl-1-HT2A-Lin-41) repeat-containing protein and a gene potentially involved in pili glycosylation. Genes associated with flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis, and pili had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxide, consistent with the previously proposed importance of these components in Fe(III) oxide reduction. These results demonstrate that there are similarities in extracellular electron transfer between G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens but the outer-surface c-type cytochromes involved in Fe(III) oxide reduction are different.

  3. 水体中高铁酸钾氧化还原电位的动态变化以及对鱼类的毒性研究%The Dynamic Variation of Potassium Ferrite (K2FeO4) on Oxidation-reduction Potential (ORP) and its Toxicology to Fish in Aquatic Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘丽萍; 吴伟

    2012-01-01

    To discuss the dynamic variation of potassium ferrite (K2FeO4) on oxidation-reduction potential (Oxidation- Reduction Potential, ORP) and its acute toxicology to fish; the experiment measured the dose, time, and pH depended-ORP of K2Fe04, and its acute toxicology to carp (Cyprinus carpio), tilapia (Oreochromis aureus), and zebra fish (Brochydaino rerio). The results showed that: ORP in aquatic environment positively depended on the concentration of K2Fe04 when it was dissolved into aquatic environment. ORP in aquatic environment decreased to the minimum concentration and reached to steady state after 48 h. The effect of pH to ORP was also very evident; the details showed that the decrease rate in alkaline water was higher than that one in acidity and neutral water. Different fish had different toxicology to K2FeO4, the 96 h LC50 to carp, tilapia fish, zebra fish was 156.36, 145.31, 123.74 mg/L respectively, and the toxic effect occurred before 48 hours, and disappeared in 48-96 h. The experiment showed that the toxic effect to fish directly depended on the ORP of K2FeO4 in aquatic environment, the toxic effect of K2FeO4 to fish was caused by the strong oxidizing property.%为了探讨高铁酸钾在水环境中氧化还原电位(Oxidation- Reduction Potential,简称ORP)的动态变化及其对不同种属鱼类的急性毒性效应.实验测定了ORP在水环境中随浓度、时间、pH变化的数值,并采用静水式急性毒性试验法研究了高铁酸钾对鲤鱼、罗非鱼、斑马鱼的急性毒性.结果显示:高铁酸钾进入水环境后,水体ORP与高铁酸钾的初始浓度呈正相关,并逐渐降低,至48h后达到最低值;pH对ORP有一定的影响,碱性水体中ORP的下降速率快于酸性和中性水体.高铁酸钾对不同的鱼类表现出不同的毒性作用,其对鲤鱼、罗非鱼、斑马鱼的96 h LC50值分别为156.36、145.31、123.74mg/L,且毒性效应表现在鱼体接触染毒物质后的48 h内,在48~96 h不表现毒

  4. On Improving Impedance Probe Plasma Potential Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-21

    assumption of a collisionless, stationary Maxwellian plasma and are seen to work well in non -flowing plasmas of sufficient density. However, as plasma...collection area. For Maxwellian electrons, np = n exp(Vp-φp)/Te and so at low frequency from Eq. (1) above, the resistive component of the ac

  5. Thermodynamic constraints on microbial iron oxide reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, S.; Behrends, T.; Haese, R.; van Cappellen, P.

    2003-04-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit large surface areas which bind trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules. Under suboxic conditions, iron oxides can reductively dissolve via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. The aim of our study was to determine the thermodynamic energy yields of dissimilatory iron reduction for different Fe(III) substrates. We used the facultative anaerobic gram-positive bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens as model iron reducing bacterium, with ferrihydrite, hematite, goethite or Fe(III)-salicylate as electron acceptor, and lactate as electron donor. Experiments were conducted in an anaerobic pH-stat batch reactor, equipped with a polarographic electrode to monitor in situ the dissolved ferrous iron activity. The stoichiometry of total Fe(II) production and acid consumption during the experiments indicated that lactate was oxidized to acetate. From the Fe(II) activity and redox potential measurements, free energy yields were calculated for Fe(III) reduction coupled to lactate oxidation. The results showed that the redox potential of the overall reaction was poised by equilibrium between the Fe(III)-substrate and aqueous Fe(II). Hence, the energy yields decreased in the order ferrihydrite > Fe(III)-salicylate > hematite > goethite. Accumulation of Fe(II) in solution only caused small decreases in the energy yields over the course of the experiments. Cessation of iron reduction, which was observed in all experiments, was therefore not due to thermodynamic limitation, but more likely reflected the decline in cell level of activity.

  6. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  7. Parameters influencing plasma column potential in a reflex discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liziakin, G. D.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Murzaev, Y. A.; Usmanov, R. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-12-01

    Distribution of electrostatic potential in direct current reflex discharge plasma has been studied experimentally. Measurements have been conducted by the single floating probe method. The influence of 0-0.2 T magnetic field, 1-200 mTorr pressure, 0-2 kV discharge voltage, and electrodes geometry on plasma column electrostatic potential was investigated. The possibility for the formation of a preset potential profile required for the realization of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel was demonstrated.

  8. Bending and Focusing with Plasmas and Crystals - Potential and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    This talk review the potential of plasmas and crystals for focusing and bending high-energy charged particle beams. It covers topics like plasma lenses, plasma wigglers, plasma dipoles, crystal channeling & reflection, radiation in crystals, crystal accelerators, crystalline beams and ultimate limitations. Past, ongoing or required R&D efforts are highlighted. Invited presentation at EuCARD'13 "Visions for the Future of Particle Accelerators," CERN, 11 June 2013.

  9. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-05-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produces large (about 25 cm diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense ({gt}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7 cm (5 in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed.

  10. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  11. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Naryshkin, R; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Naryshkin, Roman

    2007-01-01

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  12. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Naryshkin, Roman

    2007-02-01

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  13. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  14. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Schechter, D.E.; Stirling, W.L.

    1990-03-01

    An electric cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produces large (about 25-cm- diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}--cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Following a brief review of the large plasma source developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the configuration and operation of the source are described and a discharge model is presented. Results from this new ECR plasma source and potential applications for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Oxide reduction during triggered-lightning fulgurite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. E.; Jones, K. S.; Rambo, K. J.; Rakov, V. A.; Jerald, J.; Uman, M. A.

    2005-03-01

    In this study triggered-lightning induced fulgurites were formed in 99.9% pure binary oxides of manganese (MnO) and nickel (NiO) in order to study oxide reduction mechanisms. The fulgurite formation process involved packing the oxide in PVC holders and using the standard rocket-and-wire technique to trigger a lightning strike through the oxide at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Camp Blanding, Florida. These two oxides were chosen from the thermodynamic extrapolation of the oxide stability using the Ellingham Diagram. This diagram indicates that NiO is significantly less stable than MnO. Fulgurites from the pure oxides were analyzed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM); secondary electron images, backscattered images and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to determine the microstructure and composition of the fulgurites. SEM/EDS analysis of the NiO and MnO prior to fulgurite formation confirmed they were pure binary oxides with no metallic contamination. After fulgurite formation, it was found that the nickel oxide fulgurite contained metallic nickel particles; the manganese oxide fulgurite showed no metallic phase formation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination confirmed that the MnO was a pure oxide with no sign of metallic phase formation. However, TEM results of the NiO showed that approximately 50% of the NiO was reduced to metallic face-centered cubic Ni. The Ni and NiO were observed to be coherent with the [1 0 0]Ni//[1 0 0]NiO and [1 1 0]Ni//[1 1 0]NiO. These results are consistent with the aforementioned thermodynamic stability calculations and show that the presence of carbonaceous material or mixtures of oxides is not necessary for oxide reduction during fulgurite formation. These studies do not rule out the possibility that electrolysis plays a role in oxide reduction. However, these fulgurites were made simultaneously during the same lightning strike and therefore were subjected to the same

  16. Negative plasma potential relative to electron-emitting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanell, M D

    2013-09-01

    Most works on plasma-wall interaction predict that with strong electron emission, a nonmonotonic "space-charge-limited" (SCL) sheath forms where the plasma potential is positive relative to the wall. We show that a fundamentally different sheath structure is possible where the potential monotonically increases toward a positively charged wall that is shielded by a single layer of negative charge. No ion-accelerating presheath exists in the plasma and the ion wall flux is zero. An analytical solution of the "inverse sheath" regime is demonstrated for a general plasma-wall system where the plasma electrons and emitted electrons are Maxwellian with different temperatures. Implications of the inverse sheath effect are that (a) the plasma potential is negative, (b) ion sputtering vanishes, (c) no charge is lost at the wall, and (d) the electron energy flux is thermal. To test empirically what type of sheath structure forms under strong emission, a full plasma bounded by strongly emitting walls is simulated. It is found that inverse sheaths form at the walls and ions are confined in the plasma. This result differs from past particle-in-cell simulation studies of emission which contain an artificial "source sheath" that accelerates ions to the wall, leading to a SCL sheath at high emission intensity.

  17. Awakening the potential of plasma acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Civil engineering has begun for the new AWAKE experiment, which looks to push the boundaries of particle acceleration. This proof-of-principle experiment will harness the power of wakefields generated by proton beams in plasma cells, producing accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current RF cavities.   Civil engineering works are currently ongoing at the AWAKE facility. As one of CERN's accelerator R&D experiments, the AWAKE project is rather unique. Like all of CERN's experiments, AWAKE is a collaborative endeavour with institutes and organisations participating around the world. "But unlike fixed-target experiments, where the users take over once CERN has delivered the facility, in AWAKE, the synchronised proton, electron and laser beams provided by CERN are an integral part of the experiment," explains Edda Gschwendtner, CERN AWAKE project leader. "So, of course, CERN's involvement in the project goes well...

  18. Effect of Substrate Potential on Plasma Parameters of Magnetic Multicusp Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Goto, Masahiro

    1998-06-01

    The effect of substrate potential on plasmas produced in a magnetic multicusp plasma source has been studied experimentally. Plasma parameters such as electron temperature and plasma potential are estimated from electron energy distribution function numerically calculated from probe current-voltage characteristics. For a substrate potential of -150 V with respect to the source chamber, which is much lower than substrate floating potentials, the plasma parameters are not affected by the application of the potential. However, for the case where the substrate is shorted with the source chamber, the high energy component of electrons significantly decreases in comparison with the floating case leading to the reduction of electron temperature. In this case, plasma potential is positive with respect to the substrate to suppress electron loss but its absolute value is only of the order of electron temperature in eV, which is much lower than the potential between the plasma and the substrate in the floating case. This discharge mode could be advantageous in significantly reducing the ion impact energy to the substrate plate.

  19. Interaction potential of microparticles in a plasma: role of collisions with plasma particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapak, S A; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-10-01

    The interaction potential of two charged microparticles in a plasma is studied. Violation of the plasma equilibrium around the dust particles due to plasma-particle inelastic collisions results in three effects: long-range (non-Yukawa) electrostatic repulsion, attraction due to ion shadowing, and attraction or repulsion due to neutral shadowing (depending on the sign of the temperature difference between the particle surface and neutral gas). An analytical expression for the total potential is obtained and compared with previous theoretical results. The relative contribution of these effects is studied in two limiting cases-an isotropic bulk plasma and the plasma sheath region. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental results on pair particle interaction. The possibility of the so-called dust molecule formation is discussed.

  20. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada) and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2J 2W9 (Canada)]. E-mail: abuchel@perimeterinstitute.ca; Naryshkin, Roman [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kiev National University, Prosp. Glushkova 6, Kiev 03022 (Ukraine)

    2007-02-08

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  1. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  2. Stabilized tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  3. SNS potential with exchange field in quantum dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeba, I.; Batool, Maryam; Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Rozina, Ch

    2017-02-01

    The shielding potential of a static test charge is studied in quantum dusty plasmas. The plasma system consisting upon electrons, ions and negatively static charged dust species, is embedded in an ambient magnetic field. The modified equation of dispersion is derived using quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) for magnetized plasmas. The quantum effects are inculcated through Fermi degenerate pressure, tunneling effect and exchange-correlation effects. The study of shielding is important to know the existence of the silence zones in space and astrophysical objects as well as crystal formation. The graphical description of the normalized potential depict the significance of the exchange and correlation effects arising through spin and other variables on the shielding potential.

  4. Screened Coulomb potential in a flowing magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Joost, Jan-Philip; Kählert, Hanno; Arran, Christopher; Bonitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic potential of a moving dust grain in a complex plasma with magnetized ions is computed using linear response theory, thereby extending our previous work for unmagnetized plasmas [P. Ludwig et al., New J. Phys. 14, 053016 (2012)]. In addition to the magnetic field, our approach accounts for a finite ion temperature as well as ion-neutral collisions. Our recently introduced code \\texttt{Kielstream} is used for an efficient calculation of the dust potential. Increasing the magnetization of the ions, we find that the shape of the potential crucially depends on the Mach number $M$. In the regime of subsonic ion flow ($M1$ the magnetic field effectively suppresses the plasma wakefield.

  5. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  6. Measurements of Plasma Potential Distribution in Segmented Electrode Hall Thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    Use of a segmented electrode placed at the Hall thruster exit can substantially reduce the voltage potential drop in the fringing magnetic field outside the thruster channel. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of this effect on thruster operating conditions and segmented electrode configuration. A fast movable emissive probe is used to measure plasma potential in a 1 kW laboratory Hall thruster with semented electrodes made of a graphite material. Relatively small probe-induced perturbations of the thruster discharge in the vicinity of the thruster exit allow a reasonable comparison of the measured results for different thruster configurations. It is shown that the plasma potential distribution is almost not sensitive to changes of the electrode potential, but depends on the magnetic field distribution and the electrode placement.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stransky, M., E-mail: stransky@fzu.cz [Department of Radiation and Chemical Physics, Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  8. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  9. Potential Barrier around an Emitting Body an a Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonio; Luca Delzanno, Gian; Sorasio, Gianfranco; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2005-10-01

    We present a self-consistent, kinetic theory for the charging and shielding of an object at rest in a collisionless plasma [1]. The body is an electron emitter according to thermionic emission, photoemission or secondary emission. The theory is formulated for positively charged bodies, derived under the assumption of spherical symmetry so that conservation of energy and angular momentum can be used to calculate the plasma distribution functions at any given point in phase space. Far away from the body the plasma is assumed unperturbed, described by a Maxwellian distribution function at rest. Thus, the unperturbed plasma acts as a source of particles balancing the absorptions from the body and a steady state is eventually reached. The theory is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations [1-2]. Further on, several cases (focusing on parameters typical of laboratory experiments) are presented for the three different emission mechanisms, showing that shielding potentials having an attractive well are possible for all of them.[1] G. L. Delzanno, A. Bruno, G. Sorasio, G. Lapenta, Phys. Plasmas 12, 062102 (2005).[2] G. L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (3), 035002 (2004).

  10. Reduction in plasma potential by applying negative DC cathode bias in RF magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Masao; Yamada, Toshinori; Osuga, Kosuke; Shindo, Haruo

    2016-11-01

    We applied a negative DC bias voltage to the cathode of an RF magnetron sputtering system and successfully reduced the plasma potential in both argon plasma and hydrogen-diluted argon plasma. The crystallinity of the deposited Ge films is improved by increasing the negative DC bias voltage. It is indicated that the reduction in plasma potential is effective for reducing the plasma damage on deposited materials, caused by the electric potential between the plasma and substrates. In addition, the deposition rate is increased by the increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode owing to the negative DC bias voltage. The present method successfully gives us higher speed and lower damage sputtering deposition. The increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode suppresses the evacuation of electrons from the plasma and also enhances the generation of secondary electrons on the cathode. These probably suppress the electron loss from the plasma and result in the reduction in plasma potential.

  11. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  12. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  13. Three-dimensional wake potential in a streaming dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Salahuddin; M K Islam; A K Banerjee; M Salimullah; S K Ghosh

    2003-09-01

    The oscillatory wake potential for a slowly moving or static test dust particulate in a finite temperature, collisionless and unmagnetized dusty plasma with a continuous flow of ions and dust particles has been studied. The collective resonant interaction of the moving test particle with the low-frequency and low-phase-velocity dust-acoustic mode is the origin of the periodic attractive force between the like polarity particulates along and perpendicular to the streaming ions and dust grains resulting into dust-Coulomb crystal formation. This wake potential can explain the three-dimensional dust-Coulomb crystal formation in the laboratory conditions.

  14. Statically screened ion potential and Bohm potential in a quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldabekov, Zhandos [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi Str., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Schoof, Tim; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Ramazanov, Tlekkabul [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi Str., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2015-10-15

    The effective potential Φ of a classical ion in a weakly correlated quantum plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature is well described by the random phase approximation screened Coulomb potential. Additionally, collision effects can be included via a relaxation time ansatz (Mermin dielectric function). These potentials are used to study the quality of various statically screened potentials that were recently proposed by Shukla and Eliasson (SE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165007 (2012)], Akbari-Moghanjoughi (AM) [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022103 (2015)], and Stanton and Murillo (SM) [Phys. Rev. E 91, 033104 (2015)] starting from quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. Our analysis reveals that the SE potential is qualitatively different from the full potential, whereas the SM potential (at any temperature) and the AM potential (at zero temperature) are significantly more accurate. This confirms the correctness of the recently derived [Michta et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 55, 437 (2015)] pre-factor 1/9 in front of the Bohm term of QHD for fermions.

  15. A linear radio frequency plasma reactor for potential and current mapping in a magnetized plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faudot, E; Devaux, S; Moritz, J; Heuraux, S; Molina Cabrera, P; Brochard, F

    2015-06-01

    Langmuir probe measurements in front of high power ion cyclotron resonant frequency antennas are not possible or simply too noisy to be analyzed properly. A linear experiment is a radio frequency (RF) magnetized plasma discharge reactor designed to probe the rectified potential in front of such antennas but at low power level (1 kW) to next improve antenna design and mitigate sheath effects. The maximum magnetic field is 0.1 T, and the RF amplifier can work between 10 kHz and 250 MHz allowing ion cyclotron resonances for argon or helium. The first measurements with no magnetic field are presented here, especially 2D potential maps extracted from the RF compensated probe measurements yield ni ≈ 10(15) m(-3) and Te ≈ 2 eV for RF power lower than 100 W. Series resonances in the chamber are highlighted and allow to deduce the plasma parameters from a simple equivalent impedance model of the plasma in helium gas. Next studies will be focused on magnetized plasmas and especially magnetized RF sheaths.

  16. Laser Diagnostic Method for Plasma Sheath Potential Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sean P.

    Electric propulsion systems are gaining popularity in the aerospace field as a viable option for long term positioning and thrusting applications. In particular, Hall thrusters have shown promise as the primary propulsion engine for space probes during interplanetary journeys. However, the interaction between propellant xenon ions and the ceramic channel wall continues to remain a complex issue. The most significant source of power loss in Hall thrusters is due to electron and ion currents through the sheath to the channel wall. A sheath is a region of high electric field that separates a plasma from a wall or surface in contact. Plasma electrons with enough energy to penetrate the sheath may result emission of a secondary electron from the wall. With significant secondary electron emission (SEE), the sheath voltage is reduced and so too is the electron retarding electric field. Therefore, a lower sheath voltage further increases the particle loss to the wall of a Hall thruster and leads to plasma cooling and lower efficiency. To further understand sheath dynamics, laser-induced fluorescence is employed to provide a non-invasive, in situ, and spatially resolved technique for measuring xenon ion velocity. By scanning the laser wavelength over an electronic transition of singly ionized xenon and collecting the resulting fluorescence, one can determine the ion velocity from the Doppler shifted absorption. Knowing the velocity at multiple points in the sheath, it can be converted to a relative electric potential profile which can reveal a lot about the plasma-wall interaction and the severity of SEE. The challenge of adequately measuring sheath potential profiles is optimizing the experiment to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A strong signal with low noise, enables high resolution measurements and increases the depth of measurement in the sheath, where the signal strength is lowest. Many improvements were made to reduce the background luminosity, increase the

  17. Plasma-potentiated small molecules—possible alternative to antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaka, Kateryna; Bazaka, Olha; Levchenko, Igor; Xu, Shuyan; Ivanova, Elena P.; Keidar, Michael; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of the existing arsenal of antibiotics is continuously compromised by their indiscriminative and often excessive use. The antibiotic arsenal can be expanded with agents that have different mechanisms of activity to conventional drugs, such as plant-derived natural antimicrobial small molecules, yet these often lack sufficient activity and selectivity to fulfill the antibiotics requirements and conventional thermochemical methods of their transient activation may not be compatible with biomedical applications. Here, non-equilibrium conditions of atmospheric-pressure plasma are used for rapid, single-step potentiation of activity of select terpenes without the use of chemicals or heating. Substantial potentiation of activity against Staphylococcus aureus cells in planktonic and biofilm states is observed in both inherently antibacterial terpenes, e.g. terpinen-4-ol, and compounds generally considered to have limited effect against S. aureus, e.g. γ-terpinene. The improved biological activity may arise, at least in part, from the changes in the physico–chemical properties of the terpenes induced by plasma-generated chemical species and physical effects, such as electric fields and UV irradiation. This activation approach is generic, and thus can potentially be applied to other molecules and their mixtures in an effort to expand the range of effective antimicrobial agents for deactivation of pathogenic organisms in hygiene, medical and food applications.

  18. Conifer somatic embryogenesis: improvements by supplementation of medium with oxidation-reduction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Gerald S; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Copeland-Kamp, Brandi; Crockett, Jonathan; Lucrezi, Jacob; May, Sheldon W; Bucalo, Kylie

    2015-02-01

    A major barrier to the commercialization of somatic embryogenesis technology in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is recalcitrance of some high-value crosses to initiate embryogenic tissue (ET) and continue early-stage somatic embryo growth. Developing initiation and multiplication media that resemble the seed environment has been shown to decrease this recalcitrance. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbate analyses were performed weekly throughout the sequence of seed development for female gametophyte and zygotic embryo tissues to determine physiological concentrations. Major differences in stage-specific oxidation-reduction (redox) agents were observed. A simple bioassay was used to evaluate potential growth-promotion of natural and inorganic redox agents added to early-stage somatic embryo growth medium. Compounds showing statistically significant increases in early-stage embryo growth were then tested for the ability to increase initiation of loblolly pine. Low-cost reducing agents sodium dithionite and sodium thiosulfate increased ET initiation for loblolly pine and Douglas fir (Mirb) Franco. Germination medium supplementation with GSSG increased somatic embryo germination. Early-stage somatic embryos grown on medium with or without sodium thiosulfate did not differ in GSH or GSSG content, suggesting that sodium thiosulfate-mediated growth stimulation does not involve GSH or GSSG. We have developed information demonstrating that alteration of the redox environment in vitro can improve ET initiation, early-stage embryo development and somatic embryo germination in loblolly pine.

  19. Oxidation-Reduction Calculations in the Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Richard D.

    2004-01-01

    Redox calculations have the potential to reinforce important concepts in bioenergetics. The intermediacy of the NAD[superscript +]/NADH couple in the oxidation of food by oxygen, for example, can be brought out by such calculations. In practice, students have great difficulty and, even when adept at the calculations, frequently do not understand…

  20. Plasma YKL-40: a potential new cancer biomarker?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Schultz, Nicolai A; Jensen, Benny V

    2009-01-01

    tissue remodeling. Plasma levels of YKL-40 are elevated in a subgroup of patients with primary or advanced cancer compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but also in patients with many different diseases characterized by inflammation. Elevated plasma YKL-40 levels are an independent prognostic...... by inflammation. Large prospective, longitudinal clinical cancer studies are needed to determine if plasma YKL-40 is a new cancer biomarker, or is mainly a biomarker of inflammation....

  1. Tokamak Plasmas : Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya; N R Ray

    2000-11-01

    Edge plasma properties in a tokamak is an interesting subject of study from the view point of confinement and stability of tokamak plasma. The edge plasma of SINP-tokamak has been investigated using specially designed Langmuir probes. We have observed a poloidal asymmetry of floating potentials, particularly the top-bottom floating potential differences are quite noticeable, which in turn produces a vertical electric field (v). This v remains throughout the discharge but changes its direction at certain point of time which seems to depend on applied vertical magnetic field v).

  2. Wilder Bancroft's Study of Oxidant-Reductant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, John T.

    1998-07-01

    Wilder Dwight Bancroft (1867 -1953), a Harvard graduate, entered Ostwald's Leipzig laboratory in 1890. Bancroft made a systematic study of potentiometric cells in which one half contained an oxidant solution, the other half a reductant solution. He stressed the importance of the equilibration of the platinum electrodes, examined the effects of acidity and of concentration on the emf of a cell, and demonstrated that this emf was the algebraic sum of the potentials of the half-cells. After receipt of his Ph.D. in 1892, Bancroft continued his potentiometric studies in Amsterdam. Following a brief return to Harvard, Bancroft moved to Cornell, and remained there until his retirement in 1937. He founded and edited the Journal of Physical Chemistry, and was President of the American Chemical Society in 1910. He was also twice President of the Electrochemical Society.

  3. Characteristics and potential applications of an ORNL microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source that has two ECR plasma production regions and uses multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasma over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2} and could be scaled up to produce uniform plasma over 700 cm{sup 2} or larger. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The working gases used were argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of the discharge parameters. The discharge characteristics and a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source are described and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam sources for manufacturing advanced microelectronics, for space electric propulsion, and for fusion research, are discussed. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * PREFACE * INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE * LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AT TOHOKU UNIVERSITY * CHAPTER 1: DOUBLE LAYERS, SHEATHS, AND POTENTIAL STRUCTURES * 1.1 Double Layers * On Fluid Models of Stationary, Acoustic Double Layers (Invited) * Particle Simulation of Double Layer (Invited) * Space-Time Dependence of Non-Steady Double Layers * The Role of Low Energy Electrons for the Generation of Anode Double Layers in Glow Discharges * Arbitrary Amplitude Ion-Acoustic Double Layers in a Dusty Plasma * 1.2 Sheaths * Bounded Plasma Edge Physics as Observed from Simulations in 1D and 2D (Invited) * Control of RF Sheath Structure in RF Diode Discharge * Observation of Density Gradients with Fine Structures and Low Frequency Wave Excitation at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary * Double Sheath Associated with an Electron Emission to a Plasma Containing Negative Ions * Sheath Edge and Floating Potential for Multi-Species Plasmas Including Dust Particles * 1.3 Potential Structures and Oscillations * Potential Structure Formed at a Constriction of a DC He Positive Column and its Coupling with Ionization Wave * Potential Structure in a New RF Magnetron Device with a Hollow Electrode * Potential Disruption in a RF Afterglow Electronegative Plasma * Potential Oscillation in a Strongly Asymmetry RF Discharge Containing Negative Ions * Effects of External Potential Control on Coulomb Dust Behavior * Potential Structure of Carbon Arc Discharge for High-Yield Fullerenes Formation * Control of Axial and Radial Potential Profiles in Tandem Mirrors (Invited) * CHAPTER 2: FIELD-ALIGNED ELECTRIC FIELDS AND RELATED PARTICLE ACCELERATIONS * 2.1 Field-Aligned Potential Formation * Formation of Large Potential Difference in a Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines (Invited) * Presheath Formation in front of an Oblique End-Plate in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma * Plasma Potential Formation Due to ECRH in a Magnetic Well * Electrostatic

  5. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.C. (Fusion Energy Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-05-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300-400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. (orig.).

  7. On Floating Potential of Emissive Probes in a Partially-Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Kraus, Brian

    2016-10-01

    We compare measurements of plasma potential in a cross-field Penning discharge from two probes: swept biased Langmuir probe and floating emissive probe. The plasma potential was deduced from the first derivative of the Langmuir probe characteristic. In previous studies, the emissive and swept biased probes were placed at the channel exit of a Hall thruster (HT). Measurements showed that the emissive probe floats below the plasma potential, in agreement with conventional theories. However, recent measurements in the Penning discharge indicate a floating potential of a strongly-emitting hot probe above the plasma potential. In both probe applications, xenon plasmas have magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions with similar plasma densities (1010 - 1011 cm-3) . Though their electron temperatures differ by an order of magnitude (Penning 5 eV, HT 50 eV), this difference cannot explain the difference in measurement values of the hot floating potential because both temperatures are much higher than the emitting wire. In this work, we investigate how the ion velocity and other plasma parameters affect this discrepancy between probe measurements of the plasma potential. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Transport formulas for multi-component plasmas within the effective potential theory framework

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The recently proposed effective potential theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 235001 (2013)] allows evaluating transport in coupled plasmas with the well-developed formalisms for systems with binary collisions. To facilitate practical implementation of this concept in fluid models of multi-component plasmas, compact expressions for the transport coefficients in terms the generalized Coulomb logarithms are summarized from existing prescriptions. For weakly coupled plasmas, characterized by Debye-shielded Coulomb interaction potential, expressions become fully analytical. In coupled plasmas the generalized Coulomb logarithms need to be evaluated numerically. Routines implementing the described formalisms are included as supplemental material.

  9. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  10. Molecular Dynamic Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2010-11-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (P^3M) code ddcMD to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examined the wake of a particle passing through a plasma. In this poster, we compare the wake observed in 3D ddcMD simulations with that predicted by Vlasov theory and those observed in the electrostatic PIC code BEPS where the cell size was reduced to .03λD.

  11. Diagnostic potential of plasma carboxymethyllysine and carboxyethyllysine in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstock-Guttmann Bianca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs, N-(Carboxymethyllysine (CML and N-(Carboxyethyllysine (CEL, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and healthy controls (HCs, correlating these markers with clinical indicators of MS disease severity. Methods CML and CEL plasma levels were analyzed in 99 MS patients and 43 HCs by tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS. Patients were stratified based on drug modifying therapies (DMTs including interferon beta, glatiramer acetate and natalizumab. Results The level of plasma CEL, but not CML, was significantly higher in DMT-naïve MS patients when compared to HCs (P Conclusion Our results suggest that AGEs in general and CEL in particular could be useful biomarkers in MS clinical practice. Longitudinal studies are warranted to determine any causal relationship between changes in plasma level of AGEs and MS disease pathology. These studies will pave the way for use of AGE inhibitors and AGE-breaking agents as new therapeutic modalities in MS.

  12. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunoiu M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator’s body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%, equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  13. Effective Potential Theory: A Practical Way to Extend Plasma Transport Theory to Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    The effective potential theory is a physically motivated method for extending traditional plasma transport theories to stronger coupling. It is practical in the sense that it is easily incorporated within the framework of the Chapman-Enskog or Grad methods that are commonly applied in plasma physics and it is computationally efficient to evaluate. The extension is to treat binary scatterers as interacting through the potential of mean force, rather than the bare Coulomb or Debye-screened Coulomb potential. This allows for aspects of many-body correlations to be included in the transport coefficients. Recent work has shown that this method accurately extends plasma theory to orders of magnitude stronger coupling when applied to the classical one-component plasma model. The present work shows that similar accuracy is realized for the Yukawa one-component plasma model and it provides a comparison with other approaches.

  14. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2–4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating poten...

  15. A Vlasov equation with Dirac potential used in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardos, Claude [Universite Paris-Diderot, Laboratoire J.-L. Lions, BP187, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Nouri, Anne [Laboratoire d' Analyse, Topologie et Probabilites (UMR 6632), Aix-Marseille Universite, 39 Rue Joliot-Curie, 13453 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-11-15

    Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is analyzed for a singular Vlasov equation governing the evolution of the ionic distribution function of a quasineutral fusion plasma. The Penrose criterium is adapted to the linearized problem around a time and space homogeneous distribution function showing (due to the singularity) more drastic differences between stable and unstable situations. This pathology appears on the full nonlinear problem, well-posed locally in time with analytic initial data, but generally ill-posed in the Hadamard sense. Eventually with a very different class of solutions, mono-kinetic, which constrains the structure of the density distribution, the problem becomes locally in time well-posed.

  16. Characterization of SOL plasma flows and potentials in ICRF-heated plasmas in Alcator C-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Terry, J. L.; Cziegler, I.; Reinke, M. L.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    Gas-puff imaging techniques are employed to determine the far SOL region radial electric field and the plasma potential in ICRF heated discharges in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The two-dimensional velocity fields of the turbulent structures, which are advected by RF-induced {E}× {B} flows, are obtained via the time-delay estimation (TDE) techniques. Both the magnitude and radial extension of the radial electric field E r are observed to increase with the toroidal magnetic field strength B φ and the ICRF power. In particular, the RF-induced E r extends from the vicinity of the ICRF antenna to the separatrix when {B}\\varphi =7.9 {{T}} and {P}{ICRF}≳ 1 {MW}. In addition, low-Z impurity seeding near the antenna is found to substantially reduce the sheath potential associated with ICRF power. The TDE techniques have also been used to revisit and estimate ICRF-induced potentials in different antenna configurations: (1) conventional toroidally aligned (TA) antenna versus field-aligned (FA) antenna; (2) FA monopole versus FA dipole. It shows that FA and TA antennas produce similar magnitude of plasma potentials, and the FA monopole induced greater potential than the FA dipole phasing. The TDE estimations of RF-induced plasma potentials are consistent with previous results based on the poloidal phase velocity.

  17. Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Daniela; Heslin, Caitlin; Cullen, Patrick J; Bourke, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions' peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare.

  18. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-01-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current (DC) glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self excited dust acoustic waves and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust par...

  19. Results of direct measurements of the plasma potential using a laser-heated emissive probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Sarma, A.; Amarandei, G.; Ionita, C. [Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria). Inst. for Ion Physics; Klinger, T.; Grulke, O.; Vogelsang, A.; Windisch, T. [Max Planck Inst. for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Reliable diagnostics of the plasma potential is one of the most important challenges in context with the production, control and confinement of a plasma. Emissive probes are readily available as direct diagnostic tools for the plasma potential with a good temporal and spatial resolution in many plasmas, even up to middle-sized fusion experiments. We present the results of investigations on the heating of lanthanum hexaboride and graphite with an infrared diode laser and on the development of a laser-heated emissive probe. Such a probe has a higher electron emission, much longer life time and better time response than a conventional emissive wire probe. We have observed that from both materials electron emission current can be achieved sufficiently strongly even for dense laboratory and experimental fusion plasmas.

  20. Levitation and Oscillation of Dust Grains in Plasma Sheath with Wake Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    练海俊; 谢柏松; 周宏余

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the equilibrium and levitation of dust grains in a plasma sheath with various forces, in particular the wake potential force. The vertical oscillation frequency of dust chains is also obtained by including the wake potential term. It is found that the wake potential has a significant role for the levitation and oscillation of dust grains.

  1. Align Ag Nanorods via Oxidation Reduction Growth Using RF-Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Shuo Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanorod arrays grew on the individual metallic silver particles after the thermal decomposition of the silver oxides. The formation of silver oxide came from the input of oxygen during sputtering. The subsequent growth of the Ag nanorods started from the single silver grain that originated from the decomposition caused by thermal reduction. This method for oxidation reduction growth used no catalysts and improved the interface effect for the lattice match. Photoluminescence of Ag nanorods was detected at 2.17 eV.

  2. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  3. Estimate of electrical potential difference between plasmas with different degrees of ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The electrical potential difference has been estimated across the mixing region of two plasmas with different degrees of ionization. The estimation has been carried out in two different contexts of a charge neutral mixing region and a charge non-neutral sheath. Ion energy gained due to the potential difference has also been estimated. In both analyses, ion energy gain is proportional to the degree of ionization, and a fairly large ionization appears to be needed for overcoming the potential energy barrier of strongly coupled plasmas.

  4. Ionization-potential depression and dynamical structure factor in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengliang; Röpke, Gerd; Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich; Reinholz, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    The properties of a bound electron system immersed in a plasma environment are strongly modified by the surrounding plasma. The modification of an essential quantity, the ionization energy, is described by the electronic and ionic self-energies, including dynamical screening within the framework of the quantum statistical theory. Introducing the ionic dynamical structure factor as the indicator for the ionic microfield, we demonstrate that ionic correlations and fluctuations play a critical role in determining the ionization potential depression. This is, in particular, true for mixtures of different ions with large mass and charge asymmetry. The ionization potential depression is calculated for dense aluminum plasmas as well as for a CH plasma and compared to the experimental data and more phenomenological approaches used so far.

  5. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be

  6. Internal oscillating current-sustained RF plasmas: Parameters, stability, and potential for surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrikov, K.; Tsakadze, E.L.; Tsakadze, Z.L.;

    2005-01-01

    plasma parameters by the optical and Langmuir probes are presented. It is shown that the spatial profiles of the electron density, the effective electron temperature and plasma potential feature a great deal of the radial and axial uniformity compared with conventional sources of inductively coupled......A new source of low-frequency (0.46 MHz) inductively coupled plasmas sustained by the internal planar "unidirectional" RF current driven through a specially designed internal antenna configuration has been developed. The experimental results of the investigation of the optical and global argon...... applications and surface engineering. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malinsky, Jan; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Tanner, Widmar

    2007-01-10

    The plasma membrane potential is mainly considered as the driving force for ion and nutrient translocation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we have discovered a novel role of the membrane potential in the organization of the plasma membrane. Within the yeast plasma membrane, two non-overlapping sub-compartments can be visualized. The first one, represented by a network-like structure, is occupied by the proton ATPase, Pma1, and the second one, forming 300-nm patches, houses a number of proton symporters (Can1, Fur4, Tat2 and HUP1) and Sur7, a component of the recently described eisosomes. Evidence is presented that sterols, the main lipid constituent of the plasma membrane, also accumulate within the patchy compartment. It is documented that this compartmentation is highly dependent on the energization of the membrane. Plasma membrane depolarization causes reversible dispersion of the H(+)-symporters, not however of the Sur7 protein. Mitochondrial mutants, affected in plasma membrane energization, show a significantly lower degree of membrane protein segregation. In accordance with these observations, depolarized membranes also considerably change their physical properties (detergent sensitivity).

  8. Plasma-modified and polyethylene glycol-grafted polymers for potential tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svorcík, V; Makajová, Z; Kasálková-Slepicková, N; Kolská, Z; Bacáková, L

    2012-08-01

    Modified and grafted polymers may serve as building blocks for creating artificial bioinspired nanostructured surfaces for tissue engineering. Polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS) were modified by Ar plasma and the surface of the plasma activated polymers was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The changes in the surface wettability (contact angle) of the modified polymers were examined by goniometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the surface roughness and morphology and electrokinetical analysis (Zeta potential) characterized surface chemistry of the modified polymers. Plasma treatment and subsequent PEG grafting lead to dramatic changes in the polymer surface morphology, roughness and wettability. The plasma treated and PEG grafted polymers were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Biological tests, performed in vitro, show increased adhesion and proliferation of cells on modified polymers. Grafting with PEG increases cell proliferation, especially on PS. The cell proliferation was shown to be an increasing function of PEG molecular weight.

  9. Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

  10. Double Potential Pulse Chronocoulometry for Detection of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol Efflux at Disk Platinum Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Richard H.; Lu, Hui; Shaw, Kendrick; Chiel, Hillel J.; Kelley, Thomas J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    A double potential pulse scheme is reported for observation of cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of a single neuron cell. Capillary Pt disk microelectrodes having a thin glass insulator allow the 10 μm diameter electrode and cell to be viewed under optical magnification. The electrode, covalently functionalized with cholesterol oxidase, is positioned in contact with the cell surface resulting in enzyme catalyzed cholesterol oxidation and efflux of cholesterol from the plasma membrane at the electrode contact site. Enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide accumulates at the electrode/cell interface during a 5 s hold-time and is oxidized during application of a potential pulse. A second, replicate potential pulse is applied 0.5 s after the first potential pulse to gauge background charge prior to significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. The difference in charge passed between the first and second potential pulse provides a measure of hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme and is an indication of the cholesterol efflux. Control experiments for bare Pt microelectrodes in contact with the cell plasma membrane show difference charge signals in the range of about 7–10 pC. Enzyme-modified electrodes in contact with the plasma membrane show signals in the range of 16–26 pC. PMID:27330196

  11. Synthesis of Unsymmetric Ureas by Selenium-Catalyzed Oxidative-Reductive Carbonylation with CO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Jian-Ting; LU Shi-Wei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Unsymmetric, substituted ureas that contain the peptide bond (NHCONH), many of which possess biological activities, are widely used as herbicides, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. [1,2] A series of unsymmetric ureascontaining substituted groups have been synthesized via selenium-catalyzed selective oxidative-reductive carbonylation of amines and nitro compounds with CO instead of phosgene in one-pot reaction. [3,4] These catalytic reactions are important from both synthetic and industrial points of view, because not only the reactions can be proceeded with high selectivity of higher than 99% towards desired unsymmetric ureas, but also there exists a phase-transfer process of the selenium catalyst in thereaction, so that the after-treatment of the catalysts and products from the reaction systems can be easily separated by simple phase separation.

  12. Methodology for the effective stabilization of tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  13. Recycling high density tungsten alloy powder by oxidization-reduction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆森; 陈立宝; 贺跃辉; 黄伯云

    2002-01-01

    The processes of directly recycling high density tungsten alloy by oxidation-reduction technique were investigated. The particle size of recycled powder is fine, and the shape of powder particle is regular when the final reduction temperature is 850℃, in which the average size of the tungsten alloy particles reduced is about 1.5μm. The average size of the alloy particles increase to 6μm and 9μm when increasing the reduction temperature to 900℃ and 950℃, respectively. However, if the reduction temperature is higher than 900℃, the surface feature of powder is complicated. Increasing reduction temperature from 900℃ to 950℃, the content of oxygen of recycled powder decreases from 0.2314% to 0.1700%, and powder particles grow slightly. It has been also found that the chemical composition of the recycled alloy powder is the same as the initial powder.

  14. Formation of Non-Monotonic Potential Structure in the Detached Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Plasma detachment has been investigated by means of PIC simulation which includes plasma-neutral collision and Coulomb collision. In our previous study, we have shown that a strong gradient in temperature appears in front of the target plate in the case that high density and low temperature neutral gas is introduced. It is observed that a potential hill is created in the neutral gas region where ions lose energy due to the elastic and charge exchange collision and, as a result, the ion density increases. This potential structure traps the low energy electrons and may play a role in the development of plasma detachment state. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research Programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059 and the NIFS/NINS project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network.

  15. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  16. Space charge, plasma potential and electric field distributions in HiPIMS discharges of varying configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, B.; Bradley, J. W.

    2013-08-01

    An electron-emitting (emissive) probe has been used to study the temporal and spatial distribution of the plasma potential during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges with various substrate and magnetic field configurations. The average power was 700 W, with a repetition frequency of 100 Hz and pulse duration of 100 µs. Strongly negative plasma potentials exceeding -300 V and electric fields up to 10 kV m-1, caused by strong separation of charges with net charge carrier densities Δn of about 1014 m-3, were observed during the ignition of the discharge. The spatial distribution of the plasma potential in the stable stage of the discharge showed values consistently 5 V more negative for a floating substrate compared with a grounded one, so enhancing electron transport around the insulated substrate to grounded walls. However, this change in the electrical configuration of the plasma does not alter significantly the fraction of ionized sputtered particles (of about 30%) that can potentially reach the substrate. By changing the degree of unbalance of the sputtering source, we find a strong correlation between the electric field strength in the magnetic trap (created through charge separation) and the absolute value (and shape) of the magnetic field. For the more unbalanced magnetron, a flattening of the plasma potential structure (decrease in the axial electric field) was observed close to the target. Our findings show in principle that manipulation of the potential barrier close to the target through changing the magnetic field can regulate the proportion of sputtered and ionized species reaching the substrate.

  17. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Pham

    Full Text Available Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  18. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  19. Equation of state of a quark-gluon plasma using the Cornell potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayanandan, K. M.; Sethumadhavan, P.; Bannur, V. M.

    2007-10-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) using the Cornell potential based on Mayer's cluster expansion is presented. The string constant and the strong coupling constant for QGP are calculated. The EOS developed could describe the lattice EOS for pure gauge, two-flavor and three-flavor QGP qualitatively.

  20. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71al Farabi Street, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  1. Cross-field flow and electric potential in a plasma slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. De Keyser

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider cross-field plasma flow inside a field-aligned plasma slab embedded in a uniform background in a 1-dimensional geometry. This situation may arise, for instance, when long-lasting reconnection pulses inject plasma into the inner magnetosphere. The present paper presents a detailed analysis of the structure of the interfaces that separate the slab from the background plasma on either side; a fully kinetic model is used to do so. Since the velocity shear across both interfaces has opposite signs, and given the typical gyroradius differences between injected and background ions and electrons, the structure of both interfaces can be very different. The behaviour of the slab and its interfaces depends critically on the flow of the plasma transverse to the magnetic field; in particular, it is shown that there are bounds to the flow speed that can be supported by the magnetised plasma. Further complicating the picture is the effect of the potential difference between the slab and its environment.

  2. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-11-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients.

  3. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients. PMID:27599779

  4. Drag force of Anisotropic plasma at finite U(1) chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Long; Ge, Xian-Hui [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Wu, Shang-Yu [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Electrophysics, Yau Shing Tung Center, Hsinchu (China); National Center for Theoretical Science, Hsinchu (China)

    2016-05-15

    We perform the calculation of the drag force acting on a massive quark moving through an anisotropic N = 4 SU(N) Super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a U(1) chemical potential. We present the numerical results for any value of the anisotropy and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of the anisotropy. We find the effect of the chemical potential or charge density will enhance the drag force for our charged solution. (orig.)

  5. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  6. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-09-01

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  7. Direct Measurements of the Ionization Potential Depression in a Dense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Chung, H.-K.; Cho, B.-I.; Brown, C. R. D.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Engelhorn, K.; Falcone, R. W.; Graves, C.; Hájková, V.; Higginbotham, A.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, H. J.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, C. D.; Ping, Y.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Scherz, A.; Schlotter, W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Vysin, L.; Wang, T.; Wu, B.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P.; Nagler, B.; Wark, J. S.

    2012-08-01

    We have used the Linac Coherent Light Source to generate solid-density aluminum plasmas at temperatures of up to 180 eV. By varying the photon energy of the x rays that both create and probe the plasma, and observing the K-α fluorescence, we can directly measure the position of the K edge of the highly charged ions within the system. The results are found to disagree with the predictions of the extensively used Stewart-Pyatt model, but are consistent with the earlier model of Ecker and Kröll, which predicts significantly greater depression of the ionization potential.

  8. Enzymatic Modification of Plasma Low Density Lipoproteins in Rabbits: A Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeque, Regine; Mullon, Claudy J. P.; Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.; Lees, Robert S.; Langer, Robert

    1993-04-01

    Phospholipase A_2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A_2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A_2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels.

  9. RP and RQA Analysis for Floating Potential Fluctuations in a DC Magnetron Sputtering Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabavath, Gopikishan; Banerjee, I.; Mahapatra, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma is visualized using recurrence plot (RP) technique. RP comprises the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) which is an efficient method to observe critical regime transitions in dynamics. Further, RQA provides insight information about the system’s behavior. We observed the floating potential fluctuations of the plasma as a function of discharge voltage by using Langmuir probe. The system exhibits quasi-periodic-chaotic-quasi-periodic-chaotic transitions. These transitions are quantified from determinism, Lmax, and entropy of RQA. Statistical investigations like kurtosis and skewness also studied for these transitions which are in well agreement with RQA results.

  10. Jump Conditions of a Non-Neutral Plasma Shock with Current and Potential Difference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡希伟

    2002-01-01

    Jump conditions about the total momentum flux and energy flux in a non-neutral plasma shock with electric current and field are given, which are derived from the double fluid equations and the Poisson equation for electron and ion fluids. Furthermore, we derive the relations between the upstream and downstream velocities and temperatures, and the minimum upstream Mach number for the plasma shock existence M1min, which depend on the current through the shock front J0, the electric potential difference between the upstream and downstream of shock △φ, and the ion charge Z.

  11. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  12. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  13. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions.

  14. Surface Potential of Dust Grains at the Sheath Edge of Electronegative Dusty Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段萍; 王正汹; 王文春; 刘金远; 刘悦; 王晓钢

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the dust surface potential at the sheath edge of electronegative dusty plasmas theoretically, using the standard fluid model for the sheath and treating electrons and negative ions as Boltzmann particles but positive ions and dust grains as cold fluids.The dust charging model is self-consistently coupled with the sheath formation criterion by the dust surface potential and the ion Mach number, moreover the dust density variation is taken into account. The numerical results reveal that the dust number density and negative ion number density as well as its temperature can significantly affect the dust surface potential at the sheath edge.

  15. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clausse, B; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m(-1), over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  16. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Roede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys, cystine (CySS, glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (Eh to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  17. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahr, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Rosa, de la F.; Garcia-Encina, P.; Munoz, R.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0

  18. A comparison of inflection point and floating point emissive probe techniques for electric potential measurements in a Hall thruster plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Hershkowitz, Noah; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2010-11-01

    Theory suggests that when increasing the electron emission of an emissive probe the floating potential will saturate ˜Te/e below the plasma potential. This can introduce significant errors in plasma potential measurements in Hall thrusters where Te> 10 eV. The method of determining the plasma potential from the inflection point of emissive IV traces in the limit of zero emission may give a more accurate measurement of the plasma potential. The two methods are compared in a Hall thruster where ne˜10^11 cm-3, Te˜20 eV, and ion flows are significant. The results can be generalized to other types of plasmas.

  19. Degradation kinetics of peptide-coupled alginates prepared via the periodate oxidation reductive amination route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Jenssen, Ina Beate; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2017-02-10

    Biomaterials based on peptide-coupled alginates must provide both optimal biological environments and tuneable stability/degradation profiles. The present work investigates the degradation pattern and kinetics of peptide-coupled alginates prepared via the periodate oxidation reductive amination route. Alginates degrade slowly (non-enzymatically) under physiological conditions by acid-catalysed hydrolysis and alkali-catalysed β-elimination, both operating simultaneously but dominated by the latter. While periodate oxidation alone largely increases the rate of β-elimination, substitution restores the susceptibility towards β-elimination to that of the parent alginate. For acid hydrolysis the rate of depolymerization is proportional to the degree of substitution, being approximately one order of magnitude larger than the parent alginate, but still lower than for the corresponding materials with fully reduced dialdehydes. Results also suggest a composition-dependent preference for substitution at C2 or C3. These results demonstrate how the various chemistries introduced by the coupling provide useful means to tune the biodegradability profiles.

  20. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Y. Z., E-mail: qyzbird@live.com; Chen, H., E-mail: hchen61@ncu.edu.cn; Liu, S. Q., E-mail: sqlgroup@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2014-11-15

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  1. 2D DIGE analysis of maternal plasma for potential biomarkers of Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Julie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prenatal screening for Down Syndrome (DS would benefit from an increased number of biomarkers to improve sensitivity and specificity. Improving sensitivity and specificity would decrease the need for potentially risky invasive diagnostic procedures. Results We have performed an in depth two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE study to identify potential biomarkers. We have used maternal plasma samples obtained from first and second trimesters from mothers carrying DS affected fetuses compared with mothers carrying normal fetuses. Plasma samples were albumin/IgG depleted and expanded pH ranges of pH 4.5 - 5.5, pH 5.3 - 6.5 and pH 6 - 9 were used for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE. We found no differentially expressed proteins in the first trimester between the two groups. Significant up-regulation of ceruloplasmin, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, complement proteins C1s subcomponent, C4-A, C5, and C9 and kininogen 1 were detected in the second trimester in maternal plasma samples where a DS affected fetus was being carried. However, ceruloplasmin could not be confirmed as being consistently up-regulated in DS affected pregnancies by Western blotting. Conclusions Despite the in depth 2DE approach used in this study the results underline the deficiencies of gel-based proteomics for detection of plasma biomarkers. Gel-free approaches may be more productive to increase the number of plasma biomarkers for DS for non-invasive prenatal screening and diagnosis.

  2. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  3. Nucleation rate of the quark-gluon plasma droplet at finite quark chemical potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Gosain; S Somorendro Singh; Agam K Jha

    2012-05-01

    The nucleation rate of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) droplet is computed at finite quark chemical potential. In the course of computing the nucleation rate, the finite size effects of the QGP droplet are taken into account. We consider the phenomenological flow parameter of quarks and gluons, which is dependent on quark chemical potential and we calculate the nucleation rate of the QGP droplet with this parameter. While calculating the nucleation rate, we find that for low values of quark phenomenological parameter $ q$, nucleation rate is negligible and when increases, nucleation rate increases significantly.

  4. Quantum-mechanical calculation of ionization potential lowering in dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Son, Sang-Kil; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely-used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kr\\"oll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy ...

  5. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  6. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  7. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Navarro-Cavallé, J. [Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ahedo, E. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, Leganés 28911, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  8. Going wireless: Fe(III) oxide reduction without pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens strain JS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica A; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Franks, Ashley E; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili.

  9. Environmental Factors Affecting Chromium-Manganese Oxidation-Reduction Reactions in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.O.P.TREBIEN; L.BORTOLON; M.J.TEDESCO; C.A.BISSANI; F.A.O.CAMARGO

    2011-01-01

    Disposal of chromium (Cr) hexavalent form, Cr(Ⅵ), in soils as additions in organic fertilizers, liming materials or plant nutrient sources can be dangerous since Cr(Ⅵ) can be highly toxic to plants, animals, and humans. In order to explore soil conditions that lead to Cr(Ⅵ) generation, this study were performed using a Paleudult (Dystic Nitosol) from a region that has a high concentration of tannery operations in the Rio Grande do Sul State, southern Brazil. Three laboratory incubation experiments were carried out to examine the influences of soil moisture content and concentration of cobalt and organic matter additions on soil Cr(Ⅵ) formation and release and manganese (Mn) oxide reduction with a salt of chromium chloride (CrCl3) and tannery sludge as inorganic and organic sources of Cr(Ⅲ), respectively. The amount of Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation depended on the concentration of easily reducible Mn oxides and the oxidation was more intense at the soil water contents in which Mn(Ⅲ/Ⅳ) oxides were more stable. Soluble organic compounds in soil decreased Cr(Ⅵ) formation due to Cr(Ⅲ) complexation. This mechanism also resulted in the decrease in the oxidation of Cr(Ⅲ) due to the tannery sludge additions. Chromium(Ⅲ) oxidation to Cr(Ⅵ) at the solid/solution interface involved the following mechanisms:the formation of a precursor complex on manganese (Mn) oxide surfaces, followed by electron transfer from Cr(Ⅲ) to Mn(Ⅲ or Ⅳ),the formation of a successor complex with Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ), and the breakdown of the successor complex and release of Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ) into the soil solution.

  10. Potential biomarkers of fatigue identified by plasma metabolome analysis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kume

    Full Text Available In the present study, prior to the establishment of a method for the clinical diagnosis of chronic fatigue in humans, we validated the utility of plasma metabolomic analysis in a rat model of fatigue using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS. In order to obtain a fatigued animal group, rats were placed in a cage filled with water to a height of 2.2 cm for 5 days. A food-restricted group, in which rats were limited to 10 g/d of food (around 50% of the control group, was also assessed. The food-restricted group exhibited weight reduction similar to that of the fatigued group. CE-MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of food intake-dependent metabolic changes, as well as the profile in fatigue loading, resulting in the identification of 48 metabolites in plasma. Multivariate analyses using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that the plasma metabolome in the fatigued group showed clear differences from those in the control and food-restricted groups. In the fatigued group, we found distinctive changes in metabolites related to branched-chain amino acid metabolism, urea cycle, and proline metabolism. Specifically, the fatigued group exhibited significant increases in valine, leucine, isoleucine, and 2-oxoisopentanoate, and significant decreases in citrulline and hydroxyproline compared with the control and food-restricted groups. Plasma levels of total nitric oxide were increased in the fatigued group, indicating systemic oxidative stress. Further, plasma metabolites involved in the citrate cycle, such as cis-aconitate and isocitrate, were reduced in the fatigued group. The levels of ATP were significantly decreased in the liver and skeletal muscle, indicative of a deterioration in energy metabolism in these organs. Thus, this comprehensive metabolic analysis furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of fatigue, and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers based on fatigue

  11. Potential biomarkers of fatigue identified by plasma metabolome analysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Jin, Guanghua; Nakano, Masayuki; Miyashige, Yukiharu; Eguchi, Asami; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, prior to the establishment of a method for the clinical diagnosis of chronic fatigue in humans, we validated the utility of plasma metabolomic analysis in a rat model of fatigue using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). In order to obtain a fatigued animal group, rats were placed in a cage filled with water to a height of 2.2 cm for 5 days. A food-restricted group, in which rats were limited to 10 g/d of food (around 50% of the control group), was also assessed. The food-restricted group exhibited weight reduction similar to that of the fatigued group. CE-MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of food intake-dependent metabolic changes, as well as the profile in fatigue loading, resulting in the identification of 48 metabolites in plasma. Multivariate analyses using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that the plasma metabolome in the fatigued group showed clear differences from those in the control and food-restricted groups. In the fatigued group, we found distinctive changes in metabolites related to branched-chain amino acid metabolism, urea cycle, and proline metabolism. Specifically, the fatigued group exhibited significant increases in valine, leucine, isoleucine, and 2-oxoisopentanoate, and significant decreases in citrulline and hydroxyproline compared with the control and food-restricted groups. Plasma levels of total nitric oxide were increased in the fatigued group, indicating systemic oxidative stress. Further, plasma metabolites involved in the citrate cycle, such as cis-aconitate and isocitrate, were reduced in the fatigued group. The levels of ATP were significantly decreased in the liver and skeletal muscle, indicative of a deterioration in energy metabolism in these organs. Thus, this comprehensive metabolic analysis furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of fatigue, and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers based on fatigue pathophysiology.

  12. Holographic dual of a boost-invariant plasma with chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran; Kirsch, Ingo

    2010-12-15

    We construct a gravity dual of a boost-invariant flow of an N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills gauge theory plasma with chemical potential. We present both a first-order corrected late-time solution in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates and a zeroth-order solution in parametric form in Fefferman-Graham coordinates. The resulting background takes the form of a time-dependent AdS Reissner-Nordstroem-type black hole whose horizons move into the bulk of the AdS space. The solution correctly reproduces the energy and charge density as well as the viscosity of the plasma previously computed in the literature. (orig.)

  13. A potential tool for diagnosis of male infertility: Plasma metabolomics based on GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyi; Wang, Yang; Yun, Yonghuan; Xia, Zian; Lu, Hongmei; Luo, Jiekun; Liang, Yizeng

    2016-01-15

    Male infertility has become an important public health problem worldwide. Nowadays the diagnosis of male infertility frequently depends on the results of semen quality or requires more invasive surgical intervention. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel approach for early diagnosis of male infertility. According to the presence or absence of normal sexual function, the male infertility is classified into two phenotypes, erectile dysfunction (ED) and semen abnormalities (SA). The aim of this study was to investigate the GC-MS plasma profiles of infertile male having erectile dysfunction (ED) and having semen abnormalities (SA) and discover the potential biomarkers. The plasma samples from healthy controls (HC) (n=61) and infertility patients with ED (n=26) or with SA (n=44) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for discrimination and screening potential biomarkers. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on GC-MS dataset. The results showed that HC could be discriminated from infertile cases having SA (AUC=86.96%, sensitivity=78.69%, specificity=84.09%, accuracy=80.95%) and infertile cases having ED (AUC=94.33%, sensitivity=80.33%, specificity=100%, accuracy=87.36%). Some potential biomarkers were successfully discovered by two commonly used variable selection methods, variable importance on projection (VIP) and original coefficients of PLS-DA (β). 1,5-Anhydro-sorbitol and α-hydroxyisovaleric acid were identified as the potential biomarkers for distinguishing HC from the male infertility patients. Meanwhile, lactate, glutamate and cholesterol were the found to be the important variables to distinguish between patients with erectile dysfunction from those with semen abnormalities. The plasma metabolomics may be developed as a novel approach for fast, noninvasive, and acceptable diagnosis and characterization of male infertility.

  14. Near Discharge Cathode Assembly Plasma Potential Measurements in a 30-cm NSTAR Type Ion Engine During Beam Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Floating emissive probe plasma potential data are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Discharge plasma data are presented with beam extraction at throttling conditions comparable to the NASA TH Levels 8, 12, and 15. The operating conditions of the Extended Life Test (ELT) of the Deep Space One (DS1) flight spare ion engine, where anomalous discharge keeper erosion occurred, were TH 8 and TH 12 consequently they are of specific interest in investigating discharge keeper erosion phenomena. The data do not validate the presence of a potential hill plasma structure downstream of the DCA, which has been proposed as a possible erosion mechanism. The data are comparable in magnitude to data taken by other researchers in ring-cusp electron-bombardment ion thrusters. The plasma potential structures are insensitive to thruster throttling level with a minimum as low as 14 V measured at the DCA exit plane and increasing gradually in the axial direction. A sharp increase in plasma potential to the bulk discharge value of 26 to 28 volts, roughly 10 mm radially from DCA centerline, was observed. Plasma potential measurements indicate a low-potential plume structure that is roughly 20 mm in diameter emanating from the discharge cathode that may be attributed to a free-standing plasma double layer.

  15. Plasma potential of a moving ionization zone in DC magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Anders, André

    2017-02-01

    Using movable emissive and floating probes, we determined the plasma and floating potentials of an ionization zone (spoke) in a direct current magnetron sputtering discharge. Measurements were recorded in a space and time resolved manner, which allowed us to make a three-dimensional representation of the plasma potential. From this information we could derive the related electric field, space charge, and the related spatial distribution of electron heating. The data reveal the existence of strong electric fields parallel and perpendicular to the target surface. The largest E-fields result from a double layer structure at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We suggest that the double layer plays a crucial role in the energization of electrons since electrons can gain several 10 eV of energy when crossing the double layer. We find sustained coupling between the potential structure, electron heating, and excitation and ionization processes as electrons drift over the magnetron target. The brightest region of an ionization zone is present right after the potential jump, where drifting electrons arrive and where most local electron heating occurs. The ionization zone intensity decays as electrons continue to drift in the Ez × B direction, losing energy by inelastic collisions; electrons become energized again as they cross the potential jump. This results in the elongated, arrowhead-like shape of the ionization zone. The ionization zone moves in the -Ez × B direction from which the to-be-heated electrons arrive and into which the heating region expands; the zone motion is dictated by the force of the local electric field on the ions at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We hypothesize that electron heating caused by the potential jump and physical processes associated with the double layer also apply to magnetrons at higher discharge power, including high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

  16. Synchronous plasma membrane electrochemical potential oscillations during yeast colony development and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuse; Gásková, Dana; Kucerová, Helena

    2009-05-01

    Microorganisms that survive in natural environments form organized multicellular communities, biofilms and colonies with specific properties. During stress and nutrient limitation, slow growing and senescent cells in such communities retain vital processes by maintaining plasma membrane integrity and retaining the ability to generate transmembrane electrochemical gradients. We report the use of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonial model to show that population growth in a multicellular community depends on nutrient diffusion and that resting cells start to accumulate from the beginning of the second acidic phase of colony development. Despite differentiation of colony members, synchronous transmembrane potential oscillation was detected in the organized colony. The electrochemical membrane potential periodically oscillated at frequencies between those for circadian to infradian rhythms during colony aging and transiently decreased at time points previously linked with rebuilding of yeast metabolism. Despite extensive decreases in the intracellular ATP concentration and in the amount and activity of the plasma membrane proton pump during nutrient limited growth and colony aging, the transmembrane electrochemical potential appeared to be maintained above a level critical for population survival.

  17. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, D. [Research Center Jülich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Ohno, N. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Vela, L. [Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911-Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  18. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  19. The potential of rapid cooling spark plasma sintering for metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faming Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Spark plasma sintering (SPS is a remarkable technique for consolidating a large variety of advanced materials with rapid heating rates. However, adjusting the cooling rates has so far faced limitations. This communication discusses the potentials of SPS integrated with a novel gas quenching system that can allow metallic materials to be sintered and rapidly quenched directly after the sintering step, saving energy and costs. Results on numerical simulations of rapid cooling-SPS and the mechanical properties and microstructures of Ti6Al4V alloy are discussed; exhibiting the feasibility of this rapid cooling SPS technique and the major implications for the field of SPS and metallic powder consolidation.

  20. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma generated with high positive or negative applied potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Gerdin, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus superconducting magnet facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kilovolts by applying direct-current voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer of the midplane electrode rings. The electric fields which are responsible for heating the ions by E/B drift then point radially outward or inward. The low-frequency fluctuations below the ion cyclotron frequency appeared to be dominated by rotating spokes.

  1. The potential role of curcumin (diferuloylmethane in plasma cell dyscrasias/paraproteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Golombick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Terry Golombick, Terry DiamondDepartment of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, AustraliaAbstract: Plasma cell dyscrasias, most commonly associated with paraproteinemia, are a diverse group of diseases. Monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS can precede multiple myeloma, a progressive neoplastic disease. MGUS occurs in association with a variety of other diseases and currently no treatment is recommended but rather “watchful waiting”. Given that the size of the M-protein is a risk factor for disease progression, early intervention with the aim of reducing the paraprotein load would provide an innovative therapeutic tool. Preliminary results from our pilot study show a drop of between 5% and 30% serum paraprotein in patients taking curcumin compared with patients on placebo. Curcumin is a diferuloylmethane present in extracts of the rhizome of the Curcuma longa plant. As a natural product, this has exciting potential in the treatment of plasma cell dyscrasias.Keywords: plasma cell dyscrasias, MGUS, myeloma, curcumin, paraproteinemia

  2. Potential applications of nonthermal plasmas against biofilm-associated micro-organisms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligundla, P; Mok, C

    2017-01-20

    Biofilms as complex microbial communities attached to surfaces pose several challenges in different sectors, ranging from food and healthcare to desalination and power generation. The biofilm mode of growth allows microorganisms to survive in hostile environments and biofilm cells exhibit distinct physiology and behaviour in comparison with their planktonic counterparts. They are ubiquitous, resilient and difficult to eradicate due to their resistant phenotype. Several chemical-based cleaning and disinfection regimens are conventionally used against biofilm-dwelling micro-organisms in vitro. Although such approaches are generally considered to be effective, they may contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance and environmental pollution. Consequently, advanced green technologies for biofilm control are constantly emerging. Disinfection using nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) is one of the novel strategies having a great potential for control of biofilms of a broad spectrum of micro-organisms. This review discusses several aspects related to the inactivation of biofilm-associated bacteria and fungi by different types of NTPs under in vitro conditions. A brief introduction summarizes prevailing methods in biofilm inactivation, followed by introduction to gas discharge plasmas, active plasma species and their inactivating mechanism. Subsequently, significance and aspects of NTP inactivation of biofilm-associated bacteria, especially those of medical importance, including opportunistic pathogens, oral pathogenic bacteria, foodborne pathogens and implant bacteria, are discussed. The remainder of the review discusses majorly about the synergistic effect of NTPs and their activity against biofilm-associated fungi, especially Candida species.

  3. MicroRNAs in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid as potential markers for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers remains an unmet challenge, and new approaches that can improve current AD biomarker strategies are needed. Recent reports suggested that microRNA (miRNA) profiling of biological fluids has emerged as a diagnostic tool for several pathologic conditions. In this study, we measured six candidate miRNAs (miR-9, miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a) in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD and normal subjects by using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate their potential usability as AD biomarkers. The qRT-PCR results showed that plasma miR-34a and miR-146a levels, and CSF miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a levels in AD patients were significantly lower than in control subjects. On the other hand, CSF miR-29a and miR-29b levels were significantly higher than in control subjects. Our results provide a possibility that miRNAs detected in plasma and CSF can serve as biomarkers for AD.

  4. Heavy ion beam probing—diagnostics to study potential and turbulence in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Krupnik, L. I.; Eliseev, L. G.; Barcala, J. M.; Bravo, A.; Chmyga, A. A.; Deshko, G. N.; Drabinskij, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Khabanov, P. O.; Khrebtov, S. M.; Kharchev, N. K.; Komarov, A. D.; Kozachek, A. S.; Lopez, J.; Lysenko, S. E.; Martin, G.; Molinero, A.; de Pablos, J. L.; Soleto, A.; Ufimtsev, M. V.; Zenin, V. N.; Zhezhera, A. I.; T-10 Team; TJ-II Team

    2017-07-01

    Heavy ion beam probing (HIBP) is a unique diagnostics to study the core plasma potential and turbulence. Advanced HIBPs operate in the T-10 tokamak and TJ-II flexible heliac with fine focused (magnetic configurations with ECR and neutral beam injection (NBI) heating at TJ-II. Time evolution of the radial profiles and/or local values of plasma parameters from high field side (HFS) to low field side (LFS), -1  magnetic field B pol (by the beam toroidal shift), poloidal electric filed E pol that allows one to derive the electrostatic turbulent particle flux ΓE×B. The cross-phase of density oscillations produces the phase velocity of their poloidal propagation or rotation; also it gives the poloidal mode number. Dual HIBP, consisting of two identical HIBPs located ¼ torus apart provide the long-range correlations of core plasma parameters. Low-noise high-gain electronics allows us to study broadband turbulence and quasi-coherent modes like geodesic acoustic modes and Alfvén eigenmodes.

  5. Effect of Bohm quantum potential in the propagation of ion-acoustic waves in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. M.; Hossen, M. A.; Rafat, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of the ion-acoustic (IA) waves in a relativistic degenerate plasma containing relativistic degenerate electron and positron fluids in the presence of inertial non-relativistic light ion fluid. The Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), modified K-dV (mK-dV), and mixed mK-dV (mmK-dV) equations are derived by adopting the reductive perturbation method. In order to analyze the basic features (phase speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of the IA solitary waves (SWs), the SWs solutions of the K-dV, mK-dV, and mmK-dV are numerically analyzed. It is found that the degenerate pressure, inclusion of the new phenomena like the Fermi temperatures and quantum mechanical effects (arising due to the quantum diffraction) of both electrons and positrons, number densities, etc., of the plasma species remarkably change the basic characteristics of the IA SWs which are found to be formed either with positive or negative potential. The implication of our results in explaining different nonlinear phenomena in astrophysical compact objects, e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc., and laboratory plasmas like intense laser-solid matter interaction experiments, etc., are mentioned.

  6. The transport of phosphate between the plasma and dialysate compartments in peritoneal dialysis is influenced by an electric potential difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Brahm, J

    1996-01-01

    was not identifiable. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the electrochemical gradient between plasma water and dialysate favours the diffusive phosphate transport, and both electric and chemical potentials must be taken into account in calculations of the transperitoneal phosphate transport....

  7. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and

  8. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...S.L., "Derivation and testing of computer algorithms for automatic real time determination of space vehicle poteuatials in various plasma

  9. Chromium(VI)-induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane Potential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is generated, and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cell lines exposed to Cr (VI). Methods CHL cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L, 2.5 μmol/L, 0.65 μmol/L for 3 and 6 hours, respectively. The production of ROS was performed by using 2,7_dichlorofluorescin diacetate; The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4; And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. Results The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group (P<0.01); The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours (P<0.01), at 2.5 μmol/L for 6 hours (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cell cultures, and Cr(VI)_induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  10. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  11. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Coutanceau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  12. Operation circuits of emissive probes for determination of potentials in discharge plasmas; Circuitos de operacao de sondas emissivas para a determinacao de potenciais em plasmas de descargas eletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraconi, G.; Maciel, H.S.; Borges, C. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica. Lab. de Plasmas e Processos

    1999-12-01

    In this paper two circuits for plasma potential measurement are presented. The first one is an emissive probe control circuit for fast probe characteristics reading. The second one is a differential emissive probe control circuit that adjusts the bias voltage automatically and allows a direct potential measurement. These circuits present inconveniences if the characteristic of the probe does not exhibit an ideal saturation of the current as show the results obtained in continuous current discharge and RF discharge. (author)

  13. Vaccine potential of plasma bead-based dual antigen delivery system against experimental murine candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ejaj; Zia, Qamar; Fatima, Munazza Tamkeen; Owais, Mohammad; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

    2015-11-01

    The development of prophylactic anti-candidal vaccine comprising the Candida albicans cytosolic proteins (Cp) as antigen and plasma beads (PB) prepared from plasma as sustained delivery system, is described. The immune-prophylactic potential of various PBs-based dual antigen delivery systems, co-entrapping Cp pre-entrapped in PLGA microspheres were tested in the murine model. Induction of cell mediated immunity was measured by assaying DTH and NO production as well as in vitro proliferation of lymphocytes derived from the immunized animals. Expression of surface markers on APCs (CD80, CD86) and T-cells (CD4+, CD8+) was also evaluated. Humoral immune response was studied by measuring circulating anti-Cp antibodies and their subclasses. When the prophylactic efficacy of the vaccines was tested in mice challenged with virulent C. albicans, the PB-based formulation (PB-PLGA-Cp vaccine) was found to be most effective in the generation of desirable immune response, in terms of suppression of fungal load and facilitating the survival of the immunized animals.

  14. A novel approach to the pacemaker infection with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Li, Yu; Li, Yinglong; Yu, Shuang; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jue

    2017-08-01

    Although the pacemaker (PM) is a key cardiac implantable electrical device for life-threatening arrhythmias treatment, the related infection is a challenge. Thus, the aim of this study is to validate cold plasma as a potential technology for the disinfection of infected pacemakers. Fifty donated PMs were cleaned and sterilized before use and then infected with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus). Then, each experimental group was treated with cold plasma treatment for 1 min, 3 min, 5 min and 7 min, while the control group was immersed with sterilized water. Effectiveness of disinfection was evaluated by using CFU counting method and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The physicochemical properties of water treated with cold plasma at different time were evaluated, including water temperature change and oxidation reduction potential (ORP). The major reactive species generated by the cold plasma equipment during cold plasma were analyzed with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). No live bacteria were detected with CFU counting method after 7 min of cold plasma treatment, which matches with the CLSM results. The ORP value of water and H2O2 concentration changed significantly after treating with cold plasma. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially NO, O (777 nm) and O (844 nm) were probably key inactivation agents in cold plasma treatment. These results indicate that cold plasma could be an effective technology for the disinfection of implantable devices.

  15. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in pulsed inductively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasmas and potential applications in plasma etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from producing damage to stimulating synergistic reactions. Although in plasma etching processes, the rate and quality of the feature are typically controlled by the characteristics of the ion flux, to truly optimize these ion and photon driven processes, it is desirable to control the relative fluxes of ions and photons to the wafer. In prior works, it was determined that the ratio of VUV photon to ion fluxes to the substrate in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) sustained in rare gases can be controlled by combinations of pressure and pulse power, while the spectrum of these VUV photons can be tuned by adding additional rare gases to the plasma. In this work, VUV photon and ion fluxes are computationally investigated for Ar/Cl2 ICPs as used in etching of silicon. We found that while the overall ratio of VUV photon flux to ion flux are controlled by pressure and pulse power, by varying the fraction of Cl2 in the mixture, both the ratio of VUV to ion fluxes and the spectrum of VUV photons can be tuned. It was also found that the intensity of VUV emission from Cl(3p 44s) can be independently tuned by controlling wall surface conditions. With this ability to control ratios of ion to photon fluxes, photon stimulated processes, as observed in halogen etching of Si, can be tuned to optimize the shape of the etched features.

  16. [Activity of oxidation-reduction enzymes in endotheliocytes of the intestinal hemomicrocirculatory bed under normal conditions and in portal hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, I V; Tikhonova, L P; Chepur, S V; Nichiporuk, G I

    1997-01-01

    An original quantitative examination of oxidation-reduction enzymes activity in endotheliocytes of hemomicroclrculatory vessels of jejunum and rectum submucosal base in normal state and in portal hypertension was performed by the authors. Comparative analysis of the activity of the enzymes studied revealed different metabolic processes intensity in these organs, dependent on current hemodynamic conditions. Cytochemical changes in hemomicrocirculatory bed are consistent with structural reorganizations that arise in the wall of vessels studied, consist of several phases and may be used as an assessment criterion for defining the portal hypertension stage.

  17. Equation of state for hot quark-gluon plasma transitions to hadrons with full QCD potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami-Sabzevari, Bijan

    2002-05-01

    A practical method based on Mayer's cluster expansion to calculate critical values for a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase transition to hadrons is represented. It can be applied to a high-temperature QGP for clustering of quarks to mesons and baryons. The potential used is the Cornell potential, i.e., a potential containing both confining and gluon exchange terms. Debye screening effects are included. An equation of state (EOS) for hadron production is found by analytical methods, which is valid near the critical point. The example of the formation of J/ψ and Υ is recalculated. It is shown that in the range of temperatures available by today's accelerators, the latter particles are suppressed. This is further confirmation for heavy quarkonia suppression and, hence, for a signature of a QGP. The EOS presented here also shows that in future colliders there will be no heavy quarkonia production by the mechanism of phase transition. Hence, if there will be heavy quarkonia production, it must be based on some other mechanisms, perhaps on the basis of some recently suggested possibilities.

  18. Examining the Potential of Plasma-Assisted Pretreated Wheat Straw for Enzyme Production by Trichoderma reesei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez Gómez, Divanery; Lehmann, Linda Olkjær; Schultz-Jensen, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-assisted pretreated wheat straw was investigated for cellulase and xylanase production by Trichoderma reesei fermentation. Fermentations were conducted with media containing washed and unwashed plasma-assisted pretreated wheat straw as carbon source which was sterilized by autoclavation...

  19. Effect of Ambipolar Potential on the Propulsive Performance of the GDM Plasma Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) plasma thruster has the ability to confine high-density plasma for the length of time required to heat it to the temperatures...

  20. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe Coutanceau; Marc Reinholdt; Jean Durand; Valérie Flaud; Serguei Martemianov; Alina Ilie; Eric Beche; Stéphanie Roualdès; Mauricio Schieda; Jérémy Frugier

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, com...

  1. The relationship between the internal oxidation-reduction system and fetal distress on pregnant patients with intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, B; Wang, C-H; Ding, R-B; Chen, J-G; Che, Y-H; Deng, Y-X

    2015-10-01

    To discuss the relationship between the internal oxidation-reduction system and fetal distress in pregnant patients with intrahepatic cholestasis in order to provide a new basis for clinical treatment and research. From March 2012 to March 2015, eighty patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) were selected and divided into two groups: the distressed group (n = 31) and non-distressed group (n = 49). We compared the two groups for differences in MDA, SOD, NO level, GSH level, venous blood and total bile acid level. The relevance of the oxidation-reduction system indicators and the venous blood and total bile acid levels, as well as the differences in the delivery outcome and fetal distress, were compared between the two groups. The serum MDA level of the distressed group was higher than the non-distressed group while the SOD, NO, and GSH levels were lower than the non-distressed group. All differences were statistically significant (p intrahepatic cholestasis, which are MDA, SOD, NO and GSH levels, may contribute to the occurrence of fetal distress.

  2. Parameterizing the Morse potential for coarse-grained modeling of blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Wei; Bluestein, Danny; Deng, Yuefan

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale simulations of fluids such as blood represent a major computational challenge of coupling the disparate spatiotemporal scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena characterizing such complex fluids. In this paper, a coarse-grained (CG) particle model is developed for simulating blood flow by modifying the Morse potential, traditionally used in Molecular Dynamics for modeling vibrating structures. The modified Morse potential is parameterized with effective mass scales for reproducing blood viscous flow properties, including density, pressure, viscosity, compressibility and characteristic flow dynamics of human blood plasma fluid. The parameterization follows a standard inverse-problem approach in which the optimal micro parameters are systematically searched, by gradually decoupling loosely correlated parameter spaces, to match the macro physical quantities of viscous blood flow. The predictions of this particle based multiscale model compare favorably to classic viscous flow solutions such as Counter-Poiseuille and Couette flows. It demonstrates that such coarse grained particle model can be applied to replicate the dynamics of viscous blood flow, with the advantage of bridging the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales characterizing blood flow that continuum based models fail to handle adequately.

  3. Parameterizing the Morse potential for coarse-grained modeling of blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, NY 11794 (United States); Zhang, Peng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, NY 11790 (United States); Kang, Wei [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bluestein, Danny [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, NY 11790 (United States); Deng, Yuefan, E-mail: Yuefan.Deng@StonyBrook.edu [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, NY 11794 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Multiscale simulations of fluids such as blood represent a major computational challenge of coupling the disparate spatiotemporal scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena characterizing such complex fluids. In this paper, a coarse-grained (CG) particle model is developed for simulating blood flow by modifying the Morse potential, traditionally used in Molecular Dynamics for modeling vibrating structures. The modified Morse potential is parameterized with effective mass scales for reproducing blood viscous flow properties, including density, pressure, viscosity, compressibility and characteristic flow dynamics of human blood plasma fluid. The parameterization follows a standard inverse-problem approach in which the optimal micro parameters are systematically searched, by gradually decoupling loosely correlated parameter spaces, to match the macro physical quantities of viscous blood flow. The predictions of this particle based multiscale model compare favorably to classic viscous flow solutions such as Counter-Poiseuille and Couette flows. It demonstrates that such coarse grained particle model can be applied to replicate the dynamics of viscous blood flow, with the advantage of bridging the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales characterizing blood flow that continuum based models fail to handle adequately.

  4. Performance and plasma urea nitrogen of immunocastrated males pigs of medium genetic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana R Caldara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective. A study was carried out to evaluate the performance and the plasma urea nitrogen (PUN of male pigs of medium genetic potential for lean meat deposition in carcass, which underwent immunocastration. Materials and methods. Forty-five seventy-days old Large White x Landrace crossbred were used. The pigs were distributed in a randomized design in three treatments: castrated males, females and immunocastrated males. Each treatment group was replicated three times with five pigs per replicate. The trial period was of 70 days, divided into phases of growing (70 to 110 days old and finishing (111 to 140 days old. The pigs were weighed four times: at the beginning of the trial, at the first immunocastration vaccine dose (80 days old, at the second immunocastration vaccine dose (110 days old and just before slaughter (140 days old. Blood samples were taken on the same day that the animals were weighed. Results. Between 80 and 110 days old, there was an increase in PUN value, only for castrated males and females. No differences were found in weight gain between the studied groups within the periods. Immunocastrated males had lower feed intake than females and these had a lower feed intake than castrated males. To 110 days old, immunocastrated animals showed feed conversion ratio similar to females and better than castrated males. However, after the second dose of the vaccine, feed conversion was similar between groups. Conclusions. The benefits of immunocastration are prominent in animals with low to medium genetic potential.

  5. Potential plasma markers of type 1 and type 2 leprosy reactions: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Maria

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical management of leprosy Type 1 (T1R and Type 2 (T2R reactions pose challenges mainly because they can cause severe nerve injury and disability. No laboratory test or marker is available for the diagnosis or prognosis of leprosy reactions. This study simultaneously screened plasma factors to identify circulating biomarkers associated with leprosy T1R and T2R among patients recruited in Goiania, Central Brazil. Methods A nested case-control study evaluated T1R (n = 10 and TR2 (n = 10 compared to leprosy patients without reactions (n = 29, matched by sex and age-group (+/- 5 years and histopathological classification. Multiplex bead based technique provided profiles of 27 plasma factors including 16 pro inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, Interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL- IL12p70, IL2, IL17, IL1 β, IL6, IL15, IL5, IL8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1 alpha (MIP1α, 1 beta (MIP1β, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, monocyte chemoattractrant protein 1 (MCP1, CC-chemokine 11 (CCL11/Eotaxin, CXC-chemokine 10 (CXCL10/IP10; 4 anti inflammatory interleukins: IL4, IL10, IL13, IL1Rα and 7 growth factors: IL7, IL9, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Results Elevations of plasma CXCL10 (P = 0.004 and IL6 (p = 0.013 were observed in T1R patients compared to controls without reaction. IL6 (p = 0.05, IL7 (p = 0.039, and PDGF-BB (p = 0.041 were elevated in T2R. RANTES and GMCSF were excluded due to values above and below detection limit respectively in all samples. Conclusion Potential biomarkers of T1R identified were CXCL10 and IL6 whereas IL7, PDGF-BB and IL6, may be laboratory markers of TR2. Additional studies on these biomarkers may help understand the

  6. NITROGEN POTENTIAL DURING ION NITRIDING PROCESS IN GLOW-DISCHARGE PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kozlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems on regulation of phase composition of a nitrided layer during gas and ion nitriding process in a glow-discharge. It has been established that  available models for control of nitrided layer structure with the help of nitriding index (nitrogen potential can not be applied for nitriding process in the glow-discharge. Principal difference of the ion nitriding from the gas one is in the fact that chemically active nitrogen is formed in the discharge zone (cathode layer and its mass-transfer is carried out in the form of an active particle flow (ions, atoms, molecules which directed to the metal surface.Interrelation of chemical discharge activity with such characteristics of nitriding steel as nitrogen solubility in  α-solid solution and  coefficient diffusion during ion nitriding in low-discharge plasma. It has been shown that regulation of the nitride layer structure during ion nitriding is reached due to changes in nitrogen flow density in plasma. While supporting the flow at the level of nitrogen solubility in  one phase or another (α, γ′  it is possible to obtain the nitrided layer consisting only of α-solid solution or γ′-nitride layer and diffusion sub-layer. Moreover a specific range of nitrogen flow density values exists for every steel grade where it is possible to ensure a limiting nitrogen concentration in α-solid solution and the γ′-layer characterized by low diffusion  mobility is not formed on the surface.

  7. Effects of exercise intensity on plasma concentrations of appetite-regulating hormones: Potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Tom J; Islam, Hashim; Townsend, Logan K; Schmale, Matt S; Copeland, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The physiological control of appetite regulation involves circulating hormones with orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) and anorexigenic (appetite-inhibiting) properties that induce alterations in energy intake via perceptions of hunger and satiety. As the effectiveness of exercise to induce weight loss is a controversial topic, there is considerable interest in the effect of exercise on the appetite-regulating hormones such as acylated ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Research to date suggests short-term appetite regulation following a single exercise session is likely affected by decreases in acylated ghrelin and increases in PYY, GLP-1, and PP. Further, this exercise-induced response may be intensity-dependent. In an effort to guide future research, it is important to consider how exercise alters the circulating concentrations of these appetite-regulating hormones. Potential mechanisms include blood redistribution, sympathetic nervous system activity, gastrointestinal motility, cytokine release, free fatty acid concentrations, lactate production, and changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. This review of relevant research suggests blood redistribution during exercise may be important for suppressing ghrelin, while other mechanisms involving cytokine release, changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, SNS activity, and muscle metabolism likely mediate changes in the anorexigenic signals PYY and GLP-1. Overall, changes in appetite-regulating hormones following acute exercise appear to be intensity-dependent, with increasing intensity leading to a greater suppression of orexigenic signals and greater stimulation of anorexigenic signals. However, there is less research on how exercise-induced responses in appetite-regulating hormones differ between sexes or different age groups. A better understanding of how exercise intensity and workload affect appetite across the sexes and life

  8. Levels of plasma circulating cell free nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as potential biomarkers for breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diesch Claude

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the aim to simplify cancer management, cancer research lately dedicated itself more and more to discover and develop non-invasive biomarkers. In this connection, circulating cell-free DNA (ccf DNA seems to be a promising candidate. Altered levels of ccf nuclear DNA (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been found in several cancer types and might have a diagnostic value. Methods Using multiplex real-time PCR we investigated the levels of ccf nDNA and mtDNA in plasma samples from patients with malignant and benign breast tumors, and from healthy controls. To evaluate the applicability of plasma ccf nDNA and mtDNA as a biomarker for distinguishing between the three study-groups we performed ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. We also compared the levels of both species in the cancer group with clinicopathological parameters. Results While the levels of ccf nDNA in the cancer group were significantly higher in comparison with the benign tumor group (P P P P = 0.022. The level of ccf nDNA was also associated with tumor-size (2 cmP = 0.034. Using ROC curve analysis, we were able to distinguish between the breast cancer cases and the healthy controls using ccf nDNA as marker (cut-off: 1866 GE/ml; sensitivity: 81%; specificity: 69%; P P Conclusion Our data suggests that nuclear and mitochondrial ccf DNA have potential as biomarkers in breast tumor management. However, ccf nDNA shows greater promise regarding sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Plasma-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membranes based on polyvinyl chloride for potential application in direct alcohol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jue; Zhang, Chengxu; Cong, Jie; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Meng, Yuedong

    2011-05-01

    Plasma grafting is employed to prepare alkaline anion-exchange membranes in this study. The attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis demonstrate that the benzyltrimethylammonium cationic groups are successfully introduced into the polyvinyl chloride matrix via plasma grafting, quaternization and alkalization. The plasma-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membrane exhibits a satisfactory ionic exchange capacity (1.01 mmol g-1), thermal stability, mechanical property, ionic conductivity (0.0145 S cm-1) and methanol permeability (9.59 × 10-12 m2 s-1), suggesting a great potential for application in direct alcohol fuel cells. The open circuit voltage of air-breathing ADAFC using plasma-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membrane is 0.796 V with 1 M EtOH solution at ambient temperature.

  10. Effective potentials for charge-helium and charge-singly-ionized helium interactions in a dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Amirov, S.M.; Moldabekov, Zh.A. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    The effective electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials arising as a result of partial screening of the helium nucleus field by bound electrons, taking into account both screening by free charged particles and quantum diffraction effect in dense plasmas were derived. The impact of quantum effects on screening was analyzed. It was shown that plasma polarization around the atom leads to the additional repulsion (attraction) between the electron (proton) and the helium atom. The method of constructing the full electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials as the sum of the derived potentials with the polarization potential and exchange potential is discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Plasma miR-216a as a potential marker of pancreatic injury in a rat model of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Du, Yi-Qi; Li, Lei; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Guo-Kun; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Man, Xiao-Hua; Gong, Yan-Fang; Xiao, Li-Ning; Zheng, Yong-Zhi; Deng, Shang-Xin; Gu, Jun-Jun; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the potential value and specificity of plasma miR-216a as a marker for pancreatic injury. METHODS: Two rat models were applied in this article: L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis was used as one model to explore the potential value of plasma miR-216a for detection of pancreatic injury; nonlethal sepsis induced in rats by single puncture cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as the other model to evaluate the specificity of plasma miR-216a compared with two commonly used markers (amylase and lipase) for acute pancreatitis. Plasmas were sampled from rats at indicated time points and total RNA was isolated. Real-Time Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify miR-216a in plasmas. RESULTS: In the acute pancreatitis model, among five time points at which plasmas were sampled, miR-216a concentrations were significantly elevated 24 h after arginine administration and remained significantly increased until 48 h after operation (compared with 0 h time point, P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis Test). In the CLP model, plasma amylase and lipase, two commonly used biomarkers for acute pancreatitis, were significantly elevated 24 h after operation (compared with 0 h time point, P < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively, Pairwise Bonferroni corrected t-tests), while miR-216a remained undetectable among four tested time points. CONCLUSION: Our article showed for the first time that plasma miR-216a might serve as a candidate marker of pancreatic injury with novel specificity. PMID:20857533

  12. Kinetic analysis of nitric oxide reduction using biogas as reburning fuel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... reburnning technology potential to reduce NO pollution. Key word: Biomass, biogas, kinetic analysis, modeling, nitric oxide, reburning. INTRODUCTION .... factor A, the temperature β, and the activation energy E are specified.

  13. Effective momentum-dependent potentials for atomic bound states and scattering in strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christlieb, A.; Dharuman, G.; Verboncoeur, J.; Murillo, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling high energy-density experiments requires simulations spanning large length and time scales. These non-equilibrium experiments have time evolving ionization and partial degeneracy, obviating the direct use of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. Therefore, efficient approximate methods are greatly needed. We have examined the accuracy of one such method based on an effective classical-dynamics approach employing effective momentum dependent potentials (MDPs) within a Hamiltonian framework that enables large-scale simulations. We have found that a commonly used formulation, based on Kirschbaum-Wilets MDPs leads to very accurate ground state energies and good first/second-ionization energies. The continuum scattering properties of free electrons were examined by comparing the momentum-transfer cross section (MTCS) predicted by KW MDP to a semi-classical phase-shift calculation. Optimizing the KW MDP parameters for the scattering process yielded poor MTCSs, suggesting a limitation of the use of KW MDP for plasmas. However, our new MDP yields MTCS values in much better agreement than KW MDP.

  14. Investigation of multifractal nature of floating potential fluctuations obtained from a dc glow discharge magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Saha, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Sabuj; Janaki, M. S.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) has been used to analyze the floating potential fluctuations obtained with a Langmuir probe from a dc glow discharge magnetized plasma device. The generalized Hurst exponents (h(q)) , local fluctuation function (Fq(s)) , the Rényi exponents (τ(q)) and the multifractal spectrum F(α) have been calculated by applying the MF-DFA method. The result of the MF-DFA shows the multifractal nature of these fluctuations. We have investigated the influence of magnetic field on the multifractal nature of the fluctuations and it is seen that degree of multifractality is reduced with the increase in the magnetic field strength. The values of h(q) have been restricted between 0.7 and 1 for the magnetized fluctuations. This result is evidence of the existence of long-range correlations in the fluctuations. Furthermore, we employed shuffle and surrogate approaches to analyze the origins of multifractality. Comparing the MF-DFA results for the data set to those for shuffled and surrogate series, we have found that its multifractal nature is due to the existence of significant long-term correlation.

  15. Asymptotic behavior of correlation functions for electric potential and field fluctuations in a classical one-component plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The correlations of the electric potential fluctuations in a classical one-component plasma are studied for large distances between the observation points. The two-point correlation function for these fluctuations is known to decay slowly for large distances, even if exponential clustering holds for

  16. Plasma levels of the tissue inhibitor matrix metalloproteinase-3 as a potential biomarker in oral cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Wen; Su, Bo-Feng; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy with poor prognosis and is the fourth most common cancer in men in Taiwan. The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) acts as a tumor suppressor gene by inhibiting the growth, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion of cancer cells. However, few studies have examined the association of plasma TIMP3 levels with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and the role of plasma TIMP3 levels in OSCC progression is still unclear. We measured the plasma TIMP3 levels of 450 OSCC patients and 64 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also analyzed TIMP3 mRNA levels of 328 OSCC patients and 32 normal tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset. Our results revealed that plasma TIMP3 levels were significantly lower in patients with OSCC than in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Moreover, plasma TIMP3 levels in patients with OSCC were significantly associated with the tumor stage and tumor status but not with the lymph node status, metastasis, and cell differentiation. To verify our findings, we also examined TCGA bioinformatics database and discovered similar results for the association with the pathological stage of OSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasma TIMP3 is a potential biomarker for predicting the tumor stage and T status in patients with OSCC. PMID:28138307

  17. Potential application of X-ray communication through a plasma sheath encountered during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Rapid progress in exploiting X-ray science has fueled its potential application in communication networks as a carrier wave for transmitting information through a plasma sheath during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere. In this study, we addressed the physical transmission process of X-rays in the reentry plasma sheath and near-earth space theoretically. The interactions between the X-rays and reentry plasma sheath were investigated through the theoretical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method, and the Monte Carlo simulation was employed to explore the transmission properties of X-rays in the near-earth space. The simulation results indicated that X-ray transmission was not influenced by the reentry plasma sheath compared with regular RF signals, and adopting various X-ray energies according to different spacecraft reentry altitudes is imperative when using X-ray uplink communication especially in the near-earth space. Additionally, the performance of the X-ray communication system was evaluated by applying the additive white Gaussian noise, Rayleigh fading channel, and plasma sheath channel. The Doppler shift, as a result of spacecraft velocity changes, was also calculated through the Matlab Simulink simulation, and various plasma sheath environments have no significant influence on X-ray communication owing to its exceedingly high carrier frequency.

  18. A Method for Measuring Fast Time Evolutions of the Plasma Potential by Means of a Simple Emissive Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining the temporal evolution of the plasma potential, which is assumed to be given by the floating potential of a simple emissive probe. The construction of the probe is also described. The method avoids the slow time response of the usual technique where the floating...... potential is measured across a high resistance. During each sweep of the probe voltage, the changing of the sign of the probe current, which is sampled at a specific time, gives rise to a negative pulse, driving the pen-lift of an X-Y recorder. Since the real floating potential is measured where the probe...

  19. Plasma Amino Acids Profiles in Children with Autism: Potential Risk of Nutritional Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Georgianne L.; Hyman, Susan L.; Mooney, Robert A.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma amino acid profiles of 10 children with autism on gluten and casein restricted diets and 26 on unrestricted diets were reviewed. There was a trend for the children on restricted diets to have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and lower plasma levels of essential acids. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  20. Plasma Amino Acids Profiles in Children with Autism: Potential Risk of Nutritional Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Georgianne L.; Hyman, Susan L.; Mooney, Robert A.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma amino acid profiles of 10 children with autism on gluten and casein restricted diets and 26 on unrestricted diets were reviewed. There was a trend for the children on restricted diets to have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and lower plasma levels of essential acids. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  1. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Generated in Water and its Potential Use in Cancer Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this letter we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP produced in a water using three gases as carrier (argon, helium and nitrogen). Plasma stimulated water was applied to human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT assays tests showed that using argon plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of the reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water in the case of argon plasma.

  2. Plasma cadmium and zinc and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians: potential health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugwuja Emmanuel Ike

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (an essential trace element and cadmium (a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with acclaimed toxicity have been found to occur together in nature, with reported antagonism between the two elements. The present study aimed at determination of plasma levels of zinc (Zn and cadmium (Cd and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians. The series comprised adults (n=443 aged ≥18 yrs (mean ± SD 38.4±13.7 yrs, consisting of 117 males, 184 non-pregnant and 140 pregnant females. Sociodemographic data were collected by questionnaire while anthropometrics were determined using standard methods. Plasma Cd and Zn were determined by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean plasma zinc and cadmium were 94.7±18.1 μg/dl and 0.150±0.548 μg/dl, respectively. Age, sex, pregnancy, and parity had no effect on either plasma Zn or Cd. Although educational level had no effect on plasma Zn, it had a significant effect on Cd; subjects possessing either secondary or tertiary education had significantly lower plasma Cd than subjects without formal education. Moreover, there seemed to be an inverse relationship between Cd and Zn, but this was not statistically significant (r=–0.089; p=0.061. Although plasma Zn was not related to BMI (r=0.037; p=0.432, Cd was significantly negatively correlated with BMI (r=–0.124; p=0.009. It may be concluded that adult Nigerians in Ebonyi State have elevated plasma levels of Cd, with apparent impact on the levels of plasma Zn. This has important public health implications considering the essential roles of Zn in the protection of Cd mediated adverse health effects. While food diversification is recommended to improve plasma Zn, efforts should be made to reduce exposure to Cd to mitigate partially its possible adverse effects.

  3. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Melanie; Stams, Alfons J M; De la Rosa, Francisco; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raul

    2011-05-01

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 ± 4% (20 days), 65 ± 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH(4,) CH(3)OH and C(6)H(12)O(6), respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO(3)(-) instead of NH(4)(+) as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH(4) degradation from 0 to 33 ± 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 ± 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 ± 7% in the absence and 16 ± 2% in the presence of bicarbonate.

  4. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Melanie; Garcia-Encina, Pedro A.; Munoz, Raul [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Stams, Alfons J.M. [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Lab. of Microbiology; Rosa, Francisco de la [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2011-05-15

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 {+-} 4% (20 days), 65 {+-} 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}OH and C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6}, respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO{sub 3}{sup -} instead of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH4 degradation from 0 to 33 {+-} 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 {+-} 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 {+-} 7% in the absence and 16 {+-} 2% in the presence of bicarbonate. (orig.)

  5. Mechanism of porcine liver xanthine oxidoreductase mediated N-oxide reduction of cyadox as revealed by docking and mutagenesis studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigang Chen

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424-434 loop, exhibited a much lower K(m and a decreased V(max respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides.

  6. Wild soybean roots depend on specific transcription factors and oxidation reduction related genesin response to alkaline stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuanMu, Huizi; Wang, Yang; Bai, Xi; Cheng, Shufei; Deyholos, Michael K; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Li, Dan; Zhu, Dan; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-11-01

    Soil alkalinity is an important environmental problem limiting agricultural productivity. Wild soybean (Glycine soja) shows strong alkaline stress tolerance, so it is an ideal plant candidate for studying the molecular mechanisms of alkaline tolerance and identifying alkaline stress-responsive genes. However, limited information is available about G. soja responses to alkaline stress on a genomic scale. Therefore, in the present study, we used RNA sequencing to compare transcript profiles of G. soja root responses to sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) at six time points, and a total of 68,138,478 pairs of clean reads were obtained using the Illumina GAIIX. Expression patterns of 46,404 G. soja genes were profiled in all six samples based on RNA-seq data using Cufflinks software. Then, t12 transcription factors from MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP, C2H2, HB, and TIFY families and 12 oxidation reduction related genes were chosen and verified to be induced in response to alkaline stress by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The GO functional annotation analysis showed that besides "transcriptional regulation" and "oxidation reduction," these genes were involved in a variety of processes, such as "binding" and "response to stress." This is the first comprehensive transcriptome profiling analysis of wild soybean root under alkaline stress by RNA sequencing. Our results highlight changes in the gene expression patterns and identify a set of genes induced by NaHCO3 stress. These findings provide a base for the global analyses of G. soja alkaline stress tolerance mechanisms.

  7. Pseudo-Potentials in Dense and He-like Hot temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Claude; Rahal, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    Extending our former derivations in dense and high temperature plasmas of hydrogenic effective interactions mimiking the Heisenberg uncertainty principle [1,2], we worked out in a canonical ensemble, effective interactions in He-like plasmas where an orbital 1s electron remains strongly tighted to the He-like ions. The plasma electrons are then taken into account through appropriate Slater sums obtained in the most economical hydrogenic extension of the He-like bound and scattered states with angular orbital momentum lClementi and C. Roetti, Atomic Data and Nucl. Data Tables, 14,177(1974)

  8. Investigating students' understandings of the symbolic, macroscopic, and particulate domains of oxidation-reduction and the development of the redox concept inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandriet, Alexandra R.

    Previous literature regarding students' understandings about oxidation-reduction reactions has focused primarily on students' understandings at the symbolic domain, while literature regarding students' understandings about electrochemical cells has focused primarily on the particulate domain. This study attempts to explore the gap in the literature between students' symbolic oxidation-reduction understandings and particulate electrochemistry understandings by investigating students' understandings of multiple representations of oxidation-reduction reactions using sequential exploratory mixed-methods study. In the first phase of this study, students' misconceptions about oxidation-reduction at the symbolic, macroscopic, and particulate domains were elicited through qualitative research methods, and the results of this phase were used to create a concept inventory to measure students' understandings on a large scale in a quick and efficient manner. Six major misconceptions themes emerged during the students' interviews including 1) oxidation numbers, 2) surface features of the chemical representations, 3) electron transfer processes, 4) the role of the spectator ion, 5) the particulate and dynamic reaction process, and 6) charges & bonding. Using these themes, the Redox Concept Inventory (ROXCI) was developed and each item response choice was created based upon students' responses from the interviews. Therefore, the ROXCI is inherently designed to measure students' understandings. The ROXCI went through several rounds of revisions and evidence for the content validity, response process validity, test-criterion validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability are presented. The ROXCI was answered by more than 2000 students throughout the course of this study, and in the final round of implementations, the ROXCI was administered to over 1000 students in a national study. While previous studies have identified students' oxidation-reduction misconceptions in

  9. An Investigation of Compressed Natural Gas Engine for Nitrogen Oxides Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Diaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study describes the use of Reformer Gas (RG to alter NOx emission in a CNG-fueled HCCI engine. Comparison with diesel, natural gas has a very high octane number (≈120 and high auto-ignition temperature (≈600°C. Composed mostly of methane, natural gas is the only common fuel to manifest relatively pure, single-stage combustion. Other fuels have stronger low-temperature reaction and the required entropy for main stage combustion can be obtained from the low temperature heat release as a result of compression to moderate pressure and temperature. In deviation, the methane molecule resists destruction by free radicals and produces negligible heat release at low temperature. In consequences, in CNG-fueled HCCI engines the activation energy required for auto-ignition must be obtained by extreme levels of charge heating and compression. This causes inherently to a high rate of heat release. HCCI operation with pure CNG fuel was attained but not really practical due to very high NOx production. While HCCI operation is usually described as a low NOx technique, the knocking behavior when running with pure CNG raised the peak combustion temperature to a value well above normal combustion and the critical Zeldovich NOx production threshold, giving very high indicated NOx emissions. Approach: One approach to improving these properties is to convert part of the base CNG fuel to Reformer Gas (RG. In this study, modified COMET engine was operated in HCCI mode using a mixture of CNG fuel and simulated RG (75% H2 and 25% CO can be produced on-board from CNG using low current and non-thermal plasma boosted fuel converter. Results: This study shows that despite of having various RG mass fractions, λ was the dominant factor in reducing NOx production and increasing RG mass fraction had only a small effect on increasing NOx. This disconnect between the overall equivalence ratio and RG fraction shows that the real benefit of the

  10. Osteogenic potential of platelet-rich plasma in dental stem-cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, L; Carrillo, N; Calvo-Guirado, J L; Villamil, J; Delgado-Ruíz, R A

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the potential of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) culture media to induce osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental pulp stem cells compared with four other methods of culture. Both types of cell were collected from 35 healthy patients and cultured in five different media (Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium (DMEM); DMEM and melatonin; DMEM and PRP; DMEM and ascorbic acid 200μmol; DMEM and l-ascorbate 2-phosphate 50μmol). Cells were characterised by flow cytometry. Alizarin Red stain, alkaline phosphatase stain, and the expression of collagen type 1 (Col-1), runt-related transcription factor (RUNX2), osteoprotegerin, and osteopontin (quantified by qRT-PCR) were used to detect the osteogenic profile in each culture. Flow cytometry showed that both types of stem cell were a homogeneous mixture of CD90(+), CD105(+), STRO-1(+), CD34 (-), and CD45 (-) cells. Dental pulp stem cells that were cultured with PRP showed the best osteogenic profile (RUNX2 p=0.0002; osteoprotegerin p=0.001). The group of these stem cells that showed the best osteogenic profile was also cultured with PRP (osteoprotegerin p=0.001). Medium five (with l-ascorbate 2-phosphate 50μmol added) showed an increase in all osteogenic markers for periodontal ligament stem cells after PRP, while the best culture conditions for osteogenic expression of dental pulp stem cells after PRP was in medium four (ascorbic acid 200μmol added). These results suggested that culture in PRP induces osteogenic differentiation of both types of stem cell, modulating molecular pathways to promote bony formation. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cold atmospheric plasma discharged in water and its potential use in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this study we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP discharged in deionized (DI) water using three gases as carriers (argon (Ar), helium (He), and nitrogen (N2)). Plasma stimulated water was applied to the human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay tests showed that using Ar plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water.

  12. Effect of Ambipolar Potential on the Propulsive Performance of the GDM Plasma Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) thruster is an electric propulsion device, without electrodes, that will magnetically confine a plasma with such density and temperature...

  13. A sustained decrease in plasma fibrinolytic potential following partial liver resection or pancreas resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiss, Simone F.; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    Background: Patients undergoing partial hepatectomy have a substantial risk for postoperative venous thrombosis even in the presence of optimal thromboprophylaxis. Recently we demonstrated a hypercoagulable state following a partial hepatectomy which was related to decreased plasma levels of natural

  14. Potential role of plasma myeloperoxidase level in predicting long-term outcome of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Yalcin, Ridvan; Okyay, Kaan; Poyraz, Fatih; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Pasaoglu, Hatice; Boyaci, Bulent; Cengel, Atiye

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic importance of plasma myeloperoxidase levels in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at long-term follow-up, and we analyzed the correlations between plasma myeloperoxidase levels and other biochemical values. We evaluated 73 consecutive patients (56 men; mean age, 56 ± 11 yr) diagnosed with acute STEMI and 46 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median myeloperoxidase level (Group 1: plasma myeloperoxidase ≤ 68 ng/mL; and Group 2: plasma myeloperoxidase > 68 ng/mL). Patients were monitored for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), which were defined as cardiac death; reinfarction; new hospital admission for angina; heart failure; and revascularization procedures. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 16 months. Plasma myeloperoxidase levels were higher in STEMI patients than in control participants (82 ± 34 vs 20 ± 12 ng/mL; P = 0.001). Composite MACE occurred in 12 patients with high myeloperoxidase levels (33%) and in 4 patients with low myeloperoxidase levels (11%) (P = 0.02). The incidences of nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction and verified cardiac death were higher in the high-myeloperoxidase group. In multivariate analysis, high plasma myeloperoxidase levels were independent predictors of MACE (odds ratio = 3.843; <95% confidence interval, 1.625-6.563; P = 0.003). High plasma myeloperoxidase levels identify patients with a worse prognosis after acute STEMI at 2-year follow-up. Evaluation of plasma myeloperoxidase levels might be useful in determining patients at high risk of death and MACE who can benefit from further aggressive treatment and closer follow-up.

  15. Dynamic Electric Potential Redistribution And Its Influence On The Development Of A Dielectric Barrier Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices. The dielectric barrier plasma jet represents a hybrid between streamer corona and conventional DBD sources...capillary tip and beyond indicating a transition away from a DBD to what was essentially a classical streamer corona discharge drawing current directly...plasma jet generated in a single-electrode dielectric barrier configuration at atmospheric pressure. The influence of dielectric boundary conditions

  16. Aggregate-scale heterogeneity in iron (hydr)oxide reductive transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufano, K.J.; Benner, S.G.; Mayer, K.U.; Marcus, M.A.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-06-15

    There is growing awareness of the complexity of potential reaction pathways and the associated solid-phase transformations during the reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides, especially ferrihydrite. An important observation in static and advective-dominated systems is that microbially produced Fe(II) accelerates Ostwald ripening of ferrihydrite, thus promoting the formation of thermodynamically more stable ferric phases (lepidocrocite and goethite) and, at higher Fe(II) surface loadings, the precipitation of magnetite; high Fe(II) levels can also lead to green rust formation, and with high carbonate levels siderite may also be formed. This study expands this emerging conceptual model to a diffusion-dominated system that mimics an idealized micropore of a ferrihydrite-coated soil aggregate undergoing reduction. Using a novel diffusion cell, coupled with micro-x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies, we determined that diffusion-controlled gradients in Fe{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} result in a complex array of spatially distributed secondary mineral phases. At the diffusive pore entrance, where Fe{sup 2+} concentrations are highest, green rust and magnetite are the dominant secondary Fe (hydr)oxides (30 mol% Fe each). At intermediate distances from the inlet, green rust is not observed and the proportion of magnetite decreases from approximately 30 to <10%. Across this same transect, the proportion of goethite increases from undetectable up to >50%. At greater distances from the advective-diffusive boundary, goethite is the dominant phase, comprising between 40 and 95% of the Fe. In the presence of magnetite, lepidocrocite forms as a transient-intermediate phase during ferrihydrite-to-goethite conversion; in the absence of magnetite, conversion to goethite is more limited. These experimental observations, coupled with results of reactive transport modeling, confirm the conceptual model and illustrate the potential importance of diffusion-generated concentration gradients in

  17. Potential of electric discharge plasma methods in abatement of volatile organic compounds originating from the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, S; Klauson, D; Gregor, A

    2013-01-15

    Increased volatile organic compounds emissions and commensurate tightening of applicable legislation mean that the development and application of effective, cost-efficient abatement methods are areas of growing concern. This paper reviews the last two decades' publications on organic vapour emissions from food processing, their sources, impacts and treatment methods. An overview of the latest developments in conventional air treatment methods is presented, followed by the main focus of the paper, non-thermal plasma technology. The results of the review suggest that non-thermal plasma technology, in its pulsed corona discharge configuration, is an emerging treatment method with potential for low-cost, effective abatement of a wide spectrum of organic air pollutants. It is found that the combination of plasma treatment with catalysis is a development trend that demonstrates considerable potential. The as yet relatively small number of plasma treatment applications is considered to be due to the novelty of pulsed electric discharge techniques and a lack of reliable pulse generators and reactors. Other issues acting as barriers to widespread adoption of the technique include the possible formation of stable oxidation by-products, residual ozone and nitrogen oxides, and sensitivity towards air humidity.

  18. Spatial distribution of the electrical potential and ion concentration in the downstream area of atmospheric pressure remote plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mishin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results from an experimental study of the ion flux characteristics behind the remote plasma zone in a vertical tube reaction chamber for atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma was generated in pure He and gas mixtures: He–Ar, He–O2, He–TEOS. We previously used the reaction system He–TEOS for the synthesis of self-assembled structures of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. It is likely that the electrical parameters of the area, where nanoparticles have been transported from the synthesis zone to the substrate, play a significant role in the self-organization processes both in the vapor phase and on the substrate surface. The results from the spatial distribution of the electrical potential and ion concentration in the discharge downstream area measured by means of the external probe of original design and the special data processing method are demonstrated in this work. Positive and negatives ions with maximum concentrations of 106–107 cm−3 have been found at 10–80 mm distance behind the plasma zone. On the basis of the revealed distributions for different gas mixtures, the physical model of the observed phenomena is proposed. The model illustrates the capability of the virtual ion emitter formation behind the discharge gap and the presence of an extremum of the electrical potential at the distance of approximately 10−2–10−1 mm from the grounded electrode.

  19. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on diesel engine nitrogen oxide reduction operating with jojoba methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.E. [Mechanical Power Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mattaria, Helwan University, 9 k Eltaaweniat, Nasr Road, P.O. Box 11718, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-10-15

    Jojoba methyl ester (JME) has been used as a renewable fuel in numerous studies evaluating its potential use in diesel engines. These studies showed that this fuel is good gas oil substitute but an increase in the nitrogenous oxides emissions was observed at all operating conditions. The aim of this study mainly was to quantify the efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) when using JME fuel in a fully instrumented, two-cylinder, naturally aspirated, four-stroke direct injection diesel engine. The tests were carried out in three sections. Firstly, the measured performance and exhaust emissions of the diesel engine operating with diesel fuel and JME at various speeds under full load are determined and compared. Secondly, tests were performed at constant speed with two loads to investigate the EGR effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions including nitrogenous oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and exhaust gas temperatures. Thirdly, the effect of cooled EGR with high ratio at full load on engine performance and emissions was examined. The results showed that EGR is an effective technique for reducing NO{sub x} emissions with JME fuel especially in light-duty diesel engines. With the application of the EGR method, the CO and HC concentration in the engine-out emissions increased. For all operating conditions, a better trade-off between HC, CO and NO{sub x} emissions can be attained within a limited EGR rate of 5-15% with very little economy penalty. (author)

  20. Monoascorbate free radical-dependent oxidation-reduction reactions of liver Golgi apparatus membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Placido; Sun, Iris; Crane, Frederick L; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2010-04-01

    Golgi apparatus from rat liver contain an ascorbate free radical oxidoreductase that oxidizes NADH at neutral pH with monodehydroascorbate as acceptor to generate a membrane potential. At pH 5.0, the reverse reaction occurs from NAD(+). The electron spin resonance signal of the ascorbate-free radical and its disappearance upon the addition of NADH (pH 7) or NAD(+) (pH 5.0) confirms monodehydroascorbate involvement. Location of monodehydroascorbate both external to and within Golgi apparatus compartments is suggested from energization provided by inward or outward flux of electrons across the Golgi apparatus membranes. The isolated membranes are sealed, oriented cytoplasmic side out and impermeable to NAD(+) and ascorbate. NAD(+) derived through the action of Golgi apparatus beta-NADP phosphohydrolase is simultaneously reduced to NADH with monodehydroascorbate present. The response of the NADH- (NAD(+)-) ascorbate free radical oxidoreductase system to pH in Golgi apparatus provides a simple regulatory mechanism to control vesicle acidification.

  1. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, A L; Vercesi, A; Bababunmi, E A

    1978-04-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca(2+) and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca(2+) is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as beta-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca(2+). Successive cycles of Ca(2+) release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca(2+)-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca(2+), mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport.

  2. Promotion of iron oxide reduction and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis by DMSO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Cheng

    Full Text Available The dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, known for its capacity of reducing iron and manganese oxides, has great environmental impacts. The iron oxides reducing process is affected by the coexistence of alternative electron acceptors in the environment, while investigation into it is limited so far. In this work, the impact of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, a ubiquitous chemical in marine environment, on the reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO by S. oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Results show that DMSO promoted HFO reduction by both wild type and ΔdmsE, but had no effect on the HFO reduction by ΔdmsB, indicating that such a promotion was dependent on the DMSO respiration. With the DMSO dosing, the levels of extracellular flavins and omcA expression were significantly increased in WT and further increased in ΔdmsE. Bioelectrochemical analysis show that DMSO also promoted the extracellular electron transfer of WT and ΔdmsE. These results demonstrate that DMSO could stimulate the HFO reduction through metabolic and genetic regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1, rather than compete for electrons with HFO. This may provide a potential respiratory pathway to enhance the microbial electron flows for environmental and engineering applications.

  3. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial dissimilatory iron oxide reduction in simulated Archaean seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percak-Dennett, E M; Beard, B L; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Johnson, C M; Roden, E E

    2011-05-01

    The largest Fe isotope excursion yet measured in marine sedimentary rocks occurs in shales, carbonates, and banded iron formations of Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic age. The results of field and laboratory studies suggest a potential role for microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in producing this excursion. However, most experimental studies of Fe isotope fractionation during DIR have been conducted in simple geochemical systems, using pure Fe(III) oxide substrates that are not direct analogues to phases likely to have been present in Precambrian marine environments. In this study, Fe isotope fractionation was investigated during microbial reduction of an amorphous Fe(III) oxide-silica coprecipitate in anoxic, high-silica, low-sulphate artificial Archaean seawater at 30 °C to determine if such conditions alter the extent of reduction or isotopic fractionations relative to those observed in simple systems. The Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate was highly reducible (c. 80% reduction) in the presence of excess acetate. The coprecipitate did not undergo phase conversion (e.g. to green rust, magnetite or siderite) during reduction. Iron isotope fractionations suggest that rapid and near-complete isotope exchange took place among all Fe(II) and Fe(III) components, in contrast to previous work on goethite and hematite, where exchange was limited to the outer few atom layers of the substrate. Large quantities of low-δ(56)Fe Fe(II) (aqueous and solid phase) were produced during reduction of the Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate. These findings shed new light on DIR as a mechanism for producing Fe isotope variations observed in Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentary rocks.

  4. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  5. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment.

  6. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a

  7. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  8. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  9. Survival of Bc mesons in a hot plasma within a potential model

    CERN Document Server

    Alberico, W M; Czerski, P; De Pace, A; Nardi, M; Ratti, C

    2013-01-01

    We extend a previous work on the study of heavy charmonia and bottomonia in a deconfined quark-gluon plasma by considering the Bc family of mesons. With the introduction of this bound state of a charm and a beauty quark, we investigate at finite temperature the behavior of the quarkonium, in an energy region between the {\\psi} and the {\\Upsilon} states.

  10. THE POTENTIAL VALUE OF PHOTOTHERMAL IMAGING FOR THE TESTING OF PLASMA SPRAYED COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Almond, D.; Patel, P; Reiter, H.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements are presented which show that the photothermal technique may be used to evaluate plasma sprayed coatings. A photothermal image of a coating adhesion defect is shown and changes in photothermal signal with coating thickness are demonstrated. These measurements are compared directly with ultrasonic measurements of the same sample.

  11. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence: An oxidative-reductive mechanism between quinolone antibiotics and tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhead, Matthew S.; Wang, Heeyoung; Fallet, Marcel [Department of Chemistry, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Gross, Erin M. [Department of Chemistry, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States)], E-mail: eringross@creighton.edu

    2008-04-21

    The cyclic voltammetry and electrogenerated chemiluminescent (ECL) reactions of a series of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics were investigated in a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. 7-Piperazinyl fluoroquinolone antibiotics were found to participate as a coreactant in an oxidative-reductive ECL mechanism with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}) as the luminescent reagent. The reaction mechanism was investigated in order to understand and optimize the processes leading to light emission. The optimal conditions included a solution pH {approx}7 at a flow rate of 3.0 mL min{sup -1} with no added organic modifier and application of 1.2 V vs. a Pt quasi-reference electrode (QRE). Fluoroquinolones containing a tertiary distal nitrogen on the piperazine ring, such as enrofloxacin and ofloxacin, reacted to produce more intense ECL than those with a secondary nitrogen, such as ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. The method linear range, precision, detection limits, and sensitivity for the detection of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were compared to that of tripropylamine. The method was applied to the determination of the ciprofloxacin content in a pharmaceutical preparation. The assay is discussed in terms of its analytical figures of merit, ease of use, speed, accuracy and application to pharmaceutical samples.

  12. Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Madhavi [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lin, Chu-Ching [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Xiuhong [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Wang, Yangping [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Barkay, Tamar [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Yee, Nathan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-09

    In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

  13. Oxidation-reduction signalling components in regulatory pathways of state transitions and photosystem stoichiometry adjustment in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Ibrahim, Iskander M; Allen, John F

    2012-02-01

    State transitions and photosystem stoichiometry adjustment are two oxidation-reduction (redox)-regulated acclimatory responses in photosynthesis. State transitions are short-term adaptations that, in chloroplasts, involve reversible post-translational modification by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II). Photosystem stoichiometry adjustments are long-term responses involving transcriptional regulation of reaction centre genes. Both responses are initiated by changes in light quality and are regulated by the redox state of plastoquinone (PQ). The LHC II kinase involved in the state 2 transition is a serine/threonine kinase known as STT7 in Chlamydomonas, and as STN7 in Arabidopsis. The phospho-LHC II phosphatase that produces the state 1 transition is a PP2C-type protein phosphatase currently termed both TAP38 and PPH1. In plants and algae, photosystem stoichiometry adjustment is governed by a modified two-component sensor kinase of cyanobacterial origin - chloroplast sensor kinase (CSK). CSK is a sensor of the PQ redox state. Chloroplast sigma factor 1 (SIG1) and plastid transcription kinase (PTK) are the functional partners of CSK in chloroplast gene regulation. We suggest a signalling pathway for photosystem stoichiometry adjustment. The signalling pathways of state transitions and photosystem stoichiometry adjustments are proposed to be distinct, with the two pathways sensing PQ redox state independently of each other.

  14. Resistin in dairy cows: plasma concentrations during early lactation, expression and potential role in adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Reverchon

    Full Text Available Resistin is an adipokine that has been implicated in energy metabolism regulation in rodents but has been little studied in dairy cows. We determined plasma resistin concentrations in early lactation in dairy cows and investigated the levels of resistin mRNA and protein in adipose tissue and the phosphorylation of several components of insulin signaling pathways one week post partum (1 WPP and at five months of gestation (5 MG. We detected resistin in mature bovine adipocytes and investigated the effect of recombinant bovine resistin on lipolysis in bovine adipose tissue explants. ELISA showed that plasma resistin concentration was low before calving, subsequently increasing and reaching a peak at 1 WPP, decreasing steadily thereafter to reach pre-calving levels at 6 WPP. Plasma resistin concentration was significantly positively correlated with plasma non esterified fatty acid (NEFA levels and negatively with milk yield, dry matter intake and energy balance between WPP1 to WPP22. We showed, by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, that resistin mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue were higher at WPP1 than at 5 MG. The level of phosphorylation of several early and downstream insulin signaling components (IRβ, IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt, MAPK ERK1/2, P70S6K and S6 in adipose tissue was also lower at 1 WPP than at 5 MG. Finally, we showed that recombinant bovine resistin increased the release of glycerol and mRNA levels for ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase and HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase in adipose tissue explants. Overall, resistin levels were high in the plasma and adipose tissue and were positively correlated with NEFA levels after calving. Resistin is expressed in bovine mature adipocytes and promotes lipid mobilization in adipose explants in vitro.

  15. MicroRNA-134 as a potential plasma biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pulmonary embolism (APE remains a diagnostic challenge due to a variable clinical presentation and the lack of a reliable screening tool. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression in a wide range of pathophysiologic processes. Circulating miRNAs are emerging biomarkers in heart failure, type 2 diabetes and other disease states; however, using plasma miRNAs as biomarkers for the diagnosis of APE is still unknown. Methods Thirty-two APE patients, 32 healthy controls, and 22 non-APE patients (reported dyspnea, chest pain, or cough were enrolled in this study. The TaqMan miRNA microarray was used to identify dysregulated miRNAs in the plasma of APE patients. The TaqMan-based miRNA quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were used to validate the dysregulated miRNAs. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the miRNA identified as the candidate biomarker. Results Plasma miRNA-134 (miR-134 level was significantly higher in the APE patients than in the healthy controls or non-APE patients. The ROC curve showed that plasma miR-134 was a specific diagnostic predictor of APE with an area under the curve of 0.833 (95% confidence interval, 0.737 to 0.929; P Conclusions Our findings indicated that plasma miR-134 could be an important biomarker for the diagnosis of APE. Because of this finding, large-scale investigations are urgently needed to pave the way from basic research to clinical utilization.

  16. Plasma HSPA12B is a potential predictor for poor outcome in severe sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Zhang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Endothelium-derived molecules may be predictive to organ injury. Heat shock protein (HSP A12B is mainly located in endothelial cells, which can be detected in the plasma of septic patients. Whether it is correlated with prognosis of sepsis remains unclear. METHODS: Extracellular HSPA12B (eHSPA12B was determined in plasma of septic mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. It was also detected in plasma of patients with severe sepsis, sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and healthy volunteers. The predictive value for prognosis of severe sepsis was assessed by receiver operating curve (ROC and Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: eHSPA12B was elevated in plasma of CLP mice at 6 h and peaked at 24 h after surgery. A total of 118 subjects were included in the clinical section, including 66 patients with severe sepsis, 21 patients with sepsis, 16 patients with SIRS and 15 volunteers. Plasma eHSPA12B was significantly higher in patients with severe sepsis than in patients with sepsis, SIRS and volunteers. The level of eHSPA12B was also higher in non-survivals than survivals with severe sepsis. The area under the curve (AUC of eHSPA12B in predicting death among patients with severe sepsis was 0.782 (0.654-0.909 in ROC analysis, much higher than that of IL-6 and IL-10. Cox regression analysis showed that cardiovascular diseases, IL-6 and eHSPA12B were risk factors for mortality in patients with severe sepsis. Survival curve demonstrated a strikingly significant difference between 28-day survival rates of patients with an eHSPA12B lower or not lower than 1.466 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma eHSPA12B is elevated in both septic mice and patients. It may be a good predictor for poor outcome in patients with severe sepsis.

  17. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Peter; Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40-69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health.

  18. Chromium(VI)—induces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species,Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane otential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEYI; ZHUANGZHI-XIONG

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species(ROS) is generated,and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung(CHL)cell lines exposed to Cr(VI),Methods:CHL Cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 umol/L,2.5umol/L,0.65umol/L for 3 and 6 hours,respectively.The rpoduction of ROS was performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4;And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123,Results:The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group(P<0.01);The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10umol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours(P<0.01),at 2.5umol/L for 6 hours(P<0.01 or 0.05),Conclusion:Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane otential in CHL cell cultrues,and Cr(VI)-induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  19. Plasma lysosphingomyelin demonstrates great potential as a diagnostic biomarker for Niemann-Pick disease type C in a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W D Welford

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C is a devastating, neurovisceral lysosomal storage disorder which is characterised by variable manifestation of visceral signs, progressive neuropsychiatric deterioration and premature death, caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. Due to the complexity of diagnosis and the availability of an approved therapy in the EU, improved detection of NP-C may have a huge impact on future disease management. At the cellular level dysfunction or deficiency of either the NPC1 or NPC2 protein leads to a complex intracellular endosomal/lysosomal trafficking defect, and organ specific patterns of sphingolipid accumulation. Lysosphingolipids have been shown to be excellent biomarkers of sphingolipidosis in several enzyme deficient lysosomal storage disorders. Additionally, in a recent study the lysosphingolipids, lysosphingomyelin (SPC and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph, appeared to be elevated in the plasma of three adult NP-C patients. In order to investigate the clinical utility of SPC and GlcSph as diagnostic markers, an in-depth fit for purpose biomarker assay validation for measurement of these biomarkers in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed. Plasma SPC and GlcSph are stable and can be measured accurately, precisely and reproducibly. In a retrospective analysis of 57 NP-C patients and 70 control subjects, median plasma SPC and GlcSph were significantly elevated in NP-C by 2.8-fold and 1.4-fold respectively. For miglustat-naïve NP-C patients, aged 2-50 years, the area under the ROC curve was 0.999 for SPC and 0.776 for GlcSph. Plasma GlcSph did not correlate with SPC levels in NP-C patients. The data indicate excellent potential for the use of lysosphingomyelin in NP-C diagnosis, where it could be used to identify NP-C patients for confirmatory genetic testing.

  20. A method to measure deferasirox in plasma using HPLC coupled with MS/MS detection and its potential application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Bouchet, Stéphane; Micheau, Marguerite; Mahon, François Xavier; Moore, Nicholas; Titier, Karine; Molimard, Mathieu

    2010-08-01

    Iron overload resulting from transfusion dependency in some patients with chronic anaemia can be prevented by chelation. Deferasirox is an oral alternative to the well studied but inconvenient deferroxamine therapy. The pharmacokinetic parameters of this new drug suggest potential interindividual variability and patients might benefit from pharmacologic drug monitoring. We developed an liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method to quantify deferasirox in plasma. After protein precipitation, samples were injected onto an XTerra RP18 column with a gradient of acetonitrile and formiate buffer (4 mM, pH 3.0) with 5% methanol. Detection by electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry was performed using the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Sixty-three samples from patients treated with deferasirox were then analyzed to evaluate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. Calibration curves were linear from 0.5 to 40 microg/mL. Interday and intraday precision were lower than 8.9% and 7.3%, respectively. Bias did not exceed 12.7%. Plasma iron overload did not interfere with analysis. Plasma drug concentrations of patients treated by deferasirox were compared with plasma ferritin, considered as a marker of treatment efficacy. No statistically significant correlation was observed, though higher ferritin concentrations (>1000 microg/L, n = 30) were observed in patients with lower mean deferasirox concentration (9.5 +/- 9.1 microg/mL). This simple method is suitable for routine monitoring of deferasirox concentrations in plasma as it requires very few steps and has a short runtime. It allows evaluation of patient compliance, drug-drug interactions, and further investigations of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

  1. Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Plasma of Pregnant Women: Clinical Potential and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Sekizawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Circulating fetal DNA in maternal plasma can be used for both fetal genetic testing and evaluation of complications of pregnancy. As a prenatal genetic test, the greatest advantage of using circulating fetal DNA is the lack of risk. This approach has been applied to the diagnosis of fetal gender, fetal Rhesus D (RhD blood type, and fetal single-gene disorders. However, it only allows examination of disorders where the gene of interest is present in the fetal genome but absent from maternal DNA. Since most fetal DNA probably originates from villous trophoblasts, concentrations can be used to evaluate damage to trophoblasts, particularly in pathologic complications of pregnancy such as pre-eclampsia, invasive placenta, hyperemesis gravidarum, and trisomy 21. Fetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women thus offers a new source of data that can be used in various clinical settings.

  2. Plasma YKL-40: a new potential marker of fibrosis in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J S; Møller, S; Price, P A

    1997-01-01

    YKL-40 is released or extracted in the hepatosplanchnic system and to localize YKL-40 in liver tissue. METHODS: Plasma YKL-40 was determined by radioimmunoassay in 25 patients with liver diseases (alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 20), chronic active hepatitis (n = 2), cirrhosis of unknown aetiology (n = 2......), and fatty liver (n = 1) and in 18 subjects with normal liver function during a haemodynamic investigation with catheterization of liver vein and the femoral artery. Immunohistochemical studies of the localization of YKL-40 in cryostal liver biopsy specimens were obtained from eight other patients...... with alcoholic liver disease. RESULTS: Plasma YKL-40 was significantly increased in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (median, 523 micrograms/l; P

  3. Plasma microRNA might as a potential biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Li, Xue; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Bin-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Our study aims to investigate the expression signature of plasma microRNA-106b (miRNA-106b, miR-106b) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and chronic liver disease (CLD) patients compared with healthy controls and further evaluate the potential clinical value of miR-106b as biomarker in HCC detection. In addition, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the diagnostic performance of miR-106a/b as a biochemical marker for cancer screening. This study was divided into two phases. In the first phase, the expression levels of plasma miR-106b obtained from 108 subjects (47 HCC patients, 25 CLD patients, and 36 healthy controls) were measured by using qRT-PCR. Areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUCs) were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of plasma miR-106. In the second phase, a meta-analysis based on 11 previous researches as well as our current study was conducted to assess the potential clinical value of miR-106 in cancer detection. Plasma levels of miR-106b in HCC patients were significantly higher compared with CLD patients and healthy individuals. ROC curves suggested that plasma miR-106b yielded relative high sensitivities and specificities in differentiating HCC patients from CLD patients or healthy controls with corresponding AUC values of 0.726 and 0.879, respectively. In addition, miR-106b showed a relatively high accuracy in distinguishing CLD patients from healthy controls with its AUC value of 0.703. Furthermore, the meta-analysis for diagnostic performance of miR-106a/b showed a pooled sensitivity of 0.74, specificity of 0.75, and an AUC of 0.81. Subgroup analysis based on samples types revealed a higher diagnostic performance of miR-106 for cancer detection by using non-blood samples. Similarly, miR-106 as biomarker showed a higher diagnostic accuracy for gastric cancer detection. We found that plasma miR-106b has clinical value in the detection of HCC from healthy people and CLD patients. Further large-scale study

  4. Assessment of the toxic potential of engineered metal oxide nanomaterials using an acellular model: citrated rat blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Patrick Thomas; Callaghan, Neal Ingraham; MacCormack, Tyson James; Dieni, Christopher Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Citrated Sprague-Dawley rat blood plasma was used as a biologically relevant exposure medium to assess the acellular toxic potential of two metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), zinc oxide (nZnO), and cerium oxide (nCeO2). Plasma was incubated at 37 °C for up to 48 h with ENM concentrations ranging between 0 and 200 mg/L. The degree of ENM-induced oxidation was assessed by assaying for reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels using dichlorofluorescein (DCF), pH, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), lipase activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (PC). Whereas previous in vitro studies showed linear-positive correlations between ENM concentration and oxidative damage, our results suggested that low concentrations were generally pro-oxidant and higher concentrations appeared antioxidant or protective, as indicated by DCF fluorescence trends. nZnO and nCeO2 also affected pH in a manner dependent on concentration and elemental composition; higher nZnO concentrations maintained a more alkaline pH, while nCeO2 tended to decrease pH. No other biomarkers of oxidative damage (FRAP, MDA, PC, lipase activity) showed changes at any ENM concentration or time-point tested. Differential dissolution of the two ENMs was also observed, where as much as ∼31.3% of nZnO was instantaneously dissolved to Zn(2+ )and only negligible nCeO2 was degraded. The results suggest that the direct oxidative potential of nZnO and nCeO2 in citrated rat blood plasma is low, and that a physiological or immune response is needed to generate appreciable damage biomarkers. The data also highlight the need for careful consideration when selecting a model for assessing ENM toxicity.

  5. Dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Khrapak, Aleksei G; Molotkov, Vladimir I; Petrov, Oleg F [Institute for High Energy Densities, Associated Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khrapak, Sergei A [Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-05-31

    The properties of dusty plasmas - low-temperature plasmas containing charged macroparticles - are considered. The most important elementary processes in dusty plasmas and the forces acting on dust particles are investigated. The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of different states of strongly nonideal dusty plasmas - crystal-like, liquid-like, gas-like - are summarized. Waves and oscillations in dusty plasmas, as well as their damping and instability mechanisms, are studied. Some results on dusty plasma investigated under microgravity conditions are presented. New directions of experimental research and potential applications of dusty plasmas are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  6. The Apolipoprotein B/Apolipoprotein A-I Ratio as a Potential Marker of Plasma Atherogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya M. Kaneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The apolipoprotein (apo B/apoA-I ratio represents the balance between apoB-rich atherogenic particles and apoA-I-rich antiatherogenic particles, and this ratio is considered to be a marker of cardiovascular risk. Although many studies have demonstrated the importance of the apoB/apoA-I ratio in predicting the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease, less is known about apoB/apoA-I ratio as a marker of plasma atherogenicity. Methods. A total of 157 normolipidemic men aged 20–59 years were included in the study. The plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, apoA-I, apoB, and apoE were determined after a 12 h fasting period. Results. The median of the apoB/apoA-I ratio in the studied normolipidemic subjects was 0.52, with values ranging from 0.19 to 2.60. The percentage of subjects with the apoB/apoA-I ratio exceeding 0.9 (the accepted risk value of cardiovascular disease was 19.1%. The subjects with apoB/apoA-I>0.9 were characterized by higher TG levels and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP and lower values of ratio of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C to apoB (LDL-C/apoB and apoE levels compared with men with apoB/apoA-I<0.9. Conclusion. Despite normolipidemia, the subjects with the unfavorable apoB/apoA-I ratio had more atherogenic lipid profile.

  7. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  8. Approximate, semi-implicit calculation of 3D electrostatic potential in a self-consistent plasma simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, E.R.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Numerical Modeling of low pressure plasma reactors is subject to numerous time step constraints, and among the most restrictive of these is the dielectric relaxation time. In recent years, semi-implicit flux-correction techniques have allowed plasma modelers to loosen the dielectric relaxation time step restriction. However, since these simulations do solve a form of Poisson`s equation, they still have a restriction on time step based on a modified, albeit less restrictive, dielectric relaxation time. For some parameter spaces this is acceptable, but for very large scale simulations (for example in three dimensions) and for simulations of systems having long time scales, obtaining a longer time step is crucial. Using a generalization of a technique already presented, the authors present a method for obtaining an approximate electrostatic potential which has no dielectric relaxation time restriction. Implementation is of comparable difficulty to that of a conventional Poisson`s equation, and is no more computationally intensive. The module is implemented within a large, self-consistent hybrid plasma equipment model (HPEM). A rearranged continuity equation is solved, and charge neutrality is assumed. A comparison to the HPEM running with Poisson`s equation is presented, for both two and three dimensions, and for electropositive and electronegative gases.

  9. Platelet-rich plasma gel composited with nondegradable porous polyurethane scaffolds as a potential auricular cartilage alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Qin, Haiyan; Feng, Zhihong; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-02-01

    Total auricular reconstruction is still a challenge, and autologous cartilage transplant is the main therapy so far. Tissue engineering provides a promising method for auricular cartilage reconstruction. However, although degradable framework demonstrated excellent initial cosmetic details, it is difficult to maintain the auricular contour over time and the metabolites tended to be harmful to human body. In this study, biocompatible and safe nondegradable elastic polyurethane was used to make porous scaffold in specific details by rapid prototyping technology. Platelet-rich plasma contains fibrin and abundant autologous growth factors, which was used as cell carriers for in vitro expanded cells. When crosslinking polyurethane framework, platelet-rich plasma and cells together, we successfully made polyurethane/platelet-rich plasma/cell composites, and implanted them into dorsal subcutaneous space of nude mice. The results showed that this method resulted in more even cell distribution and higher cell density, promoted chondrocyte proliferation, induced higher level expressions of aggrecan and type II collagen gene, increased content of newly developed glycosaminoglycans, and produced high-quality cartilaginous tissue. This kind of cartilage tissue engineering approach may be a potential promising alternative for external ear reconstruction.

  10. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  11. Hundred joules plasma focus device as a potential pulsed source for in vitro cancer cell irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, J.; Moreno, J.; Andaur, R.; Armisen, R.; Morales, D.; Marcelain, K.; Avaria, G.; Bora, B.; Davis, S.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma focus devices may arise as useful source to perform experiments aimed to study the effects of pulsed radiation on human cells in vitro. In the present work, a table top hundred joules plasma focus device, namely "PF-400J", was adapted to irradiate colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1. For pulsed x-rays, the doses (energy absorbed per unit mass, measured in Gy) were measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLD-100 dosimeters). The neutron fluence and the average energy were used to estimate the pulsed neutron doses. Fifty pulses of x-rays (0.12 Gy) and fifty pulses of neutrons (3.5 μGy) were used to irradiate the cancer cells. Irradiation-induced DNA damage and cell death were assessed at different time points after irradiation. Cell death was observed using pulsed neutron irradiation, at ultralow doses. Our results indicate that the PF-400J can be used for in vitro assessment of the effect of pulsed radiation in cancer cell research.

  12. Potential for osseous regeneration of platelet rich plasma: a comparitive study in mandibular third molar sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, G K; Sripathi Rao, B H

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma in soft tissue healing & bone regeneration in mandibular third molar extraction socket. The study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars. Following extraction, autologous Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) was placed in one extraction socket, the other socket was studied as the control site with no PRP. The patients were assessed for postoperative pain, soft tissue healing, bone blending and trabecular formation. Radiological assessment of the extraction site was done for a period of 4 months to evaluate the change in bone density. Pain was less in the study site compared to control site, soft tissue healing was better in study site. Evaluation for bone blending and trabecular bone formation started earlier in PRP site compared to control, non PRP site. The evaluation of bone density by radiological assessment showed the grey level values calculated after 4 months at the PRP site were comparatively higher than the average baseline value of bone density at extraction site in control site. The study showed that autologous PRP is biocompatible and has significantly improved soft tissue healing, bone regeneration and increase in bone density in extraction sockets. However a more elaborate study with a larger number of clinical cases is essential to be more conclusive regarding its efficacy.

  13. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Matteucci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na+/H+ exchange and HC3 -/Cl- anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore damaged proteins, it is equipped with high activity of protective enzymes. Redox changes in the cell initiate various signalling pathways. Plasma membrane oxido-reductases (PMORs are transmembrane electron transport systems that have been found in the membranes of all cells and have been extensively characterized in the human erythrocyte. Erythrocyte PMORs transfer reducing equivalents from intracellular reductants to extracellular oxidants, thus their most important role seems to be to enable the cell respond to changes in intra- and extra-cellular redox environments.So far the activity of erythrocyte PMORs in disease states has not been systematically investigated. This review summarizes present knowledge on erythrocyte electron transfer activity in humans (health, type 1 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic uremia and hypothesizes an integrated model of the functional organization of erythrocyte plasma membrane where electron pathways work in parallel with transport metabolons to maintain redox homeostasis.

  14. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio

    2007-09-17

    Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na(+)/H(+) exchange and HC(3) (-)/Cl(-) anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore damaged proteins, it is equipped with high activity of protective enzymes. Redox changes in the cell initiate various signalling pathways. Plasma membrane oxido-reductases (PMORs) are transmembrane electron transport systems that have been found in the membranes of all cells and have been extensively characterized in the human erythrocyte. Erythrocyte PMORs transfer reducing equivalents from intracellular reductants to extracellular oxidants, thus their most important role seems to be to enable the cell respond to changes in intra- and extra-cellular redox environments.So far the activity of erythrocyte PMORs in disease states has not been systematically investigated. This review summarizes present knowledge on erythrocyte electron transfer activity in humans (health, type 1 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic uremia) and hypothesizes an integrated model of the functional organization of erythrocyte plasma membrane where electron pathways work in parallel with transport metabolons to maintain redox homeostasis.

  15. Investigation of toroidal acceleration and potential acceleration forces in EAST and J-TEXT plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudi; Pan, Xiayun; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guangming; Wang, Yuming; Han, Xiang; Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhongyong; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth; Rice, John; Morita, Shigeru; Li, Yadong; Zhuang, Ge; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian; Shi, Yuejiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to produce intrinsic rotation, bulk plasmas must be collectively accelerated by the net force exerted on them, which results from both driving and damping forces. So, to study the possible mechanisms of intrinsic rotation generation, it is only needed to understand characteristics of driving and damping terms because the toroidal driving and damping forces induce net acceleration which generates intrinsic rotation. Experiments were performed on EAST and J-TEXT for ohmic plasmas with net counter- and co-current toroidal acceleration generated by density ramping up and ramping down. Additionally on EAST, net co-current toroidal acceleration was also formed by LHCD or ICRF. For the current experimental results, toroidal acceleration was between - 50 km/s^2 in counter-current direction and 70 km/s^2 in co-current direction. According to toroidal momentum equation, toroidal electric field (E\\-(\\g(f))), electron-ion toroidal friction, and toroidal viscous force etc. may play roles in the evolution of toroi...

  16. Potential biomarkers for Turner in maternal plasma: possibility for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Papantoniou, Nikos; Vougas, Konstantinos; Antsaklis, Aris; Fountoulakis, Michael; Mavrou, Ariadni; Tsangaris, George Th

    2010-10-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, caused by the complete or partial absence of one X chromosome. To identify biomarkers for TS, we compared the protein composition of maternal plasma samples from pregnant women with normal and TS fetuses, using a proteomic approach consisting of 2D-E separation and MS analysis for the identification of the differentially expressed proteins. Samples were routinely obtained in the second trimester of pregnancy, stored, and used after prenatal determination of the fetal karyotype. Nine proteins (C1S, CO3, CLUS, AFAM, HABP2, IGHA1, HPT, SHBG, and CD5L) were significantly increased in the plasma of women carrying TS fetuses, whereas KNG1, IGJ, and TTHY were decreased. Identified proteins were further evaluated by immunoblot analysis while functional network association was carried out to asses significance. The identification of specific biomarkers may facilitate the development of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis and improve our understanding of the pathology of TS. Nevertheless, testing a larger cohort of pregnant women is necessary to evaluate the relevance of the reported findings.

  17. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.; Belenkiy, V. Ya.; Koleva, E. G.; Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 1016 m-3, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A.m-2, i.e. 8 mA for a 3-10 cm2 collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  18. Key steps in type III secretion system (T3SS) towards translocon assembly with potential sensor at plant plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Dong, Hansong

    2015-09-01

    Many plant- and animal-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from bacterial cells into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. The effector translocation occurs through an integral component of T3SS, the channel-like translocon, assembled by hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteinaceous translocators in a two-step process. In the first, hydrophilic translocators localize to the tip of a proteinaceous needle in animal pathogens, or a proteinaceous pilus in plant pathogens, and associate with hydrophobic translocators, which insert into host plasma membranes in the second step. However, the pilus needs to penetrate plant cell walls in advance. All hydrophilic translocators so far identified in plant pathogens are characteristic of harpins: T3SS accessory proteins containing a unitary hydrophilic domain or an additional enzymatic domain. Two-domain harpins carrying a pectate lyase domain potentially target plant cell walls and facilitate the penetration of the pectin-rich middle lamella by the bacterial pilus. One-domain harpins target plant plasma membranes and may play a crucial role in translocon assembly, which may also involve contrapuntal associations of hydrophobic translocators. In all cases, sensory components in the target plasma membrane are indispensable for the membrane recognition of translocators and the functionality of the translocon. The conjectural sensors point to membrane lipids and proteins, and a phosphatidic acid and an aquaporin are able to interact with selected harpin-type translocators. Interactions between translocators and their sensors at the target plasma membrane are assumed to be critical for translocon assembly.

  19. Dynamical properties of non-ideal plasma on the basis of effective potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Kodanova, S. K.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Issanova, M. K. [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi str., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, stopping power has been calculated on the basis of the Coulomb logarithm using the effective potentials. Calculations of the Coulomb logarithm and stopping power for different interaction potentials and degrees of ionization are compared. The comparison with the data of other theoretical and experimental works was carried out.

  20. A potential role for plasma uric acid in the endothelial pathology of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neida K Mita-Mendoza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokinemia and systemic activation of the microvascular endothelium are central to the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Recently, 'parasite-derived' uric acid (UA was shown to activate human immune cells in vitro, and plasma UA levels were associated with inflammatory cytokine levels and disease severity in Malian children with malaria. Since UA is associated with endothelial inflammation in non-malaria diseases, we hypothesized that elevated UA levels contribute to the endothelial pathology of P. falciparum malaria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured levels of UA and soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, E-selectin (sE-Selectin, thrombomodulin (sTM, tissue factor (sTF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the plasma of Malian children aged 0.5-17 years with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 487 and non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM, n = 68. In 69 of these children, we measured these same factors once when they experienced a malaria episode and twice when they were healthy (i.e., before and after the malaria transmission season. We found that levels of UA, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin and sTM increase during a malaria episode and return to basal levels at the end of the transmission season (p<0.0001. Plasma levels of UA and these four endothelial biomarkers correlate with parasite density and disease severity. In children with UM, UA levels correlate with parasite density (r = 0.092, p = 0.043, sICAM-1 (r = 0.255, p<0.0001 and sTM (r = 0.175, p = 0.0001 levels. After adjusting for parasite density, UA levels predict sTM levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Elevated UA levels may contribute to malaria pathogenesis by damaging endothelium and promoting a procoagulant state. The correlation between UA levels and parasite densities suggests that parasitized erythrocytes are one possible source of excess UA. UA-induced shedding of

  1. A potential role for plasma uric acid in the endothelial pathology of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita-Mendoza, Neida K; van de Hoef, Diana L; Lopera-Mesa, Tatiana M; Doumbia, Saibou; Konate, Drissa; Doumbouya, Mory; Gu, Wenjuan; Anderson, Jennifer M; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Rodriguez, Ana; Fay, Michael P; Diakite, Mahamadou; Long, Carole A; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokinemia and systemic activation of the microvascular endothelium are central to the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Recently, 'parasite-derived' uric acid (UA) was shown to activate human immune cells in vitro, and plasma UA levels were associated with inflammatory cytokine levels and disease severity in Malian children with malaria. Since UA is associated with endothelial inflammation in non-malaria diseases, we hypothesized that elevated UA levels contribute to the endothelial pathology of P. falciparum malaria. We measured levels of UA and soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), E-selectin (sE-Selectin), thrombomodulin (sTM), tissue factor (sTF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the plasma of Malian children aged 0.5-17 years with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 487) and non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM, n = 68). In 69 of these children, we measured these same factors once when they experienced a malaria episode and twice when they were healthy (i.e., before and after the malaria transmission season). We found that levels of UA, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin and sTM increase during a malaria episode and return to basal levels at the end of the transmission season (p<0.0001). Plasma levels of UA and these four endothelial biomarkers correlate with parasite density and disease severity. In children with UM, UA levels correlate with parasite density (r = 0.092, p = 0.043), sICAM-1 (r = 0.255, p<0.0001) and sTM (r = 0.175, p = 0.0001) levels. After adjusting for parasite density, UA levels predict sTM levels. Elevated UA levels may contribute to malaria pathogenesis by damaging endothelium and promoting a procoagulant state. The correlation between UA levels and parasite densities suggests that parasitized erythrocytes are one possible source of excess UA. UA-induced shedding of endothelial TM may represent a novel mechanism of malaria pathogenesis, in

  2. Potential role of kinetic Alfvén waves and whistler waves in solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations indicate the signatures of highly oblique kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and whistler waves in the solar wind plasma. In the present work, we explore the possible role of KAWs and whistler waves in the observed solar wind magnetic turbulent spectrum. The nonlinear spatial evolution of KAW is studied including the effects of the ponderomotive force which results in intense localized structures due to the background density modification. Weak quasi-transverse whistler wave propagating through these localized structures also gets localized in the form of small-scale localized structures. We present numerically calculated magnetic power spectra for both KAW as well as for whistler wave. Our obtained results demonstrate the important role that KAWs and whistler waves play in the energy cascading from larger to smaller scales. The relevance of these results to recent spacecraft observations is also pointed out.

  3. Plasma viscosity: a potential predictor of both medical treatment response and clinical stage of ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolga, Yakar; Mansur, Cosar Arif; Savas, Gokturk Hu Seyin; Gulhan, Unler Kanat Ayse; Alper, Parlakgumus; Ilknur, Kozanoglu; Ender, Serin

    2016-01-01

    La colite ulcerosa (UC) è una delle maggiori forme di colonpatia infiammatoria cronica recidivante. La capacità di identificare tipo, gravità e sensibilità alla terapia su parametri di laboratorio è da tempo oggetto di ricerca degli studi clinici. Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di accertare la relazione tra la viscosità del plasma (PV), l’attività della malattia e la risposta al trattamento medico. Lo studio si è svolto su 105 pazienti con UC e 42 volontari sani. I prelievi di sangue sono stati utilizzati per valutare la viscosità del plasma (PV), la velocità di eritrosedimentazione (ESR), la proteina C-reattiva ultrasensibile (hs-CRP), il D-dimero e il fibrinogeno. I pazienti con UC sono stati raggruppati in relazione al grado di attività flogistica (cioè 59 attivi e 46 in remissione). La PV è risultata più elevata in quelli con UC attiva rispetto a quella dei soggetti in remissione o nei soggetti sani. È risultata significativamente più elevata sia nei casi di UC refrattaria al trattamento steroideo rispetto a quelli sensibili (p< 0.001), e nelle UC rafrattarie alla ciclosrporina rispetto a quelli sensibili (p= 0.003). Con l’aumento della PV nei pazienti affetti da UC sono risultati significativamente associati il punteggio del SCCAI (Increased Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index), dell’EGS (Endoscopic Grading Scale) e del HAD (Histological Disease Activity (HAD). Si conclude che la PV è un marker utile per la previsione di sensibilità al trattamento sterorideo e con ciclosporina nei pazienti con UC attiva. Potrebbe essere rimpiazzata dalla ESR e dalla hs-CRP come misura della risposta in fase acuta in quanto sufficientemente sensibile. Questi risultati possono essere utili per l’identificazione dei pazienti con UC attiva da destinare alla colectomia.

  4. Isolation and characterization of glutathione reductase from Physarum polycephalum and stage-specific expression of the enzyme in life-cycle stages with different oxidation-reduction levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yoshiko; Kohama, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Yu-Ji; Akasaka, Kenichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Physarum polycephalum has a life cycle with several distinct phases that have different oxidation-reduction requirements. To investigate the relationship between the life cycle and the oxidation-reduction state, we isolated glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) from Physarum microplasmodia. The enzyme was found to be a homodimer with a subunit M(r) of 49,000, and K(m) values for oxidized glutathione and NADPH of 40 and 28.6 microM, respectively. We then constructed a cDNA library from microplasmodium mRNA and cloned GR cDNA from the library. The isolated cDNA consisted of 1,475 bp encoding a polypeptide of 452 amino acids. The amino acid sequence similarity was about 50% with GRs of other organisms, and several conserved sequence motifs thought to be necessary for activity are evident in the Physarum enzyme. Escherichia coli transformed with an expression vector containing the cDNA synthesized the active GR. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that the GR gene is present as a single copy in the Physarum genome. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR analysis detected GR mRNA expression in the microplasmodium, plasmodium, and sclerotium, but not in the spore or flagellate. GR activity was low in the spore and flagellate. These results suggest that the glutathione oxidation-reduction system relates to the Physarum life cycle.

  5. Thermodynamics of the quark-gluon plasma at finite chemical potential: color path integral Monte Carlo results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V.S.; Fortov, V.E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Leibnizstrasse 15, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ivanov, Y.B. [National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow, Russia, National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ilgenfritz, E.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Reseach, Joliot-Curie str. 6, Dubna, 141980, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-01

    Based on the constituent quasiparticle model of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), color quantum path-integral Monte-Carlo (PIMC) calculations of the thermodynamic properties of the QGP are performed. We extend our previous zero chemical potential simulations to the QGP at finite baryon chemical potential. The results indicate that color PIMC can be applied not only above the QCD critical temperature T{sub c} but also below T{sub c}. Besides reproducing the lattice equation of state our approach yields also valuable additional insight into the internal structure of the QGP, via the pair distribution functions of the various quasiparticles. In particular, the pair distribution function of gluons reflects the existence of gluon-gluon bound states at low temperatures and μ = 175 MeV, i.e. glueballs, while meson-like bound states are not found. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA 300M Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; KamHawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA 300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 DT,m downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 DT,m from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the nearfield, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was small, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA 300 M.

  7. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  8. Deoxycytidine in human plasma: potential for protecting leukemic cells during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J D; Strock, D J; Teik, J E; Katz, T B; Marcel, P D

    1997-06-24

    Degradation of DNA produces deoxycytidine. Metabolism of deoxycytidine to dCTP inhibits phosphorylation of cytosine arabinoside (araC), fludarabine (FaraA) and 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (CdA) by deoxycytidine kinase. This study measured plasma deoxycytidine in healthy adults and two leukemia patients and then determined how clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels would affect drug toxicity in human leukemia and lymphoma cells. Deoxycytidine was well below 0.05 microM in ten healthy persons. In the leukemia patients it was <0.05 and 0.44 microM before chemotherapy, rising to 10.3 and 5.5 microM during treatment. A broad range of clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels were high enough to profoundly decrease araC, FaraA and CdA toxicity in MOLT3, CA46 and HL60 leukemia/lymphoma cells and to change dCTP, DNA synthesis and drug incorporation into DNA in a manner consistent with prior mechanistic studies. Varying deoxycytidine levels could be an important factor influencing leukemia therapy.

  9. Hot QCD equation of state and quark-gluon plasma-- finite quark chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    We explore the relevance of a hot QCD equation of state of $O[g^6\\ln(1/g)]$, which has been obtained\\cite{avrn} for non-vanishing quark-chemical potentials to heavy ion collisions. Employing a method proposed in a recent paper \\cite{chandra1}, we use the EOS to determine a host of thermodynamic quantities, the energy density, specific heat, entropy dnesity, and the temperature dependence of screening lengths, with the behaviour of QGP at RHIC and LHC in mind. We also investigate the sensitivity of these observables to the quark chemical potential.

  10. Identification of plasma microRNAs as new potential biomarkers with high diagnostic power in human cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Carpi, Sara; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Dubbini, Nevio; Lanza, Maria; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Nieri, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Melanoma is a devastating disease with few therapeutic options in the advanced stage and with the urgent need of reliable biomarkers for early detection. In this context, circulating microRNAs are raising great interest as diagnostic biomarkers. We analyzed the expression profiles of 21 selected microRNAs in plasma samples from melanoma patients and healthy donors to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers. Data analysis was performed using global mean normalization and NormFinder algorithm. Linear regression followed by receiver operating characteristic analyses was carried out to evaluate whether selected plasma miRNAs were able to discriminate between cases and controls. We found five microRNAs that were differently expressed among cases and controls after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Specifically, miR-15b-5p, miR-149-3p, and miR-150-5p were up-regulated in plasma of melanoma patients compared with healthy controls, while miR-193a-3p and miR-524-5p were down-regulated. Receiver operating characteristic analyses of these selected microRNAs provided area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values ranging from 0.80 to 0.95. Diagnostic value of microRNAs is improved when considering the combination of miR-149-3p, miR-150-5p, and miR-193a-3p. The triple classifier had a high capacity to discriminate between melanoma patients and healthy controls, making it suitable to be used in early melanoma diagnosis.

  11. Identification of a DNA methylome profile of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and potential plasma epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufeng Li

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a critical epigenetic mechanism involved in key cellular processes. Its deregulation has been linked to many human cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. This study was designed to explore the whole methylation status of ESCC and to identify potential plasma biomarkers for early diagnosis. We used Infinium Methylation 450k array to analyze ESCC tissues (n = 4, paired normal surrounding tissues (n = 4 and normal mucosa from healthy individuals (n = 4, and combined these with gene expression data from the GEO database. One hundred and sixty eight genes had differentially methylated CpG sites in their promoter region and a gene expression pattern inverse to the direction of change in DNA methylation. These genes were involved in several cancer-related pathways. Three genes were validated in additional 42 ESCC tissues and paired normal surrounding tissues. The methylation frequency of EPB41L3, GPX3, and COL14A1 were higher in tumor tissues than in normal surrounding tissues (P < 0.017. The higher methylation frequency of EPB41l3 was correlated with large tumor size (P = 0.044 and advanced pT tumor stage (P = 0.001. The higher methylation frequency of GPX3 and COL14A1 were correlated with advanced pN tumor stage (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001. The methylation of EPB41L3, GPX3, and COL14A1 genes were only found in ESCC patients' plasma, but not in normal individuals upon testing 42 ESCC patients and 50 healthy individuals. Diagnostic sensitivity was increased when methylation of any of the 3 genes were counted (64.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These differentially methylated genes in plasma may be used as biomarkers for early diagnosis of ESCC.

  12. Intracellular protein transport to the thyrocyte plasma membrane: potential implications for thyroid physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvan, P; Kim, P S; Kuliawat, R; Prabakaran, D; Muresan, Z; Yoo, S E; Abu Hossain, S

    1997-02-01

    We present a snapshot of developments in epithelial biology that may prove helpful in understanding cellular aspects of the machinery designed for the synthesis of thyroid hormones on the thyroglobulin precursor. The functional unit of the thyroid gland is the follicle, delimited by a monolayer of thyrocytes. Like the cells of most simple epithelia, thyrocytes exhibit specialization of the cell surface that confronts two different extracellular environments-apical and basolateral, which are separated by tight junctions. Specifically, the basolateral domain faces the interstitium/bloodstream, while the apical domain is in contact with the lumen that is the primary target for newly synthesized thyroglobulin secretion and also serves as a storage depot for previously secreted protein. Thyrocytes use their polarity in several important ways, such as for maintaining basolaterally located iodide uptake and T4 deiodination, as well apically located iodide efflux and iodination machinery. The mechanisms by which this organization is established, fall in large part under the more general cell biological problem of intracellular sorting and trafficking of different proteins en route to the cell surface. Nearly all exportable proteins begin their biological life after synthesis in an intracellular compartment known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), upon which different degrees of difficulty may be encountered during nascent polypeptide folding and initial export to the Golgi complex. In these initial stages, ER molecular chaperones can assist in monitoring protein folding and export while themselves remaining as resident proteins of the thyroid ER. After export from the ER, most subsequent sorting for protein delivery to apical or basolateral surfaces of thyrocytes occurs within another specialized intracellular compartment known as the trans-Golgi network. Targeting information encoded in secretory proteins and plasma membrane proteins can be exposed or buried at different

  13. Potential plasma biomarkers for progression of knee osteoarthritis using glycoproteomic analysis coupled with a 2D-LC-MALDI system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda Isao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although osteoarthritis (OA is a highly prevalent joint disease, to date, no reliable biomarkers have been found for the disease. In this study, we attempted to identify factors the amounts of which significantly change in association with the progression of knee OA. Methods A total of 68 subjects with primary knee OA were enrolled in the study. These subjects were followed up over an 18-month period, and plasma and serum samples were obtained together with knee radiographs every 6 months, i.e., 0, 6, 12 and 18 months after the enrollment. Progressors and non-progressors were determined from the changes on radiographs, and plasma samples from those subjects were subjected to N-glycoproteomic 2D-LC-MALDI analysis. MS peaks were identified, and intensities for respective peaks were compared between the progressors and non-progressors to find the peak intensities of which differed significantly between the two groups of subjects. Proteins represented by the chosen peaks were identified by MS/MS analysis. Expression of the identified proteins was evaluated in synovial tissues from 10 OA knee joints by in situ hybridization, western blotting analysis and ELISA. Results Among the subjects involved in the study, 3 subjects were determined to be progressors, and 6 plasma and serum samples from these subjects were subjected to the analysis together with another 6 samples from the non-progressors. More than 3000 MS peaks were identified by N-glycoproteomic 2D-LC-MALDI analysis. Among them, 4 peaks were found to have significantly different peak intensities between the progressors and non-progressors. MS/MS analysis revealed that these peaks represented clusterin, hemopexin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein-2, and macrophage stimulating protein, respectively. The expression of these genes in OA synovium was confirmed by in situ hybridization, and for clusterin and hemopexin, by western blotting analysis and ELISA as well. Conclusions In this

  14. Plasma miR-126 Is a Potential Biomarker for Early Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Susceptible Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a major public health problem in China. Diagnostic markers are urgently needed to identify individuals at risk of developing T2DM and encourage them to adapt to a healthier life style. Circulating miRNAs present important sources of noninvasive biomarkers of various diseases. Recently, a novel plasma microRNA signature was identified in T2DM. Here, we evaluated the T2DM-related miRNA signature in plasma of three study groups: normal (fasting glucose (FG, 4.8–5.2 mmol/L, T2DM-susceptible (FG, 6.1–6.9 mmol/L, and T2DM individuals (FG, ≥7.0 mmol/L and tested the feasibility of using circulating miRNAs to identify individuals at risk of developing T2DM. Among the 5 miRNAs included in the signature, miR-29b and miR-28-3p are not detectable. miR-15a and miR-223 have comparable expression levels among three groups. Notably, miR-126 is the only miRNA that showed significantly reduced expression in susceptible individuals and T2DM patients compared to normal individuals, suggesting that miR-126 in circulation may serve as a potential biomarker for early identification of susceptible individuals to T2DM.

  15. A new Differential Equation for Anomalous Diffusion with Potential Applications to Nonlinear Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, N. W.; Credgington, D.; Sanchez, R.; Chapman, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Since the 1960s Mandelbrot has advocated the use of fractals for the description of the non-Euclidean geometry of many aspects of nature. In particular he proposed two kinds of model to capture persistence in time (his Joseph effect, common in hydrology and with fractional Brownian motion as the prototpe) and/or prone to heavy tailed jumps (the Noah effect, typical of economic indices, for which he proposed Lévy flights as an exemplar). Both effects are now well demonstrated in space plasmas, notably in indices quantifying Earth's auroral currents and in the turbulent solar wind. Models have, however, typically emphasised one of the Noah and Joseph parameters (the Lévy exponent μ and the temporal exponent β) at the other's expense. I will describe recent work [1] in which we studied a simple self-affine stable model-linear fractional stable motion, LFSM, which unifies both effects. I will discuss how this resolves some contradictions seen in earlier work. Such Noah-Joseph hybrid ("ambivalent" [2]) behaviour is highly topical in physics but is typically studied in the paradigm of the continuous time random walk (CTRW) [2,3] rather than LFSM. I will clarify the physical differences between these two pictures and present a recently-derived diffusion equation for LFSM. This replaces the second order spatial derivative in the equation of fBm [4] with a fractional derivative of order μ, but retains a diffusion coefficient with a power law time dependence rather than a fractional derivative in time (c.f. [2,3]). Intriguingly the self-similarity exponent extracted from the CTRW differs from that seen in LFSM. In the CTRW it is the ratio of μ to a temporal exponent, in LFSM it is an additive function of them. I will also show work in progress using an LFSM model and simple analytic scaling arguments to study the problem of the area between an LFSM curve and a threshold-related to the burst size measure introduced by Takalo and Consolini into solar- terrestrial physics

  16. Neutralization potential of the plasma of HIV-1 infected Indian patients in the context of anti-V3 antibody content and antiretroviral therapy. [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alok Kumar; Andrabi, Raiees; Prakash, Somi Sankaran; Kumar, Rajesh; Choudhury, Shubhasree Dutta; Wig, Naveet; Biswas, Ashutosh; Hazarika, Anjali; Luthra, Kalpana

    2012-02-01

    We assessed the anti-V3 antibody content and viral neutralization potential of the plasma of 63 HIV-1-infected patients (antiretroviral naïve=39, treated=24) against four primary isolates (PIs) of clade C and a tier 1 clade B isolate SF162. Depletion and inhibition of anti-V3 antibodies in the plasma of five patients with high titers of anti-V3 antibodies led to modest change in the neutralization percentage against two PIs (range 0-21%). The plasma of antiretroviral-treated patients exhibited higher neutralization potential than that of the drug-naïve plasmas against the four PIs tested which was further evidenced by a follow-up study.

  17. Potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection may reduce the atherogenic index of plasma in Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shi-Wei; Lu, Yun; Li, Feng; Shen, Zhen-Hai; Xu, Ming; Yao, Wei-Feng; Feng, Yin-Bo; Yun, Jing-Ting; Wang, Ya-Ping; Ling, Wang; Qi, Hua-Jin; Tong, Da-Xin

    2015-04-01

    The major purpose of this study was to assess the association between the potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Among 1597 men aged ⩾45 years who received health examinations and lived in previous schistosomiasis-endemic regions of China, 465 patients with previous schistosome infection were selected as study subjects, and 1132 subjects formed the control group. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease were measured and compared between the previous schistosome infection and control groups. The Atherogenic Index of Plasma, triglycerides, waist circumference and body mass index were significantly lower in the previous schistosome infection group than in the control group (all P values immune response against schistosome infections. The development of a schistosomiasis vaccine may effectively prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  18. The diagnostic potential of maternal plasma in detecting fetal diseases by DNA test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Biswajit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, DNA based investigations for fetal diseases are done by chorionic villous sampling and amniocentesis. Both are invasive techniques. Recently, molecular diagnosis has also been made possible in early pregnancy from maternal blood which is noninvasive and advantageous. Most of the researches have tried to identify the Y chromosome marker(s to detect a male fetus and paternally inherited allele. This is currently helpful to detect a very few genetic disorders including Rh D status in Rh negative women in early pregnancy and preeclampsia a few weeks preceding the clinical onset. This is a potential area for prenatal diagnosis in future.

  19. Static quark-antiquark potential in the quark-gluon plasma from lattice QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2015-02-27

    We present a state-of-the-art determination of the complex valued static quark-antiquark potential at phenomenologically relevant temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. Its values are obtained from nonperturbative lattice QCD simulations using spectral functions extracted via a novel Bayesian inference prescription. We find that the real part, both in a gluonic medium, as well as in realistic QCD with light u, d, and s quarks, lies close to the color singlet free energies in Coulomb gauge and shows Debye screening above the (pseudo)critical temperature T_{c}. The imaginary part is estimated in the gluonic medium, where we find that it is of the same order of magnitude as in hard-thermal loop resummed perturbation theory in the deconfined phase.

  20. Plasma variables, meat quality, and glycolytic potential in broilers stunned with different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Ji, F; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Zhang, H J; Zhang, L; Qi, G H

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of different CO(2) concentrations on blood variables, glycolytic potential (GP), and meat quality of hot-boned muscles in broilers. Thirty broilers were exposed to one of the following 5 gas mixtures for 90 s: 40% CO(2) + 30% O(2) + N(2) (control), 30% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G30%), 40% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G40%), 50% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G50%), and 60% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G60%). Samples were taken from the pectoralis major (PM), musculus iliofibularis (MI), and tibialis anterior muscles 45 min postmortem. The ultimate pH in both the PM (vs. G30% and G40%) and MI (vs. G40%) was decreased with G60% (P 0.05). In conclusion, stunning broilers with low CO(2) levels (30 and 40%) improved meat quality but had no advantage in animal welfare compared with high CO(2) levels (50 and 60%).

  1. Evaluation and Optimization of Paper-Based SERS Substrate for Potential Label-Free Raman Analysis of Seminal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zufang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization and optimization of paper SERS substrate were performed in detail, in which morphologies and distribution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs on the paper substrate pretreated with different concentrations of NaCl and the subsequent soaking with colloidal AgNPs for different period of time were evaluated. Our results show that both NaCl concentration and soaking time with AgNPs have a significant influence on SERS enhancement, showing that an optimal EF of 2.27 × 107 was achieved when the paper substrate was treated with 20 mM NaCl and one-hour soak with AgNPs. Moreover, seminal plasma (SP was specifically selected to evaluate the performance of paper-based SERS substrate for potential clinical detection and diagnosis. The optimization of the paper SERS substrate demonstrates potential applications in reliable on-site detection of SP and clinical diagnosis of fertility-related diseases as well.

  2. [Effect of supposed radioprotectors on oxidation-reduction of vitamin E in the tissues of irradiated rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranich, A V; Pocherniaeva, V F; Dubinskaia, G M; Mishchenko, V P; Mironova, N G; Gugalo, V P; Nazarets, V V

    1993-01-01

    In experiments with mature Wistar male rats under irradiation by dose of 5 Gy the effect of emoxypine, citomedine and echinacea purpurea on the content of liposoluble vitamin A, carotene, vitamin E and its metabolites (quinone and oxidized tocopherol) in blood plasma, spleen, liver and testes was studied. It was shown the drugs under study mobilized the internal reserves of these vitamins and promoted effective functioning of vitamin E redox system. Mechanisms of their action are different. The drugs might be used as radioprotectors, but they exhaust the reserves of the liposoluble vitamins. Therefore they should be used in a combination with vitamin preparations.

  3. Fast low-temperature plasma reduction of monolayer graphene oxide at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodik, Michal; Zahoranova, Anna; Micusik, Matej; Bugarova, Nikola; Spitalsky, Zdenko; Omastova, Maria; Majkova, Eva; Jergel, Matej; Siffalovic, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ultrafast plasma-based graphene oxide reduction method superior to conventional vacuum thermal annealing and/or chemical reduction. The method is based on the effect of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma generated by the diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in proximity of the graphene oxide layer. As the reduction time is in the order of seconds, the presented method is applicable to the large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide layers. The short reduction times are achieved by the high-volume power density of plasma, which is of the order of 100 W cm‑3. Monolayers of graphene oxide on silicon substrate were prepared by a modified Langmuir–Schaefer method and the efficient and rapid reduction by methane and/or hydrogen plasma was demonstrated. The best results were obtained for the graphene oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma, as verified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Exploring the potential of remote plasma sputtering for the production of L10 ordered FePt thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygridou, S.; Barton, C. W.; Nutter, P. W.; Thomson, T.

    2017-07-01

    Lowering the temperature at which the desirable L10 phase forms in FePt thin films is a key requirement in the development of next generation high-density data storage media and spintronic devices. Remote plasma sputtering offers a higher degree of control over the sputtering parameters, allowing the properties of films to be tailored, and potentially can affect the ordering kinetics of the L10 phase of FePt. Here, we report a comprehensive study of FePt thin films deposited under a range of temperatures and sputtering conditions. X-ray diffraction and magnetometry investigations show that whilst FePt thin films ordered in the L10 phase with high perpendicular anisotropy can be produced using this technique, there is no significant reduction in the required ordering temperature compared with films produced using conventional DC sputtering. Optimally ordered L10 FePt films were fabricated when the film was deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 °C, followed by post annealing at 750 °C.

  5. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Terriza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD, onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes.

  6. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  7. Evaluation of osteoinductive and endothelial differentiation potential of Platelet-Rich Plasma incorporated Gelatin-Nanohydroxyapatite Fibrous Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Anjana; Kuttappan, Shruthy; Keyan, Kripa S; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was incorporated into gelatin-nanohydroxyapatite fibrous scaffold in two forms (PRP gel as coating on the scaffold [PCSC] and PRP powder within the scaffold [PCSL] and investigated for (a) growth factor release; (b) stability of scaffold at different temperature; (c) stability of scaffold before and after ETO sterilization; and (d) osteogenic and endothelial differentiation potential using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PCSC demonstrated a high and burst growth factor release initially followed by a gradual reduction in its concentration, while PCSL showed a steady state release pattern for 30 days. The stability of growth factors released from PCSL was not altered either through ETO sterilization or through its storage at different temperature. PRP-loaded scaffolds induced the differentiation of MSCs into osteogenic and endothelial lineage without providing any induction factors in the cell culture medium and the differentiation rate was significantly higher when compared to the scaffolds devoid of PRP. PCSC performed better than PCSL. In general, PRP in combination with composite fibrous scaffold could be a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

  8. Potential of Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization for solving spectral interference in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2009-05-01

    Spectral interference is one of the main causes of erroneous results in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This paper describes some cases of spectral interferences with conventional nebulization ICP-OES and the potential of solving them utilizing electrothermal vaporization for volatility-based separation. The cases studied were, the well-known spectral overlap between the As and Cd lines at 228.8 nm that are only 10 pm apart, and the interference of Fe on the main emission lines of As, Cd and Pb. The spectral interferences were studied by monitoring the typical signals of solutions that contain the analytes and the potential interferent, by studying the spectra and calculating Background Equivalent Concentration (BEC)-values. A three step temperature program was developed to be used for direct analysis of solid soil samples by Electrothermal Vaporization (ETV)-ICP-OES: step 1 (760 °C, 40 s), step 2 (1620 °C, 20 s) and a cleaning step (2250 °C, 10 s) where Cd vaporizes in step 1, As, Pb and part of Fe in step 2 and the major part of Fe in the cleaning step. Because As and Cd were time-separated using this program, their prominent lines at 228.8 nm, could be used for determination of each element by ETV-ICP-OES, in spite of the serious wavelength overlap. Selective vaporization was also shown to reduce or eliminate the Fe background emission on As, Cd and Pb lines. To confirm the applicability of the method, a solid soil certified reference materials was analyzed directly without any sample treatment. Good or reasonable accuracy was obtained for the three elements.

  9. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well.

  10. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs. And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL. Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3% than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  11. A potential kidney-bone axis involved in the rapid minute-to-minute regulation of plasma Ca2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anders; Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva;

    2015-01-01

    of plasma-Ca(2+) (p-Ca(2+)) takes place via an exchange mechanism of Ca(2+) between plasma and bone. A labile Ca storage pool exists on bone surfaces storing excess or supplying Ca when blood Ca is lowered. Aim was to examine minute-to-minute regulation of p-Ca(2+) in the very early phase of acute uremia...

  12. Potentials of plasma NGAL and MIC-1 as biomarker(s in the diagnosis of lethal pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhwinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC is lethal malignancy with very high mortality rate. Absence of sensitive and specific marker(s is one of the major factors for poor prognosis of PC patients. In pilot studies using small set of patients, secreted acute phase proteins neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL and TGF-β family member macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1 are proposed as most potential biomarkers specifically elevated in the blood of PC patients. However, their performance as diagnostic markers for PC, particularly in pre-treatment patients, remains unknown. In order to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of NGAL and MIC-1, their levels were measured in plasma samples from patients with pre-treatment PC patients (n = 91 and compared it with those in healthy control (HC individuals (n = 24 and patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP, n = 23. The diagnostic performance of these two proteins was further compared with that of CA19-9, a tumor marker commonly used to follow PC progression. The levels of all three biomarkers were significantly higher in PC compared to HCs. The mean (± standard deviation, SD plasma NGAL, CA19-9 and MIC-1 levels in PC patients was 111.1 ng/mL (2.2, 219.2 U/mL (7.8 and 4.5 ng/mL (4.1, respectively. In comparing resectable PC to healthy patients, all three biomarkers were found to have comparable sensitivities (between 64%-81% but CA19-9 and NGAL had a higher specificity (92% and 88%, respectively. For distinguishing resectable PC from CP patients, CA19-9 and MIC-1 were most specific (74% and 78% respectively. CA19-9 at an optimal cut-off of 54.1 U/ml is highly specific in differentiating resectable (stage 1/2 pancreatic cancer patients from controls in comparison to its clinical cut-off (37.1 U/ml. Notably, the addition of MIC-1 to CA19-9 significantly improved the ability to distinguish resectable PC cases from CP (p = 0.029. Overall, MIC-1 in combination with CA19-9 improved the diagnostic

  13. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-12-30

    Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  14. Underwater operation of a DBD plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.; Weatherford, Brandon; Gillman, Eric; Yee, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    A plasma jet produced in water using a submerged ac excited electrode in a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge configuration was studied. Plasma jet formation was found to occur only while the source was submerged. Plasma jet operation was characterized with and without gas flow. It was found that over 60% of the discharge power was deposited into the water and did not vary appreciably with excitation frequency. Presumably the remaining power fraction went into excitation, ionization and local electrode heating. Emission spectra of the jet revealed nitrogen, hydrogen, hydroxyl and oxygen emission lines. Operation of the plasma jet in water containing the oxidation-reduction indicator methylene blue dye resulted in a marked clearing of the water as observed visually and with a spectrophotometer, suggesting plasma-induced chemical reactivity.

  15. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  16. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  17. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  18. Transformations of Heavy Metals and Plant Nutrients in Dredged Sediments as Affected by Oxidation Reduction Potential and pH. Volume 1. Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    ultimately to industrial mercury-containing waste discharges into Minamata Bay. Since then, the occurrence of a few similar episodes in various parts of the... Minamata Bay incident. Methylmercury has been found to be the pre- dominant form of mercury in the biological cycle.1 79 Since most of the mer- cury

  19. Establishment of a Method for Measuring Antioxidant Capacity in Urine, Based on Oxidation Reduction Potential and Redox Couple I2/KI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Tinghui; He, Min; Bai, Tianyu; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    .... The new method was compared with the traditional method of iodine titration and then used to measure the antioxidant capacity of urine samples from 30 diabetic patients and 30 healthy subjects. Results...

  20. Toxic metals signature in the human seminal plasma of Pakistani population and their potential role in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Ambreen; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Bostan, Nazish; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Tahir, Faheem; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Hussain, Alamdar; Alamdar, Ambreen; Huang, Qingyu; Peng, Siyuan; Shen, Heqing

    2015-06-01

    Aims of this study were to provide firsthand data on the incidence of trace metals in human seminal plasma and find possible correlations between levels of toxic metals and semen quality of Pakistani population. Human semen samples were collected from male partners of couples undergoing infertility assessment at the National Institute of Health Islamabad (Pakistan). We investigated seventy-five seminal plasma samples, which were further categorized into three groups (normozoospermia, oligozoospermia and azoospermia) according to WHO guidelines. The concentration of 17 different toxic metals in human seminal plasma was determined simultaneously by using Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Out of 17 trace metals, Cd and Ni showed significant difference (p metals were lower and/or comparable to that found in populations of other countries. The results show the first evidence of the effect of toxic metals on semen quality and male infertility in Pakistan.

  1. Determining potential adverse effects in marine fish exposed to pharmaceuticals and personal care products with the fish plasma model and whole-body tissue concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, James P; Yeh, Andrew; Gallagher, Evan P

    2017-07-26

    The Fish Plasma Model (FPM) was applied to water exposure and tissue concentrations in fish collected from two wastewater treatment plant impacted estuarine sites. In this study we compared predicted fish plasma concentrations to Cmax values for humans, which represents the maximum plasma concentration for the minimum therapeutic dose. The results of this study show that predictions of plasma concentrations for a variety of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) from effluent concentrations resulted in 37 compounds (54%) exceeding the response ratio (RR = Fish [Plasma]/1%Cmaxtotal) of 1 compared to 3 compounds (14%) detected with values generated with estuarine receiving water concentrations. When plasma concentrations were modeled from observed whole-body tissue residues, 16 compounds out of 24 detected for Chinook (67%) and 7 of 14 (50%) for sculpin resulted in an RRtissue value greater than 1, which highlights the importance of this dose metric over that using estuarine water. Because the tissue residue approach resulted in a high percentage of compounds with calculated response ratios exceeding a value of unity, we believe this is a more accurate representation for exposure in the field. Predicting plasma concentrations from tissue residues improves our ability to assess the potential for adverse effects in fish because exposure from all sources is captured. Tissue residues are also more likely to represent steady-state conditions compared to those from water exposure because of the inherent reduction in variability usually observed for field data and the time course for bioaccumulation. We also examined the RR in a toxic unit approach to highlight the importance of considering multiple compounds exhibiting a similar mechanism of action. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H; Bongard, Robert D; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Merker, Marilyn P

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψ(m) and Δψ(p)) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([R(e)]) were measured over time. R123 [R(e)] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [R(e)] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K(+) concentration ([K(+)]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [R(e)], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [R(e)]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [R(e)] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψ(m) (-130 ± 7 and -133 ± 4 mV), Δψ(p) (-36 ± 4 and -49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (K(Pgp), 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψ(m) (-124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψ(m) and Δψ(p.) Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O(2) for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψ(m), hyperoxic cell Δψ(m) was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H.; Bongard, Robert D.; Gauthier, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψm and Δψp) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([Re]) were measured over time. R123 [Re] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [Re] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K+ concentration ([K+]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [Re], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [Re]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [Re] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψm (−130 ± 7 and −133 ± 4 mV), Δψp (−36 ± 4 and −49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (KPgp, 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψm (−124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψm and Δψp. Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O2 for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψm, hyperoxic cell Δψm was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21239539

  4. Potential utility of soluble p3-alcadein α plasma levels as a biomarker for sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takita, Rie; Miki, Tetsuro; Konno, Tomoko; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins (α, β, γ) that share identical localization and function to the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in the brain. Alcs are proteolyzed in neurons through successive cleavages via secretases, resulting in non-aggregative p3-Alc, where p3 corresponds to the AβPP-fragment. We found p3-Alcα detected in human plasma reflected the pathological process of amyloid-β accumulation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and therefore investigated the utility of p3-Alcα as a plasma biomarker in AD. We measured p3-Alcα plasma levels in 83 sporadic-AD, 18 mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and 24 control subjects using the sandwich-ELISA system. Pooled samples with previously published data (171 AD and 45 controls) were also analyzed. The plasma p3-Alcα concentrations in patients with AD and MCI were significantly higher compared with control subjects (224.7 ± 40.4, 223.3 ± 53.9, and 189.1 ± 32.9 pg/ml, respectively; p = 0.0012). In AD patients, the plasma p3-Alcα concentration significantly correlated with age (r = 0.23, p = 0.037) and serum creatinine levels (r = 0.23, p = 0.0012). Even after adjusting for confounding factors of age, gender, renal function, and ApoE-ε4, high plasma p3-Alcα levels were correlated with significant AD risk, with an odds ratio 1.47 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.93, p = 0.0019) for every 10 pg/ml increase. Pooled analysis further confirmed these findings. Increased plasma p3-Alcα, evident in the early stages of cognitive impairment, suggests that Alc metabolites are useful plasma biomarkers of AD.

  5. Simultaneous profiling of eicosanoid metabolome in plasma by UPLC-MS/MS method: Application to identify potential makers for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nannan; Dai, Ronghua; Wang, Weihui; Peng, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoning; Bi, Kaishun

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the potential relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and arachidonic acid (AA) metabonomics via cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways, a UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for simultaneous and quantitative profiling of eicosanoid metabolome in rat plasma. The analytes were extracted from plasma samples by protein precipitation procedure, and then separated on a Shim-pack XR-ODS column with mobile phase A (0.05% formic acid in water, pH=3.3 adjusted with dilute ammonium hydroxide) and mobile phase B [methanol: acetonitrile (20:80, v/v)]. The detection was performed on UPLC-MS/MS system with an electro spray ion source in the negative ion and multiple reaction-monitoring modes. The developed method was optimized to completely separate all twenty-three analytes and three internal standards in 12min. All standard calibration curves were linear and the calibration regression coefficients were ranged from 0.9903 to 0.9992 for all analytes. The recoveries of analytes were all more than 60%. By means of the method developed, the plasma samples from model rats and normal rats had been successfully determined. Results showed that AA and fifteen kinds of metabolites by LOX and COX pathways in model rat plasma were significant higher than those in normal ones(Peicosanoid metabolome occurring in plasma from rat subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. It could be a powerful manner to diagnostic and/or prognostic values for rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Nitric oxide reduction over biomass and coal chars under fluidized bed combustion conditions: the role of thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piero Salatino; Anna Di Somma; Roberto Solimene; Riccardo Chirone [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica

    2008-07-01

    The de-NOx potential of biomass-and waste-derived fuels candidate for cofiring with coal is assessed. The experimental procedure is based on operation of a bench scale fluidized bed reactor where NO-doped nitrogen is contacted with batches of the fuel. A second type of experiment has been purposely designed to assess the extent of thermodeactivation of biogenous fuels, i.e. the loss of reactivity toward the NOx-char reaction as char is annealed for pre-set times at temperatures typical of fluidized bed combustion. A simple phenomenological model is developed to shed light on the basic features of the interaction between heterogeneous char-NOx reaction and thermal annealing of the char. Results are discussed in the light of the potential exploitation of synergistic effects on NOx emission associated with cofiring with coal. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Studies on the preparation and plasma spherodization of yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres for their potential application in liver brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, K. P.; Saxena, S. K.; Kumar, Yogendra; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Dash, Ashutosh; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-02-01

    Plasma spheroidization exploits the high temperature and high enthalpy available in the thermal plasma jet to melt irregularly shaped powder particles and quench them to get dense spherical particles. Plasma spheroidization is a versatile process and can be applied to metals, ceramics, alloys and composites to obtain fine spherical powders. Radioactive microspheres incorporated with high energetic beta emitting radioisotopes have been reported to be useful in the palliative treatment of liver cancer. These powders are to be prepared in closer range of near spherical morphology in the size range 20-35 microns. Inactive glass samples were prepared by heating the pre-calculated amount of glass forming ingredients in a recrystallized alumina crucible. The glass was formed by keeping the glass forming ingredients at 1700°C for a period of three hours to form a homogeneous melt. After cooling, the glass was recovered from the crucible by crushing and was subsequently powdered mechanically with the help of mortar and pestle. This powder was used as the feed stock for plasma spheroidization using an indigenously developed 40 kW plasma spray system. Experiments were carried out at various operating parameters. The operating parameters were optimised to get spheroidised particles. The powder was sieved to get the required size range before irradiation.

  8. Studies on the preparation and plasma spherodization of yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres for their potential application in liver brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreekumar, K P; Saxena, S K; Kumar, Yogendra; Thiyagarajan, T K; Dash, Ashutosh; Ananthapadmanabhan, P V; Venkatesh, Meera, E-mail: nair.sreekumar@gmail.co [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Plasma spheroidization exploits the high temperature and high enthalpy available in the thermal plasma jet to melt irregularly shaped powder particles and quench them to get dense spherical particles. Plasma spheroidization is a versatile process and can be applied to metals, ceramics, alloys and composites to obtain fine spherical powders. Radioactive microspheres incorporated with high energetic beta emitting radioisotopes have been reported to be useful in the palliative treatment of liver cancer. These powders are to be prepared in closer range of near spherical morphology in the size range 20-35 microns. Inactive glass samples were prepared by heating the pre-calculated amount of glass forming ingredients in a recrystallized alumina crucible. The glass was formed by keeping the glass forming ingredients at 1700{sup 0}C for a period of three hours to form a homogeneous melt. After cooling, the glass was recovered from the crucible by crushing and was subsequently powdered mechanically with the help of mortar and pestle. This powder was used as the feed stock for plasma spheroidization using an indigenously developed 40 kW plasma spray system. Experiments were carried out at various operating parameters. The operating parameters were optimised to get spheroidised particles. The powder was sieved to get the required size range before irradiation.

  9. Differentially expressed plasma microRNAs and the potential regulatory function of Let-7b in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijuan; Yang, Yuanhua; Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Li, Jifeng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Gan, Huili; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Jason X-J; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1) thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2) Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3) ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH by

  10. Plasma microRNA profiling in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients revealsmiR-548q andmiR-483-5p as potential biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui Zheng; Cui Cui; Hong-Lian Ruan; Wen-Qiong Xue; Shao-Dan Zhang; Ye-Zhu Hu; Xin-Xi Zhou; Wei-Hua Jia

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which play a role in tumorigenesis, may also serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. However, studies on human miRNA profiles in plasma from nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients are in their infancy. Here, we used microarrays to perform systematic profiling of human miRNAs in plasma from NPC patients. We subsequently used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to validate miRNAs with aberrant expression that could serve as potential biomarkers. By comparing the plasma miRNA profiles of 31 NPC patients and 19 controls, 39 of 887 human miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed. Considering the fold change andP value,miR-548q andmiR-483-5p were validated in 132 samples from 82 NPC patients and 50 controls. Moreover, high expression of miR-548q andmiR-483-5p was further found in 3 NPC celllines and clinical biopsy tissues from 54 NPC patients and 22 controls. Our results revealed thatmiR-548q andmiR-483-5p are potential biomarkers of NPC. Combining the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses of these 2 miRNAs, an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.737 with 67.1% sensitivity and 68.0% specificity were obtained, showing the preliminary diagnostic value of plasma miRNAs. Moreover, most NPC patients with a poor outcome exhibited high expression (> median) ofmiR-548q (70.6%) andmiR-483-5p (64.7%) in tissue samples, indicating their prognostic value. The high expression levels ofmiR-548q andmiR-483-5p in plasma, celllines, and clinical tissues of NPC patients indicate that their roles in NPC should be explored in the future.

  11. Cold-air atmospheric pressure plasma against Clostridium difficile spores: a potential alternative for the decontamination of hospital inanimate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Tânia; Cahill, Orla J; O'Connor, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile spores survive for months on environmental surfaces and are highly resistant to decontamination. We evaluated the effect of cold-air plasma against C. difficile spores. The single-jet had no effect while the multi-jet achieved 2-3 log10 reductions in spore counts and may augment traditional decontamination.

  12. Identification of altered plasma proteins by proteomic study in valvular heart diseases and the potential clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about genetic basis and proteomics in valvular heart disease (VHD including rheumatic (RVD and degenerative (DVD valvular disease. The present proteomic study examined the hypothesis that certain proteins may be associated with the pathological changes in the plasma of VHD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Differential protein analysis in the plasma identified 18 differentially expressed protein spots and 14 corresponding proteins or polypeptides by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in 120 subjects. Two up-regulated (complement C4A and carbonic anhydrase 1 and three down-regulated proteins (serotransferrin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and vitronectin were validated by ELISA in enlarging samples. The plasma levels (n = 40 for each of complement C4A in RVD (715.8±35.6 vs. 594.7±28.2 ng/ml, P = 0.009 and carbonic anhydrase 1 (237.70±15.7 vs. 184.7±10.8 U/L, P = 0.007 in DVD patients were significantly higher and that of serotransferrin (2.36±0.20 vs. 2.93±0.16 mg/ml, P = 0.025 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (370.0±13.7 vs. 413.0±11.6 µg/ml, P = 0.019 in RVD patients were significantly lower than those in controls. The plasma vitronectin level in both RVD (281.3±11.0 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.006 and DVD (283.6±11.4 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.011 was significantly lower than those in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have for the first time identified alterations of 14 differential proteins or polypeptides in the plasma of patients with various VHD. The elevation of plasma complement C4A in RVD and carbonic anhydrase 1 in DVD and the decrease of serotransferrin and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in RVD patients may be useful biomarkers for these valvular diseases. The decreased plasma level of vitronectin - a protein related to the formation of valvular structure - in both RVD and DVD patients might indicate the possible genetic deficiency in these patients.

  13. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  14. The formation of relativistic plasma structures and their potential role in the generation of cosmic ray electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Dieckmann

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent particle-in-cell (PIC simulation studies have addressed particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic astrophysical flows by plasma phase space structures. We discuss the astrophysical environments such as the jets of compact objects, and we give an overview of the global PIC simulations of shocks. These reveal several types of phase space structures, which are relevant for the energy dissipation. These structures are typically coupled in shocks, but we choose to consider them here in an isolated form. Three structures are reviewed. (1 Simulations of interpenetrating or colliding plasma clouds can trigger filamentation instabilities, while simulations of thermally anisotropic plasmas observe the Weibel instability. Both transform a spatially uniform plasma into current filaments. These filament structures cause the growth of the magnetic fields. (2 The development of a modified two-stream instability is discussed. It saturates first by the formation of electron phase space holes. The relativistic electron clouds modulate the ion beam and a secondary, spatially localized electrostatic instability grows, which saturates by forming a relativistic ion phase space hole. It accelerates electrons to ultra-relativistic speeds. (3 A simulation is also revised, in which two clouds of an electron-ion plasma collide at the speed 0.9c. The inequal densities of both clouds and a magnetic field that is oblique to the collision velocity vector result in waves with a mixed electrostatic and electromagnetic polarity. The waves give rise to growing corkscrew distributions in the electrons and ions that establish an equipartition between the electron, the ion and the magnetic energy. The filament-, phase space hole- and corkscrew structures are discussed with respect to electron acceleration and magnetic field generation.

  15. The role of genomic oxidative-reductive balance as predictor of complex regional pain syndrome development: a novel theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S

    2010-01-01

    The aftermath of sequencing the human genome has birthed many efforts to utilize an individual's genetic information in order to tailor optimal treatment strategies - so-called personalized medicine. An individual's genetic information may eventually help diagnosis and treatment, as well selecting optimal pharmacologic agents based partly on how well they reach their target, how well they will bind to and produce an effect at their targets, how well they will be metabolized, and the profile of their adverse effects. It also appears that clinicians may be able to utilize an individual's genetic information to ascertain a subject's risk or susceptibility of developing a particular medical condition. Although, this has not been widely utilized in pain medicine at this point, the future may revolutionize the role of genetic information in the evaluation and management of various pain conditions. One reason for variations in therapeutic outcomes from different pharmacologic pain treatments is the different genetic disposition of patient to develop pain or to respond to analgesics. The patient's phenotype may represent a conglomerate of several different genetic variants concomitantly present in an individual. Genetic variants may modulate the risk of developing a painful condition, or may modulate the perception of pain (e.g. OPRM1 or GCH1 variants conferring modest "protection" from pain by increasing the tone of the endogenous opioid system or decreasing nitric oxide formation). Other genetic polymorphisms may alter pharmacokinetic mechanisms (e.g. CYP2D6 related prodrug activation of codeine to morphine), alter pharmacodynamic mechanisms (e.g. opioid receptor mutations), or alter other analgesic effects (e.g. diminished euphoric effects from opioids potentially due to DRD2 polymorphisms decreasing the functioning of the dopaminergic reward system). This article theorizes that genetic alterations including functional polymorphisms of Nrf2 (a master regulator of the

  16. Reaction pathways of oxide-reduction-diffusion (ORD) synthesis of SmCo{sub 5} and in situ study of its hydrogen induced amorphization (HIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belener, Kevin L.A. [Inorganic Solid State Chemistry, Saarland University, Saarbrücken (Germany); Kohlmann, Holger, E-mail: holger.kohlmann@uni-leipzig.de [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University Leipzig, Johannisallee 29, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    A modified oxide-reduction-diffusion (ORD) method for the synthesis of single-phase SmCo{sub 5} is described. Samarium oxide, cobalt and calcium (20% excess) are heated in sealed niobium tubes following an optimized temperature programme. The reaction proceeds via Ca{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O as an intermediate and yields SmCo{sub 5}, and CaO, which may be washed off with dilute acetic acid. Single-phase SmCo{sub 5} prepared by this route shows an enhanced reactivity towards hydrogen and reacts already at moderate conditions of p(H{sub 2})=0.1 MPa and T<770 K. in situ difference scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction suggest the formation of ternary hydrides SmCo{sub 5}H{sub x} at temperatures around 473 and 573 K, and disproportionation into cobalt of poor crystallinity and probably an amorphous binary samarium hydride at 700 K, i.e. a hydrogen induced amorphization (HIA) of SmCo{sub 5}. Neutron powder diffraction was carried out on a {sup 154}SmCo{sub 5} sample with the high-intensity neutron powder diffractometer D20 at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. The CaCu{sub 5} type crystal structure was confirmed (space group P6/mmm, a=500.60 (2) pm, c=397.01 (2) pm at T=298 (1) K) and the magnetic moments along the crystallographic c axis, μ||{sub c}, were refined to be 0.15 (6), 2.02 (6) and 1.75 (5) μ{sub B} for Sm, Co1 and Co2 atoms, respectively, in ferromagnetic SmCo{sub 5}. The HIA process was confirmed by in situ neutron powder diffraction at higher pressures of 8.1 MPa deuterium gas. - Highlights: • Single-phase SmCo{sub 5} is prepared by a modified oxide-reduction-diffusion method. • Reactivity towards hydrogen is achieved at p(H{sub 2})=0.1 MPa and T<770 K. • Hydrogen-induced amorphization is observed in situ (DSC and neutron diffraction). • The magnetic structure of SmCo{sub 5} is refined by neutron diffraction.

  17. Changes of plasma membrane ATPase activity,membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in Kandelia candel and Avicennia marina seedlings with various salinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhong-qiu; ZHENG Hai-lei; ZHU Yong-guan

    2004-01-01

    The salt-secreting mangrove, Avicennia marina, and non-salt-secreting mangrove, Kandelia candel were cultivated in sand with various salinities(0 ‰, 10 ‰, 20 ‰, 30 ‰, 40 ‰) for 60 d. Plasma membrane vesicles of high-purity in leaves and roots of A.marina and K. candel seedlings were obtained by two-phase partitioning. The function of the plasma membranes, the activity of ATPase, membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient, at various salinities were investigated. The results showed that within a certain range of salinity(A. marina and roots of K. candel: 0-30‰;leaves of K.candel: 0-20‰), the activity of ATPase increased with increasing salinity, while high salinity(above 30‰ or 20‰) inhibited ATPase activity. In comparison with A. marina, K. candel appeared to be more sensitive to salinity. The dynamics of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in leaves and roots of A. marina and K. candel seedlings were similar to that of ATPase. When treated directly by NaCl all the indexes were inhibited markedly: there was a little increase within 0-10‰(K. candel) or 0-20‰(A. marina) followed by sharp declining. It indicated that the structure and function of plasma membrane was damaged severely.

  18. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Stěpánka; Svorčík, Václav

    2014-04-04

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  19. Plasma autoantibodies against heat shock protein 70, enolase 1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 as potential biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucksak Rucksaken

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1 and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139 were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, enolase 1 (ENO1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1 obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity. Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001. In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05. Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA.

  20. Plasma Autoantibodies against Heat Shock Protein 70, Enolase 1 and Ribonuclease/Angiogenin Inhibitor 1 as Potential Biomarkers for Cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucksaken, Rucksak; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khuntikeo, Narong; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Selmi, Carlo; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139) were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), enolase 1 (ENO1) and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1) obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity). Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001). In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05). Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA. PMID:25058392

  1. A systems biology strategy reveals biological pathways and plasma biomarker candidates for potentially toxic statin-induced changes in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijo Laaksonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aggressive lipid lowering with high doses of statins increases the risk of statin-induced myopathy. However, the cellular mechanisms leading to muscle damage are not known and sensitive biomarkers are needed to identify patients at risk of developing statin-induced serious side effects. METHODOLOGY: We performed bioinformatics analysis of whole genome expression profiling of muscle specimens and UPLC/MS based lipidomics analyses of plasma samples obtained in an earlier randomized trial from patients either on high dose simvastatin (80 mg, atorvastatin (40 mg, or placebo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High dose simvastatin treatment resulted in 111 differentially expressed genes (1.5-fold change and p-value<0.05, while expression of only one and five genes was altered in the placebo and atorvastatin groups, respectively. The Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified several affected pathways (23 gene lists with False Discovery Rate q-value<0.1 in muscle following high dose simvastatin, including eicosanoid synthesis and Phospholipase C pathways. Using lipidomic analysis we identified previously uncharacterized drug-specific changes in the plasma lipid profile despite similar statin-induced changes in plasma LDL-cholesterol. We also found that the plasma lipidomic changes following simvastatin treatment correlate with the muscle expression of the arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein. CONCLUSIONS: High dose simvastatin affects multiple metabolic and signaling pathways in skeletal muscle, including the pro-inflammatory pathways. Thus, our results demonstrate that clinically used high statin dosages may lead to unexpected metabolic effects in non-hepatic tissues. The lipidomic profiles may serve as highly sensitive biomarkers of statin-induced metabolic alterations in muscle and may thus allow us to identify patients who should be treated with a lower dose to prevent a possible toxicity.

  2. Improved in vitro evaluation of novel antimicrobials: potential synergy between human plasma and antibacterial peptidomimetics, AMPs and antibiotics against human pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citterio, Linda; Franzyk, Henrik; Palarasah, Yaseelan;

    2016-01-01

    Stable peptidomimetics mimicking natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as a promising class of potential novel antibiotics. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether the antibacterial activity of two α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics against a range of bacterial pathogens...... was affected by conditions mimicking in vivo settings. Their activity was enhanced to an unexpected degree in the presence of human blood plasma for thirteen pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values typically decreased 2- to 16-fold in the presence of a human plasma concentration...... treatments might be lower than traditionally deduced from MICs determined in laboratory media. Thus, antibiotics previously considered too toxic could be developed into usable last-resort drugs, due to ensuing lowered risk of side effects. In contrast, the activity of the compounds was significantly...

  3. Selectivity in the potentiation of antibacterial activity of α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics and antimicrobial peptides by human blood plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M.; Franzyk, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for novel antibiotics; however, their activity is often compromised under physiological conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the activity of alpha-peptide/beta-peptoid peptidomimetics and AMPs against Escherichia coli...... and Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of human blood-derived matrices and immune effectors. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of two peptidomimetics against E. coli decreased by up to one order of magnitude when determined in 50% blood plasma as compared to MHB media. The MIC of a membrane-active AMP......, LL-I/3, also decreased, whereas two intracellularly acting AMPs were not potentiated by plasma. Blood serum had no effect on activity against E. coli and neither matrix had an effect on activity against S. aureus. Unexpectedly, physiological concentrations of human serum albumin did not influence...

  4. Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide Reduction Salt Utilized in the Reprocessing of Used Uranium Oxide Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyas, Josef; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes various approaches for making sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to recover uranium from used oxide fuel. The approaches include sol-gel and solution-based synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2O and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt.

  5. Efficacy of a solution-based approach for making sodalite waste forms for an oxide reduction salt utilized in the reprocessing of used uranium oxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J., E-mail: brian.riley@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Frank, Steven M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Matyáš, Josef; Burns, Carolyne A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the various approaches evaluated for making solution-derived sodalite with a LiCl–Li{sub 2}O oxide reduction salt selected to dissolve used uranium oxide fuel so the uranium can be recovered and recycled. The approaches include modified sol–gel and solution-based synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na{sub 2}O–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na{sup +} and Cl{sup −} to form halite in solution and Li{sub 2}O and SiO{sub 2} to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions in the crystalline product (∼92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl–Li{sub 2}O salt but that the incorporation of Li into the sodalite is low.

  6. A Geobacter sulfurreducens strain expressing pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili localizes OmcS on pili but is deficient in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Vargas, Madeline

    2014-02-01

    The conductive pili of Geobacter species play an important role in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides, in long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms, and in direct interspecies electron transfer. Although multiple lines of evidence have indicated that the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens have a metal-like conductivity, independent of the presence of c-type cytochromes, this claim is still controversial. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated strain PA, was constructed in which the gene for the native PilA, the structural pilin protein, was replaced with the PilA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain PA expressed and properly assembled P. aeruginosa PilA subunits into pili and exhibited a profile of outer surface c-type cytochromes similar to that of a control strain expressing the G. sulfurreducens PilA. Surprisingly, the strain PA pili were decorated with the c-type cytochrome OmcS in a manner similar to the control strain. However, the strain PA pili were 14-fold less conductive than the pili of the control strain, and strain PA was severely impaired in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production. These results demonstrate that the presence of OmcS on pili is not sufficient to confer conductivity to pili and suggest that there are unique structural features of the G. sulfurreducens PilA that are necessary for conductivity.

  7. A Novel Oxidation-Reduction Route for Layer-by-Layer Synthesis of TiO2 Nanolayers and Investigation of Its Photocatalytical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Semishchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Layer-by-layer (LbL synthesis of titanium dioxide was performed by an oxidation-reduction route using a Ti(OH3 colloid and NaNO2 solutions. A model of chemical reactions was proposed based on the results of an investigation of synthesized nanolayers by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and studying colloidal solution of Ti(OH3 with laser Doppler microelectrophoresis. At each cycle, negatively charged colloidal particles of [Ti(OH3]HSO4- adsorbed onto the surface of substrate. During the next stage of treatment in NaNO2 solution, the particles were oxidized to Ti(OH4. Photocatalytic activity was studied by following decomposition of methylene blue (MB under UV irradiation. Sensitivity of the measurements was increased using a diffuse transmittance (DT method. The investigation revealed strong photocatalytical properties of the synthesized layers, caused by their high area per unit volume and uniform globular structure.

  8. RNA sequencing reveals differential expression of mitochondrial and oxidation reduction genes in the long-lived naked mole-rat when compared to mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanfei Yu

    Full Text Available The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber is a long-lived, cancer resistant rodent and there is a great interest in identifying the adaptations responsible for these and other of its unique traits. We employed RNA sequencing to compare liver gene expression profiles between naked mole-rats and wild-derived mice. Our results indicate that genes associated with oxidoreduction and mitochondria were expressed at higher relative levels in naked mole-rats. The largest effect is nearly 300-fold higher expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Epcam, a tumour-associated protein. Also of interest are the protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin (A2m, and the mitochondrial complex II subunit Sdhc, both ageing-related genes found strongly over-expressed in the naked mole-rat. These results hint at possible candidates for specifying species differences in ageing and cancer, and in particular suggest complex alterations in mitochondrial and oxidation reduction pathways in the naked mole-rat. Our differential gene expression analysis obviated the need for a reference naked mole-rat genome by employing a combination of Illumina/Solexa and 454 platforms for transcriptome sequencing and assembling transcriptome contigs of the non-sequenced species. Overall, our work provides new research foci and methods for studying the naked mole-rat's fascinating characteristics.

  9. Plasma cell alloantigen ENPP1 is expressed by a subset of human B cells with potential regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeongheon; Wang, Hongsheng; Kim, Yong Chan; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Abbasi, Sadia; Morse Iii, Herbert C

    2016-09-01

    Plasma cell alloantigen 1 (PC1), also known as ENPP1 (ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1), is an enzyme involved primarily in hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate at the cell surface. Although the expression pattern of PC1 is relatively broad, its expression in B cells is found at significant levels only in terminally differentiated germinal center B cells, plasma cells and a subset of B-1a cells in mice. Here we describe studies designed to determine whether expression of PC1 might define novel populations of human B cells with similarities to mouse B cells. We found that PC1 is expressed in small populations of human B lineage cells in peripheral blood, cord blood, tonsils, bone marrow and pediatric peritoneal fluid, with the highest levels in plasma cells. The characteristics of human PC1(+) B cells differ from mouse peritoneal B-1a subsets and from features of the human CD20(+)CD27(+)CD43(+)CD70(-) B-cell subset proposed to be human B-1 cells. Expression of PC1 was greatly increased in B cells stimulated with the combination of CD40 ligand, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-21. In addition, PC1(+) B cells activated CD4(+) T regulatory cells. ENPP1 thus defines a subset of human B cells that differs significantly from mouse peritoneal B-1a and proposed human B-1 cells.

  10. Improved in vitro evaluation of novel antimicrobials: potential synergy between human plasma and antibacterial peptidomimetics, AMPs and antibiotics against human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Linda; Franzyk, Henrik; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Andersen, Thomas Emil; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    Stable peptidomimetics mimicking natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as a promising class of potential novel antibiotics. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether the antibacterial activity of two α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics against a range of bacterial pathogens was affected by conditions mimicking in vivo settings. Their activity was enhanced to an unexpected degree in the presence of human blood plasma for thirteen pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values typically decreased 2- to 16-fold in the presence of a human plasma concentration that alone did not damage the cell membrane. Hence, MIC and MBC data collected in these settings appear to represent a more appropriate basis for in vivo experiments preceding clinical trials. In fact, concentrations of peptidomimetics and peptide antibiotics (e.g. polymyxin B) required for in vivo treatments might be lower than traditionally deduced from MICs determined in laboratory media. Thus, antibiotics previously considered too toxic could be developed into usable last-resort drugs, due to ensuing lowered risk of side effects. In contrast, the activity of the compounds was significantly decreased in heat-inactivated plasma. We hypothesize that synergistic interactions with complement proteins and/or clotting factors most likely are involved.

  11. Potentiation of the bioavailability of blueberry phenolic compounds by co-ingested grape phenolic compounds in mice, revealed by targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Dubé, Pascal; Varin, Thibault V; Calon, Frédéric; Desjardins, Yves

    2016-08-10

    The low bioavailability of dietary phenolic compounds, resulting from poor absorption and high rates of metabolism and excretion, is a concern as it can limit their potential beneficial effects on health. Targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces of mice supplemented for 15 days with a blueberry extract, a grape extract or their combination revealed significantly increased plasma concentrations (3-5 fold) of blueberry phenolic metabolites in the presence of a co-ingested grape extract, associated with an equivalent decrease in their appearance in feces. Additionally, the repeated daily administration of the blueberry-grape combination significantly increased plasma phenolic concentrations (2-3-fold) compared to animals receiving only a single acute dose, with no such increase being observed with individual extracts. These findings highlight a positive interaction between blueberry and grape constituents, in which the grape extract enhanced the absorption of blueberry phenolic compounds. This study provides for the first time in vivo evidence of such an interaction occurring between co-ingested phenolic compounds from fruit extracts leading to their improved bioavailability.

  12. Effect of Fluvastatin on Oxidation-reduction Function and ICAM-1 Expression in Pocine Carotid Artery Endothelial Cells Dealt with Hypoxia/Reoxygenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fukuda Daiju; Sata Masataka; Toshiyuki Hagiwara; Kayoko Gomita

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the protective function of lfuvastatinon endothelial cells in an ischemia-reperfusion process. Methods:Pocine carotid artery endothelial cells (PCAEC) were cultured, grown together with different concentrations of fluvastatin (0.1 μmol/L, 0.2 μmol/L, 0.5 μmol/L, 1.0 μmol/L) for 44 h, and then divided into normal control group, different concentrations of lfuvastatin groups and H/R group. Serum immunology and cell immunochemistry were used to detect the levels of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) after 1-h hypoxia and 3-h reoxygenation. The effect of fluvastatin on oxidation-reduction function and ICAM-1 expression in PCAEC dealt with hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) was observed. Results:There was signiifcant difference regarding the cell viability between H/R group intervened by 0.5 μmol/L of lfuvastatin and simple H/R group (P=0.01). H/R could obviously decrease SOD activity in culture cells, and the generated MDA was conspicuously higher by comparison to lfuvastatin group and normal control group (P=0.001). Signiifcant differences were presented regarding GSH-PX level between normal control group, lfuvastatin group and H/R group (P=0.002). Additionally, ICAM-1 cell immunochemical staining showed marked differences among each group (P=0.018). Conclusion: Proper concentration of lfuvastatin can protect H/R endothelial cells.

  13. Effect of Fluvastatin on Oxidation-reduction Function and ICAM-1 Expression in Pocine Carotid Artery Endothelial Cells Dealt with Hypoxia/Reoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda Daiju

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the protective function of fluvastatin on endothelial cells in an ischemiareperfusion process. Methods: Pocine carotid artery endothelial cells (PCAEC were cultured, grown together with different concentrations of fluvastatin (0.1 μmol/L, 0.2 μmol/L, 0.5 μmol/L, 1.0 μmol/L for 44 h, and then divided into normal control group, different concentrations of fluvastatin groups and H/R group. Serum immunology and cell immunochemistry were used to detect the levels of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 after 1-h hypoxia and 3-h reoxygenation. The effect of fluvastatin on oxidation-reduction function and ICAM-1 expression in PCAEC dealt with hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R was observed. Results: There was significant difference regarding the cell viability between H/R group intervened by 0.5 μmol/L of fluvastatin and simple H/R group (P=0.01. H/R could obviously decrease SOD activity in culture cells, and the generated MDA was conspicuously higher by comparison to fluvastatin group and normal control group (P=0.001. Significant differences were presented regarding GSH-PX level between normal control group, fluvastatin group and H/R group (P=0.002. Additionally, ICAM-1 cell immunochemical staining showed marked differences among each group (P=0.018. Conclusion: Proper concentration of fluvastatin can protect H/R endothelial cells.

  14. Ethanol-drug absorption interaction: potential for a significant effect on the plasma pharmacokinetics of ethanol vulnerable formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Generally, gastric emptying of a drug to the small intestine is controlled by gastric motor activity and is the main factor affecting the onset of absorption. Accordingly, the emptying rate from the stomach is mainly affected by the digestive state, the properties of the pharmaceutical formulation and the effect of drugs, posture and circadian rhythm. Variability in the gastric emptying of drugs is reflected in variability in the absorption rate and the shape of the plasma pharmacokinetic profile. When ethanol interacts with an oral controlled release product, such that the mechanism controlling drug release is impaired, the delivery of the dissolved dose into the small intestine and the consequent absorption may result in dangerously high plasma concentrations. For example, the maximal plasma concentration of hydromorphone has individually been shown to be increased as much as 16 times through in vivo testing as a result of this specific pharmacokinetic ethanol-drug formulation interaction. Thus, a pharmacokinetic ethanol-drug interaction is a very serious safety concern when substantially the entire dose from a controlled release product is rapidly emptied into the small intestine (dose dumping), having been largely dissolved in a strong alcoholic beverage in the stomach during a sufficient lag-time in gastric emptying. Based on the literature, a two hour time frame for screening the in vitro dissolution profile of a controlled release product in ethanol concentrations of up to 40% is strongly supported and may be considered as the absolute minimum standard. It is also evident that the dilution, absorption and metabolism of ethanol in the stomach are processes with a minor effect on the local ethanol concentration and that ethanol exposure will be highly dependent on the volume and ethanol concentration of the fluid ingested, together with the rate of intake and gastric emptying. When and in which patients a clinically significant dose dumping will happen is

  15. High-fat diet-induced insulin resistance does not increase plasma anandamide levels or potentiate anandamide insulinotropic effect in isolated canine islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orison O Woolcott

    Full Text Available Obesity has been associated with elevated plasma anandamide levels. In addition, anandamide has been shown to stimulate insulin secretion in vitro, suggesting that anandamide might be linked to hyperinsulinemia.To determine whether high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance increases anandamide levels and potentiates the insulinotropic effect of anandamide in isolated pancreatic islets.Dogs were fed a high-fat diet (n = 9 for 22 weeks. Abdominal fat depot was quantified by MRI. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Fasting plasma endocannabinoid levels were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. All metabolic assessments were performed before and after fat diet regimen. At the end of the study, pancreatic islets were isolated prior to euthanasia to test the in vitro effect of anandamide on islet hormones. mRNA expression of cannabinoid receptors was determined in intact islets. The findings in vitro were compared with those from animals fed a control diet (n = 7.Prolonged fat feeding increased abdominal fat content by 81.3±21.6% (mean±S.E.M, P<0.01. In vivo insulin sensitivity decreased by 31.3±12.1% (P<0.05, concomitant with a decrease in plasma 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (from 39.1±5.2 to 15.7±2.0 nmol/L but not anandamide, oleoyl ethanolamide, linoleoyl ethanolamide, or palmitoyl ethanolamide. In control-diet animals (body weight: 28.8±1.0 kg, islets incubated with anandamide had a higher basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as compared with no treatment. Islets from fat-fed animals (34.5±1.3 kg; P<0.05 versus control did not exhibit further potentiation of anandamide-induced insulin secretion as compared with control-diet animals. Glucagon but not somatostatin secretion in vitro was also increased in response to anandamide, but there was no difference between groups (P = 0.705. No differences in gene expression of CB1R or CB2R between groups were found.In canines, high-fat diet

  16. Influence of Interleukin-1 Beta on Platelet-Poor Plasma Clot Formation: A Potential Impact on Early Bone Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Hematoma quality (especially the fibrin matrix plays an important role in the bone healing process. Here, we investigated the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β on fibrin clot formation from platelet-poor plasma (PPP.Five-milliliter of rat whole-blood samples were collected from the hepatic portal vein. All blood samples were firstly standardized via a thrombelastograph (TEG, blood cell count, and the measurement of fibrinogen concentration. PPP was prepared by collecting the top two-fifths of the plasma after centrifugation under 400 × g for 10 min at 20°C. The effects of IL-1β cytokines on artificial fibrin clot formation from PPP solutions were determined by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, confocal microscopy (CM, turbidity, and clot lysis assays.The lag time for protofibril formation was markedly shortened in the IL-1β treatment groups (243.8 ± 76.85 in the 50 pg/mL of IL-1β and 97.5 ± 19.36 in the 500 pg/mL of IL-1β compared to the control group without IL-1β (543.8 ± 205.8. Maximal turbidity was observed in the control group. IL-1β (500 pg/mL treatment significantly decreased fiber diameters resulting in smaller pore sizes and increased density of the fibrin clot structure formed from PPP (P < 0.05. The clot lysis assay revealed that 500 pg/mL IL-1β induced a lower susceptibility to dissolution due to the formation of thinner and denser fibers.IL-1β can significantly influence PPP fibrin clot structure, which may affect the early bone healing process.

  17. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S.L.S. Reis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion, scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by electroejaculation, were evaluated soon after collection for motility, vigor and wave motion under an optical microscope. Sperm membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial activity were evaluated under a fluorescent microscope using probe association (FITC-PSA, PI, JC-1, H342. The sperm were classified into eight integrity categories depending on whether they exhibited intact or damaged membranes, an intact or damaged acrosomal membrane, and high or low mitochondrial potential. The results show that bulls have a low amount of sperm with intact membranes at puberty, and the sperm show low motility, vigor, and wave motion; however, in bulls at early sexual maturity, the integrity of the sperm membrane increased significantly. The rate of sperm membrane damage was negatively correlated with motility, vigor, wave motion, and testosterone in the bulls, and a positive correlation existed between sperm plasma membrane integrity and scrotal circumference. The integrity of the acrosomal membrane was not influenced by puberty. During puberty and into early sexual maturity, bulls show low sperm mitochondrial potential, but when bulls reached sexual maturity, high membrane integrity with high mitochondrial potential was evident.

  18. O2, pH, and redox potential microprofiles around Potamogeton malaianus measured using microsensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Dong

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elucidate the effects of periphyton on the microprofiles of oxygen (O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential around the stems and leaves of a submerged macrophyte Potamogeton malaianus and on the plant growth in the eutrophic shallow Taihu Lake, China. The microprofiles were measured using a motorized microprofiling system equipped with microsensors. The leaf age of the macrophyte and periphyton exerted significant effects on the microprofiles of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential. O2 concentration and pH increased whereas the oxidation-reduction potential decreased with decreasing distance to the stem/leaf surface. The fluctuation amplitudes of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential were the largest in the microprofiles of mature leaves and the lowest in senescent leaves. The periphyton increased the thickness of the broad diffusive boundary layer and fluctuation amplitudes of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential. When the periphyton was removed, the thickness of the broad diffusive boundary layer in the microprofiles of stems, senescent leaves, and mature leaves reduced by 29.0%, 49.72%, and 70.34%, and the O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential fluctuation amplitudes also declined accordingly. Our results suggest that a thick periphyton exerted negative effects on the growth of macrophytes by providing extensive shading and creating a barrier that hindered the transport of dissolved substances such as O2, and led to premature decline in macrophytes in the eutrophic Taihu Lake. The consequent implications can help to elucidate the control mechanism of the broad diffusive boundary layer around macrophytes on nutrient cycling in eutrophic waters and to better understand the role of this layer in the Taihu Lake and other similar eutrophic waters.

  19. Direct measurement of the cross-shock electric potential at low plasma $\\beta$, quasi-perpendicular bow shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, S D; Krasnoselskikh, V V

    2008-01-01

    We use the Cluster EFW experiment to measure the cross-shock electric field at ten low $\\beta$, quasi-perpendicular supercritical bow shock crossings on March 31, 2001. The electric field data are Lorentz-tranformed to a Normal Incidence frame (NIF), in which the incoming solar wind velocity is aligned with the shock normal. In a boundary normal coordinate system, the cross-shock (normal) electric field is integrated to obtain the cross shock potential. Using this technique, we measure the cross-shock potential at each of the four Cluster satellites and using an electric field profile averaged between the four satellites. Typical values are in the range 500-2500 volts. The cross-shock potential measurements are compared with the ion kinetic energy change across the shock. The cross-shock potential is measured to be from 23 to 236% of the ion energy change, with large variations between the four Cluster spacecraft at the same shock. These results indicate that solar wind flow through the shock is likely to be ...

  20. Glucose generates sub-plasma membrane ATP microdomains in single islet beta-cells. Potential role for strategically located mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, H J; Pouli, A E; Ainscow, E K; Jouaville, L S; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    1999-05-01

    Increases in the concentration of free ATP within the islet beta-cell may couple elevations in blood glucose to insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels and activating Ca2+ influx. Here, we use recombinant targeted luciferases and photon counting imaging to monitor changes in free [ATP] in subdomains of single living MIN6 and primary beta-cells. Resting [ATP] in the cytosol ([ATP]c), in the mitochondrial matrix ([ATP]m), and beneath the plasma membrane ([ATP]pm) were similar ( approximately 1 mM). Elevations in extracellular glucose concentration (3-30 mM) increased free [ATP] in each domain with distinct kinetics. Thus, sustained increases in [ATP]m and [ATP]pm were observed, but only a transient increase in [ATP]c. However, detectable increases in [ATP]c and [ATP]pm, but not [ATP]m, required extracellular Ca2+. Enhancement of glucose-induced Ca2+ influx with high [K+] had little effect on the apparent [ATP]c and [ATP]m increases but augmented the [ATP]pm increase. Underlying these changes, glucose increased the mitochondrial proton motive force, an effect mimicked by high [K+]. These data support a model in which glucose increases [ATP]m both through enhanced substrate supply and by progressive Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial enzymes. This may then lead to a privileged elevation of [ATP]pm, which may be essential for the sustained closure of KATP channels. Luciferase imaging would appear to be a useful new tool for dynamic in vivo imaging of free ATP concentration.

  1. Ex Vivo Measurement of Enzyme Stability in Human Plasma: A Potential Screening Method for In Vivo Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    INTRODUCTION Catalytic enzymes offer the potential to protect against organophosphate poisoning by detoxifying these compounds in the blood stream, before...phosphotriesterase for the hydrolysis of  organophosphate  nerve agents,  Biochemistry published online, August 2012.  2 Bigley, A.N., C. Xu, T.J. Henderson

  2. Searsia chirindensis reverses the potentiating effect of prenatal stress on the development of febrile seizures and decreased plasma interleukin-1β levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qulu, Lihle; Daniels, Willie M U; Russell, Vivienne; Mabandla, Musa V

    2016-02-01

    It is estimated that more than 80% of patients with epilepsy live in developing countries with 50-60% of them being children. This high prevalence is perpetuated by low socio-economic challenges, poor health care facilities and lack of drug affordability. Searsia chirindensis formerly known as rhus chirindensis and commonly known as 'Red Current' is a popular traditional medicinal plant, which has been used to treat a number of illnesses such as heart complaints and neurological disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of S. chirindensis on the development of febrile seizure in a prenatally stressed rat. Febrile seizures were induced by administering lipopolysaccharide to 14-day-old rat pups followed by kainic acid. A subset of the rats was treated with Searsia after induction of febrile seizures. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels were measured in plasma. Lipid peroxidation was determined in liver tissue. Our data shows that treatment with Searsia reduced interleukin-1β levels in plasma of the febrile seizure rats and prevented lipid oxidation in the liver. Prenatal stress is dampened by the beneficial effects of Searsia on seizure development in rat pups. These results highlight the potentiating effects of Searsia in the reversal of febrile seizures and prenatal stress effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluoxetine, but not tricyclic antidepressants, potentiates the 5-hydroxytryptophan-mediated increase in plasma cortisol and prolactin secretion in subjects with major depression or with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, H; Bastani, B; Jayathilake, K; Maes, M

    1997-07-01

    It has been suggested that the clinical efficacy of chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine and perhaps all antidepressants is due to their ability to enhance serotonergic activity. The effects of chronic treatment with fluoxetine or tricyclic antidepressants on the L-5-hydroxytryptophan (200 mg, L-5-HTP; PO)-induced increases in plasma cortisol and prolactin (PRL) concentrations were studied in patients with major depression or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Administration of L-5-HTP increased plasma cortisol and PRL levels in medicated and unmedicated patients with major depression or OCD. The L-5-HTP-induced cortisol and PRL responses were significantly higher in fluoxetine-treated than in tricyclic-treated or unmedicated major depressed patients. The latter two groups did not differ significantly in their cortisol or PRL responses to L-5-HTP. The L-5-HTP-induced increases in cortisol and PRL in fluoxetine-treated patients with major depression or OCD were not significantly different. The results suggest that fluoxetine, but not tricyclic antidepressants, potentiates 5-HT receptor-mediated stimulation of cortisol and PRL secretion in humans, consistent with available evidence that fluoxetine treatment, but not tricyclic antidepressants, increases central serotonergic activity in patients with MD or OCD by a presynaptic mechanism.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma-Purified VLDL, LDL, and HDL Fractions from Atherosclerotic Patients Undergoing Carotid Endarterectomy: Identification of Serum Amyloid A as a Potential Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J. Lepedda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoproteins are very heterogeneous protein family, implicated in plasma lipoprotein structural stabilization, lipid metabolism, inflammation, or immunity. Obtaining detailed information on apolipoprotein composition and structure may contribute to elucidating lipoprotein roles in atherogenesis and to developing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lipoprotein-associated disorders. This study aimed at developing a comprehensive method for characterizing the apolipoprotein component of plasma VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE coupled with Mass Spectrometry analysis, useful for identifying potential markers of plaque presence and vulnerability. The adopted method allowed obtaining reproducible 2-DE maps of exchangeable apolipoproteins from VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Twenty-three protein isoforms were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. Differential proteomic analysis allowed for identifying increased levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A protein (AP SAA in all lipoprotein fractions, especially in LDL from atherosclerotic patients. Results have been confirmed by western blotting analysis on each lipoprotein fraction using apo AI levels for data normalization. The higher levels of AP SAA found in patients suggest a role of LDL as AP SAA carrier into the subendothelial space of artery wall, where AP SAA accumulates and may exert noxious effects.

  5. Untargeted screening of unknown xenobiotics and potential toxins in plasma of poisoned patients using high-resolution mass spectrometry: Generation of xenobiotic fingerprint using background subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Xu, Hui; Su, Dan; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Hongliang; Feng, Yulin; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-11-09

    A novel analytical workflow was developed and applied for the detection and identification of unknown xenobiotics in biological samples. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS)-based data-independent MS(E) acquisition was employed to record full scan MS and fragment spectral datasets of test and control samples. Then, an untargeted data-mining technique, background subtraction, was utilized to find xenobiotics present only in test samples. Structural elucidation of the detected xenobiotics was accomplished by database search, spectral interpretation, and/or comparison with reference standards. Application of the workflow to analysis of unknown xenobiotics in plasma samples collected from four poisoned patients led to generation of xenobiotic profiles, which were regarded as xenobiotic fingerprints of the individual samples. Among 19 xenobiotics detected, 11 xenobiotics existed in a majority of the patients' plasma samples, thus were considered as potential toxins. The follow-up database search led to the tentative identification of azithromycin (X5), α-chaconine (X9) and penfluridol (X12). The identity of X12 was further confirmed with its reference standard. In addition, one xenobiotic component (Y5) was tentatively identified as a penfluridol metabolite. The remaining unidentified xenobiotics listed in the xenobiotic fingerprints can be further characterized or identified in retrospective analyses after their spectral data and/or reference compounds are available. This HRMS-based workflow may have broad applications in the detection and identification of unknown xenobiotics in individual biological samples, such as forensic and toxicological analysis and sport enhancement drug screening.

  6. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    , while MYL12B was changeless in plasma of control group. Taking together, phosphorylated MYL12B may be employed as a potential plasma biomarker for the early diagnosis of SAKI. PMID:26823757

  7. Direct measurement of the cross-shock electric potential at low plasma $\\beta$, quasi-perpendicular bow shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Bale, S. D.; Mozer, F.S.; Krasnoselskikh, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    We use the Cluster EFW experiment to measure the cross-shock electric field at ten low $\\beta$, quasi-perpendicular supercritical bow shock crossings on March 31, 2001. The electric field data are Lorentz-tranformed to a Normal Incidence frame (NIF), in which the incoming solar wind velocity is aligned with the shock normal. In a boundary normal coordinate system, the cross-shock (normal) electric field is integrated to obtain the cross shock potential. Using this technique, we measure the cr...

  8. Elements of plasma technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Chiow San

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some fundamental aspects of plasma technology that are important for beginners interested to start research in the area of plasma technology . These include the properties of plasma, methods of plasma generation and basic plasma diagnostic techniques. It also discusses several low cost plasma devices, including pulsed plasma sources such as plasma focus, pulsed capillary discharge, vacuum spark and exploding wire; as well as low temperature plasmas such as glow discharge and dielectric barrier discharge which the authors believe may have potential applications in industry. The treatments are experimental rather than theoretical, although some theoretical background is provided where appropriate. The principles of operation of these devices are also reviewed and discussed.

  9. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity.

  10. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  11. Reactive radical-driven bacterial inactivation by hydrogen-peroxide-enhanced plasma-activated-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songjie; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The combined effects of plasma activated water (PAW) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), PAW/HP, in sterilization were investigated in this study. To assess the synergistic effects of PAW/HP, S. aureus was selected as the test microorganism to determine the inactivation efficacy. Also, the DNA/RNA and proteins released by the bacterial suspensions under different conditions were examined to confirm membrane integrity. Additionally, the intracellular pH (pHi) of S. aureus was measured in our study. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was employed to identify the presence of radicals. Finally, the oxidation reduction potential (ORP), conductivity and pH were measured. Our results revealed that the inactivation efficacy of PAW/HP is much greater than that of PAW, while increased H2O2 concentration result in higher inactivation potential. More importantly, as compared with PAW, the much stronger intensity ESR signals and higher ORP in PAW/HP suggests that the inactivation mechanism of the synergistic effects of PAW/HP: more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially OH and NO radicals, are generated in PAW combined with H2O2 resulting in more deaths of the bacteria.

  12. Effect of electrical stunning current and frequency on meat quality, plasma parameters, and glycolytic potential in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Zhang, L; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Zhang, H J; Ji, F; Qi, G H

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of electrical stunning variables (low currents and high frequencies) on meat quality, glycolytic potential, and blood parameters in broilers. A total of 54 broilers were stunned with 9 electrical stunning methods for 18 s using sinusoidal alternating currents combining 3 current levels (35 V, 47 mA; 50 V, 67 mA; and 65 V, 86 mA) with 3 frequencies (160, 400, and 1,000 Hz). Samples for meat quality were obtained from the pectoralis major (PM) and musculus iliofibularis (MI), and samples for glycogen metabolism were taken from the PM and tibialis anterior muscle at 45 min postmortem. The use of high frequency reduced the shear value in PM (400 and 1,000 Hz vs. 160 Hz; P 50 V, 67 mA).

  13. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavya S Doshi

    Full Text Available Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa. However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I" kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II" inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined f

  14. Shear and Bulk Viscosities of a Weakly Coupled Quark Gluon Plasma with Finite Chemical Potential and Temperature---Leading-Log Results

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Song, Yu-Kun; Wang, Qun

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the shear (eta) and bulk (zeta) viscosities of a weakly coupled quark gluon plasma at the leading-log order with finite temperature T and quark chemical potential mu. We find that the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s increases monotonically with mu and eventually scales as (mu/T)^2 at large mu. In contrary, zeta/s is insensitive to mu. Both eta/s and zeta/s are monotonically decreasing functions of the quark flavor number N_f when N_f \\geq 2. This property is also observed in pion gas systems. Our perturbative calculation suggests that QCD becomes the most perfect (i.e. with the smallest eta/s) at mu=0 and N_f = 16 (the maximum N_f with asymptotic freedom). It would be interesting to test whether the currently smallest eta/s computed close to the phase transition with mu=0 and N_f = 0 can be further reduced by increasing N_f.

  15. Grafting of poly-L-lysine dendrigrafts onto polypropylene surface using plasma activation for ATP immobilization - Nanomaterial for potential applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturaud, Benoit; Molero Bondia, Andrea; Faye, Clément; Garrelly, Laurent; Mas, André; Robin, Jean Jacques

    2013-10-15

    The present work describes a new environmental friendly strategy for the development of surfaces with high amine density via the grafting of native or modified poly-L-lysine dendrigraft (DGL G3) onto plasma activated polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyimide, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. Modified DGL G3 was prepared by replacement of few peripheral amines by various functionalities. Grafting efficiency was determined by wettability measurements, IRTF, XPS, AFM, and by colorimetry using optimized Coomassie Brilliant Blue method tailored for surface analysis. It was shown that a 4-7nm DGL G3 monolayer with 4×10(14)aminecm(-)(2) was covalently grafted onto various surfaces. Immobilization of adenosine triphosphate on the DGL-g-PP material from dilute solution was studied by bioluminescence and proved the ability of the material to interact with polyanionic biological compounds: 1 ATP complex with 5 amine groups. So, this material has a potential use in diagnostic and more widely for biotechnology due to its high capacity for biomolecule immobilization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Chondrogenic Induction Potential for Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells between Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma and Common Chondrogenic Induction Agents: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-zheng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interests in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and their application in stem cell therapy have contributed to a better understanding of the basic biology of the prochondrogenesis effect on bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs. We aimed at comparing the effect of autologous PRP with common chondrogenic induction agents (CCIAs on the chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Rabbit BMSCs were isolated and characterized by flow cytometry and differentiated towards adipocytes and osteoblasts. The chondrogenic response of BMSCs to autologous PRP and CCIAs which included transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, dexamethasone (DEX, and vitamin C (Vc was examined by cell pellet culture. The isolated BMSCs after two passages highly expressed CD29 and CD44 but minimally expressed CD45. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials of the isolated BMSCs were also confirmed. Compared with common CCIAs, autologous PRP significantly upregulated the chondrogenic related gene expression, including Col-2, AGC, and Sox-9. Osteogenic related gene expression, including Col-1 and OCN, was not of statistical significance between these two groups. Thus, our data shows that, compared with common chondrogenic induction agents, autologous PRP can be more effective in promoting the chondrogenesis of BMSCs.

  17. Soluble CD40 in plasma and malignant pleural effusion with non-small cell lung cancer:A potential marker of prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Yong Mu; Pang-Xue Qin; Qiu-Xia Qu; Cheng Chen; Jian-An Huang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Soluble CD40 (sCD40) is a potential modulator for both antitumor responses and CD40-based immunotherapy;however the levels and significance of sCD40 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with malignant pleural effusion are unknown. Methods: Forty-eight patients with lung cancer were treated in our institutions from January 2008 to January 2010. Peripheral blood and pleural effusion samples were collected from each subject. sCD40 levels in plasma and malignant pleural effusions supernatant were measured. The CD40L expression on CD3t T-cells was confirmed by flow cytometric direct immunofluorescence analysis. All patients were followed up after the study ended on January 1, 2010. Results: Patients with malignant pleural effusion of NSCLC had elevated circulating and pleural effusion levels of sCD40, and these elevated sCD40 levels were associated with advanced diseases and a poor prognosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that elevated sCD40 may have a role in modulating antitumor responses and may also be a useful prognostic marker. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  18. Effect of chemical composition on hydrophobicity and zeta potential of plasma sprayed HA/CaO-P2O5 glass coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, M P; Monteiro, F J; Serro, A P; Saramago, B; Gibson, I R; Santos, J D

    2001-12-01

    Multilayered plasma sprayed coatings on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloys have been prepared, which were composed of an underlayer of HA and a surface layer of a CaO-P2O5 glass-HA composite, with 2 or 4wt% of glass. Contact angle and surface tension variation with time, for both water and a protein solution, were determined by the sessile and pendent drop methods respectively using the ADSA-P software. Wettability studies showed that hydrophobicity of the coatings increase with the glass addition. The work of adhesion of albumin was also altered in a controlled manner by the addition of the CaO-P2O5 glass, being lower on the composite coatings than on HA. Zeta potential (ZP) results showed that composite coatings presented a higher net negative charge than HA coatings and that ZP values were also influenced by the content of the glass. This study demonstrated that the surface properties of those coatings may be modified by the addition of CaO-P2O5 glass.

  19. Selected constants oxydo-reduction potentials tables of constants and numerical data affiliated to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, v.8

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1958-01-01

    Selected Constants: Oxydo-Reduction Potentials contains Tables of the most probable value of the normal oxidation-reduction potential, or of the formal or apparent potential, of a given oxidation-reduction system. This book is prepared under the sponsorship of the Commission on Electrochemical Data of the Section of Analytical Chemistry of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. It is included in a general program of the Section of Analytical Chemistry. Entry items are classified in alphabetical order. This book will be of value to specialized and non-specialized chemists, teach

  20. THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT OF OXIDATION -REDUCTION INITIATOR SYSTEM USED FOR UP RESIN%不饱和聚酯树脂氧化还原引发体系的最新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟季茹; 赵磊; 梁国正; 秦华宇

    2001-01-01

    简述了不饱和聚酯树脂用氧化还原引发体系的种类、特点及其引发机理,重点介绍了近年来常温固化不饱和聚酯树脂用氧化还原引发体系促进剂的最新研究成果。其中包括过氧化苯甲酰、过氧化甲乙酮、过氧化环己酮、叔丁基过氧化氢、过苯甲酸叔丁酯等引发剂和N,N—二甲基苯胺,N,N—二甲基对甲苯胺,N,N—二(2-羟乙基)对甲苯胺,钴、钒、锰等变价金属环烷酸、异辛酸盐等。%Variety,feature and initiating mechanism of oxidation-reduction initiators,including BPO,MEKPO,CHKPO,TBHPO,TBBPO et al,were reviewed briefly.The latest development of accelerators,such as,DMA,DMT,DHET,Co,V and Mn naphthvenate and isooctanate,et al,of oxidation-reduction initiation was mainly introduced.

  1. Determination of cystathionine beta-synthase activity in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: potential use in diagnosis of CBS deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krijt, Jakub

    2011-02-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency is usually confirmed by assaying the enzyme activity in cultured skin fibroblasts. We investigated whether CBS is present in human plasma and whether determination of its activity in plasma could be used for diagnostic purposes. We developed an assay to measure CBS activity in 20 μL of plasma using a stable isotope substrate - 2,3,3-(2)H serine. The activity was determined by measurement of the product of enzyme reaction, 3,3-(2)H-cystathionine, using LC-MS\\/MS. The median enzyme activity in control plasma samples was 404 nmol\\/h\\/L (range 66-1,066; n = 57). In pyridoxine nonresponsive CBS deficient patients, the median plasma activity was 0 nmol\\/ho\\/L (range 0-9; n = 26), while in pyridoxine responsive patients the median activity was 16 nmol\\/hour\\/L (range 0-358; n = 28); this overlapped with the enzyme activity from control subject. The presence of CBS in human plasma was confirmed by an in silico search of the proteome database, and was further evidenced by the activation of CBS by S-adenosyl-L-methionine and pyridoxal 5\\'-phosphate, and by configuration of the detected reaction product, 3,3-(2)H-cystathionine, which was in agreement with the previously observed CBS reaction mechanism. We hypothesize that the CBS enzyme in plasma originates from liver cells, as the plasma CBS activities in patients with elevated liver aminotransferase activities were more than 30-fold increased. In this study, we have demonstrated that CBS is present in human plasma and that its catalytic activity is detectable by LC-MS\\/MS. CBS assay in human plasma brings new possibilities in the diagnosis of pyridoxine nonresponsive CBS deficiency.

  2. Determination of cystathionine beta-synthase activity in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: potential use in diagnosis of CBS deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijt, Jakub; Kopecká, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Moat, Stuart; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; Mayne, Philip; Kožich, Viktor

    2011-02-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency is usually confirmed by assaying the enzyme activity in cultured skin fibroblasts. We investigated whether CBS is present in human plasma and whether determination of its activity in plasma could be used for diagnostic purposes. We developed an assay to measure CBS activity in 20 μL of plasma using a stable isotope substrate - 2,3,3-(2)H serine. The activity was determined by measurement of the product of enzyme reaction, 3,3-(2)H-cystathionine, using LC-MS/MS. The median enzyme activity in control plasma samples was 404 nmol/h/L (range 66-1,066; n = 57). In pyridoxine nonresponsive CBS deficient patients, the median plasma activity was 0 nmol/ho/L (range 0-9; n = 26), while in pyridoxine responsive patients the median activity was 16 nmol/hour/L (range 0-358; n = 28); this overlapped with the enzyme activity from control subject. The presence of CBS in human plasma was confirmed by an in silico search of the proteome database, and was further evidenced by the activation of CBS by S-adenosyl-L-methionine and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and by configuration of the detected reaction product, 3,3-(2)H-cystathionine, which was in agreement with the previously observed CBS reaction mechanism. We hypothesize that the CBS enzyme in plasma originates from liver cells, as the plasma CBS activities in patients with elevated liver aminotransferase activities were more than 30-fold increased. In this study, we have demonstrated that CBS is present in human plasma and that its catalytic activity is detectable by LC-MS/MS. CBS assay in human plasma brings new possibilities in the diagnosis of pyridoxine nonresponsive CBS deficiency.

  3. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  4. Integrated plasma and urine metabolomics coupled with HPLC/QTOF-MS and chemometric analysis on potential biomarkers in liver injury and hepatoprotective effects of Er-Zhi-Wan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weifeng; Gu, Haiwei; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Barding, Gregory; Cheng, Haibo; Bao, Beihua; Zhang, Li; Ding, Anwei; Li, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Metabolomics techniques are the comprehensive assessment of endogenous metabolites in a biological system and may provide additional insight into the molecular mechanisms. Er-Zhi-Wan (EZW) is a traditional Chinese medicine formula, which contains Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) and Herba Ecliptae (HE). EZW is widely used to prevent and treat various liver injuries through the nourishment of the liver. However, the precise molecular mechanism of hepatoprotective effects has not been comprehensively explored. Here, an integrated metabolomics strategy was designed to assess the effects and possible mechanisms of EZW against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury, a commonly used model of both acute and chronic liver intoxication. High-performance chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/QTOF-MS) combined with chemometric approaches including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to discover differentiating metabolites in metabolomics data of rat plasma and urine. Results indicate six differentiating metabolites, tryptophan, sphinganine, tetrahydrocorticosterone, pipecolic acid, L-2-amino-3-oxobutanoic acid and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, in the positive mode. Functional pathway analysis revealed that the alterations in these metabolites were associated with tryptophan metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis, lysine degradation, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and pentose phosphate pathway. Of note, EZW has a potential pharmacological effect, which might be through regulating multiple perturbed pathways to the normal state. Our findings also showed that the robust integrated metabolomics techniques are promising for identifying more biomarkers and pathways and helping to clarify the function mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine.

  5. Plasma LncRNA-ATB, a Potential Biomarker for Diagnosis of Patients with Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixuan Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LncRNA-ATB (lncRNA was activated by transforming growth factor-β has been reported to be involved in specific physiological and pathological processes in human diseases, and could serve as biomarkers for cancers. However, the role of lncRNA-ATB in coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between lncRNA-ATB and CWP. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect plasma lncRNA-ATB expression in 137 CWP patients, 72 healthy coal miners and 168 healthy controls. LncRNA-ATB was significantly upregulated in CWP (p < 0.05. Compared with the healthy controls and healthy coal miners, the odds ratios (ORs (95% confidence interval (CI for CWP were 2.57 (1.52–4.33 and 2.17 (1.04–4.53, respectively. LncRNA-ATB was positively associated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 (r = 0.30, p = 0.003 and negative correlated with vital capacity (VC (r = −0.18, p = 0.033 and forced vital capacity (FVC (r = −0.18, p = 0.046 in CWP patients. Compared with healthy controls, the area under the curve (AUC was 0.84, resulting in a 71.17% sensitivity and 88.14% specificity. When compared with healthy coal miners, the AUC was 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.07% and 86.36%, respectively. LncRNA-ATB expression is commonly increased in CWP and significantly correlates with the TGF-β1 in CWP patients. Furthermore, elevated lncRNA-ATB was associated with CWP risk and may serve as a potential biomarker for CWP.

  6. Plasma LncRNA-ATB, a Potential Biomarker for Diagnosis of Patients with Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jixuan; Cui, Xiuqing; Rong, Yi; Zhou, Yun; Guo, Yanjun; Zhou, Min; Xiao, Lili; Chen, Weihong

    2016-08-22

    LncRNA-ATB (lncRNA was activated by transforming growth factor-β) has been reported to be involved in specific physiological and pathological processes in human diseases, and could serve as biomarkers for cancers. However, the role of lncRNA-ATB in coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between lncRNA-ATB and CWP. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect plasma lncRNA-ATB expression in 137 CWP patients, 72 healthy coal miners and 168 healthy controls. LncRNA-ATB was significantly upregulated in CWP (p < 0.05). Compared with the healthy controls and healthy coal miners, the odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval (CI)) for CWP were 2.57 (1.52-4.33) and 2.17 (1.04-4.53), respectively. LncRNA-ATB was positively associated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) (r = 0.30, p = 0.003) and negative correlated with vital capacity (VC) (r = -0.18, p = 0.033) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.18, p = 0.046) in CWP patients. Compared with healthy controls, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.84, resulting in a 71.17% sensitivity and 88.14% specificity. When compared with healthy coal miners, the AUC was 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.07% and 86.36%, respectively. LncRNA-ATB expression is commonly increased in CWP and significantly correlates with the TGF-β1 in CWP patients. Furthermore, elevated lncRNA-ATB was associated with CWP risk and may serve as a potential biomarker for CWP.

  7. Plasma LncRNA-ATB, a Potential Biomarker for Diagnosis of Patients with Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jixuan; Cui, Xiuqing; Rong, Yi; Zhou, Yun; Guo, Yanjun; Zhou, Min; Xiao, Lili; Chen, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    LncRNA-ATB (lncRNA was activated by transforming growth factor-β) has been reported to be involved in specific physiological and pathological processes in human diseases, and could serve as biomarkers for cancers. However, the role of lncRNA-ATB in coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between lncRNA-ATB and CWP. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect plasma lncRNA-ATB expression in 137 CWP patients, 72 healthy coal miners and 168 healthy controls. LncRNA-ATB was significantly upregulated in CWP (p < 0.05). Compared with the healthy controls and healthy coal miners, the odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval (CI)) for CWP were 2.57 (1.52–4.33) and 2.17 (1.04–4.53), respectively. LncRNA-ATB was positively associated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) (r = 0.30, p = 0.003) and negative correlated with vital capacity (VC) (r = −0.18, p = 0.033) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = −0.18, p = 0.046) in CWP patients. Compared with healthy controls, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.84, resulting in a 71.17% sensitivity and 88.14% specificity. When compared with healthy coal miners, the AUC was 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.07% and 86.36%, respectively. LncRNA-ATB expression is commonly increased in CWP and significantly correlates with the TGF-β1 in CWP patients. Furthermore, elevated lncRNA-ATB was associated with CWP risk and may serve as a potential biomarker for CWP. PMID:27556453

  8. Plasmas for medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2013-09-01

    economic potential. This ambivalent situation fundamentally requires a responsible use of plasma sources, which are specifically designated for biomedical applications. To enable physicians as well as life scientists to decide whether a given plasma source is really suitable for medical applications or biological experiments, a meaningful and mandatory spectrum of indicators has to be compiled to allow for a basic estimation of the potential of this plasma source.

  9. Coronary Artery-Bypass-Graft Surgery Increases the Plasma Concentration of Exosomes Carrying a Cargo of Cardiac MicroRNAs: An Example of Exosome Trafficking Out of the Human Heart with Potential for Cardiac Biomarker Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanza Emanueli

    Full Text Available Exosome nanoparticles carry a composite cargo, including microRNAs (miRs. Cultured cardiovascular cells release miR-containing exosomes. The exosomal trafficking of miRNAs from the heart is largely unexplored. Working on clinical samples from coronary-artery by-pass graft (CABG surgery, we investigated if: 1 exosomes containing cardiac miRs and hence putatively released by cardiac cells increase in the circulation after surgery; 2 circulating exosomes and exosomal cardiac miRs correlate with cardiac troponin (cTn, the current "gold standard" surrogate biomarker of myocardial damage.The concentration of exosome-sized nanoparticles was determined in serial plasma samples. Cardiac-expressed (miR-1, miR-24, miR-133a/b, miR-208a/b, miR-210, non-cardiovascular (miR-122 and quality control miRs were measured in whole plasma and in plasma exosomes. Linear regression analyses were employed to establish the extent to which the circulating individual miRs, exosomes and exosomal cardiac miR correlated with cTn-I. Cardiac-expressed miRs and the nanoparticle number increased in the plasma on completion of surgery for up to 48 hours. The exosomal concentration of cardiac miRs also increased after CABG. Cardiac miRs in the whole plasma did not correlate significantly with cTn-I. By contrast cTn-I was positively correlated with the plasma exosome level and the exosomal cardiac miRs.The plasma concentrations of exosomes and their cargo of cardiac miRs increased in patients undergoing CABG and were positively correlated with hs-cTnI. These data provide evidence that CABG induces the trafficking of exosomes from the heart to the peripheral circulation. Future studies are necessary to investigate the potential of circulating exosomes as clinical biomarkers in cardiac patients.

  10. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  11. Plasma adiabatic lapse rate

    CERN Document Server

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient and difference in average ionization states . Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

  12. Bactericidal Effects against S. aureus and Physicochemical Properties of Plasma Activated Water stored at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin; Tian, Ying; Li, Yinglong; Ma, Ruonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Water activated by non-thermal plasma creates an acidified solution containing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, known as plasma-activated water (PAW). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different storage temperatures (25 °C, 4 °C, ‑20 °C, ‑80 °C) on bactericidal activities against S. aureus and physicochemical properties of PAW up to 30 days. Interestingly, PAW stored at ‑80 °C yielded the best antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, 3~4 log reduction over a 30-day period after PAW generation; meanwhile, PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, and ‑20 °C, respectively, yielded 0.2~2 log decrease in cell viability after the same exposure and storage time. These results were verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties of PAW stored at different temperatures were evaluated, including pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, nitrite anion and NO radical levels. These findings suggested that bacterial activity of PAW stored at 25 °C, 4 °C, ‑20 °C decreased over time, and depended on three germicidal factors, specifically ORP, H2O2, and NO3‑. Moreover, PAW stored at ‑80 °C retained bactericidal activity, with NO2‑ contributing to bactericidal ability in association with H2O2. Our findings provide a basis for PAW storage and practical applications in disinfection and food preservation.

  13. Statin action favors normalization of the plasma lipidome in the atherogenic mixed dyslipidemia of MetS: potential relevance to statin-associated dysglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, Peter J; Wong, Gerard; Tan, Ricardo; Giral, Philippe; Robillard, Paul; Orsoni, Alexina; Hounslow, Neil; Magliano, Dianna J; Shaw, Jonathan E; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Chapman, M John

    2015-12-01

    The impact of statin treatment on the abnormal plasma lipidome of mixed dyslipidemic patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group at increased risk of developing diabetes, was evaluated. Insulin-resistant hypertriglyceridemic hypertensive obese males (n = 12) displaying MetS were treated with pitavastatin (4 mg/day) for 180 days; healthy normolipidemic age-matched nonobese males (n = 12) acted as controls. Statin treatment substantially normalized triglyceride (-41%), remnant cholesterol (-55%), and LDL-cholesterol (-39%), with minor effect on HDL-cholesterol (+4%). Lipidomic analysis, normalized to nonHDL-cholesterol in order to probe statin-induced differences in molecular composition independently of reduction in plasma cholesterol, revealed increment in 132 of 138 lipid species that were subnormal at baseline and significantly shifted toward the control group on statin treatment. Increment in alkyl- and alkenylphospholipids (plasmalogens) was prominent, and consistent with significant statin-induced increase in plasma polyunsaturated fatty acid levels. Comparison of the statin-mediated lipidomic changes in MetS with the abnormal plasma lipidomic profile characteristic of prediabetes and T2D in the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study and San Antonio Family Heart Study cohorts by hypergeometric analysis revealed a significant shift toward the lipid profile of controls, indicative of a marked trend toward a normolipidemic phenotype. Pitavastatin attenuated the abnormal plasma lipidome of MetS patients typical of prediabetes and T2D.

  14. Microwave Probing of Air-Plasma and Plasma Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Katherine; Rock, Ben; Helle, Mike

    2016-10-01

    Plasma metamaterials are of recent interest due to their unique ability to be engineered with specific electromagnetic responses. One potential metamaterial architecture is based on a `forest' of plasma rods that can be produced using intense laser plasma filaments. In our work, we use a continuous microwave source at 26.5 GHz to measure a single air plasma filament characteristics generated from a 5 mJ laser pulse within a cylindrical hole in a Ka-band waveguide. Preliminary results show the air plasma produces a strong shock and acts to reflect microwave radiation. A computational comparison using 3D EM modeling is performed to examine the reflection and transmission properties of a single plasma rod, and further, to investigate an array of plasma rods as a potential plasma based metamaterial.

  15. On the excess energy of nonequilibrium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, A. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Hydrogen Power Engineering and Plasma Technologies (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    The energy that can be released in plasma due to the onset of instability (the excess plasma energy) is estimated. Three potentially unstable plasma states are considered, namely, plasma with an anisotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution of plasma particles, plasma with a two-beam velocity distribution, and an inhomogeneous plasma in a magnetic field with a local Maxwellian velocity distribution. The excess energy can serve as a measure of the degree to which plasma is nonequilibrium. In particular, this quantity can be used to compare plasmas in different nonequilibrium states.

  16. Preliminary study on effects of 200 mW/cm2 microwave radiation on damage of the oxidation reduction system in rats%200mW/cm2微波辐射对大鼠氧化还原系统损伤初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜艳霞; 纪朋艳; 吕士杰; 张巍; 罗军; 徐俊杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of high power microwave radiation on the damage of oxidation reduction system in rats.Methods Thirty-six specific pathogen free adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group , low power and high power microwave groups , with 12 rats in each group , the microwave groups were treated with 100 and 200 mW/cm2 microwave radiation respectively for 10 minutes, while no microwave radiation was given to control group .After the end of the experiment , the plasma levels of superoxide free radical anion ( O2-· ) , superoxide dismutase ( SOD ) , catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), nitricoxide (NO) and nitricoxide synthase ( NOS) in the rats were detected .Results The O2-· levels in low power microwave group were higher than those of the control [ ( 169.85 ±15.98 ) vs ( 102.17 ±17.38 ) U/L, P0.05).Conclusion High power microwave radiation could lead to the increase of O 2-· and GSH-Px levels, and the reduce of CAT, NOS and GSH levels.The change of oxidation reduction system may be an important reason for the microwave radiation damage .%目的 探讨高功率微波辐射对大鼠氧化还原系统损伤的影响. 方法 36只无特定病原体级健康成年Wistar大鼠随机分为对照组、低功率微波组和高功率微波组,每组12只. 2个微波组分别给予功率密度为100和200 mW/cm2微波辐射10 min,对照组不作任何微波辐射. 实验结束后,检测大鼠血浆中超氧阴离子自由基(O2-·)、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化氢酶(CAT)、丙二醛(MDA)、谷胱甘肽(GSH)、谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(GSH-Px)、一氧化氮(NO)、一氧化氮合酶(NOS)水平.结果 低功率微波组大鼠血浆中O2-·水平高于对照组[(169.85±15.98) vs (102.17±17.38)U/L,P0.05).结论 高功率微波辐射可导致O2-·、GSH-Px水平增高以及CAT、NOS、GSH水平降低,氧化还原系统的改变可能是微波辐射损伤的一个重要原因.

  17. Short communication: Effect of commercial or depurinized milk diet on plasma advanced oxidation protein products, cardiovascular markers, and bone marrow CD34+ stem cell potential in rat experimental hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, Gordana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic, Tatjana; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Jovanovic, Aneta; Jovanovic, Jelena; Zivkovic, Petar

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular repair and myocardial contractility may be improved by migration of bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and their delivery to the site of injury, a process known as BMSC homing. The aim of our study was to examine the dietary effect of a newly patented depurinized milk (DP) that is almost free of uric acid and purine and pyrimidine compounds compared with a standard commercial 1.5% fat UHT milk diet or allopurinol therapy in rat experimental hyperuricemia. Bone marrow stem cell potential (BMCD34(+), CD34-postive bone marrow cells), plasma oxidative stress parameters [advanced oxidation protein products, AOPP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)], myocardial damage markers [creatine phosphokinase (CPK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)], plasma cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were investigated. The DP milk diet significantly increased the number of BMCD34(+) stem cells compared with commercial UHT milk. Allopurinol given alone also increased the number of BMCD34(+). Hyperuricemia caused a significant increase in all plasma enzyme markers for myocardial damage (CPK, LDH, and AST). A cardioprotective effect was achieved with allopurinol but almost equally with DP milk and more than with commercial milk. Regarding plasma AOPP, TBARS, and cholesterol levels, the most effective treatment was DP milk. In conclusion, the protective role of a milk diet on cardiovascular function may be enhanced through the new depurinized milk diet, which may improve cardiovascular system function via increased bone marrow stem cell regenerative potential, decreased plasma oxidative stress parameters, and decreased levels of myocardial damage markers and cholesterol. New dairy technology strategies focused on eliminating harmful milk compounds should be completely nontoxic. Novel milk products should be tested for their ability to improve tissue repair and function.

  18. Low plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor are potential risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Yi; Du, Xiao-Fang; Ma, Xiang; Guo, Jian-Lian; Lu, Jian-Min; Ma, Lu-Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies suggested that neurotrophins play a role in the diabetic retinopathy (DR). We therefore evaluated the role of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR). Plasma levels of BDNF were determined in type 2 diabetic patients (N=344). At baseline, the demographical and clinical data were taken. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) was used to test the overall predict accuracy of BDNF and other markers. Diabetic patients with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (Pdiabetes duration for DR from 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.82) to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; Prisk factors showed that plasma BDNF levels≤12.4 ng/mL(1(rd) quartiles) was an independent marker of DR (OR=3.92; 95%CI: 2.31-6.56) and VTDR (OR=4.88; 95%CI: 2.21-9.30). The present study demonstrated that decreased plasma levels of BDNF were independent markers for DR and VDTR in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting a possible role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of DR complications.

  19. Pregnancy associated plasma protein A, a potential marker for vulnerable plaque in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Teisner, Ane S; Teisner, Borge

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the presence and time-related pattern of circulating pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) levels in patients with non ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). DESIGN AND METHODS: Consecutively admitted patients (N=573) with clinical signs of NSTE-...

  20. Changes in the Sterol Composition of the Plasma Membrane Affect Membrane Potential, Salt Tolerance and the Activity of Multidrug Resistance Pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of the deletions of genes from the final steps in the biosynthesis of ergosterol (ERG6, ERG2, ERG3, ERG5, ERG4) on the physiological function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma membrane by a combination of biological tests and the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay. Most of the erg mutants were more sensitive than the wild type to salt stress or cationic drugs, their susceptibilities were proportional to the hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes. The different sterol composition of the plasma membrane played an important role in the short-term and long-term processes that accompanied the exposure of erg strains to a hyperosmotic stress (effect on cell size, pH homeostasis and survival of yeasts), as well as in the resistance of cells to antifungal drugs. The pleiotropic drug-sensitive phenotypes of erg strains were, to a large extent, a result of the reduced efficiency of the Pdr5 efflux pump, which was shown to be more sensitive to the sterol content of the plasma membrane than Snq2p. In summary, the erg4Δ and erg6Δ mutants exhibited the most compromised phenotypes. As Erg6p is not involved in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, it may become a target for a new generation of antifungal drugs.

  1. Temporal course of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A in angioplasty-treated ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients and potential significance of concomitant heparin administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Christian J; Oxvig, Claus; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a putative plaque instability marker. In acute coronary syndromes, the disrupted culprit plaque contains abundant PAPP-A, and circulating PAPP-A levels predict clinical outcomes. Determinants of circulating PAPP-A levels, however, are not fully...

  2. Metallic oxide reduction in molten chlorides: electrochemical solvent regeneration; Reduction d'oxydes metalliques en milieu de chlorures fondus: regeneration du solvant salin par electrochimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.

    2005-11-15

    We consider the reaction MeO{sub 2} + 2 Ca {yields} Me + 2 CaO in CaCl{sub 2} at 850 C. We want to re-use the molten media, which is a CaO-CaCl{sub 2} melt at the end of the reaction. For that we want to de-oxidize it. When we electrolyse CaO we obtain Ca and O{sub 2}; it presents three difficult points that we want to solve: (1) it is difficult to oxidize O{sub 2}{sup -} without oxidizing Cl{sup -} because their oxidation potential are very closed, (2) the chemical or electrochemical anodic corrosion, (3) the anodically produced gas dissolution in the mell One way of avoiding chlorine gas evolution is to prevent chloride ions from reaching the anode, for example using a selective membrane. Furthermore, the best prevention of the anodically produced gas dissolution in the melt can be done with a compartment, physically separating the anode from the rest of the reactional media. Thus in this work we have used an yttria stabilized zirconia membrane as a selective membrane for the deoxidation of a CaO-CaCl{sub 2} melt at 850 C. (author)

  3. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  4. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  5. Peroxiredoxin 2: a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of Hepatitis B Virus related liver fibrosis identified by proteomic analysis of the plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haijian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver fibrosis is a middle stage in the course of chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, which will develop into cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC if not treated at the early stage. Considering the limitations and patients' reluctance to undergo liver biopsy, a reliable, noninvasive diagnostic system to predict and assess treatment and prognosis of liver fibrosis is needed. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of HBV related liver fibrosis. Method Plasma samples from 7 healthy volunteers and 27 HBV infected patients with different stages of fibrosis were selected for 2-DIGE proteomic screening. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to assess differences in protein expression among all groups. The alteration was further confirmed by western blotting. Plasma levels of 25 serological variables in 42 healthy volunteers and 68 patients were measured to establish a decision tree for the detection of various stages fibrosis. Result The up-regulated proteins along with fibrosis progress included fibrinogen, collagen, macroglobulin, hemopexin, antitrypsin, prealbumin and thioredoxin peroxidase. The down-regulated proteins included haptoglobin, serotransferrin, CD5 antigen like protein, clusterin, apolipoprotein and leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein. For the discrimination of milder stage fibrosis, the area under curve for Prx II was the highest. Four variables (PT, Pre, HA and Prx II were selected from the 25 variables to construct the decision tree. In a training group, the correct prediction percentage for normal control, milder fibrosis, significant fibrosis and early cirrhosis was 100%, 88.9%, 95.2% and 100%, respectively, with an overall correct percent of 95.9%. Conclusion This study showed that 2-D DIGE-based proteomic analysis of the plasma was helpful in screening for new plasma biomarkers for liver disease. The significant up-expression of Prx II could be used in the early

  6. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca2+, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca2+ efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca2+ and H+ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca2+-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants. PMID:26742036

  7. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca²⁺, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-05

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca(2+) efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca(2+) and H⁺ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca(2+)-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants.

  8. Modulation of plasma metabolite biomarkers of MAPK pathway with the MEK inhibitor RO4987655: pharmacodynamic and predictive potential in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Joo Ern; Pal, Akos; Asad, Yasmin J; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie; Box, Gary; de Haven Brandon, Alexis; Revell, Victoria; Skene, Debra J; Venturi, Miro; Rueger, Ruediger; Meresse, Valerie; Eccles, Suzanne A; de Bono, Johann S; Kaye, Stanley B; Workman, Paul; Banerji, Udai; Raynaud, Florence I

    2017-06-21

    MAPK pathway activation is frequently observed in human malignancies, including melanoma, and is associated with sensitivity to MEK inhibition and changes in cellular metabolism. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we identified in preclinical models 21 plasma metabolites including amino acids, propionylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins that were significantly altered in two B-RAF mutant melanoma xenografts and that were reversed following a single dose of the potent and selective MEK inhibitor RO4987655. Treatment of non-tumour bearing animals and mice bearing the PTEN null U87MG human glioblastoma xenograft elicited plasma changes only in amino acids and propionylcarnitine. In patients with advanced melanoma treated with RO4987655, on-treatment changes of amino acids were observed in patients with disease progression and not in responders. In contrast, changes in phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins were observed in responders. Furthermore, pre-treatment levels of 7 lipids identified in the preclinical screen were statistically significantly able to predict objective responses to RO4987655. The RO4987655 treatment-related changes were greater than baseline physiological variability in non-treated individuals. This study provides evidence of a translational exo-metabolomic plasma readout predictive of clinical efficacy together with pharmacodynamic utility following treatment with a signal transduction inhibitor. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Cleaved forms of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in plasma have diagnostic potential and predict postoperative survival in patients with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henic, E.; Borgfeldt, C.; Christensen, I.J.;

    2008-01-01

    -FIA 3 measuring the liberated uPAR(I). Tumors were classified as benign (n = 211), borderline (possibly malignant; n = 30), and well (n = 19), moderately (n = 15), and poorly (n = 60) differentiated malignant. RESULTS: All uPAR forms as well as CA125 were statistically significant in univariate analysis...... (95% CI), 0.90-0.98] as well as borderline and benign tumors (AUC, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89). All suPAR forms were markers for poor prognosis in univariate analyses, and high preoperative plasma level of uPAR(I) is an independent predictor of poor prognosis (hazard ratio, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.15-2.95; P = 0.......011) in multivariate analyses including age and CA125. CONCLUSIONS: High concentration of plasma uPAR(I) is an independent preoperative marker of poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. The combination of plasma suPAR(I-III) + suPAR(II-III) and CA125 discriminates between malignant and benign tumors...

  10. Plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Concentration and Alveolar Nitric Oxide as Potential Predictors of Disease Progression and Mortality in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalpa Kotecha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Declining lung function signifies disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentration is associated with declining lung function in 6 and 12-month studies. Alveolar nitric oxide concentration (CANO is increased in patients with IPF, however its significance is unclear. This study investigated whether baseline plasma VEGF concentration and CANO are associated with disease progression or mortality in IPF. Methods: 27 IPF patients were studied (maximum follow-up 65 months. Baseline plasma VEGF concentration, CANO and pulmonary function tests (PFTs were measured. PFTs were performed the preceding year and subsequent PFTs and data regarding mortality were collected. Disease progression was defined as one of: death, relative decrease of ≥10% in baseline forced vital capacity (FVC % predicted, or relative decrease of ≥15% in baseline single breath diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (TLCO-SB % predicted. Results: Plasma VEGF concentration was not associated with progression-free survival or mortality. There was a trend towards shorter time to disease progression and death with higher CANO. CANO was significantly higher in patients with previous declining versus stable lung function. Conclusion: The role of VEGF in IPF remains uncertain. It may be of value to further investigate CANO in IPF.

  11. Wakes in inhomogeneous plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kompaneets, Roman; Nosenko, Vladimir; Morfill, Gregor E

    2014-01-01

    The Debye shielding of a charge immersed in a flowing plasma is an old classic problem in plasma physics. It has been given renewed attention in the last two decades in view of experiments with complex plasmas, where charged dust particles are often levitated in a region with strong ion flow. Efforts to describe the shielding of the dust particles in such conditions have been focused on the homogeneous plasma approximation, which ignores the substantial inhomogeneity of the levitation region. We address the role of the plasma inhomogeneity by rigorously calculating the point charge potential in the collisionless Bohm sheath. We demonstrate that the inhomogeneity can dramatically modify the wake, making it non-oscillatory and weaker.

  12. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadnaik Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive lesion composed of polyclonal plasma cells. It manifests primarily in the lungs, but may occur in various other anatomic locations like the oral cavity. Intraoral plasma cell granulomas involving the tongue, lip, oral mucosa and gingiva have been reported in the past. This case presents a 54-year-old female with chronic periodontitis and mandibular anterior gingival overgrowth treated by Phase I therapy (scaling and root planing and excisional biopsy. Histological examination revealed inflammatory cell infiltrate containing sheets of plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. This case highlights the need to biopsy for unusual lesions to rule out potential neoplasms.

  13. Using Dissolved Oxygen,Oxidation Reduction Potential and pH Value for Control Nitrogen Removal in SBR Process%以DO、ORP、pH控制SBR法的脱氮过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高景峰; 彭永臻; 王淑莹; 曾薇; 隋铭皓

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve on-line fuzzy control of nitrogen removal inSBR,a brewery wastewater was treated in a SBR.Variation patterns of ORP,DO and pH value during the removal of organic matters,nitrification and denitrification were studied in detail with different influent concentrations of ammonia nitrogen.The results show that the characteristic points and platforms of DO,ORP and pH value are repeated very well,and can be used as process control parameters for the removal of organic matters,nitrification and denitrification in a SBR process.%为实现SBR法脱氮在线模糊控制,以啤酒废水为研究对象,通过不同进水混合液氨氮浓度的试验,详细地研究了SBR法在去除有机物和硝化、反硝化过程中DO、ORP、pH的变化规律。试验表明,DO、ORP、pH的特征点和平台的重现性很好,可以作为SBR法去除有机物,硝化,反硝化的过程控制参数。

  14. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-10-14

    Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm(-2)) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12(λ). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  15. The proteolytic activity of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A is potentially regulated by stanniocalcin-1 and -2 during human ovarian follicle development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Malene R.; Kløverpris, Søren; Bøtkjær, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the proteolytic activity of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) regulated by the stanniocalcins (STC1 and STC2) during human follicle maturation? SUMMARY ANSWER: The STCs and PAPP-A show similar expression by immunohistochemistry in developing follicles, and regulation...... of PAPP-A proteolytic activity is suggested by the identification of inhibited protein complexes between PAPP-A and STC1 or STC2 in human follicular fluid (FF). WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-regulating proteinase PAPP-A is secreted by the granulosa cells of estrogen...

  16. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis using narrow pH 3-5.6 immobilised pH gradient strips identifies potential novel disease biomarkers in plasma or serum

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Bevin Gangadharan & Nicole Zitzmann ### Abstract Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is a protein separation technique often used to separate plasma or serum proteins in an attempt to identify novel biomarkers. This protocol describes how to run 2-DE gels using narrow pH 3-5.6 immobilised pH gradient strips to separate 2 mg of serum proteins. pH 3-6 ampholytes are used to enhance the solubility of proteins in this pH range before the serum proteins are separated in...

  17. Quantification of anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol plasma levels to examine potential influences of tetrahydrocannabinol application on the endocannabinoid system in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Ulrike; Schelling, Gustav; Hauer, Daniela; Greif, Robert; Dame, Torsten; Laubender, Ruediger Paul; Bernhard, Werner; Thieme, Detlef; Campolongo, Patrizia; Theiler, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids, ECs) are both mediated by activation of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Exogenous activation of these receptors by THC could therefore alter EC levels. We tested this hypothesis in healthy volunteers (n = 25) who received a large intravenous dose of THC (0.10 mg/kg). Effects on the EC system were quantified by serial measurements of plasma ECs after THC administration. Eleven blood samples were drawn during the first 5 h after THC administration and two more samples after 24 and 48 h. THC, its metabolites THC-OH (biologically active) and THC-COOH (non-active), and the ECs anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) were quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. EC-plasma levels showed a biphasic response after THC injection reaching maximal values at 30 min. Anandamide increased slightly from 0.58 ± 0.21 ng/ml at baseline to 0.64 ± 0.24 ng/ml (p < 0.05) and 2-AG from 7.60 ± 4.30 ng/ml to 9.50 ± 5.90 ng/ml (p < 0.05). After reaching maximal concentrations, EC plasma levels decreased markedly to a nadir of 300 min after THC administration (to 0.32 ± 0.15 ng/ml for anandamide and to 5.50 ± 3.01 ng/ml for 2-AG, p < 0.05). EC plasma concentrations returned to near baseline levels until 48 h after the experiment. THC (0.76 ± 0.16 ng/ml) and THC-OH (0.36 ± 0.17 ng/ml) were still measurable at 24 h and remained detectible until 48 h after THC administration. Although the underlying mechanism is not clear, high doses of intravenous THC appear to influence endogenous cannabinoid concentrations and presumably EC-signalling. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Simultaneous determination of 18 D-amino acids in rat plasma by an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method: application to explore the potential relationship between Alzheimer's disease and D-amino acid level alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yuping; Li, Xiaoyan; Guo, Xingjie; Cui, Yan

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids are increasingly being recognized as important signaling molecules, and abnormal levels of D-amino acids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To evaluate the potential relationship between Alzheimer's disease and D-amino acids, a simple, sensitive, and reliable UPLC-MS/MS method with pre-column derivatization was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 18 D-amino acids in rat plasma. The analytes were extracted from plasma samples by a protein precipitation procedure, and then derivatized with (S)-N-(4-nitrophenoxycarbonyl) phenylalanine methoxyethyl ester [(S)-NIFE]. Chromatographic separation was achieved using an ACQUITY UPLC BEH C18 column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 1.7 μm) with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile containing 8 mM ammonium hydrogen carbonate at a flow rate of 0.6 mL min(-1). The analytes were detected by electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring modes. Under the optimum experimental conditions, all the linear regressions were acquired with r > 0.9932. The limits of quantitation of all derivatized D-amino acids were within 0.05-40.0 ng mL(-1) in rat plasma. The intra- and inter-day precisions, expressed as percentage relative standard deviations (%RSD), were within the range of 12.3 and 10.1%, respectively. The recoveries for all the analytes were observed over the range of 82.8-100.5% with RSD values less than 12.5%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of the 18 D-amino acids in plasma from Alzheimer's disease rats and age-matched normal controls. Results showed that the concentrations of D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, D-leucine, and D-proline in Alzheimer's disease rat plasma were significantly decreased compared with those in normal controls, while D-phenylalanine levels increased. It was revealed that some of these D-amino acids would be potential diagnostic biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Graphene oxide reduction recipes, spectroscopy, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of new materials labeled ""graphene oxides."" It provides a comprehensive overview of graphene oxide-based nanomaterials in terms of their synthesis, structures, properties, and extensive applications in catalysis, separation, filtration, energy storage and conversion. The book also covers emerging research on graphite oxides and the impact of the research on fundamental and applied sciences.

  20. Nickel oxide reduction studied by environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2012-01-01

    In situ reduction of an industrial NiO powder is performed under 1.3 mbar of H2 (2 mlN/min) in a differentially pumped FEI Titan 80-300 environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). Images, diffraction patterns and electron energy loss spectra (EELS) are acquired to monitor the structura...

  1. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, Maria P., E-mail: patderrico@libero.it [Department of Laboratory Medicine, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Grimaldi, Luca [Department of Medical Physics, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Petruzzelli, Maria F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Gianicolo, Emilio A.L. [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Tramacere, Francesco [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto [Department of Laboratory Medicine, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Pili, Giorgio [Department of Medical Physics, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio [Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy); Portaluri, Maurizio [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' A. Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Clinical Physiology Institute, National Research Council (IFC-CNR), Pisa-Lecce (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small

  2. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...... Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement...

  3. Screening and Analysis of the Potential Bioactive Components in Rabbit Plasma after Oral Administration of Hot-Water Extracts from Leaves of Bambusa textilis McClure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Sun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bambusa textilis McClure is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant belonging to the Bambusoideae subfamily and used to treat chronic fever and infectious diseases. To investigate the bioactive compounds absorbed in the rabbit blood after oral administration of hot-water extracts from the leaves of B. textilis McClure, a validated chromatographic fingerprint method was established using LC-Q-TOF-MS. Twenty compounds in bamboo leaves and three potential bioactive compounds in rabbit plasma were detected. Of the twenty detected compounds in vitro, fifteen of which were tentatively identified either by comparing the retention time and mass spectrometry data with that of reference compounds or by reviewing the literature. Three potential bioactive compounds, including (E-p-coumaric acid, (Z-p-coumaric acid, and apigenin-8-C-β-D-(2"-O-α-L-rhamnosyl-gluco-pyranoside, were detected in both the leaves of B. textilis McClure and rabbit plasma. Of the three compounds, apigenin-8-C-β-D-(2"-O-α-L-rhamnosylglucopyranoside was identified based on its UV, MS, and NMR spectra. This study provides helpful chemical information for further pharmacology and active mechanism research on B. textilis McClure.

  4. Advanced plasma diagnostics for plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, Mikhail Victorovich

    1999-10-01

    A new, non-intrusive, non-perturbing diagnostic method was developed that can be broadly applied to low pressure, weakly ionized plasmas and glow discharges-trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES). The method is based on a comparison of intensities of atomic emission from trace amounts of inert gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) that are added to the discharge to intensities calculated from the theoretical model. The model assumes a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), computes the population of emitting levels both from the ground state and the metastable states of rare gases, and from the best fit between theory and experiment determines electron temperature (Te). Subject to conditions, TRG-OES can also yield electron density or its upper or lower limit. From the comparison of the emission from levels excited predominantly by high energy electrons to that excited by low energy electrons, information about the EEDF can be obtained. The use of TRG-OES also allows a traditionally qualitative actinometry technique (determination of concentration of radical species in plasma through optical emission) to become a precise quantitative method by including Te and rare gases metastables effects. A combination of TRG-OES, advanced actinometry, and Langmuir probe measurements was applied to several different plasma reactors and regimes of operation. Te measurements and experiments to correct excitation cross section were conducted in a laboratory helical resonator. Two chamber configuration of a commercial (Lam Research) metal etcher were studied to determine the effects of plasma parameters on plasma-induced damage. Two different methods (RF inductive coupling and ultra-high frequency coupling) for generating a plasma in a prototype reactor were also studied. Pulsed plasmas, a potential candidate to eliminate the plasma-induced damage to microelectronics devices that occurs in manufacturing due to differential charging of the wafer, have

  5. Plasma Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    N M Vijay

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental base of plasma antenna is the use of an ionized medium as a conductor. The plasma antenna is a radiofrequency antenna formed by a plasma columns, Filaments or sheets, which are excited by a surface wave. The relevance of this device is how rapidly it can be turned on and off, only applying an electrical pulse. Besides its wide carrier frequency, the great directivity and controllable antenna shape. Otherwise a disadvantage is that it needs energy to be ionized....

  6. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  7. Understanding Micro Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, J; Böke, M; Ellerweg, D; Hemke, T; Knake, N; Mussenbrock, T; Niermann, B; Schröder, D; der Gathen, V Schulz-von; von Keudell, A

    2011-01-01

    Micro plasmas are operated around atmospheric pressure exhibiting pronounced non-equilibrium characteristics, i.e. they possess energetic electrons while ions and neutrals remain cold. They have gained significant interest due to their enormous application potential e.g. in the biomedical, surface modification and light source areas, just to name a few. Many different configurations are in use. Their understanding and quantification is mandatory for further progress in applications. We report on recent progress in the diagnostics and simulation of the entire micro plasma system from gas introduction, via the plasma discharge up to the samples at the example of a plasma jet operated in He/O2 in an ambient air environment.

  8. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the determination of sterols in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, S; Schmitz, G; Bauer, S; Kiermaier, J; Matysik, F-M

    2014-04-11

    The application of Gas Chromatography (GC)-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI)-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) is presented for sterol analysis in human plasma. A commercial APCI interface was modified to ensure a well-defined humidity which is essential for controlled ionization. In the first step, optimization regarding flow rates of auxiliary gases was performed by using a mixture of model analytes. Secondly, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of sterols including oxysterols, cholesterol precursors, and plant sterols as trimethylsilyl-derivatives was successfully carried out. The characteristics of APCI together with the very good mass accuracy of TOF-MS data enable the reliable identification of relevant sterols in complex matrices. Linear calibration lines and plausible results for healthy volunteers and patients could be obtained whereas all mass signals were extracted with an extraction width of 20 ppm from the full mass data set. One advantage of high mass accuracy can be seen in the fact that from one recorded run any search for m/z can be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 in Plasma from Soluble Leishmania Antigen-Stimulated Whole Blood as a Potential Biomarker of the Cellular Immune Response to Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. Ibarra-Meneses

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New biomarkers are needed to identify asymptomatic Leishmania infection as well as immunity following vaccination or treatment. With the aim of finding a robust biomarker to assess an effective cellular immune response, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 was examined in plasma from soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA-stimulated whole blood collected from subjects living in a Leishmania infantum-endemic area. MCP-1, expressed 110 times more strongly than IL-2, identified 87.5% of asymptomatic subjects and verified some asymptomatic subjects close to the cutoff. MCP-1 was also significantly elevated in all patients cured of visceral leishmaniasis (VL, unlike IL-2, indicating the specific memory response generated against Leishmania. These results show MCP-1 to be a robust candidate biomarker of immunity that could be used as a marker of cure and to both select and follow the population in vaccine phase I–III human clinical trials with developed rapid, easy-to-use field tools.

  10. Potential beneficial effects of electron-hole plasmas created in silicon sensors by XFEL-like high intensity pulses for detector development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    There is a compelling need for a high frame rate imaging detector with a wide dynamic range, from single x-rays/pixel/pulse to >10{sup 6} x-rays/pixel/pulse, that is capable of operating at both x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) and 3rd generation sources with sustained fluxes of > 10{sup 11} x-rays/pixel/s [1, 2, 3]. We propose to meet these requirements with the High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) by (a) increasing the speed of charge removal strategies [4], (b) increasing integrator range by implementing adaptive gain [5], and (c) exploiting the extended charge collection times of electron-hole pair plasma clouds that form when a sufficiently large number of x-rays are absorbed in a detector sensor in a short period of time [6]. We have developed a measurement platform similar to the one used in [6] to study the effects of high electron-hole densities in silicon sensors using optical lasers to emulate the conditions found at XFELs. Characterizations of the employed tunable wavelength laser with picosecond pulse duration have shown Gaussian focal spots sizes of 6 ± 1 µm rms over the relevant spectrum and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude increase in available intensity compared to previous measurements presented in [6]. Results from measurements on a typical pixelated silicon diode intended for use with the HDR-PAD (150 µm pixel size, 500 µm thick sensor) are presented.

  11. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  12. A pilot study on potential plasma hypoxia markers in the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, C.; Bache, M.; Guettler, A.; Vordermark, D. [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kotzsch, M. [Technical University Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Hypoxic radioresistance plays a critical role in the radiotherapy of cancer and adversely impacts prognosis and treatment response. This prospective study investigated the interrelationship and the prognostic significance of several hypoxia-related proteins in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Pretreatment osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) plasma levels were determined by ELISA in 55 NSCLC (M0) patients receiving 66 Gy curative-intent radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Marker correlation, association with clinicopathological parameters and the prognostic value of a biomarker combination was evaluated. All biomarkers were linearly correlated and linked to different clinical parameters including lung function, weight loss (OPN), gross tumor volume (VEGF) and T stage (CA IX). High OPN (p = 0.03), VEGF (p = 0.02) and CA IX (p = 0.04) values were significantly associated with poor survival. Double marker combination additively increased the risk of death by a factor of 2 and high plasma levels of the triple combination OPN/VEGF/CA IX yielded a 5.9-fold risk of death (p = 0.009). The combined assessment of OPN/VEGF/CA IX correlated independently with prognosis (p = 0.03) in a multivariate Cox regression model including N stage, T stage and GTV. This pilot study suggests that a co-detection augments the prognostic value of single markers and that the integration of OPN, VEGF and CA IX into a hypoxic biomarker profile for the identification of patients with largely hypoxic and radioresistant tumors should be further evaluated. (orig.) [German] Hypoxische Radioresistenz spielt eine kritische Rolle in der Radiotherapie maligner Tumoren und beeinflusst Prognose und Therapieansprechen negativ. Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte den Zusammenhang und die prognostische Bedeutung einiger hypoxieassoziierter Proteine bei Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom

  13. Association with the Plasma Membrane Is Sufficient for Potentiating Catalytic Activity of Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins of the R7 Subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Brian S; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-25

    Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) promote deactivation of heterotrimeric G proteins thus controlling the magnitude and kinetics of responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the nervous system, RGS7 and RGS9-2 play essential role in vision, reward processing, and movement control. Both RGS7 and RGS9-2 belong to the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins that form macromolecular complexes with R7-binding protein (R7BP). R7BP targets RGS proteins to the plasma membrane and augments their GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity, ultimately accelerating deactivation of G protein signaling. However, it remains unclear if R7BP serves exclusively as a membrane anchoring subunit or further modulates RGS proteins to increase their GAP activity. To directly answer this question, we utilized a rapidly reversible chemically induced protein dimerization system that enabled us to control RGS localization independent from R7BP in living cells. To monitor kinetics of Gα deactivation, we coupled this strategy with measuring changes in the GAP activity by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay in a cellular system containing μ-opioid receptor. This approach was used to correlate changes in RGS localization and activity in the presence or absence of R7BP. Strikingly, we observed that RGS activity is augmented by membrane recruitment, in an orientation independent manner with no additional contributions provided by R7BP. These findings argue that the association of R7 RGS proteins with the membrane environment provides a major direct contribution to modulation of their GAP activity.

  14. Revisiting the plasma sheath - dust in plasma sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Das, G C; Bora, M P

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of lunar plasma sheath, though the results obtained in this work could be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisso...

  15. Particle acceleration by plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, A

    2002-01-01

    Plasma acceleration is carried out by using potential of plasma wave. It is classified by generation method of plasma wave such as the laser wake-field acceleration and the beat wave acceleration. Other method using electron beam is named the plasma wake-field acceleration (or beam wake-field acceleration). In this paper, electron acceleration by laser wake-field in gas plasma, ion source by laser radiation of solid target and nanoion beam generation by one component of plasma in trap are explained. It is an applicable method that ions, which run out from the solid target irradiated by laser, are used as ion source of accelerator. The experimental system using 800 nm laser, 50 mJ pulse energy and 50 fs pulse width was studied. The laser intensity is 4x10 sup 1 sup 6 Wcm sup - sup 2 at the focus. The target film of metal and organic substance film was used. When laser irradiated Al target, two particles generated, in front and backward. It is new fact that the neutral particle was obtained in front, because it...

  16. Electronegative Plasma Instabilities in Industrial Pulsed Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribyl, Patrick; Hansen, Anders; Gekelman, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Electronegative gases that are important for industrial etch processes have a series of instabilities that occur at process relevant conditions. These have been studied since the 1990s, but are becoming a much more important today as plasma reactors are being pushed to produce ever finer features, and tight control of the etch process is becoming crucial. The experiments are being done in a plasma etch tool that closely simulates a working industrial device. ICP coils in different configurations are driven by a pulsed RF generators operating at 2-5 MHz. A computer controlled automated probe drive can access a volume above the substrate. The probe can be a Langmuir probe, a ``Bdot'' probe, or an emissive probe the latter used for more accurate determination of plasma potential. A microwave interferometer is available to measure line-averaged electron density. The negative ion instability is triggered depending upon the gas mix (Ar,SF6) , pressure and RF power. The instability can be ``burned through'' by rapidly pulsing the RF power. In this study we present measurements of plasma current and density distribution over the wafer before, after and during the rapid onset of the instability. Work suported by NSF-GOALI Award and done at the BAPSF.

  17. Plasma chromograninx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Hilsted, Linda M; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk assessment remains difficult in elderly patients. We examined whether chromogranin A (CgA) measurement in plasma may be valuable in assessing risk of death in elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure in a primary care setting. A total of 470 patients (mean age 73 years......) were followed for 10 years. For CgA plasma measurement, we used a two-step method including a screening test and a confirmative test with plasma pre-treatment with trypsin. Cox multivariable proportional regression and receiver-operating curve (ROC) analyses were used to assess mortality risk...... of follow-up showed significant additive value of CgA confirm measurements compared with NT-proBNP and clinical variables. CgA measurement in the plasma of elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure can identify those at increased risk of short- and long-term mortality....

  18. Plasma Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  19. Novel recurrent chromosomal aberrations detected in clonal plasma cells of light chain amyloidosis patients show potential adverse prognostic effect: first results from a genome-wide copy number array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzow, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Bochtler, Tilmann; Hemminki, Kari; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Schönland, Stefan O; Jauch, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by the deposition of abnormal amyloid fibrils in multiple organs, thus impairing their function. In the largest cohort studied up to now of 118 CD138-purified plasma cell samples from previously untreated immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis patients, we assessed in parallel copy number alterations using high-density copy number arrays and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). We used fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the IgH translocations t(11;14), t(4;14), and t(14;16) or any other IgH rearrangement as well as numerical aberrations of the chromosome loci 1q21, 8p21, 5p15/5q35, 11q22.3 or 11q23, 13q14, 15q22, 17p13, and 19q13. Recurrent gains included chromosomes 1q (36%), 9 (24%), 11q (24%), as well as 19 (15%). Recurrent losses affected chromosome 13 (29% monosomy) and partial losses of 14q (19%), 16q (14%) and 13q (12%), respectively. In 88% of patients with translocation t(11;14), the hallmark chromosomal aberration in AL amyloidosis, a concomitant gain of 11q22.3/11q23 detected by iFISH was part of the unbalanced translocation der(14)t(11;14)(q13;q32) with the breakpoint in the CCND1/MYEOV gene region. Partial loss of chromosome regions 14q and 16q were significantly associated to gain 1q. Gain 1q21 detected by iFISH almost always resulted from a gain of the long arm of chromosome 1 and not from trisomy 1, whereas deletions on chromosome 1p were rarely found. Overall and event-free survival analysis found a potential adverse prognostic effect of concomitant gain 1q and deletion 14q as well as of deletion 1p. In conclusion, in the first whole genome report of clonal plasma cells in AL amyloidosis, novel aberrations and hitherto unknown potential adverse prognostic effects were uncovered. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  20. Plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  1. Plasma parameters controlled by remote electron shower in a double plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Phukan, A.

    2012-07-01

    The principal feature of this experiment is the electron showers consisting of three tungsten wires embedded by the plasma, which are heated up consequently emitting electrons inside the diffused plasma to control the plasma parameters in the discharge section of a double plasma device. These cold electrons emitted by the heated filament are free from maintenance of discharge which is sustained in the source section. The target plasma, where electrons are injected is produced as a result of diffusion from the source section. It is found that, plasma density and plasma potential can be effectively controlled in this way.

  2. Menthol-induced action potentials in Conocephalum conicum as a result of unspecific interactions between menthol and the lipid phase of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupisz, Kamila; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-07-01

    Our previous study has shown that the liverwort Conocephalum conicum generates action potentials (APs) in response to both temperature drop and menthol, which are also activators of the TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8) receptor in animals. Not only similarities but also differences between electrical reactions to menthol and cooling observed in the liverwort aroused our interest in the action of menthol at the molecular level. Patch-clamp investigations have shown that menthol causes a reduction of current flowing through slow vacuolar (SV) channels to 29 ± 10% of the initial value (n = 9); simultaneously, it does not influence magnitudes of currents passing through a single SV channel. This may point to an unspecific interaction between menthol and the lipid phase of the membrane. An influence of menthol on lipid organization in membranes was investigated in two-component monomolecular layers formed with menthol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at the argon-water interface. Analyses of the mean molecular area parameters vs the molar fraction of the menthol component have shown over-additivity (approximately 20 Å(2) ) in the region of high molar fractions of menthol. Infrared absorption spectroscopy studies have shown that menthol, most probably, induces breaking of a hydrogen bond network formed by ester carbonyl groups and water bridges in the lipid membrane and binds to the polar head group region of DPPC. We conclude that the disruption in the lipid phase of the membrane influences ion channels and/or pumps and subsequently causes generation of APs in excitable plants such as C. conicum.

  3. Microarray Expression Profile Analysis of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Umbilical Cord Plasma Reveals their Potential Role in Gestational Diabetes-Induced Macrosomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Shi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fetal macrosomia and its associated complications are the most frequent and serious morbidities for infants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. The associations between long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs and macrosomia have been rarely reported; therefore, we investigated the umbilical cord lncRNA profiles in GDM macrosomia. Method: Thirty pairs of GDM macrosomia and normal controls were divided into three subgroups randomly, and the umbilical cord vein blood from each subgroup was mixed, and hybridized to a microarray containing probes representing 33,000 lncRNA genes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to validate selected differentially expressed lncRNAs. The gene ontology (GO, pathway and network analysis were performed. Result: The microarray identified 8814 lncRNAs that were expressed in the umbilical cord blood, of which 349 were significantly upregulated and 892 were significantly downregulated (fold-change ≥ 2.0 in GDM group. The highest enriched GOs targeted by downregulated transcripts were biological regulation. Pathway analysis indicated that nine pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts. Conclusions: Certain lncRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in the umbilical cord blood from GDM macrosomia might play a partial or key role in GDM macrosomia development. This study provided potential targets for treatment of macrosomia and novel insights into macrosomia biology.

  4. Microarray Expression Profile Analysis of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Umbilical Cord Plasma Reveals their Potential Role in Gestational Diabetes-Induced Macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhonghua; Zhao, Chun; Long, Wei; Ding, Hongjuan; Shen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Fetal macrosomia and its associated complications are the most frequent and serious morbidities for infants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The associations between long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and macrosomia have been rarely reported; therefore, we investigated the umbilical cord lncRNA profiles in GDM macrosomia. Thirty pairs of GDM macrosomia and normal controls were divided into three subgroups randomly, and the umbilical cord vein blood from each subgroup was mixed, and hybridized to a microarray containing probes representing 33,000 lncRNA genes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to validate selected differentially expressed lncRNAs. The gene ontology (GO), pathway and network analysis were performed. The microarray identified 8814 lncRNAs that were expressed in the umbilical cord blood, of which 349 were significantly upregulated and 892 were significantly downregulated (fold-change ≥ 2.0) in GDM group. The highest enriched GOs targeted by downregulated transcripts were biological regulation. Pathway analysis indicated that nine pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts. Certain lncRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in the umbilical cord blood from GDM macrosomia might play a partial or key role in GDM macrosomia development. This study provided potential targets for treatment of macrosomia and novel insights into macrosomia biology. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Practical applications of plasma surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Radio frequency activated gas plasma is an environmentally conscious manufacturing process which provides surface treatments for improved product quality. Plasma processing offers significant potential for reducing the use of solvents and other wet processing chemicals now used in surface treatments such as cleaning, activation for bonding, and moisture removal. Plasma treatments are generally accomplished without creating hazardous waste streams to dispose of. Plasma process development and application is ongoing at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division.

  6. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J.; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W.; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 μg of plasma with density above 1017 cm-3 to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 μg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  7. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  8. The effect of an intracerebroventricular injection of metformin or AICAR on the plasma concentrations of melatonin in the ewe: potential involvement of AMPK?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collet Armelle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now widely accepted that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a critical regulator of energy homeostasis. Recently, it has been shown to regulate circadian clocks. In seasonal breeding species such as sheep, the circadian clock controls the secretion of an endogenous rhythm of melatonin and, as a consequence, is probably involved in the generation of seasonal rhythms of reproduction. Considering this, we identified the presence of the subunits of AMPK in different hypothalamic nuclei involved in the pre- and post-pineal pathways that control seasonality of reproduction in the ewe and we investigated if the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of two activators of AMPK, metformin and AICAR, affected the circadian rhythm of melatonin in ewes that were housed in constant darkness. In parallel the secretion of insulin was monitored as a peripheral metabolic marker. We also investigated the effects of i.c.v. AICAR on the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, a downstream target of AMPK, in brain structures along the photoneuroendocrine pathway to the pineal gland. Results All the subunits of AMPK that we studied were identified in all brain areas that were dissected but with some differences in their level of expression among structures. Metformin and AICAR both reduced (p Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest a potential role for AMPK on the secretion of melatonin probably acting trough the paraventricular nucleus and/or directly in the pineal gland. We conclude that AMPK may act as a metabolic cue to modulate the rhythm of melatonin secretion.

  9. Plasma Sources for Medical Applications - A Comparison of Spot Like Plasmas and Large Area Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Plasma applications in life science are currently emerging worldwide. Whereas today's commercially available plasma surgical technologies such as argon plasma coagulation (APC) or ablation are mainly based on lethal plasma effects on living systems, the newly emerging therapeutic applications will be based on selective, at least partially non-lethal, possibly stimulating plasma effects on living cells and tissue. Promising results could be obtained by different research groups worldwide revealing a huge potential for the application of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma in fields such as tissue engineering, healing of chronic wounds, treatment of skin diseases, tumor treatment based on specific induction of apoptotic processes, inhibition of biofilm formation and direct action on biofilms or treatment of dental diseases. The development of suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapies requires an in-depth knowledge of their physics, chemistry and parameters. Therefore much basic research still needs to be conducted to minimize risk and to provide a scientific fundament for new plasma-based medical therapies. It is essential to perform a comprehensive assessment of physical and biological experiments to clarify minimum standards for plasma sources for applications in life science and for comparison of different sources. One result is the DIN-SPEC 91315, which is now open for further improvements. This contribution intends to give an overview on the status of commercial cold plasma sources as well as cold plasma sources still under development for medical use. It will discuss needs, prospects and approaches for the characterization of plasmas from different points of view. Regarding the manageability in everyday medical life, atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) and dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are of special interest. A comprehensive risk-benefit assessment including the state of the art of commercial sources for medical use

  10. plasma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puač Nevena

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present results for plasma sterilization of planktonic samples of two reference strains of bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. We have used a plasma needle as a source of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma in all treatments. This device is already well characterized by OES, derivative probes and mass spectrometry. It was shown that power delivered to the plasma is bellow 2 W and that it produces the main radical oxygen and nitrogen species believed to be responsible for the sterilization process. Here we will only present results obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance which was used to detect the OH, H and NO species. Treatment time and power delivered to the plasma were found to have the strongest influence on sterilization. In all cases we have observed a reduction of several orders of magnitude in the concentration of bacteria and for the longest treatment time complete eradication. A more efficient sterilization was achieved in the case of gram negative bacteria.

  11. Plasma metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, J M

    1997-01-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of s...

  12. Plasma dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rincon, F; Schekochihin, A A; Valentini, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire Universe and, through their dynamical interactions with matter, affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. How primordial cosmological seed fields arose and were further amplified to $\\mu$Gauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs, is a major theoretical puzzle still largely unconstrained by observations. Extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to collisional magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic-field growth and its sustainment through an efficient dynamo instability driven by chaotic motions is possible in such plasmas is not known. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a six-dimensional phase space necessary to answer this question have until recently remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic-field a...

  13. Plasma medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This comprehensive text is suitable for researchers and graduate students of a 'hot' new topic in medical physics. Written by the world's leading experts,  this book aims to present recent developments in plasma medicine, both technological and scientific, reviewed in a fashion accessible to the highly interdisciplinary audience consisting of doctors, physicists, biologists, chemists and other scientists, university students and professors, engineers and medical practitioners. The book focuses on major topics and covers the physics required to develop novel plasma discharges relevant for medic

  14. Reduction of a thin chromium oxide film on Inconel surface upon treatment with hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesel, Alenka, E-mail: alenka.vesel@guest.arnes.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mozetic, Miran [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [PROMES-CNRS Laboratory, 7 Rue du four solaire, 66120 Font Romeu Odeillo (France)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Oxidized Inconel alloy was exposed to hydrogen at temperatures up to 1500 K. • Oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma started at approximately 1300 K. • AES depth profiling revealed complete reduction of oxides in plasma. • Oxides were not reduced, if the sample was heated just in hydrogen atmosphere. • Surface of reduced Inconel preserved the same composition as the bulk material. - Abstract: Inconel samples with a surface oxide film composed of solely chromium oxide with a thickness of approximately 700 nm were exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures to determine the suitable parameters for reduction of the oxide film. The hydrogen pressure during treatment was set to 60 Pa. Plasma was created by a surfaguide microwave discharge in a quartz glass tube to allow for a high dissociation fraction of hydrogen molecules. Auger electron depth profiling (AES) was used to determine the decay of the oxygen in the surface film and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to measure structural modifications. During hydrogen plasma treatment, the oxidized Inconel samples were heated to elevated temperatures. The reduction of the oxide film started at temperatures of approximately 1300 K (considering the emissivity of 0.85) and the oxide was reduced in about 10 s of treatment as revealed by AES. The XRD showed sharper substrate peaks after the reduction. Samples treated in hydrogen atmosphere under the same conditions have not been reduced up to approximately 1500 K indicating usefulness of plasma treatment.

  15. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  16. Dusty plasma as a unique object of plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The self-consistency and basic openness of dusty plasma, charge fluctuations, high dissipation and other features of dusty plasma system lead to the appearance of a number of unusual and unique properties of dusty plasma. “Anomalous” heating of dusty particles, anisotropy of temperatures and other features, parametric resonance, charge fluctuations and interaction potential are among these unique properties. Study is based on analytical approach and numerical simulation. Mechanisms of “anomalous” heating and energy transfer are proposed. Influence of charge fluctuations on the system properties is discussed. The self-consistent, many-particle, fluctuation and anisotropic interparticle interaction potential is studied for a significant range of gas temperature. These properties are interconnected and necessary for a full description of dusty plasmas physics.

  17. Dusty plasma (Yukawa) rings

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, T E

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional strongly-coupled dusty plasma rings have been created experimentally. Longitudinal (acoustic) and transverse (optical) dispersion relations for the 1-ring were measured and found to be in very good agreement with the theory for an unbounded straight chain of particles interacting through a Yukawa (i.e., screened Coulomb or Debye-H\\"uckel) potential. These rings provide a new system in which to study one-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional physics.

  18. Ponderomotive manipulation of cold subwavelength plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Smorenburg, P W; Luiten, O J

    2012-01-01

    Ponderomotive forces (PFs) induced in cold subwavelength plasmas by an externally applied electromagnetic wave are studied analytically. To this end, the plasma is modeled as a sphere with a radially varying permittivity, and the internal electric fields are calculated by solving the macroscopic Maxwell equations using an expansion in Debye potentials. It is found that the PF is directed opposite to the plasma density gradient, similarly to large-scale plasmas. In case of a uniform density profile, a residual spherically symmetric compressive PF is found, suggesting possibilities for contactless ponderomotive manipulation of homogeneous subwavelength objects. The presence of a surface PF on discontinuous plasma boundaries is derived. This force is essential for a microscopic description of the radiation-plasma interaction consistent with momentum conservation. It is shown that the PF integrated over the plasma volume is equivalent to the radiation pressure exerted on the plasma by the incident wave. The conce...

  19. Plasma therapy in foals and adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennent-Brown, Brent

    2011-10-01

    Although a range of plasma-based products (e.g., cryoprecipitate, albumin, platelet-rich plasma, individual coagulation factors) are available to human physicians, equine veterinarians are largely restricted to using whole blood, frozen plasma, and fresh frozen plasma for transfusions. The indications for frozen or fresh frozen plasma in human medicine are relatively limited, and there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of these products in many cases. Furthermore, many human physicians have concerns regarding disease transmission and anaphylactic reactions after administration of any plasma product. In equine medicine, plasma products have been used (1) to treat failure of passive transfer (FPT); sepsis; and coagulopathies; (2) as "antiendotoxin" agents; and (3) to provide colloidal support. The use of plasma should be carefully considered before administration because of potential (although rare) adverse reactions as well as expense. In addition, the benefits are uncertain in some equine patients.

  20. Polyamine Metabolites Profiling for Characterization of Lung and Liver Cancer Using an LC-Tandem MS Method with Multiple Statistical Data Mining Strategies: Discovering Potential Cancer Biomarkers in Human Plasma and Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huarong; Liu, Ran; He, Bosai; Bi, Cathy Wenchuan; Bi, Kaishun; Li, Qing

    2016-08-10

    Polyamines, one of the most important kind of biomarkers in cancer research, were investigated in order to characterize different cancer types. An integrative approach which combined ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection and multiple statistical data processing strategies including outlier elimination, binary logistic regression analysis and cluster analysis had been developed to discover the characteristic biomarkers of lung and liver cancer. The concentrations of 14 polyamine metabolites in biosamples from lung (n = 50) and liver cancer patients (n = 50) were detected by a validated UHPLC-MS/MS method. Then the concentrations were converted into independent variables to characterize patients of lung and liver cancer by binary logic regression analysis. Significant independent variables were regarded as the potential biomarkers. Cluster analysis was engaged for further verifying. As a result, two values was discovered to identify lung and liver cancer, which were the product of the plasma concentration of putrescine and spermidine; and the ratio of the urine concentration of S-adenosyl-l-methionine and N-acetylspermidine. Results indicated that the established advanced method could be successfully applied to characterize lung and liver cancer, and may also enable a new way of discovering cancer biomarkers and characterizing other types of cancer.

  1. Polyamine Metabolites Profiling for Characterization of Lung and Liver Cancer Using an LC-Tandem MS Method with Multiple Statistical Data Mining Strategies: Discovering Potential Cancer Biomarkers in Human Plasma and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines, one of the most important kind of biomarkers in cancer research, were investigated in order to characterize different cancer types. An integrative approach which combined ultra-high performance liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry detection and multiple statistical data processing strategies including outlier elimination, binary logistic regression analysis and cluster analysis had been developed to discover the characteristic biomarkers of lung and liver cancer. The concentrations of 14 polyamine metabolites in biosamples from lung (n = 50 and liver cancer patients (n = 50 were detected by a validated UHPLC-MS/MS method. Then the concentrations were converted into independent variables to characterize patients of lung and liver cancer by binary logic regression analysis. Significant independent variables were regarded as the potential biomarkers. Cluster analysis was engaged for further verifying. As a result, two values was discovered to identify lung and liver cancer, which were the product of the plasma concentration of putrescine and spermidine; and the ratio of the urine concentration of S-adenosyl-l-methionine and N-acetylspermidine. Results indicated that the established advanced method could be successfully applied to characterize lung and liver cancer, and may also enable a new way of discovering cancer biomarkers and characterizing other types of cancer.

  2. Influence of plasma resistance and fluctuation on probe characteristics in detached recombining plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N.; Tanaka, N.; Nishijima, D.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Ezumi, N. [Dept. of Electronics and Control Engineering, Nagano National Coll. of Technology, Tokuma (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In order to find the causes of the strong anomaly of current-voltage characteristics of Langmuir probe observed in detached recombining plasmas in a linear divertor plasma simulator, NAGDIS-II, we have investigated plasma resistance along a magnetic field and potential fluctuations in the detached recombining plasmas. Simple calculation on the ratio between the plasma length, at which plasma resistance and resistance of ion sheath formed around a probe tip become equal, and an electron collection length indicates that the evaluation of electron temperature T{sub e} becomes inaccurate at T{sub e} of less than 0.6 eV when plasma density and neutral pressure are 1.0 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and 10 mtorr, respectively. The potential fluctuation in detached recombining plasmas was found to be so large compared to T{sub e}/e, which can also modify the probe characteristics. (orig.)

  3. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  4. Conditional Eddies in Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, H.; Pécseli, H.L.; Trulsen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Low‐frequency electrostatic turbulence generated by the ion–ion beam instability was investigated experimentally in a double‐plasma device. Real time signals were recorded and examined by a conditional statistical analysis. Conditionally averaged potential distributions reveal the formation...... and propagation of structures with a relatively long lifetime. Various methods for making a conditional analysis are discussed and compared. The results are discussed with reference to ion phase space vortices and clump formation in collisionless plasmas....

  5. Platelet-Rich Plasma Greatly Potentiates Insulin-Induced Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Through a Serine/Threonine Kinase Akt-Dependent Mechanism and Promotes Clinical Fat Graft Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, Valerio; Scioli, Maria G.; Gentile, Pietro; Doldo, Elena; Bonanno, Elena; Spagnoli, Luigi G.

    2012-01-01

    The potential plasticity and therapeutic utility in tissue regeneration of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) isolated from adult adipose tissue have recently been highlighted. The use of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) represents an alternative strategy in regenerative medicine for the local release of multiple endogenous growth factors. Here we investigated the signaling pathways and effects of PRP and human recombinant insulin on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation of ASCs in vitro. PRP stimulated proliferation (EC50 = 15.3 ± 1.3% vol/vol), whereas insulin's effect was the opposite (IC50 = 3.0 ± 0.5 μM). Although PRP alone did not increase adipogenesis, in association with insulin it prevented ASC proliferative arrest, greatly enhanced intracytoplasmic lipid accumulation, strongly increased serine/threonine kinase Akt phosphorylation and mouse monoclonal anti-sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 accumulation, and downregulated Erk-1 activity; adipogenic effects were markedly prevented by the Akt inhibitor wortmannin. PRP with insulin synergistically upregulated fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and downregulated epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB) expression; moreover, PRP in association prevented insulin-induced insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and insulin receptor downregulation. The inhibition of FGFR-1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (ErbB2) activity reduced ASC proliferation, but only that of FGFR-1 reduced adipogenesis and Akt phosphorylation, whereas the ErbB2 inhibition effects were the opposite. However, EGFR activity was needed for ErbB2-mediated inhibition of ASC adipogenesis. Clinically, the injection of insulin further ameliorated patients' 1-year PRP-induced fat graft volume maintenance and contour restoring. Our results ascertain that PRP in association with insulin greatly potentiates adipogenesis in human ASCs through a FGFR-1 and ErbB2-regulated Akt

  6. Electrosurgical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kenneth R.; McMillen, Donald F.; Woloszko, Jean

    2005-06-01

    Electrosurgical medical devices based on repetitively pulsed nonequilibrium micron-scale to millimetre-scale plasma discharges in saline solutions are described. The formation of vapour layers (bubbles) around active electrodes appears to be a common feature at moderate (<300 V rms) voltages, and dissociation, excitation and ionization of the vapour in these bubbles produces chemical conditions that are thought to be the source of beneficial tissue removal and treatment. Experimental data are discussed, as are the results of modelling efforts of the plasma chemistry. Hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms and other species are observed spectroscopically and their interactions with collagen, a common component of tissue encountered in surgical situations, are considered. Several pathways by which hydroxyl radicals interacting with collagen can lead to tissue removal are discussed.

  7. Electrosurgical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalder, Kenneth R; McMillen, Donald F; Woloszko, Jean [ArthroCare Corp., Sunnyvale, CA 94085-3523 (United States)

    2005-06-07

    Electrosurgical medical devices based on repetitively pulsed nonequilibrium micron-scale to millimetre-scale plasma discharges in saline solutions are described. The formation of vapour layers (bubbles) around active electrodes appears to be a common feature at moderate (<300 V rms) voltages, and dissociation, excitation and ionization of the vapour in these bubbles produces chemical conditions that are thought to be the source of beneficial tissue removal and treatment. Experimental data are discussed, as are the results of modelling efforts of the plasma chemistry. Hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms and other species are observed spectroscopically and their interactions with collagen, a common component of tissue encountered in surgical situations, are considered. Several pathways by which hydroxyl radicals interacting with collagen can lead to tissue removal are discussed.

  8. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  9. The potential effects of antioxidant feed additives in mitigating the adverse effects of corn naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on antioxidant systems in the intestinal mucosa, plasma, and liver in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Le Thanh, Bich; Lemay, Michel; Bastien, Alexandre; Lapointe, Jérôme; Lessard, Martin; Chorfi, Younès; Guay, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Seventy-two piglets (6.0 kg BW) were randomly distributed within six different dietary treatments to evaluate the effect of deoxynivalenol (DON) and the potential of four antioxidant feed additives in mitigating the adverse effects of DON on growth performances and oxidative status. Dietary treatments were as follows: control diet 0.8 mg/kg DON; contaminated diet (DON-contaminated diet) 3.1 mg/kg DON; and four contaminated diets, each supplemented with a different antioxidant feed additive, DON + vitamins, DON + organic selenium (Se)/glutathione (GSH), DON + quercetin, and DON + COMB (vitamins + Se/GSH + quercetin from the other treatments). Although DON was the main mycotoxin in the contaminated diet, this diet also contained 1.8 mg/kg of zearalenone (ZEN). The "mycotoxin" effects therefore included the combined effect of these two mycotoxins, DON, and ZEN. The DON-ZEN ingestion did not affect growth performances, average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and feed efficiency (G:F ratio), but partially induced oxidative stress in weaned pigs as shown by increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the plasma and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver (P  0.05). Supplementation with individual antioxidant feed additive had a limited effect in weaned pigs fed DON-ZEN-contaminated diets. Combination of antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E, quercetin, and organic Se/GSH) reduced plasma and liver MDA content and SOD activity in liver (P < 0.05) of piglets fed DON-ZEN-contaminated diets. Furthermore, this combination also reduced MDA content in the ileum (P < 0.05), although activity of glutathione peroxidases (GPx), SOD or catalase (CAT) in the ileum was not affected by DON-ZEN contamination or antioxidant supplements. In conclusion, DON-ZEN contamination induced oxidative stress in weaned pigs and combination of antioxidant feed additives restored partially the oxidative status. Further studies will be necessary to assess whether the

  10. Reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography-diode array detection of the bispyridinium compound MB327: plasma analysis of a potential novel antidote for the treatment of organophosphorus poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Harald; Mikler, John; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst

    2016-02-01

    In the case of poisoning by organophosphorus nerve agents or pesticides, there is still a lack of pharmacological treatment of the cholinergic crisis selectively targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Recently, the compound MB327 was identified as a potential novel lead structure to close this gap, thus demanding a quantitative assay for initial pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. MB327 is a salt consisting of the dicationic bispyridinium compound (BPC) 1,1´-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(4-tert-butylpyridinium) and two iodide counter ions. Due to the permanent positive charge of the BPC, an isocratic reversed-phase ion-pair chromatographic separation (RPIPC) was developed using heptanesulfonic acid as ion-pairing reagent and 45% v/v methanol as organic modifier (1 mL/min). Selective UV-detection (230 nm) was done by a diode array detector (DAD) for reliable, rugged, precise (RSD < 7%) and accurate (96-104%) quantitative analysis of 50 μL swine plasma (linear range 1-1000 µg BPC/mL plasma, lower limit of quantification 2 µg/mL). During method validation, diverse parameters essential for the chromatographic process were investigated to generate van´t Hoff, van Deemter and width plots allowing calculation of thermodynamic data like the distribution constant K (5.7 ± 0.3), change in enthalpy, ΔH(0) : -23.66 kJ/mol, and entropy, ΔS(0) : -65 J/(mol*K). In addition, RPIPC-DAD analysis enabled calculation of molar absorptivities of the BPC, ε230 : 17 400 ± 1100 L/(mol*cm), and iodide, ε230 : 9900 ± 400 L/(mol*cm), which determination was hampered by interference with each other in conventional cuvette UV-spectrophotometric measurements. Finally, the RPIPC-DAD procedure was applied to samples from an in vivo study of swine.

  11. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  12. Transport properties of inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issanova, M.K.; Kodanova, S.K.; Ramazanov, T.S. [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the transport properties of non-isothermal dense deuterium-tritium plasmas were studied. Based on the effective interaction potentials between particles, the Coulomb logarithm for a two-temperature nonisothermal dense plasma was obtained. These potentials take into consideration long-range multi-particle screening effects and short-range quantum-mechanical effects in two-temperature plasmas. Transport processes in such plasmas were studied using the Coulomb logarithm. The obtained results were compared with the theoretical works of other authors and with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Aerospace applications of pulsed plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    The use of a thermal equilibrium plasma for combustion control dates back more than a hundred years to the advent of internal combustion (IC) engines and spark ignition systems. The same principles are still applied today to achieve high efficiency in various applications. Recently, the potential use of nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion control has garnered increasing interest due to the possibility of plasma-assisted approaches for ignition and flame stabilization. During the past decade, significant progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of plasma chemistry interactions, energy redistribution and the nonequilibrium initiation of combustion. In addition, a wide variety of fuels have been examined using various types of discharge plasmas. Plasma application has been shown to provide additional combustion control, which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine (GTE) relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines (PDE) and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition (HCCI) engines, among others. The present paper describes the current understanding of the nonequilibrium excitation of combustible mixtures by electrical discharges and plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates an ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions.

  14. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  15. Reaction Process Phase Transfer Catalysis for Selective Oxidative-Reductive Carbonylation to Monuron%反应过程相转移催化选择性氧化还原羰基化合成灭草隆除草剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The basic problem of a homogeneous catalytic process is the separation of products from catalytic reaction system. Two main important developments, to immobilize the solid complex catalyst on the solid support and to use the two-phase (aqueous-organic solvent) catalysis, have achieved to solve this problem. However, some difficulties, such as the continuous loss of the catalyst and lower aqueous solubility of the ubstrate, still remain as before[1,2]. Recently, a complex catalyst of nonmetal selenium with triethylamine in the presence of CO, which possesses the reaction process phase transfer property, has been developed[3~7]. This catalytic system provides both advantages from homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, resulting in simple and complete separation of the product from the catalytic system. It differs from the two-phase catalysis, in our catalytic system no water was used as solvent, and the catalytic system is effective in selective oxidative-reductive carbonylation with nitroaromatic compounds and alkylamine as reagents at the same time[5~7]. Monuron is a kind of herbicide. The methods for its industrial synthesis use mainly the phosgene, but the phosgene has high toxicity and produces a lot of corrosive contaminants[8,9]. Our study is extended to the selective oxidative-reductive carbonylation of p-ClC6H4NO2 and 33%HN(CH3)2-67%H2O in one-pot reaction to give monuron.

  16. Adiabatic plasma buncher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrario, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Katsouleas, T.C. [Los Angeles Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Serafini, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Ben Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2000-07-01

    In this paper is presented a new scheme of injection into a plasma accelerator, aimed at producing a high quality beam while relaxing the demands on the bunch length of the injected beam. The beam dynamics in the injector, consisting of a high voltage pulsed photo-diode, is analyzed and optimized to produce a {lambda}{sub p}/20 long electron bunch at 2.5 MeV. This bunch is injected into a plasma wave in which it compresses down to {lambda}{sub p}/100 while simultaneously accelerating up to 250 MeV. This simultaneous bunching and acceleration of a high quality beam requires a proper combination of injection energy and injection phase. Preliminary results from simulations are shown to assess the potentials of the scheme.

  17. Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luche, J.; Falcoz, Q.; Bastien, T.; Leninger, J. P.; Arabi, K.; Aubry, O.; Khacef, A.; Cormier, J. M.; Lédé, J.

    2012-02-01

    Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

  18. Dusty Sheaths in Magnetized Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu. I. Chutov; O. Yu. Kravchenko; S. Masuzaki; A. Sagara; R. D. Smirnov; Yu. Tomita

    2004-01-01

    Parameters of self-consistent magnetized dusty sheaths are investigated using computer simulations of a temporal evolution of one-dimensional slab plasma with dust particles. The evolution is caused by a collection of electrons and ions by both a wall (electrode) and dust particles, which are initially immersed into plasma and distributed in front of the electrode. Obtained results show the existence of oscillations of a self-consistent potential in magnetized dusty sheaths including boundary potentials. Dust particles weaken magnetized sheaths and create additional sheaths close to a boundary of dust particles. The magnetic field does not influence on the dust particle charge.

  19. Complex plasmas scientific challenges and technological opportunities

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Jose; Becker, Kurt; Thomsen, Hauke

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the reader with an introduction to the physics of complex plasmas, a discussion of the specific scientific and technical challenges they present, and an overview of their potential technological applications. Complex plasmas differ from conventional high-temperature plasmas in several ways: they may contain additional species, including nanometer- to micrometer-sized particles, negative ions, molecules and radicals, and they may exhibit strong correlations or quantum effects. This book introduces the classical and quantum mechanical approaches used to describe and simulate complex plasmas. It also covers some key experimental techniques used in the analysis of these plasmas, including calorimetric probe methods, IR absorption techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final part of the book reviews the emerging applications of microcavity and microchannel plasmas, the synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials through plasma electrochemistry, the large-scale generation of ozone using mi...

  20. Plasma-Assisted Combustion Studies at AFRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-04

    important for lean, gas-turbine ( powerplant ) operation Might one also mitigate/influence acoustic fluctuations? Potential for uniform performance with...Thermometry with pulsed -W Source No -W Pulsed -W Direct coupled plasma torch: flame OH vs. - wave power: Plasma-assisted Ignition Cathey, Gundersen, Wang...Determine physical mechanism, primarily for transient plasma ignition  What is role of humidity: XH2O affects detonation wave speed in PDE but not

  1. Effects of nicorandil on cardiac plasma membrane and cardiac mitochondrial membrane potential of guinea-pig%尼可地尔对豚鼠心肌细胞膜及线粒体膜电位的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯力; 刘伊丽; 刘杰; 金春华

    2001-01-01

    研究KATP通道开放剂尼可地尔(Nic)对豚鼠心肌细胞膜和线粒体膜电位的影响.用激光共聚焦显微镜和特异性荧光探针,观察不同剂量的Nic及KATP通道阻滞剂格列本脲(Gli)引起急性分离的豚鼠心肌细胞膜电位,线粒体膜电位荧光值的变化.Nic1mmol.L-1引起细胞膜电位在1min内迅速超极化〔膜电位荧光值减少(75±12)%〕,Gli3μmol.L-1可阻断其变化;0.1和1mmol.L-1Nic可使线粒体膜电位去极化和膜电位荧光值在1,2,5min分别增加(12±3)%和(32±8)%,(25±6)%和(39±9)%,(34±6)%和(45±12)%;3μmol.L-1Gli可抑制其变化.结果说明低浓度Nic只引起线粒体膜电位去极化,高浓度Nic还可使细胞膜电位发生超极化,引起KATP通道开放.%With digital imaging techniques of advanced laser confocalmicroscope, effects of KATP channel opener nicorandil(Nic) on cardiac plasma membrane(CPM) and cardiac mitochondrial membrane(CMM) potential of guinea-pig were studied. It was found that Nic 1 mmol.L-1 caused the potential of CPM more negative (hyperpolarization), fluorescence intensity(FI) decreased by (75±12)% of baseline within 1 min, but no effect at 0.1 mmol.L-1. CMM was depolarized by 0.1 mmol.L-1 Nic〔FI increased by (12±3)%, (25±6)%, (34±6)% of baseline within 1, 2, 5 min〕, and by 1 mmol.L-1 Nic〔FI remarkably increased by (32±8)%, (39±9)%, (45±12)% of baseline〕. KATP channel blocker glibenclamide 3 μmol.L-1 itself caused no effect on potential of CPM and CMM, but blocked the above effect on potential of CPM and CMM induced by Nic. The results suggest that KATP channel of CMM is activated by low dose of Nic, and the high dose of Nic activate both KATP channels of CPM and CMM.

  2. Paper-based plasma sanitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjin; Chen, Qiang; Suresh, Poornima; Roy, Subrata; White, James F.; Mazzeo, Aaron D.

    2017-05-01

    This work describes disposable plasma generators made from metallized paper. The fabricated plasma generators with layered and patterned sheets of paper provide a simple and flexible format for dielectric barrier discharge to create atmospheric plasma without an applied vacuum. The porosity of paper allows gas to permeate its bulk volume and fuel plasma, while plasma-induced forced convection cools the substrate. When electrically driven with oscillating peak-to-peak potentials of ±1 to ±10 kV, the paper-based devices produced both volume and surface plasmas capable of killing microbes. The plasma sanitizers deactivated greater than 99% of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and greater than 99.9% of Escherichia coli cells with 30 s of noncontact treatment. Characterization of plasma generated from the sanitizers revealed a detectable level of UV-C (1.9 nWṡcm-2ṡnm-1), modest surface temperature (60 °C with 60 s of activation), and a high level of ozone (13 ppm with 60 s of activation). These results deliver insights into the mechanisms and suitability of paper-based substrates for active antimicrobial sanitization with scalable, flexible sheets. In addition, this work shows how paper-based generators are conformable to curved surfaces, appropriate for kirigami-like “stretchy” structures, compatible with user interfaces, and suitable for sanitization of microbes aerosolized onto a surface. In general, these disposable plasma generators represent progress toward biodegradable devices based on flexible renewable materials, which may impact the future design of protective garments, skin-like sensors for robots or prosthetics, and user interfaces in contaminated environments.

  3. Electrosurgical Plasma Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, K. R.; Woloszko, J.

    2002-10-01

    Electrosurgical instruments employing plasmas to volumetrically ablate tissue are now enjoying widespread use in medical applications. We have studied several commercially available instruments in which luminous plasma discharges are formed near electrodes immersed in saline solutions when sufficiently large amplitude bipolar voltage waveforms are applied. Different aqueous salt solutions have been investigated, including isotonic NaCl solution as well as solutions of KCl, and BaCl_2. With strong driving voltage applied, a vapor layer is formed as well as visible and UV optical emissions. Spectroscopic measurements reveal the predominant emissions are from the low ionization potential salt species, but significant emissions from electron impact dissociated water fragments such as OH and H-atoms also are observed. The emissions also coincide with negative bias on the active electrode. These optical emissions are consistent with an electron density of about 10^12cm-3 and an electron temperature of about 4 eV. Experimental results and model calculations of the vapor layer formation process and plasma formation in the high-field region will be discussed.

  4. Shear Viscosity of Turbulent Chiral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Das, Amita; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.

  5. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  6. Solitary Waves in Relativistic Electromagnetic Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-Song; HUA Cun-Cai

    2005-01-01

    Solitary waves in relativistic electromagnetic plasmas are obtained numerically. The longitudinal momentum of electrons has been taken into account in the problem. It is found that in the moving frame with electromagnetic field propagating the solitary waves can exist in both cases, where the vector potential frequency is larger or smaller than the plasma characteristic frequency.

  7. Plasma Free Metanephrines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Plasma Free Metanephrines Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Plasma Metanephrines Formal name: Fractionated Plasma Free Metanephrines (Metanephrine ...

  8. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  9. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  10. Theoretical plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. H.; Vahala, G. M.

    1992-05-01

    Work during the past year in the areas of classical and anomalous transport, three-dimensional equilibria, divertor physics, and diagnostic techniques using waves is reported. Although much work was done on classical transport, the validity of the guiding-center drift equations, which are the basis of much of the theory, has received little attention. The limitations of the drift approximation are being studied. Work on three-dimensional equilibria, which shows that quasi-helical symmetry is broken in third order in the inverse aspect ratio, on the modification of the current profile due to tearing modes was completed. This work is relevant to the maintenance of a steady-state tokamak by the bootstrap current. Divertor physics is a primary area that required development for ITER. One of the few methods by which the physics of the divertor can be modified or controlled is magnetic perturbations. The effect of magnetic perturbations on the divertor scrapeoff layer in collaboration with Hampton University is being studied. The evolution of magnetic field embedded in a moving plasma is a dynamics problem of potential importance. Renormalization techniques gave important insights first in the theory of phase transitions. The applications of these techniques has extended to many areas of physics, including turbulence in fluids and plasmas. Essentially no diagnostics for magnetic fluctuations inside a fusion-grade plasma exist. A collaborative program with Old Dominion University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to develop such a diagnostic based on the conversion of electromagnetic waves from the ordinary to the extraordinary mode is underway.

  11. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  12. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  13. Conditional Eddies in Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Helene; Pécseli, Hans; Trulsen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Conditional structures, or eddies, in turbulent flows are discussed with special attention to electrostatic turbulence in plasmas. The potential variation of these eddies is obtained by sampling the fluctuations only when a certain condition is satisfied in a reference point. The resulting...

  14. High Throughput Plasma Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujovic, Selman; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    The troublesome emergence of new classes of micro-pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors, poses challenges for conventional water treatment systems. In an effort to address these contaminants and to support water reuse in drought stricken regions, new technologies must be introduced. The interaction of water with plasma rapidly mineralizes organics by inducing advanced oxidation in addition to other chemical, physical and radiative processes. The primary barrier to the implementation of plasma-based water treatment is process volume scale up. In this work, we investigate a potentially scalable, high throughput plasma water reactor that utilizes a packed bed dielectric barrier-like geometry to maximize the plasma-water interface. Here, the water serves as the dielectric medium. High-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the reactor discharges. Changes in methylene blue concentration and basic water parameters are mapped as a function of plasma treatment time. Experimental results are compared to electrostatic and plasma chemistry computations, which will provide insight into the reactor's operation so that efficiency can be assessed. Supported by NSF (CBET 1336375).

  15. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  16. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  17. Plasma Relaxation in Hall Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, B K

    2011-01-01

    Parker's formulation of isotopological plasma relaxation process in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is extended to Hall MHD. The torsion coefficient alpha in the Hall MHD Beltrami condition turns out now to be proportional to the "potential vorticity." The Hall MHD Beltrami condition becomes equivalent to the "potential vorticity" conservation equation in two-dimensional hydrodynamics if the Hall MHD Lagrange multiplier beta is taken to be proportional to the "potential vorticity" as well. The winding pattern of the magnetic field lines in Hall MHD then appears to evolve in the same way as "potential vorticity" lines in 2D hydrodynamics.

  18. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  19. Experimental studies of collisional plasma shocks and plasma interpenetration via merging supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 4 years on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL, we have studied obliquely and head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets of an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture. The jets are formed/launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. In successive experimental campaigns, we characterized the (a) evolution of plasma parameters of a single plasma jet as it propagated up to ~ 1 m away from the railgun nozzle, (b) density profiles and 2D morphology of the stagnation layer and oblique shocks that formed between obliquely merging jets, and (c) collisionless interpenetration transitioning to collisional stagnation between head-on-merging jets. Key plasma diagnostics included a fast-framing CCD camera, an 8-chord visible interferometer, a survey spectrometer, and a photodiode array. This talk summarizes the primary results mentioned above, and highlights analyses of inferred post-shock temperatures based on observations of density gradients that we attribute to shock-layer thickness. We also briefly describe more recent PLX experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution with magnetic and viscous effects, and potential future collisionless shock experiments enabled by low-impurity, higher-velocity plasma jets formed by contoured-gap coaxial guns. Supported by DOE Fusion Energy Sciences and LANL LDRD.

  20. Plasma Control in Symmetric Mirror Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Rowan, W. L.; Alvarado, Igor; Fu, X. R.; Beklemishev, A. D.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma confinement in the symmetric rotating mirror plasma at the Budker Institute shows enhanced confinement with high electron temperatures with end plates biasing. Improved confinement is achieved by biasing end plate cells in the expansion tanks so as to achieve an inward pointing radial electric field. The negative potential well produces vortex plasma rotation similar to that in the negative potential well of Ohmic heated tokamaks. This plasma state has similarity with the lower turbulence level regimes documented in the Helimak where negative biasing of the end plates produces an inward radial electric field. To understand this vortex confinement we carry out 3D simulations with nonlinear partial differential equations for the electric potential and density in plasmas with an axially localized region of unfavorable and favorable magnetic curvature. The simulations show that the plasma density rapidly adjusts to be higher in the region of favorable curvature regions and remains relatively well confined while rapidly rotating. The results support the concept of using plasma-biasing electrodes in large expander tanks to achieve enhanced mirror plasma confinement. Supported by US-DoE grant to UT, LANL and the Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  1. A Study of Different Doped Metal Cations on the Physicochemical Properties and Catalytic Activities of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) Composite Oxides for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Changshun; Li, Min; Qian, Junning; Hu, Qun; Huang, Meina; Lin, Qingjin; Ruan, Yongshun; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin; Fan, Minguang

    2016-08-05

    This work is mainly focused on investigating the effects of different doped metal cations on the formation of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) composite oxides and their physicochemical and catalytic properties for NO reduction by CO as a model reaction. The obtained samples were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen and by oxygen (H2 -TPR and O2 -TPD), in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and the NO+CO model reaction. The results imply that the introduction of M(x+) into the lattice of CeO2 increases the specific surface area and pore volume, especially for variable valence metal cations, and enhances the catalytic performance to a great extent. In this regard, increases in the oxygen vacancies, reduction properties, and chemisorbed O2 (-) (and/or O(-) ) species of these Ce20 M1 Ox composite oxides (M refers to variable valence metals) play significant roles in this reaction. Among the samples, Ce20 Cr1 Ox exhibited the best catalytic performance, mainly because it has the best reducibility and more chemisorbed oxygen, and significant reasons for these attributes may be closely related to favorable synergistic interactions of the vacancies and near-surface Ce(3+) and Cr(3+) . Finally, a possible reaction mechanism was tentatively proposed to understand the reactions.

  2. International movement of plasma and plasma contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, A

    2005-01-01

    Plasma fractionation is a global business characterised by technological stability, increasing consolidation and a high level of regulatory oversight. All these factors affect the ease with which plasma derivatives can be accessed in the world market. As domestic regulatory measures in the first world blood economies become increasingly resonant to the precautionary approach, the availability of plasma as a raw material, as well as its cost, become an increasingly significant component in the cost of the final product. This decreases the amount of plasma which fractionators are able to allocate for export activities. Also, regulatory standards in the country of manufacture will reflect priorities in that country which may not be similar to those in export markets, but which will affect entry to those markets. While many countries possess a fractionation capacity, the limiting factor in supply worldwide is the amount of plasma available, and nationalistic drivers for each country to have its own plant are inimical to product safety and supply. Rather, the provision of sufficient supplies of domestic plasma should be the focus of resource allocation, with a choice of an appropriate contract fractionator. However, contract fractionation too may be affected by domestic considerations unrelated to the needs of the country of plasma origin. This chapter will review the global plasma market and the influences on plasma and plasma product movement across national borders. Problems in ensuring adequate safety and supply will be identified, and some tentative approaches to the amelioration of current barriers to the provision of plasma derivatives will be outlined.

  3. Electrodeless plasma thrusters for spacecraft: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, S. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    The physics of electrodeless electric thrusters that use directed plasma to propel spacecraft without employing electrodes subject to plasma erosion is reviewed. Electrodeless plasma thrusters are potentially more durable than presently deployed thrusters that use electrodes such as gridded ion, Hall thrusters, arcjets and resistojets. Like other plasma thrusters, electrodeless thrusters have the advantage of reduced fuel mass compared to chemical thrusters that produce the same thrust. The status of electrodeless plasma thrusters that could be used in communications satellites and in spacecraft for interplanetary missions is examined. Electrodeless thrusters under development or planned for deployment include devices that use a rotating magnetic field; devices that use a rotating electric field; pulsed inductive devices that exploit the Lorentz force on an induced current loop in a plasma; devices that use radiofrequency fields to heat plasmas and have magnetic nozzles to accelerate the hot plasma and other devices that exploit the Lorentz force. Using metrics of specific impulse and thrust efficiency, we find that the most promising designs are those that use Lorentz forces directly to expel plasma and those that use magnetic nozzles to accelerate plasma.

  4. Short-term Acipimox decreases the ability of plasma from Type 2 diabetic patients and healthy subjects to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux : a potentially adverse effect on reverse cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; van Tol, A

    Aims To evaluate the effect of short-term administration of the anti-lipolytic agent, Acipimox, on the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol removal, which represents one of the first steps in the anti-atherogenic process of reverse cholesterol transport. Methods Eight male Type 2

  5. Short-term Acipimox decreases the ability of plasma from type 2 diabetic patients and healthy subjects to stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux: A potentially adverse effect on reverse cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin); A. van Tol (Arie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAims: To evaluate the effect of short-term administration of the anti-lipolytic agent, Acipimox, on the ability of plasma to stimulate cellular cholesterol removal, which represents one of the first steps in the anti-atherogenic process of reverse cholesterol transport. Methods: Eight

  6. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  7. Approximation analytical solutions for a unified plasma sheath model by double decomposition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FangJin-Qing

    1998-01-01

    A unified plasma sheath model and its potential equation are proposed.Any higher-order approximation analytical solutions for the unified plasma sheath potential equation are derived by double decomposition method.

  8. Measurement of Redox Potential in Nanoecotoxicological Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Tantra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO or cerium oxide (CeO2 dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe.

  9. Screening length in dusty plasma crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V. S.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Particles interaction and value of the screening length in dusty plasma systems are of great interest in dusty plasma area. Three inter-particle potentials (Debye potential, Gurevich potential and interaction potential in the weakly collisional regime) are used to solve equilibrium equations for two dusty particles suspended in a parabolic trap. The inter-particle distance dependence on screening length, trap parameter and particle charge is obtained. The functional form of inter-particle distance dependence on ion temperature is investigated and compared with experimental data at 200-300 K in order to test used potentials applicability to dusty plasma systems at room temperatures. The preference is given to the Yukawa-type potential including effective values of particle charge and screening length. The estimated effective value of the screening length is 5-15 times larger than the Debye length.

  10. Communication through Plasma Sheaths

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, A O; Zakharov, V E

    2007-01-01

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  11. Introduction to plasma dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A I

    2013-01-01

    As the twenty-first century progresses, plasma technology will play an increasing role in our lives, providing new sources of energy, ion-plasma processing of materials, wave electromagnetic radiation sources, space plasma thrusters, and more. Studies of the plasma state of matter not only accelerate technological developments but also improve the understanding of natural phenomena. Beginning with an introduction to the characteristics and types of plasmas, Introduction to Plasma Dynamics covers the basic models of classical diffuse plasmas used to describe such phenomena as linear and shock w

  12. Collisionless plasmas in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, Gerard; Mottez, Fabrice; Pantellini, Filippo; Pelletier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics examines the unique properties of media without collisions in plasma physics. Experts in this field, the authors present the first book to concentrate on collisionless conditions in plasmas, whether close or not to thermal equilibrium. Filling a void in scientific literature, Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics explains the possibilities of modeling such plasmas, using a fluid or a kinetic framework. It also addresses common misconceptions that even professionals may possess, on phenomena such as "collisionless (Landau) damping". Abundant illustrations

  13. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  14. Turbulence measurements in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Turbulence measurements in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas have a long history and relevance due to the detrimental role of turbulence induced transport on particle, energy, impurity and momentum confinement. The turbulence—the microscopic random fluctuations in particle density, temperature, potential and magnetic field—is generally driven by radial gradients in the plasma density and temperature. The correlation between the turbulence properties and global confinement, via enhanced diffusion, convection and direct conduction, is now well documented. Theory, together with recent measurements, also indicates that non-linear interactions within the turbulence generate large scale zonal flows and geodesic oscillations, which can feed back onto the turbulence and equilibrium profiles creating a complex interdependence. An overview of the current status and understanding of plasma turbulence measurements in the closed flux surface region of magnetic confinement fusion devices is presented, highlighting some recent developments and outstanding problems.

  15. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  16. Electric fields and double layers in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-05-01

    Various mechanisms for driving double layers in plasmas are briefly described, including applied potential drops, currents, contact potentials, and plasma expansions. Some dynamical features of the double layers are discussed. These features, as seen in simulations, laboratory experiments, and theory, indicate that double layers and the currents through them undergo slow oscillations which are determined by the ion transit time across an effective length of the system in which double layers form. It is shown that a localized potential dip forms at the low potential end of a double layer, which interrupts the electron current through it according to the Langmuir criterion, whenever the ion flux into the double is disrupted. The generation of electric fields perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field by contact potentials is also discussed. Two different situations were considered; in one, a low-density hot plasma is sandwiched between high-density cold plasmas, while in the other a high-density current sheet permeates a low-density background plasma. Perpendicular electric fields develop near the contact surfaces. In the case of the current sheet, the creation of parallel electric fields and the formation of double layers are also discussed when the current sheet thickness is varied. Finally, the generation of electric fields and double layers in an expanding plasma is discussed.

  17. Methionine and Choline Supply during the Periparturient Period Alter Plasma Amino Acid and One-Carbon Metabolism Profiles to Various Extents: Potential Role in Hepatic Metabolism and Antioxidant Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to profile plasma amino acids (AA and derivatives of their metabolism during the periparturient period in response to supplemental rumen-protected methionine (MET or rumen-protected choline (CHOL. Forty cows were fed from −21 through 30 days around parturition in a 2 × 2 factorial design a diet containing MET or CHOL. MET supply led to greater circulating methionine and proportion of methionine in the essential AA pool, total AA, and total sulfur-containing compounds. Lysine in total AA also was greater in these cows, indicating a better overall AA profile. Sulfur-containing compounds (cystathionine, cystine, homocystine, and taurine were greater in MET-fed cows, indicating an enriched sulfur-containing compound pool due to enhanced transsulfuration activity. Circulating essential AA and total AA concentrations were greater in cows supplied MET due to greater lysine, arginine, tryptophan, threonine, proline, asparagine, alanine, and citrulline. In contrast, CHOL supply had no effect on essential AA or total AA, and only tryptophan and cystine were greater. Plasma 3-methylhistidine concentration was lower in response to CHOL supply, suggesting less tissue protein mobilization in these cows. Overall, the data revealed that enhanced periparturient supply of MET has positive effects on plasma AA profiles and overall antioxidant status.

  18. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  19. Plasma in the Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Taylor; Gentile, Charles; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2011-10-01

    Development of nanotechnology, specifically the production of carbon nanotubes, may be integral to innovation in an array of fields, from textiles to electronics. The structure of carbon nanotubes affords for the creation of materials with exceptional strength and conductivity. At present, scientists rely on ``cut-and-try'' methods to perfect the plasma synthesis, leaving an interface gap between plasma and material sciences. As a result, methods of producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and length is difficult to standardize. Therefore, the development of a method to produce carbon nanotubes efficiently and in uniform sizes is of great interest. To elucidate the role of plasma in the synthesis of nanoparticles, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab is developing a Plasma-Based Nano Laboratory (PBNL). The PBNL houses an Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment (EDGE) as well as a Nanotube Arc Discharge Experiment (NADE) with the purpose of investigating plasma-nanoparticle interaction. The NADE studies the ability to control the diameter and length of nanotube formation through a set of experimental parameters. In addition, the potential to increase nanotube length will be studied. PPPL's expertise on plasma science could be critically valuable to the successful development of highly efficient and low cost plasma-based techniques, which have the potential to increase accessibility of nanotubes, and propel further innovation rooted in nanotechnology.

  20. Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, Sergei V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic “Four-Ray Star” pattern.

  1. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  2. Reviews of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    "Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24," edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence

  3. Reviews of plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafranov, Vitalii Dmitrievich (ed.); Bakunin, Oleg G. (comps.) [Rossijskij Nauchnyj Tsentr ' ' Kurchatovskij Inst.' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Fusion Inst.; Rozhansky, V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24, edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence (orig.)

  4. Simulations of a beam-driven plasma antenna in the regime of plasma transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Berendeev, E. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the theoretically predicted possibility to increase the efficiency of electromagnetic radiation generated by a thin beam-plasma system in the regime of oblique emission, when a plasma column becomes transparent to radiation near the plasma frequency, is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. If a finite-size plasma column has a longitudinal density modulation, such a system is able to radiate electromagnetic waves as a dipole antenna. This radiation mechanism is based on the conversion of an electron beam-driven potential plasma wave on the periodic perturbation of plasma density. In this case, the frequency of radiated waves appears to be slightly lower than the plasma frequency. That is why their fields enable the penetration into the plasma only to the skin-depth. This case is realized when the period of density modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, and the produced radiation escapes from the plasma in the purely transverse direction. In the recent theoretical paper [I. V. Timofeev et al. Phys. Plasmas 23, 083119 (2016)], however, it has been found that the magnetized plasma can be transparent to this radiation at certain emission angles. It means that the beam-to-radiation power conversion can be highly efficient even in a relatively thick plasma since not only boundary layers but also the whole plasma volume can be involved in the generation of electromagnetic waves. Simulations of steady-state beam injection into a pre-modulated plasma channel confirm the existence of this effect and show limits of validity for the simplified theoretical model.

  5. Qualitative model of a plasma photoelectric converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, N. A.; Flamant, G.

    2009-01-01

    A converter of focused optical radiation into electric current is considered on the basis of the photovoltaic effect in plasmas. The converter model is based on analysis of asymmetric spatial distributions of charge particle number density and ambipolar potential in the photoplasma produced by external optical radiation focused in a heat pipe filled with a mixture of alkali vapor and a heavy inert gas. Energy balance in the plasma photoelectric converter is analyzed. The conditions in which the external radiation energy is effectively absorbed in the converter are indicated. The plasma parameters for which the energy of absorbed optical radiation is mainly spent on sustaining the ambipolar field in the plasma are determined. It is shown that the plasma photoelectric converter makes it possible to attain a high conversion efficiency for focused solar radiation.

  6. Optical Properties of Relativistic Plasma Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenti, H; Kahaly, S; Martin, Ph; Quéré, F

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for optical components suitable to handle ultrahigh light intensities. Due to the unavoidable laser-induced ionization of matter, these components will have to be based on a plasma medium. An archetype of such optical elements is a plasma mirror, created when an intense femtosecond laser pulse impinges on a solid target. It consists of a dense plasma, formed by the laser field itself, which specularly reflects the main part of the pulse. Plasma mirrors have major potential applications as active optical elements to manipulate the temporal and spatial properties of intense laser beams, in particular for the generation of intense attosecond pulses of light. We investigate the basic physics involved in the deformation of a plasma mirror resulting from the light pressure exerted by the ultraintense laser during reflection, by deriving a simple model of this fundamental process, which we validate both numerically and experimentally. The understanding ...

  7. Platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, M; Karkos, P D; Markou, K; Grigoriadis, N

    2016-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a novel material that is being used more frequently in many surgical specialties. A literature review on the current and potential uses of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology was performed. There is limited evidence on the use of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology compared with other specialties: only 11 studies on various subspecialties (otology, rhinology and laryngology) were included in the final review. Based on the limited number of studies, we cannot draw safe conclusions about the value of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology. Nevertheless, the available literature suggests that platelet-rich plasma holds promise for future research and may have a number of clinical applications.

  8. Characterization of a plasma photonic crystal using the multi-fluid plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Whitney; Shumlak, Uri; Miller, Sean

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals have great potential to expand the capabilities of current microwave filtering and switching technologies by providing high speed control of energy band-gap/pass characteristics. While there has been considerable research into dielectric, semiconductor, metallic, and even liquid crystal based radiation manipulation, using plasmas is a relatively new field. Concurrently, processing power has reached levels where realistic, computationally expensive, multi-fluid plasma simulations are now possible. Unlike single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, multi-fluid plasma models capture the electron fluid response to electromagnetic waves, a key process responsible for reflecting radiation. In this study, a 5-moment multi-fluid plasma model is implemented in University of Washington's WARPXM computational plasma physics code to examine the energy band-gap characteristics of an array of plasma-filled rods. This configuration permits the thorough analysis of the effect that plasma temperature, density, and array configuration have on energy transmission, absorption, and reflection. Furthermore, high-resolution simulations of the plasma columns gives a detailed window into plasma-radiation interactions. This work is supported by a Grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. Hot plasma dielectric tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    The hot plasma dielectric tensor is discussed in its various approximations. Collisionless cyclotron resonant damping and ion/electron Bernstein waves are discussed to exemplify the significance of a kinetic description of plasma waves.

  10. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  11. Development Work at JYFL:Plasma Potential Measurements,Electron Heating Simulations,JYFL-MMPS,High Temperature Ovens%在JYFL开展的研究工作:等离子体势的测量、电子加热的模拟、JYFL-MMPS及高温炉子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Koivisto; G.Ciavola; P.Frondelius; T.Koponen; P.Lappalainen; T.Ropponen; M.Savonen; P.Suominent; O.Tarvainen; K.Tinschert

    2007-01-01

    Extensive plasma potential measurements have been carried out using a device developed at JYFL.In this article the main results of the measurements will be summarized.A new simulation code to study the electron heating is being developed.One objective of the code is to determine the change of the electron loss cone when the magnetic field component of the electromagnetic wave is taken into account along with the permittivity of the plasma.As a part of the work,accurate X-ray measurements have been initiated.A new plasma chamber based on the MMPS-concept (Modified MultiPole Structure)has successfully been constructed and tested with the JYFL 6.4GHZ ECRIS.The results and conclusions will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.In the same article.a new concept of ECRIS and first results will be presented.The active development work of evaporation ovens has been carried out in a joint European collaboration(ISIBHI).The objective of the task is to make the operation of the oven reliable at 2000℃ for several days.Both resistively and inductively heated ovens have been studied and further developed.The status of this work will be presented.

  12. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise Des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance.

  13. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    an electron-ion pair in the discharge. Fig. 2. EEDF is non - Maxwellian and changes along the plasma column The electron–neutral collision...plasma radius. Even at atmospheric pressure the EEDF is non - Maxwellian and it is changing along the plasma column. ...18 31st ICPIG, July 14-19, 2013, Granada, Spain EEDF usually strongly differs from Maxwellian and chages along the plasma column (this is

  14. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  15. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  16. Phytochemical Composition and Antioxidant Potential of Ruta graveolens L. In Vitro Culture Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Diwan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruta graveolens L. is a medicinal plant used in traditional systems of medicine for treatment of psoriasis, vitiligo, leucoderma, and lymphomas with well-known anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Therefore antioxidant potential of R. graveolens (in planta and in vitro was investigated. As antioxidants present in plant extracts are multifunctional, their activity and mechanism depends on the composition and conditions of the test system. Therefore, the total antioxidant capacity was evaluated using assays that detect different antioxidants: free radical scavenging (DPPH and ABTS, transition metal ion reduction (phosphomolybdenum assay, reducing power, and nitric oxide reduction. Content of furanocoumarin-bergapten in the extracts showed good corelation with free radical scavenging, transition metal reduction and reducing power, while total phenolic content showed good corelation with nitric oxide reduction potential. Antioxidant activity of in vitro cultures was significantly higher compared to in vivo plant material. The present study is the first report on comprehensive study of antioxidant activity of R. graveolens and its in vitro cultures.

  17. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  18. Effective action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we study a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well-known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasma...

  19. Plasma panel-based radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Peter; Beene, James; Benhammou, Yan; Ben-Moshe, Meny; Bentefour, Hassan; Chapman, J W; Etzion, Erez; Ferretti, Claudio; Levin, Daniel; Silver, Yiftah; Varner, Robert; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; 10.1002/jsid.151

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels. It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in plasma display panels, it uses nonreactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (<50-mm RMS) and low cost. In this paper, we report on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons, and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including the detection of alphas, heavy ions at low-to-medium energy, thermal neutrons, and X-rays.

  20. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane separates the cellular contents from the surrounding environment. Nutrients must enter through the plasma membrane in order to reach the cell interior, and toxic metabolites and several ions leave the cell by traveling across the same barrier. Biological pumps in the plasma me...