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Sample records for plasma focus device

  1. Design and Construction of a Dense Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    breakdown phase ............ 6 3. Typical device waveforms ........ .................... . 11 4. Fluid models of pinch mechanisms...16 5. Ion trajectory models ........... ...................... 19 6. Fillipov-type plasma focus device ...... ................ ... 22 7...52 14a. Pulse amplifier .......... ......................... ... 56 14b. Triggering circuit for the thyratron tube and spark gap ........ 57 15

  2. Numerical Experiments Providing New Insights into Plasma Focus Fusion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent extensive and systematic numerical experiments have uncovered new insights into plasma focus fusion devices including the following: (1 a plasma current limitation effect, as device static inductance is reduced towards very small values; (2 scaling laws of neutron yield and soft x-ray yield as functions of storage energies and currents; (3 a global scaling law for neutron yield as a function of storage energy combining experimental and numerical data showing that scaling deterioration has probably been interpreted as neutron ‘saturation’; and (4 a fundamental cause of neutron ‘saturation’. The ground-breaking insights thus gained may completely change the directions of plasma focus fusion research.

  3. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2008-04-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement—MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  4. A compact plasma focus device and its neutron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新新; 韩旻; 王志文; 刘坤

    1999-01-01

    A 2.2-kJ compact plasma focus device was developed and its characteristics of neutron emission were investigated. A maximum neutron yield of (3.1 ± 1.5) × 10~7 was obtained at 15 hPa deuterium filling pressure. It was found that the neutron yield Y_n is strongly correlated with the amplitude of the pinch dip in di/dt waveform. The time resolved measurement of the neutron pulse indicated that both the hard X-rays and the neutrons are emitted from plasma focus at the same instant and the width of neutron pulse (FWHM) changes slightly from 50 to 53 ns. The pinch time t_p varies from 1.5 to 16.5 ns and it is usually the case that the shorter t_p, the higher the neutron yield. It was also found that the squirrel cage cathode is better than the tubular cathode.

  5. Experimental results of breakdown in "Dena" plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Shervin; Hoseinian, S. M.; Raeisdana, A.

    2014-06-01

    In spite of the intense research activities on Plasma Focus devices, the physics of the initial breakdown and surface discharge phase has not been realized completely. In this paper we have analyzed the surface discharge and initial breakdown phase in Filippov-type Plasma Focus Facility "Dena" (90 kJ, 25 kV) on the base of the current and current derivative measured signals by using Argon, Neon and Krypton as working gases at different discharge voltages and gas pressures, and the effects of working conditions (atomic weight, discharge voltage and gas pressure) on the breakdown and surface discharge phase have expressed. Also, on the base of these results, we have investigated about the relation of this phase with final pinch phase.

  6. Simulations with Conventional and Gas Puff Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Liu, Mahe; Lee, Paul; Lee, Sing

    2000-10-01

    An energy consistent plasma focus model is improved by considering the plasma ionization states based on the corona equilibrium. This provides the model with the capability of calculating the plasma dynamics and states for different gases in plasma focus. The model is employed to simulate the behavior of the NX2 plasma focus, with both neon and argon gases. The results show that much lower pressure is required to work with argon for x-ray. The model has also been modified to describe a gas-puff plasma focus based on a measured pressure distribution profile. The simulation result reveals that the gas-puff scheme is more efficient in plasma heating and can improve the stability of the plasma column. By comparing with the published results, agreements have been obtained between the computations and experiments of both machines in the major points regarding plasma dynamics, plasma column stability and appearances, plasma temperatures, and x-ray radiation properties.

  7. Preliminary Results Of A 600 Joules Small Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary results of a 600 J (3.7 μF, 18 kV) Mather type plasma focus device operated at low pressure will be presented. The discharge is formed between a solid anode with length of 6 cm and six symmetrically and coaxially arranged cathode rods of same lengths. The cathode base is profiled in a knife-edge design and a set of coaxial plasma gun are attached to it in order to initiate the breakdown and enhance the current sheath formation. The experiments have been performed in argon gas under a low pressure condition of several microbars. The discharge current and the voltage across the electrodes during the discharge are measured with high voltage probe and current coil. The current and voltage characteristics are used to determine the possible range of operating pressure that gives good focusing action. At a narrow pressure regime of 9.0±0.5 μbar, focusing action is observed with good reproducibility. Preliminary result of ion beam energy is presented. More work will be carried out to investigate the radiation output.

  8. Characterization of bismuth nanospheres deposited by plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M., E-mail: cscientific2@aec.org.sy [IBA Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Mrad, O. [Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2015-02-14

    A new method for producing thin layer of bismuth nanospheres based on the use of low energy plasma focus device is demonstrated. Various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the morphology and the composition of the nanospheres. Experimental parameters may be adjusted to favour the formation of bismuth nanospheres instead of microspheres. Therefore, the formation of large surface of homogeneous layer of bismuth nanospheres with sizes of below 100 nm can be obtained. The natural snowball phenomenon is observed to be reproduced in nanoscale where spheres roll over the small nanospheres and grow up to bigger sizes that can reach micro dimensions. The comet-like structure, a reverse phenomenon to snowball is also observed.

  9. Hard X-ray sources from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first stage of a program to design a repetitive pulsed radiation generator for industrial applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Hard X-rays are being studied in these devices operating with hydrogen. Images of metallic plates with different thickness were obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize the energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge chamber of PF-400 J. An effective energy of the order of 90 keV was measured under those conditions. X ray images of different metallic objects also have been obtained. (authors)

  10. Neutron and Ion Beams Emitted from Plasma Focus (112.5 J) Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aragi M., G.

    2010-02-01

    Preliminary results of recent experiments performed within the Mather-type 112.5 J plasma focus device are presented. The ion beams from the focus device operated with deuterium filling at 1 mbar were registered using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and a Faraday cup detector for time-resolved measurements. The time-resolved neutron emission from the focus region measurements was detected with a photomultiplier tube (IP-28) optically coupled with a plastic scintillator NE 102.

  11. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  12. Statistical characterization of the reproducibility of neutron emission of small plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Soto, Leopoldo [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN), Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile) and Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this work is to discuss the techniques related to the detection of fast pulsed neutrons produced in plasma focus (PF) devices, the statistical analysis of the corresponding data, and the methodologies for evaluation of the device performance in low emission neutron sources. A general mathematical framework is presented for the assessment of the reproducibility of the neutron emission of small PF devices given the shot-to-shot distribution and detector efficiency. The effect on the reproducibility in case of using two independent detectors is also discussed. The analysis is applied to the neutron emission of the plasma focus device PF-50J operating in repetitive mode (0.1-0.5 Hz and 65 J bank energy).

  13. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency.

  14. Numerical Analysis of Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device for Neon and Argon Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam Sharak, M.; Goudarzi, S.; Raeisdana, A.; Jafarabadi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the experimental results in different working conditions in Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device have been compared with the numerical results of a two-dimensional simulation code based on Lee's model. The experiments were done with pure Neon and Argon as operating gases over a wide range of working conditions (gas pressures and discharge voltages). It is observed that by a proper choice for values of the efficiency factors, comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  15. Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, Ariel [CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche (Argentina); Gonzalez, Jose [INVAP-CONICET and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche, Argentina. (Argentina); Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [CCHEN, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2012-01-15

    Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

  16. Surface modifications of fusion reactor relevant materials on exposure to fusion grade plasma in plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niranjan, Ram, E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rout, R.K.; Srivastava, R. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chakravarthy, Y. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, T.C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exposure of materials (W, Ni, SS, Mo and Cu) to fusion plasma in a plasma focus device. • The erosion and the formations of blisters, pores, craters, micro-cracks after irradiation. • The structural phase transformation in the SS sample after irradiation. • The surface layer alloying of the samples with the plasma focus anode material. - Abstract: An 11.5 kJ plasma focus (PF) device was used here to irradiate materials with fusion grade plasma. The surface modifications of different materials (W, Ni, stainless steel, Mo and Cu) were investigated using various available techniques. The prominent features observed through the scanning electron microscope on the sample surfaces were erosions, cracks, blisters and craters after irradiations. The surface roughness of the samples increased multifold after exposure as measured by the surface profilometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the changes in the microstructures and the structural phase transformation in surface layers of the samples. We observed change in volumes of austenite and ferrite phases in the stainless steel sample. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis suggested alloying of the surface layer of the samples with elements of the PF anode. We report here the comparative analysis of the surface damages of materials with different physical, thermal and mechanical properties. The investigations will be useful to understand the behavior of the perspective materials for future fusion reactors (either in pure form or in alloy) over the long operations.

  17. Imperative function of electron beams in low-energy plasma focus device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Z Khan; L K Lim; S L Yap; C S Wong

    2015-12-01

    A 2.2 kJ plasma focus device was analysed as an electron beam and an X-ray source that operates with argon gas refilled at a specific pressure. Time-resolved X-ray signals were observed using an array of PIN diode detectors, and the electron beam energy was detected using a scintillator-assisted photomultiplier tube. The resultant X-rays were investigated by plasma focus discharge for pressures ranging from 1.5 mbar to 2.0 mbar. This range corresponded to the significant values of X-ray yields and electron beam energies from the argon plasma. The electron temperature of argon plasma at an optimum pressure range was achieved by an indirect method using five-channel BPX65 PIN diodes of aluminum foils with different thicknesses. X-ray yield, electron beam energy, and electron temperature of argon plasma were achieved at 1.5–2.0 mbar because of the strong bombardment of the energetic electron beam.

  18. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, R K; Niranjan, Ram; Mishra, P; Srivastava, R; Rawool, A M; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2013-06-01

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 ± 0.8) × 10(4) neutrons∕pulse into 4π steradians with a pulse width of 15 ± 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 μF capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 μF, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of (3)He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

  19. Calibration constant of a silver activation counter used with plasma focus devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Etaati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The silver activation counters are commonly used for pulsed-neutron yield measurements especially in plasma focus devices. The counter normally consists of a Geiger-Muller tube along with silver foils and polyethylene (as a moderator, which is calibrated against an Am-Be radioisotope neutron source. The neutrons, after being slowed-down in the polyethylene, activate the silver foils. By measuring the foil activity with a Geiger-Muller counter, the neutron yield is determined. In the present paper, the activation counter’s calibration constant calculation using the MCNP4C code is explained. The calculated calibration constant is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidarnia, A., E-mail: a-heidarnia@yahoo.com; Sadighzadeh, A.; Zaeem, A. A.; Damideh, V. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this article, design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device to achieve 10{sup 11} neutrons/shot is reported. One of its important characteristics is the triple-part anode design. The anode is surrounded by an alumina insulator. The second part of the anode is changeable in order to locate cylindrical, conical, or other shapes of pieces mounted on it. This geometry leads to the easier investigation of the neutron and X-ray emissions of the device. The third part of the anode is for changing the materials exposed to different kinds of radiations. The design parameters are considered by semiempirical and empirical formulas and are sketched by Solidworks software. Also, the peak current and neutron yield are estimated.

  1. Design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarnia, A.; Sadighzadeh, A.; Zaeem, A. A.; Damideh, V.

    2016-12-01

    In this article, design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device to achieve 1011 neutrons/shot is reported. One of its important characteristics is the triple-part anode design. The anode is surrounded by an alumina insulator. The second part of the anode is changeable in order to locate cylindrical, conical, or other shapes of pieces mounted on it. This geometry leads to the easier investigation of the neutron and X-ray emissions of the device. The third part of the anode is for changing the materials exposed to different kinds of radiations. The design parameters are considered by semiempirical and empirical formulas and are sketched by Solidworks software. Also, the peak current and neutron yield are estimated.

  2. Hundred joules plasma focus device as a potential pulsed source for in vitro cancer cell irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, J.; Moreno, J.; Andaur, R.; Armisen, R.; Morales, D.; Marcelain, K.; Avaria, G.; Bora, B.; Davis, S.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma focus devices may arise as useful source to perform experiments aimed to study the effects of pulsed radiation on human cells in vitro. In the present work, a table top hundred joules plasma focus device, namely "PF-400J", was adapted to irradiate colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1. For pulsed x-rays, the doses (energy absorbed per unit mass, measured in Gy) were measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLD-100 dosimeters). The neutron fluence and the average energy were used to estimate the pulsed neutron doses. Fifty pulses of x-rays (0.12 Gy) and fifty pulses of neutrons (3.5 μGy) were used to irradiate the cancer cells. Irradiation-induced DNA damage and cell death were assessed at different time points after irradiation. Cell death was observed using pulsed neutron irradiation, at ultralow doses. Our results indicate that the PF-400J can be used for in vitro assessment of the effect of pulsed radiation in cancer cell research.

  3. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

  4. Simulation of electrical discharge in a 3.6 Joule miniature plasma focus device using SIMULINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Hossein; Habibi, Morteza

    2014-08-01

    A novel technique has been developed and studied in this paper to simulate the electrical discharge circuit of a 3.6 J miniature plasma focus device (PFD) and investigate the effect of inductance variation on voltage spike and current dip. The technique is based on a correlation between the electrical discharge circuit and plasma dynamics in a very small PFD that operates at the energy of 3.6 J. The simulation inputs include the charging voltage, capacitor bank capacitance, current limiter resistance, by-pass resistance as well as the time-dependent inductance and resistance of the plasma sheath which are calculated by assuming the plasma dynamics as transit times in going from one phase to the next. The variations of the most important elements in the circuit (i.e. the constant and breakdown inductances) and their effects on the current dip are studied in PFDs with low and high constant inductance. The model demonstrated for achieving a good pinch in the PFD, although the total inductance of the system should be low; however there is always an optimum inductance which causes an appropriate pinch. Furthermore, the electrical power produced by the pulsed power supply, the mechanical energy as well as the magnetic energy which are transferred into the plasma tube were obtained from simulation. The graph of electrical power demonstrated a high instantaneous increment in the power transferred into the plasma as one of the greatest advantages of the pulsed power supply. The simulation was performed using software tools within the MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation environment.

  5. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  6. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5×1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences.

  7. Experimental study of the performance of a very small repetitive plasma focus device in different working conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, S.; Babaee, H.; Esmaeli, A.; Nasiri, A.

    2017-01-01

    SORENA-1 is a very small repetitive Mather-type plasma focus device (20 J) that can operate at frequencies up to 1 Hz. This device has been designed and constructed in the Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research School of the Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute of Iran. In this article, the structure of SORENA-1 is described and results of experiments with Ar, Ne, and D2 working gases at several discharge voltages and initial pressures are presented and analyzed.

  8. Investigation of structural properties of chromium thin films prepared by a plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Habibi, M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.; Behbahani, R. A.

    2012-08-01

    We report the synthesis of chromium thin films on Si(400) substrates by utilizing a low-energy (1.6 kJ) plasma focus device. The films of chromium are deposited with different numbers of focus shots (15, 25 and 35) at a distance of 8 cm and at 0° angular position with respect to the anode axis. The films are investigated structurally by x-ray diffraction analysis and morphologically by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The elemental composition is characterized by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Furthermore, Vicker's micro hardness is used to study the mechanical properties of the deposited films. The degree of crystallinity of chromium films, the size of the particles and the hardness values of the films increase when the number of focus shots is raised from 15 to 25 and then decrease when the substrate is treated with 35 shots. We discuss the dynamic processes involved in the formation of the chromium films.

  9. A new attempt using LabVIEW into a computational experiment of plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungkyu

    2017-03-01

    The simulation program of plasma focus device based on S. Lee's model has been first developed since 30 years ago and it is widely used to date. Originally the program made by GWbasic language, and then modified by visual basic which was included in the Microsoft Excel. Using Excel well-known to researchers is a key advantage of this program. But it has disadvantages in displaying data in same graph, in slow calculation speed, and in displaying data and calculation of smaller time step. To overcome all these points, the LabVIEW that made by national instrument and based on graphical environment is used for simulation. Furthermore it is correlated with data acquisition of experiment, once experiment being the data is directly transferred to the simulation program and then analyzes and predicts for the next shot. The mass swept factor (fm) and current factor (fc) can be easily find out using this program. This paper describes the detail function and usage of the program and compares the results with the existing one.

  10. Development and experimental study of oil-free capacitor module for plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ravindra Kumar; Sharma, Archana

    2017-03-01

    This development is concerned with the compact capacitor module for a plasma focus device. Oil-free, non-standard geometry capacitors are designed and developed for high current delivery in sub-microseconds time. Metalized dielectric film based pulse capacitor becomes progressively less viable at currents above 10 kA. It is due to reliability and energy scaling difficulties, based on effects such as vaporization, high resistivity, and end connection. Bipolar electrolytic capacitors are also not preferred due to their limited life and comparatively low peak current delivery. Bi-axially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film with extended aluminum foil is a combination to deliver moderately high power. But, electrically weak points, relative permittivity, and the edge gap margins have made its adoption difficult. A concept has been developed in lab for implementing the above combination in a less complex and costly manner. This paper concerns the development and testing process techniques for quite different hollow cylindrical, oil-free capacitors (4 μ F , 10 kV, 20 nH). Shot life of 1000 has been experimentally performed on the test bed at its rated energy density level. The technological methods and engineering techniques are now available and utilized for manufacturing and testing of BOPP film based oil-free capacitors.

  11. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4π sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  12. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  13. Construction and experimental study of a 2.5 kJ, simply configured, Mather type plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirani, B.; Abbasi, F. [Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Department

    2010-06-15

    In this work, a 2.5 kJ plasma focus device (named as SBUPF1) has been constructed on the basis of a simple configuration. The most important characteristics of this configuration is relative simplicity and using less components in its structure compared with common configurations. SBUPF1 has been tested between 18- 25 kV and wide range of pressure for various gases including Argon, Neon and Deuterium. The system shows consistent and reproducible plasma focusing action as well as fusion neutron production (when deuterium is used as working gas). (author)

  14. Nanofocus: an ultra-miniature dense pinch plasma focus device with submillimetric anode operating at 0.1 J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Barbaglia, Mario; Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)], E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl

    2009-02-01

    As a method for investigating the minimum energy to produce a pinch plasma focus (PF) discharge, an ultra-miniature device for pinch discharges has been designed, constructed and characterized (nanofocus (NF): 5 nF, 5-10 kV, 5-10 kA, 60-250 mJ, 16 ns time to peak current). Submillimetric anode radii (0.8 and 0.21 mm) covered by coaxial insulators were used for experiments in hydrogen. Evidence of pinch was observed in electrical signals in discharges operating at 3 mbar and {approx}100 mJ. A single-frame image converter camera (4 ns exposure) was used to obtain plasma images in the visible range. The dynamics observed from the photographs is consistent with (a) the formation of a plasma sheath close to the insulator surface, (b) the plasma covering the anode, (c) radial compression over the anode; (d) finally the plasma is detached from the anode in the axial direction. The total time from stages (a) to (d) was observed in {approx}30 ns. This ultra-miniature device has a value for the 'plasma energy density parameter' and for the 'drive parameter' of the same order or greater than PF devices operating at energies several orders of magnitude higher.

  15. Comparison of measured and computed radial trajectories of plasma focus devices UMDPF1 and UMDPF0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, L. H.; Yap, S. L., E-mail: yapsl@um.edu.my; Lim, L. K.; Lee, M. C.; Poh, H. S.; Ma, J. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, S. S. [UMPEDAC, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor (Malaysia); Lee, S. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    In published literature, there has been scant data on radial trajectory of the plasma focus and no comparison of computed with measured radial trajectory. This paper provides the first such comparative study. We compute the trajectories of the inward-moving radial shock and magnetic piston of UMDPF1 plasma focus and compare these with measured data taken from a streak photograph. The comparison shows agreement with the measured radial trajectory in terms of average speeds and general shape of trajectory. This paper also presents the measured trajectory of the radially compressing piston in another machine, the UMDPF0 plasma focus, confirming that the computed radial trajectory also shows similar general agreement. Features of divergence between the computed and measured trajectories, towards the end of the radial compression, are discussed. From the measured radial trajectories, an inference is made that the neutron yield mechanism could not be thermonuclear. A second inference is made regarding the speeds of axial post-pinch shocks, which are recently considered as a useful tool for damage testing of fusion-related wall materials.

  16. Radiography using a dense plasma focus device as a source of pulsed X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Julio; Castillo, Fermín; Gamboa, Isabel; Rangel, José

    2007-11-01

    Soft and hard X-ray emissions have been studied in the FN-II, which is a small dense plasma focus machine (5 kJ), operating at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, using aluminum filtered pin-hole cameras. Their angular distribution has been measured using TLD-200 dosimeters [1]. Their temporal evolution has been observed by means of a PIN diode, and scinltillators coupled to photomultipliers outside the discharge chamber. The X rays source can be concentrated by placing a needle on the end of the electrode. X-rays crossing across a 300 micron aluminum window, through the axis of the machine, can be used to obtain high contrast radiographs, with an average dose of 0.4 mGy per shot. In contrast, the average dose with a hollow cathode is 0.2 mGy per shot. This work is partially supported by grant IN105705 de la DGAPA-UNAM. [1] F. Castillo, J.J.E. Herrera, J. Rangel, I. Gamboa, G. Espinosa y J.I. Golzarri ``Angular Distribution of fusion products and X-rays emitted by a small dense plasma focus machine'' Journal of Applied Physics 101 013303-1-7 (2007).

  17. Axial and radial preliminary results of the neutron radiation from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, J.; Silva, P.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first step of a program to design a repetitive pulsed neutron generator for applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Neutron emission has been obtained in both devices operating in deuterium. A specific technique was necessary to develop in order to detect neutron pulsed of 10{sup 4} neutrons per shot. The maximum total neutron yield measured was of the order of 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} neutrons per shot in the PF-400 J and PF-50 J respectively. Axial and radial measurements of the neutron emission are presented and the anisotropy is evaluated in this work. The neutrons are measured by pairs of silver activation counters, {sup 3}He detectors and scintillator-photomultiplier detectors. (authors)

  18. Demonstration of neutron production in a table-top pinch plasma focus device operating at only tens of joules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Silva, Patricio; Moreno, Jose; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian [Comision Chilena de EnergIa Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Kies, Walter; Altamirano, Luis; Huerta, Luis [Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Mayer, Roberto E [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)], E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl

    2008-10-21

    Neutron emission from a deuterium plasma pinch generated in a very small plasma focus (6 mm anode diameter) operating at only tens of joules is presented. A maximum current of 50 kA is achieved 140 ns after the beginning of the discharge, when the device is charged at 50 J (160 nF capacitor bank, 38 nH, 20-30 kV, 32-72 J). Although the stored energy is very low, the estimated energy density in the plasma and the energy per particle in the plasma are of the same order as in higher energy devices. The dependence of the neutron yield on the filling pressure of deuterium was obtained for discharges with 50 and 67 J stored in the capacitor bank. Neutrons were measured by means of a system based on a {sup 3}He proportional counter in current mode. The average neutron yield for 50 J discharges at 6 mbar was (1.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 4} neutrons per shot, and (3.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup 4} for 67 J discharges at 9 mbar. The maximum energy of the neutrons was (2.7 {+-} 1.8) MeV. Possible applications related to substance detection and others are discussed.

  19. Experimental study of soft X-ray intensity with different anode tips in Amirkabir plasma focus device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HABIBI MORTEZA; MAHTAB MAHSA

    2016-07-01

    To study the effect of different anode tip geometries on the intensity of soft X-rays emitted from a 4 kJ plasma focus device (PFD), we considered five different anode tips which were cylindrical-flat, cylindricalhollow, spherical-convex, cone-flat and cone-hollow tips. BPX-65 PIN diodes covered by four different filters are used to register the intensity of soft X-rays. The use of cone-flat anode tip has augmented the emitted X-ray three times compared to the conventional cylindrical-flat anode.

  20. The effect of anode shape on neon soft x-ray emissions and current sheath configuration in plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M A; Sobhanian, S [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wong, C S [Plasma Research Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Lee, S; Lee, P; Rawat, R S, E-mail: rajdeep.rawat@nie.edu.s [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2009-02-21

    The effect of three different anode shapes, flat, tapered and hemispherical, on the x-ray emission characteristics of a neon filled UNU-ICTP plasma focus device is investigated. The current sheath dynamics, in the radial collapse phase, has been simultaneously interrogated using the laser shadowgraphy method to understand the variation in x-ray emission characteristics for anodes of different shapes used in the experiments. The maximum neon soft x-ray (SXR) yield for the flat anode is about 7.5 {+-} 0.4 J at 4 mbar, whereas for hemispherical and tapered anodes the neon SXR is almost halved with the optimum pressure shifting to a lower value of 3 mbar. The laser shadowgraphic images confirm that the reduction in the overall neon SXR yield is due to the reduced focused plasma column length for these anodes. The relative HXR yield was the highest for the hemispherical anode followed by the tapered and the flat anodes in that order. The shadowgraphic images and the voltage probe signals confirmed that for the hemispherical anode the multiple-pinch phenomenon was most commonly observed, which could be responsible for multiple HXR bursts for this anode with maximum HXR yields.

  1. Experimental results on the irradiation of nuclear fusion relevant materials at the dense plasma focus ‘Bora’ device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Gribkov, V. A.; Niemela, J.; Tuniz, C.; Zanolli, C.; Chernyshova, M.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Talab, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of materials counted as perspective ones for use in the first-wall and construction elements in nuclear fusion reactors (FRs) with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement (W, Ti, Al, low-activated ferritic steel ‘Eurofer’ and some alloys) were irradiated in the dense plasma focus (DPF) device ‘Bora’ having a bank energy of ⩽5 kJ. The device generates hot dense (T ˜ 1 keV, n ˜ 1019 cm-3) deuterium plasma, powerful plasma streams (v ˜ 3 × 107 cm s-1) and fast (E ˜ 0.1 … 1.0 MeV) deuterons of power flux densities q up to 1010 and 1012 W cm-2 correspondingly. ‘Damage factor’ F = q × τ0.5 ensures an opportunity to simulate radiation loads (predictable for both reactors types) by the plasma/ion streams, which have the same nature and namely those parameters as expected in the FR modules. Before and after irradiation we provided investigations of our samples by means of a number of analytical techniques. Among them we used optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand character and parameters of damageability of the surface layers of the samples. Atomic force microscopy was applied to measure roughness of the surface after irradiation. These characteristics are quite important for understanding mechanisms and values of dust production in FR that may relate to tritium retention and emergency situations in FR facilities. We also applied two new techniques. For the surface we elaborated the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single photon detection with high spectroscopic and angular resolutions. For bulk damageability investigations we applied an x-ray microCT system where x-rays were produced by a Hamamatsu microfocus source (150 kV, 500 µA, 5 µm minimum focal spot size). The detector was a Hamamatsu CMOS flat panel coupled to a fibre optic plate under the GOS scintillator. The reconstruction of three-dimensional data was run with Cobra 7.4 and DIGIX CT software while VG Studio Max 2.1, and Amira 5.3 were used for

  2. Deposition of magnesium nitride thin films on stainless steel-304 substrates by using a plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Amir Hoshang; Habibi, Maryam; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2014-08-01

    In this research, for the first time, we synthesize magnesium nitride thin films on 304-type stainless steel substrates using a Mather-type (2 kJ) plasma focus (PF) device. The films of magnesium nitride are coated with different number of focus shots (like 15, 25 and 35) at a distance of 8 cm from the anode tip and at 0° angular position with respect to the anode axis. For investigation of the structural properties and surface morphology of magnesium nitride films, we utilized the X-ray diffractometer (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, respectively. Also, the elemental composition is characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Furthermore, Vicker's microhardness is used to study the mechanical properties of the deposited films. The results show that the degree of crystallinity of deposited thin films (from XRD), the average size of particles and surface roughness (from AFM), crystalline growth of structures (from SEM) and the hardness values of the films depend on the number of focus shots. The EDX analysis demonstrates the existence of the elemental composition of magnesium in the deposited samples.

  3. Compression between ion and hard x-ray emissions from nitrogen and argon in Mather type plasma focus device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Paghe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some characteristics of a Mather type Plasma Focus (PF device such as a discharge current, pinch time, ion flux and hard x-ray intensity has been investigated simultaneously in argon and nitrogen gases separately for various operating gas pressures and charging voltages of capacitor bank. It was observed that pinch phenomena was energy and pressure dependent in current sheath as well as ion and hard x-ray emission intensity. Optimum pressure with maximum ion flux and the most intense hard x-ray showed a nearly linear dependence on the charging voltage of the device. Maximum ion flux was estimated in the order of 1018 ions per steradian in both gases. Hard x-ray emission was registered a little after discharge current and Faraday cup (FC signals. Also, optimum pressure for maximum ion flux was not the same as the pressure for intense hard x-rays. Hard x-ray intensity reached its peak at higher pressures

  4. Deposition of Chromium Thin Films on Stainless Steel-304 Substrates Using a Low Energy Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Hojabri, A.; Habibi, M.; Hosseinnejad, M. T.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study thin films of chromium deposited on stainless steel-304 substrates using a low energy (1.6 kJ) plasma focus device. The films of chromium are likewise deposited with 25 focus shots each at various axial distances from the top of the anode (3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 cm). We also consider different angular positions with respect to the anode axis (0°, 15° and 30°) at a distance of 5 cm from the anode tip to deposit the chromium films on the stainless steel substrates. To characterize the structural properties of the films, we benefit from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are applied as well to study the surface morphology of these deposited films. Furthermore, we make use of Vicker's micro-hardness measurements to investigate the mechanical properties of chromium thin films. The XRD results show that the degree of crystallinity of chromium thin films depends on the substrate axial and angular positions. The AFM images illustrate that the film deposited at the distance of 5 cm and the angular position of 0° has quite a uniform surface with homogeneous distribution of grains on the film surface. From the hardness results, we observe that the sample deposited at the axial distance of 5 cm from the anode tip and at the angle of 0° with respect to the anode axis, is harder than the other deposited films.

  5. Argon ion beam interaction on polyethylene terephthalate surface by a 4 kJ plasma focus device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Habibi Morteza; Alavi M H S

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has a wide variety of applications ranging from making regular bottles to biosensors. However, for many of these applications, surface treatment is needed to improve its surface characteristics such as adhesion to other materials. In this study, we focussed on treating PET foils by dense Ar pulsed plasma produced by a 4.5 kJ Mather-type plasmafocus device (20 kV, 40 $\\mu$f, 115 nH) to examine its ability to make the PET surface hydrophilic. The most common method to examine this characteristic is measuring the water contact angle on a polymer surface. The results show that while the energy and density of plasma in our device are higher compared to other devices, as the exposure time is very low, the device can enhance thewettability of PET film surfaces.

  6. Optical plasma microelectronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Thyler; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices was successfully replaced with an optically triggered gas plasma channel. The combination of DC and laser-induced gas ionizations controls the conductivity of the channel, enabling us to realize different electronic devices such as transistors, switches, modulators, etc. A special micro-scale metasurface was used to enhance the laser-gas interaction, as well as combining it with DC ionization properly. Optical plasma devices benefit form the advantages of plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving most of the integrablity of semiconductor based devices.

  7. Evidence of nuclear fusion neutrons in an extremely small plasma focus device operating at 0.1 Joules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavéz, Cristián; Moreno, José; Altamirano, Luis; Huerta, Luis; Barbaglia, Mario; Clausse, Alejandro; Mayer, Roberto E.

    2017-08-01

    We report on D-D fusion neutron emission in a plasma device with an energy input of only 0.1 J, within a range where fusion events have been considered very improbable. The results presented here are the consequence of scaling rules we have derived, thus being the key point to assure the same energy density plasma in smaller devices than in large machines. The Nanofocus (NF)—our device—was designed and constructed at the P4 Lab of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. Two sets of independent measurements, with different instrumentation, were made at two laboratories, in Chile and Argentina. The neutron events observed are 20σ greater than the background. The NF plasma is produced from a pulsed electrical discharge using a submillimetric anode, in a deuterium atmosphere, showing empirically that it is, in fact, possible to heat and compress the plasma. The strong evidence presented here stretches the limits beyond what was expected. A thorough understanding of this could possibly tell us where the theoretical limits actually lie, beyond conjectures. Notwithstanding, a window is thus open for low cost endeavours for basic fusion research. In addition, the development of small, portable, safe nonradioactive neutron sources becomes a feasible issue.

  8. Plasma detachment in linear devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, N.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma detachment research in linear devices, sometimes called divertor plasma simulators, is reviewed. Pioneering works exploring the concept of plasma detachment were conducted in linear devices. Linear devices have contributed greatly to the basic understanding of plasma detachment such as volume plasma recombination processes, detached plasma structure associated with particle and energy transport, and other related issues including enhancement of convective plasma transport, dynamic response of plasma detachment, plasma flow reversal, and magnetic field effect. The importance of plasma detachment research using linear devices will be highlighted aimed at the design of future DEMO.

  9. Calibration of the RSS-131 high efficiency ionization chamber for radiation dose monitoring during plasma experiments conducted on plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczak, Kamil; Jednoróg, Sławomir

    2014-10-01

    Plasma research poses a radiation hazard. Due to the program of deuterium plasma research using the PF-1000 device, it is an intensive source of neutrons (up to 1011 n · pulse -1) with energy of 2,45 MeV and ionizing electromagnetic radiation with a broad energy spectrum. Both types of radiation are mostly emitted in ultra-short pulses (˜100 ns). The aim of this work was to test and calibrate the RSS-131 radiometer for its application in measurements of ultra-short electromagnetic radiation pulses with broad energy spectrum emitted during PF-1000 discharge. In addition, the results of raw measurements performed in the control room are presented.

  10. Effect of deposition parameters on structural and mechanical properties of niobium nitride synthesized by plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Jamil; Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, Riaz; Khalid, Nida

    2015-06-01

    Effects of deposition angle and axial distance on the structural and mechanical properties of niobium nitride synthesized by a dense plasma focus (DPF) system are studied. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the deposition parameters affect the growth of multi-phase niobium nitride. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the granular surface morphology with strong thermally assisted coagulation effects observed at the 5-cm axial distance. The non-porous granular morphology observed at the 9-cm distance along the anode axis is different from those observed at deposition angles of 10° and 20°. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy reveals the maximum nitrogen content at the shortest (5 cm) axial position. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibits that the roughness of coated films varies for coatings synthesized at different axial and angular positions, and the Vickers micro-hardness test shows that a maximum hardness value is (08.44 ± 0.01) GPa for niobium nitride synthesized at 5-cm axial distance, which is about 500% more than that of a virgin sample. Project supported by the HEC, Pakistan.

  11. Study of the effect of pyrex and quartz insulators on X-ray intensity in a 4 kJ plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohestani, Saeedeh; Habibi, Morteza; Amrollahi, Reza

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we study the soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR) intensity produced in different insulator sleeves by a 4 kJ plasma focus device (APF) using filtered PIN-diodes and a fast scintillation detector. The experiments were performed for a great number of neon filling gas pressures at voltages of 11, 12 and 13 kV. Lengths of 40 and 50 mm look optimal to yield the most SXR intensity for the Pyrex and Quartz insulators respectively. The device appears to optimize much better for Pyrex insulator than the Quartz. For Pyrex and Quartz insulators, the lengths of 40 mm and 50 mm seem optimal to yield maximum HXR intensity, respectively.

  12. The effects of pre-ionization using a shunt resistor on reproducibility of the x-ray emission in a dense plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriaei, D.; Yousefi, H. R.; Mahabadi, T. D.; SalarElahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this research, the effects of pre-ionization using a shunt resistor on reproducibility of x-ray emission in a Mather type plasma focus device have been studied. This technique increased the intensities of the emitted x-rays from argon as the filling gas of the device and made the x-ray yields with similar intensities reproducible. A Mirnov coil was also used to record the variations of the plasma's magnetic field, and the wavelet spectrums of these recorded signals showed the reduced instabilities due to the application of the pre-ionization technique. Moreover, it was demonstrated that this technique was capable of reducing the number of initial runaway electrons that could increase the impurities and instabilities inside the plasma. In addition to the above-mentioned features, this technique could improve the uniform formation of the current sheath during the breakdown phase that might later lead to a high quality pinch and high intensity emitted x-rays.

  13. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  14. Hard X-ray dose intensity and spatial distribution in a plasma focus device using thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Kanani; M N Nasrabadi; B Shirani; I Jabbari

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, X-ray emission dose characteristics from a small Mather-type PF device in various pressures of argon as the operating gas were studied. The PF device was powered by a 12 F capacitor at 25 kV charging voltage. Time-integrated hard X-ray (HXR) emission was investigated using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). These detectors were calibrated with 60Co and 131Cs sources. Twenty-four dosimeters were placed at four different radial distances from the axis of the electrodes at the top of the anode to measure the dose spatial distribution at the top of the anode for different pressures (0.5–1.3 mbar). At each radius, six dosimeters were placed circularly with equal angular intervals on the inner surface of the device chamber. It was found that the optimum pressure for the highest yield of X-ray is 0.9 mbar. The maximum measured dose was 17 mGy per shot at the top of the anode and about 0.5 mGy per shot at 90° with respect to the anode axis. Furthermore, these results showed that the dose at each radius is symmetrical at 360° around the top of the anode, but X-ray distribution follows an anisotropical behaviour. A fast plastic scintillator was also used for time-resolved HXR detection, and a linear relation was observed between the amplitude of the scintillator-PMT signals and TLD responses.

  15. A novel technique based on a plasma focus device for nano-porous gallium nitride formation on P-type silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Malvajerdi, S.; Salar Elahi, A.; Habibi, M.

    2017-04-01

    A new deposition formation was observed with a Mather-type Plasma Focus Device (MPFD). MPFD was unitized to fabricate porous Gallium Nitride (GaN) on p-type Silicon (Si) substrate with a (100) crystal orientation for the first time in a deposition process. GaN was deposited on Si with 4 and 7 shots. The samples were subjected to a 3 phase annealing procedure. First, the semiconductors were annealed in the PFD with nitrogen plasma shots after their deposition. Second, a thermal chemical vapor deposition annealed the samples for 1 h at 1050 °C by nitrogen gas at a pressure of 1 Pa. Finally, an electric furnace annealed the samples for 1 h at 1150 °C with continuous flow of nitrogen. Porous GaN structures were observed by Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, X-Ray diffraction analysis was carried out to determine the crystallinity of GaN after the samples were annealed. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy indicated the amount of gallium, nitrogen, and oxygen due to the self-oxidation of the samples. Photoluminescence spectroscopy revealed emissions at 2.94 eV and 3.39 eV, which shows that hexagonal wurtzite crystal structures were formed.

  16. Theoretical Study of a Spherical Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Yasar

    A theoretical model is developed for two concentric electrodes spherical plasma focus device in order to investigate the plasma sheath dynamics, radiative emission, and the ion properties. The work focuses on the model development of the plasma sheath dynamics and its validation, followed by studying of the radiation effects and the beam-ion properties in such unique geometry as a pulsed source for neutrons, soft and hard x-rays, and electron and ion beams. Chapter 1 is an introduction on fusion systems including plasma focus. Chapter 2 is an extensive literature survey on plasma focus modeling and experiments including the various radiations and their mechanism. Chapter 3 details modeling and validation of the plasma sheath dynamics model with comparison between hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and deuterium-tritium mixture for the production of pulsed neutrons. Chapter 4 is a study of the radiative phase, in which neutron yield is investigated, as well as the predicted beam-ion properties. Chapter 5 summarizes and discusses the results. Chapter 6 provides concluding remarks and proposed future works. The phases of the developed model are the rundown phase I, rundown phase II, the reflected phase and a radiative phase. The rundown phase I starts immediately after the completion of the gas breakdown and ends when the current sheath reaches the equator point of the spherical shape. Then immediately followed by rundown phase II to start and it ends when the shock front hits the axis, which is the beginning of the reflected shock phase. Reflected shock front moves towards the incoming current sheath and meets it which is both the end of the reflected shock phase and the beginning of the radiative phase. After the reflected shock front and the current sheath meet, the current sheath continues to move radially inward by compressing the produced plasma column until it reaches the axis. Since the discharge current contains important information about the plasma dynamic

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low

  18. Measurement of ion beam angular distribution at different helium gas pressures in a plasma focus device by large-area polycarbonate detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M., E-mail: mortezahabibi@gmail.com; Ramezani, V. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Energy Engineering and Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The paper presents an experimental study and analysis of full helium ion density angular distributions in a 4-kJ plasma focus device (PFD) at pressures of 10, 15, 25, and 30 mbar using large-area polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) (15-cm etchable diameter) processed by 50-Hz-HV electrochemical etching (ECE). Helium ion track distributions at different pressures, in particular, at the main axis of the PFD are presented. Maximum ion track density of ~4.4 × 10{sup 4} tracks/cm{sup 2} was obtained in the PCTD placed 6 cm from the anode. The ion distributions for all pressures applied are ring-shaped, which is possibly due to the hollow cylindrical copper anode used. The large-area PCTD processed by ECE proves, at the present state-of-theart, a superior method for direct observation and analysis of ion distributions at a glance with minimum efforts and time. Some observations of the ion density distributions at different pressures are reported and discussed.

  19. Early effects comparison of X-rays delivered at high-dose-rate pulses by a plasma focus device and at low dose rate on human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virelli, A; Zironi, I; Pasi, F; Ceccolini, E; Nano, R; Facoetti, A; Gavoçi, E; Fiore, M R; Rocchi, F; Mostacci, D; Cucchi, G; Castellani, G; Sumini, M; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the effects of high-dose-rate (DR) X-ray beams produced by a plasma focus device (PFMA-3), to exploit its potential medical applications (e.g. radiotherapy), and low-DR X-ray beams produced by a conventional source (XRT). Experiments have been performed at 0.5 and 2 Gy doses on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). Cell proliferation rate and potassium outward currents (IK) have been investigated by time lapse imaging and patch clamp recordings. The results showed that PFMA-3 irradiation has a greater capability to reduce the proliferation rate activity with respect to XRT, while it does not affect IK of T98G cells at any of the dose levels tested. XRT irradiation significantly reduces the mean IK amplitude of T98G cells only at 0.5 Gy. This work confirms that the DR, and therefore the source of radiation, is crucial for the planning and optimisation of radiotherapy applications.

  20. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  1. Low voltage operation of plasma focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, S K; Banerjee, P; Das, R; Deb, P; Prabahar, T; Das, B K; Adhikary, B; Shyam, A

    2010-08-01

    Plasma foci of compact sizes and operating with low energies (from tens of joules to few hundred joules) have found application in recent years and have attracted plasma-physics scientists and engineers for research in this direction. We are presenting a low energy and miniature plasma focus which operates from a capacitor bank of 8.4 muF capacity, charged at 4.2-4.3 kV and delivering approximately 52 kA peak current at approximately 60 nH calculated circuit inductance. The total circuit inductance includes the plasma focus inductance. The reported plasma focus operates at the lowest voltage among all reported plasma foci so far. Moreover the cost of capacitor bank used for plasma focus is nearly 20 U.S. dollars making it very cheap. At low voltage operation of plasma focus, the initial breakdown mechanism becomes important for operation of plasma focus. The quartz glass tube is used as insulator and breakdown initiation is done on its surface. The total energy of the plasma focus is approximately 75 J. The plasma focus system is made compact and the switching of capacitor bank energy is done by manual operating switch. The focus is operated with hydrogen and deuterium filled at 1-2 mbar.

  2. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Plasma focus in the limit of low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P.; Soto, L.; Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188 D, Santiago (Chile); Bruzzone, H.; Clausse, A.; Moreno, C. [Red Interinstitucional de Plasmas Densos y Magnetizados, PLADEMA (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    In order to achieve the design of a repetitive neutron pulses source for a substance detector, a single shot very small plasma focus device has been designed and constructed. The plasma focus operates in the limit of low energy (160 nF capacitor bank, 25-50 nH, 30-40 kV, 70-130 J). The design of the electrode was assisted by a simple model of a Mather plasma focus. A neutron yield of 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} is expected when the discharge is operated with deuterium. (Author)

  4. Tuning particle focusing in inertial microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Kaitlyn; Kahkeshani, Soroush; di Carlo, Dino; Roper, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    Particles in microfluidic devices at finite Reynolds number are subject to two forces: (i) inertial focusing and (ii) particle-particle interactions. Although microfluidic chips exploit these forces to manipulate particles for particle/cell sorting and high throughput flow cytometry, the forces are not understood well enough to allow rational design of devices that can tune and attenuate particle focusing. We present a mathematical model addressing both inertial focusing and particle interactions, and we apply our model to various channel geometries to determine the balance of forces. In addition, we present experimental data that illustrate the accuracy of our model. We will address the following questions: Why do high aspect ratio channels favor two equilibrium positions? Why do particle chains form?

  5. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  6. Focused Ion Beam Technology for Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithmaier, J. P.; Bach, L.; Forchel, A.

    2003-08-01

    High-resolution proximity free lithography was developed using InP as anorganic resist for ion beam exposure. InP is very sensitive on ion beam irradiation and show a highly nonlinear dose dependence with a contrast function comparable to organic electron beam resists. In combination with implantation induced quantum well intermixing this new lithographic technique based on focused ion beams is used to realize high performance nano patterned optoelectronic devices like complex coupled distributed feedback (DFB) and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers.

  7. Modelling of new generation plasma optical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litovko Irina V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new generation plasma optical devices based on the electrostatic plasma lens configuration that opens a novel attractive possibility for effective high-tech practical applications. Original approaches to use of plasma accelerators with closed electron drift and open walls for the creation of a cost-effective low-maintenance plasma lens with positive space charge and possible application for low-cost, low-energy rocket engine are described. The preliminary experimental, theoretical and simulation results are presented. It is noted that the presented plasma devices are attractive for many different applications in the state-of-the-art vacuum-plasma processing.

  8. Experimental studies of radiation resistance of boron nitride, C2C ceramics Al2O3 and carbon-fiber composites using a PF-1000 plasma-focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Tuniz, C.; Demina, E. V.; Dubrovsky, A. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Maslyaev, S. V.; Gaffka, R.; Gryaznevich, M.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M. J.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports on experiments undertaken to compare the radiation resistance of two types of ceramics, boron nitride (BN) and pure alumina (Al2O3), which are used in a TAEA antenna coil installed in the MAST spherical tokamak. Samples of the investigated materials (bulk BN and a 20 μm film of Al2O3 on Al substrate) were exposed on the axis of the plasma-focus PF-1000 device, which can emit intense streams of hot plasma (v≈107 cm s-1 and Npl≈1018 cm-3) and fast deuteron beams (Ei≈100 keV). The most powerful plasma-ion pulse lasted 0.2-1.0 μs and its intensity decayed in about 100 μs. The irradiation process was diagnosed using fast optical cameras, laser interferometry and optical spectrometry. Experiments were performed at power flux densities equal to 109-1010 W cm-2 or 108-109 W cm-2 during the most powerful stage of the interaction process. The irradiated specimens were investigated by means of optical microscopy and x-ray structure analysis (XRSA). It was shown that at 1010 W cm-2 pulses the Al2O3 coating was completely evaporated, whereas a surface of the BN sample became smoother than in the virgin one. A direct comparison of both samples after the action of 108 W cm-2 pulses demonstrated a wave-like structure (more distinct on Al2O3). Weighing of these samples showed, however, that the evaporation of BN was about two times stronger than that of Al2O3 in spite of the lower irradiation flux; the XRSA showed no evidence of cracking of Al2O3 after these pulses. The insulation properties of Al2O3 did not decline, and the Al2O3 coating may be potentially more beneficial, provided that it is kept below its melting point. Characteristic features of damages of a material based on the carbon-fiber composite with additions of silicium carbide (SiC; 8-40% volumetric) were also investigated. It was found that at q=109 W cm-2, the surface erosion is associated with sputtering and evaporation. The degree of this erosion depends on the fibers' orientation in

  9. Preionization Techniques in a kJ-Scale Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povilus, Alexander; Shaw, Brian; Chapman, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Cooper, Christopher; Falabella, Steve; Prasad, Rahul; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a type of z-pinch device that uses a high current, coaxial plasma gun with an implosion phase to generate dense plasmas. These devices can accelerate a beam of ions to MeV-scale energies through strong electric fields generated by instabilities during the implosion of the plasma sheath. The formation of these instabilities, however, relies strongly on the history of the plasma sheath in the device, including the evolution of the gas breakdown in the device. In an effort to reduce variability in the performance of the device, we attempt to control the initial gas breakdown in the device by seeding the system with free charges before the main power pulse arrives. We report on the effectiveness of two techniques developed for a kJ-scale DPF at LLNL, a miniature primer spark gap and pulsed, 255nm LED illumination. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Development of a mobile and repetitive plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapezzi, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rossi, E.; Samuelli, M.; Mezzetti, F.

    2004-05-01

    A plasma focus device aimed at working in environmental conditions not tailored for nuclear equipment has been developed by ENEA. It can operate in deuterium at 1 Hz shot rate, with an average neutron production of 3 × 108 neutrons/shot at 6 kJ of capacitor energy. It is easy to transport and conceived for those industrial purposes where a rather intense neutron generator is required but the use of tritium is forbidden. The machine is designed to be reliable and uniform in emission and to be operated in the field by personnel who are not specialists, to meet the requirements of the possible transformation into a commercial product.

  11. Modeling of plasma devices for pulsed power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, Joseph A.; Gundersen, Martin A.

    1984-07-01

    This letter considers quantitative models of microscopic processes in plasmas formed in gas phase devices for pulsed power. Although models have been developed for devices such as lasers, there are others, such as switches, where these processes have been treated only phenomenologically. Further, transport data must be adjusted to include the effects of high electron density. It is shown that it is necessary to use a microscopic model to correctly describe the device behavior. Examples presented include the effect of Coulomb collisions on conductivity in various gases, and the ionization processes in a hydrogen thyratron.

  12. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  13. Plasma motion observations in a very small plasma focus in the limit of low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, L.; Silva, P.; Moreno, J. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D Santiago, (Chile); Altamirano, L. [Dicontek, Pasaje Galicia 11365, La Florida, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, A. [PLADEMA, UNCPBA Tandil and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    A very small plasma focus device has been designed and constructed. The plasma focus operates in the limit of low energy (160 n F capacitor bank, 65 n H, 20 - 40 kV, {approx} 32 - 100 J). The design of the electrode was assisted by a simple model of a Mather plasma focus. A neutron yield of 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} is expected when the discharge is operated with deuterium. Experiments in H{sub 2} has been performed at pressures over the range 0.1 to 2 mbar. The diagnostics used in the experiments include current derivative, voltage monitor, and plasma image using a ICCD camera gated at 5 ns. The umbrella-like current sheath running over the end of the coaxial electrodes and the pinch after the radial collapse can be clearly observed in the photographs. The velocity of the radial collapse is of the order of 10{sup 5} m/s. The observations are similar to the results obtained with devices operating at energies several order of magnitude higher. (Author)

  14. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  15. Observation of plasma jets in a table top plasma focus discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Pedreros, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile)

    2015-04-15

    In the last years, medium size Z-pinch experiments operating at tens of kJ are being used to create supersonic plasma jets. Those experiments are produced with wire arrays and radial foils, and they are conducted in generators based on water-filled transmission lines. Also plasma jets have been observed in small X-pinch experiments operating at 1 kJ. In this work, observations of plasma jets produced in a table top plasma focus device by means of optical and digital interferometry are shown. The device was operated at only ∼70 J, achieving 50 kA in 150 ns. The plasma jets were observed after the pinch, in the region close and on the anode, along the axis. The electron density measured from the jets is in the range 10{sup 24}–10{sup 25 }m{sup −3}. From two consecutive plasma images separated 18 ns, the axial jet velocity was measured in the order of 4 × 10{sup 4 }m/s.

  16. Experimental studies of radiation resistance of boron nitride, C2C ceramics Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and carbon-fiber composites using a PF-1000 plasma-focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribkov, V A; Demina, E V; Dubrovsky, A V; Pimenov, V N; Maslyaev, S V [Laboratory for Radiation Interaction with Metals, A A Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tuniz, C [Multidisciplinary Laboratory, Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Gaffka, R; Gryaznevich, M [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Skladnik-Sadowska, E; Sadowski, M J [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk n. Warsaw (Poland); Miklaszewski, R; Paduch, M; Scholz, M, E-mail: gribkovv@yahoo.com [Dense Magnetized Plasma Division, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-04-15

    This paper reports on experiments undertaken to compare the radiation resistance of two types of ceramics, boron nitride (BN) and pure alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which are used in a TAEA antenna coil installed in the MAST spherical tokamak. Samples of the investigated materials (bulk BN and a 20 {mu}m film of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Al substrate) were exposed on the axis of the plasma-focus PF-1000 device, which can emit intense streams of hot plasma (v{approx}10{sup 7} cm s{sup -1} and N{sub pl}{approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) and fast deuteron beams (E{sub i}{approx}100 keV). The most powerful plasma-ion pulse lasted 0.2-1.0 {mu}s and its intensity decayed in about 100 {mu}s. The irradiation process was diagnosed using fast optical cameras, laser interferometry and optical spectrometry. Experiments were performed at power flux densities equal to 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2} or 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2} during the most powerful stage of the interaction process. The irradiated specimens were investigated by means of optical microscopy and x-ray structure analysis (XRSA). It was shown that at 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2} pulses the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was completely evaporated, whereas a surface of the BN sample became smoother than in the virgin one. A direct comparison of both samples after the action of 10{sup 8} W cm{sup -2} pulses demonstrated a wave-like structure (more distinct on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Weighing of these samples showed, however, that the evaporation of BN was about two times stronger than that of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in spite of the lower irradiation flux; the XRSA showed no evidence of cracking of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} after these pulses. The insulation properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} did not decline, and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating may be potentially more beneficial, provided that it is kept below its melting point. Characteristic features of damages of a material based on the carbon-fiber composite with additions of silicium carbide (Si

  17. Understanding neutron production in the deuterium dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelbe, Brian, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk; Chittenden, Jeremy, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    The deuterium Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) can produce copious amounts of MeV neutrons and can be used as an efficient neutron source. However, the mechanism by which neutrons are produced within the DPF is poorly understood and this limits our ability to optimize the device. In this paper we present results from a computational study aimed at understanding how neutron production occurs in DPFs with a current between 70 kA and 500 kA and which parameters can affect it. A combination of MHD and kinetic tools are used to model the different stages of the DPF implosion. It is shown that the anode shape can significantly affect the structure of the imploding plasma and that instabilities in the implosion lead to the generation of large electric fields at stagnation. These electric fields can accelerate deuterium ions within the stagnating plasma to large (>100 keV) energies leading to reactions with ions in the cold dense plasma. It is shown that the electromagnetic fields present can significantly affect the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the resulting neutron production.

  18. Concrete shielding of neutron radiations of plasma focus and dose examination by FLUKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M. J.; Amrollahi, R.; Habibi, M.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma Focus (PF) is among those devices which are used in plasma investigations, but this device produces some dangerous radiations after each shot, which generate a hazardous area for the operators of this device; therefore, it is better for the operators to stay away as much as possible from the area, where plasma focus has been placed. In this paper FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation has been used to calculate radiations produced by a 4 kJ Amirkabir plasma focus device through different concrete shielding concepts with various thicknesses (square, labyrinth and cave concepts). The neutron yield of Amirkabir plasma focus at varying deuterium pressure (3-9 torr) and two charging voltages (11.5 and 13.5 kV) is (2.25 ± 0.2) × 108 neutrons/shot and (2.88 ± 0.29) × 108 neutrons/shot of 2.45 MeV, respectively. The most influential shield for the plasma focus device among these geometries is the labyrinth concept on four sides and the top with 20 cm concrete.

  19. Pulsed Plasma Lubrication Device and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); D'Agostino, Saverio A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a lubrication device comprising a solid lubricant disposed between and in contact with a first electrode and a second electrode dimensioned and arranged such that application of an electric potential between the first electrode and the second electrode sufficient to produce an electric arc between the first electrode and the second electrode to produce a plasma in an ambient atmosphere at an ambient pressure which vaporizes at least a portion of the solid lubricant to produce a vapor stream comprising the solid lubricant. Methods to lubricate a surface utilizing the lubrication device in-situ are also disclosed.

  20. MHD modeling of dense plasma focus electrode shape variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Harry; Hartman, Charles; Schmidt, Andrea; Tang, Vincent; Link, Anthony; Ellsworth, Jen; Reisman, David

    2013-10-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a very simple device physically, but results to date indicate that very extensive physics is needed to understand the details of operation, especially during the final pinch where kinetic effects become very important. Nevertheless, the overall effects of electrode geometry, electrode size, and drive circuit parameters can be informed efficiently using MHD fluid codes, especially in the run-down phase before the final pinch. These kinds of results can then guide subsequent, more detailed fully kinetic modeling efforts. We report on resistive 2-d MHD modeling results applying the TRAC-II code to the DPF with an emphasis on varying anode and cathode shape. Drive circuit variations are handled in the code using a self-consistent circuit model for the external capacitor bank since the device impedance is strongly coupled to the internal plasma physics. Electrode shape is characterized by the ratio of inner diameter to outer diameter, length to diameter, and various parameterizations for tapering. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Variation of plasma parameters in a modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Phukan; M K Mishra; B K Saikia; M Chakraborty

    2010-03-01

    A modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device is presented and plasma parameters are controlled in this configuration. Here plasma is produced by applying a discharge voltage between the hot filaments in the source (cathode) and the target magnetic cage (anode) of the device. In this configuration, the hot electron emitting filaments are present only in the source and the magnetic cage of this is kept at a negative bias such that due to the repulsion of the cage bias, the primary electrons can go to the grounded target and produce plasma there. The plasma parameters can be controlled by varying the voltages applied to the source magnetic cage and the separation grid of the device.

  2. Bending and Focusing with Plasmas and Crystals - Potential and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    This talk review the potential of plasmas and crystals for focusing and bending high-energy charged particle beams. It covers topics like plasma lenses, plasma wigglers, plasma dipoles, crystal channeling & reflection, radiation in crystals, crystal accelerators, crystalline beams and ultimate limitations. Past, ongoing or required R&D efforts are highlighted. Invited presentation at EuCARD'13 "Visions for the Future of Particle Accelerators," CERN, 11 June 2013.

  3. Plasma flow in peripheral region of detached plasma in linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    A plasma flow structure is investigated using a Mach probe under detached plasma condition in a linear plasma device NAGDIS-II. A reverse flow along the magnetic field is observed in a steady-state at far-peripheral region of the plasma column in the upstream side from the recombination front. These experimental results indicate that plasma near the recombination front should strongly diffuse across the magnetic field, and it should be transported along the magnetic field in the reverse flow direction. Furthermore, bursty plasma density fluctuations associated with intermittent convective plasma transport are observed in the far-peripheral region of the plasma column in both upstream and downstream sides from the recombination front. Such a nondiffusive transport can contribute to the intermittent reverse plasma flow, and the experimental results indicate that intermittent transports are frequently produced near the recombination front.

  4. Miniaturized Cell Lysis Device Using Spherically Focused Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 肖宏; 郭旻; 程京

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of a miniaturized cell lysis device developed using a concave spherical transducer is capable of lysing bacteria without added chemical denaturants, enzymes or microparticles and is capable of efficiently lysing yeast without any mechanical or enzymatic pretreatment.The device is designed for miniature bio-analysis systems where cell lysing is needed to obtain intracellular materials for further analysis such as DNA identification.The device lysis efficiency was evaluated using viable cell counts and microscopy.Additionally, the device efficiency was compared with that of traditional chemical cell lysis methods using standard molecular biological techniques such as agarose gels and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy.The results indicate that efficient bacteria and cell disruption can be achieved through a low-voltage-driven and spherically focused high-frequency ultrasonic device.

  5. A hyperlens-based device for nanoscale focusing of light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangnan Zhao; Guoxing Zheng; Song Li; Hui Zhou; Yue Ma; Ruiying Zhang; Yah Shi; Ping'an He

    2012-01-01

    To resolve the problem of missed evanescent waves in a beam focusing system,a hyperlens-based beam focusing device is proposed in this letter.This device can convert the evanescent waves into propagating waves,and then a super-resolution spot is formed at the center of the hyperlens.The working principle of the device is presented,and the way in which the material and structural parameters of the hyperlens affect the resolution and transmission is analyzed in detail. A multibeam focusing device is optimally designed,and the simulated results verify that a nanoscale spot with a diameter of 15.6 nm (corresponding to λ0/24,where λ0 is the working wavelength in vacuum) is achieved,which is far less than the diffraction limited resolution with a value of 625 nm (l.7λ0).The device is expected to find numerous applications in optical data storage and nano-photolithography,among others.

  6. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  7. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  8. Variable-focus side-firing endoscopic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberg, Vladimir G.; Black, Michael

    1996-05-01

    Conventional side-firing fiber technology exhibits performance limitations and utilizes expensive single-use only devices which often require multiple fibers for laser prostatectomy. Another limitation of existing side-firing fiber technology is its inability to focus the beam to create incisions for urologic applications such as laser TURP (transurethral resectional prostatectomy), tumor necrosis, lithotripsy, genital warts, and photodynamic therapy. Newly introduced variable-focus side-firing endoscopic device utilizes either one or two lenses and a mirror, onto a single cylinder of molded glass. The laser beam exits the optical fiber, passes through the lens, strikes the cylindrical mirror, and traverses the cylindrical surface. Depending on the design, the laser beam is reflected at the angles ranging from 30 degrees to 120 degrees out of the cylindrical lens. A second lens can be formed onto the side of the cylindrical surface at the beam's exit point. Another advantage of the innovative side-firing device is its capability to provide versatile matching to multiple laser wavelengths from 360 nm to 2.5 microns, and achieve power densities great enough to perform vaporization, incision and coagulation of tissue. Precise focusing of the laser beam results in reduced tissue necrosis of surrounding the treatment area as well as in decreased laser radiation back-scattering. Surgeons can very the focus by adjusting the distance from the tip to the target area. The variable focus side-firing device provides a focused beam at the range of 1.0 to 1.5 mm, for incision. Outside this range, it produces a defocused beam for coagulation.

  9. Autonomous Method and System for Minimizing the Magnitude of Plasma Discharge Current Oscillations in a Hall Effect Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Pote, Bruce (Inventor); Rosenblad, Nathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An autonomous method for minimizing the magnitude of plasma discharge current oscillations in a Hall effect plasma device includes iteratively measuring plasma discharge current oscillations of the plasma device and iteratively adjusting the magnet current delivered to the plasma device in response to measured plasma discharge current oscillations to reduce the magnitude of the plasma discharge current oscillations.

  10. Image Analysis of Plasma Induced by Focused IR Pulsed Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hadi Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma induced by focused laser beam is very essential especially in laser material interaction. Preliminary study leading to this research has been carried out. A Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was employed as a source of energy. The laser was focused using a wide-angle camera lens. The formation of plasma at the focal region was visualized perpendicularly using a CCD video camera interfaced to an image processing system. The dynamic expansion of the laser plasma was grabbed in conjunction with a high-speed photographic system. The observation results show that the plasma was formed in an ellipsoidal shape. The lateral width and the length of the plasma were found gradually increased

  11. Three-dimensional axisymmetric flow-focusing device using stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Tan, Wei-Heong; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional microfluidic axisymmetric flow-focusing device (AFFD) fabricated using stereolithography. Using this method, we can fabricate AFFDs rapidly and automatically without cumbersome alignment needed in conventional methods. The AFFDs are able to be fabricated reproducibly with a micro-sized orifice of diameter around 250 mum. Using this device, we are able to produce monodisperse water-in-oil (W/O) droplets with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 4.5%, W/O droplets with encapsulated microbes (CV < 4.9%) and oil-in-water (O/W) droplets (CV < 3.2%) without any surface modifications. The diameter of these droplets range from 54 to 244 mum with respect to the flow rate ratio of the fluids used; these results are in good agreement with theoretical behavior. For applications of the AFFD, we demonstrate that these devices can be used to produce double emulsions and monodisperse hydrogel beads.

  12. Pressure-flow reducer for aerosol focusing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Eric; Riot, Vincent; Coffee, Keith; Woods, Bruce; Tobias, Herbert; Birch, Jim; Weisgraber, Todd

    2008-04-22

    A pressure-flow reducer, and an aerosol focusing system incorporating such a pressure-flow reducer, for performing high-flow, atmosphere-pressure sampling while delivering a tightly focused particle beam in vacuum via an aerodynamic focusing lens stack. The pressure-flow reducer has an inlet nozzle for adjusting the sampling flow rate, a pressure-flow reduction region with a skimmer and pumping ports for reducing the pressure and flow to enable interfacing with low pressure, low flow aerosol focusing devices, and a relaxation chamber for slowing or stopping aerosol particles. In this manner, the pressure-flow reducer decouples pressure from flow, and enables aerosol sampling at atmospheric pressure and at rates greater than 1 liter per minute.

  13. Low Temperature Plasmas Generated and Sustained Indefinitely Using a Focused Microwave Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Remington; Hoff, Brad; Lepell, Paul; AFRL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory has constructed a device that can initiate a plasma discharge in a focused microwave beam and sustain it indefinitely. A 10 kW, 4.5 GHz beam is passed through a vacuum chamber outfitted with pressure windows that are transparent to 4.5 GHz radiation. The pressure windows are large enough in diameter to prevent any interactions between the beam and the metallic chamber. The entire experiment is housed inside an anechoic chamber to minimize reflections. This novel plasma source generates low temperature, low density plasmas that have no contact with the walls which minimizes contamination and sheath formation.

  14. Slot-Antenna/Permanent-Magnet Device for Generating Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    A device that includes a rectangular-waveguide/slot-antenna structure and permanent magnets has been devised as a means of generating a substantially uniform plasma over a relatively large area, using relatively low input power and a low gas flow rate. The device utilizes electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) excited by microwave power to efficiently generate plasma in a manner that is completely electrodeless in the sense that, in principle, there is no electrical contact between the plasma and the antenna. Plasmas generated by devices like this one are suitable for use as sources of ions and/or electrons for diverse material-processing applications (e.g., etching or deposition) and for ion thrusters. The absence of plasma/electrode contact essentially prevents plasma-induced erosion of the antenna, thereby also helping to minimize contamination of the plasma and of objects exposed to the plasma. Consequently, the operational lifetime of the rectangular-waveguide/ slot-antenna structure is long and the lifetime of the plasma source is limited by the lifetime of the associated charged-particle-extraction grid (if used) or the lifetime of the microwave power source. The device includes a series of matched radiating slot pairs that are distributed along the length of a plasma-source discharge chamber (see figure). This arrangement enables the production of plasma in a distributed fashion, thereby giving rise to a uniform plasma profile. A uniform plasma profile is necessary for uniformity in any electron- or ion-extraction electrostatic optics. The slotted configuration of the waveguide/ antenna structure makes the device scalable to larger areas and higher powers. All that is needed for scaling up is the attachment of additional matched radiating slots along the length of the discharge chamber. If it is desired to make the power per slot remain constant in scaling up, then the input microwave power must be increased accordingly. Unlike in prior ECR microwave plasma

  15. Arc plasma devices: Evolving mechanical design from numerical simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ghorui; A K Das

    2013-04-01

    Wide ranges of technological applications involve arc plasma devices as the primary plasma source for processing work. Recent findings exhibit the existence of appreciable thermal non-equilibrium in these so-called thermal plasma devices. Commercially available magnetohydrodynamic codes are not capable of handling such systems due to unavailability of non-equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data and self-consistent models. A recipe for obtaining mechanical design of arc plasma devices from numerical simulation incorporating two-temperature thermal non-equilibrium model is presented in this article with reference to the plasma of the mixture of molecular gases like nitrogen and oxygen. Such systems are technologically important as they correspond to the plasma devices operating with air, oxygen plasma torches in cutting industries and plasma devices using nitrogen as shielding gas. Temperature field, associated fluid dynamics and electrical characteristics of a plasma torch are computed in a systematic manner to evaluate the performance of a conceived design using a two-fluid CFD model coupled with a two-temperature thermodynamic and transport property code. Important effects of different nozzle designs and plasma gases obtained from the formalism are discussed. Non-equilibrium thermo-dynamic properties are computed using modified two-temperature Saha equations and transport properties are computed using standard Chapman–Enskog approach.

  16. Low-voltage paper isotachophoresis device for DNA focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Long; Crooks, Richard M

    2015-10-21

    We present a new paper-based isotachophoresis (ITP) device design for focusing DNA samples having lengths ranging from 23 to at least 1517 bp. DNA is concentrated by more than two orders of magnitude within 4 min. The key component of this device is a 2 mm-long, 2 mm-wide circular paper channel formed by concertina folding a paper strip and aligning the circular paper zones on each layer. Due to the short channel length, a high electric field of ~16 kV m(-1) is easily generated in the paper channel using two 9 V batteries. The multilayer architecture also enables convenient reclamation and analysis of the sample after ITP focusing by simply opening the origami paper and cutting out the desired layers. We profiled the electric field in the origami paper channel during ITP experiments using a nonfocusing fluorescent tracer. The result showed that focusing relied on formation and subsequent movement of a sharp electric field boundary between the leading and trailing electrolyte.

  17. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  18. The plasma focus as a tool for plasma-wall-interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G.; Martinez, M.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Castillo, F.

    2015-03-01

    The study of the interaction of magnetized plasmas with candidate materials for fusion reactors, as for example tungsten, is a main topic in fusion research. Many studies simulate the plasma wall interaction using ion beams, while only a few use plasma simulators. Plasma foci can produce dense magnetized plasmas of deuterium and helium among other species. We used the plasma focus Fuego-Nuevo II, to expose tungsten samples to deuterium and helium plasmas. The samples were analysed by means of SEM, RBS and NRA, evidencing surface erosion, surface melting and retention of deuterium in a shallow surface layer of 250 nm amounting 6.5·1016 D/cm2. The plasma temperature has been measured at the position of the samples using a triple Langmuir probe and compared to calculations of a snowplow model. The modelling of the electrode to reach desired plasma parameters is discussed.

  19. Self-sustained focusing of high-density streaming plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, A.; Dobrovolskiy, A.; Goncharov, A.; Gushenets, V.; Litovko, I.; Naiko, I.; Oks, E.

    2017-01-01

    We describe our observations of the transport through an electrostatic plasma lens of a wide-aperture, high-current, low energy, metal-ion plasma flow produced by a cathodic arc discharge. The lens input aperture was 80 mm, the length of the lens was 140 mm, and there were three electrostatic ring electrodes located in a magnetic field formed by permanent magnets. The lens outer electrodes were grounded and the central electrode was biased up to -3 kV. The plasma was a copper plasma with directed (streaming) ion energy 20-40 eV, and the equivalent ion current was up to several amperes depending on the potential applied to the central lens electrode. We find that when the central lens electrode is electrically floating, the current density of the plasma flow at the lens focus increases by up to 40%-50%, a result that is in good agreement with a theoretical treatment based on plasma-optical principles of magnetic insulation of electrons and equipotentialization along magnetic field lines. When the central lens electrode is biased negatively, an on-axis stream of energetic electrons is formed, which can also provide a mechanism for focusing of the plasma flow. Optical emission spectra under these conditions show an increase in intensity of lines corresponding to both copper atoms and singly charged copper ions, indicating the presence of fast electrons within the lens volume. These energetic electrons, as well as accumulating on-axis and providing ion focusing, can also assist in reducing the microdroplet component in the dense, low-temperature, metal plasma.

  20. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  1. In-liquid plasma devices and methods of use thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-08-10

    Devices and methods for generating a plasma in a liquid are provided. A low- dielectric material can be placed in contact with the liquid to form an interface a distance from an anode. A voltage can be applied across the anode and a cathode submerged in the liquid to produce the plasma. A variety of devices are provided, including for continuous operation. The devices and methods can be used to generate a plasma in a variety of liquids, for example for water treatment, hydrocarbon reformation, or synthesis of nanomaterial.

  2. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  3. Analysis of Power Model for Linear Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Deng, Baiquan; Zuo, Haoyi; Zheng, Xianjun; Cao, Xiaogang; Xue, Xiaoyan; Ou, Wei; Cao, Zhi; Gou, Fujun

    2016-08-01

    A single cathode linear plasma device has been designed and constructed to investigate the interactions between plasma and materials at the Sichuan University. In order to further investigate the Ohmic power of the device, the output heat load on the specimen and electric potential difference (between cathode and anode) have been tested under different discharge currents. This special power distribution in the radial direction of the plasma discharge channel has also been discussed and described by some improved integral equations in this paper; it can be further simplified as P ∝ α-2 in one-parameter. Besides, we have measured the power loss of the channel under different discharge currents by the calorimetric method, calculated the effective power of the device and evaluated the performances of the plasma device through the power efficiency analysis. supported by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Program (No. 2013GB114003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275135 and 11475122)

  4. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    sensitive surfaces. In this paper, the consumed power for plasma generation (plasma power) has been estimated from voltage-current waveform analysis in... consumed power for plasma generation is calculated by integrating the product of the discharge voltage and current over one cycle; according to the...Faculty Symposium: Course Design for the Millennial Student, Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi, 2011. (Showcased by the Center for Faculty

  5. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    research associates. The PI and the research team have published over 10 journal articles and over 50 conference proceedings and over 50 symposiums...reflections. Optical interference filters with center wavelength at 5322 or 632.82 nm are used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma self- luminescence ...wavelength at 532 ± 2 nm was used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma jet self- luminescence . The shadow of the laser induced plasma falls onto

  6. Application of an impedance matching transformer to a plasma focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bures, B L; James, C; Krishnan, M; Adler, R

    2011-10-01

    A plasma focus was constructed using an impedance matching transformer to improve power transfer between the pulse power and the dynamic plasma load. The system relied on two switches and twelve transformer cores to produce a 100 kA pulse in short circuit on the secondary at 27 kV on the primary with 110 J stored. With the two transformer systems in parallel, the Thevenin equivalent circuit parameters on the secondary side of the driver are: C = 10.9 μF, V(0) = 4.5 kV, L = 17 nH, and R = 5 mΩ. An equivalent direct drive circuit would require a large number of switches in parallel, to achieve the same Thevenin equivalent. The benefits of this approach are replacement of consumable switches with non-consumable transformer cores, reduction of the driver inductance and resistance as viewed by the dynamic load, and reduction of the stored energy to produce a given peak current. The system is designed to operate at 100 Hz, so minimizing the stored energy results in less load on the thermal management system. When operated at 1 Hz, the neutron yield from the transformer matched plasma focus was similar to the neutron yield from a conventional (directly driven) plasma focus at the same peak current.

  7. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and radiation dosimetery assessment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M El-Arag; M A Ayad; M A El-Kolaly; W Madcour

    2010-10-01

    Scattered ionizing radiation emissions from a low-energy plasma focus (0.1 kJ Mather-type) device operating with different gases were studied. The plasma focus device was powered by a capacitor bank of 1 F at 18 kV maximum charging voltage. The radiation emissions were investigated using time-integrated thermoluminescence TLD-500. These detectors were calibrated against standard X-ray machine as well as standard sources (60Co and 137Ca). Calibration of detectors showed linear relation over all the region of measurements. It was found that radiation levels would be minimum for different gases, when the gas pressure was between 0.5 and 0.8 Torr. Only helium deviated from this phenomenon as it gave maximum radiation level at 0.8 Torr pressure. It was also found that, for all the gases used, the radiation levels were maximum when the applied voltage was 15 keV.

  8. Advances towards pB11 Fusion with the Dense Plasma Focus

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Eric J

    2007-01-01

    The prospects for achieving net energy production with pB11 fuel have recently considerably brightened. Studies have shown that the multi-GG field potentially obtainable with modest dense plasma focus devices have the effect of reducing the flow of energy from the ions to the electrons and thus suppressing bremsstrahlung radiation that cools the plasma. We report here on new simulations that indicate that net energy production may be achievable in high-magnetic-field devices at peak currents as low as 2.3 MA. While these simulations only model the dense plasmoid formed in the focus, new simulation techniques can allow a full particle-in-cell simulation of DPF functioning over the wide range of time and space scales needed. Such simulations will be of great value in the next round of experiments that will use pB11 fuel.

  9. Developing a plasma focus research training system for the fusion energy age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    The 3 kJ UNU/ICTP Plasma Focus Facility is the most significant device associated with the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training). In original and modified/upgraded form it has trained generations of plasma focus (PF) researchers internationally, producing many PhD theses and peer-reviewed papers. The Lee Model code was developed for the design of this PF. This code has evolved to cover all PF machines for design, interpretation and optimization, for derivation of radiation scaling laws; and to provide insights into yield scaling limitations, radiative collapse, speed-enhanced and current-stepped PF variants. As example of fresh perspectives derivable from this code, this paper presents new results on energy transfers of the axial and radial phases of generalized PF devices. As the world moves inexorably towards the Fusion Energy Age it becomes ever more important to train plasma fusion researchers. A recent workshop in Nepal shows that demand for such training continues. Even commercial project development consultants are showing interest. We propose that the AAAPT-proven research package be upgraded, by modernizing the small PF for extreme modes of operation, switchable from the typical strong-focus mode to a slow-mode which barely pinches, thus producing a larger, more uniform plasma stream with superior deposition properties. Such a small device would be cost-effective and easily duplicated, and have the versatility of a range of experiments from intense multi-radiation generation and target damage studies to superior advanced-materials deposition. The complementary code is used to reference experiments up to the largest existing machine. This is ideal for studying machine limitations and scaling laws and to suggest new experiments. Such a modernized versatile PF machine complemented by the universally versatile code would extend the utility of the PF experience; so that AAAPT continues to provide leadership in pulsed plasma research training in

  10. The HelCat dual-source plasma device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan G; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher; Herrea, Janis; Kelly, Ralph; Will, Steve; Xie, Shuangwei; Yan, Lincan; Zhang, Yue

    2009-10-01

    The HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) device has been constructed to support a broad range of basic plasma science experiments relevant to the areas of solar physics, laboratory astrophysics, plasma nonlinear dynamics, and turbulence. These research topics require a relatively large plasma source capable of operating over a broad region of parameter space with a plasma duration up to at least several milliseconds. To achieve these parameters a novel dual-source system was developed utilizing both helicon and thermionic cathode sources. Plasma parameters of n(e) approximately 0.5-50 x 10(18) m(-3) and T(e) approximately 3-12 eV allow access to a wide range of collisionalities important to the research. The HelCat device and initial characterization of plasma behavior during dual-source operation are described.

  11. X-ray emission from a small 2 kJ plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, F. N.; Ross, I.; Dangor, A. E.

    1997-05-01

    We report on a study of a 2 kJ, 200 kA plasma focus device as an x-ray source. The x-ray yield from a number of pure gases, deuterium, nitrogen, neon, argon, and xenon, was measured as a function of pressure. X-ray emission is mainly due to line radiation. Maximum x-ray yield of 12.5 J obtained for neon. At lower pressures, electron beams are generated which play an important role.

  12. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ellsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  13. Plasma enhanced vortex fluidic device manipulation of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Darryl B; Chen, Xianjue; Sibley, Alexander; Quinton, Jamie S; Shearer, Cameron J; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L

    2016-08-25

    A vortex fluid device (VFD) with non-thermal plasma liquid processing within dynamic thin films has been developed. This plasma-liquid microfluidic platform facilitates chemical processing which is demonstrated through the manipulation of the morphology and chemical character of colloidal graphene oxide in water.

  14. The HelCat basic plasma science device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Desjardins, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; Watts, C.; Hsu, S. C.; Betts, S.; Kelly, R.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Helicon-Cathode(HelCat) device is a medium-size linear experiment suitable for a wide range of basic plasma science experiments in areas such as electrostatic turbulence and transport, magnetic relaxation, and high power microwave (HPM)-plasma interactions. The HelCat device is based on dual plasma sources located at opposite ends of the 4 m long vacuum chamber - an RF helicon source at one end and a thermionic cathode at the other. Thirteen coils provide an axial magnetic field B >= 0.220 T that can be configured individually to give various magnetic configurations (e.g. solenoid, mirror, cusp). Additional plasma sources, such as a compact coaxial plasma gun, are also utilized in some experiments, and can be located either along the chamber for perpendicular (to the background magnetic field) plasma injection, or at one of the ends for parallel injection. Using the multiple plasma sources, a wide range of plasma parameters can be obtained. Here, the HelCat device is described in detail and some examples of results from previous and ongoing experiments are given. Additionally, examples of planned experiments and device modifications are also discussed.

  15. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  16. New Large Diameter RF Complex Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John; Nosenko, Volodymyr; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-10-01

    The Complex Plasma Research Group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen has built a new large diameter rf plasma setup for dusty plasma experiments. The vacuum chamber is a stainless steel cylinder 0.90 m in diameter and 0.34 m in height with ports for viewing and measurement. A 0.85 m diameter plate in about the center serves as a powered electrode (13.56 MHz) with the chamber walls as the ground. It is pumped on by one of two Oerlikon turbo pumps with a pumping rate of 1100 l/s or 270 l/s. Argon gas is admitted into the chamber by an MKS mass flow meter and pumping is regulated by a butterfly valve to set pressure for experiments. A manual dropper is used to insert dust into the plasma. The dust is illuminated horizontally by a 660 nm 100 mW laser sheet and viewed from above by a Photron FASTCAM 1024 PCI camera. A vertical laser sheet of 635 nm will be used for side imaging. So far, single-layer plasma crystals of up to 15000 particles have been suspended. The particle velocity fluctuation spectra were measured and from these, the particle charge and screening length were calculated. Future experiments will explore the system-size dependence of the plasma crystal properties.

  17. Plasma parameters controlled by remote electron shower in a double plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Phukan, A.

    2012-07-01

    The principal feature of this experiment is the electron showers consisting of three tungsten wires embedded by the plasma, which are heated up consequently emitting electrons inside the diffused plasma to control the plasma parameters in the discharge section of a double plasma device. These cold electrons emitted by the heated filament are free from maintenance of discharge which is sustained in the source section. The target plasma, where electrons are injected is produced as a result of diffusion from the source section. It is found that, plasma density and plasma potential can be effectively controlled in this way.

  18. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Gadri, J. R. Roth , T. C. Montie, K. Kelly-Wintenberg, P. P. Y. Tsai, D. J. Helfritch, P. Feldman, D. M. Sherman, F. Karakaya, Z. Y. Chen, and U. P. S...Edinburgh, Scotland : 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS), 2012). 20. Magesh Thiyagarajan, Xavier Gonzales$, Heather...Anderson# and Megan Norfolk. Non-thermal Plasma Induction of Pre-Programmed Cell Death in Monocytic Leukemia Cells. (Edinburgh, Scotland : 39th IEEE

  19. Fast Tunable Microwave Devices Using Self-driven Plasma Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, David; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Tunable electromagnetic devices using plasmas are of interest for various applications such as high frequency communications and analog signal processing. At microwave frequencies of tens of gigahertz, low-pressure plasmas must be employed in order to avoid high wave damping from collisions. The drawback of low-pressure plasmas is that their diffusion timescales are long, on the order of hundreds of microseconds. Other mechanisms than diffusion must be employed to achieve fast tuning capabilities of these devices. One candidate mechanism is to use a self-driven plasma instability, which may allow for fast tuning of microwave resonant cavities. In this work, a microwave resonant cavity is studied consisting of a rectangular waveguide with two conducting posts spaced along the propagation direction to form a rectangular cavity. The cavity acts as a band pass filter and transmits microwave signals around its resonant frequency. Plasma may be introduced into the cavity between the conducting posts in order to change the refractive index and thus the resonant and transmission frequency of the device. The location of the plasma and its plasma density are important parameters in determining the resonant frequency, and both parameters are capable of being tuned with plasma instabilities. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  20. Parameters of atmospheric plasmas produced by electrosurgical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alexey; Canady, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    Electrosurgical systems are extensively utilized in general surgery, surgical oncology, plastic and reconstructive surgery etc. In this work we study plasma parameters created by electrosurgical system SS-200E/Argon 2 of US Medical Innovations. The maximal length of the discharge plasma column at which the discharge can be sustained was determined as function of discharge power and argon flow rate. Electrical parameters including discharge current and voltage were measured. Recently proposed Rayleigh microwave scattering method for temporally resolved density measurements of small-size atmospheric plasmas was utilized. Simultaneously, evolution of plasma column was observed using intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera.

  1. Study of Neutron From a Dense Plasma Focus Paco Instrument by Means of Nuclear Tracks Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Milanese

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A most interesting feature of dense plasma foci is the acceleration of charge particle at energy in the range of MeV per nucleon. Using deuterium gas, this devices produce fusion D-D reactions, generation fast neutron pulses (~ 2.5 MeV. The device used in the present work is a Mather-type dense plasma focus, called PACO. It is a 2kJ device at 31 kV, with an oxygen-free copper anode, 50 mm long with 40 mm diameter. The coaxial cathode is formed by ten copper rods arranged in a squirrel cage configuration at a radius of 50mm. The insulator in an annular Pyrex® tube located at the base of the anode. The energy store is provided by four 1 µF (40 kV, 40 nH capacitors in parallel. The plasma focus was operated at 1.5 mb deuterium gas pressure. Neutron and accelerated particles are analyzed with material detectors (CR-39 Lantrack® for different conditions. A detailed study is made of track diameters when the plastic is chemically etched with, 6N KOH at 60°C (±1 for 12 h.

  2. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    34Nonthermal Plasma Technology as a Versatile Strategy for Polymeric Biomaterials Surface Modification: A Review," Biomacromolecules, vol. 10, pp. 2351...high aspect ratio for biomedical applications with complex 3D surface geometries, capillaries and microstructure dental cavities.15-18 Atmospheric

  3. Seeding the m = 0 instability in dense plasma focus Z-pinches with a hollow anode

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, J X; McMahon, M; Tummel, K; Cooper, C; Higginson, D; Shaw, B; Povilus, A; Link, A; Schmidt, A

    2016-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a classic Z-pinch plasma device that has been studied for decades as a radiation source. The formation of the m = 0 plasma instability during the compression phase is linked to the generation of high-energy charged particle beams, which, when operated in deuterium, lead to beam-target fusion reactions and the generation of neutron yield. In this paper, we present a technique of seeding the m = 0 instability by employing a hollow in the anode. As the plasma sheath moves along the anode's hollow structure, a low density perturbation is formed and this creates a non-uniform plasma column which is highly unstable. Dynamics of the low density perturbation and preferential seeding of the m = 0 instability were studied in detail with fully kinetic plasma simulations performed in the Large Scale Plasma particle-in-cell code as well as with a simple snowplow model. The simulations showed that by employing an anode geometry with appropriate inner hollow radius, the neutron yield of the D...

  4. Dense plasma focus (DPF) accelerated non radio isotopic radiological source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusnak, Brian; Tang, Vincent

    2017-01-31

    A non-radio-isotopic radiological source using a dense plasma focus (DPF) to produce an intense z-pinch plasma from a gas, such as helium, and which accelerates charged particles, such as generated from the gas or injected from an external source, into a target positioned along an acceleration axis and of a type known to emit ionizing radiation when impinged by the type of accelerated charged particles. In a preferred embodiment, helium gas is used to produce a DPF-accelerated He2+ ion beam to a beryllium target, to produce neutron emission having a similar energy spectrum as a radio-isotopic AmBe neutron source. Furthermore, multiple DPFs may be stacked to provide staged acceleration of charged particles for enhancing energy, tunability, and control of the source.

  5. Characterisation of a micro-plasma device sensor using electrical measurements and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, D

    2002-04-01

    This thesis reports on research undertaken on the characterisation of a micro-plasma device to be used for gas analysis by mean of plasma emission spectroscopy. The work covers aspects related to the micro-plasma electrical and optical emission parameters, and their importance for the utilisation of the micro-plasma device in gas analysis. Experimental results have been used to analyse the fundamental micro-plasma processes and to develop a model, which could provide additional information. This dissertation contains a general literature review of topics related to plasma physics, plasma emission spectroscopy, gas analysis (chemical analysis and artificial olfaction) and other micro-plasma applications. Experimental work focuses on two main areas: electrical measurements and emission measurements. Firstly, electrical measurements are taken and interpretations are given. Where necessary, new theoretical treatments are suggested in order to describe better the physical phenomena. Plasma emission has been considered under different working conditions. This allowed the characterisation of the micro-plasma emission and also a better understanding of the micro-plasma processes. On the basis of the experimental data obtained and other assumptions a model has been developed. A computer simulation based on this model provided additional useful information on the micro- plasma behaviour. The first fundamental implication of this new research is the peculiar behaviour of the micro-plasma. This micro-plasma exhibited deviations from Paschen law and strong dependency on cathode material, which contributed to the formation of a low current stable regime. These results have been followed by physical interpretations and theoretical descriptions. The second implication is the establishment of the boundaries and of the influencing parameters for plasma emission spectroscopy as an analytical tool in this particular micro-plasma. From the applied perspective this study has shown that

  6. Self-aligning concave relativistic plasma mirror with adjustable focus

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph M; Stark, David J; Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, M C

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental-computational study of the optical properties of plasma mirrors (PMs) at the incident laser frequency when irradiated directly at relativistic intensity (1e18 < I_0 < 1e19 W/cm^2) by near-normally incident (4 degree), high-contrast, 30 fs, 800 nm laser pulses. We find that such relativistic PMs are highly reflective (0.6 to 0.8), and focus a significant fraction of reflected light to intensity as large as 10I_0 at distance f as small 25 microns from the PM, provided that pre-pulses do not exceed 1e14 W/cm^2 prior to 20 ps before arrival of the main pulse peak. Particle-in-cell simulations show that focusing results from denting of the reflecting surface by light pressure combined with relativistic transparency, and that reflectivity and f can be adjusted by controlling pre-plasma length L over the range 0.5 < L < 3 microns. Pump-probe reflectivity measurements show the PM's focusing properties evolve on a ps time scale.

  7. Corrosion and wear in plasma electrosurgical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspredes, J.; Ryan, T. P.; Stalder, K. R.; Woloszko, J.

    2017-02-01

    Data were previously reported on studies of the effects of electrical discharges on the corrosion and wear of simple, single-wire test devices immersed in isotonic saline 1 . This work showed that there are a wide variety of mechanisms that can explain various aspects of electrode mass loss, even with very simple electrode geometries and operating conditions. It was found that the electrode material composition played an important role. Subsequently, our studies were expanded to include more realistic device geometries and operating conditions. This paper shows the results of studies on wear characteristics of electrodes made from a variety of highly corrosion resistant metals and alloys, including Waspaloy, Hastelloy, Inconel, Havar, Monel, and other pure metals such as Hafnium. All of these metals underwent wear testing under clinically relevant conditions. Depending on the operating conditions, multiple discrete physical and chemical effects were observed at different locations on the surface of an individual millimeter-scale device electrode. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and area loss data will be presented for a variety of test conditions and electrode materials.

  8. Operational status of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholten, John, E-mail: j.scholten@differ.nl; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Smeets, P.H.M.; De Temmerman, G.C.; Brons, S.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Pol, M.J. van de; Graswinckel, M.F.; Groen, P.W.C.; Poelman, A.J.; Genuit, J.W.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • High heat flux, high density plasmas in a highly accessible linear plasma device. • Plasma exposure of targets of different sizes under selectable plasma beam angles. • Dedicated plasma and surface diagnostics. • Differential vacuum pumping system. -- Abstract: The construction phase of the linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI at the FOM institute DIFFER has been completed and the facility has been officially opened in March 2012. The scientific program to gain more insight in the plasma–wall interactions relevant for ITER and future fusion reactors has started. In Magnum-PSI, targets of a wide range of materials and shapes can be exposed to high particle, high heat flux plasmas (>10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1}; >10 MW/m{sup 2}). For magnetization of the plasma, oil-cooled electromagnets are temporarily installed to enable pulsed operation until the device is upgraded with a superconducting magnet. The magnets generate a field of up to 1.9 T close to the plasma source for a duration of 6 s. Longer exposure times are available for lower field settings. Plasma characterizations were done with a variety of gases (H, D, He, Ne and Ar) to determine the machine performance and prepare for subsequent scientific experiments. Thomson scattering and optical emission spectroscopy were used to determine the plasma parameters while infrared thermography and target calorimetry were used to determine the power loads to the surface. This paper reports on the status of Magnum-PSI and its diagnostic systems. In addition, an overview of the plasma parameters that can be achieved in the present state will be given.

  9. Dynamics of the plasma current sheath in plasma focus discharges in different gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradov, V. P.; Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz-vi@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Mokeev, A. N. [Project Center ITER (Russian Federation); Myalton, V. V.; Kharrasov, A. M. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The shape of the plasma current sheath (PCS) in the final stage of its radial compression, the dynamics of pinching, and the subsequent pinch decay in plasma focus (PF) discharges in different gases are studied using an improved multichannel system of electron-optical plasma photography and a newly elaborated synchronization system. The PCS structure in discharges in heavy gases (Ne, Ar) is found to differ significantly from that in discharges in hydrogen and deuterium. The influence of a heavy gas (Xe) additive to hydrogen and deuterium on the structure and compression dynamics of the PCS is investigated.

  10. Reliable Field Distortion Spark Gap for Plasma Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.HUSSAIN; M.ZAKAULLAH

    2007-01-01

    A simple,low cost,easily maintained,and reliable field distortion spark gap has been developed to operate at a voltage up to 30 kV.The header construction necessary to attach the spark gap switch to a single 12.5μF,40 kV(10 kJ)capacitor is described.The main features of the spark gap are its wide range of voltage operation,high current capacity,low inductance and long lifetime.The performance of spark gap has been tested in a plasma focus and results are presented in this report.

  11. Bipolar Charge Plasma Transistor: A Novel Three Terminal Device

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh; Nadda, Kanika

    2012-01-01

    A distinctive approach for forming a lateral Bipolar Charge Plasma Transistor (BCPT) is explored using 2-D simulations. Different metal work-function electrodes are used to induce n- and p-type charge plasma layers on undoped SOI to form the emitter, base and collector regions of a lateral NPN transistor. Electrical characteristics of the proposed device are simulated and compared with that of a conventionally doped lateral bipolar junction transistor with identical dimensions. Our simulation...

  12. Stark Broadening Analysis Using Optical Spectroscopy of the Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patrick; Bennett, Nikki; Dutra, Eric; Hagen, E. Chris; Hsu, Scott; Hunt, Gene; Koch, Jeff; Waltman, Tom; NSTec DPF Team

    2015-11-01

    To aid in validating numerical modeling of MA-class dense plasma focus (DPF) devices, spectroscopic measurements of the Gemini Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) were performed using deuterium and deuterium/dopant (argon/krypton) gas. The spectroscopic measurements were made using a fiber-coupled spectrometer and streak camera. Stark line-broadening analysis was applied to the deuterium beta emission (486 nm) in the region near the breakdown of the plasma and during the run-down and run-in phases of the plasma evolution. Densities in the range of 1e17 to low 1e18 cm-3 were obtained. These values are in agreement with models of the DPF performed using the LSP code. The spectra also show a rise and fall with time, indicative of the plasma sheath passing by the view port. Impurity features were also identified in the spectra which grew in intensity as the gas inside the DPF was discharged repeatedly without cycling. Implications of this impurity increase for D-T discharges (without fresh gas fills between every discharge) will be discussed. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory, under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA25396 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2515.

  13. Upgrading of the Magnetic Confinement Plasma Device KT-5E

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何迎花; 余羿; 闻一之; 刘万东; 李定; 俞昌旋; 谢锦林; 李弘; 兰涛; 王昊宇

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present ideas of providing appropriate poloidal magnetic field for helimaks to help to generate toroidal magnetic plasma torus. Placing a conductive ring in the center of the cross-section to induce a suitable current, we change the helical magnetic field lines in the helimak discharge into magnetic surface. In this kind of discharge, the plasma density is greatly increased, and the corresponding density fluctuation is significantly decreased, showing a better confinement by magnetic shear. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental investigations on the toroidal magnetic confinement plasmas to be carried on in this kind of device.

  14. Focused beams of fast neutral atoms in glow discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Metel, A. S.; Volosova, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    Glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons in a vacuum chamber allows plasma processing of conductive products in a wide pressure range of p = 0.01 - 5 Pa. To assist processing of a small dielectric product with a concentrated on its surface beam of fast neutral atoms, which do not cause charge effects, ions from the discharge plasma are accelerated towards the product and transformed into fast atoms. The beam is produced using a negatively biased cylindrical or a spherical grid immersed in the plasma. Ions accelerated by the grid turn into fast neutral atoms at p > 0.1 Pa due to charge exchange collisions with gas atoms in the space charge sheaths adjoining the grid. The atoms form a diverging neutral beam and a converging beam propagating from the grid in opposite directions. The beam propagating from the concave surface of a 0.24-m-wide cylindrical grid is focused on a target within a 10-mm-wide stripe, and the beam from the 0.24-m-diameter spherical grid is focused within a 10-mm-diameter circle. At the bias voltage U = 5 kV and p ˜ 0.1 Pa, the energy of fast argon atoms is distributed continuously from zero to eU ˜ 5 keV. The pressure increase to 1 Pa results in the tenfold growth of their equivalent current and a decrease in the mean energy by an order of magnitude, which substantially raises the efficiency of material etching. Sharpening by the beam of ceramic knife-blades proved that the new method for the generation of concentrated fast atom beams can be effectively used for the processing of dielectric materials in vacuum.

  15. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  16. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  17. Construction of a Compact, Low-Inductance, 100 J Dense Plasma Focus for Yield Optimization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher; Povilus, Alex; Chapman, Steven; Falabella, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Shaw, Brian; Liu, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A new 100 J mini dense plasma focus (DPF) is constructed to optimize neutron yields for a variety of plasma conditions and anode shapes. The device generates neutrons by leveraging instabilities that occur during a z-pinch in a plasma sheath to accelerate a beam of deuterium ions into a background deuterium gas target. The features that distinguish this miniDPF from previous 100 J devices are a compact, engineered electrode geometry and a low-impedance driver. The driving circuit inductance is minimized by mounting the capacitors close to the back of the anode and cathode yields. The anode can rapidly be changed out to test new designs. The neutron yield and 2D images of the visible light emission are compared to simulations with the hybrid kinetic code LSP which can directly simulate the device and anode designs. Initial studies of the sheath physics and neutron yields for a scaling of discharge voltages and neutral fill pressures are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Chaos control and taming of turbulence in plasma devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinger, T.; Schröder, C.; Block, D.;

    2001-01-01

    Chaos and turbulence are often considered as troublesome features of plasma devices. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems, a number of strategies have been developed to achieve active control over complex temporal or spatio-temporal behavior. Many of these techniques apply to p...

  19. Nanofocus of tenth of joules and a portable plasma focus of few joules for field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavéz, Cristian; Moreno, José; Tarifeño, Ariel; Pedreros, José; Altamirano, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A repetitive pinch plasma focus that works with stored energy less than 1 J per shot has be developed at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. The main features of this device, repetitive Nanofocus, are 5 nF of capacity, 5 nH of inductance, 5-10 kV charging voltage, 60-250 mJ stored energy, 5-10 kA current peak, per shot. The device has been operated at 20 Hz in hydrogen and deuterium. X-ray radiographs of materials of different thickness were obtained. Neutrons were detected using a system based upon 3He proportional counter in chare integrated mode. However, the reproducibility of this miniaturized device is low and several technological subjects have to be previously solved in order to produce neutrons for periods greater than minutes. Further studies in the Nanofocus are being carried out. In addition, a device with a stored energy of a few joules is being explored. A preliminary compact, low weight (3 kg), portable PF device (25 cm×5 cm×5 cm) for field applications has been designed. This device was designed to operate with few kilovolts (10 kV or less) with a stored energy of 2 J and a repetition rate of 10 Hz without cooling. A neutron flux of the order of 104-105 n/s is expected.

  20. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P; Lucky, Z; Drandell, M; Leneman, D; Maggs, J; Vincena, S; Van Compernolle, B; Tripathi, S K P; Morales, G; Carter, T A; Wang, Y; DeHaas, T

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  1. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  2. Opening switch research on a dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdin, G.

    1987-02-01

    Experiments were performed to enhance power coupling to the load by placing the load electrode opposite the muzzle end of the Dense Plasma Focus plasma gun. The impaler concept, whereby the current sheath is run into a knife edge insulator, was tested in two configurations. However, the power coupled to the load was always less than one tenth that of the experiments where the load was coupled to the breach of the gun. Other load coupling schemes where the load electrode was brought near the outside of the central electrode prevented pinches (voltage surges) when placed too close and the power coupled to the load was reduced when the load electrodes were moved away. The results were not as good as those of the impaler concept. Measurements of the dynamics of the current sheath in various stages were performed and compared with theory. Generally the velocity of the current sheath falls below theoretical expectations suggesting the presence of electrode drag, a phenomenon not present in the model. During the radial collapse phase the model and the experimental estimates of dL/dt are in substantiaL agreement before pinch time but disagree afterward due to two dimensional effects not present in the theory.

  3. Repetitive tabletop plasma focus to produce a tunable damage factor on materials for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Inestrosa-Izurieta, Maria Jose; Moreno, Jose; Davis, Sergio; Bora, Biswajit; Avaria, Gonzalo; Jain, Jalaj; Altamirano, Luis; Panizo, Miguel; Gonzalez, Raquel; Rivera, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Future thermonuclear reactors, both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches, need materials capable of withstanding the extreme radiation and heat loads expected from high repetition rate plasma. A damage factor (F = qτ1/2) in the order of 104 (W/cm2) s1/2 is expected. The axial plasma dynamics after the pinch in a tabletop plasma focus of hundred joules, PF-400J, was characterized by means of pulsed optical refractive diagnostics. The energy, interaction time and power flux of the plasma burst interacting with targets was obtained. Results show a high dependence of the damage factor with the distance from the anode top where the sample is located. A tunable damage factor in the range 10- 105(W/cm2) s1/2 can be obtained. At present the PF-400J operating at 0.077 Hz is being used to study the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material target, including nanostructured materials. A new tabletop device to be operated up to 1Hz including tunable damage factor has been designed and is being constructed, thus thousand cumulative shots on materials could be obtained in few minutes. The scaling of the damage factor for plasma foci operating at different energies is discussed. Supported by CONICYT: PIA ACT-1115, PAI 79130026.

  4. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  5. Two-fluid biasing simulations of the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2017-02-01

    External biasing of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and its impact on plasma flows and turbulence are explored for the first time in 3D simulations using the Global Braginskii Solver code. Without external biasing, the LAPD plasma spontaneously rotates in the ion diamagnetic direction. The application of a positive bias increases the plasma rotation in the simulations, which show the emergence of a coherent Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) mode outside of the cathode edge with poloidal mode number m ≃6 . Negative biasing reduces the rotation in the simulations, which exhibit KH turbulence modestly weaker than but otherwise similar to unbiased simulations. Biasing either way, but especially positively, forces the plasma potential inside the cathode edge to a spatially constant, KH-stable profile, leading to a more quiescent core plasma than the unbiased case. A moderate increase in plasma confinement and an associated steepening of the profiles are seen in the biasing runs. The simulations thus show that the application of external biasing can improve confinement while also driving a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Ion-neutral collisions have only a weak effect in the biased or unbiased simulations.

  6. Analysis for Radiation and Shielding Dose in Plasma Focus Neutron Source Using FLUKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M. J.; Amrollahi, R.; Habibi, M.

    2012-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for the attenuation of neutron radiation produced at Plasma focus (PF) devices through various shielding design. At the test site it will be fired with deuterium and tritium (D-T) fusion resulting in a yield of about 1013 fusion neutrons of 14 MeV. This poses a radiological hazard to scientists and personnel operating the device. The goal of this paper was to evaluate various shielding options under consideration for the PF operating with D-T fusion. Shields of varying neutrons-shielding effectiveness were investigated using concrete, polyethylene, paraffin and borated materials. The most effective shield, a labyrinth structure, allowed almost 1,176 shots per year while keeping personnel under 20 mSV of dose. The most expensive shield that used, square shield with 100 cm concrete thickness on the walls and Borated paraffin along with borated polyethylene added outside the concrete allowed almost 15,000 shot per year.

  7. Low Energy Plasma Focus as an Intense X-ray Source for Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Hussain; M. Zakaullah; Shujaat Ali; A. Waheed

    2004-01-01

    Study on X-ray emission from a low energy (1.8 k J) plasma focus device powered by a 9 μF capacitor bank, charged at 20 kV and giving peak discharge current of about 175 kA by using a lead-inserted copper-tapered anode is reported. The X-ray yield in different energy windows is measured as a function of hydrogen filling pressure. The maximum yield in 4π-geometry is found to be (27.3±1.1) J and corresponding wall plug efficiency for X-ray generation is 1.52 ±0.06%. X-ray emission, presumably due to bombarding activity of electrons in current sheath at the anode tip was dominant, which is confirmed by the pinhole images. The feasibility of the device as an intense X-ray source for radiography is demonstrated.

  8. Self-Similar Nonlinear Dynamical Solutions for One-Component Nonneutral Plasma in a Time-Dependent Linear Focusing Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Qin and Ronald C. Davidson

    2011-07-19

    In a linear trap confining a one-component nonneutral plasma, the external focusing force is a linear function of the configuration coordinates and/or the velocity coordinates. Linear traps include the classical Paul trap and the Penning trap, as well as the newly proposed rotating-radio- frequency traps and the Mobius accelerator. This paper describes a class of self-similar nonlinear solutions of nonneutral plasma in general time-dependent linear focusing devices, with self-consistent electrostatic field. This class of nonlinear solutions includes many known solutions as special cases.

  9. Negative ion studies on the RF plasma device MAGPIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Hannah; Santoso, Jesse; Corr, Cormac; Gibson, Kieran

    2016-10-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) systems provide both heating and current drive in tokamak fusion reactors. High energy (> 1 MeV) neutral beams are produced by neutralising accelerated ions, for which negative ions are used; the neutralisation cross section for positive ions becomes negligible at these energies. This requires very high throughput negative ion sources. Currently this is achieved using inductively coupled plasma sources, which incorporate caesium to improve the production rate. It has been proposed that helicon plasma sources could provide a more efficient, higher throughput method of producing negative ions for NBI, possibly even removing the need for caesium. We report on studies of the negative hydrogen ion population in the MAGPIE helicon device (Australian National University) under a variety of operating conditions. The probe-based laser photodetachment method and Langmuir probes are employed to estimate the negative hydrogen ion density throughout the device. Initial results support the viability of helicon-based negative ion sources.

  10. Negative hydrogen ions in a linear helicon plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Cormac; Santoso, Jesse; Samuell, Cameron; Willett, Hannah; Manoharan, Rounak; O'Byrne, Sean

    2015-09-01

    Low-pressure negative ion sources are of crucial importance to the development of high-energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for the ITER experimental tokamak device. Due to their high power coupling efficiency and high plasma densities, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially remove the need for caesium. In helicon sources, the RF power can be coupled efficiently into the plasma and it has been previously observed that the application of a small magnetic field can lead to a significant increase in the plasma density. In this work, we investigate negative ion dynamics in a high-power (20 kW) helicon plasma source. The negative ion fraction is measured by probe-based laser photodetachment, electron density and temperature are determined by a Langmuir probe and tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is used to determine the density of the H(n = 2) excited atomic state and the gas temperature. The negative ion density and excited atomic hydrogen density display a maximum at a low applied magnetic field of 3 mT, while the electron temperature displays a minimum. The negative ion density can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of the magnetic field. Spatial and temporal measurements will also be presented. The Australian Research Grants Council is acknowledged for funding.

  11. Viscoelastic Multicomponent Fluids in confined Flow-Focusing Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    The effects of elasticity on the break-up of liquid threads in microfluidic cross-junctions is investigated using numerical simulations based on the "lattice Boltzmann models" (LBM). Working at small Capillary numbers, we investigate the effects of non-Newtonian phases in the transition from droplet formation at the cross-junction (DCJ) and droplet formation downstream of the cross-junction (DC) (Liu & Zhang, ${\\it Phys. Fluids.}$ ${\\bf 23}$, 082101 (2011)). Viscoelasticity is found to influence the break-up point of the threads, which moves closer to the cross-junction and stabilizes. This is attributed to an increase of the polymer feedback stress forming in the corner flows, where the side channels of the device meet the main channel.

  12. New developments in intrauterine device use: focus on the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson AL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anita L Nelson,1 Natasha Massoudi2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Torrance, CA, USA; 2American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Cupecoy, Sint Maarten Abstract: Many more women in the US today rely upon intrauterine devices (IUDs than in the past. This increased utilization may have substantially contributed to the decline in the percentage of unintended pregnancies in the US. Evidence-based practices have increased the number of women who are medically eligible for IUDs and have enabled more rapid access to the methods. Many women enjoy freedom to use IUDs without cost, but for many the impact of the Affordable Care Act has yet to be realized. Currently, there are three hormonal IUDs and one copper IUD available in the US. Each IUD is extremely effective, convenient, and safe. The newer IUDs have been tested in populations not usually included in clinical trials and provide reassuring answers to older concerns about IUD use in these women, including information about expulsion, infection, and discontinuation. On the other hand, larger surveillance studies have provided new estimates about the risks of complications such as perforation, especially in postpartum and breastfeeding women. This article summarizes significant features of each IUD and provides a summary of the differences to aid clinicians in the US and other countries in advising women about IUD choices. Keywords: copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine systems, noncontraceptive benefits, same-day/quick start initiation, safety, bleeding patterns, placement pain, medical eligibility

  13. Ion beam emission within a low energy focus plasma (0.1 kJ) operating with hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Aragi, Gamal E. [Nuclear Research Center, Cairo (Egypt). Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Dept.

    2010-06-15

    An investigation of energetic ion beam emission from a low energy plasma focus (0.1 kJ Mather type) device operating with hydrogen gas is studied. The ion beam emission is investigated using time-integrated and time-resolved detectors. The present plasma focus device is powered by a capacitor bank of 1 {mu}F at 18 kV maximum charging voltage. The correlation of ion beam intensity with filling gas pressure indicates that the beam emission is maximized at the optimum pressure for the focus formation at peak current. Energy of ions is determined with a time-of-flight (TOF) method, taking into account distance from the center electrode to the detection plane. (orig.)

  14. Focusing a beam beyond the diffraction limit using a hyperlens-based device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Guo-Xing; Zhang Rui-Ying; Li Song; He Ping-An; Zhou Hui

    2011-01-01

    A super-focusing device composed of a focusing objective and a hyperlens is proposed to focus an incident plane wave into the deep subwavelength dimension. In the device,the objective converts the incident plane wave into a convergent one.The half cylindrical hyperlens can support high wave vector k modes propagating towards its core.So the convergent wave can be focused into an ultrasmall spot beyond the diffraction limit.The layout is proposed for the super-focusing device and its characteristics are investigated theoretically.Numerical simulations verify that the focused beams are confined in a spot with a diameter of 16.3 nm in the focal plane of the focusing objective with a numerical aperture of 0.6,which corresponds to a super-resolution spot of λ0/23 (λ0 is the wavelength in vacuum).The simulations confirm the effectiveness of the proposed device.

  15. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  16. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  17. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, I., E-mail: eu13z002@steng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  18. The ITER full size plasma source device design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: piergiorgio.sonato@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Anaclerio, G.; Antoni, V.; Barana, O.; Bigi, M.; Boldrin, M. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dal Bello, S.; Palma, M. Dalla [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Daniele, A. [ENEA, Frascati, Roma (Italy); D' Arienzo, M.; De Lorenzi, A.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Grando, L.; Fantini, F.; Fellin, F. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)] (and others)

    2009-06-15

    In the framework of the strategy for the development and the procurement of the NB systems for ITER, it has been decided to build in Padova a test facility, including two experimental devices: a full size plasma source with low voltage extraction and a full size NB injector at full beam power (1 MV). These two different devices will separately address the main scientific and technological issues of the 17 MW NB injector for ITER. In particular the full size plasma source of negative ions will address the ITER performance requirements in terms of current density and uniformity, limitation of the electron/ion ratio and stationary operation at full current with high reliability and constant performances for the whole operating time up to 1 h. The required negative ion current density to be extracted from the plasma source ranges from 290 A/m{sup 2} in D{sub 2} (D{sup -}) and 350 A/m{sup 2} in H{sub 2} (H{sup -}) and these values should be obtained at the lowest admissible neutral pressure in the plasma source volume, nominally at 0.3 Pa. The electron to ion ratio should be limited to less than 1 and the admissible ion inhomogeneity extracted from the grids should be better than 10% on the whole plasma cross-section having a surface exposed to the extraction grid of the order of 1 m{sup 2}. The main design choices will be presented in the paper as well as an overview of the design of the main components and systems.

  19. Understanding plasma facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Koel, B. E.; Roszell, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The plasma-material interface is recognized to be the most critical challenge in the realization of fusion energy. Liquid metals offer a self-healing, renewable interface that bypasses present issues with solid, neutron-damaged materials such as tungsten. Lithium in particular has dramatically improved plasma performance in many tokamaks through a reduction of hydrogen recycling. However the detailed chemical composition and properties of the top few nm that interact with the plasma are often obscure. Surface analysis has proven to be a key tool in semiconductor processing and a new laboratory has been established at PPPL to apply surface science techniques to plasma facing materials. We have shown that lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will likely be oxidized during the intershot interval. Present work is focused on deuterium uptake of solid and liquid metals for plasma density control and sub-micron scale wetting of liquid metals on their substrates. The long-term goal is to provide a material database for designing liquid metal plasma facing components for tokamaks such as National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-ST (FNSF-ST). Support was provided through DOE-PPPL Contract Number is DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for complex plasma experiments with flow

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2015-01-01

    A versatile table-top dusty plasma experimental device (DPEx) to study flow induced excitations of linear and nonlinear waves/structures in a complex plasma is presented. In this $\\Pi$-shaped apparatus a DC glow discharge plasma is produced between a disc shaped anode and a grounded long cathode tray by applying a high voltage DC in the background of a neutral gas and subsequently a dusty plasma is created by introducing micron sized dust particles that get charged and levitated in the sheath region. A flow of the dust particles is induced in a controlled manner by adjusting the pumping speed and the gas flow rate into the device. A full characterisation of the plasma, using Langmuir and emissive probe data, and that of the dusty plasma using particle tracking data with the help of an idl based (super) Particle Identification and Tracking (sPIT) code is reported. Experimental results on the variation of the dust flow velocity as a function of the neutral pressure and the gas flow rate are given. The potential...

  1. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research is consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and wind pressure resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional drive parameter, is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  2. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and "wind pressure" resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional "drive parameter," is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  3. FePt nanoparticle formation with lower phase transition temperature by single shot plasma focus ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. J.; Roshan, M. V.; Pan, Z. Y.; Verma, R.; Lee, P.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Rawat, R. S.

    2008-07-01

    Uniform FePt nanoparticles were synthesized through nanostructuring of pulsed laser deposited FePt thin films by single shot H+ ion irradiation using a plasma focus device. The annealing temperature required for phase transition from low Ku face-centred cubic to high Ku face-centred tetragonal, for ion irradiated samples, is simultaneously lowered down to 400 °C. The energetic H+ ion irradiation significantly reduces the activation energy for atomic ordering by increasing the number of vacancies. The advantage of using a plasma focus device is that it can achieve nanostructuring in much shorter time, in single shot ion exposure with pulse duration of typically about a few hundreds of nanoseconds, as compared with much longer duration required by continuous ion sources.

  4. Using Focus Groups to Study Consumer Understanding and Experiences with Tamper-Evident Packaging Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascall, Melvin A.; Lee, Ken; Fraser, Angela; Halim, Linna

    2009-01-01

    A focus group with an educational component was used to help initiate a new research hypothesis. Early-stage development of a new tamper-evident invention was improved with input from a consumer focus group. The focus group comprised consumers who were shown several tamper-evident devices, including a new color-changing cap under active…

  5. Plasma focus neutron anisotropy measurements and influence of a deuteron beam obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebitaher, A.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.

    2017-03-01

    The deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion neutron yield and anisotropy were measured on a shot-to-shot basis for the NX2 plasma focus (PF) device using two beryllium fast-neutron activation detectors at 0° and 90° to the PF axis. Measurements were performed for deuterium gas pressures in the range 6-16 mbar, and positive correlations between neutron yield and anisotropy were observed at all pressures. Subsequently, at one deuterium gas pressure (13 mbar), the contribution to the fusion yield produced by the forwardly-directed D+ ion beam, emitted from the plasma pinch, was investigated by using a circular Pyrex plate to obstruct the beam and suppress its fusion contribution. Neutron measurements were performed with the obstacle positioned at two distances from the anode tip, and also without the obstacle. It was found that 80% of the neutron yield originates in the plasma pinch column and just above that. In addition, proton pinhole imaging was performed from the 0° and 90° directions to the pinch. The obtained proton images are consistent with the conclusion that DD fusion is concentrated ( 80%) in the pinch column region.

  6. Opening Switch Research on a Plasma Focus VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-26

    densi y ( -’cm-3 suggest that th. I asma is at max imu: compress ion. Xna xxmmn1m AVI JulmrW0 51 (a) PLASMA DENSITY (SCALE: 1.0=1.6- 1018CM-3 ) 1.0 .4 7...IEEE inter. Pulsed Power Conf., New Mexico , 350 (1983). 3. F. Venneri, and G. Gerdin, IEEE Int. Conf. on Plasma Sci., St. Louis, MO, 1984, Conf. Record

  7. Numerical Experiments on Oxygen Plasma Focus: Scaling Laws of Soft X-Ray Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, M.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical experiments have been investigated on UNU/ICTP PFF low energy plasma focus device with oxygen filling gas. In these numerical experiments, the temperature window of 119-260 eV has been used as a suitable temperature range for generating oxygen soft X-rays. The Lee model was applied to characterize the UNU/ICTP PFF plasma focus. The optimum soft X-ray yield (Ysxr) was found to be 0.75 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.03 % at pressure of 2.36 Torr and the end axial speed was va = 5 cm/μs. The practical optimum combination of p0, z0 and `a' for oxygen Ysxr was found to be 0.69 Torr, 4.8 cm and 2.366 cm respectively, with the outer radius b = 3.2 cm. This combination gives Ysxr ~ 5 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.16 %. Thus we expect to increase the oxygen Ysxr of UNU/ICTP PFF, without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and operating pressure. Scaling laws on oxygen soft X-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. It was found that the oxygen soft X-ray yields scale well with and for the low inductance (L0 = 30 nH) (where yields are in J and currents in kA). While the soft X-ray yield scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The oxygen soft X-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 8.7 kJ for storage energy of 1 MJ. The optimum efficiency for soft X-ray yield (1.1 %) is with capacitor bank energy of 120 kJ. This indicates that oxygen plasma focus is a good soft X-ray source when properly designed.

  8. Research on pinches driven by SPPED 2 generator hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Soto, L L; Silva, P; Sylvester, G S; Zambra, M; Pavez, C; Raspa, V; Castillo, F; Kies, W; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Silva, Patricio; Sylvester, Gustavo; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian; Raspa, Veronica; Castillo, Fermin; Kies, Walter

    2004-01-01

    SPEED2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. SPEED2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 mF equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt~1013 A/s). Currently the SPEED2 is operating at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN, Chile, being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in SPEED2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from SPEED2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kiloamperes to mega-amperes, using the SPEED2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration oper...

  9. Research on pinches driven by Speed-2 generator: Hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, L.; Moreno, J.; Silva, P.; Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Pavez, C. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Pavez, C. [Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Castillo, F. [Insitituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM (Mexico); Kies, W. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Speed-2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. Speed-2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 {mu}F equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt {approx} 10{sup 13} A/s). Currently Speed-2 is operating at CCHEN (Chilean nuclear energy commission), being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in Speed-2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from Speed-2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kilo- to mega-amperes, using the Speed-2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration operating in deuterium in order to characterize the neutron emission and the hard X-ray production. Silver activation counters, plastics CR39 and scintillator-photomultiplier detectors are used to characterize the neutron emission. Images of metallic plates with different thickness are obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize an effective energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge. (authors)

  10. Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, G.S.

    2006-03-14

    The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized

  11. Ion beam and neutron output from a sub-kilojoule dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsworth, J. L., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We are seeking to gain a better fundamental understanding of the ion beam acceleration and neutron production dense plasma focus (DPF) device. Experiments were performed on a kilojoule level, fast rise time DPF located at LLNL. Ion beam spectra and neutron yield were measured for deuterium pinches. Visible light images of the pinch are used to determine the pinch length. In addition, an RF probe was placed just outside the cathode to measure fluctuations in E{sub z} up to 6 GHz, which is within the range of the lower hybrid frequencies. We find these oscillations arise at a characteristic frequency near 4 GHz during the pinch. Comparisons of the neutron yield and ion beam characteristics are presented. The neutron yield is also compared to scaling laws.

  12. MCNP Simulation to Hard X-Ray Emission of KSU Dense Plasma Focus Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Amgad E

    2015-01-01

    The MCNP program used to simulate the hard x-ray emission from KSU dense plasma focus device, an electron beam spectrum of maximum energy 100 keV was used to hit anode target. The bremsstrahlung radiation was measured using the F2 tally functions on the chamber walls and on a virtual sphere surrounding the machine, the radiation spectrum was recorded for various anode materials like tungsten, stainless steel and molybdenum. It was found that tungsten gives the best and the most intense radiation for the same electron beam. An aluminum filter of thickness 2mm and 4mm was used to cutoff the lower energy band from the x-ray spectrum. It was found that the filters achieved the mission and there is no distinct difference in between.

  13. Focusing of plasma flow in an E cross B discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Martin; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-11-01

    ExB discharges can be used to accelerate ions in a quasi-neutral plasma. Large ion fluxes can be produced in this way because there is no space charge limitation, however difficulty in specifying the electric field distribution results in large flow divergence [1]. Recent work has identified new methods to control the flow divergence [2,3]. We present the results of new techniques that are designed to further reduce the divergence. [4pt] [1] A.I. Morozov and V.V. Savelyev, Reviews of Plasma Physics vol. 21, B. B. Kadomtsev and V. D. Shafranov, Eds. New York: Consultants Bureau, 2000. [2] Y. Raitses, L.A. Dorf, A.A. Litvak, and N.J. Fisch, Journal of Applied Physics 88 (2000) 1263. [3] A. Smirnov, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science 36 (2008) 1998.

  14. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Measurements of Concentration Distributions in Acoustic Focusing Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K A; Fisher, K; Jung, B; Ness, K; Mariella Jr., R P

    2008-06-16

    We describe a modeling approach to capture the particle motion within an acoustic focusing microfluidic device. Our approach combines finite element models for the acoustic forces with analytical models for the fluid motion and uses these force fields to calculate the particle motion in a Brownian dynamics simulation. We compare results for the model with experimental measurements of the focusing efficiency within a microfabricated device. The results show good qualitative agreement over a range of acoustic driving voltages and particle sizes.

  16. Global parameter optimization of Mather type plasma focus in the framework of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional snowplow model

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is known to produce highly energetic ions, electrons and plasma environment which can be used for breeding of short-lived isotopes, plasma nanotechnology and other material processing applications. Commercial utilization of DPF in such areas would need a design tool which can be deployed in an automatic search for the best possible device configuration for a given application. The recently revisited [S K H Auluck, Physics of Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)] Gratton-Vargas (GV) two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus provides a numerical formula for dynamic inductance of a Mather type plasma focus fitted to thousands of automated computations, which enables construction of such design tool. This inductance formula is utilized in the present work to explore global optimization, based on first-principles optimality criteria, in a 4-dimensional parameter-subspace of the zero-resistance GV model. The optimization process is shown to reproduce the empirically observed constancy ...

  17. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  18. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus evolution in the context of contemporary research

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2013-01-01

    Recent resurgence of interest in applications of dense plasma focus and doubts about the conventional view of dense plasma focus as a purely irrotational compressive flow have re-opened questions concerning device optimization. In this context, this paper re-appraises and extends the analytical snowplow model of plasma focus sheath evolution developed by F. Gratton and J.M. Vargas (GV) (Energy Storage, Compression and Switching, Ed. V. Nardi, H. Sahlin, and W. H. Bostick, Eds., vol. 2. New York: Plenum, 1983, p. 353) and shows its relevance to contemporary research. The GV model enables construction of a special orthogonal coordinate system in which the plasma flow problem can be simplified and a model of sheath structure can be formulated. The LPP plasma focus facility, which reports neutron yield better than global scaling law, is shown to be operating closer to an optimum operating point of the GV model as compared with PF-1000.

  19. 76 FR 43119 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Focused Ultrasound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... focused ultrasound exposure (thermal damage), such as erythema, edema, pigmentary changes, and pain. These... risk is addressed by recommended treatment parameters that have been shown to be safe with little or no... risk is addressed by recommended treatment parameters that have been shown to be safe with little or no...

  20. Ion probe beam experiments and kinetic modeling in a dense plasma focus Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Ellsworth, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; McLean, H., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Rusnak, B., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Sears, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, 418 Washington St SE, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) emits multiple-MeV ions in a ∼cm length. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood. We are exploring the origins of these large gradients using measurements of an ion probe beam injected into a DPF during the pinch phase and the first kinetic simulations of a DPF Z-pinch. To probe the accelerating fields in our table top experiment, we inject a 4 MeV deuteron beam along the z-axis and then sample the beam energy distribution after it passes through the pinch region. Using this technique, we have directly measured for the first time the acceleration of an injected ion beam. Our particle-in-cell simulations have been benchmarked on both a kJ-scale DPF and a MJ-scale DPF. They have reproduced experimentally measured neutron yields as well as ion beams and EM oscillations which fluid simulations do not exhibit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for accelerator and neutron source applications.

  1. EBT2 Dosimetry of X-rays produced by the electron beam from PFMA-3, a Plasma Focus for medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccolini, Elisa; Mostacci, Domiziano; Sumini, Marco; Tartari, Agostino

    2011-01-01

    The electron beam emitted from the back of Plasma Focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for IORT (IntraOperative Radiation Therapy) applications. A Plasma Focus device is being developed to this aim, to be utilized as an X-ray source. The electron beam is driven to impinge on 50 {\\mu}m brass foil, where conversion X-rays are generated. Measurements with gafchromic film are performed to analyse the attenuation of the X-rays beam and to predict the dose given to the culture cell in radiobiological experiments to follow.

  2. Nonlinear instability in simulations of Large Plasma Device turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, B; Umansky, M V; Schaffner, D; Joseph, I

    2013-01-01

    Several simulations of turbulence in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Inst. 62, 2875 (1991)] are energetically analyzed and compared with each other and with the experiment. The simulations use the same model, but different axial boundary conditions. They employ either periodic, zero-value, zero-derivative, or sheath axial boundaries. The linear stability physics is different between the scenarios because the various boundary conditions allow the drift wave instability to access different axial structures, and the sheath boundary simulation contains a conducting wall mode instability which is just as unstable as the drift waves. Nevertheless, the turbulence in all the simulations is relatively similar because it is primarily driven by a robust nonlinear instability that is the same for all cases. The nonlinear instability preferentially drives $k_\\parallel = 0$ potential energy fluctuations, which then three-wave couple to $k_\\parallel \

  3. Design and initial results from a kilojoule level dense plasma focus with hollow anode and cylindrically symmetric gas puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.; Schmidt, A.; Guethlein, G.; Hawkins, S.; Rusnak, B.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and built a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinch device using a kJ-level capacitor bank and a hollow anode, and fueled by a cylindrically symmetric gas puff. Using this device, we have measured peak deuteron beam energies of up to 400 keV at 0.8 kJ capacitor bank energy and pinch lengths of ˜6 mm, indicating accelerating fields greater than 50 MV/m. Neutron yields of on the order of 107 per shot were measured during deuterium operation. The cylindrical gas puff system permitted simultaneous operation of DPF with a radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator for beam-into-plasma experiments. This paper describes the machine design, the diagnostic systems, and our first results.

  4. effect of the plasma ion channel on self-focusing of a Gaussian laser pulse in underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Irani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  We have considered the self-focusing of a Gaussian laser pulse in unmagnetized plasma. High-intensity electromagnetic fields cause the variation of electron density in plasma. These changes in the special conditions cause the acceleration of electrons to the higher energy and velocities. Thus the equation of plasma density evolution was obtained considering the electrons ponderomotive force. Then, an equation for the width of laser pulse with a relativistic mass correction term and the effect of ion channel were derived and the propagation of high-intensity laser pulse in an underdense plasma with weak relativistic approximation was investigated. It is shown that the ratio of ion channel radius to spot size could result in different forms of self focusing for the laser pulse in plasma.

  5. Diagnostic systems for the nuclear fusion and plasma research in the PF-24 plasma focus laboratory at the IFJ PAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciniak Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of diagnostics dedicated to PF-24 - new medium size - plasma focus (PF device built and operated at the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN. The PF-24 can operate at energy level up to 93 kJ and charging voltage up to 40 kV. Each condenser is connected with a specially designed spark gap with a very small jitter, which ensures a high effi ciency and a low current rise time. The working parameters of PF-24 generator make it a suitable tool for testing new detection systems to be used in fusion research. Four types of such detection systems are presented in this article: three diagnostic systems used to measure electric quantities (Rogowski coil, magnetic probe, capacitance probe, neutron counter based on beryllium activation, fast neutron pinhole camera based on small-area BCF-12 plastic scintillation detectors and high-speed four-frame soft X-ray camera with microchannel plate.

  6. Strong self-focusing of a cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magneto-plasma under plasma density ramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti, E-mail: nitikant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, G. T. Road, Phagwara, Punjab 144411 (India)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of plasma density ramp on self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam considering ponderomotive nonlinearity is analyzed using WKB and paraxial approximation. It is noticed that cosh-Gaussian laser beam focused earlier than Gaussian beam. The focusing and de-focusing nature of the cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter, intensity parameter, magnetic field, and relative density parameter has been studied and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter “b” plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam as for b=2.12, strong self-focusing is seen. Further, it is observed that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For b=2.12, with the increase in the value of magnetic field self-focusing effect, in case of extraordinary mode, becomes very strong under plasma density ramp. Present study may be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers. Moreover, plasma density ramp plays a vital role to enhance the self-focusing effect.

  7. Study of Magnetic Field Behavior at Lower Pressure of Neon in the Axial Phase of INTI Plasma Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K.A. Devi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic field distribution substantially affects mechanisms for the generation of radiation in Z-pinches. Investigation of the axial component of the magnetic field is one of the important problems in plasma focus studies. The designed magnetic probe is intended to use for the study of current sheet in INTI plasma focus device with energy of about 3.3 kJ. The measurements of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field on the INTI Plasma Focus operated at neon pressures below 1 Torr was carried out using a custom built calibrated magnetic probe. The probe was tested for neon gas under the various lower pressures (i.e., 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7, 1, 2, 3, 5 torr etc.. It is observed that the time response of the designed probe is sufficient for the rise time of the magnetic field associated with the current in the axial phase. We also note that the small size of the designed probe is well suited to sense the magnetic field without perturbing the plasma unduly. The probe designed and constructed is also suitable to carryout measurements to obtain axial distributions of trajectory, average axial velocity and magnetic field of the current sheath at a certain radial distances along the axis of the tube.

  8. Soft X-ray Emission Optimization Studies with Krypton and Xenon Gases in Plasma Focus Using Lee Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, Mohamad

    2013-10-01

    The X-ray emission properties of krypton and xenon plasmas are numerically investigated using corona plasma equilibrium model. Numerical experiments have been investigated on various low energy plasma focus devices with Kr and Xe filling gases using Lee model. The Lee model was applied to characterize and to find the optimum combination of soft X-ray yields (Ysxr) for krypton (~4 Å) and xenon (~3 Å) plasma focus. These combinations give Ysxr = 0.018 J for krypton, and Ysxr = 0.5 J for xenon. Scaling laws on Kr and Xe soft X-ray yields, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 2.8 to 900 kJ. Soft X-ray yields scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as and for Kr and Xe, respectively, (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The maximum soft X-ray yields are found to be about 0.5 and 27 J from krypton and xenon, respectively, for storage energy of 900 kJ. The optimum efficiencies for soft X-ray yields (0.0002 % for Kr) and (0.0047 % for Xe) are with capacitor bank energies of 67.5 and 225 kJ, respectively.

  9. Dense plasma focus research at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka (Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kisoda, A.; Yamada, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Yamanaka, C.

    1983-09-01

    Research using a 50 kV/50 kJ deuterium plasma focus with 1.25 MA maximum current is summarized. Plasma dynamics in implosion phase of dense plasma focus were investigated by 2nsec ruby laser holographic interferometry and shadowgraphy. Radial pinch velocity of the plasma column and ionizing front velocity are 20 million cm/sec. Rayleigh-Taylor instability is observed in the early stage of the implosion phase. Effects of CO2 laser light on a dense plasma focus are discussed. High energy deuteron intensity, energy spectrum, and angular distribution were measured from radioactivity induced in graphite, aliminum and copper in ion dominant low pressure mode and neutron dominant high pressure mode.

  10. On the history of plasma treatment and comparison of microbiostatic efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device with two modern devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napp, Judith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP with its many bioactive properties has defined a new medical field: the plasma medicine. However, in the related form of high-frequency therapy, CAP was even used briefly a century ago. The aim of this study was to review historic CAP treatments and to obtain data regarding the antimicrobial efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device.Methods: First, historic literature regarding the history of CAP treatment was evaluated, because in the modern literature no data were available. Second, the susceptibility of 5 different bacterial wound isolates, cultured on agar, to a historic plasma source (violet wand [VW] and two modern devices (atmospheric pressure plasma jet [APPJ] and Dielectric Barrier Discharge [DBD] was analyzed . The obtained inhibition areas (IA were compared.Results: First, the most convenient popular historical electromedical treatments produced a so-called effluvia by using glass electrodes, related to today’s CAP. Second, all three tested plasma sources showed complete eradication of all tested microbial strains in the treated area. The “historical” cold VW plasma showed antimicrobial effects similar to those of modern APPJ and DBD regarding the diameter of the IA.Conclusion: Some retrograde evidence may be deducted from this, especially for treatment of infectious diseases with historical plasma devices. The underlying technology may serve as model for construction of modern sucessive devices.

  11. Innovation in the development of plasma propulsion devices in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Dan R.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we review plasma propulsion development approach which focuses on innovation. We then bring the example of the state of Israel in general, and Rafael in particular, and show how it has adopted an innovative approach to develop a low power Hall thruster and a low current cathode. To present one special test-case of innovation we elaborate upon the development process of a heaterless hollow cathode that was developed at Rafael. In particular, by presenting the cathode characterization and wear test results we demonstrate that the heaterless cathode developed has a sufficiently wide operational range and may operate continuously for 1,500 hours without any measurable degradation in performance.

  12. Counter-facing plasma focus system as an efficient and long-pulse EUV light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, H.; Hayashi, K.; Kuroda, Y.; Nose, H.; Hotozuka, K.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2011-04-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and efficient EUV light source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrode. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time duration in at least ten microseconds for Xe plasma. Also, we confirmed operations of our system for Li plasma. We estimated the highest EUV energy in Li plasma operation at 93mJ/4π sr per 2% bandwidth per pulse.

  13. A Novel Continuously Initiated Polymerization by One-Atmosphere Low Temperature Plasma Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You qingliang; Meng yuedong; Wang jianhua; Ou qiongrong; Xu xu; Zhong shaofeng

    2005-01-01

    A novel atmospheric plasma device developed in this paper, which is more effective and convenient to study the plasma-initiated polymerization (PIP) than conventional setup. The structure and mechanism of the device is introduced. Some plasma-initiated polymerization experiments are carried out on the device, and the conversion of AA (Acrylic acid) and AM (Acryl amide) atmospheric (N2) plasma polymerization are respectively 89% and 94% after 120 h post polymerization, whereby IR spectra of the product (AA, AM). Our PIP result are confirmed.

  14. Electrowetting-controlled droplet generation in a microfluidic flow-focusing device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malloggi, F.G.J.; Vanapalli, Srinivas; Vanapalli Veera, V.S.A.R.; Gu, H.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2007-01-01

    We studied the generation of aqueous microdrops in an oil–water flow-focusing device with integrated insulator-covered electrodes that allow for continuous tuning of the water wettability by means of electrowetting. Depending on the oil and water inlet pressures three different operating conditions

  15. Microbubble formation and pinch-off scaling exponent in flow-focusing devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, van Wim; Dollet, Benjamin; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the gas jet breakup and the resulting microbubble formation in a microfluidic flow-focusing device using ultra high-speed imaging at 1 × 106 frames/s. In recent experiments [Dollet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 034504 (2008)], it was found that in the final stage of the collapse the r

  16. The Effect of Asterisks as an Attention Focusing Device on Test Performance of Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, David W.; Kerasotes, Dean L.

    It was hypothesized that using asterisks as attention focusing devices would cause students to read all asteriked test items more carefully and would improve test scores of undergraduate education students. Sixty-three undergraduates majoring in elementary or special education were administered a 36-item objective test. Asterisks were used to…

  17. Complex plasma experimental device – A test bed for studying dust vortices and other collective phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANJIT KAUR; SAYAK BOSE; P K CHATTOPADHYAY; J GHOSH; Y C SAXENA

    2016-12-01

    A typical device for carrying out sophisticated and complex dusty plasma experiments is designed, fabricated and made operational at the Institute for Plasma Research, India. The device is named as complex plasma experimental device (CPED). The main aim of this multipurpose machine is to study the formation and behaviour of dust vortices in the absence of external magnetic field under the effect of various plasma parameters. Further, the device is equipped with advanced imaging diagnostics for studying many other interesting phenomena such as dust oscillations, three-dimensional crystalline structures, dust rotation, etc. The device is quite flexible to accommodate many innovative experiments. Detailed design of the device, its diagnostics capabilities and theadvanced image analysis techniques are presented in this paper.

  18. The Dynamics of an Isolated Plasma Filament at the Edge of a Toroidal Device, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D

    2006-09-28

    The dynamics of an isolated plasma filament (an isolated blob) in the far scrape-off layer (SOL) of a toroidal device is described, with a proper averaging of the geometrical parameters as well as plasma parameters along the filament. The analysis is limited to the magnetohydrodynamic description. The effects of the anchored ends and finite plasma resistivity are also discussed.

  19. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 1021 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  20. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio, E-mail: komori@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than {approx} 1 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is {approx} 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  1. Influence of the Al wire placed in the anode axis on the transformation of the deuterium plasma column in the plasma focus discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Cikhardtova, B.; Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Zielinska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the influence of an Al wire of 270 μm in diameter placed along the anode axis on the transformation of the deuterium pinch column in a megaampere (MA) plasma focus device. The evolution of the pinched column and of the wire corona was investigated by means of the multiframe interferometry, neutron and X-ray diagnostics. The wire corona did not influence considerably on the evolution of dense plasma structures and neutron production, but it increased the plasma density and consequently, the currents around its surface. The distribution of the closed internal currents (ranging hundreds of kA) and associated magnetic fields amounting to 5 T were also estimated in the dense plasma column and in plasmoidal structures at the near-equilibrium state. The description is based on the balance of the plasma pressure and the pressure of the internal poloidal and toroidal current components compressed by the external pinched column. The dominant number of fusion deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutrons is produced during the evolution of instabilities, when the uninterrupted wire corona (containing deuterium) connects the dense structures of the pinch, and it did not allow the formation of a constriction of the sub-millimeter diameter.

  2. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  3. Neutron angular distribution in a plasma focus obtained using nuclear track detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Mejía, F; Herrera, J J E; Rangel, J; Golzarri, J I; Espinosa, G

    2002-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a coaxial plasma gun in which a high-density, high-temperature plasma is obtained in a focused column for a few nanoseconds. When the filling gas is deuterium, neutrons can be obtained from fusion reactions. These are partially due to a beam of deuterons which are accelerated against the background hot plasma by large electric fields originating from plasma instabilities. Due to a beam-target effect, the angular distribution of the neutron emission is anisotropic, peaked in the forward direction along the axis of the gun. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the use of CR-39 nuclear track detectors as a diagnostic tool in the determination of the time-integrated neutron angular distribution. For the case studied in this work, neutron emission is found to have a 70% contribution from isotropic radiation and a 30% contribution from anisotropic radiation.

  4. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, A., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Halvorson, C., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  5. Parabolic lithium mirror for a laser-driven hot plasma producing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.

    1979-06-19

    A hot plasma producing device is provided, wherein pellets, singly injected, of frozen fuel are each ignited with a plurality of pulsed laser beams. Ignition takes place within a void area in liquid lithium contained within a pressure vessel. The void in the liquid lithium is created by rotating the pressure vessel such that the free liquid surface of molten lithium therein forms a paraboloid of revolution. The paraboloid functions as a laser mirror with a reflectivity greater than 90%. A hot plasma is produced when each of the frozen deuterium-tritium pellets sequentially arrive at the paraboloid focus, at which time each pellet is illuminated by the plurality of pulsed lasers whose rays pass through circular annuli across the top of the paraboloid. The beams from the lasers are respectively directed by associated mirrors, or by means of a single conical mirror in another embodiment, and by the mirror-like paraboloid formed by the rotating liquid lithium onto the fuel pellet such that the optical flux reaching the pellet can be made to be uniform over 96% of the pellet surface area. The very hot plasma produced by the action of the lasers on the respective singly injected fuel pellets in turn produces a copious quantity of neutrons and X-rays such that the device has utility as a neutron source or as an x-ray source. In addition, the neutrons produced in the device may be utilized to produce tritium in a lithium blanket and is thus a mechanism for producing tritium.

  6. Impurity screening and edge-plasma modifications for plasma devices with liquid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, Thomas D.

    2001-10-01

    The edge-plasma region of magnetic fusion confinement devices plays various important roles, two of which are (1), shielding the core plasma from gas and impurities, and (2), influencing the core-boundary plasma temperature and density. The first role is crucial to the successful use of liquid walls, and the second role, if controllable, could enhance core energy confinement by reducing drives for core turbulence. In fusion reactors, liquid walls would allow higher wall power-loading, and sufficiently thick walls would greatly reduce neutron activation of support structures.(R.W. Moir, Nucl. Fusion 37), 557 (1997); M. Abdou, et al., Fusion Eng. Design 54, 181 (2001). In addition, liquid divertors could largely eliminate the surface erosion problem.(J.N. Brooks, et al.), J. Nucl. Mater. 290-293, 185 (2001.); R.F. Mattas, et al., Fusion Eng. Design 49-50, 127 (2000). In this talk, results of self-consistent, 2-D edge transport simulations are presented to quantify the allowable influx of liquid-wall vapor for various candidate liquids (Li, Flibe, SnLi, Sn) which, in turn, set the allowable surface operating temperatures that controls the vapor evaporation rates. The results are explained and summarized by a reduced model that includes the radiation characteristics of different impurity species, and the competition between anomalous radial transport and parallel flow along the B-field. The modification of the edge plasma properties by liquid walls is also presented, with an emphasis on the low-recycling regime thought possible by the use of lithium, which naturally leads to a high edge-temperature regime. The effect of long mean-free-path parallel transport in the high-temperature regime is described by the bounce-averaged, particle- and energy-loss model.

  7. Neutron production with mixture of deuterium and krypton in Sahand Filippov type plasma focus facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M.A., E-mail: mohammadidorbash@yahoo.com [Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sobhanian, S. [Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rawat, R.S. [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2011-08-01

    This Letter reports the order of magnitude enhancement in neutron yield from Sahand plasma focus device with krypton seeded deuterium operation. The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10{sup 9} neutrons per shot was achieved at 1.00 Torr deuterium with 3% krypton which is higher than the best average neutron yield of 3.18x10{sup 8} neutrons per shot for pure deuterium operation. Estimation of average neutron energy showed that the maximum and minimum average energies are 2.98±0.6 MeV at 16 kV in 0.25 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr and 2.07±0.2 MeV at 18 kV operation in 0.5 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr, respectively. The anisotropy of neutron emission from Sahand DPF showed that the neutrons are produced mainly by beam-target mechanisms. -- Highlights: → The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10{sup 9} neutrons per shot was achieved at mixture of deuterium and krypton. → In the krypton seeding of deuterium also anisotropy of neutron emission deuterium is found. → The krypton seeding of deuterium made the neutron emission more reliable over wider operating pressure ranges.

  8. Low-Energy Plasma Focus as a Tailored X-Ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaullah, M.; Alamgir, K.; Shafiq, M.; Sharif, M.; Waheed, A.; Murtaza, G.

    2000-06-01

    A low-energy (2.3 kJ) plasma focus energized by a single 32-μF capacitor charged at 12 kV with filling gases hydrogen, neon, and argon is investigated as an X-ray source. Experiments are conducted with a copper and an aluminum anode. Specifically, attention is given to tailoring the radiation in different windows, e.g., 1.2-1.3 keV, 1.3-1.5 keV, 2.5-5 keV, and Cu-Kα line radiation. The highest X-ray emission is observed with neon filling and the copper anode in the 1.2-1.3 keV window, which we speculate to be generated due to recombination of hydrogenlike neon ions with a few eV to a few 10s of eV electrons. The wall-plug efficiency of the device is found to be 4%. The other significant emission occurs with hydrogen filling, which exhibits wall-plug efficiency of 1.7% for overall X-ray emission and 0.35% for Cu-Kα line radiation. The emission is dominated by the interaction of electrons in the current sheath with the anode tip. The emission with the aluminum anode and hydrogen filling is up to 10 J, which corresponds to wall-plug efficiency of 0.4%. The X-ray emission with argon filling is less significant.

  9. In-situ and non-destructive focus determination device for high-precision laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Naghilou, Aida; Pöhl, Hannes; Kautek, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A non-destructive, in-line, and low-cost focusing device based on an image sensor has been developed and demonstrated. It allows an in situ focus determination for a broad variety of laser types (e.g. cw and pulsed lasers). It provides stringent focusing conditions with high numerical apertures. This approach does not require sub-picosecond and/or auxiliary lasers, or high fluences above damage thresholds. Applications of this system include, but are not limited to the laser-illumination of micro-electrodes, pump-probe microscopy on thin films, and laser ablation of small samples without sufficient surface area for focus determination by ablation. An uncertainty of the focus position by an order of magnitude less than the respective Rayleigh length could be demonstrated.

  10. New linear plasma devices in the trilateral euregio cluster for an integrated approach to plasma surface interactions in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterberg, B., E-mail: b.unterberg@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM- Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Jaspers, R. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koch, R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas/Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Association, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Massaut, V. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, EURATOM-Association, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Rapp, J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Reiter, D.; Kraus, S.; Kreter, A.; Philipps, V.; Reimer, H.; Samm, U.; Scheibl, L.; Schweer, B. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM- Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Schuurmans, J.; Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, EURATOM-Association, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Al, R.; Berg, M.A. van den; Brons, S.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Goedheer, W.J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    New linear plasma devices are currently being constructed or planned in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC) to meet the challenges with respect to plasma surface interactions in DEMO and ITER: i) MAGNUM-PSI (FOM), a high particle and power flux device with super-conducting magnetic field coils which will reach ITER-like divertor conditions at high magnetic field, ii) the newly proposed linear plasma device JULE-PSI (FZJ), which will allow to expose toxic and neutron activated target samples to ITER-like fluences and ion energies including in vacuo analysis of neutron activated samples, and iii) the plasmatron VISION I, a compact plasma device which will be operated inside the tritium lab at SCK-CEN Mol, capable to investigate tritium plasmas and moderately activated wall materials. This contribution shows the capabilities of the new devices and their forerunner experiments (Pilot-PSI at FOM and PSI-2 Juelich at FZJ) in view of the main objectives of the new TEC program on plasma surface interactions.

  11. A two-dimensionally focusing, quasi-optical antenna for millimeter-wave scattering in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idehara, T.; Tatsukawa, T. (Faculty of Engineering, Fukui University, Fukui 910, Japan (JP)); Brand, G.F.; Fekete, P.W.; Moore, K.J. (School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia))

    1990-06-01

    A two-dimensionally focusing, quasi-optical antenna having one elliptical reflector and one parabolic reflector has been built for use with a tunable gyrotron in order to carry out millimeter-wave scattering measurements on the TORTUS tokamak plasma at the University of Sydney. The advantages of this antenna are the following: (1) The elliptical reflector focuses the radiation beam in the toroidal direction, while the parabolic reflector focuses in the direction of major radius. This gives excellent two-dimensional focusing in the plasma region, and consequently excellent spatial resolution. (2) The focal point can be easily swept along the direction of major radius in the whole plasma region, simply by changing the angle of the parabolic reflector by a small amount. These features have been demonstrated experimentally using the tunable gyrotron source, GYROTRON III, and in computations of the radiated fields.

  12. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and...

  13. Description of plasma focus current sheath as the Turner relaxed state of a Hall magnetofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2009-12-01

    The central mystery of plasma focus research is the two orders-of-magnitude-higher-than-thermal fusion reaction rate and the fact that both the space-resolved neutron spectra and space-resolved reaction proton spectra show features which can be ascribed only to a rotational motion of the center-of-mass of the reacting deuteron population. It has been suggested earlier [S. K. H. Auluck, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 25, 37 (1997)] that this and other experimental observations can be consistently explained in terms of a hypothesis involving rotation of the current carrying plasma annulus behind the imploding gas-dynamic shock. Such rotation (more generally, mass flow) is an in-built feature of relaxed state of a two-fluid plasma [R. N. Sudan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 1277 (1979)]. Relaxation in the "Hall magnetofluid" approximation, in which the generalized Ohm's law includes the Hall effect term and the magnetic convection term but omits the contributions to the electric field from resistive dissipation, electron pressure gradient, thermoelectric effect, electron inertia, etc., has been extensively studied by many authors. In the present paper, Turner's [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 849 (1986)] degenerate solution for the relaxed state of the Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasma has been adapted to the case of an infinitely long annular current carrying plasma, a tractable idealization of the current sheath of a plasma focus. The resulting model is consistent with experimental values of ion kinetic energy and observation of predominantly radially directed neutron emission in good shots.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Moreno; Marisa Gaspar Carreño; Jose María Alonso Herreros; Jose Antonio Romero Garrido; Piedad López-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Propose: To describe PRP extraction devices, through a review of kits available in Spain, taking into account AEMPS and SEFH working groups (GPS, Farmacotecnia, Hemoderivados groups) contributions. Methods: Three independent searches about PRP extraction devices were carried out. Device suppliers were contacted and an individually meeting was called with each one. Characteristics of each device was reviewed by virtual demonstration. A kits comparison chart was made with all the informatio...

  15. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  16. Fabrication and Operation of Acoustofluidic Devices Supporting Bulk Acoustic Standing Waves for Sheathless Focusing of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, C. Wyatt; Cruz, Daniela F.; Ohiri, Korine A.; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Lopez, Gabriel P.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustophoresis refers to the displacement of suspended objects in response to directional forces from sound energy. Given that the suspended objects must be smaller than the incident wavelength of sound and the width of the fluidic channels are typically tens to hundreds of micrometers across, acoustofluidic devices typically use ultrasonic waves generated from a piezoelectric transducer pulsating at high frequencies (in the megahertz range). At characteristic frequencies that depend on the geometry of the device, it is possible to induce the formation of standing waves that can focus particles along desired fluidic streamlines within a bulk flow. Here, we describe a method for the fabrication of acoustophoretic devices from common materials and clean room equipment. We show representative results for the focusing of particles with positive or negative acoustic contrast factors, which move towards the pressure nodes or antinodes of the standing waves, respectively. These devices offer enormous practical utility for precisely positioning large numbers of microscopic entities (e.g., cells) in stationary or flowing fluids for applications ranging from cytometry to assembly. PMID:27022681

  17. Calibration of an automated California mastitis test with focus on the device-dependent variation

    OpenAIRE

    Neitzel, Anne-Christin; Stamer, Eckhard; Junge, Wolfgang; Thaller, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to estimate the accuracy of the metrology of an installed indirect on-line sensor system based on the automated California Mastitis Test (CMT) with focus on the prior established device-dependent variation. A sensor calibration was implemented. Therefore, seven sensors were tested with similar trials on the dairy research farm Karkendamm (Germany) on two days in July 2011 and January 2012. Thereby, 18 mixed milk samples from serial dilutions were fourfold recorded at ...

  18. On the Self-Focusing of Whistler Waves in a Radial Inhomogeneous Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balmashnov, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The process of whistler wave self-focusing is experimentally investigated. It was found that a whistler wave propagating along the plasma column with a density crest excites a longitudinal wave of the same frequency propagating across the external magnetic field. The amplitude modulation...... of the latter wave is accompanied by a density modification, which leads to trapping of the whistler wave in a density trough in the center of the plasma column....

  19. Global parameter optimization of a Mather-type plasma focus in the framework of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional snowplow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) is known to produce highly energetic ions, electrons and plasma environment which can be used for breeding short-lived isotopes, plasma nanotechnology and other material processing applications. Commercial utilization of DPF in such areas would need a design tool that can be deployed in an automatic search for the best possible device configuration for a given application. The recently revisited (Auluck 2013 Phys. Plasmas 20 112501) Gratton-Vargas (GV) two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus provides a numerical formula for dynamic inductance of a Mather-type plasma focus fitted to thousands of automated computations, which enables the construction of such a design tool. This inductance formula is utilized in the present work to explore global optimization, based on first-principles optimality criteria, in a four-dimensional parameter-subspace of the zero-resistance GV model. The optimization process is shown to reproduce the empirically observed constancy of the drive parameter over eight decades in capacitor bank energy. The optimized geometry of plasma focus normalized to the anode radius is shown to be independent of voltage, while the optimized anode radius is shown to be related to capacitor bank inductance.

  20. Reciprocating free-flow isoelectric focusing device for preparative separation of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan-Zhi; Yang, Ying; Wang, Yi; Li, Guo-Qing; Li, Shan; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Liu, Shao-Rong; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2015-11-27

    The traditional recycling free-flow isoelectric focusing (RFFIEF) suffered from complex structure, tedious operations and poor extensibility as well as high cost. To address these issues, a novel reciprocating free-flow isoelectric focusing device (ReFFIEF) was developed for proteins or peptides pre-fractionation. In the new device, a reciprocating background flow was for the first time introduced into free flow electrophoresis (FFE) system. The gas cushion injector (GCI) used in the previous continuous free-flow electrophoresis (CFFE) was redesigned for the reciprocating background flow. With the GCI, the reciprocating background flow could be achieved between the GCI, separation chamber and transient self-balance collector (tSBC). In a run, process fluid flowed to and from, forming a stable reciprocating fluid flow in the separation chamber. A pH gradient was created within the separation chamber, and at the same time proteins were focused repeatedly when passing through the chamber under perpendicular electric field. The ReFFIEF procedure was optimized for fractionations of three model proteins, and the optimized method was further used for pre-fractionation of model human serum samples. As compared with the traditional RFFIEF devices developed about 25 years ago, the new ReFFIEF system showed several merits, such as simple design and structure, user-friendly operation and easy to extend as well as low cost.

  1. Electron Temperature Measurement Using PIN Diodes as Detectors to Record the X-ray Pulses from a Low-Energy Mather-Type Plasma Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Asif; Amna Ikram

    2004-01-01

    In the experiment to determine the plasma electron temperature, a modified multichannel PIN diodes assembly is used as detectors to record the X-ray pulses from a low-energy Mather-type plasma focus device energized by a 32μF, 15 kV (3.6 k J) single capacitor, with deuterium as a filling gas. The ratio of the integrated bremsstrahlung emission transmitting through foils to the total incident flux as a function of foil thickness at various temperatures is obtained for foil absorbers of material. Using 3μm, 6μm, 9μm,12μm,15μm and 18μm thick aluminium absorbers, the transmitted X-ray flux is detected. By comparing the experimental and theoretical curves through a computer program, the plasma electron temperature is determined. Results show that the deuterium focus plasma electron temperature is about 800 eV.

  2. DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETRON AND PULSED-LASER PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Burmakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modifications of complex pulsed laser and magnetron deposition thin-film structures unit are presented. They include joint and separate variants of layer deposition. Unit realizes the plasma parameters control and enhances the possibility of laser-plasma and magnetron methods of coatings deposition.

  3. Fine structure of modal focusing effect in a three dimensional plasma-sheath-lens formed by disk electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Yamaguchi, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Modal and discrete focusing effects associated with three-dimensional plasma-sheath-lenses show promising potential for applications in ion beam extraction, mass spectrometry, plasma diagnostics and for basic studies of plasma sheath. The ion focusing properties can be adjusted by controlling the...

  4. Intricate Plasma-Scattered Images and Spectra of Focused Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Talib, Md. Ridzuan

    2016-08-01

    We report on some interesting phenomena in the focusing and scattering of femtosecond laser pulses in free space that provide insights on intense laser plasma interactions. The scattered image in the far field is analyzed and the connection with the observed structure of the plasma at the focus is discussed. We explain the physical mechanisms behind the changes in the colorful and intricate image formed by scattering from the plasma for different compressions, as well as orientations of plano-convex lens. The laser power does not show significant effect on the images. The pulse repetition rate above 500 Hz can affect the image through slow dynamics The spectrum of each color in the image shows oscillatory peaks due to interference of delayed pulse that correlate with the plasma length. Spectral lines of atomic species are identified and new peaks are observed through the white light emitted by the plasma spot. We find that an Ar gas jet can brighten the white light of the plasma spot and produce high resolution spectral peaks. The intricate image is found to be extremely sensitive and this is useful for applications in sensing microscale objects.

  5. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanilav

    2016-11-15

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and the electronic waste as a real waste. The process of polyethylene decomposition showed that the operation of the device is correct because 99.74% of carbon moles contained in the PE samples was detected in the gas after the process. Thus, the PE samples practically were pyrolyzed completely to hydrocarbons, which were completely oxidized in the plasma reactor. It turned out that the device is useful for decomposition of the electronic waste. The conditions in the plasma reactor during the oxidation process of the pyrolysis products did not promote the formation of PCDD/Fs despite the presence of the oxidizing conditions. An important parameter determining the efficiency of the oxidation of the pyrolysis products is gas temperature in the plasma reactor.

  6. Production of high transient heat and particle fluxes in a linear plasma device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Zielinski, J. J.; van der Meiden, H.; Melissen, W.; Rapp, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the generation of high transient heat and particle fluxes in a linear plasma device by pulsed operation of the plasma source. A capacitor bank is discharged into the source to transiently increase the discharge current up to 1.7 kA, allowing peak densities and temperature of 70x10(20) m

  7. Laser Plasmas : Lie-optic matrix algorithm for computer simulation of paraxial self-focusing in a plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Subbarao; R Uma; Kamal Goyal; Sanjeev Goyal; Karuna Batra

    2000-11-01

    Propagation algorithm for computer simulation of stationary paraxial self-focusing laser beam in a medium with saturating nonlinearity is given in Lie-optic form. Accordingly, a very natural piece-wise continuous Lie transformation that reduces to a restricted Lorentz group of the beam results. It gives rise to a matrix method for self-focusing beam propagation that is constructed and implemented. Although the results use plasma nonlinearities of saturable type, and a gaussian initial beam, these results are applicable for other media like linear optical fibers and to more general situations.

  8. Time-resolved spectra of dense plasma focus using spectrometer, streak camera, and CCD combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldin, F. J. [Livermore Operations, National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [North Las Vegas Facility, National Security Technologies, LLC, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilkins, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny-Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  9. Time-Resolved Spectra of Dense Plasma Focus Using Spectrometer, Streak Camera, CCD Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. J. Goldin, B. T. Meehan, E. C. Hagen, P. R. Wilkins

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny–Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  10. Self-Focusing/Defocusing of Chirped Gaussian Laser Beam in Collisional Plasma with Linear Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Manzoor Ahmad; Kant, Niti

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the self-focusing/defocusing of chirped Gaussian laser beam in collisional plasma with linear absorption. We have derived the differential equation for the beam width parameter by using WKB and paraxial approximations and solved it numerically. The effect of chirp and other laser plasma parameters is seen on the behavior of beam width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation. The results are discussed and presented graphically. Our simulation results show that the amplitude of oscillations decreases with the distance of propagation. Due to collisional frequency, the laser beam shows fast divergence which can be minimized by the introduction of chirp parameter. The chirp decreases the effect of defocusing and increases the ability of self-focusing of laser beam in collisional plasma. Supported by a financial grant from CSIR, New Delhi, India, under Project No. 03(1277)/13/EMR-II

  11. Magnetic properties of ultrathin CO/Pt multilayer Hall devices irradiated using focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K., E-mail: K.Wang@hqu.edu.cn [College of Information Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen City 361021 (China); Huang, Y.; Qiu, Y.Z.; Chen, R.F. [College of Information Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen City 361021 (China); Heard, P. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS2 1TL (United Kingdom); Bending, S. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    A ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer was lithographically patterned into 10-μm-wide Hall devices. The anisotropy of the fabricated devices was modified using focused ion beam (FIB). Extraordinary Hall effect (EHE) measurements reveal pronounced reduction in nucleation field of the perpendicular loops at room temperature. At low temperature of 4.2 K reduced remanent ratios in EHE loops were observed, indicating a tilting of easy magnetic axis. The canting magnetization can be explained by an increasing magnetic moment at low temperatures and a reduced anisotropy by irradiation. The aperture angles were estimated to be in the range of 20–32° at 4.2 K. The aperture angle of the easy cone of magnetization was found to increase with doses at low temperatures.

  12. Comparison of technologies for nano device prototyping with a special focus on ion beams: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhaus, L.; Mazarov, P.; Bischoff, L.; Gierak, J.; Wieck, A. D.; Hövel, H.

    2017-03-01

    Nano device prototyping (NDP) is essential for realizing and assessing ideas as well as theories in the form of nano devices, before they can be made available in or as commercial products. In this review, application results patterned similarly to those in the semiconductor industry (for cell phone, computer processors, or memory) will be presented. For NDP, some requirements are different: thus, other technologies are employed. Currently, in NDP, for many applications direct write Gaussian vector scan electron beam lithography (EBL) is used to define the required features in organic resists on this scale. We will take a look at many application results carried out by EBL, self-organized 3D epitaxy, atomic probe microscopy (scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope), and in more detail ion beam techniques. For ion beam techniques, there is a special focus on those based upon liquid metal (alloy) ion sources, as recent developments have significantly increased their applicability for NDP.

  13. Ion beam extraction from a matrix ECR plasma source by discrete ion-focusing effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Draghici, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    Positive or negative ion beams extracted from plasma are used in a large variety of surface functionalization techniques such as implantation, etching, surface activation, passivation or oxidation. Of particular importance is the surface treatment of materials sensitive to direct plasma exposure...... due to high heath fluxes, the controllability of the ion incidence angle, and charge accumulation when treating insulating materials. Despite of a large variety of plasma sources available for ion beam extraction, there is a clear need for new extraction mechanisms that can make available ion beams...... with high current densities that can treat surfaces placed adjacent to the extraction region. This work introduces a new phenomenology for ion beam extraction using the discrete ion-focusing effect associated with three-dimensional plasma-sheath-lenses [1, 2]. Experiments are performed in a matrix...

  14. Self-Focusing of Hermite-Cosh-Gaussian Laser Beams in Plasma under Density Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor Ahmad Wani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-focusing of Hermite-Cosh-Gaussian (HChG laser beam in plasma under density transition has been discussed here. The field distribution in the medium is expressed in terms of beam-width parameters and decentered parameter. The differential equations for the beam-width parameters are established by a parabolic wave equation approach under paraxial approximation. To overcome the defocusing, localized upward plasma density ramp is considered, so that the laser beam is focused on a small spot size. Plasma density ramp plays an important role in reducing the defocusing effect and maintaining the focal spot size up to several Rayleigh lengths. To discuss the nature of self-focusing, the behaviour of beam-width parameters with dimensionless distance of propagation for various values of decentered parameters is examined by numerical estimates. The results are presented graphically and the effect of plasma density ramp and decentered parameter on self-focusing of the beams has been discussed.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Moreno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Propose: To describe PRP extraction devices, through a review of kits available in Spain, taking into account AEMPS and SEFH working groups (GPS, Farmacotecnia, Hemoderivados groups contributions. Methods: Three independent searches about PRP extraction devices were carried out. Device suppliers were contacted and an individually meeting was called with each one. Characteristics of each device was reviewed by virtual demonstration. A kits comparison chart was made with all the information acquired. Kits were classified as Closed-Technique and Opened- Technique in accordance with the AEMPS technical committee report. Results: Ten devices were found: ACP®; Angel®, Cascade®, Endoret ®, GPS®, Magellan®, Minos®, Ortho-pras®, Smart-prepr® and Tricell®. However, we could found out the mechanism in detail of seven of them. Information about Cascade®, Magellan ® and Smart-prepr® kits was not enough. Conclusion: The review provided the main PRP extraction devices available with CE marking and its distinguishing characteristics, however, it is crucial to pay attention to PRP extraction procedure and administration, to guarantee the final product quality. Pharmacy Department must get involved in the device selections due to the close link with the manufactured drug quality. Working together with the AEMPS will contribute to defining extraction procedure specifically.

  16. Out-of-focus effects on microscale schlieren measurements of mass transport in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Tuan; Sun, Chen-li

    2016-08-01

    The microscale schlieren technique provides a means for a non-invasive, full-field measurement for mixing microfluidics with excellent sensitivity and resolution. Nevertheless, an out-of-focus effect due to microscopic optics may lead to undesirable errors in quantifying the gradient information at high degrees of magnification. If the channel in the microfluidic device under study is too deep, light deflection caused by inhomogeneity located far from the focal plane may contributes little to the intensity change on the image plane. To address this issue, we propose the use of a weighting function that approximates a Gaussian profile with an optical-system-dependable width. We assume that the resultant intensity change is proportional to a weighted sum of the gradient across the channel depth and acquire micro-schlieren images of fluid mixing in a T-junction microchannel at various positions along the optical axis. For each objective, the width of the weighting function is then determined iteratively by curve fitting the ratio of changes in grayscale readouts for out-of-focus and focus micro-schlieren images. The standard deviation in the Gaussian distribution facilitates the quantification of the out-of-focus effect. In addition, we measure the sensitivities of a microscale schlieren system equipped with different objectives and compare the values to the model. Despite its better resolution, we find that an objective with higher magnification suffers from a more severe out-of-focus effect and a loss of sensitivity. Equations are proposed for estimations of the standard deviation and the sensitivity of microscale schlieren measurements. The outcome will facilitate the selection of proper microchannel depths for various microscale schlieren systems or vice versa, thus improving the precision of micro-schlieren measurements in microfluidic devices.

  17. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertazzi, B., E-mail: bruno.albertazzi@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); D' Humières, E. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lancia, L.; Antici, P. [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: Julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Böcker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O. [Institut für Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Bonlie, J.; Cauble, B.; Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Chen, S. N. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sentoku, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  18. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, D. [Research Center Jülich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Ohno, N. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Vela, L. [Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911-Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  19. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  20. Collaborative Research: Fundamental studies of plasma control using surface embedded electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); PanneerChelvam, PremKumar [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Levko, Dimtry [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-02-26

    The proposed study will investigate the effect of active electron injection of from electrode surfaces To the best of our knowledge, no such a study has ever been attempted even though it could lead to the formation of whole new classes of plasma based devices and systems. We are motivated by recent articles and simple theory which gives strong reason to believe that embedded electronic devices can be used to exert control over the SEE coefficient of semiconductor surfaces (and maybe other surface types as well). Furthermore, the research will explore how such sub-surface electronic devices can best be used to exert control over an associated plasma.

  1. The Dense Plasma Focus Opportunities in Detection of Hidden Objects by Using Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V.; Dubrovsky, A.; Karpiński, L.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; StrzyŻewski, P.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-12-01

    Dense Plasma Focus device is proposed for use as a neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration. Our devices PF-6, recently put into operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland, and PF-10 belonging to the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia, have energy storages in its capacitor banks 7.4 kJ and 13 kJ as a maximum. Operated with the DPF chambers of a special design they have a current maximum up to ˜760 kA with a quarter period of the discharge equal to 1 microsecond. They generate circa 109 of 2.5-MeV neutrons in one pulse of ≅ 10-ns duration when working with deuterium, what permit to expect 1011 14-MeV neutrons at their operation with DT-mixture. This feature gives a principal possibility to create a "single-shot detection system" for interrogation of hidden objects. It means that all necessary information will be received during a single bright pulse of neutrons having duration in a nanosecond range by means of the time-of-flight technique with a short flight base. It might be a base for the creation of the Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS). These characteristics of the neutron source open a number of opportunities while interrogation time in this case would now depend only on the data-processing system.

  2. Shape reconstruction of merging spherical tokamak plasma in UTST device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiki, Tomohiko; Itagaki, Masafumi; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    Spherical tokamak (ST) merging method is one of the ST start-up methods which heats the plasma through magnetic reconnection. In the present study reconstruction of eddy current profile and plasma shape was performed during spherical tokamak merging only using external sensor signals by the Cauchy condition surface (CCS) method. CCS method have been implemented for JT-60 (QST), QUEST (Kyushu University), KSTAR (NFRI), RELAX (KIT), and LHD (Nifs). In this method, CCS was assumed inside each plasmas, where both flux function and its normal derivative are unknown. Effect of plasma current was replaced by the boundary condition of CCS, assuming vacuum field everywhere. Also, the nodal points for the boundary integrals of eddy current density were set using quadratic elements in order to express the complicated vacuum vessel shape. Reconstructed profiles of the eddy current and the magnetic flux were well coincided with the reference in each phase of merging process. Magnetic sensor installation plan for UTST was determined from these calculation results. This work was supported by the JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus''.

  3. Submicron focusing of XUV radiation from a laser plasma source using a multilayer Laue lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, M.; Schäfer, B.; Großmann, P.; Bayer, A.; Mann, K.; Liese, T.; Krebs, H. U.

    2011-01-01

    The focusing properties of a one-dimensional multilayer Laue lens (MLL) were investigated using monochromatic soft X-ray radiation from a table-top, laser-produced plasma source. The MLL was fabricated by a focused ion beam (FIB) structuring of pulsed laser deposited ZrO2/Ti multilayers. This novel method offers the potential to overcome limitations encountered in electron lithographic processes. Utilizing this multilayer Laue lens, a line focus of XUV radiation from a laser-induced plasma in a nitrogen gas puff target could be generated. The evaluated focal length is close to the designed value of 220 μm for the measurement wavelength of 2.88 nm. Divergence angle and beam waist diameter are measured by a moving knife edge and a far-field experiment, determining all relevant second-order moments based beam parameters. The waist diameter has been found to be approximately 370 nm (FWHM).

  4. Performance study of microfluidic devices for blood plasma separation—a designer’s perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Siddhartha; Bala Varun Kumar, Y. V.; Prabhakar, Amit; Joshi, Suhas S.; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-08-01

    In this work, design and experiments on various blood plasma microdevices based on hydrodynamic flow separation techniques is carried out. We study their performance as a function of dependent governing parameters such as flow rate, feed hematocrit, and microchannel geometry. This work focuses on understanding separation phenomena in simple geometries; subsequently, individual simple geometrical parameters and biophysical effects are combined to fabricate hybridized designs, resulting in higher separation efficiencies. The distinctive features of our microfluidic devices are that they employ elevated dimensions (of the order of hundreds of microns), and thereby can be operated continuously over sufficient duration without clogging, while simplicity of fabrication makes them cost effective. The microdevices have been experimentally demonstrated over the entire range of hematocrit (i.e. from Hct 7% to Hct 45%). A high separation efficiency of about (78.34  ±  2.7)% with pure blood is achieved in our best hybrid design. We believe that the theory and experimental results presented in this study will aid designers and researchers working in the field of blood plasma separation microdevices.

  5. Experimental Assessment of Plasma Transport in a 16-cm Multicusp Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Aimee; Foster, John

    2012-10-01

    The physics of plasma transport from the bulk plasma through the magnetic cusp to the anode remains poorly understood. A proper accounting of plasma losses to the anode is critical to accurate modeling of multicusp device performance. In this work, plasma transport in a 16-cm multicusp discharge chamber was studied. Each ring was covered with an electrically isolated electrode, which enables the direct measurement of current to each individual ring as well as the discharge chamber wall. A translatable Langmuir probe was used to obtain maps of spatially resolved plasma parameters in bulk plasma region. These maps of spatially resolved plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential were compared to current collection at the cusps as well as the magnetic circuit and device performance. Ring electrode measurements coupled with spatially resolved plasma parameter measurements throughout the discharge chamber allow for an assessment of plasma losses to each ring in terms of an ``effective loss area'' which, multiplied by electron current density incident on the bulk/cusp boundary, gives the correct collected current to each ring. A relationship between effective loss area and the physical loss area was determined that can be applied to a 0-D particle and energy balance model.

  6. High heat flux capabilities of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Temmerman, G., E-mail: g.c.detemmerman@differ.nl; Berg, M.A. van den; Scholten, J.; Lof, A.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Eck, H.J.N. van; Morgan, T.W.; Kruijf, T.M. de; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Zielinski, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is an advanced linear plasma device uniquely capable of producing plasma conditions similar to those expected in the divertor of ITER both steady-state and transients. The machine is designed both for fundamental studies of plasma–surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes, and as a high-heat flux facility for the tests of plasma-facing components under realistic plasma conditions. To study the effects of transient heat loads on a plasma-facing surface, a novel pulsed plasma source system as well as a high power laser is available. In this article, we will describe the capabilities of Magnum-PSI for high-heat flux tests of plasma-facing materials.

  7. Effectiveness of ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems for terminal room decontamination: Focus on clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Anderson, Deverick J; Chen, Luke F; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Boyce, John M

    2016-05-02

    Over the last decade, substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that indicates contamination of environmental surfaces in hospital rooms plays an important role in the transmission of key health care-associated pathogens (eg, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter spp). For example, a patient admitted to a room previously occupied by a patient colonized or infected with one of these pathogens has a higher risk for acquiring one of these pathogens than a patient admitted to a room whose previous occupant was not colonized or infected. This risk is not surprising because multiple studies have demonstrated that surfaces in hospital rooms are poorly cleaned during terminal cleaning. To reduce surface contamination after terminal cleaning, no touch methods of room disinfection have been developed. This article will review the no touch methods, ultraviolet light devices, and hydrogen peroxide systems, with a focus on clinical trials which have used patient colonization or infection as an outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet light devices and hydrogen peroxide systems have been shown to inactivate microbes experimentally plated on carrier materials and placed in hospital rooms and to decontaminate surfaces in hospital rooms naturally contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens. A growing number of clinical studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems when used for terminal disinfection can reduce colonization or health care-associated infections in patients admitted to these hospital rooms.

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of inertial gases admixtures influence on the hard x-ray emission of plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the influence of inertial gases admixtures (Ar, Kr, Xe) to deuterium in plasma focus (PF) chambers. Experiments were realized in PF chambers with discharge currents of 350, 650 and 1000 kA. The measurements of the hard x-ray (HXR) emission were carried out by the scintillation detector SSDI38 with time resolution of 2.5 ns. Experiments show the existence of optimum amount of inertial gases, which corresponds with the atomic number of added gas. At the optimum amount of inertial gas and deuterium in PF chamber, the HXR yield rises up to 10 times in comparison with HXR yield only for deuterium filling. This work shows the dependence of HXR emission on PF device stored energy. The mechanism of inertial gases admixtures influence that leads to rise of HXR yield has been discussed. The mechanism concerns with different behavior of deuterium ions and ions of inertial gases during the pinch decay phase when the discharge current compression force has reduced. Inertial gas ions locate near the axis of the pinch and deuterium ions go to the near plasma area. Local positive charge in plasma forms on this axis because of multiply charged ions of inertial gases. Then electrons gather to the axis area and electron density increases. This electrons form high current electron beam under the influence of the induced electromotive force during the pinch decay phase. HXR emission is generated after the electron beam interaction with the anode target in PF chamber.

  9. Electrowetting-induced drop generation and control in a microfluidic flow-focusing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloggi, Florent; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Gu, Hao; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2007-11-01

    Recent upsurge in droplet-based microfluidic research is fueled by the potential application of drops as well-controlled environments for biochemical reactions, single cell analysis and fluid logical devices. Commonly pressure driven flows are used to create droplets continuously either in a flow-focusing or in T-junction geometry. While this approach provides high throughput capability, it is neither amenable to detailed on-demand generation of individual drops nor to dynamic control of surface wettability, which can dramatically affect the dynamics of two-phase microflows. Alternatively, electrowetting (EW)-on-dielectric is used to digitally manipulate drops. The EW provides exquisite control over individual drops and surface wettability. However, current implementations have low throughput and cannot readily be integrated with existing channel-based technologies. Here, we adopt a unified approach to create a soft microfluidic platform that harvests the power of both methods and offers the capability to address their limitations. We achieve this integration by incorporating EW into a flow-focusing device and demonstrate EW-controlled drop formation. We identify experimentally the range of voltages and driving pressures that yields EW-induced droplet generation. A theoretical description based on the balance of external pressures and voltage-controlled capillary pressures quantitatively accounts for the observations. Moreover we show that the smaller the geometric scales the more efficient the electrowetting control of drop generation.

  10. Focused ion beam techniques for fabricating geometrically-complex components and devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Adams, David Price; Hodges, V. Carter; Vasile, Michael J.

    2004-03-01

    We have researched several new focused ion beam (FIB) micro-fabrication techniques that offer control of feature shape and the ability to accurately define features onto nonplanar substrates. These FIB-based processes are considered useful for prototyping, reverse engineering, and small-lot manufacturing. Ion beam-based techniques have been developed for defining features in miniature, nonplanar substrates. We demonstrate helices in cylindrical substrates having diameters from 100 {micro}m to 3 mm. Ion beam lathe processes sputter-define 10-{micro}m wide features in cylindrical substrates and tubes. For larger substrates, we combine focused ion beam milling with ultra-precision lathe turning techniques to accurately define 25-100 {micro}m features over many meters of path length. In several cases, we combine the feature defining capability of focused ion beam bombardment with additive techniques such as evaporation, sputter deposition and electroplating in order to build geometrically-complex, functionally-simple devices. Damascene methods that fabricate bound, metal microcoils have been developed for cylindrical substrates. Effects of focused ion milling on surface morphology are also highlighted in a study of ion-milled diamond.

  11. Dust particles in controlled fusion devices: morphology, observations in the plasma and influence on the plasma performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, M.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Sergienko, G.; Biel, W.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Huber, A.; Philipps, V.

    2001-08-01

    The formation and release of particle agglomerates, i.e. debris and dusty objects, from plasma facing components and the impact of such materials on plasma operation in controlled fusion devices has been studied in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch and the TEXTOR tokamak. Several plasma diagnostic techniques, camera observations and surface analysis methods were applied for in situ and ex situ investigation. The results are discussed in terms of processes that are decisive for dust transfer: localized power deposition connected with wall locked modes causing emission of carbon granules, brittle destruction of graphite and detachment of thick flaking co-deposited layers. The consequences for large next step devices are also addressed.

  12. Relativistic self-focusing of intense laser beam in thermal collisionless quantum plasma with ramped density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, S.; Yazdani, E.; Rezaee, S.; Anvari, A.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Propagation of a Gaussian x-ray laser beam has been analyzed in collisionless thermal quantum plasma with considering a ramped density profile. In this density profile due to the increase in the plasma density, an earlier and stronger self-focusing effect is noticed where the beam width oscillates with higher frequency and less amplitude. Moreover, the effect of the density profile slope and the initial plasma density on the laser propagation has been studied. It is found that, by increasing the initial density and the ramp slope, the laser beam focuses faster with less oscillation amplitude, smaller laser spot size and more oscillations. Furthermore, a comparison is made among the laser self-focusing in thermal quantum plasma, cold quantum plasma and classical plasma. It is realized that the laser self-focusing in the quantum plasma becomes stronger in comparison with the classical regime.

  13. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raquel Moreno; Marisa Gaspar Carreño; Jose María Alonso Herreros; Jose Antonio Romero Garrido; Piedad López-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    ...: Ten devices were found: ACP®; Angel®, Cascade®, Endoret ®, GPS®, Magellan®, Minos®, Ortho-pras®, Smart-prepr® and Tricell®. However, we could found out the mechanism in detail of seven of them...

  15. Dense Plasma Focus Z-pinches for High Gradient Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Adams, M L; Rusnak, B

    2009-07-24

    The final Z-pinch stage of a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) could be used as a simple, compact, and potentially rugged plasma-based high-gradient accelerator with fields at the 100 MV/m level. In this paper we review previously published experimental beam data that indicate the feasibility of such an DPF-based accelerator, qualitatively discuss the physical acceleration processes in terms of the induced voltages, and as a starting point examine the DPF acceleration potential by numerically applying a self-consistent DPF system model that includes the induced voltage from both macroscopic and instability driven plasma dynamics. Applications to the remote detection of high explosives and a multi-staged acceleration concept are briefly discussed.

  16. Ponderomotive self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari Milani, M. R., E-mail: mrj.milani@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam through warm collisional plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive force nonlinearity and the complex eikonal function. By introducing the dielectric permittivity of warm unmagnetized plasma and using the WKB and paraxial ray approximations, the coupled differential equations defining the variations of laser beam parameters are obtained and solved numerically. Effects of laser and plasma parameters such as the collision frequency, the initial laser intensity and its spot size on the beam width parameter and the axis laser intensity distribution are analyzed. It is shown that, self-focusing of the laser beam takes place faster by increasing the collision frequency and initial laser spot size and then after some distance propagation the laser beam abruptly loses its initial diameter and vastly diverges. Furthermore, the modified electron density distribution is obtained and the collision frequency effect on this distribution is studied.

  17. Plasma effect in Silicon Charge Couple Devices (CCDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Juan; Blostein, J

    2011-01-01

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing alpha-particles with energies in the range 0.5 - 5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agrees with previous measurements in the high energy region (>3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using alpha-particles produced by (n,alpha) reactions of neutrons in a Boron-10 target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of alpha particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  18. Plasma effect in silicon charge coupled devices (CCDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, J., E-mail: estrada@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Molina, J., E-mail: jmolina@ing.una.py [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Asuncion, Laboratorio de Mecanica y Energia, Campus de la UNA, San Lorenzo 2160 (Paraguay); Blostein, J.J., E-mail: jeronimo@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET (Argentina); Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Fernandez, G., E-mail: fmoroni.guillermo@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-02-11

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing {alpha}-particles with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agree with previous measurements in the high energy region ({>=}3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using {alpha}-particles produced by (n,{alpha}) reactions of neutrons in a {sup 10}B target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of {alpha} particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  19. Application of plasma-polymerized films for isoelectric focusing of proteins in a capillary electrophoresis chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shuo-Wen; Loughran, Michael; Hiratsuka, Atsunori; Yano, Kazuyoshi; Karube, Isao

    2003-03-01

    The first use of plasma polymerization technique to modify the surface of a glass chip for capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) of different proteins is reported. The electrophoresis separation channel was machined in Tempax glass chips with length 70 mm, 300 microm width and 100 microm depth. Acetonitrile and hexamethyldisiloxane monomers were used for plasma polymerization. In each case 100 nm plasma polymer films were coated onto the chip surface to reduce protein wall adsorption and minimize the electroosmotic flow. Applied voltages of 1000 V, 2000 V and 3000 V were used to separate mixtures of cytochrome c (pI 9.6), hemoglobin (pI 7.0) and phycocyanin (pI 4.65). Reproducible isoelectric focusing of each pI marker protein was observed in different coated capillaries at increasing concentration 2.22-5 microg microL(-1). Modification of the glass capillary with hydrophobic HMDS plasma polymerized films enabled rapid cIEF within 3 min. The separation efficiency of cytochrome c and phycocyanin in both acrylamide and HMDS coated capillaries corresponded to a plate number of 19600 which compares favourably with capillary electrophoresis of neurotransmitters with amperometric detection.

  20. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated Argon plasma in pasotron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Neha; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram; Choyal, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma- assisted slow wave oscillator (PASOTRON) is a high power microwave source in which the electron beam in the interaction region is confined by the background plasma. The plasma is generated by impact ionization of background gas with the electron beam. A model has been developed for temporal evolution of Argon plasma in pasotron device. In this model, we consider electron beam of energy E interacting with Argon gas. The resulting ionization creates quasi neutral argon plasma composed of argon Ar atoms, singly ionized ions Ar+1and electrons having energy from 0 to E. Electron impact excitation, ionization, radiative decay, radiative recombination and three body recombination processes are considered in this model. Population of ground and excited states of argon atom, ground state of argon ion as well as the population of electron energy groups is calculated by solving time dependent rate equations. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated plasma is given.

  1. Catalytic action of β source on x-ray emission from plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, Mehboob; Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preionization around the insulator sleeve by a mesh-type β source (Ni6328) for the x-ray emission from a (2.3-3.9 kJ) plasma focus device is investigated. Quantrad Si p-i-n diodes along with suitable filters are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors and a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of argon and hydrogen gas filling pressures with and without β source at different charging voltages. It is found that the pressure range for the x-ray emission is broadened, x-ray emission is enhanced, and shot to shot reproducibility is improved with the β source. With argon, the CuKα emission is estimated to be 27.14 J with an efficiency of 0.7% for β source and 21.5 J with an efficiency of 0.55% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be about 68.90 J with an efficiency of 1.8% for β source and 54.58 J with an efficiency of 1.4% without β source. With hydrogen, CuKα emission is 11.82 J with an efficiency of 0.32% for β source and 10.07 J with an efficiency of 0.27% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be 30.20 J with an efficiency of 0.77% for β source and 25.58 J with an efficiency of 0.6% without β source. The x-ray emission with Pb insert at the anode tip without β source is also investigated and found to be reproducible and significantly high. The maximum x-ray yield is estimated to be 46.6 J in 4π geometry with an efficiency of 1.4% at 23 kV charging voltage. However, degradation of x-ray yield is observed when charging voltage exceeds 23 kV for Pb insert. From pinhole images it is observed that the x-ray emission due to the bombardment of electrons at the anode tip is dominant in both with and without β source.

  2. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: construction and its plasma aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis; Chowdhuri, Manis

    2010-07-01

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density approximately 3-5x10(10) cm(-3) and temperature approximately 7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  4. Modeling a short cold cathode DC discharge device with controllable plasma parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Adams, Steven; Demidov, Vladimir; Bogdanov, Yevgeny

    2009-11-01

    A short (without positive column) DC gas-discharge device with a cold cathode has been modeled. The device consists of the plane disk-shaped cathode and anode while the inter-electrode gap is bounded by a cylindrical wall. The cathode and anode are each 2.5 cm in diameter, and the inter-electrode gap is 12 mm. The wall is made of conducting parts divided by an insulator. The modeling has been performed for argon plasma at 1 Torr pressure. It is demonstrated in the model that spatial distributions of electron density and temperature and argon metastable atom density depend on the DC voltage applied to different conducting parts of the wall. Applied voltage can trap within the device volume energetic electrons arising from atomic and molecular processes in the plasma. This leads to a modification in the heating of slow electrons by energetic electrons and as a result modifies the controlling plasma parameters.

  5. Customizable in situ TEM devices fabricated in freestanding membranes by focused ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Anders; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Booth, Timothy John; Homann, Lasse Vinther; Kallesoe, Christian; Sukas, Ozlem Sardan; Gyrsting, Yvonne; Molhave, Kristian; Boggild, Peter

    2010-10-08

    Nano- and microelectromechanical structures for in situ operation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) were fabricated with a turnaround time of 20 min and a resolution better than 100 nm. The structures are defined by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in 135 nm thin membranes of single crystalline silicon extending over the edge of a pre-fabricated silicon microchip. Four-terminal resistance measurements of FIB-defined nanowires showed at least two orders of magnitude increase in resistivity compared to bulk. We show that the initial high resistance is due to amorphization of silicon, and that current annealing recrystallizes the structure, causing the electrical properties to partly recover to the pristine bulk resistivity. In situ imaging of the annealing process revealed both continuous and abrupt changes in the crystal structure, accompanied by instant changes of the electrical conductivity. The membrane structures provide a simple way to design electron-transparent nanodevices with high local temperature gradients within the field of view of the TEM, allowing detailed studies of surface diffusion processes. We show two examples of heat-induced coarsening of gold on a narrow freestanding bridge, where local temperature gradients are controlled via the electrical current paths. The separation of device processing into a one-time batch-level fabrication of identical, generic membrane templates, and subsequent device-specific customization by FIB milling, provides unparalleled freedom in device layout combined with very short effective fabrication time. This approach significantly speeds up prototyping of nanodevices such as resonators, actuators, sensors and scanning probes with state-of-art resolution.

  6. Customizable in situ TEM devices fabricated in freestanding membranes by focused ion beam milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Anders; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Booth, Timothy John; Homann, Lasse Vinther; Kallesoe, Christian; Sukas, Ozlem Sardan; Molhave, Kristian; Boggild, Peter [DTU Nanotech, Department of Nano- and Microtechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Gyrsting, Yvonne, E-mail: Anders.Lei@nanotech.dtu.dk [DTU Danchip, National Center for Micro- and Nanofabrication, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-10-08

    Nano- and microelectromechanical structures for in situ operation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) were fabricated with a turnaround time of 20 min and a resolution better than 100 nm. The structures are defined by focused ion beam (FIB) milling in 135 nm thin membranes of single crystalline silicon extending over the edge of a pre-fabricated silicon microchip. Four-terminal resistance measurements of FIB-defined nanowires showed at least two orders of magnitude increase in resistivity compared to bulk. We show that the initial high resistance is due to amorphization of silicon, and that current annealing recrystallizes the structure, causing the electrical properties to partly recover to the pristine bulk resistivity. In situ imaging of the annealing process revealed both continuous and abrupt changes in the crystal structure, accompanied by instant changes of the electrical conductivity. The membrane structures provide a simple way to design electron-transparent nanodevices with high local temperature gradients within the field of view of the TEM, allowing detailed studies of surface diffusion processes. We show two examples of heat-induced coarsening of gold on a narrow freestanding bridge, where local temperature gradients are controlled via the electrical current paths. The separation of device processing into a one-time batch-level fabrication of identical, generic membrane templates, and subsequent device-specific customization by FIB milling, provides unparalleled freedom in device layout combined with very short effective fabrication time. This approach significantly speeds up prototyping of nanodevices such as resonators, actuators, sensors and scanning probes with state-of-art resolution.

  7. A numerical study of two-phase Stokes flow in an axisymmetric flow-focusing device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Jakob; Stone, H.A.; Bruus, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    in MATLAB, which interfaces with the finite-element software FEMLAB. We derive scaling laws for the volume of a created bubble and for the gas flow rate, and confirm them numerically. Our results are consistent with existing experimental results by Garstecki et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 164501 (2005......We present a numerical investigation of the time-dependent dynamics of the creation of gas bubbles in an axisymmetric flow-focusing device. The liquid motion is treated as a Stokes flow, and using a generic framework we implement a second-order time-integration scheme and a free-surface model......)], and predict a scaling yet to be observed: the bubble volume scales with the outlet channel radius to the power of 4 and the surface tension. Our axisymmetric simulations further show that the collapse of the gas thread before bubble snap-off is different from the recent experimental results. We suggest...

  8. MC ray-tracing optimization of lobster-eye focusing devices with RESTRAX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroun, Jan [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: saroun@ujf.cas.cz; Kulda, Jiri [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-11-15

    The enhanced functionalities of the latest version of the RESTRAX software, providing a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) ray-tracing code to represent a virtual three-axis neutron spectrometer, include representation of parabolic and elliptic guide profiles and facilities for numerical optimization of parameter values, characterizing the instrument components. As examples, we present simulations of a doubly focusing monochromator in combination with cold neutron guides and lobster-eye supermirror devices, concentrating a monochromatic beam to small sample volumes. A Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm is used to optimize simultaneously several parameters of the monochromator and lobster-eye guides. We compare the performance of optimized configurations in terms of monochromatic neutron flux and energy spread and demonstrate the effect of lobster-eye optics on beam transformations in real and momentum subspaces.

  9. Pin cushion plasmonic device for polarization beam splitting, focusing, and beam position estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Gilad M; Levy, Uriel

    2013-03-13

    Great hopes rest on surface plasmon polaritons' (SPPs) potential to bring new functionalities and applications into various branches of optics. In this paper, we demonstrate a pin cushion structure capable of coupling light from free space into SPPs, split them based on the polarization content of the illuminating beam of light, and focus them into small spots. We also show that for a circularly or randomly polarized light, four focal spots will be generated at the center of each quarter circle comprising the pin cushion device. Furthermore, following the relation between the relative intensity of the obtained four focal spots and the relative position of the illuminating beam with respect to the structure, we propose and demonstrate the potential use of our structure as a miniaturized plasmonic version of the well-known four quadrant detector. Additional potential applications may vary from multichannel microscopy and multioptical traps to real time beam tracking systems.

  10. Focused ion beam patterning to dielectrophoretically assemble single nanowire based devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferrara, V; Massera, E; Francia, G Di [ENEA Research Center, P.le E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Alfano, B, E-mail: vera.laferrara@portici.enea.i [University of Naples ' Federico II' , P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2010-02-01

    Direct-write processing is increasingly taking place in nanodevice fabrication. In this work, Focused Ion Beam (FIB), a powerful tool in maskless micromachining, is used for electrode patterning onto a silicon/silicon nitride substrate. Then a single palladium nanowire is assembled between electrodes by means of dielectrophoresis (DEP). The nanowire morphology depends on the electrode pattern when DEP conditions are fixed. FIB/DEP combination overcomes the problem of nanowire electrical contamination due to gallium ion bombardment and the as-grown nanowire retains its basic electrical properties. Single nanowire based devices have been fabricated with this novel approach and have been tested as hydrogen sensors, confirming the reliability of this technology.

  11. Characterization of acoustic droplet formation in a microfluidic flow-focusing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yin Nee; Qiu, Huihe

    2011-12-01

    Local control of droplet formation with acoustic actuation in a microfluidic flow-focusing device is investigated, and the effects of acoustic voltage, frequency, flow-rate ratio, fluid viscosity, and flow vorticity are characterized. Acoustic actuation is provided to affect droplet breakup in the squeezing regime by imposing periodic oscillation to the fluid-fluid interface and, therefore, a periodic change in its curvature at the cross-junction of the device. Time reduction is observed for the three key stages of droplet breakup in the squeezing regime: dispersed phase flow-front advancement into the orifice, pressure buildup upstream and within the orifice together with liquid inflation downstream, and finally the thinning and pinch-off of the liquid thread. It is found that acoustic actuation has less of an effect on droplet size for the continuous phase with a higher viscosity due to the restrained interfacial vibration under a high shear stress environment. Periodic velocity flow fields within the dispersed phase at different phases of one oscillation cycle are calculated based on the results from phase-averaged microresolution-particle-image velocimetry (μPIV). The oscillation paths for the points of maximum vorticities of phase-averaged velocity components are traced, which reveals that the motion is mainly along the y direction.

  12. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  13. MHD Instabilities and Their Effects on Plasma Confinement in Large Helical Device Plasmas with Intense Neutral Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Toi; K. Narihara; K. Tanaka; T. Tokuzawa; H. Yamada; Q. Yang; LHD experimental group; S. Ohdachi; S. Yamamoto; S. Sakakibara; K. Y. Watanabe; N. Nakajima; X. Ding; J. Li; S. Morita

    2004-01-01

    MHD stability of the Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas produced with intense neutral beam injection is experimentally studied. When the steep pressure gradient near the edge is produced through L-H transition or linear density ramp experiment, interchange-like MHD modes whose rational surface is located very close to the last closed flux surface are strongly excited in a certain discharge condition and affect the plasma transport appreciably. In NBI-heated energetic ion loss, but also trigger the formation of internal and edge transport barriers.

  14. A self-focusing, high transformer ratio, collinear plasma dielectric wakefield accelerator driven by a ramped bunch train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Gennadij V.; Marshall, Thomas C.; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    New results of studies of wakefield excitation by a ramped bunch train in a collinear, single-channel dielectriclined THz-wakefield accelerator structure that is filled with a low-temperature plasma are presented. A novel ramped train of drive bunches, together with plasma filling part of the transport channel, makes possible substantial improvement of the transformer ratio of the multimode collinear device to 6:1 while the plasma could stabilize the transverse motion of the drive and witness bunches.

  15. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  16. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  17. Kinetic Simulations of the Self-Focusing and Dissipation of Finite-Width Electron Plasma Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winjum, B. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapman, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Banks, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunner, S. [Federal Inst. of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations, both Vlasov and particle-in-cell, are presented that show the evolution of the field and electron distribution of finite-width, nonlinear electron plasma waves. The intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied in simulated systems that are hundreds of wavelengths long in the transverse direction but only one wavelength long and periodic in the propagation direction. From various initial wave states, both the width at focus Δm relative to the initial width Δ0 and the maximum field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability γTPMI divided by the loss rate of field energy νE to electrons escaping the trapping region. With dissipation included, an amplitude threshold for self-focusing γTPMIE~1 is found that supports the analysis of Rose [Phys. Plasmas 12, 012318 (2005)].

  18. Integrated separation of blood plasma from whole blood for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Forouzan, Omid; Brown, Theodore P; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2012-01-21

    Many diagnostic tests in a conventional clinical laboratory are performed on blood plasma because changes in its composition often reflect the current status of pathological processes throughout the body. Recently, a significant research effort has been invested into the development of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) implementing these conventional laboratory tests for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings. This paper describes the use of red blood cell (RBC) agglutination for separating plasma from finger-prick volumes of whole blood directly in paper, and demonstrates the utility of this approach by integrating plasma separation and a colorimetric assay in a single μPAD. The μPAD was fabricated by printing its pattern onto chromatography paper with a solid ink (wax) printer and melting the ink to create hydrophobic barriers spanning through the entire thickness of the paper substrate. The μPAD was functionalized by spotting agglutinating antibodies onto the plasma separation zone in the center and the reagents of the colorimetric assay onto the test readout zones on the periphery of the device. To operate the μPAD, a drop of whole blood was placed directly onto the plasma separation zone of the device. RBCs in the whole blood sample agglutinated and remained in the central zone, while separated plasma wicked through the paper substrate into the test readout zones where analyte in plasma reacted with the reagents of the colorimetric assay to produce a visible color change. The color change was digitized with a portable scanner and converted to concentration values using a calibration curve. The purity and yield of separated plasma was sufficient for successful operation of the μPAD. This approach to plasma separation based on RBC agglutination will be particularly useful for designing fully integrated μPADs operating directly on small samples of whole blood.

  19. Application of plasma focus installations for a study of the influence of deuterium cumulative flows on materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L I Ivanov; A I Dedyurin; I V Borovitskaya; O N Krokhin; V Ya Nikulin; S N Polukhin; A A Tikhomirov; A S Fedotov

    2003-12-01

    In this work, as an example of an application of the plasma focus (PF) device, we study the influence on alloys of vanadium of a cumulative flow producing in the PF device. The experiment was done in a 4-kJ PF device with various gas fillings and various anode shapes. It was found that the velocity of the axial cumulative flow depends on the type of gas and is about $5\\cdot 10^{7}$ cm/s for deuterium and $2\\cdot 10^{7}$ cm/s for argon fillings of plasma focus chamber; the shape of the flow is changed from a broad conical fly for deuterium to a quasi-one-directional stream for argon. The dynamics and structure of such flows are investigated by means of laser diagnostics and an image converter camera. The experiments show that cumulative flows produce various defects in tested samples. The appearance of a large number of cracks on the surface of vanadium under the impulse influence of deuterium plasma shows that pure vanadium cannot be used for the construction of thermonuclear fusion reactors. Such PF installations could also be used effectively for the study of other material and construction elements proposed for the use in thermonuclear machines.

  20. Search for thermonuclear neutrons in a mega-ampere plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Scholz, M.; Kalinowska, Z.; Bienkowska, B.; Karpinski, L.; Kortanek, J.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Tomaszewski, K.; Zielinska, E.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma focus experiments were carried out at a modified PF-1000 where the cathode disc was added in front of the anode. Experimental results indicated a fraction of thermonuclear neutrons on the mega-ampere current level. In order to prove the thermonuclear mechanism, the time of neutron production and the neutron energy spectrum were measured by time-of-flight (TOF) diagnostics. Neutron TOF signals showed that the neutron production was a multiphase process and more than one mechanism occurred simultaneously. The occurrence of the thermonuclear mechanism was most evident during the plasma stagnation at low deuterium pressures. At low filling pressures, the narrow width of the neutron energy spectra demonstrated an ion temperature of about 1 keV. The possibility of thermonuclear neutrons was studied also after the stagnation, during the main neutron emission. In this case, the thermonuclear mechanism could be verified by calculating the number of deuterons that participate in the fusion process. For the bulk of thermonuclear plasmas, a significant fraction of plasma should participate in fusion. Finally, the basic consideration of the thermonuclear mechanism in Z-pinches showed the reasonableness of the MagLIF concept.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent-driven Sheared Parallel Flows in the CSDX Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, George; Hong, Rongjie; Li, Jiacong; Thakur, Saikat; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Parallel velocity and its radial shear is a key element for both accessing improved confinement regimes and controlling the impurity transport in tokamak devices. In this study, the development of radially sheared parallel plasma flows in plasmas without magnetic shear is investigated using laser induced fluorescence, multi-tip Langmuir and Mach probes in the CSDX helicon linear plasma device. Results show that a mean parallel velocity shear grows as the radial gradient of plasma density increased. The sheared flow onset corresponds to the onset of a finite parallel Reynolds stress that acts to reinforce the flow. As a result, the mean parallel flow gains energy from the turbulence that, in turn, is driven by the density gradient. This results in a flow away from the plasma source in the central region of the plasma and a reverse flow in far-peripheral region of the plasma column. The results motivate a model of negative viscosity induced by the turbulent stress which may help explain the origin of intrinsic parallel flow in systems without magnetic shear.

  2. An Electrothermal Plasma Source Developed for Simulation of Transient Heat Loads in Future Large Fusion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Trey; Baylor, Larry; Winfrey, Leigh

    2016-10-01

    The realization of fusion energy requires materials that can withstand high heat and particle fluxes at the plasma material interface. In this work, an electrothermal (ET) plasma source has been designed as a possible transient heat flux source for a linear plasma material interaction device. An ET plasma source operates in the ablative arc regime, which is driven by a DC capacitive discharge. The current travels through the 4mm bore of a boron nitride liner and subsequently ablates and ionizes the liner material. This results in a high density plasma with a large unidirectional bulk flow out of the source exit. The pulse length for the ET source has been optimized using a pulse forming network to have a duration of 1ms at full-width half maximum. The peak currents and maximum source energies seen in this system are 2kA and 5kJ. The goal of this work is to show that the ET source produces electron densities and heat fluxes that are comparable to transient events in future large magnetic confinement fusion devices. Heat flux, plasma temperature, and plasma density were determined for each test shot using infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy techniques. This work will compare the ET source output (heat flux, temperature, and density) with and without an applied magnetic field. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  3. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  4. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-08-26

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  5. Enhancement of acoustic streaming induced flow on a focused surface acoustic wave device: Implications for biosensing and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Reetu; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid motion induced on the surface of 100 MHz focused surface acoustic wave (F-SAW) devices with concentric interdigital transducers (IDTs) based on Y-cut Z-propagating LiNbO3 substrate was investigated using three-dimensional bidirectionally coupled finite element fluid-structure interaction models. Acoustic streaming velocity fields and induced forces for the F-SAW device are compared with those for a SAW device with uniform IDTs (conventional SAW). Both, qualitative and quantitative differences in the simulation derived functional parameters, such as device displacements amplitudes, fluid velocity, and streaming forces, are observed between the F-SAW and conventional SAW device. While the conventional SAW shows maximum fluid recirculation near input IDTs, the region of maximum recirculation is concentrated near the focal point of the F-SAW device. Our simulation results also indicate acoustic energy focusing by the F-SAW device leading to maximized device surface displacements, fluid velocity, and streaming forces near the focal point located in the center of the delay path, in contrast to the conventional SAW exhibiting maximized values of these parameters near the input IDTs. Significant enhancement in acoustic streaming is observed in the F-SAW device when compared to the conventional ones; the increase in streaming velocities was computed to be 352% and 216% for tangential velocities in propagation and transverse directions, respectively, and 353% for the normal velocity. Consequently, the induced streaming force for F-SAW is 480% larger than that for conventional SAW. In biosensing applications, this allows for the removal of smaller submicron sized particles by F-SAW which are otherwise difficult to remove using the conventional SAW. The F-SAW presents an order of magnitude reduction in the smallest removable particle size compared to the conventional device. Our results indicate that the acoustic energy focusing and streaming enhancement brought about by

  6. [Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Raquel; Gaspar Carreño, Marisa; Alonso Herreros, Jose María; Romero Garrido, Jose Antonio; López-Sánchez, Piedad

    2016-09-01

    Objetivo: Describir los dispositivos para la obtención de Plasma Rico en Plaquetas (PRP) mediante la revisión de los productos existentes en España, teniendo en consideración las aportaciones de la Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios (AEMPS) y los grupos de trabajo de Productos Sanitarios (GPS), Farmacotecnia y Hemoderivados de la Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (SEFH). Método: Se realizaron tres búsquedas independientes sobre dispositivos de fraccionamiento de plasma. Se contactó con los proveedores y se estableció una reunión con cada uno de ellos. Se revisaron las características de cada dispositivo mediante una demostración del proceso de fraccionamiento virtual y se elaboró una tabla de comparación de kits. Los dispositivos se clasificaron como Técnica cerrada y Técnica abierta de acuerdo al informe del comité técnico de inspección de la AEMPS. Resultados: Se localizaron diez dispositivos: ACP®; Angel®, Cascade®, Endoret®, GPS®, Magellan®, Minos®, Ortho-pras®, Smart-prepr® y Tricell®, pudiendo conocer de forma detallada el funcionamiento en siete de ellos. Sin embargo, de Cascade ®, Magellan® y Smart-prepr® no se consiguió información suficiente. Conclusión: La revisión permitió conocer los principales dispositivos de extracción de PRP disponibles con marcado CE y sus características diferenciales; sin embargo, para garantizar la calidad del producto final es crucial poner atención en el propio proceso de extracción y administración del PRP. El Servicio de Farmacia debe implicarse en su selección por la estrecha relación que mantiene con la calidad del medicamento elaborado. El trabajo conjunto con la AEMPS permitirá definir de forma más específica el proceso correcto de elaboración.

  7. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  8. Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schaefer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2013-04-01

    The last few years have witnessed a dramatic convergence of three distinct lines of research concerned with different kinds of extreme quantum matter. Two of these involve new quantum fluids that can be studied in the laboratory, ultracold quantum gases and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) plasmas. Even though these systems involve vastly different energy scales, the physical properties of the two quantum fluids are remarkably similar. The third line of research is based on the discovery of a new theoretical tool for investigating the properties of extreme quantum matter, holographic dualties. The main goal of this focus issue is to foster communication and understanding between these three fields. We proceed to describe each in more detail. Ultracold quantum gases offer a new paradigm for the study of nonperturbative quantum many-body physics. With widely tunable interaction strength, spin composition, and temperature, using different hyperfine states one can model spin-1/2 fermions, spin-3/2 fermions, and many other spin structures of bosons, fermions, and mixtures thereof. Such systems have produced a revolution in the study of strongly interacting Fermi systems, for example in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover region, where a close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists—typical in this field—enabled ground-breaking studies in an area spanning several decades. Half-way through this crossover, when the scattering length characterizing low-energy collisions diverges, one obtains a unitary quantum gas, which is universal and scale invariant. The unitary gas has close parallels in the hydrodynamics of QCD plasmas, where the ratio of viscosity to entropy density is extremely low and comparable to the minimum viscosity conjecture, an important prediction of AdS/CFT (see below). Exciting developments in the thermodynamic and transport properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases are of broad

  9. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Study of plasma equilibrium in toroidal fusion devices using mesh-free numerical calculation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, C.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Rokrok, B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma confinement using external magnetic field is one of the successful ways leading to the controlled nuclear fusion. Development and validation of the solution process for plasma equilibrium in the experimental toroidal fusion devices is the main subject of this work. Solution of the nonlinear 2D stationary problem as posed by the Grad-Shafranov equation gives quantitative information about plasma equilibrium inside the vacuum chamber of hot fusion devices. This study suggests solving plasma equilibrium equation which is essential in toroidal nuclear fusion devices, using a mesh-free method in a condition that the plasma boundary is unknown. The Grad-Shafranov equation has been solved numerically by the point interpolation collocation mesh-free method. Important features of this approach include truly mesh free, simple mathematical relationships between points and acceptable precision in comparison with the parametric results. The calculation process has been done by using the regular and irregular nodal distribution and support domains with different points. The relative error between numerical and analytical solution is discussed for several test examples such as small size Damavand tokamak, ITER-like equilibrium, NSTX-like equilibrium, and typical Spheromak.

  11. Dense Plasma Focus as Collimated Source of D-D Fusion Neutron Beams for Irradiation Experiences and Study of Emitted Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, M.; Niedbalski, J.; Moroso, R.; Guichón, S.; Supán, J.

    2008-04-01

    A "table-top" 2 kJ, 250 kA plasma focus, the PACO (Plasma AutoConfinado), designed by the Dense Plasma Group of IFAS is used in its optimum regime for neutron yield for obtaining collimated pulsed neutron beams (100 ns). A simple and low-cost shielding arrangement was developed in order to fully eliminate the 2.45 MeV neutrons generated in the PACO device (108 per shot at 31 kV, 1-2 mbar). Conventional neutron diagnostics: scintillator-photomultiplier (S-PMT), silver activation counters (SAC), etc., are used to determine the minimum width of the shielding walls. Emission of very hard electromagnetic pulses is also studied. Collimation using lead and copper plates is made to determine the localization of the very hard X-ray source. The maximum energy of the continuum photon distribution is estimated in 0,6 MeV using a system of filters.

  12. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  13. Calibration of an automated California mastitis test with focus on the device-dependent variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, Anne-Christin; Stamer, Eckhard; Junge, Wolfgang; Thaller, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to estimate the accuracy of the metrology of an installed indirect on-line sensor system based on the automated California Mastitis Test (CMT) with focus on the prior established device-dependent variation. A sensor calibration was implemented. Therefore, seven sensors were tested with similar trials on the dairy research farm Karkendamm (Germany) on two days in July 2011 and January 2012. Thereby, 18 mixed milk samples from serial dilutions were fourfold recorded at every sensor. For the validation, independent sensor records with corresponding lab somatic cell score records (LSCS) in the period between both trials were used (n = 1,357). From these records for each sensor a polynomial regression function was calculated. The predicted SCS (PSCS) was obtained for each sensor with the previously determined regression coefficients. Pearson correlation coefficients between PSCS and LSCS were established for each sensor and ranged between r = 0.57 and r = 0.67. Comparing the results with the correlation coefficients between the on-line SCS (OSCS) and the LSCS (r = 0.20 to 0.57) for every sensor, the calibration showed the tendency to improve the installed sensor system.

  14. Exploring cryogenic focused ion beam milling as a Group III–V device fabrication tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolph, Melissa Commisso, E-mail: mdolph@mitre.org [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA 22102 (United States); Santeufemio, Christopher, E-mail: Christopher_Santeufemio@uml.edu [Campus Materials Characterization Labs, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we compare the features observed on a Group III–V strained layer superlattice (SLS) materials system as a result of room temperature Ga{sup +} focused ion beam (FIB) milling to the features observed as a result of cryogenic FIB (cryo-FIB) milling at –135 °C under the same beam conditions (30 kV:1 nA). The features on the cryo-FIB milled material were observed both when the material was still cold and after it returned to room temperature. Although cryo-FIB milling yielded patterned features that were initially cleaner than comparable features defined by FIB milling at room temperature, we found that both room temperature FIB milling and cryo-FIB milling with subsequent sample warm-up resulted in the formation of Group III enriched features. These findings suggest that the structural and chemical properties of features fabricated by cryo-FIB milling are temperature-dependent, which is an important consideration when it comes to device fabrication. These dependencies will need to be better understood and controlled if cryo-FIB milling is to have future applications in this area.

  15. Microbubble formation and pinch-off scaling exponent in flow-focusing devices

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoeve, Wim; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the gas jet breakup and the resulting microbubble formation in a microfluidic flow-focusing device using ultra high-speed imaging at 1 million frames/s. In recent experiments [Dollet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 034504 (2008)] it was found that in the final stage of the collapse the radius of the neck scales with time with a 1/3 power-law exponent, which suggested that gas inertia and the Bernoulli suction effect become important. Here, ultra high-speed imaging was used to capture the complete bubble contour and quantify the gas flow through the neck. It revealed that the resulting decrease in pressure, due to Bernoulli suction, is too low to account for an accelerated pinch-off. The high temporal resolution images enable us to approach the final moment of pinch-off to within 1 {\\mu}s. We observe that the final moment of bubble pinch-off is characterized by a scaling exponent of 0.41 +/- 0.01. This exponent is approximately 2/5, which can be derived, based on the observation that during the co...

  16. Capillary flow-driven microfluidic device with wettability gradient and sedimentation effects for blood plasma separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M. Sneha; Rakesh, P. E.; Chandra, T. S.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    We report a capillary flow-driven microfluidic device for blood-plasma separation that comprises a cylindrical well between a pair of bottom and top channels. Exposure of the well to oxygen-plasma creates wettability gradient on its inner surface with its ends hydrophilic and middle portion hydrophobic. Due to capillary action, sample blood self-infuses into bottom channel and rises up the well. Separation of plasma occurs at the hydrophobic patch due to formation of a ‘self-built-in filter’ and sedimentation. Capillary velocity is predicted using a model and validated using experimental data. Sedimentation of RBCs is explained using modified Steinour’s model and correlation between settling velocity and liquid concentration is found. Variation of contact angle on inner surface of the well is characterized and effects of well diameter and height and dilution ratio on plasma separation rate are investigated. With a well of 1.0 mm diameter and 4.0 mm height, 2.0 μl of plasma was obtained (from <10 μl whole blood) in 15 min with a purification efficiency of 99.9%. Detection of glucose was demonstrated with the plasma obtained. Wetting property of channels was maintained by storing in DI water under vacuum and performance of the device was found to be unaffected over three weeks. PMID:28256564

  17. Capillary flow-driven microfluidic device with wettability gradient and sedimentation effects for blood plasma separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M. Sneha; Rakesh, P. E.; Chandra, T. S.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report a capillary flow-driven microfluidic device for blood-plasma separation that comprises a cylindrical well between a pair of bottom and top channels. Exposure of the well to oxygen-plasma creates wettability gradient on its inner surface with its ends hydrophilic and middle portion hydrophobic. Due to capillary action, sample blood self-infuses into bottom channel and rises up the well. Separation of plasma occurs at the hydrophobic patch due to formation of a ‘self-built-in filter’ and sedimentation. Capillary velocity is predicted using a model and validated using experimental data. Sedimentation of RBCs is explained using modified Steinour’s model and correlation between settling velocity and liquid concentration is found. Variation of contact angle on inner surface of the well is characterized and effects of well diameter and height and dilution ratio on plasma separation rate are investigated. With a well of 1.0 mm diameter and 4.0 mm height, 2.0 μl of plasma was obtained (from purification efficiency of 99.9%. Detection of glucose was demonstrated with the plasma obtained. Wetting property of channels was maintained by storing in DI water under vacuum and performance of the device was found to be unaffected over three weeks.

  18. Investigations on the transition between column and micropinch mode of plasma focus operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebert, R.; Engel, A.; Neff, W.

    1995-12-01

    X-ray emission from pinch plasma devices with pinch currents ranging from 200 to 400 kA operated with pure high-Z gases are investigated with temporal spatial and spectral resolution. If operated using elements Zneon) K-shell emission is observed from column-like volumes several 100 μm in diameter and several mm in length (bulk or column mode). For Z≳18 (e.g., krypton or xenon) emission with hν≳1 keV is only observed from micropinches. For argon (Z=18) both modes of operation can be observed. The occurrence of a specific mode depends on the initial gas pressure. In this paper the transition regime between column and micropinches is investigated with particular regard to argon. A criterion is proposed to decide whether column mode or micropinch mode is expected.

  19. AmBe Radiological Source Replacement Using Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian; Povilus, Alexander; Chapman, Steven; Podpaly, Yuri; Cooper, Christopher; Higginson, Drew; Link, Anthony; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a compact plasma gun that produces high energy ion beams up to several MeV through strong potential gradients formed from m=0 plasma instabilities. These ion beams can be used to replace radiological sources for a variety of applications. Americium-beryllium (AmBe) neutron sources are commonly used for oil well logging. An optimized DPF produces high energy helium ion beams of 2+ MeV which can interact with a beryllium target to produce neutrons. The alpha-Be interaction produces a neutron energy spectrum similar to the neutrons produced by the AmBe reaction. To demonstrate this concept experimentally a 2 kJ DPF is used to produce a beam of alpha particles which interacts with a beryllium target. We report on the improvements made to the DPF platform using He gas and the observation of 3.0 ×104 peak neutrons generated per shot. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Jason, E-mail: sears8@llnl.gov, E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, Anthony, E-mail: sears8@llnl.gov, E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Schmidt, Andrea, E-mail: sears8@llnl.gov, E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Welch, Dale [Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation during the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.

  1. Some physics and chemistry of Coblation® electrosurgical plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kenneth R.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Woloszko, Jean

    2013-02-01

    Electrosurgical devices employing plasmas to ablate, cut and otherwise treat tissues have been in widespread use for decades. Following d'Arsonval's 19th century work on the neuromuscular response from high-frequency excitation of tissue, Doyen treated skin blemishes with a spark-gap generator in 1909. In the late 1920's, physician Harvey Cushing and Harvard physicist William Bovie developed an electrosurgical device and power source that eventually became a standard of care for cutting, coagulating, desiccating, or fulgurating tissue. Beginning in the 1990's a new class of low-voltage electrosurgical devices employing electricallyconducting saline fluids were developed by ArthroCare Corp. These modern Coblation® devices are now widely used in many different surgical procedures, including those in arthroscopic surgery, otorhinolaryngology, spine surgery, urology, gynecological surgery, and others. This paper summarizes some of the research we have been doing over the last decade to elucidate the physics and chemistry underlying Coblation® electrosurgical devices. Electrical-, thermal-, fluid-, chemicaland plasma-physics all play important roles in these devices and give rise to a rich variety of observations. Experimental techniques employed include optical and mass spectroscopy, fast optical imaging, and electrical voltage and current measurements. Many of the features occur on fast time scales and small spatial scales, making laboratory measurements difficult, so coupled-physics, finite-element-modeling can also be employed to glean more information than has been acquired thus far through physical observation.

  2. A titanium hydride gun for plasma injection into the T2-reversed field pinch device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. V.; Hellblom, K. G.

    1999-02-01

    A study of a plasma gun (modified Bostic type) with titanium hydride electrodes has been carried out. The total number of released hydrogen atoms was in the range 1016-1018 and the maximum plasma flow velocity was 2.5×105 m s-1. The ion density near the gun edge reached 1.8×1020 m-3 and the electron temperature was around 40 eV as estimated from probe measurements. No species other than hydrogen or titanium were seen in the plasma line radiation. The plasma injector was successfully used for gas pre-ionization in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch device (ohmic heating toroidal experiment (OHTE)).

  3. Automation of plasma protein binding assay using rapid equilibrium dialysis device and Tecan workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhengqi; Zetterberg, Craig; Gao, Hong

    2017-03-14

    Binding of drug molecules to plasma proteins is an important parameter in assessing drug ADME properties. Plasma protein binding (PPB) assays are routinely performed during drug discovery and development. A fully automated PPB assay was developed using rapid equilibrium dialysis (RED) device and Tecan workstation coupled to an automated incubator. The PPB assay was carried out in unsealed RED plates which allowed the assay to be fully automated. The plasma pH was maintained at 7.4 during the 6-h dialysis under 2% CO2 condition. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The percent bound results of 10 commercial drugs in plasma protein binding were very similar between the automated and manual assays, and were comparable to literature values. The automated assay increases laboratory productivity and is applicable to high-throughput screening of drug protein binding in drug discovery.

  4. The Role of the Driver Circuit in the Neutron Yield of the Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; Welch, Dale

    2015-11-01

    Emperical observations have suggested that dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield increases with driver impedance. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP, we reproduce this trend in a kJ DPF, and demonstrate in detail how driver impedance is coupled to neutron output. We implement a 2-D model of the plasma focus including self-consistent circuit-driven boundary conditions. We show that m=0 growth is central to beam formation and is a chaotic, non-deterministic process. Neutrons are produced when high, short-lived electric fields in the low-density cavity of an m=0 mode accelerate a beam of ions into the dense downstream pinch region. Neutron yield is highest when the ion beam is generated within 50 ns of the pinch formation on axis, because at that time the pinch (target) density is highest. High driver impedance contributes to prompt beam formation in two ways. First, the high impedance driver, losing less energy to run-down, has a faster run-in velocity and hence larger Rayleigh-Taylor features that more readily seed the m=0 instability. Second, the shorter anode of the high-impedance driver retains less trailing mass in the run-down region and thus exhibits fewer and less parasitic restrikes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the

  6. Note: Repetitive operation of the capacitor bank of the low-voltage miniature plasma focus at 50 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rohit; Shyam, Anurag

    2013-10-01

    We have already reported the low-voltage operation of a plasma focus describing the operation of plasma focus at 4.2 kV which proposes possibility of making a repetitive system using compact driving source. Another recent article describes that the same capacitor-bank can drive the plasma focus for a measured ˜5 × 104 neutrons per shot at 5 kV and 59 kA current. In the present work, repetitive operation of the capacitor-bank of plasma focus is done and that too is being reported at a very high repetition rate of 50 Hz using very simple scheme of charging and triggering the bank. The bank is continuously discharged to burst duration of 20 s in this configuration admeasuring a thousand shots.

  7. Post-operative orbital imaging: a focus on implants and prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Ashok [Royal London Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mankad, Kshitij [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Poitelea, Cornelia; Verity, David H. [Moorfields Eye Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davagnanam, Indran [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Accurate interpretation of orbital imaging in the presence of either orbital implants requires a sound knowledge of both the surgical approach used and the imaging characteristics of the implanted devices themselves. In this article, the radiological appearance of the various devices used in ophthalmology, and their relationship to other orbital structures, is reviewed. In addition, the intended anatomical location, function of these devices, and clinical indications for their use are provided. (orig.)

  8. Development of a new experimental device for long-duration magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ryoma; Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Kento; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a universal phenomenon which determines global structure and energy conversion in magnetized plasmas. Many experimental studies have been carried out to explore the physics of magnetic reconnection in fully ionized condition. However, it is predicted that the behavior of magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasmas such as solar chromosphere plasma will show different behavior such as ambipolar diffusion caused by interaction with neutral particles. In this research, we are developing a new experimental device to uncover the importance of ambipolar diffusion during magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasmas. We employ an inverter-driven rotating magnetic fields technique, which is used for generating steady azimuthal plasma current, to establish long-duration ( 1 ms) anti-parallel reconnection with magnetic field of 5 mT in weakly ionized plasma. We will present development status and initial results from the new experimental setup. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus'', Giant-in Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI) 15H05750, 15K14279, 26287143 and the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS14KNWP004).

  9. The in-situ diagnosis of plasma-wall interactions on magnetic fusion devices with accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary

    2013-10-01

    We present the first in-situ, time-resolved measurements of low-Z isotope composition and deuterium retention over a large plasma-facing component (PFC) surface area in a magnetic fusion device. These critical measurements were made using a novel diagnostic technique based on the analysis of induced nuclear reactions from PFC surfaces on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Achieving an integrated understanding of plasma physics and materials science in magnetic fusion devices is severely hindered by a dearth of in-situ PFC surface diagnosis. Plasma-wall interactions, such as the erosion/redeposition of PFC material, the evolution of PFC surface isotope composition, and fusion fuel retention present significant plasma physics and materials science challenges for long pulse or steady-state devices. Our diagnostic uses a compact (~1 meter), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject ~1 MeV deuterons into the vacuum vessel. We control the tokamak's magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to PFC surfaces, where they induce high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes in the first ~10 microns of material. Analysis of the induced gamma and neutron energy spectra provides quantitative reconstruction of PFC surface conditions. This nondestructive, in-situ technique achieves PFC surface composition measurements with plasma shot-to-shot time resolution and 1 centimeter spatial resolution over large PFC areas. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER54235 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  10. Development of a simple device for processing whole-blood samples into measured aliquots of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, C A; Johnson, W F; Walker, W A

    1986-09-01

    A capillary processor and aliquoter has been designed and fabricated that is capable of accepting aliquots of whole blood and automatically processing them into discrete aliquots of plasma. The device consists of two disks, each of which contains 16 individual capillaries and a processing rotor. One disk accepts larger capillaries that hold approximately 100 microL of whole blood each. The second disk accepts 2.54-cm-long precision capillaries of various internal diameters, which provide exact sample volumes from 1 to 10 microL. The processing rotor contains 16 individual compartments and chambers to accept both disks. Applying centrifugal force transfers the aliquots of whole blood into their respective compartments, where they are separated into cellular and plasma fractions. As the rotor speed is slowly decreased, an aliquot of plasma is withdrawn by capillary action into each measuring capillary. The disk containing the 16 measured aliquots of plasma is then removed and placed into a modified rotor for conventional centrifugal analysis. This device can entrain and deliver microliter volumes of liquids with precision and accuracy (1-2%) near that of mechanical pipettes. Assays of the separated plasma aliquots also have acceptable precision (e.g., CVs approximately 3% for measurements of serum enzymes).

  11. Plasma-on-chip device for stable irradiation of cells cultured in media with a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomohiro; Chang, Chun-Yao; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) device which enables plasma treatment for cells cultured in media. The device, referred to as the plasma-on-chip, comprises microwells and microplasma sources fabricated together in a single chip. The microwells have through-holes between the microwells and microplasma sources. Each microplasma source is located on the backside of each microwells. The reactive components generated by the microplasma sources pass through the through-holes and reach cells cultured in the microwells. In this study, a plasma-on-chip device was modified for a stable plasma treatment. The use of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique allowed a stable plasma treatment up to 3 min. The plasma-on-chip with the original electrode configuration typically had the maximum stable operation time of around 1 min. Spectral analysis of the plasma identified reactive species such as O and OH radicals that can affect the activity of cells. Plasma treatment was successfully performed on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and green algae (Chlorella) cells. While no apparent change was observed with yeast, the treatment degraded the activity of the Chlorella cells and decreased their fluorescence. The device has the potential to help understand interactions between plasma and cells.

  12. Gradient Index Devices for the Simultaneous Focusing of the S0 and A0 Lamb Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Yabin; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Gradient index devices for the simultaneous control of the S 0 and A 0 Lamb modes are presented and numerically analysed. It is found a special relationship between the refractive indexes for these two modes which allows their simultaneous control by means of graded phononic crystals and thickness variations of the plate. A flat gradient index lens and a circular Luneburg lens are designed. Numerical simulations show that the performance of these devices is good for the two modes in a broadband frequency region, and that this approach can be used to design more advanced refractive devices for the total control of guided vibrational modes.

  13. Fully Three-dimensional Simulation and Modeling of a Dense Plasma Focus

    CERN Document Server

    Meehan, B T

    2014-01-01

    A Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is a pulsed-power machine that electromagnetically accelerates and cylindrically compresses a shocked plasma in a Z-pinch. The pinch results in a brief (about 100 nanosecond) pulse of X-rays, and, for some working gases, also a pulse of neutrons. A great deal of experimental research has been done into the physics of DPF reactions, and there exist mathematical models describing its behavior during the different time phases of the reaction. Two of the phases, known as the inverse pinch and the rundown, are approximately governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and there are a number of well-established codes for simulating these phases in two dimensions or in three dimensions under the assumption of axial symmetry. There has been little success, however, in developing fully three-dimensional simulations. In this work we present three-dimensional simulations of DPF reactions and demonstrate that 3D simulations predict qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior than their 2D counterp...

  14. Fully three-dimensional simulation and modeling of a dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, B. T.; Niederhaus, J. H. J.

    2014-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a pulsed-power machine that electromagnetically accelerates and cylindrically compresses a shocked plasma in a Z-pinch. The pinch results in a brief (~ 100 ns) pulse of X-rays, and, for some working gases, also a pulse of neutrons. A great deal of experimental research has been done into the physics of DPF reactions, and there exist mathematical models describing its behavior during the different time phases of the reaction. Two of the phases, known as the inverse pinch and the rundown, are approximately governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and there are a number of well-established codes for simulating these phases in two dimensions or in three dimensions under the assumption of axial symmetry. There has been little success, however, in developing fully three-dimensional simulations. In this work we present three-dimensional simulations of DPF reactions and demonstrate that three-dimensional simulations predict qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior than their two-dimensional counterparts. One of the most important quantities to predict is the time duration between the formation of the gas shock and Z-pinch, and the three-dimensional simulations more faithfully represent experimental results for this time duration and are essential for accurate prediction of future experiments.

  15. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A. [Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Postal Code 5166614766, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  16. Radiation protection of PFMA-1, a plasma focus for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, A; Frignani, M; Mannucci, S; Mostacci, D; Rocchi, F; Sumini, M; Teodori, F; Angeli, E; Tartari, A; Cucchi, G

    2007-12-01

    A plasma focus is being developed for breeding short-lived radionuclides. The different radiation protection issues and concerns posed by the machine once in operation are analysed and discussed. Activation is shown to be totally negligible and likewise neutron emission is found to pose no concern at all. The only source of radiation risk is found to rest in the radionuclides produced, 18F and 15 O, generating a peak exposure of 1.114 Sv y(-1) at the distance of closest approach of 2.5 m. Shielding to protect against this hazard is calculated to be 5 cm Pb or 54 cm concrete for the operation area and 5.5 cm Pb for the transportation flask.

  17. Feasibility analysis of a Plasma Focus neutron source for BNCT treatment of transplanted human liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzi, V.; Mezzetti, F.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.

    2004-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy preliminary treatments on transplanted human liver have been recently conducted at Pavia University. The need of high fluences of thermal neutrons imposed the use of the available thermal channel of a TRIGA reactor properly modified for this application. We analyse the possibility of using the Plasma Focus (PF) machine as a pulsed neutron source for this medical application instead of a nuclear reactor. Thermalization of the fast (2.45 MeV for D-D reactions) neutrons produced by the PF is gained with a paraffin or polyethylene moderator which contains both the neutron source and the irradiation chamber. The design parameters of a PF optimized for such an application are discussed, as well as other considerations on the advantages that this machine can bring to this kind of cancer therapy.

  18. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  19. Silicon dioxide mask by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in focused ion beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Shah, Ali; Alasaarela, Tapani; Chekurov, Nikolai; Savin, Hele; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2017-02-01

    In this work, focused ion beam (FIB) lithography was developed for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) silicon dioxide SiO2 hard mask. The PEALD process greatly decreases the deposition temperature of the SiO2 hard mask. FIB Ga+ ion implantation on the deposited SiO2 layer increases the wet etch resistivity of the irradiated region. A programmed exposure in FIB followed by development in a wet etchant enables the precisely defined nanoscale patterning. The combination of FIB exposure parameters and the development time provides greater freedom for optimization. The developed process provides high pattern dimension accuracy over the tested range of 90–210 nm. Utilizing the SiO2 mask developed in this work, silicon nanopillars with 40 nm diameter were successfully fabricated with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching and the aspect ratio reached 16:1. The fabricated mask is suitable for sub-100 nm high aspect ratio silicon structure fabrication.

  20. Energy-dependent finite-orbit treatment for plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation of hot plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices and results from this model are presented. In a small, hot magnetically confined plasma, the ion orbit radius (rho/sub i/) can be comparable to the plasma radius (R/sub p/). It a mirror-confined plasma were rho/sub i//R/sub p/ > 1/25 (such as 2XII-B), a point kinetic treatment of ion interactions becomes inaccurate and a finite gyro-radius (FGR) treatment must be used to adequately describe plasma buildup processes. This is particularly true for describing losses due to cold-gas charge exchange (c-x) near the plasma surface, since a particle lost near the vacuum interface may have contributed to the density as far as 2 rho/sub i/ radially inward from the c-x point. A similar FGR effect applies to beam-deposited ions whose large orbits influence the density up to 2 rho/sub i/ from the trapping point.

  1. Spontaneous excitation of waves by an intense ion beam on the Large Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Compernolle, Bart; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Heidbrink, William

    2016-10-01

    A hydrogen ion beam (15 keV, 10 A) has been injected into a large magnetized plasma (n 1010 -1013 cm-3, Te = 5.0 - 15.0 eV, B = 0.6 - 1.8 kG, He+ and H+ ions, 19 m long, 0.6 m diameter) for performing fast-ion studies on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The beam forms a helical orbit (pitch-angle 7° -55°), propagates with an Alfvénic speed (beam-speed/Alfvén-speed = 0.2 - 3.0), and significantly enhances the electron temperature and density when injected during the plasma afterglow. We report results on spontaneous generation of Alfvén waves and electrostatic waves in the lower-hybrid range of frequencies by the beam. Roles of normal and anomalous Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonances in destabilizing the Alfvén waves were examined by measuring the phase-speed of waves and relevant parameters of the plasma using a variety of diagnostic tools (retarding-field energy analyzer, three-axis magnetic-loop, Dipole, and Langmuir probes). Conditions for the maximum growth of these waves were determined by varying the parameters of the beam and ambient plasma and examining the mode-structures in the fluctuation-spectra. Work jointly supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  2. Capillarity-driven blood plasma separation on paper-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Shantimoy; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate capillarity-driven plasma separation from whole blood on simple paper-based H-channels. This methodology, unlike other reported techniques, does not necessitate elaborate and complex instrumentation, and the usage of expensive consumables. We believe that this technique will be ideally suited to be implemented in rapid and portable blood diagnostic devices designed to be operative at locations with limited resources.

  3. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  4. High-resolution X-ray focusing concave (elliptical) curved crystal spectrograph for laser-produced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali xiao(肖沙里); Yingjun Pan(潘英俊); Xianxin Zhong(钟先信); Xiancai Xiong(熊先才); Guohong Yang(杨国洪); Zongli Liu(刘宗礼); Yongkun Ding(丁永坤)

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum emitted from laser-produced plasma contains plentiful information.X-ray spectrometer is a powerful tool for plasma diagnosis and studying the information and evolution of the plasma.X-ray concave(elliptical)curved crystals analyzer was designed and manufactured to investigate the properties of laser-produced plasma.The experiment was carried out on Mianyang Xingguang-ⅡFacility and aimed at investigating the characteristics of a high density iron plasma.Experimental results using KAP,LIF,PET,and MICA curved crystal analyzers are described,and the spectra of Au,Ti laser-produced plasma are shown.The focusing crystal analyzer clearly gave an increase in sensitivity over a flat crystal.

  5. The effect of pre-ionization by a shunt resistor on the reproducibility of plasma focus x-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Sadiq, Mehboob [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Shafiq, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Waheed, A [PINSTECH, PO Box 2151, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Lee, P [Natural Sciences Academics Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, 637616 (Singapore); Zakaullah, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-08-15

    The effect of pre-ionization by means of a shunt resistor on the x-ray emission of a low energy (1.8 kJ) plasma focus device powered by a 9 {mu}F capacitor bank, charged at 20 kV and giving a peak discharge current of about 175 kA is investigated. Quantrad Si pin-diodes along with a suitable filter are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors, whereas a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray flux in 4{pi}-geometry is measured as a function of argon filling pressure with and without pre-ionization. It is found that appropriate selection of the shunt resistor increases shot-to-shot reproducibility of the x-ray emission as well as the stability of the pinch filament and broadens the x-ray pulse width. The x-ray emission is also enhanced by (45 {+-} 5)% at the optimum pressure.

  6. Effect of the RF wall conditioning on the high performance plasmas in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H., E-mail: takahashi.hiromi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Nakano, H.; Tokitani, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Fujii, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Murakami, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takeiri, Y.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The wall conditioning using radio frequency (RF) plasma was carried out using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and/or Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) with the working gas of helium under the established confinement magnetic field. After sufficient numbers of repetitive wall discharge conditioning (DC, ICDC for ICRF and ECDC for ECRH), the formation of the parabolic electron density profile and the increase of the central ion temperature T{sub i} were observed. There was no difference in the attained central T{sub i} of the NBI discharge just after the conditioning using a similar value of input energy regardless of the applied RF source. Thus, it is concluded that both ICDC and the ECDC are effective for the higher T{sub i} plasma production under the established magnetic field in the Large Helical Device. The effective RF wall conditioning scenarios are also investigated for high T{sub i} plasma production.

  7. The power-supply control system in the device of acetylene production by H-plasma pyrolysis coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.Y.; Zhang, M.; Fu, P.; Weng, P.D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2006-09-15

    The device of acetylene production by hydrogen (H{sub 2}) plasma pyrolysis coal is examined and developed not only for studying the application of low temperature plasma but also for studying the clean use of coal. The power-supply control system is used to ensure supplying a steady energy to generate and maintain the plasma electric arc of the device. The hardware configuration and the software design of the system are described in this paper. Verified by experiments, this system can meet the requirements of real-time performance, reliability and extensibility for the device.

  8. The Power-Supply Control System in the Device of Acetylene Production by H-Plasma Pyrolysis Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyun; Zhang, Ming; Fu, Peng; Weng, Peide

    2006-09-01

    The device of acetylene production by hydrogen (H-) plasma pyrolysis coal is examined and developed not only for studying the application of low temperature plasma but also for studying the clean use of coal. The power-supply control system is used to ensure supplying a steady energy to generate and maintain the plasma electric arc of the device. The hardware configuration and the software design of the system are described in this paper. Verified by experiments, this system can meet the requirements of real-time performance, reliability and extensibility for the device.

  9. Carbon Nanofibers Functionalized with Active Screen Plasma-Deposited Metal Nanoparticles for Electrical Energy Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corujeira Gallo, Santiago; Li, Xiaoying; Fütterer, Klaus; Charitidis, Constantinos A; Dong, Hanshan

    2017-07-12

    Supercapacitors are energy storage devices with higher energy densities than conventional capacitors but lower than batteries or fuel cells. There is a strong interest in increasing the volumetric and gravimetric capacitance of these devices to meet the growing demands of the electrical and electronic sectors. The capacitance depends largely on the electrode material, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have attracted much attention because of their relatively low cost, large surface area, and good electrical conductivity as well as chemical and thermal stability. The deposition of metal nanoparticles on CNFs is a promising way to increase their surface properties and, ultimately, the capacitance of the devices. In this study, nickel and silver nanoparticles were deposited on CNFs using the active screen plasma technology. The CNFs were characterized, and their electrochemical performance was assessed in a three-electrode cell. The results show significant improvements over the untreated CNFs, particularly after functionalization with silver nanoparticles.

  10. Moderation of neoclassical impurity accumulation in high temperature plasmas of helical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco, J L; Satake, S; Alonso, A; Nunami, M; Yokoyama, M; Sato, M; Dinklage, A; Estrada, T; Fontdecaba, J M; Liniers, M; McCarthy, K J; Medina, F; Van Milligen, B Ph; Ochando, M; Parra, F; Sugama, H; Zhezhera, A

    2016-01-01

    Achieving impurity and helium ash control is a crucial issue in the path towards fusion-grade magnetic confinement devices, and this is particularly the case of helical reactors, whose low-collisionality ion-root operation scenarios usually display a negative radial electric field which is expected to cause inwards impurity pinch. In these work we discuss, based on experimental measurements and standard predictions of neoclassical theory, how plasmas of very low ion collisionality, similar to those observed in the impurity hole of the Large Helical Device, can be an exception to this general rule, and how a negative radial electric field can coexist with an outward impurity flux. This interpretation is supported by comparison with documented discharges available in the International Stellarator-Heliotron Profile Database, and it can be extrapolated to show that achievement of high ion temperature in the core of helical devices is not fundamentally incompatible with low core impurity content.

  11. Dense Plasma Focus: physics and applications (radiation material science, single-shot disclosure of hidden illegal objects, radiation biology and medicine, etc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Chernyshova, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Tomaszewski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.; Giannini, G.; Longo, F.; Talab, A.; Ul'yanenko, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents some outcomes obtained during the year of 2013 of the activity in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Co-ordinated research project "Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion-Relevant Pulses". The main results are related to the effects created at the interaction of powerful pulses of different types of radiation (soft and hard X-rays, hot plasma and fast ion streams, neutrons, etc. generated in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) facilities) with various materials including those that are counted as perspective ones for their use in future thermonuclear reactors. Besides we discuss phenomena observed at the irradiation of biological test objects. We examine possible applications of nanosecond powerful pulses of neutrons to the aims of nuclear medicine and for disclosure of hidden illegal objects. Special attention is devoted to discussions of a possibility to create extremely large and enormously diminutive DPF devices and probabilities of their use in energetics, medicine and modern electronics.

  12. Ventricular assist devices for heart failure: a focus on patient selection and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriani M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manlio Cipriani, Vincenzo De Simone, Luciana D'Angelo, Enrico Perna, Marzia Lilliu, Virginia Bovolo, Fabrizio Oliva, Maria Frigerio Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department, A De Gasperis Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy Abstract: Heart transplantation represents the “gold standard” for the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure, but remains challenged by inadequate donor supply, finite graft survival, and long-term complications arising from immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, a lot of patients waiting for a heart transplant experience clinical deterioration, and other patients become ineligible to undergo this treatment due to their age or relevant comorbidities. Left ventricular assist devices have emerged as a valid therapeutic option for advanced heart failure. In recent years, we have seen significant advances not only in the technologies available, but also in patient selection, indications for use, and management after implantation. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of implants and an improvement in the survival rate and quality of life for these patients. At the same time, there are new challenges on the horizon. Patient selection is a difficult process, based on clinical and imaging parameters and risk scores, and more data are needed to refine patient selection criteria and the timing of the implant. Left ventricular assist device-related complications are still a serious problem, causing adverse events and hospital readmissions. Continuous progress in the development of these implantable devices, such as a further reduction in size and hopefully the abolition of the external driveline, will probably make ventricular assist devices an option also for less advanced stages of heart failure. Here, we discuss the current indications for left ventricular assist device implantation, patient selection criteria, and the most frequent complications associated with these devices. Keywords

  13. Focus ion beam-induced mechanical stress switching in an ultra-fast resistive switching device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The Mo/Si3N4:Pt/Pt nanometallic resistive switching devices with ultra-fast write/erase speed (meta-stable state, while LRS (detrapping state) is a stable state. Strong mechanical stress facilitates local bond distortion in dielectric films and thus lowers the energy barrier between HRS and LRS, eventually leading to a barrier-less state transition. A quantitative model based on stress-mediated parallel conduction paths were established to provide a more accurate description of the resistive switching devices.

  14. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus - Part II: Looking at the singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2016-01-01

    The Gratton-Vargas snowplow model, recently revisited and expanded (S K H Auluck, Physics of Plasmas, 20, 112501 (2013)), has given rise to significant new insights into some aspects of the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF), in spite of being a purely kinematic description having no reference to plasma phenomena. It is able to provide a good fit to the experimental current waveforms in at least 4 large facilities. It has been used for construction of a local curvilinear frame of reference, in which conservation laws for mass, momentum and energy can be reduced to effectively-one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations. Its utility in global parameter optimization of device parameters has been demonstrated. These features suggest that the Gratton-Vargas model deserves a closer look at its supposed limitations near the singular phase of the DPF. This paper presents a discussion of its development near the device axis, based on the original work of Gratton and Vargas, with some differences. It is shown that the...

  15. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus. II. Looking at the singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auluck, S. K. H., E-mail: skhauluck@gmail.com [HiQ TechKnowWorks Private Limited, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400706 (India)

    2015-11-15

    The Gratton-Vargas snowplow model, recently revisited and expanded [S. K. H. Auluck, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)], has given rise to significant new insights into some aspects of the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF), in spite of being a purely kinematic description having no reference to plasma phenomena. It is able to provide a good fit to the experimental current waveforms in at least 4 large facilities. It has been used for construction of a local curvilinear frame of reference, in which conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy can be reduced to effectively-one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations. Its utility in global parameter optimization of device parameters has been demonstrated. These features suggest that the Gratton-Vargas model deserves a closer look at its supposed limitations near the singular phase of the DPF. This paper presents a discussion of its development near the device axis, based on the original work of Gratton and Vargas, with some differences. It is shown that the Gratton-Vargas partial differential equation has solutions for times after the current singularity, which exhibit an expanding bounded volume (which can serve as model of an expanding plasma column) and decreasing dynamic inductance of the discharge, in spite of having no built-in hydrodynamics. This enables the model to qualitatively reproduce the characteristic shape of the current derivative in DPF experiments without reference to any plasma phenomena, such as instabilities, anomalous resistance, or reflection of hydrodynamic shock wave from the axis. The axial propagation of the solution exhibits a power-law dependence on the dimensionless time starting from the time of singularity, which is similar to the power-law relations predicted by theory of point explosions in ideal gases and which has also been observed experimentally.

  16. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus. II. Looking at the singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2015-11-01

    The Gratton-Vargas snowplow model, recently revisited and expanded [S. K. H. Auluck, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)], has given rise to significant new insights into some aspects of the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF), in spite of being a purely kinematic description having no reference to plasma phenomena. It is able to provide a good fit to the experimental current waveforms in at least 4 large facilities. It has been used for construction of a local curvilinear frame of reference, in which conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy can be reduced to effectively-one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations. Its utility in global parameter optimization of device parameters has been demonstrated. These features suggest that the Gratton-Vargas model deserves a closer look at its supposed limitations near the singular phase of the DPF. This paper presents a discussion of its development near the device axis, based on the original work of Gratton and Vargas, with some differences. It is shown that the Gratton-Vargas partial differential equation has solutions for times after the current singularity, which exhibit an expanding bounded volume (which can serve as model of an expanding plasma column) and decreasing dynamic inductance of the discharge, in spite of having no built-in hydrodynamics. This enables the model to qualitatively reproduce the characteristic shape of the current derivative in DPF experiments without reference to any plasma phenomena, such as instabilities, anomalous resistance, or reflection of hydrodynamic shock wave from the axis. The axial propagation of the solution exhibits a power-law dependence on the dimensionless time starting from the time of singularity, which is similar to the power-law relations predicted by theory of point explosions in ideal gases and which has also been observed experimentally.

  17. Photovoltaic material and device measurements workshop: focus on polycrystalline thin film cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The general purpose of the workshop was to accelerate the development of thin film solar cells by improving the versatility and reliability of material and device measurement techniques. Papers were presented under the following sessions: structural/chemical session; optical/electro-optical session; charge transport session; and poster session. Each paper was processed for EDB.

  18. The Multiple Resonance Probe: A Novel Device for Industry Compatible Plasma Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Storch, Robert; Lapke, Martin; Oberrath, Jens; Schulz, Christian; Styrnoll, Tim; Zietz, Christian; Awakowicz, Peter; Musch, Thomas; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Rolfes, Ilona

    2012-10-01

    To be useful for the supervision or control of technical plasmas, a diagnostic method must be i) robust and stable, ii) insensitive to perturbation by the process, iii) itself not perturbing the process, iv) clearly and easily interpretable without the need for calibration, v) compliant with the requirements of process integration, and, last but not least, vi) economical in terms of investment, footprint, and maintenance. Plasma resonance spectroscopy, exploiting the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency, provides a good basis for such an ``industry compatible'' plasma diagnostics. The contribution will describe the general idea of active plasma resonance spectroscopy and introduce a mathematical formalism for its analysis. It will then focus on the novel multipole resonance probe (MRP), where the excited resonances can be classified explicitly and the connection between the probe response and the desired electron density can be cast as a simple formula. The current state of the MRP project will be described, including the experimental characterization of a prototype in comparison with Langmuir probes, and the development of a specialized measurement circuit.

  19. Use of delayed gamma rays for active non-destructive assay of {sup 235}U irradiated by pulsed neutron source (plasma focus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andola, Sanjay; Niranjan, Ram [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, T.C., E-mail: tckk@barc.gov.in [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rout, R.K. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Ashwani; Paranjape, D.B.; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, B.S.; Ramakumar, K.L. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, S.C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed neutron source based on plasma focus device has been used for active interrogation and assay of {sup 235}U by monitoring its delayed high energy γ-rays. The method involves irradiation of fissile material by thermal neutrons obtained after moderation of a burst of neutrons emitted upon fusion of deuterium in plasma focus (PF) device. The delayed gamma rays emitted from the fissile material as a consequence of induced fission were detected by a large volume sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detector. The detector is coupled to a data acquisition system of 2k input size with 2k ADC conversion gain. Counting was carried out in pulse height analysis mode for time integrated counts up to 100 s while the temporal profile of delayed gamma has been obtained by counting in multichannel scaling mode with dwell time of 50 ms. To avoid the effect of passive (natural) and active (from surrounding materials) backgrounds, counts have been acquired for gamma energy between 3 and 10 MeV. The lower limit of detection of {sup 235}U in the oxide samples with this set-up is estimated to be 14 mg.

  20. Hole injection enhancement in organic light emitting devices using plasma treated graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesuraj, P. Justin; Parameshwari, R.; Kanthasamy, K.; Koch, J.; Pfnür, H.; Jeganathan, K.

    2017-03-01

    The hole injection layer (HIL) with high work function (WF) is desirable to reduce the injection barrier between anode and hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLED). Here, we report a novel approach to tune the WF of graphene oxide (GO) using oxygen and hydrogen plasma treatment and its hole injection properties in OLEDs. The mild exposure of oxygen plasma on GO (O2-GO) significantly reduces the injection barrier by increasing the WF of anode (4.98 eV) through expansion of Csbnd O bonds. In contrast, the hole injection barrier was drastically increased for hydrogen plasma treated GO (H2-GO) layers as the WF is lowered by the contraction of Csbnd O bond. By employing active O2-GO as HIL in OLEDs found to exhibit superior current efficiency of 4.2 cd/A as compared to 3.3 cd/A for pristine GO. Further, the high injection efficiency of O2-GO infused hole only device can be attributed to the improved energy level matching. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to correlate the WF of HIL infused anode towards the enhanced performance of OLEDs with their capricious content of Csbnd O in GO matrix.

  1. Self-excitation of microwave oscillations in plasma-assisted slow-wave oscillators by an electron beam with a movable focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Yu P; Nusinovich, G S; Shkvarunets, A G; Carmel, Y

    2004-10-01

    Plasma-assisted slow-wave oscillators (pasotrons) operate without external magnetic fields, which makes these devices quite compact and lightweight. Beam focusing in pasotrons is provided by ions, which appear in the device due to the impact ionization of a neutral gas by beam electrons. Typically, the ionization time is on the order of the rise time of the beam current. This means that, during the rise of the current, beam focusing by ions becomes stronger. Correspondingly, a beam of electrons, which was initially diverging radially due to the self-electric field, starts to be focused by ions, and this focus moves towards the gun as the ion density increases. This feature makes the self-excitation of electromagnetic (em) oscillations in pasotrons quite different from practically all other microwave sources where em oscillations are excited by a stationary electron beam. The process of self-excitation of em oscillations has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that in pasotrons, during the beam current rise the amount of current entering the interaction space and the beam coupling to the em field vary. As a result, the self-excitation can proceed faster than in conventional microwave sources with similar operating parameters such as the operating frequency, cavity quality-factor and the beam current and voltage.

  2. The differing behavior of electrosurgical devices made of various electrode materials operating under plasma conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, K. R.; Ryan, T. P.; Gaspredes, J.; Woloszko, J.

    2015-03-01

    Coblation® is an electrosurgical technology which employs electrically-excited electrodes in the presence of saline solution to produce a localized and ionized plasma that can cut, ablate, and otherwise treat tissues for many different surgical needs. To improve our understanding of how Coblation plasmas develop from devices made from different electrode materials we describe several experiments designed to elucidate material effects. Initial experiments studied simple, noncommercial cylindrical electrode test devices operating in buffered isotonic saline without applied suction. The applied RF voltage, approximately 300 V RMS, was sufficient to form glow discharges around the active electrodes. The devices exhibited significantly different operating characteristics, which we ascribe to the differing oxidation tendencies and other physical properties of the electrode materials. Parameters measured include RMS voltage and current, instantaneous voltage and current, temporally-resolved light emission and optical emission spectra, and electrode mass-loss measurements. We correlate these measured properties with some of the bulk characteristics of the electrode materials such as work functions, standard reduction potentials and sputter yields.

  3. Moderation of neoclassical impurity accumulation in high temperature plasmas of helical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, J. L.; Calvo, I.; Satake, S.; Alonso, A.; Nunami, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Sato, M.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Liniers, M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Ochando, M.; Parra, F.; Sugama, H.; Zhezhera, A.; The LHD Experimental Team; The TJ-II Team

    2017-01-01

    Achieving impurity and helium ash control is a crucial issue in the path towards fusion-grade magnetic confinement devices, and this is particularly the case of helical reactors, whose low-collisionality ion-root operation scenarios usually display a negative radial electric field which is expected to cause inwards impurity pinch. In this work we discuss, based on experimental measurements and standard predictions of neoclassical theory, how plasmas of very low ion collisionality, similar to those observed in the impurity hole of the large helical device (Yoshinuma et al and The LHD Experimental Group 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 062002, Ida et al and The LHD Experimental Group 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 056111 and Yokoyama et al and LHD Experimental Group 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 143), can be an exception to this general rule, and how a negative radial electric field can coexist with an outward impurity flux. This interpretation is supported by comparison with documented discharges available in the International Stellarator-Heliotron Profile Database, and it can be extrapolated to show that achievement of high ion temperature in the core of helical devices is not fundamentally incompatible with low core impurity content.

  4. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P. K., E-mail: pkumar@ipr.res.in; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M., E-mail: kushagra.lalit@gmail.com; Mattoo, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2016-07-15

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  5. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  6. An Investigation of Bremsstrahlung Reflection in a Dense Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    of this Report: Dr. Greg Benford (1 CD) Physics Department University of California Irvine, CA 92717 AFRL/PRSP (15 CD) Dr. Frank Mead...G. Maclay (1 CD) Quantum Fields 20876 Wildflower Ln. Richland Center WI 53581 Dr. Patrick McDaniels (1 CD) Sandia National Laboratories MS

  7. Numerical simulation study on density dependence of plasma detachment in simulated gas divertor experiments of the TPD-I device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Mori, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Suzuki, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    It is one of the most critical requirements to reduce the heat load to the divertor plate in the next generation fusion devices such as ITER, intended to have a long pulse or a steady state operation. Dynamic gas target divertor as well as high recycling divertor is one of the most important candidates for ITER. Recently a detached plasma has been observed in experimental fusion devices. Knowledge of the basic physics of the plasma detachment is required for any application of the gas target and high recycling divertor to the next generation experimental reactors. Linear plasma divertor simulators with high heat flux plasmas are used to investigate the plasma detachment because its good accessibility for comprehensive measurements and simple geometry leads a deeper understanding of the plasma detachment by comparing between simulation predictions and the experimental results. (orig.)

  8. Fabrication and Operation of Acoustofluidic Devices Supporting Bulk Acoustic Standing Waves for Sheathless Focusing of Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, C. Wyatt; Cruz, Daniela F.; Ohiri, Korine A.; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Lopez, Gabriel P.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustophoresis refers to the displacement of suspended objects in response to directional forces from sound energy. Given that the suspended objects must be smaller than the incident wavelength of sound and the width of the fluidic channels are typically tens to hundreds of micrometers across, acoustofluidic devices typically use ultrasonic waves generated from a piezoelectric transducer pulsating at high frequencies (in the megahertz range). At characteristic frequencies that depend on the ...

  9. Comparative study of X-ray emission from plasma focus relative to different preionization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Qayyum, A.; Hassan, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-07-01

    A 2.7-kJ Mather-type plasma focus has been investigated for X-ray emission with preionization produced by an α-source, a β-source, and a shunt resistor. Time-resolved and time integrated measurements are carried out using a PIN-diode-based X-ray spectrometer and pinhole camera. The β-source (28Ni63) assisted preionization enhances the X-ray emission up to 25%, while preionization induced by depleted uranium (92U238) increases both Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 100%. The preionization caused by the optimum shunt resistor enhances the Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 53%. It is found that preionization also broadens the working pressure range for the high X-ray yield and improves the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the system. Pinhole images reveal that the X-ray emission from the anode tip is dominant owing to impact of electron bombardment, while the X-ray emission from hot spots is also visible.

  10. In situ determination of the static inductance and resistance of a plasma focus capacitor bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S H; Lee, S; Roy, F; Chong, P L; Vengadeswaran, V; Sidik, A S M; Leong, Y W; Singh, A

    2010-05-01

    The static (unloaded) electrical parameters of a capacitor bank are of utmost importance for the purpose of modeling the system as a whole when the capacitor bank is discharged into its dynamic electromagnetic load. Using a physical short circuit across the electromagnetic load is usually technically difficult and is unnecessary. The discharge can be operated at the highest pressure permissible in order to minimize current sheet motion, thus simulating zero dynamic load, to enable bank parameters, static inductance L(0), and resistance r(0) to be obtained using lightly damped sinusoid equations given the bank capacitance C(0). However, for a plasma focus, even at the highest permissible pressure it is found that there is significant residual motion, so that the assumption of a zero dynamic load introduces unacceptable errors into the determination of the circuit parameters. To overcome this problem, the Lee model code is used to fit the computed current trace to the measured current waveform. Hence the dynamics is incorporated into the solution and the capacitor bank parameters are computed using the Lee model code, and more accurate static bank parameters are obtained.

  11. Revisiting Plant Plasma Membrane Lipids in Tobacco: A Focus on Sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacas, Jean-Luc; Buré, Corinne; Grosjean, Kevin; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Lherminier, Jeannine; Rombouts, Yoann; Maes, Emmanuel; Bossard, Claire; Gronnier, Julien; Furt, Fabienne; Fouillen, Laetitia; Germain, Véronique; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Robert, Franck; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The lipid composition of plasma membrane (PM) and the corresponding detergent-insoluble membrane (DIM) fraction were analyzed with a specific focus on highly polar sphingolipids, so-called glycosyl inositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) 'Bright Yellow 2' cell suspension and leaves, evidence is provided that GIPCs represent up to 40 mol % of the PM lipids. Comparative analysis of DIMs with the PM showed an enrichment of 2-hydroxylated very-long-chain fatty acid-containing GIPCs and polyglycosylated GIPCs in the DIMs. Purified antibodies raised against these GIPCs were further used for immunogold-electron microscopy strategy, revealing the distribution of polyglycosylated GIPCs in domains of 35 ± 7 nm in the plane of the PM. Biophysical studies also showed strong interactions between GIPCs and sterols and suggested a role for very-long-chain fatty acids in the interdigitation between the two PM-composing monolayers. The ins and outs of lipid asymmetry, raft formation, and interdigitation in plant membrane biology are finally discussed.

  12. Treatment of near-skull brain tissue with a focused device using shear-mode conversion: a numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave. Rm C713 Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-12-21

    Shear mode transmission through the skull has been previously proposed as a new trans-skull propagation technique for noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound (Clement 2004 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115 1356-64). The main advantage of choosing shear over longitudinal mode resides on the fact that there is less wavefront distortion with the former. In the present study, the regions of the brain suitable for shear-mode transmission were established for a simple focused ultrasound device. The device consists of a spherically curved transducer that has a focal length of 10 cm, an aperture between 30{sup 0} and 60{sup 0} and operates at 0.74 MHz. The regions suitable for shear-mode transmission were determined by the shear wave acoustic windows that matched the shape of the device acoustic field. The acoustic windows were calculated using segmentation and triangulation of outer and inner faces of skull from 3D-MRI head datasets. Nine heads of healthy adults were analyzed. The surface considered for the calculations was the head region found above the supra-orbital margin. For every inspected point in the brain volume, the axis of the device was determined by the vector between this inspection point and a point located in the center of the brain. Numerical predictions of the acoustic field, where shear-mode conversion through the skull was considered, were obtained and compared to the case of water-only conditions. The brain tissue that is close to the skull showed suitable acoustic windows for shear waves. The central region of the brain seems to be unreachable using shear-mode. Analysis of the acoustic fields showed a proportional relation between the acoustic window for shear mode and the effective degree of focusing. However, this relation showed significant differences among specimens. In general, highly focused fields were obtained when the acoustic window for shear waves (A{sub SW}) intersected more than 67% of the entering acoustic window (A{sub TX}) of the device. The

  13. Treatment of near-skull brain tissue with a focused device using shear-mode conversion: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-12-01

    Shear mode transmission through the skull has been previously proposed as a new trans-skull propagation technique for noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound (Clement 2004 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115 1356-64). The main advantage of choosing shear over longitudinal mode resides on the fact that there is less wavefront distortion with the former. In the present study, the regions of the brain suitable for shear-mode transmission were established for a simple focused ultrasound device. The device consists of a spherically curved transducer that has a focal length of 10 cm, an aperture between 30° and 60° and operates at 0.74 MHz. The regions suitable for shear-mode transmission were determined by the shear wave acoustic windows that matched the shape of the device acoustic field. The acoustic windows were calculated using segmentation and triangulation of outer and inner faces of skull from 3D-MRI head datasets. Nine heads of healthy adults were analyzed. The surface considered for the calculations was the head region found above the supra-orbital margin. For every inspected point in the brain volume, the axis of the device was determined by the vector between this inspection point and a point located in the center of the brain. Numerical predictions of the acoustic field, where shear-mode conversion through the skull was considered, were obtained and compared to the case of water-only conditions. The brain tissue that is close to the skull showed suitable acoustic windows for shear waves. The central region of the brain seems to be unreachable using shear-mode. Analysis of the acoustic fields showed a proportional relation between the acoustic window for shear mode and the effective degree of focusing. However, this relation showed significant differences among specimens. In general, highly focused fields were obtained when the acoustic window for shear waves (ASW) intersected more than 67% of the entering acoustic window (ATX) of the device. The average depth from the

  14. Research of the Effects of Electron Focused Electric Field upon an Enhanced Glow Discharge Plasma Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liu-he; WU Yong-qin; ZHANG Yan-hua; CAI Xun; CHU Paul K

    2004-01-01

    A new Enhanced Glow Discharge Plasma Ion Implantation methods are introduced, in which the plasma are produced by the self glow discharge excitated by high negative voltage bias. The electric field is designed to a electron focusing mode by using a small area hollow anode and a large area sample holder cathode. The pattern of equipotentials of the electric field are calculated through finite-element method. By using the special electron-focusing field, the self glow discharge are enhanced and provide denser ions to implanted into the substrate.

  15. Collisional damping of helicon waves in a high density hydrogen linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan F.; Blackwell, Boyd D.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation and damping of helicon waves along the length (50 cm) of a helicon-produced 20 kW hydrogen plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 1–2 × 1019 m‑3, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 1–6 eV, H2 8 mTorr) operated in a magnetic mirror configuration (antenna region: 50–200 G and mirror region: 800 G). Experimental results show the presence of traveling helicon waves (4–8 G and {λz}∼ 10–15 cm) propagating away from the antenna region which become collisionally absorbed within 40–50 cm. We describe the use of the WKB method to calculate wave damping and provide an expression to assess its validity based on experimental measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with experiment and indicate that for conditions where Coulomb collisions are dominant classical collisionality is sufficient to explain the observed wave damping along the length of the plasma column. Based on these results, we provide an expression for the scaling of helicon wave damping relevant to high density discharges and discuss the location of surfaces for plasma-material interaction studies in helicon based linear plasma devices.

  16. Hybrid simulation of a parallel collisionless shock in the Large Plasma Device

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, M S; Jenko, F; Niemann, C

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional hybrid kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic simulations of planned laser-ablation experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). Our results, based on parameters which have been validated in previous experiments, show that a parallel collisionless shock can begin forming within the available space. Carbon-debris ions that stream along the magnetic-field direction with a blow-off speed of four times the Alfven velocity excite strong magnetic fluctuations, eventually transfering part of their kinetic energy to the surrounding hydrogen ions. This acceleration and compression of the background plasma creates a shock front, which satisfies the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and can therefore propagate on its own. Furthermore, we analyze the upstream turbulence and show that it is dominated by the right-hand resonant instability.

  17. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  18. Janus droplet parallel arrangements using a simple Y-channel flow-focusing microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Long; Cai, Bo; Zuo, Yunfeng; Xiao, Liang; Rao, Lang; He, Zhaobo; Yang, Yi; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Due to its unique advantages such as monodispersity and high throughput, droplet microfluidics has been widely used to generate diverse droplets/particles that have specific structures. Herein, we implemented Janus droplet parallel arrangements in a flow-focusing microchip through regulating corresponding fluid flow rates. Initially, fluorescence dye and PBS buffer solution kept laminar flow before the flow-focusing orifice and then was sheared into Janus droplets. Droplet diameter and corresponding generation frequency could be effectively manipulated. Subsequently, the generation of different Janus droplet parallel arrangements (e.g. monolayer, double-layer or three-layer arrangement) could be achieved by fluid regulation.

  19. Efficient mask data preparation for variable shaped e-beam writing system focusing on memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae H.; Lee, Jong-Bae; Shin, Jae-Pil; Yoo, Kwang-Jai; Jung, Dai-Hyun; Park, Yong-Hee; Yoo, Moon-Hyun; Kong, Jeong-Taek

    2003-12-01

    To cope with sub-100nm technology in the mask making industry, a variable shaped e-beam(VSB) writing system is one of the solutions through its high-electron voltage. The VSB writing system, however, requires a different mask data preparation comparing to the traditional raster scan writing system. Due to the differences, mask making industries are confronted with difficult problems, such as explosively increasing data volume and unpredictably growing mask making time especially for memory devices. VSB system's writing time is determined by the conversion from CAD data to VSB data. The conversion time, especially for the critical layers of memory devices, mostly depends on to what extent optimize CAD data to enhance writing system throughput. For this reason, to shorten the unpredictably growing mask making time, a data conversion tool must consider the throughput of data conversion and mask writing at the same time. To reduce the data conversion time while retaining the optimal writing time, we propose the mixed-mode data processing method, in which the hierarchical data operation is applied on memory cells and the flat data operation is applied on peripheral circuits. For each area, different fracturing strategies are applied, too. The polygon-aware fracturing method is applied to improve the CD control within memory cells, and the selective one-directional fracturing method is applied to reduce the writing time within peripheral circuits.

  20. Measurements of line-averaged electron density of pulsed plasmas using a He-Ne laser interferometer in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, D.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    In next step of fusion devices such as ITER, lifetime of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) is strongly affected by transient heat and particle loads during type I edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption. To clarify damage characteristics of the PFMs, transient heat and particle loads have been simulated by using a plasma gun device. We have performed simulation experiments by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The line-averaged electron density measured by a He-Ne interferometer is 2x10^21 m-3 in a drift tube. The plasma velocity measured by a time of flight technique and ion Doppler spectrometer was 70 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 100 eV for helium. Thus, the ion flux density is 1.4x10^26 m-2s-1. On the other hand, the MCPG is connected to a target chamber for material irradiation experiments. It is important to measure plasma parameters in front of target materials in the target chamber. In particular, a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material produced by the pulsed plasma irradiation has to be characterized in order to understand surface damage of PFMs under ELM-like plasma bombardment. In the conference, preliminary results of application of the He-Ne laser interferometer for the above experiment will be shown.

  1. Resonant excitation of waves by a spiraling ion beam on the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna

    2015-11-01

    The resonant interaction between energetic-ions and plasma waves is a fundamental topic of importance in the space, controlled magnetic-fusion, and laboratory plasma physics. We report new results on the spontaneous generation of traveling shear Alfvén waves and high-harmonic beam-modes in the lower-hybrid range of frequencies by an intense ion beam. In particular, the role of Landau and Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonances (DICR) in extracting the free-energy from the ion-beam and destabilizing Alfvén waves was explored on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). In these experiments, single and dual-species magnetized plasmas (n ~1010 -1012 cm-3, Te ~ 5.0-10.0 eV, B = 0.6-1.8 kG, He+ and H+ ions, 19.0 m long, 0.6 m diameter) were produced and a spiraling hydrogen ion beam (5-15 keV, 2-10 A, beam-speed/Alfvén-speed = 0.2-1.5, J ~ 50-150 mA/cm2, pitch-angle ~53°) was injected into the plasma. The interaction of the beam with the plasma was diagnosed using a retarding-field energy analyzer, three-axis magnetic-loop, and Langmuir probes. The resonance conditions for the growth of shear Alfvén waves were examined by varying the parameters of the ion-beam and ambient plasma. The experimental results demonstrate that the DICR process is particularly effective in exciting left-handed polarized shear Alfvén waves that propagate in the direction opposite to the ion beam. The high-harmonic beam modes were detected in the vicinity of the spiraling ion beam and contained more than 80 harmonics of Doppler-shifted gyro-frequency of the beam. Work jointly supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  2. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  3. Generation of acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas through three-dimensional particle focusing by distorted waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Rogue waves--rare uncertainly emerging localized events with large amplitudes--have been experimentally observed in many nonlinear wave phenomena, such as water waves, optical waves, second sound in superfluid He II (ref. ) and ion acoustic waves in plasmas. Past studies have mainly focused on one-dimensional (1D) wave behaviour through modulation instabilities, and to a lesser extent on higher-dimensional behaviour. The question whether rogue waves also exist in nonlinear 3D acoustic-type plasma waves, the kinetic origin of their formation and their correlation with surrounding 3D waveforms are unexplored fundamental issues. Here we report the direct experimental observation of dust acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas and construct a picture of 3D particle focusing by the surrounding tilted and ruptured wave crests, associated with the higher probability of low-amplitude holes for rogue-wave generation.

  4. Study of focusing characteristics of ultrasound for designing acoustic lens in ultrasonic moxibustion device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Hyun; Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Bok [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Traditional moxibustion therapy can cause severe pain and leave scarring burns at the moxibustion site as it relies on the practitioner's subjective and qualitative treatment. Recently, ultrasound therapy has received attention as an alternative to moxibustion therapy owing to its objectiveness and quantitative nature. However, in order to convert ultrasound energy into heat energy, there is a need to precisely understand the ultrasound-focusing characteristics of the acoustic lens. Therefore, in this study, an FEM simulation was performed for acoustic lenses with different geometries a concave lens and zone lens as the geometry critically influences ultrasound focusing. The acoustic pressure field, amplitude, and focal point were also calculated. Furthermore, the performance of the fabricated acoustic lens was verified by a sound pressure measurement experiment.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy of deuterium and helium plasma jets emitted from plasma focus discharges at the PF-1000U facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zaloga, D. R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Krauz, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy techniques were used to investigate the spectra of dense deuterium-plasma jets generated by high-current pulse discharges within the large PF-1000U facility and to estimate parameters of plasma inside the jets and their surroundings. Time-resolved optical spectra were recorded by means of a Mechelle®900 spectrometer. From an analysis of the deuterium line broadening, it was estimated that the electron concentration at a distance 57 cm from the electrode outlets amounted to (0.4-3.7) × 1017 cm-3 depending on the initial gas distribution and the time interval of the spectrum registration after the instant of the plasma jet generation. From the re-absorption dip in the Dβ profile, it was assessed that the electron concentration in the surrounding gas was equal to about 1.5 × 1015 cm-3. On the basis of the measured ratio of He II 468.6 nm and He I 587.6 nm line intensities, it was estimated that the electron temperature amounted to about 5.3 eV. Also estimated were some dimensionless parameters of the investigated plasma jets.

  6. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves, E-mail: frederico.mancuso@grupofleury.com.br [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira [Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  7. A tunable microflow focusing device utilizing controllable moving walls and its applications for formation of micro-droplets in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Hong; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-06-01

    This study reports a new microfluidic device capable of fine-tuned sample-flow focusing and generation of micro-droplets in liquids by controlling moving wall structures. Two microfluidic components including an 'active microchannel width controller' and a 'micro chopper' can be used to fine-tune the width of the hydrodynamically pre-focused stream and subsequently generate micro-droplets. In this study, a basic concept of a 'controllable moving wall' structure was addressed and applied as the active microchannel width controller and the micro chopper to generate the proposed function. Pneumatic side chambers were placed next to a main flow channel to construct the controllable moving wall structures. The deformation of the controllable moving wall structure can be generated by the pressurized air injected into the pneumatic side chambers. The proposed chip device was fabricated utilizing polymer material such as PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) to provide the flexibility of the controllable moving wall deformation. The microfluidic chip device with dimensions of 2.5 cm in width and 3.0 cm in length can be fabricated using a simple fabrication process. Experimental data showed that the deformation of the controllable moving wall structure can be adjusted by applying different air pressures, so that the width of the main flow channel can be controlled accordingly. By utilizing the proposed mechanism, the pre-focused dispersed phase stream could be actively focused into a narrower stream, and well-controlled micro-droplets with smaller diameters could be generated. The stream width can be reduced from 30 µm to 9 µm and micro-droplets with a diameter of 76 µm could be generated by utilizing the proposed device. In addition, to generate micro-droplets within smaller diameters, uniform size distribution of the micro-droplets can be obtained. According to the experimental results, development of the microfluidic device could be promising for a variety of applications such

  8. Ion beam extraction from a matrix ECR plasma source by discrete ion-focusing effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Draghici, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    Positive or negative ion beams extracted from plasma are used in a large variety of surface functionalization techniques such as implantation, etching, surface activation, passivation or oxidation. Of particular importance is the surface treatment of materials sensitive to direct plasma exposure ...

  9. Enhanced relativistic self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in plasma under density transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti, E-mail: nitikant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, Punjab (India)

    2014-04-15

    Enhanced and early relativistic self-focusing of Hermite-cosh-Gaussian (HChG) beam in the plasmas under density transition has been investigated theoretically using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial ray approximation for mode indices m=0, 1, and 2. The variation of beam width parameter with normalized propagation distance for m=0, 1, and 2 is reported, and it is observed that strong self-focusing occurs as the HChG beam propagates deeper inside the nonlinear medium as spot size shrinks due to highly dense plasmas and the results are presented graphically. A comparative study between self-focusing of HChG beam in the presence and absence of plasmas density transition is reported. The dependency of beam width parameter on the normalized propagation distance for different values of decentered parameter “b” has also been presented graphically. For m=0 and 1, strong self-focusing is reported for b=1.8, and for m=2 and b=1.8, beam gets diffracted. The results obtained indicate the dependency of the self-focusing of the HChG beam on the selected values of decentered parameter. Moreover, proper selection of decentered parameter results strong self-focusing of HChG beam. Stronger self-focusing of laser beam is observed due to the presence of plasma density transition which might be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, etc.

  10. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico José Neves Mancuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  11. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocarlan, C.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; 10.1063/1.4822333

    2013-01-01

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive selffocusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.01018 cm3, the peak normalized...

  12. Comparison between high-intensity focused ultrasound devices for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakushi; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Shoji, Sunao; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the association between long-term clinical outcomes and morbidity of patients with prostate cancer who underwent high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We included 918 patients with stage T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer who were treated with Sonablate™ (SB) devices during 1999-2012 and followed-up for >2 years. Risk stratification and complication rates were compared between the treatment groups. The 10-year overall and cancer-specific survival rates were 89.6% and 97.4%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in the SB200/500, SB500 version 4, and SB500 tissue change monitor groups were 48.3%, 62.3%, and 82.0%, respectively (p biopsy rate was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis showed pre-treatment serum prostate-specific antigen levels, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, and devices as significant predictors (p technological advancements.

  13. Structural and composition investigations at delayered locations of low k integrated circuit device by gas-assisted focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dandan, E-mail: dandan.wang@globalfoundries.com; Kee Tan, Pik; Yamin Huang, Maggie; Lam, Jeffrey; Mai, Zhihong [Technology Development Department, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte. Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2014-05-15

    The authors report a new delayering technique – gas-assisted focused ion beam (FIB) method and its effects on the top layer materials of integrated circuit (IC) device. It demonstrates a highly efficient failure analysis with investigations on the precise location. After removing the dielectric layers under the bombardment of an ion beam, the chemical composition of the top layer was altered with the reduced oxygen content. Further energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that the oxygen reduction lead to appreciable silicon suboxide formation. Our findings with structural and composition alteration of dielectric layer after FIB delayering open up a new insight avenue for the failure analysis in IC devices.

  14. Investigation of the Effect of Plasma Polymerized Siloxane Coating for Enzyme Immobilization and Microfluidic Device Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalim Belhacene

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the impact of a physical immobilization methodology, using plasma polymerized 1,1,3,3, tetramethyldisiloxane, on the catalytic performance of β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae in a microfluidic device. The β-galactosidase was immobilized by a polymer coating grown by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PEVCD. Combined with a microchannel patterned in the silicone, a microreactor was obtained with which the diffusion through the plasma polymerized layer and the hydrolysis of a synthetic substrate, the resorufin-β-d-galactopyranoside, were studied. A study of the efficiency of the immobilization procedure was investigated after several uses and kinetic parameters of immobilized β-galactosidase were calculated and compared with those of soluble enzyme. Simulation and a modelling approach were also initiated to understand phenomena that influenced enzyme behavior in the physical immobilization method. Thus, the catalytic performances of immobilized enzymes were directly influenced by immobilization conditions and particularly by the diffusion behavior and availability of substrate molecules in the enzyme microenvironment.

  15. Fast Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria in Plasma Confinement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, S. K.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Wingen, A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    High-fidelity reconstruction of plasma equilibria in confinement devices like stellarators and tokamaks with external three dimensional (3D) fields is computationally very expensive and routinely requires days, even weeks, to complete using serial approaches. Here, we present the performance results of coupling the 3D plasma reconstruction code, V3FIT, with PARVMEC, the recently developed parallel version of VMEC. We present the parallel design of this coupled software along with a scalability analysis to identify its performance bottlenecks. Dependence of its scalability limits on model parameters is derived. These analyses are supported by scaling studies on over 6,000 processor cores of a Cray XC30 supercomputer. PARVMEC, which dominates the total runtime of the reconstruction procedure, is shown to deliver speedup improvements of over one to two orders of magnitude, depending on whether the equilibrium computations are carried out in a free or fixed boundary mode. The overall speedup of the coupled reconstruction code is shown to deliver over 40X improvement enabling fusion scientists to carry out high-fidelity 3D plasma reconstruction analyses in only a few hours instead of in days/weeks for the first time. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. On the generation of magnetized collisionless shocks in the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Winske, D.; Larson, D. J.; Cowee, M. M.; Constantin, C. G.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Niemann, C.

    2017-04-01

    Collisionless shocks are common phenomena in space and astrophysical systems, and in many cases, the shocks can be modeled as the result of the expansion of a magnetic piston though a magnetized ambient plasma. Only recently, however, have laser facilities and diagnostic capabilities evolved sufficiently to allow the detailed study in the laboratory of the microphysics of piston-driven shocks. We review experiments on collisionless shocks driven by a laser-produced magnetic piston undertaken with the Phoenix laser laboratory and the Large Plasma Device at the University of California, Los Angeles. The experiments span a large parameter space in laser energy, background magnetic field, and ambient plasma properties that allow us to probe the physics of piston-ambient energy coupling, the launching of magnetosonic solitons, and the formation of subcritical shocks. The results indicate that piston-driven magnetized collisionless shocks in the laboratory can be characterized with a small set of dimensionless formation parameters that place the formation process in an organized and predictive framework.

  17. Formation of annular plasma downstream by magnetic aperture in the helicon experimental device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Yadav, S.; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Pal, R.; Bora, D.

    2017-02-01

    In the Helicon eXperimental (HeX) device, the geometric aperture is fixed, but the position of the magnetic aperture can be varied. Working with Argon gas in the pressure range of 1 - 10 × 10 - 4 mbar, an annular plasma (density ˜ 10 16 m - 3 ) is formed downstream, always in front of the magnetic aperture. This occurs irrespective of the relative position of the geometric aperture or the presence of a radial electric field. This is in contrary to the earlier proposition made by others that a radial electric field is necessary to produce a hollow plasma profile. Instead, the ionization of neutrals in the radially outer region by the tail electrons, rotating fast due to gradient-B drift in the azimuthal direction, seems to account for the observed off-axis density peaking in the present experiment. This also explains the variation of the plasma annulus diameter seen here by changing the input radio frequency power ( 100 - 800 W ) .

  18. Low Damage, High Anisotropy Inductively Coupled Plasma for Gallium Nitride based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Youssef H.

    2013-05-27

    Group III-nitride semiconductors possess unique properties, which make them versatile materials for suiting many applications. Structuring vertical and exceptionally smooth GaN profiles is crucial for efficient optical device operation. The processing requirements for laser devices and ridge waveguides are stringent as compared to LEDs and other electronic devices. Due to the strong bonding and chemically inert nature of GaN, dry etching becomes a critical fabrication step. The surface morphology and facet etch angle are analyzed using SEM and AFM measurements. The influence of different mask materials is also studied including Ni as well as a SiO2 and resist bilayer. The high selectivity Ni Mask is found to produce high sidewall angles ~79°. Processing parameters are optimized for both the mask material and GaN in order to achieve a highly anisotropic, smooth profile, without resorting to additional surface treatment steps. An optimizing a SF6/O2 plasma etch process resulted in smooth SiO2 mask sidewalls. The etch rate and GaN surface roughness dependence on the RF power was also examined. Under a low 2mTorr pressure, the RF and ICP power were optimized to 150W and 300W respectively, such that a smooth GaN morphology and sidewalls was achieved with reduced ion damage. The The AFM measurements of the etched GaN surface indicate a low RMS roughness ranging from 4.75 nm to 7.66 nm.

  19. Plasma process for development of a bulk heterojunction optoelectronic device: A highly sensitive UV detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shyamalima; Pal, Arup R.; Chutia, Joyanti; Bailung, Heremba; Sarma, Neelotpal S.; Dass, Narendra N.; Patil, Dinkar

    2012-08-01

    Deposition of composite thin film of polyaniline/TiO2 (PAni/TiO2) has been carried out by a combined process of magnetron sputtering and plasma polymerization at a pressure of 5 × 10-2 Torr using titanium as a target material for sputtering, aniline as monomer, oxygen as reactive gas and argon as carrier gas/ion source for sputtering. The deposition has been achieved using direct current (dc) discharge power of 35 W for sputtering and radio frequency (rf) power of 8-12 W at substrate bias values in the ranges of -80 to -100 V for polymerization. The composition of the film has been studied using infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The morphology of the film has been characterized with the help of a transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The ultraviolet (UV) photo-stability of the composite film has been studied by exposing the film deposited on silicon substrate for different reaction times up to 1 h under UV radiation at wave length range of 280-400 nm with an intensity of 0.4 mW/cm2. An organic/inorganic nanocomposite film based photovoltaic device has been developed. The device has an aluminum/composite/indium tin oxide sandwiched structure that shows strong photoresponse in ultraviolet region and hence the device has potential for application as an UV detector.

  20. From images to text: focusing and anaphoric devices usage in child and young adults’ narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Borzone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the use of anaphoric expressions for introducing, re-introducing and maintaining referents in children and teenagers Spanish-speaking narrative productions from a picture book. We try to explore whether they are able to produce an autonomous narrative text by the adequate use of correferential mechanisms. Four groups of children, aged 5, 8, 11 and 16, took part in his study. Results showed that all groups performance is similar with regard to the prevailing use of FN to introduce and re-introduce agent in focus and subjects omissions for referential continuity. But in 5 years old children narratives, the use of deictic forms is very frequent, fact that indicats their difficulty to produce autonomous texts. In the other group’s narratives a significant increment in the control over the linguistic cohesive resources was observed.

  1. Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: A focus on medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Puc, Cyril; Szwarcensztein, Karine; Beuscart, Régis; Coulonjou, Hélène; Degrassat-Théas, Albane; Dutot, Camille; Epis de Fleurian, Anne-Aurélie; Favrel-Feuillade, Florence; Hounliasso, Iliona; Lechat, Philippe; Luigi, Emmanuel; Mairot, Laurent; Nguyen, Thao; Piazza, Laurent; Roussel, Christophe; Vienney, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) guides decisions as to whether new healthcare products should be made available within hospital structures. Its extension to medical devices (MDs) makes it possible to analyse several relevant aspects of these healthcare products in addition to their clinical value, and such evaluations are of interest to national health authorities, other healthcare establishments and industry. The aim of this work was to formulate several recommendations for a blueprint for hospital-based HTA for MDs in France. Five themes based on the work of the European Adopting hospital-based HTA in the EU (AdHopHTA) project were defined. Each member of the roundtable was then allocated a documentation task based on their experience of the theme concerned, and a literature review was carried out. An inventory of hospital-based HTA was performed and six recommendations aiming to strengthen and improve this approach were put forward: (1) encouragement of the spread of the hospital-based HTA culture and participation in communications and the promotion of this approach to hospital decision-makers; (2) adaptation of hospital-based HTA to the needs of decision-makers, taking into account the financial timetable and strategic objectives of the healthcare establishment; (3) harmonisation of the dossiers requested from industry between healthcare establishments, based on a common core; (4) promotion of the sharing of hospital-based HTA data under certain conditions, with data dissociable from the HTA report and the use of a validated methodology for the literature review; (5) creation of a composite indicator reflecting data production effort and the sharing of HTA activities, to be taken into account in the distribution of funds allocated for teaching, research and innovation missions considered of general interest; (6) the transmission of information directly from local to national level by pioneering centres. This work highlights the major issues

  2. Laser-optical measurements of the velocities of the plasma jets formed from different gases in a kilojoule-range plasma focus facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polukhin, S. N., E-mail: snpol@lebedev.ru; Dzhamankulov, A. M.; Gurei, A. E.; Nikulin, V. Ya., E-mail: vnik@lebedev.ru; Peregudova, E. N.; Silin, P. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The velocities of the plasma jets formed from Ne, N{sub 2}, Ar, and Xe gases in plasma focus facilities were determined by means of laser-optical shadowgraphy of the shock waves generated at the jet leading edge. In spite of the almost tenfold ratio between the atomic weights of these gases, the outflow velocities of the plasma jets formed in experiments with these gases differ by less than twice, in the range of (0.7–1.1) × 10{sup 7} cm/s under similar discharge conditions. The energies of the jet ions were found to vary from 0.7 keV for nitrogen to 4 keV for xenon.

  3. Motion-free hybrid design laser beam propagation analyzer using a digital micromirror device and a variable focus liquid lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mumtaz; Riza, Nabeel A

    2010-06-01

    To the best of our knowledge, we propose the first motion-free laser beam propagation analyzer with a hybrid design using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and a liquid electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL). Unlike prior analyzers that require profiling the beam at multiple locations along the light propagation axis, the proposed analyzer profiles the beam at the same plane for multiple values of the ECVFL focal length, thus eliminating beam profiler assembly motion. In addition to measuring standard Gaussian beam parameters, the analyzer can also be used to measure the M(2) beam propagation parameter of a multimode beam. Proof-of-concept beam parameter measurements with the proposed analyzer are successfully conducted for a 633 nm laser beam. Given the all-digital nature of the DMD-based profiling and all-analog motion-free nature of the ECVFL beam focus control, the proposed analyzer versus prior art promises better repeatability, speed, and reliability.

  4. Development of Diagnostics for Large-Scale Experiments with Dense Magnetized Plasmas - MJ Plasma-focus diagnostics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, M.; Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E.; Chodukowski, T. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)] [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swiert (Poland); Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swiert (Poland); Krauz, S. [RNC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mitrovanov, K. [FGUP GNC RF Triniti, Troick (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    This document presents the diagnostics arrangements and interesting results of research on fusion pulsed plasma, which was generated within the large PF-1000 facility operated in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (Warsaw, Poland). Experimental studies were carried out with the following diagnostic techniques: 1) Rogovski coil for current measurements; 2) Four dI/dt probes in different places around the collector of PF-1000; 3) Voltage divider; 4) Mach-Zender interferometer (16 frames); 5) Fast scintillation probes for X-ray and neutron detection; 6) Silver activation counters; 7) Specially prepared current probes; 8) Thomson spectrometer for mass- and energy-analysis of deuterium beams; 9) Ion-pinhole cameras equipped with nuclear-track detectors, etc. The studies have been carried out with the pure deuterium filling, and particular attention was paid to correlations between the fast-neutron emission and an evolution of plasma parameters. The total fusion-neutron yield, as measured with four silver-activation counters, was found to be up to 7*10{sup 11} per shot, depending on the experimental conditions. Correlations of the neutron pulses with interferometric frame-pictures of the PF pinch column were studied. From time-of-flight (ToF) measurements of the fusion neutrons it was possible to estimate a CM velocity of deuterons involved in the D-D reactions. The fast fusion-produced protons have also been recorded and analyzed by means pinhole cameras and shielded track detectors. The document is composed of an abstract followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  5. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry's continued trend of manufacturing device features on the nanometer scale requires increased plasma processing control and improved understanding of plasma characteristics and plasma-surface interactions. This dissertation presents a series of experimental results for focus studies conducted in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. First novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tools are characterized and related to plasma characteristics. Second, plasma-polymer interactio...

  6. A multiaxis device for in-focus manipulation of objects under a dissecting microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Heribert

    2014-10-01

    An inexpensive specimen holder for objects under a dissecting microscope is described which allows arbitrary orientation and rotation of the object within the visual field and focal plane of the microscope. Based on a spherical cap upon a magnet, this apparatus is easy to construct and permits single-handed manipulation of the specimen from some distance. Precise positioning is demonstrated for halteres of Drosophila under up to 120× magnification. Because of the restricted field of view and depth of focus of a dissecting microscope, it is often difficult to position tiny objects under study in varying orientation, especially if the specimen must simultaneously be dissected with forceps, microscissors or needles. The problem is solved most conveniently with a specimen holder based on a spherical cap which is held by a strong magnet on a steel ring. The specimen tilts vertically in any direction by up to 70° and-even in oblique orientation-rotates through 360° around the sphere's centre in the focal plane. By help of an interleaved plastic foil in a ring carrier, these movements can be controlled unimanually from outside the visual field. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. OPTIMISATION OF NEON SXR (SOFT X-RAY YIELD OF THE INTI PLASMA FOCUS MACHINE AT 12 kV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R.J.A. FEDERICO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The INTI plasma focus machine is a 3 kJ Mather type plasma focus machine,powered by a single Maxwell capacitor. The system produces remarkable consistent focusing action in neon, making it a suitable source for the production of high energy photons, electrons, ions and neon soft x-rays (SXR [1, 2]. The aim of this paper is to optimise the neon SXR yield of the INTI plasma focus machine operated at 12 kV by parametrically, changing the anode dimensions (radius and length using the Lee Model Code (version RADPFV5.15dd. Results of the optimisation procedures resulted in a neon SXR yield of 6.47 J at 2.5 torr and 12 kV, with a shorter length and a fatter anode radius of 7.9 cm and 1.2 cm respectively. This gives an improvement in the neon SXR yield of 40% when compares to neon SXR yield of 2.74 J at 2.5 torr 12 kV with the present configurations.

  8. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6-2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5-2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1-1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150-170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330-880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  9. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia

  10. ELM-induced melting: assessment of shallow melt layer damage and the power handling capability of tungsten in a linear plasma device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgan, T. W.; van Eden, G. G.; de Kruif, T. M.; van den Berg, M. A.; J Matejicek,; T Chraska,; De Temmerman, G.

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten samples were exposed to combined steady state and edge localised mode transient replication experiments in a linear plasma device; either in combined hydrogen plasma and high powered laser exposures at Magnum-PSI or steady state hydrogen plasma and superimposed plasma pulses created using a

  11. Study of the interrelation between the electrotechnical parameters of the plasma focus discharge circuit and the plasma compression dynamics on the PF-3 and PF-1000 facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrkn@inbox.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz-vi@nrcki.ru, E-mail: vkrauz@yandex.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Grabovski, E. V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Myalton, V. V.; Vinogradov, V. P. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Paduch, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (Poland); Scholz, M. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Karpiński, L. [Łukasiewicz University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering (Poland)

    2015-05-15

    The main stages of the plasma current sheath (PCS) dynamics on two plasma focus (PF) facilities with different geometries of the electrode system, PF-3 (Filippov type) and PF-1000 (Mather type), were studied by analyzing the results of the current and voltage measurements. Some dynamic characteristics, such as the PCS velocity in the acceleration phase in the Mather-type facility (PF-1000), the moment at which the PCS reaches the anode end, and the plasma velocity in the radial stage of plasma compression in the PF-3 Filippov-type facility, were determined from the time dependence of the inductance of the discharge circuit with a dynamic plasma load. The energy characteristics of the discharge circuit of the compressing PCS were studied for different working gases (deuterium, argon, and neon) at initial pressures of 1.5–3 Torr in discharges with energies of 0.3–0.6 MJ. In experiments with deuterium, correlation between the neutron yield and the electromagnetic energy deposited directly in the compressed PCS was investigated.

  12. Synthesis of TiN/a-Si3N4 thin film by using a Mather type dense plasma focus system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Hussain; R.Ahmad; N.Khalid; Z.A.Umar; A.Hussnain

    2013-01-01

    A 2.3 kJ Mather type pulsed plasma focus device was used for the synthesis of a TiN/a-Si3N4 thin film at room temperature.The film was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and atomic force microscopy (AFM).The XRD pattern confirms the growth of polycrystalline TiN thin film.The XPS results indicate that the synthesized film is non-stoichiometric and contains titanium nitride,silicon nitride,and a phase of silicon oxy-nitride.The SEM and AFM results reveal that the surface of the synthesized film is quite smooth with 0.59 nm roughness (root-mean-square).

  13. Self-focusing of coaxial electromagnetic beams in a plasma with electron temperature dependent electron-ion recombination coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    An analytical formulation, describing the propagation of multiple coaxial Gaussian electromagnetic (em) beams in a self-formed plasma channel with dominant collisional nonlinearity has been developed; the generation/recombination of high energy plasma particles has been considered as an additional source of plasma non-linearity in addition to Ohmic heating. Well versed paraxial approach in the vicinity of the intensity maximum has been adopted to solve the wave equation and examine the non-linear propagation of em beams while the dielectric function in the presence of the em field is determined from the balance of partial pressure gradient of electron/ion gas with the space charge field and energy balance of plasma particles. On the basis of the analysis the influence of this novel non-linearity on the propagation features like electron temperature, dielectric function and critical curves are derived numerically and graphically presented. The inclusion of this novel nonlinearity results in reduced focusing effect. The three regime characteristic features viz. oscillatory focusing/defocusing and steady divergence of beam propagation have also been worked out.

  14. The Effect of Driver Rise-Time on Pinch Current and its Impact on Plasma Focus Performance and Neutron Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; Welch, Dale

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have suggested that dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield increases with faster drivers [Decker NIMP 1986]. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP [Schmidt PRL 2012], we reproduce this trend in a kJ DPF [Ellsworth 2014], and demonstrate how driver rise time is coupled to neutron output. We implement a 2-D model of the plasma focus including self-consistent circuit-driven boundary conditions. Driver capacitance and voltage are varied to modify the current rise time, and anode length is adjusted so that run-in coincides with the peak current. We observe during run down that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities of the sheath shed blobs of plasma that remain in the inter-electrode gap during run in. This trailing plasma later acts as a low-inductance restrike path that shunts current from the pinch during maximum compression. While the MHD growth rate increases slightly with driver speed, the shorter anode of the fast driver allows fewer e-foldings and hence reduces the trailing mass between electrodes. As a result, the fast driver postpones parasitic restrikes and maintains peak current through the pinch during maximum compression. The fast driver pinch therefore achieves best simultaneity between its ion beam and peak target density, which maximizes neutron production. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Dynamics of plasma formation and permanent structural transformation in ZBLAN excited by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Hong, Jong Wook

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved dynamics of plasma formation and bulk refractive-index modification in fluoride glass (ZBLAN) excited by a tightly focused femtosecond (130 fs) Ti:sapphire laser ( λp=790 nm) was observed in situ. The femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe measurement with perpendicularly linear polarized beams was used to study the dynamics of both plasma formation and induced permanent structural transformation with refractive-index change. In the refractive-index domain, the lifetime of induced plasma formation is ˜35 ps and structural transition time for forming the refractive-index change is ˜80 ps. In the optical damage domain, however, the lifetime of induced plasma formation is ˜40 ps and structural transition time for forming the optical damage is ˜140 ps. We found that the process of refractive-index bulk modification is significantly different from that of optical cracks. From the diffraction efficiency of Kogelnik's coupled mode theory, the maximum value of refractive-index change (Δ n) was estimated to be 1.3×10 -2. By the scanning of fluoride glass on the optical X-Y-Z stages, the fabrication of internal grating with refractive-index modification was demonstrated in fluoride glass using tightly focused femtosecond laser.

  16. Using FLUKA to Study Concrete Square Shield Performance in Attenuation of Neutron Radiation Produced by APF Plasma Focus Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M. J.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    In 2010, representatives from the Nuclear Engineering and physics Department of Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete shield for their Plasma Focus as neutron source. The project team in Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering and physics department of Amirkabir University of Technology choose some shape of shield to study on their performance with Monte Carlo code. In the present work, the capability of Monte Carlo code FLUKA will be explored to model the APF Plasma Focus, and investigating the neutron fluence on the square concrete shield in each region of problem. The physical models embedded in FLUKA are mentioned, as well as examples of benchmarking against future experimental data. As a result of this study suitable thickness of concrete for shielding APF will be considered.

  17. Effect of Higher Order Axial Electron Temperature on Self-Focusing of Electromagnetic Pulsed Beam in Collisional Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏雄平; 易林

    2012-01-01

    Effect of higher order axial electron temperature on self-focusing of electromagnetic pulsed beam in collisional plasma is investigated.It is shown that higher order axial electron temperature T p4 is not trivial than T p0 and T p2,which can modify slightly radial redistribution of electron density and increases effective dielectric constant.As a result,on one hand,slightly reduce electromagnetic beam self-focusing in the course of oscillatory convergence,on the other hand,quicken beam divergence in the course of steady divergence,i.e.,higher order axial electron temperature T p4 can decrease the influence of collisional nonlinearity in collisional plasma.

  18. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  19. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  20. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren; Sun, Jian-An; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-07-01

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam.

  1. Laser-driven, magnetized quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks on the Large Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D. B., E-mail: dschaeffer@physics.ucla.edu; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Winske, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The interaction of a laser-driven super-Alfvénic magnetic piston with a large, preformed magnetized ambient plasma has been studied by utilizing a unique experimental platform that couples the Raptor kJ-class laser system [Niemann et al., J. Instrum. 7, P03010 (2012)] to the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the University of California, Los Angeles. This platform provides experimental conditions of relevance to space and astrophysical magnetic collisionless shocks and, in particular, allows a detailed study of the microphysics of shock formation, including piston-ambient ion collisionless coupling. An overview of the platform and its capabilities is given, and recent experimental results on the coupling of energy between piston and ambient ions and the formation of collisionless shocks are presented and compared to theoretical and computational work. In particular, a magnetosonic pulse consistent with a low-Mach number collisionless shock is observed in a quasi-perpendicular geometry in both experiments and simulations.

  2. Laser Plasmas : Lie-optics, geometrical phase and nonlinear dynamics of self-focusing and soliton evolution in a plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Subbarao; R Uma; H Singh; Kamal Goyal; Sanjeev Goyal; Ravinder Kumar

    2000-11-01

    It is useful to state propagation laws for a self-focusing laser beam or a soliton in grouptheoretical form to be called Lie-optical form for being able to predict self-focusing dynamics conveniently and amongst other things, the geometrical phase. It is shown that the propagation of the gaussian laser beam is governed by a rotation group in a non-absorbing medium and by the Lorentz group in an absorbing medium if the additional symmetry of paraxial propagation is imposed on the laser beam. This latter symmetry, however, needs care in its implementation because the electromagnetic wave of the laser sees a different refractive index profile than the laboratory observer in this approximation. It is explained how to estimate this non-Taylor paraxial power series approximation. The group theoretical laws so-stated are used to predict the geometrical or Berry phase of the laser beam by a technique developed by one of us elsewhere. The group-theoretical Lie-optic (or ABCD) laws are also useful in predicting the laser behavior in a more complex optical arrangement like in a laser cavity etc. The nonlinear dynamical consequences of these laws for long distance (or time) predictions are also dealt with. Ergodic dynamics of an ensemble of laser beams on the torus during absorptionless self-focusing is discussed in this context. From the point of view of new physics concepts, we introduce a stroboscopic invariant torus and a stroboscopic generating function in classical mechanics that is useful for long-distance predictions of absorptionless self-focusing.

  3. Validation study of a drift-wave turbulence model for CSDX linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-09-01

    A validation study of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment linear plasma device using Langmuir probe synthetic diagnostics is presented in this paper. We use a set of nonlocal 3D equations, which evolve density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, and include proper sheath boundary conditions. Nonlinear simulations of these equations are carried out using BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework. To identify the dominant parametric dependencies of the model, a linear growth rate sensitivity analysis is performed using input parameter uncertainties, which are taken from the experimental measurements. For the direct comparison of nonlinear simulation results to experiment, we use synthetic Langmuir probe diagnostics to generate a set of synthetic ion saturation current and floating potential fluctuations. In addition, comparisons of azimuthal velocities determined via time-delay estimation, and nonlinear energy transfer are shown. We observe a significant improvement of model-experiment agreement relative to the previous 2D simulations. An essential component of this improved agreement is found to be the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on floating potential measurements, which introduces clear amplitude and phase shifts relative to the plasma potential fluctuations in synthetically measured quantities, where the simulations capture the experimental measurements in the core of plasma. However, the simulations overpredict the fluctuation levels at larger radii. Moreover, systematic simulation scans show that the self-generated E × B zonal flows profile is very sensitive to the steepening of density equilibrium profile. This suggests that evolving both fluctuations and equilibrium profiles, along with the inclusion of modest axial variation of radial profiles in the model are needed for further improvement of simulation results against the experimental measurements.

  4. Dynamics of Fluctuations, Flows and Global Stability Under Electrode Biasing in a Linear Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tiffany

    2015-11-01

    Various bias electrodes have been inserted into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) device at the University of New Mexico, in order to affect intrinsic drift-wave turbulence and flows. The goal of the experiments was to suppress and effect the intrinsic turbulence and with detailed measurements, understand the changes that occur during biasing. The drift-mode in HelCat varies from coherent at low magnetic field (1kG). The first electrode consists of 6 concentric rings set in a ceramic substrate; these rings act as a boundary condition, sitting at the end of the plasma column 2-m away from the source. A negative bias has been found to have no effect on the fluctuations, but a positive bias (Vr>5Te) is required in order to suppress the drift-mode. Two molybdenum grids can also be inserted into the plasma and sit close to the source. Floating or grounding a grid results in suppressing the drift-mode of the system. A negative bias (>-5Te) is found to return the drift-mode, and it is possible to drive a once coherent mode into a broad-band turbulent one. From a bias voltage of -5Tenew mode, which is identified as a parallel-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At high positive bias, Vg>10Te, a new large-scale global mode is excited. This mode exhibits fluctuations in the ion saturation current, as well as in the potential, with a magnitude >50%. This mode has been identified as the potential relaxation instability (PRI). In order to better understand the modes and changes observed in the plasma, a linear stability code, LSS, was employed. As well, a 1D3V-PIC code utilizing Braginskii's equations was also utilized to understand the high-bias instability.

  5. Self-focusing and self-compression of a laser pulse in the presence of an external tapered magnetized density-ramp plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedjalil, N.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of external tapered axial magnetic field and plasma density-ramp on the spatiotemporal evolution of the laser pulse in inhomogeneous plasma have been studied. The external magnetic field can modify the refractive index of plasma and consequently intensifies the nonlinear effects. By considering the relativistic nonlinearity effect, self-focusing and self-compression of the laser beam propagating through the magnetized plasma have been investigated, numerically. Numerical results indicate that self-focusing and self-compression are better enhanced in a tapered magnetic field than in a uniform one. Besides, in plasma density-ramp profile, self-focusing and self-compression of the laser beam improve in comparison with no ramp structure. In addition, with increasing both the slope of the density ramp and slope constant parameter of the tapered magnetic field, the laser focusing increases, properly, in short distances of the laser propagation through the plasma.

  6. Inorganic-solid-state electrolyte layer deposited by cathodic arc plasma for rapidly switching electrochromic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Wen; Chang, Chen-Te; Wu, Jin-Yu; Jan, Der-Jun; Li, Yu-Chen; Hsieh, Cheng-Chang; Tsai, Wen-Fa

    2017-08-01

    This work focuses on fabricating a solid electrolyte Ta2O5 thin film deposited by cathodic arc plasm (CAP) deposition through three different ratio of oxygen and argon. In our experiments, refractive index of Ta2O5 films are taken as 2.25, 1.96, 1.9 with various O2/Ar= 1.5, O2/Ar= 2, O2/Ar= 2.4, respectively. Our results show that the refractive index mostly decreased as we increase the oxygen flow rate, in which the minimum is found at 240 sccm. It provides good conduction pathways for ions through smaller thin-film's refractive index that exhibits more porosity voids. This property enhances ion's mobility for electrochromic device causing rapid coloring/bleaching phenomenon. Ta2O5 thin film is suitable as a solid electrolyte layer in center of electrochromic device (ECD) using CAP deposition. As a result, rapid response times were observed in fabricated device with an area of 5 cm×5 cm, exhibiting transmittance optical modulation ΔT = 61.5% (@550 nm) with the bleaching time τ = 8 s and transmittance optical modulation ΔT = 50% (@550 nm) with the coloring time τ = 10 s.

  7. Validation of the Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer (ABF-LIPS) for Metal Emission Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Figure 2-3 Focusing Simulation by Computational Fluid Dynamic ( CFD ) Modeling ... 6 Figure 2-4 ABF-LIPS prototype...32 Figure 5-8 Sampling location for ABF-LIPS and reference method during September 2005 test on platform prior to baghouse ...CAAA Clean Air Act Amendments CCD Charge Coupled Device CEMS Continuous Emission Monitoring System CFD Computational Fluid Dynamic CFR Code of

  8. Demonstration of relativistic electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Ta Phuoc, K; Gautier, J; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Flacco, A; Tissandier, F; Sebban, S; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2015-04-16

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high-energy electron accelerators. It could make free-electron lasers available to a broad scientific community and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high-energy physics. Furthermore, the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultrafast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  9. Demonstration of electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Döpp, Andreas; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin; Phuoc, Kim Ta; Gautier, Julien; Goddet, Jean-Philippe; Tafzi, Amar; Flacco, Alessandro; Tissandier, Fabien; Sebban, Stéphane; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high energy electron accelerators. It could make free electron lasers available to a broad scientific community, and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high energy physics. Furthermore the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultra-fast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams, mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens, in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  10. The plasma membrane calcium pumps: focus on the role in (neuro)pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto; Calì, Tito

    2017-02-19

    The plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA pump) is a member of the superfamily of P-type pumps. It is organized in the plasma membrane with ten transmembrane helices and two main cytosolic loops, one of which contains the catalytic center. It also contains a long C-terminal tail that houses the binding site for calmodulin, the main regulator of the activity of the pump. The pump also contains a number of other regulators, among them acidic phospholipids, kinases, and numerous protein interactors. Separate genes code for 4 basic pump isoforms in mammals, additional isoform complexity being generated by the alternative splicing of primary transcripts. Pumps 1 and 4 are expressed ubiquitously, pumps 2 and 3 are tissue restricted, with preference for the nervous system. In essentially all cells, the pump coexists with much more powerful systems that clear Ca(2+) from the cytosol, e.g. the SERCA pump and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Its role in the global regulation of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis is thus quantitatively marginal: its main function is the regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in selected sub-plasma membrane microdomains where Ca(2+) modulated interactors also reside. Malfunctions of the pump linked to genetic mutations are now described with increasing frequency, the disease phenotypes being especially severe in the nervous system where isoforms 2 and 3 predominate. The analysis of the pump defects suggests that the disease phenotypes are likely to be related to the imperfect modulation of Ca(2+) signaling in selected sub-plasma membrane microdomains, leading to the defective control of the activity of important Ca(2+) dependent interactors.

  11. Use of plasma "reconstitution" during cardio pulmonary bypass for a heart transplant after previous left ventricular assist device implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A; Saczkowski, R; Hynes, M; Boodhwani, M; Hudson, C C C

    2014-01-01

    The case report describes a novel technique of pre-emptive plasma "reconstitution" prior to disengagement from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to minimize RV volume overload. The concomitant use of hemoconcentration facilitates volume and blood product management in cardiac transplant after previous left ventricular assist device implant surgery.

  12. Relativistic Spherical Wake Wave in Plasma. Relativistic focusing spherical mirror and Schwinger pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, Stepan; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Zhidkov, Alexei

    2009-11-01

    We report on the analytic and computer simulation study of a relativistic spherical wake wave. Such a wave in the breaking regime, traveling towards the center is able to reflect and focus the incoming radiation and up-shifting its frequency. The reflected and focused electromagnetic pulse can have such high intensity, that it is able to create e^+e^- pairs via Schwinger process.

  13. Elements of plasma technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Chiow San

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some fundamental aspects of plasma technology that are important for beginners interested to start research in the area of plasma technology . These include the properties of plasma, methods of plasma generation and basic plasma diagnostic techniques. It also discusses several low cost plasma devices, including pulsed plasma sources such as plasma focus, pulsed capillary discharge, vacuum spark and exploding wire; as well as low temperature plasmas such as glow discharge and dielectric barrier discharge which the authors believe may have potential applications in industry. The treatments are experimental rather than theoretical, although some theoretical background is provided where appropriate. The principles of operation of these devices are also reviewed and discussed.

  14. Study of x-ray emission from a table top plasma focus and its application as an x-ray backlighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, F. N.; Ross, I.; Lorenz, A.; Worley, J. F.; Dangor, A. E.; Haines, M. G.

    2000-09-01

    A study of a 2 kJ, 200 kA, table top plasma focus device as an intense x-ray source is reported. The x-ray yield from a number of gases, (deuterium, nitrogen, neon, argon, and xenon) is measured as a function of filling pressure and in neon as a function of anode length. In gases with Zplasma implodes to form a uniform cylindrical column, whereas for Z⩾18, the plasma consists of a number of hot spots. A maximum x-ray yield of 16.6 J and pulse length of 10-15 ns was obtained in neon. The x-ray emission was established to be due to H- and He-like line radiation. The temperature estimated from spectroscopic observations was about 300-400 eV at an electron density of (3-5)×1020cm-3 in neon. At low pressures in neon, hard x-ray radiation, presumably due to electron beams was dominant. Mesh images of different wire materials were recorded at the optimum pressure in neon as a proof of principle for x-ray backlighting.

  15. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  16. Organic plasma process for simple and substrate-independent surface modification of polymeric BioMEMS devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Atsunori; Muguruma, Hitoshi; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Karube, Isao

    2004-07-15

    A polymeric bio micro electromechanical systems (BioMEMS) device was fabricated using organic plasma polymerization, by which the surface of a polymeric substrate could easily be modified through vapor-phase deposition of organic thin films. This technique, capable of polymeric deposition of any kind of monomer, can serve the purpose of anti-fouling coating, wettability control, or layer-to-layer interface creation, on the surface of any given chemically-inert polymeric substrate without involving cumbersome surface organic reactions. A prototype device was fabricated to have an array of electrochemical glucose biosensors with the three electrode configuration, each of which has a microfluidic channel (500 microm x 800 microm) for capillary-action-driven sample delivery and the concerned enzymatic reaction. Stressing the advantages of the plasma polymerization process using a polymeric substrate together with some additional features accomplished in our device fabrication, new possibilities in the field of polymeric BioMEMS are discussed.

  17. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  18. Study of soft X-ray emission during wire array implosion under plasma focus conditions at the PF-3 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan’ko, S. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I.; Myalton, V. V.; Zhuzhunashvili, A. I.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Anan’ev, S. S.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Kalinin, Yu. G. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Results of measurements of soft X-ray emission with photon energies of <1 keV under conditions of a plasma focus (PF) experiment are presented. The experiments were carried out at the world’s largest PF device—the PF-3 Filippov-type facility (I ⩽ 3 MA, T/4 ≈ 15–20 µs, W{sub 0} ⩽ 3 MJ). X-ray emission from both a discharge in pure neon and with a tungsten wire array placed on the axis of the discharge chamber was detected. The wire array imploded under the action of the electric current intercepted from the plasma current sheath of the PF discharge in neon. The measured soft X-ray powers from a conventional PF discharge in gas and a PF discharge in the presence of a wire array were compared for the first time.

  19. Efficacy of liver assisting in patients with hepatic encephalopathy with special focus on plasma exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbøg, Poul; Busk, Troels; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2013-01-01

    edema is based on restoring and keeping normal physiological variables including tonicity, blood gasses, lactate, temperature and vascular resistance by a wide variety of interventions. In addition liver support devices improve the stage of HE, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and glucose......Severe liver injury result in development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and often also in brain edema that is a potentially fatal complication. HE and brain edema are correlated to the level and persistence of hyperammonemia and the presence of systemic inflammation. Treatment of HE and brain...

  20. Paradigm shifts in plasma processing and application of fundamental kinetics to problems targeting 5 nm technology device technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee

    2016-09-01

    It is often said that semiconductor technology is approaching the end of scaling. While fundamental device limits do approach, plasma etching has been doing the heavy lifting to supplement the basic limits in lithography. RF plasmas, pulsing in many forms, diffusion plasmas are but a few of the important developments over the last 20 years that have succeeded in the seemingly impossible tasks. The commonality of these plasmas is being self-consistent: their near-Boltzmann EEDf maintains ionization with its tail while providing charge-balance with its Te . To control the plasma chemistry is to control its EEDf; the entanglement of ionization with charge-balance in self-consistent plasmas places a constraint on the decoupling of plasma chemistry from ionization. Example like DC/RF parallel-plate hybridizes stochastic heating with DC-cathode injected e- -beam. While such arrangement offers some level of decoupling, it raised more questions than what it helped answered along the lines of beam-plasma instabilities, bounce-resonance ionization, etc. Pure e- -beam plasmas could be a drastic departure from the self-consistent plasmas. Examples like the NRL e- -beam system and the more recent TEL NEP (Nonambipolar e- Plasma) show strong decoupling of Te from ionization but it is almost certain, many more questions lurk: the functions connecting collisional relaxation with instabilities, the channels causing the dissociation of large fluorocarbons (controlling the ion-to- radical ratio), the production of the damaging deep UV in e- -beam plasmas, etc., and the list goes on. IADf is one factor on feature-profile and IEDf determines the surgical surface-excitation governing the selectivity, and both functions have Ti as the origin; what controls the e- -beam plasmas' Ti ? RF-bias has served well in applications requiring energetic excitation but, are there ways to improve the IEDf tightness? What are the adverse side-effects of ``improved IEDf''? Decades ago an infant RF-plasma

  1. A continuous flow micro filtration device for plasma/blood separation using submicron vertical pillar gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Goo; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ji, Hongmiao; Lim, Pei Yi; Chen, Yu

    2014-08-01

    This work demonstrates a continuous flow plasma/blood separator using a vertical submicron pillar gap structure. The working principle of the proposed separator is based on size exclusion of cells through cross-flow filtration, in which only plasma is allowed to pass through submicron vertical pillars located tangential to the main flow path of the blood sample. The maximum filtration efficiency of 99.9% was recorded with a plasma collection rate of 0.67 µl min-1 for an input blood flow rate of 12.5 µl min-1. The hemolysis phenomenon was observed for an input blood flow rate above 30 µl min-1. Based on the experimental results, we can conclude that the proposed device shows potential for the application of on-chip plasma/blood separation as a part of integrated point-of-care (POC) diagnostics systems.

  2. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, Ahmed [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  3. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus - III: Scaling theory for high pressure operation and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2016-01-01

    Recent work on the revised Gratton-Vargas model has demonstrated that there are some aspects of Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) which are not sensitive to details of plasma dynamics and are well captured in an oversimplified model assumption which contains very little plasma physics. A hyperbolic conservation law formulation of DPF physics reveals the existence of a velocity threshold related to specific energy of dissociation and ionization, above which, the work done during shock propagation is adequate to ensure dissociation and ionization of the gas being ingested. These developments are utilized to formulate an algorithmic definition of DPF optimization that is valid in a wide range of applications, not limited to neutron emission. A universal scaling theory of DPF design optimization is proposed and illustrated for designing devices working at one or two orders higher pressure of deuterium than the current practice of designs optimized at pressures less than 10 mbar of deuterium. These examples show that the u...

  4. Numerical simulation to study the transient self focusing of laser beam in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R. P.; Hussain, Saba, E-mail: sabahussain44@yahoo.com; Gaur, Nidhi [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we present the numerical simulation for the coupled system of equations governing the dynamics of laser and Ion Acoustic Wave (IAW) in a collisionless plasma, when the coupling between the waves is through ponderomotive non-linearity. The nonlinear evolution of the laser beam is studied when the pump laser is perturbed by a periodic perturbation. By changing the perturbation wave number, we have studied its effect on the nonlinear evolution pattern of laser beam. In order to have a physical insight into the nonlinear dynamics of laser beam evolution in time and space, we have studied the laser and IAW spectra containing spatial harmonics. The magnitude of these harmonics changes with time and leads to time dependent localization of laser beam in spatial domain. The nonlinear dynamics of this localization is investigated in detail by using simulation and a semi-analytical model.

  5. Dense plasma focus PACO as a hard X-ray emitter: a study on the radiation source

    OpenAIRE

    Supán, L.; Guichón, S.; Milanese, Maria Magdalena; Niedbalski, Jorge Julio; Moroso, Roberto Luis; Acuña, H.; Malamud, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    The radiation in the X-ray range detected outside the vacuum chamber of the dense plasma focus (DPF) PACO, are produced on the anode zone. The zone of emission is studied in a shot-to-shot analysis, using pure deuterium as filling gas. We present a diagnostic method to determine the place and size of the hard X-ray source by image analysis of high density radiography plates. Fil: Supán, L.. Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas. Insti...

  6. Electron Beam Focusing and Spreading due to interactions With Copropagating Plasma Waves and Lasers: Explanation of Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, A.; Williams, R. L.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation results suggest that a low energy electron beam, injected perpendicularly across co-propagating plasma waves and laser beams, can be compressed to a line focus under certain conditions, but under different conditions can be spread out into two main lobes on which bunching patterns are impressed. We report several explanations for these observations, and also discuss the similarity of these results to other research results previously reported in the literature. The prospects for testing these results in a laboratory will be discussed, as well as the use of these phenomena as diagnostics. Supported by the Department of Energy.

  7. On the Role of Metastable Argon in Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets with Shielding Gas Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jorn; Sousa, Joao Santos; Puech, Vincent; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan; ZIK plasmatis at the INP Greifswald e. V. Team; Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (LPGP), CNRS; Université Paris-Sud Team

    2014-10-01

    Shielding gas devices are a valuable tool for controlling the reactive species output of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) Jets for biomedical applications. In this work we investigate the effect of different shielding gas compositions using a CAPP jet (kinpen) operated with argon. As shielding gas various mixtures of N2 and O2 are used. Metastable argon (Ar*) has been quantified using laser absorption spectroscopy and was identified as an important energy carrier in the CAPP jets effluent. The Ar* excitation dynamics was studied using phase resolve optical emission spectroscopy. Based on these findings a kinetic model for the gas phase chemistry has been developed that uses the Ar* density and dynamics as input and yields densities of O3, NO2, HNO2, HNO3, N2O5, H2O2 and N2O produced by the CAPP jet for different shielding gas compositions. The results are in good agreement with Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy measurements on these species. Authors gratefully acknowledge the funding by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12).

  8. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  9. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren, E-mail: hxr_nwnu@163.com; Sun, Jian-An, E-mail: sunja@nwnu.edu.cn; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-07-12

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam. - Highlights: • Some behaviors for Gaussian laser are also found for q-Gaussian one. • The parameter regions corresponding to different laser behaviors are given. • Influence of q on the laser propagation behavior is obvious. • The q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than the Gaussian one.

  10. Isolation of Circulating Plasma Cells in Multiple Myeloma Using CD138 Antibody-Based Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Wu, Yichao C.; Bose, Suman; Menachery, Anoop; Talluri, Srikanth; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Prabhala, Rao H.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-04-01

    The necessity for bone marrow aspiration and the lack of highly sensitive assays to detect residual disease present challenges for effective management of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell cancer. We show that a microfluidic cell capture based on CD138 antigen, which is highly expressed on plasma cells, permits quantitation of rare circulating plasma cells (CPCs) in blood and subsequent fluorescence-based assays. The microfluidic device is based on a herringbone channel design, and exhibits an estimated cell capture efficiency of ~40-70%, permitting detection of <10 CPCs/mL using 1-mL sample volumes, which is difficult using existing techniques. In bone marrow samples, the microfluidic-based plasma cell counts exhibited excellent correlation with flow cytometry analysis. In peripheral blood samples, the device detected a baseline of 2-5 CD138+ cells/mL in healthy donor blood, with significantly higher numbers in blood samples of MM patients in remission (20-24 CD138+ cells/mL), and yet higher numbers in MM patients exhibiting disease (45-184 CD138+ cells/mL). Analysis of CPCs isolated using the device was consistent with serum immunoglobulin assays that are commonly used in MM diagnostics. These results indicate the potential of CD138-based microfluidic CPC capture as a useful ‘liquid biopsy’ that may complement or partially replace bone marrow aspiration.

  11. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  12. Skin Depth vs. Relativistics Self-focusing at ps Laser-Plasma Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich; Peng, Hansheng; Zhang, Weiyan; Osman, Frederick

    2002-03-01

    Highly charged MeV ions from target irradiated by laser longer than 0.1 ns, can be explained by relativistic self-focusing and subsequent acceleration by the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force [1]. In strong contrast to this, same laser intensities of ps pulses produced hundred times less energetic ions if the contrast ratio for suppression of prepulses was sufficiently high [1]. It was remarkable that the number of ions was constant and the ion energy linear on the laser intensity. We developed a model to explain the measurements as interactions within the skin layer of the target in contrast to relativistic self-focusing. However, if there is an appropriate prepulse applied, the MeV ions appear as before with the ns pulses which can be explained by the then possible relativistic self focusing. Consequences for the fast ignitor laser fusion scheme are elaborated. [1] J. Badziak, et al. Laser and Particle Beams 17, 323 (1999); E. Woryna, J. Wolowski, B. Kralikowa, J. Kraska, L. Laska, M. Pfeifer, K. Rohlena, J. Skala, V. Perina, R. Höpfl, & H. Hora, Rev. Scient. Instrum. 71, 949 (2000).

  13. Spatial and Temporal characterization of plasma properties via emission spectroscopy in fusion materials testing device Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Casey; Biewer, Theodore; Shaw, Guinevere; Beers, Josh; Ray, Holly

    2016-10-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma source, and is intended to study plasma-material interactions (PMI) in conditions similar to those found in future fusion reactors. A high-resolution McPherson Czerny-Turner visible range spectrometer has been utilized to study the behavior of ions in the plasma. Analysis of the spectral lines, D_beta, D_gamma, and D_delta yields valuable information regarding the temperature and density of plasma ions at various locations along Proto-MPEX. Spectroscopic temperature and density measurements are compared to double Langmuir probe measurements to determine plasma behavior as a function of radius. Temporal and spatial measurements along the length of Proto-MPEX are constructed and compared to a photomultiplier tube based diagnostic manufactured at ORNL to determine the plasma's axial behavior along Proto-MPEX. Relative emission of beta, gamma, and delta lines are used to assess recycling effects in the device. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  14. A dense plasma focus-based neutron source for a single-shot detection of illicit materials and explosives by a nanosecond neutron pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribkov, V A; Latyshev, S V [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Miklaszewski, R A; Chernyshova, M [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Drozdowicz, K; Wiacek, U [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Tomaszewski, K [ACS Ltd, Warsaw (Poland); Lemeshko, B D [N L Dukhov All-Russian Institute of Automation, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gribkovv@yahoo.com

    2010-03-15

    Recent progress in a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of 10 ns only, which are generated by dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or DT mixture as a working gas. The small size occupied by the neutron bunch in space, number of neutrons per pulse and mono-chromaticity ({delta}E/E{approx}1%) of the neutron spectrum provides the opportunity to use a time-of-flight (TOF) technique with flying bases of about a few metres. In our researches we used DPF devices having bank energy in the range 2-7 kJ. The devices generate a neutron yield of the level of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} 2.45 MeV and 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} 14 MeV neutrons per pulse with pulse duration {approx}10-20 ns. TOF base in the tests was 2.2-18.5 m. We have demonstrated the possibility of registering of neutrons scattered by the substances under investigation-1 litre bottles with methanol (CH{sub 3}OH), phosphoric (H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) and nitric (HNO{sub 3}) acids as well as a long object-a 1 m gas tank filled with deuterium at high pressure. It is shown that the above mentioned short TOF bases and relatively low neutron yields are enough to distinguish different elements' nuclei composing the substance under interrogation and to characterize the geometry of lengthy objects in some cases. The wavelet technique was employed to 'clean' the experimental data registered. The advantages and restrictions of the proposed and tested NINIS technique in comparison with other methods are discussed.

  15. A dense plasma focus-based neutron source for a single-shot detection of illicit materials and explosives by a nanosecond neutron pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Latyshev, S. V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiącek, U.; Tomaszewski, K.; Lemeshko, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Recent progress in a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of 10 ns only, which are generated by dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or DT mixture as a working gas. The small size occupied by the neutron bunch in space, number of neutrons per pulse and mono-chromaticity (ΔE/E~1%) of the neutron spectrum provides the opportunity to use a time-of-flight (TOF) technique with flying bases of about a few metres. In our researches we used DPF devices having bank energy in the range 2-7 kJ. The devices generate a neutron yield of the level of 108-109 2.45 MeV and 1010-1011 14 MeV neutrons per pulse with pulse duration ~10-20 ns. TOF base in the tests was 2.2-18.5 m. We have demonstrated the possibility of registering of neutrons scattered by the substances under investigation—1 litre bottles with methanol (CH3OH), phosphoric (H2PO4) and nitric (HNO3) acids as well as a long object—a 1 m gas tank filled with deuterium at high pressure. It is shown that the above mentioned short TOF bases and relatively low neutron yields are enough to distinguish different elements' nuclei composing the substance under interrogation and to characterize the geometry of lengthy objects in some cases. The wavelet technique was employed to 'clean' the experimental data registered. The advantages and restrictions of the proposed and tested NINIS technique in comparison with other methods are discussed.

  16. Silicon microfluidic flow focusing devices for the production of size-controlled PLGA based drug loaded microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Kieran; Brennan, Des; Galvin, Paul; Griffin, Brendan T

    2014-06-05

    The increasing realisation of the impact of size and surface properties on the bio-distribution of drug loaded colloidal particles has driven the application of micro fabrication technologies for the precise engineering of drug loaded microparticles. This paper demonstrates an alternative approach for producing size controlled drug loaded PLGA based microparticles using silicon Microfluidic Flow Focusing Devices (MFFDs). Based on the precise geometry and dimensions of the flow focusing channel, microparticle size was successfully optimised by modifying the polymer type, disperse phase (Qd) flow rate, and continuous phase (Qc) flow rate. The microparticles produced ranged in sizes from 5 to 50 μm and were highly monodisperse (coefficient of variation <5%). A comparison of Ciclosporin (CsA) loaded PLGA microparticles produced by MFFDs vs conventional production techniques was also performed. MFFDs produced microparticles with a narrower size distribution profile, relative to the conventional approaches. In-vitro release kinetics of CsA was found to be influenced by the production technique, with the MFFD approach demonstrating the slowest rate of release over 7 days (4.99 ± 0.26%). Finally, MFFDs were utilised to produce pegylated microparticles using the block co-polymer, PEG-PLGA. In contrast to the smooth microparticles produced using PLGA, PEG-PLGA microparticles displayed a highly porous surface morphology and rapid CsA release, with 85 ± 6.68% CsA released after 24h. The findings from this study demonstrate the utility of silicon MFFDs for the precise control of size and surface morphology of PLGA based microparticles with potential drug delivery applications.

  17. Magnetic shield for turbomolecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subir; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Pal, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    The turbo molecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device is protected from damage by a magnetic shield. As the pump runs continuously in a magnetic field environment during a plasma physics experiment, it may get damaged owing to eddy current effect. For design and testing of the shield, first we simulate in details various aspects of magnetic shield layouts using a readily available field design code. The performance of the shield made from two half cylinders of soft iron material, is experimentally observed to agree very well with the simulation results.

  18. Comparison of a new blood sampling device with the vacuum tube system for plasma and hematological analyses in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brice S; Boudet, Karine G; Faucher, Mathieu R; Geffre, Anne; Germain, Claude; Lefebvre, Hervé P

    2008-01-01

    Pediatric devices based on a capillary system may provide an alternative to vacuum tubes for canine blood sampling. The potential advantages are absence of vein collapse, limited blood volume sampled, and improved safety. The aim of this study was to compare routine plasma and hematological variables in seven healthy dogs using both techniques. Five biochemical analytes were measured, and a complete hematological examination and plasma exogenous creatinine clearance test were performed. No clinically relevant difference between the two techniques was observed for any variable or functional test assessed.

  19. ESTIMATING RATIO OF PEAK TO UNIFORM VALUES OF VARIOUS PROFILES OF RELEVANCE TO PLASMA FOCUS PINCH COLUMNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHONG PERK LIN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Lee Model code for radiative plasma focus computation, both the density profile and the temperature profile (versus anode radius of the pinch column are approximated by step functions with uniform values across the column radius. This means that the computed density and temperatures will be lower than the physical situation where the density and temperature profiles will certainly have peak values higher than the uniform (with radius values of the step function. It has been shown that the density profile is side-peaked (somewhat shell-shaped or like the shape of a volcanic crater with the assumption of no reflected shock wave; whereas the temperature profile is centre-peaked somewhat like a Gaussian shape. The aim of this paper is to investigate the use of higher degree mathematical function, where the crater-shaped profile can be well represented, to pproximate the plasma focus density profile. Two different approximated functions will be discussed: namely Gaussian distribution function and Bézier function. From these profiles we obtain the likely ratio of the profiled peak temperature to the step function uniform temperature and the peak density to the step function uniform density. In this manner we are able to suggest correction factors to the temperature and density computed by the Lee Model code.

  20. Electron self-injection during interaction of tightly focused few-cycle laser pulses with underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2008-09-01

    We study the interaction of short laser pulses tightly focused in a tiny volume proportional to the cube of the pulse wavelength (λ3) with underdense plasma by means of real-geometry particle-in-cell simulations. Underdense plasma irradiated by relatively low-energy λ3 (and λ2 ) laser pulses is shown to be an efficient source of multi-MeV electrons, ˜50nC/J , and coherent hard x rays, despite a strong pulse diffraction. Transverse wave breaking in the vicinity of the laser focus is found to give rise to an immense electron charge loading to the acceleration phase of a laser wake field. A strong blowout regime provoked by the injected electrons resulting in the distribution of accelerated electrons is found for λ3 pulses (further electron acceleration driving by λ2 pulses runs in the usual way). With an increase of pulse energy, wiggling and electron-hose instabilities in the λ3 pulse wake are recognized in the blowout regime. For higher-energy λ3 pulses, the injected beams are well modulated and may serve as a good source of coherent x rays.

  1. Conceptual model for reducing infections and antimicrobial resistance in skilled nursing facilities: focusing on residents with indwelling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Bradley, Suzanne F; Galecki, Andrzej; Olmsted, Russell N; Fitzgerald, James T; Kauffman, Carol A; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2011-03-01

    Infections in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) are common and result in frequent hospital transfers, functional decline, and death. Colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) - including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (R-GNB) - is also increasingly prevalent in SNFs. Antimicrobial resistance among common bacteria can adversely affect clinical outcomes and increase health care costs. Recognizing a need for action, legislators, policy-makers, and consumer groups are advocating for surveillance cultures to identify asymptomatic patients with MDROs, particularly MRSA in hospitals and SNFs. Implementing this policy for all SNF residents may be costly, impractical, and ineffective. Such a policy may result in a large increase in the number of SNF residents placed in isolation precautions with the potential for reduced attention by health care workers, isolation, and functional decline. Detection of colonization and subsequent attempts to eradicate selected MDROs can also lead to more strains with drug resistance. We propose an alternative strategy that uses a focused multicomponent bundle approach that targets residents at a higher risk of colonization and infection with MDROs, specifically those who have an indwelling device. If this strategy is effective, similar strategies can be studied and implemented for other high-risk groups.

  2. Development of a double plasma gun device for investigation of effects of vapor shielding on erosion of PFC materials under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge localized modes (ELMs) could limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. We have investigated surface damage of tungsten (W) materials under transient heat and particle loads by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is 144 kJ (2.88 mF, 10 kVmax). Surface melting of a W material was clearly observed at the energy density of ˜2 MJ/m2. It is known that surface melting and evaporation during a transient heat load could generate a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material [1]. Then, the subsequent erosion could be reduced by the vapor shielding effect. In this study, we introduce a new experiment using two MCPG devices (MCPG-1, 2) to understand vapor shielding effects of a W surface under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment. The capacitor bank energy of MCPG-2 is almost same as that of MCPG-1. The second plasmoid is applied with a variable delay time after the plasmoid produced by MCPG-1. Then, a vapor cloud layer could shield the second plasma load. To verify the vapor shielding effects, surface damage of a W material is investigated by changing the delay time. In the conference, the preliminary experimental results will be shown.[4pt] [1] A. Hassanein et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391, pp. 777-780 (2009).

  3. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Fischer, W.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Poole, H. J.; Todd, R.

    2015-05-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  4. Plasma Sputtering Robotic Device for In-Situ Thick Coatings of Long, Small Diameter Vacuum Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-10-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated & operated. Reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes and of electron clouds, due to high secondary electron yield (SEY), in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced SEY to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel RHIC tube has conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Device detail and experimental results will be presented. Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under

  5. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A., E-mail: hershcovitch@bnl.gov; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Todd, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Poole, H. J. [PVI, Oxnard, California 93031 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  6. A spectral line survey from 17.5-250 nm of plasmas created in a magnetic confinement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Hollmann, E. M.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; TJ-II Team1, the

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emission lines continue to be a powerful tool for studying astrophysical, process, laser-produced, and magnetically confined plasmas, among others. Hence, numerous spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostics, from the x-ray to the infrared, make use of the relative intensity, width, displacement in wavelength, or temporal evolution of such emission lines emitted by the atoms and ions present in such plasmas. In this work, a spectral line survey, from 17.5-250 nm, is presented for electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas created and maintained in the TJ-II stellarator, a medium-sized magnetically confined plasma device. In these plasmas, for which hydrogen, deuterium or helium have been used as the working gas, central electron temperatures and densities up to 1 keV and 5 × 1019 m-3, respectively, are achieved. This work is a compilation of the identified spectral emission lines emitted by the working gas as well by the intrinsic and injected impurity ions in the above wavelength range. For this, spectra were recorded, over the past fifteen years of TJ-II operation, using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled detector at its output focal plane. In total, almost 400 spectral emission lines from eighteen different elements have been identified using a number of atomic line emission databases.

  7. Enhancing the plasma illumination behaviour of microplasma devices using microcrystalline/ultra-nanocrystalline hybrid diamond materials as cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tinghsun; Lou, Shiucheng; Chen, Huangchin; Chen, Chulung; Lee, Chiyoung; Tai, Nyanhwa; Lin, Inan

    2013-08-21

    The properties of capacity-type microplasma devices were significantly enhanced due to the utilisation of hybrid diamond films as cathodes. The performance of the microplasma devices was closely correlated with the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the diamond cathode materials. The nanoemitters, which were prepared by growing duplex-structured diamond films [microcrystalline diamond (MCD)/ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD)] on Si-pyramid templates via a two-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPE-CVD) process, exhibited improved EFE properties (E0 = 5.99 V μm(-1), J(e) = 1.10 mA cm(-2) at 8.50 V μm(-1) applied field), resulting in superior microplasma device performance (with a lower threshold field of 200 V mm(-1) and a higher plasma current density of 7.80 mA cm(-2)) in comparison with UNCD film devices prepared using a single-step MPE-CVD process. The superior EFE properties of the duplex-structured MCD-UNCD films relative to those of the UNCD films can be attributed to the unique granular structure of the diamond films. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the MCD-UNCD films consisted of abundant graphitic phases located at the periphery of large diamond aggregates and at the boundaries between the ultra-small diamond grains. The presence of the graphite phase is presumed to be the prime factor that renders these films more conductive and causes these films to exhibit higher EFE properties, thus resulting in the improved plasma illumination properties of the microplasma devices.

  8. The ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration focused on the stability of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanenbaum, David M.; Hermenau, Martin; Voroshazi, Eszter;

    2012-01-01

    Seven distinct sets (n ¢ 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices were prepared by leading research laboratories in a collaboration planned at the Third International Summit on Organic Photovoltaic Stability (ISOS-3). All devices were shipped to RISØ DTU and characterized simultaneously...... experiment both to provide an assessment of the homogeneity of the samples and to distribute samples for a variety of post soaking analytical measurements at six distinct laboratories enabling comparison at various stages in the degradation of the devices. Over 100 devices with more than 300 cells were used...

  9. Comparative study of nanocomposites prepared by pulsed and dc sputtering combined with plasma polymerization suitable for photovoltaic device applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Amreen A. [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati, Assam (India); Pal, Arup R., E-mail: arpal@iasst.gov.in [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati, Assam (India); Kar, Rajib [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Bailung, Heremba; Chutia, Joyanti [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati, Assam (India); Patil, Dinkar S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2014-12-15

    Plasma processing, a single step method for production of large area composite films, is employed to deposit plasma polymerized aniline-Titanium dioxide (PPani-TiO{sub 2}) nanocomposite thin films. The deposition of PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films are made using reactive magnetron sputtering and plasma polymerization combined process. This study focuses on the direct comparison between continuous and pulsed dc magnetron sputtering techniques of titanium in combination with rf plasma polymerization of aniline. The deposited PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films are characterized and discussed in terms of structural, morphological and optical properties. A self powered hybrid photodetector has been developed by plasma based process. The proposed method provides a new route where the self-assembly of molecules, that is, the spontaneous association of atomic or molecular building blocks under plasma environment, emerge as a successful strategy to form well-defined structural and morphological units of nanometer dimensions. - Highlights: • PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite by pulsed and dc sputtering with rf plasma polymerization. • In-situ and Ex-situ H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping in PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite. • PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite based self-powered-hybrid photodetector.

  10. Pretreatment of plasma samples by a novel hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltrate device for the determination of cefaclor concentrations in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Mei; Li, Cen; Jiang, Ye; Ren, Shu-Meng

    2010-10-29

    A simple sample preparation method was developed by using a centrifugal ultrafiltration (CF-UF) device with hollow fiber (HF) for the determination of cefaclor in plasma by HPLC. Samples were placed into a homemade device, which was consisted of a glass tube and a U-shaped hollow fiber. The filtrate was withdrawn from the hollow fiber into a syringe after centrifugation and 20 μL was directly injected into the HPLC for analysis. The HPLC method had a linear calibration curve in the concentration range of 6.00×10(-2)-30.7 μg mL(-1)(r=0.9996). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.06 μg mL(-1), respectively. The intra and inter-day precisions (RSD) were 1.7%, 1.2%, 1.0% and 3.6%, 2.5%, 1.9%, respectively, for three concentrations. Assay accuracy was higher than 99.2% and the absolute recovery was 86.8-92.5%. It is feasible to use this novel and low cost device for sample pretreatment for the analysis of cefaclor in plasma.

  11. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus. III. Scaling theory for high pressure operation and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2016-12-01

    Recent work on the revised Gratton-Vargas model (Auluck, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013); 22, 112509 (2015) and references therein) has demonstrated that there are some aspects of Dense Plasma Focus (DPF), which are not sensitive to details of plasma dynamics and are well captured in an oversimplified model assumption, which contains very little plasma physics. A hyperbolic conservation law formulation of DPF physics reveals the existence of a velocity threshold related to specific energy of dissociation and ionization, above which, the work done during shock propagation is adequate to ensure dissociation and ionization of the gas being ingested. These developments are utilized to formulate an algorithmic definition of DPF optimization that is valid in a wide range of applications, not limited to neutron emission. This involves determination of a set of DPF parameters, without performing iterative model calculations, that lead to transfer of all the energy from the capacitor bank to the plasma at the time of current derivative singularity and conversion of a preset fraction of this energy into magnetic energy, while ensuring that electromagnetic work done during propagation of the plasma remains adequate for dissociation and ionization of neutral gas being ingested. Such a universal optimization criterion is expected to facilitate progress in new areas of DPF research that include production of short lived radioisotopes of possible use in medical diagnostics, generation of fusion energy from aneutronic fuels, and applications in nanotechnology, radiation biology, and materials science. These phenomena are expected to be optimized for fill gases of different kinds and in different ranges of mass density compared to the devices constructed for neutron production using empirical thumb rules. A universal scaling theory of DPF design optimization is proposed and illustrated for designing devices working at one or two orders higher pressure of deuterium than the current

  12. ISOS-3 Inter-Laboratory Collaboration Focused on the Stability of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanenbaum, D. M.; Hermenau, M.; Voroshazi, E.; Lloyd, M. T.; Galagan, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Hosel, M.; Dam, H. F.; Jrgensen, M.; Gevorgyan, S. A.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Wurfel, U.; Andriessen, R.; Rosch, R.; Hoppe, H.; Teran-Escobar, G.; Lira-Cantu, M.

    2012-02-07

    Seven distinct sets (n {>=} 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices were prepared by leading research laboratories in a collaboration planned at the Third International Summit on Organic Photovoltaic Stability (ISOS-3). All devices were shipped to RISO DTU and characterized simultaneously up to 1830 h in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under three distinct illumination conditions: accelerated full sun simulation; low level indoor fluorescent lighting; and dark storage with daily measurement under full sun simulation. Three nominally identical devices were used in each experiment both to provide an assessment of the homogeneity of the samples and to distribute samples for a variety of post soaking analytical measurements at six distinct laboratories enabling comparison at various stages in the degradation of the devices. Over 100 devices with more than 300 cells were used in the study. We present here design and fabrication details for the seven device sets, benefits and challenges associated with the unprecedented size of the collaboration, characterization protocols, and results both on individual device stability and uniformity of device sets, in the three illumination conditions.

  13. Research on anisotropy of fusion-produced protons and neutrons emission from high-current plasma-focus discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, K., E-mail: karol.malinowski@ncbj.gov.pl; Sadowski, M. J.; Szydlowski, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IFPiLM), 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Zaloga, D. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IFPiLM), 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    The paper concerns fast protons and neutrons from D-D fusion reactions in a Plasma-Focus-1000U facility. Measurements were performed with nuclear-track detectors arranged in “sandwiches” of an Al-foil and two PM-355 detectors separated by a polyethylene-plate. The Al-foil eliminated all primary deuterons, but was penetrable for fast fusion protons. The foil and first PM-355 detector were penetrable for fast neutrons, which were converted into recoil-protons in the polyethylene and recorded in the second PM-355 detector. The “sandwiches” were irradiated by discharges of comparable neutron-yields. Analyses of etched tracks and computer simulations of the fusion-products behavior in the detectors were performed.

  14. Specific features of X-ray generation by plasma focus chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Krapiva, P. S.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moskalenko, I. N.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The process of hard X-ray (HXR) generation in plasma focus (PF) chambers was studied experimentally. The radiation was recorded using scintillation detectors with a high time resolution and thermoluminescent detectors in combination with the method of absorbing filters. Time-resolved analysis of the processes of neutron and X-ray generation in PFs is performed. The spectra of HXR emission from PF chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings are determined. In experiments with PF chambers filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture, in addition to the HXR pulse with photon energies of up to 200-300 keV, a γ-ray pulse with photon energies of up to 2.5-3.0 MeV is recorded, and a mechanism of its generation is proposed.

  15. Control of Beam Energy and Flux Ratio in an Ion-Beam-Background Plasma System Produced in a Double Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zian; Ma, Jinxiu; Li, Yuanrui; Sun, Yan; Jiang, Zhengqi

    2016-11-01

    Plasmas containing ion beams have various applications both in plasma technology and in fundamental research. The ion beam energy and flux are the two factors characterizing the beam properties. Previous studies have not achieved the independent adjustment of these two parameters. In this paper, an ion-beam-background-plasma system was produced with hot-cathode discharge in a double plasma device separated by two adjacent grids, with which the beam energy and flux ratio (the ratio between the beam flux and total ion flux) can be controlled independently. It is shown that the discharge voltage (i.e., voltage across the hot-cathode and anode) and the voltage drop between the two separation grids can be used to effectively control the beam energy while the flux ratio is not affected by these voltages. The flux ratio depends sensitively on hot-filaments heating current whose influence on the beam energy is relatively weak, and thus enabling approximate control of the flux ratio supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575183, 11175177)

  16. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  17. Energy- and time-resolved measurements of fast ions emitted from plasma-focus discharges by means of a Thomson spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, R.; Czaus, K.; Paduch, M.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D. R.; Zielinska, E.; Żebrowski, J.

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved measurements of fast deuterons emitted from high-current discharges of the Plasma-Focus (PF) type. The measurements were performed in a modified PF-1000U facility which is operated at the IFPiLM in Warsaw, Poland. The device was equipped with a fast-acting gas valve placed inside the inner electrode and oriented along the z-axis. The valve could inject a small volume of a chosen gas in front of this electrode. The PF discharges were initiated at the initial deuterium pressure equal to 1.6 or 2 hPa, with or without the use of the gas-puffing. Such discharges emitted intense beams of accelerated primary ions and X-ray pulses as well as products of nuclear fusion reactions. The reported measurements of the fast ion beams were performed by means of a Thomson-type spectrometer located at a chosen distance at the z-axis and equipped with miniature scintillation detectors. These detectors were placed in different points upon the deuteron parabola which corresponded to determined energy values. The detectors configuration allowed us to determine instants of the ion emission (using a TOF technique) and to compare them with instants of the X-ray emission. The collected data provided important information about emission characteristics of the modified PF-1000U facility.

  18. Plasma-Material Interface Development for Future Spherical Tokamak-based Devices in NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    et. al, V

    2011-09-24

    , ELMs otherwise suppressed due to lithium conditioning. Fast divertor measurements showed that impulsive particle and heat fluxes due to the ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region of the snowflake divertor. The snowflake divertor configuration is being combined in experiments with extrinsic deuterium or impurity gas puffing for increased dissipative divertor power losses, additional upper divertor nulls for increased power sharing between the upper and the lower divertors, and lithium coated plasma facing components for large area ion pumping. These efforts are aimed at the development of an integrated PMI for future ST-based devices for fusion development applications.

  19. Development of plasma sources for ICRF heating experiment in KMAX mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Shi, Peiyun

    2016-10-01

    KMAX, Keda Mirror with AXisymmeticity, is a tandem mirror machine with a length of 10 meters and diameters of 1.2 meters in the central cell and 0.3 meters in the mirror throat. In the past experiments, the plasma was generated by helicon wave launched from the west end. We obtained the blue core mode in argon discharge, however, it cannot provide sufficient plasma for hydrogen discharge, which is at least 1012 cm-3 required for effective ICRF heating. Several attempts have thus been tried or under design to increase the central cell's plasma density: (1) a washer gun with aperture of 1cm has been successfully tested, and a plasma density of 1013 cm-3 was achieved in the west cell near the gun, however, the plasma is only 1011 cm-3 in the central cell possible due to the mirror trapping and/or neutral quenching effect (2) a larger washer gun with aperture of 2.5 cm and a higher power capacitor bank are being assembled in order to generate more plasmas. In addition, how to mitigate the neutrals is under consideration (3) A hot cathode is been designed and will be tested in combination with plasma gun or alone. Preliminary results from those plasma sources will be presented and discussed.

  20. EDTA-treated cotton-thread microfluidic device used for one-step whole blood plasma separation and assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul; Maylina, Leni; Noviana, Deni; Wicaksono, Dedy Hermawan Bagus

    2016-04-21

    This study aims to observe the wicking and separation characteristics of blood plasma in a cotton thread matrix functioning as a microfluidic thread-based analytical device (μTAD). We investigated several cotton thread treatment methods using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) anticoagulant solution for wicking whole blood samples and separating its plasma. The blood of healthy Indonesian thin tailed sheep was used in this study to understand the properties of horizontal wicking and separation on the EDTA-treated μTAD. The wicking distance and blood cell separation from its plasma was observed for 120 s and documented using a digital phone camera. The results show that untreated cotton-threads stopped the blood wicking process on the μTAD. On the other hand, the deposition of EDTA anticoagulant followed by its drying on the thread at room temperature for 10 s provides the longest blood wicking with gradual blood plasma separation. Furthermore, the best results in terms of the longest wicking and the clearest on-thread separation boundary between blood cells and its plasma were obtained using the μTAD treated with EDTA deposition followed by 60 min drying at refrigerated temperature (2-8 °C). The separation length of blood plasma in the μTADs treated with dried-EDTA at both room and refrigerated temperatures was not statistically different (P > 0.05). This separation occurs through the synergy of three factors, cotton fiber, EDTA anticoagulant and blood platelets, which induce the formation of a fibrin-filter via a partial coagulation process in the EDTA-treated μTAD. An albumin assay was employed to demonstrate the efficiency of this plasma separation method during a one-step assay on the μTAD. Albumin in blood is an important biomarker for kidney and heart disease. The μTAD has a slightly better limit of detection (LOD) than conventional blood analysis, with an LOD of 114 mg L(-1) compared to 133 mg L(-1), respectively. However, the μTAD performed

  1. XPS, SIMS and FTIR-ATR characterization of boronized graphite from the thermonuclear plasma device RFX-mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezzi, F., E-mail: ghezzi@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Canton, A.; Dal Bello, S.; Rais, B. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Anderle, M. [Knowledge Department, Provincia Autonoma di Trento, 38123, Trento (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • XPS, ATR and SIMS characterization of samples from the first wall of RFX-mod device. • Amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus other carbon type bonds. • Results suggest to increase the number of electrode used for boronization. - Abstract: In this paper the characterization of a thin (tens of nanometers) boron layer on fine grain polycrystalline graphite substrate is presented. The boron film is used as conditioning technique for the full graphite wall of the Reversed Field eXperiment–modified (RFX-mod) experiment, a device for the magnetic confinement of plasmas of thermonuclear interest. Aim of the present analysis is to enlighten the chemical structure of the film, the trapping mechanism that makes it a getter for oxygen and hydrogen and the reason of its loss of effectiveness after exposure to about 100 s of hydrogen plasma. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy in combination with the Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) were used to obtain the structure and the chemical composition of graphitic samples as coated or coated and subsequently exposed to hydrogen plasma after boron deposition. The boron layers on the only coated samples were found to be amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus a variety of bonds like B-B, B-H, B-O, B-OH, C-C, C-H, C-O, C-OH. Both the thickness and the homogeneity of the layers were found to depend on the distance of the sample from the anode during the deposition. The samples contained oxygen along the layer thickness, at level of 5%, bound to boron. The gettering action of the boron is therefore already active during the deposition itself. The exposure to plasma caused erosion of the boron film and higher content of H and O bound to boron throughout the whole thickness. The interaction of the B layer with plasma is therefore a bulk phenomenon.

  2. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (˜1 m), high-current (˜1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ˜5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  3. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-01-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (a...

  4. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    small laboratory size fusion experiments, as compared to those of the larger laboratories, to report about their latest achievements working with medium size and small scale tokamaks, stellarators, compact tori, dense plasma focus, reversed field pinches, helical devices, linear machines, and other small plasma devices. The Technical Meeting aims at stimulating new synergies which can contribute to better streamline the research outputs to the mainstream fusion research. Previous meetings in the series were held in Budapest, Hungary (1985), Nagoya, Japan (1986), Nice, France (1988), Washington DC, USA (1990), Hefei, China (1991), Wuerzburg, Germany (1992), Campinas, Brazil (1993), Madrid, Spain (1994), Ahmedabad, India (1995), Prague, Czech Republic (1996), Cairo, Egypt (1997), Tokyo, Japan (1998) in Chengdu, China (1999), São Paulo, Brazil (2002), Vienna, Austria (2003) in Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Lisbon, Portugal (2007), in Alushta, Ukraine (2008), Kurchatov, Kazakhstan (2009) and Vienna, Austria (2011). The 1st Costa Rican Summer School on Plasma Physics was held a week before the Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD, and the 2nd Latin American Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) was organized in parallel with the it. The objective of the AITP Workshop is to enhance the regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held at the Crowne Plaza Corobici Hotel in San José from 27 to 31 January 2014. The LAWPP scientific programme, which was spread along the whole week, had 15 invited speakers, 126 participants from 20 countries around the world. It included 7 plenary talks, 8 invited talks and 12 oral contributed papers were chosen out of 92 submissions. 82 contributions in 25 topics were presented in poster sessions on Monday 27, Tuesday 28 and Thursday 30 January 2014. The 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held along the LAWPP 2014 from 27 to 29 January

  5. On the history of plasma treatment and comparison of microbiostatic efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device with two modern devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napp, Judith; Daeschlein, Georg; Napp, Matthias; von Podewils, Sebastian; Gümbel, Denis; Spitzmueller, Romy; Fornaciari, Paolo; Hinz, Peter; Jünger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Kaltes Atmosphärendruckplasma (CAP) hat durch seine mannigfaltigen bioaktiven Eigenschaften ein neues medizinisches Feld definiert: die Plasmamedizin. Allerdings wurde vor etwa 100 Jahren CAP in verwandter Form in der Hochfrequenztherapie genutzt. Zielsetzung dieser Studie war eine Übersicht über die historischen Plasmabehandlungen zu gewinnen und Daten bezüglich der antimikrobiellen Wirkung eines historischen Hochfrequenzapparats zu gewinnen.Methode: Erstens wurde historische Literatur bezüglich CAP-Behandlungen ausgewertet, da aus dem heutigen Schrifttum keine Angaben gewonnen werden konnten. Zweitens wurde die Empfindlichkeit von fünf verschiedenen bakteriellen Wundisolaten auf Agar gegenüber einer historischen Plasmaquelle (violet wand [VW]) und zwei modernen Geräten (atmospheric pressure plasma jet [APPJ] und Dielectric Barrier Discharge [DBD]) ermittelt. Die erzielten Hemmhöfe wurde verglichen. Ergebnisse: Die seinerzeit populärsten elektromedizinischen Anwendungen erzeugten durch Glaselektroden sogenannte Effluvien, die mit modernem CAP verwandt sind. Alle drei untersuchten Plasmaquellen zeigten eine vollständige Eradikation aller behandelter Isolate im plasmabehandelten Bereich. Die historische Plasmaquelle (VW) war dabei ähnlich wirksam wie die modernen Plasmaquellen. Schlussfolgerung: In begrenztem Umfang kann retrograd ein Wirksamkeitsnachweis der historischen Plasmabehandlungen abgeleitet werden, insbesondere bei der Behandlung infektiöser Erkrankungen. Die zugrunde liegende Technologie könnte für die Entwicklung moderner Nachfolgegeräte genutzt werden.

  6. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics in a DPF and the associated instabilities and neutron production.

  7. Formation and sustainment of low aspect ratio torus plasma by ECH in the LATE device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Masaki; Higaki, Kenichi; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Igami, Hiroe; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Takashi [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    A plasma current of I{sub p} {approx_equal} 3 kA is generated and maintained for 1 second by injecting a 2.45 GHz microwave power of 5 kW without Ohmic heating power. Magnetic measurements suggest that closed flux surfaces are formed. The electron density inferred from an interferometer is more than 1.0 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} which is beyond the plasma cut off density, suggesting that electron cyclotron heating by mode-converted electron Bernstein waves may be responsible for plasma heating and current drive. The plasma currents are observed to increase with the increase of RF power and equilibrium vertical field, and I{sub p} {approx_equal} 5 kA have been obtained by 2 GHz klystron power of 53 kW. (author)

  8. Ion sensitive probe measurement in the linear plasma device PSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: ezumi@ec.nagano-nct.ac.jp; Kiss' ovski, Zh. [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Bohmeyer, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Plasmadiagnostik, Brook-Taylor-Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Fussmann, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Plasmadiagnostik, Brook-Taylor-Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The suitability of an ion sensitive probe (ISP) with respect to ion temperature (T {sub i}) measurements has been tested in the linear plasma generator in PSI-2. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were recorded as a function of two key parameters: shielding height (h) and potential differences between inner and outer electrodes (V {sub B}). It could be experimentally confirmed that the current within the electron saturation region is reduced with increasing h. Furthermore, the I-V characteristics change drastically when V {sub B} is varied. Radial profiles of the plasma parameters including plasma and floating potentials could be taken. Whereas the T {sub i} values determined by ISP in the plasma core region agree fairly with those obtained by using a local optical probe, severe interpretation difficulties occurred for the outer regions.

  9. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the electrochemical properties of Prussian blue electrodes for transparent electrochromic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A-Young [Advanced Energy Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Hun [Advanced Energy Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Dongjin [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joong Kee, E-mail: leejk@kist.re.kr [Advanced Energy Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The effect of oxygen plasma on the electrochromic characteristics of electrochromic devices that utilize Prussian blue electrodes is investigated. Prussian blue working electrodes were electrodeposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide films that were grown on glass substrates by electron cyclotron resonance-metal organic chemical vapor deposition. An indium tin oxide coated glass was employed as the counter electrode that served as an ion storage layer. The goal of the oxygen plasma treatment is to increase the oxygen functional groups on the surface of the Prussian blue electrode leading to the enhancement of the oxidation reaction and eventually the increase in coloration efficiency. Improvement of electrochromic properties, such as optical density and response time, was also observed following plasma treatment. - Highlights: • Prussian blue (PB) films on SnOx:F thin film as a working electrode are investigated. • PB color changed that in oxidation state is blue and in reduction state is transparent. • Enhancement of electrochemical performance of electrode after oxygen plasma treatment.

  10. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Cremona, A.; Dellasega, D.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F.; Passoni, M.; Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E.

    2015-08-01

    In this work results of the first D2/N2 experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (ne 5 ṡ 1010 cm-3, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3-5 ṡ 1020 m-2s-1) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ṡ 1023 m-2. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of WxNy layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1-10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  11. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively.

  12. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguardia, L., E-mail: laguardia@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Caniello, R.; Cremona, A. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Dell’Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In this work results of the first D{sub 2}/N{sub 2} experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (n{sub e} 5 ⋅ 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3–5 ⋅ 10{sup 20} m{sup −2}s{sup −1}) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ⋅ 10{sup 23} m{sup −2}. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of W{sub x}N{sub y} layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1–10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  13. 3D plasma turbulence and neutral simulations using the Hermes model in BOUT + + : a study of linear devices and the tokamak edge and divertor region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Jarrod; Dudson, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport processes in the low temperature plasma at the boundary region of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) devices is crucial to the design and operation of future fusion reactor devices. It influences the divertor heat load, and probably the core confinement as well. The dominant source of this transport is turbulence, which serves to mix the high and low temperature regions of the plasma. The nature of this plasma turbulence is affected by not only the plasma parameters, but also the neutral species that also exist in these low temperature regions. The interaction of neutrals with the plasma turbulence is studied in linear device geometry (for its simplicity, yet similarity in plasma parameters), and the result is a strong interaction that impacts the local plasma and neutral densities, momenta and energies. The neutral gas is found to affect plasma edge turbulence primarily through momentum exchange, reducing the radial electric field and enhancing cross-field transport, with consequent implications for the SOL width and divertor heat loads. Therefore, turbulent plasma and fluid simulations have been performed in multiple tokamak geometries to more closely examine the effects of this interaction. These cases were chosen for the variety in configuration with ISTOK having a toroidal limiter (ie. no divertor), DIII-D having a standard divertor configuration, and MAST-U having a super-X divertor with extended outer divertor legs. Progress towards the characterization of neutral impact on detachment and edge behavior will be presented.

  14. Direct measurement of refracted trajectory of transmitting electron cyclotron beam through plasma on the Large Helical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron-cyclotron (EC -beam refraction due to the presence of plasma was investigated in the Large Helical Device. The transmitted-EC-beam measurement system was constructed and the beam pattern on the opposite side of the irradiated surface was measured using an IR camera. Clear dependence of the EC-beam refraction on the electron density was observed and the beam shift in the toroidal direction showed good agreement with the ray-trace calculation of TRAVIS. The influence of the peripheral density profile and the thermal effect on the beam refraction were discussed.

  15. Comparison of RF C-V extraction methods using device simulations with focus on the influence of parasitics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijk, van E.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    When the gateoxide thickness of a CMOS device is below approximately 2 nm, it is impossible to perform classical C-V measurements due to the high leakage current. This can be modelled by a capacitor and a resistance in parallel. The oxide capacitance can be obtained by taking the imaginary part of t

  16. The long way to steady state fusion plasmas - the superconducting stellarator device Wendelstein 7-X

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The stable generation of high temperature Hydrogen plasmas (ion and electron temperature in the range 10-20 keV) is the basis for the use of nuclear fusion to generate heat and thereby electric power. The most promising path is to use strong, toroidal, twisted magnetic fields to confine the electrically charged plasma particles in order to avoid heat losses to the cold, solid wall elements. Two magnetic confinement concepts have been proven to be most suitable: (a) the tokamak and (b) the stellarator. The stellarator creates the magnetic field by external coils only, the tokamak by combining the externally created field with the magnetic field generated by a strong current in the plasma. “Wendelstein 7-X” is the name of a large superconducting stellarator that went successfully into operation after 15 years of construction. With 30 m3 plasma volume, 3 T magnetic field on axis, and 10 MW micro wave heating power, Hydrogen plasmas are generated that allow one to establish a scientific basis for the extrapol...

  17. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples.

  18. Knowing the dense plasma focus - The coming of age (of the PF) with broad-ranging scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2017-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is blessed not only with copious multi-radiations ranging from electron and ion beams, x-rays both soft and hard, fusion neutrons D-D and D-T but also with the property of enhanced compression from radiative collapse leading to HED (high energy density) states. The Lee code has been used in extensive systematic numerical experiments tied to reality through fitting with measured current waveforms and verified through comparison of measured and computed yields and measurements of multi-radiation. The studies have led to establishment of scaling laws with respect to storage energy, discharge current and pinch currents for fusion neutrons, characteristic soft x-rays, all-line radiation and ion beams. These are summarized here together with a first-time presentation of a scaling law of radiatively enhanced compression as a function of atomic number of operational gas. This paper emphasizes that such a broad range of scaling laws signals the coming of age of the DPF and presents a reference platform for planning the many potential applications such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes, imaging and energy and high energy density (HED).

  19. Aquaregia and Oxygen Plasma Treatments on Fluorinated Tin Oxide for Assembly of PLEDs Devices Using OC1C10-PPV as Emissive Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Roberto SANTOS

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work were carried out treatments with oxygen plasma and aquaregia on fluorinated tin oxide (FTO films varying the treatment times. After treatments, the samples were analyzed by techniques measurements: sheet resistance, thickness, Hall effect, transmittance and superficial roughness. Devices using FTO/PEDOT:PSS/OC1C10-PPV/Al were assembled. In this experiment some variations were observed by sheet resistance and thickness and Hall effect measurements indicated most elevated carriers concentration and resistivity for aquaregia than that oxygen plasma. The roughness was elevated for the first minutes with treatment by aquaregia too. In the I-V curves the aquaregia devices presented the lowest threshold voltage for 30 minutes and devices treated by oxygen plasma presented a behavior most resistivity different of typical curves for PLEDs devices.

  20. XPS, SIMS and FTIR-ATR characterization of boronized graphite from the thermonuclear plasma device RFX-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, F.; Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Canton, A.; Dal Bello, S.; Rais, B.; Anderle, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the characterization of a thin (tens of nanometers) boron layer on fine grain polycrystalline graphite substrate is presented. The boron film is used as conditioning technique for the full graphite wall of the Reversed Field eXperiment-modified (RFX-mod) experiment, a device for the magnetic confinement of plasmas of thermonuclear interest. Aim of the present analysis is to enlighten the chemical structure of the film, the trapping mechanism that makes it a getter for oxygen and hydrogen and the reason of its loss of effectiveness after exposure to about 100 s of hydrogen plasma. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy in combination with the Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) were used to obtain the structure and the chemical composition of graphitic samples as coated or coated and subsequently exposed to hydrogen plasma after boron deposition. The boron layers on the only coated samples were found to be amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus a variety of bonds like B-B, B-H, B-O, B-OH, C-C, C-H, C-O, C-OH. Both the thickness and the homogeneity of the layers were found to depend on the distance of the sample from the anode during the deposition. The samples contained oxygen along the layer thickness, at level of 5%, bound to boron. The gettering action of the boron is therefore already active during the deposition itself. The exposure to plasma caused erosion of the boron film and higher content of H and O bound to boron throughout the whole thickness. The interaction of the B layer with plasma is therefore a bulk phenomenon.

  1. Excitation and Propagetion of Modified Fluctuation in a Toroidal Plasma in KT-5C Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玄; 王之江; 陆荣华; 闻一之; 万树德; 俞昌旋; 刘万东; 王成; 潘阁生; 王文浩; 王俊

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the propagation of the turbulent perturbation in the tokamak edge plasma is an important issue to actively modify or control the turbulence, reduce the anomalous transport and improve plasma confmement. To realize active modification of the edge perturbation, a high dynamic output, broad-band, low-cost power amplifier is set up, and used to drive the active probes in the experiments on KT-5C Tokmak. By using small-size magnetic probes together with Langmiur probes, It is observed that the modified perturbation by the active probes with sufficiently driving power may spread with electrostatic mode, and electromagnetic mode as well.

  2. Clinical management of electromagnetic interferences in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: review of the literature and focus on magnetic resonance conditional devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzani, Alessandro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Allaria, Luca; Diemberger, Igor; Martignani, Cristian; Bratten, Tara; Gardini, Beatrice; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The number of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) has greatly increased in the last 10 years. Many electronic devices used in daily activities generate electromagnetic interferences (EMIs) that can interact with CIEDs. In clinical practice, it is very important to know the potential sources of EMIs and their effect on CIEDs in order to understand how to manage or mitigate them. A very important source of EMI is magnetic resonance (MR), which is considered nowadays the diagnostic gold standard for different anatomical districts. In this review, we focused on the effects of EMI on CIEDs and on the clinical management. Moreover, we made a clarification about MR and CIEDs.In patients with CIEDs, EMIs may cause potentially serious and even life-threatening complications (inappropriate shocks, device malfunctions, inhibition of pacing in pacemaker-dependent patients) and may rarely dictate device replacement. The association of inappropriate shocks with increased mortality highlights the importance of minimizing the occurrence of EMI. Adequate advice and recommendations about the correct management of EMIs in patients with CIEDs are required to avoid all complications during hospitalization and in daily life. Furthermore, the article focused on actual management about MR and CIEDs.

  3. MIP Plasma Decapsulation of Copper-wired Semiconductor Devices for Failure Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of Integrated Circuit (IC) devices are encapsulated in wire-bonded plastic IC packages. Epoxy molding compound is used as the encapsulation material and gold was used as the bonding wire material. However, the increase of gold material price from 400 USD/ounce in year 2005 to 1400 USD/o

  4. MIP Plasma Decapsulation of Copper-wired Semiconductor Devices for Failure Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of Integrated Circuit (IC) devices are encapsulated in wire-bonded plastic IC packages. Epoxy molding compound is used as the encapsulation material and gold was used as the bonding wire material. However, the increase of gold material price from 400 USD/ounce in year 2005 to 1400 USD/o

  5. MIP Plasma Decapsulation of Copper-wired Semiconductor Devices for Failure Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of Integrated Circuit (IC) devices are encapsulated in wire-bonded plastic IC packages. Epoxy molding compound is used as the encapsulation material and gold was used as the bonding wire material. However, the increase of gold material price from 400 USD/ounce in year 2005 to 1400

  6. Observed Multi-Decade DD and DT Z-Pinch Fusion Rate Scaling in 5 Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Lowe, D. R. [National Security Technologies, LLC; O' Brien, R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Meehan, B. T. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2013-06-18

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) machines are in use worldwide or a wide variety of applications; one of these is to produce intense, short bursts of fusion via r-Z pinch heating and compression of a working gas. We have designed and constructed a series of these, ranging from portable to a maximum energy storage capacity of 2 MJ. Fusion rates from 5 DPF pulsed fusion generators have been measured in a single laboratory using calibrated activation detectors. Measured rates range from ~ 1015 to more than 1019 fusions per second have been measured. Fusion rates from the intense short (20 – 50 ns) periods of production were inferred from measurement of neutron production using both calibrated activation detectors and scintillator-PMT neutron time of flight (NTOF) detectors. The NTOF detectors are arranged to measure neutrons versus time over flight paths of 30 Meters. Fusion rate scaling versus energy and current will be discussed. Data showing observed fusion cutoff at D-D fusion yield levels of approximately 1*1012, and corresponding tube currents of ~ 3 MA will be shown. Energy asymmetry of product neutrons will also be discussed. Data from the NTOF lines of sight have been used to measure energy asymmetries of the fusion neutrons. From this, center of mass energies for the D(d,n)3He reaction are inferred. A novel re-entrant chamber that allows extremely high single pulse neutron doses (> 109 neutrons/cm2 in 50 ns) to be supplied to samples will be described. Machine characteristics and detector types will be discussed.

  7. Three-dimensional antenna coupling to core plasma in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.; Stallings, D.C.; Galambos, J.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Wang, C.Y.

    1995-09-01

    A complete understanding of the RF physics from the launcher to the plasma core is required to fully analyze RF experiments and to evaluate the performance of RF antenna designs in ITER. This understanding requires a consistent model for the RF power launching system, propagation and absorption through the edge region, and the response of the core plasma to the RF power. As a first step toward such a model, the three-dimensional (3D) antenna modeling code, RANT3D, has been coupled with the reduced order full wave code, PICES. Preliminary results from this model are presented in this paper for parameters similar to those found in the DIII-D experiment.

  8. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system ({rho},{xi}) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number {alpha} as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions.

  9. Evaluation of Different Holder Devices for Freeze-Drying in Dual-Chamber Cartridges With a Focus on Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpus, Christoph; Friess, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    For freeze-drying in dual-chamber cartridges, a holder device to enable handling and safe positioning in the freeze-dryer is necessary. The aim of this study was to analyze 4 different types of holder devices and to define the best system based on energy transfer. The main criteria were drying homogeneity, ability to minimize the influence of atypical radiation on product temperatures, and heat transfer effectiveness. The shell holder reduced the influence of atypical radiation by almost 60% compared to a block system and yielded the most homogenous sublimation rates. Besides the most efficient heat transfer with values of 1.58E-4 ± 2.06E-6 cal/(s*cm(2)*K) at 60 mTorr to 3.63E-4 ± 1.85E-5 cal/(s*cm(2)*K) at 200 mTorr for Ktot, reaction times to shelf temperature changes were up to 4 times shorter compared to the other holder systems and even faster than for vials. The flexible holder provided a comparable shielding against atypical radiation as the shell but introduced a third barrier against energy transfer. Block and guardrail holder were the least efficient system tested. Hence, the shell holder provided the best radiation shielding, enhanced the transferability of the results to a larger scale, and improved the homogeneity between the dual-chamber cartridges.

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet-synthesized electrochromic organomolybdenum oxide thin films for flexible electrochromic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yung-Sen, E-mail: yslin@fcu.edu.tw; Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Tien, Shih-Wei

    2013-02-01

    An investigation is conducted into fast synthesis of electrochromic organomolybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}C{sub y}) thin films onto 40 Ω/□ flexible polyethylene terephthalate/indium tin oxide substrates via atmospheric pressure plasma jet. A precursor [molybdenum carbonyl, Mo(CO){sub 6}] vapor, carried by argon gas, is injected into air plasma torch to synthesize MoO{sub x}C{sub y} films for offering extraordinary electrochromic performance. Only low driving voltages from − 1 V to 1 V are needed to offer reversible Li{sup +} ion intercalation and deintercalation in a 1 M LiClO{sub 4}-propylene carbonate electrolyte. Light modulation with transmittance variation of up to 61%, optical density change of 0.54 and coloration efficiency of 37.5 cm{sup 2}/C at a wavelength of 550 nm after 200 cycles of cyclic voltammetry switching measurements is achieved. - Highlights: ► Fast deposition of MoO{sub x}C{sub y} film by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet ► Organic–inorganic hybrid MoO{sub x}C{sub y} films synthesized ► Flexible and electrochromic MoO{sub x}C{sub y} films produced.

  11. Influences on ionization fraction in an inductively coupled ionized physical vapor deposition device plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Daniel R.; Ruzic, David N.; Allain, Monica M. C.; Hayden, Douglas B.

    2002-01-01

    A computer simulation was created to model the transport of sputtered atoms through an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) system. The simulation combines Monte Carlo and fluid methods to track the metal atoms that are emitted from the target, interact with the IPVD plasma, and are eventually deposited somewhere in the system. Ground-state neutral, excited, and ionized metal atoms are tracked. The simulation requires plasma conditions to be specified by the user. Langmuir probe measurements were used to determine these parameters in an experimental system in order to compare simulation results with experiment. The primary product of the simulation is a prediction of the ionization fraction of the sputtered atom flux at the substrate under various conditions. This quantity was experimentally measured and the results compared to the simulation. Experiment and simulation differ significantly. It is hypothesized that heating of the background gas due to the intense sputtered atom flux at the target is primarily responsible for this difference. Heating of the background gas is not accounted for in the simulation. Difficulties in accurately measuring plasma parameters, especially electron temperature, are also significant.

  12. Supporting students' scientific explanations: A case study investigating the synergy focusing on a teacher's practices when providing instruction and using mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Ibrahim

    Engage students in constructing scientific practices is a critical component of science instruction. Therefore a number of researchers have developed software programs to help students and teachers in this hard task. The Zydeco group, designed a mobile application called Zydeco, which enables students to collect data inside and outside the classroom, and then use the data to create scientific explanations by using claim-evidence-reasoning framework. Previous technologies designed to support scientific explanations focused on how these programs improve students' scientific explanations, but these programs ignored how scientific explanation technologies can support teacher practices. Thus, to increase our knowledge how different scaffolds can work together, this study aimed to portray the synergy between a teacher's instructional practices (part 1) and using supports within a mobile devices (part 2) to support students in constructing explanations. Synergy can be thought of as generic and content-specific scaffolds working together to enable students to accomplish challenging tasks, such as creating explanations that they would not normally be able to do without the scaffolds working together. Providing instruction (part 1) focused on understanding how the teacher scaffolds students' initial understanding of the claim-evidence-reasoning (CER) framework. The second component of examining synergy (part 2: using mobile devices) investigated how this teacher used mobile devices to provide feedback when students created explanations. The synergy between providing instruction and using mobile devices was investigated by analyzing a middle school teacher's practices in two different units (plants and water quality). Next, this study focused on describing how the level of synergy influenced the quality of students' scientific explanations. Finally, I investigated the role of focused teaching intervention sessions to inform teacher in relation to students' performance. In

  13. Plasma Microdischarge as Power-Induced Limiter Element in Microstrip Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Pascaud, Romain; Pizarro, Francisco; Callegari, Thierry; Liard, Laurent; Pascal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The use of micro-hollow cathode sustained discharges (MCSD) as power-induced limiter elements in microstrip devices is proposed to protect receivers against high-power microwave (HPM) threats. The basic principle of the MCSD and its integration into a microstrip circuit are exposed. The power-limiting capability of such a solution has been experimentally assessed for three microstrip circuits, namely a microstrip transmission line, a microstrip ring filter, and a microstrip antenna.

  14. Students distracted by electronic devices perform at the same level as those who are focused on the lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romesh P. Nalliah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about the characteristics of internet distractions that students may engage in during lecture. The objective of this pilot study is to identify some of the internet-based distractions students engage in during in-person lectures. The findings will help identify what activities most commonly cause students to be distracted from the lecture and if these activities impact student learning.Methods. This study is a quasi-experimental pilot study of 26 students from a single institution. In the current study, one class of third-year students were surveyed after a lecture on special needs dentistry. The survey identified self-reported utilization patterns of “smart” devices during the lecture. Additionally, twelve quiz-type questions were given to assess the students’ recall of important points in the lecture material that had just been covered.Results. The sample was comprised of 26 students. Of these, 17 were distracted in some form (either checking email, sending email, checking Facebook, or sending texts. The overall mean score on the test was 9.85 (9.53 for distracted students and 10.44 for non-distracted students. There were no significant differences in test scores between distracted and non-distracted students (p = 0.652. Gender and types of distractions were not significantly associated with test scores (p > 0.05. All students believed that they understood all the important points from the lecture.Conclusions. Every class member felt that they acquired the important learning points during the lecture. Those who were distracted by electronic devices during the lecture performed similarly to those who were not. However, results should be interpreted with caution as this study was a small quasi-experimental design and further research should examine the influence of different types of distraction on different types of learning.

  15. Students distracted by electronic devices perform at the same level as those who are focused on the lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the characteristics of internet distractions that students may engage in during lecture. The objective of this pilot study is to identify some of the internet-based distractions students engage in during in-person lectures. The findings will help identify what activities most commonly cause students to be distracted from the lecture and if these activities impact student learning. Methods. This study is a quasi-experimental pilot study of 26 students from a single institution. In the current study, one class of third-year students were surveyed after a lecture on special needs dentistry. The survey identified self-reported utilization patterns of "smart" devices during the lecture. Additionally, twelve quiz-type questions were given to assess the students' recall of important points in the lecture material that had just been covered. Results. The sample was comprised of 26 students. Of these, 17 were distracted in some form (either checking email, sending email, checking Facebook, or sending texts). The overall mean score on the test was 9.85 (9.53 for distracted students and 10.44 for non-distracted students). There were no significant differences in test scores between distracted and non-distracted students (p = 0.652). Gender and types of distractions were not significantly associated with test scores (p > 0.05). All students believed that they understood all the important points from the lecture. Conclusions. Every class member felt that they acquired the important learning points during the lecture. Those who were distracted by electronic devices during the lecture performed similarly to those who were not. However, results should be interpreted with caution as this study was a small quasi-experimental design and further research should examine the influence of different types of distraction on different types of learning.

  16. Restoration of vision in blind individuals using bionic devices: a review with a focus on cortical visual prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Philip M; Ackland, Helen M; Lowery, Arthur J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2015-01-21

    The field of neurobionics offers hope to patients with sensory and motor impairment. Blindness is a common cause of major sensory loss, with an estimated 39 million people worldwide suffering from total blindness in 2010. Potential treatment options include bionic devices employing electrical stimulation of the visual pathways. Retinal stimulation can restore limited visual perception to patients with retinitis pigmentosa, however loss of retinal ganglion cells precludes this approach. The optic nerve, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex provide alternative stimulation targets, with several research groups actively pursuing a cortically-based device capable of driving several hundred stimulating electrodes. While great progress has been made since the earliest works of Brindley and Dobelle in the 1960s and 1970s, significant clinical, surgical, psychophysical, neurophysiological, and engineering challenges remain to be overcome before a commercially-available cortical implant will be realized. Selection of candidate implant recipients will require assessment of their general, psychological and mental health, and likely responses to visual cortex stimulation. Implant functionality, longevity and safety may be enhanced by careful electrode insertion, optimization of electrical stimulation parameters and modification of immune responses to minimize or prevent the host response to the implanted electrodes. Psychophysical assessment will include mapping the positions of potentially several hundred phosphenes, which may require repetition if electrode performance deteriorates over time. Therefore, techniques for rapid psychophysical assessment are required, as are methods for objectively assessing the quality of life improvements obtained from the implant. These measures must take into account individual differences in image processing, phosphene distribution and rehabilitation programs that may be required to optimize implant functionality. In this review, we

  17. Aerosol Beam Focused-Laser Induced Plasma Spectrometer (ABF-LIPS) Continuous Emissions Multi-Metals Analyzer. Cost and Performance Report: WP-0213

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Process. ..................................................................... 5 Figure 1-3. Focusing Simulation by Computational Fluid Dynamic ( CFD ...21 Figure 2-8. Sampling location for ABF-LIPS and reference method during September 2005 test on platform prior to baghouse ...Unit CAA Clean Air Act CAAA Clean Air Act Amendments CCD Charge Coupled Device CEMS Continuous Emission Monitoring System CFD Computational Fluid

  18. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  19. Spectral survey of helium lines in a linear plasma device for use in HELIOS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, H. B.; Biewer, T. M.; Fehling, D. T.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Fast visible cameras and a filterscope are used to examine the visible light emission from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Proto-MPEX. The filterscope has been configured to perform helium line ratio measurements using emission lines at 667.9, 728.1, and 706.5 nm. The measured lines should be mathematically inverted and the ratios compared to a collisional radiative model (CRM) to determine Te and ne. Increasing the number of measurement chords through the plasma improves the inversion calculation and subsequent Te and ne localization. For the filterscope, one spatial chord measurement requires three photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) connected to pellicle beam splitters. Multiple, fast visible cameras with narrowband filters are an alternate technique for performing these measurements with superior spatial resolution. Each camera contains millions of pixels; each pixel is analogous to one filterscope PMT. The data can then be inverted and the ratios compared to the CRM to determine 2-dimensional "images" of Te and ne in the plasma. An assessment is made in this paper of the candidate He I emission lines for an imaging technique.

  20. Plasma processing of niobium for the production of thin-film superconducting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tugwell, A.J.; Hutson, D.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Josephson junctions, which are regions of weak electrical connection between two superconductors, are the active elements of very sensitive thin-film magnetometers. Junctions are fabricated by growing barriers of native oxide on thin Nb films and depositing a layer of PbIn alloy on top. High sensitivity magnetometers require junctions of small area, and to achieve this, edge junctions are fabricated in which one dimension is defined by the thickness of the Nb and the other is set by the limit of optical lithography. An edge with a suitable angle is produced by reactive ion etching using 5 vol % O/sub 2/ in CF/sub 4/ in a parallel plate rf plasma etcher. Details of etch rates and edge profiles are given. The barrier is formed by a cleaning and oxidation process in an rf plasma at a pressure of 10/sup -6/ bar. Details of the design of a purpose built rf cathode and the run-to-run reproducibility of junction characteristics are given. Different oxidation times and bias voltages are necessary to produce a given oxide thickness on a sloping edge of Nb, as compared to a planar surface, and an explanation for this is proposed. Examples are described of magnetometers made using the above processes.