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Sample records for plant pathogenic bacteria

  1. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacteriocins active against plant pathogenic bacteria.

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    Grinter, Rhys; Milner, Joel; Walker, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Gram-negative phytopathogens cause significant losses in a diverse range of economically important crop plants. The effectiveness of traditional countermeasures, such as the breeding and introduction of resistant cultivars, is often limited by the dearth of available sources of genetic resistance. An alternative strategy to reduce loss to specific bacterial phytopathogens is to use narrow-spectrum protein antibiotics such as colicin-like bacteriocins as biocontrol agents. A number of colicin-like bacteriocins active against phytopathogenic bacteria have been described previously as have strategies for their application to biocontrol. In the present paper, we discuss these strategies and our own recent work on the identification and characterization of candidate bacteriocins and how these potent and selective antimicrobial agents can be effectively applied to the control of economically important plant disease.

  3. Molecular battles between plant and pathogenic bacteria in the phyllosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Baker

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The phyllosphere, i.e., the aerial parts of the plant, provides one of the most important niches for microbial colonization. This niche supports the survival and, often, proliferation of microbes such as fungi and bacteria with diverse lifestyles including epiphytes, saprophytes, and pathogens. Although most microbes may complete the life cycle on the leaf surface, pathogens must enter the leaf and multiply aggressively in the leaf interior. Natural surface openings, such as stomata, are important entry sites for bacteria. Stomata are known for their vital role in water transpiration and gas exchange between the plant and the environment that is essential for plant growth. Recent studies have shown that stomata can also play an active role in limiting bacterial invasion of both human and plant pathogenic bacteria as part of the plant innate immune system. As counter-defense, plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst DC3000 use the virulence factor coronatine to suppress stomate-based defense. A novel and crucial early battleground in host-pathogen interaction in the phyllosphere has been discovered with broad implications in the study of bacterial pathogenesis, host immunity, and molecular ecology of bacterial diseases.

  4. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions.

  5. Innovative tools for detection of plant pathogenic viruses and bacteria.

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    López, María M; Bertolini, Edson; Olmos, Antonio; Caruso, Paola; Gorris, María Teresa; Llop, Pablo; Penyalver, Ramón; Cambra, Mariano

    2003-12-01

    Detection of harmful viruses and bacteria in plant material, vectors or natural reservoirs is essential to ensure safe and sustainable agriculture. The techniques available have evolved significantly in the last few years to achieve rapid and reliable detection of pathogens, extraction of the target from the sample being important for optimising detection. For viruses, sample preparation has been simplified by imprinting or squashing plant material or insect vectors onto membranes. To improve the sensitivity of techniques for bacterial detection, a prior enrichment step in liquid or solid medium is advised. Serological and molecular techniques are currently the most appropriate when high numbers of samples need to be analysed. Specific monoclonal and/or recombinant antibodies are available for many plant pathogens and have contributed to the specificity of serological detection. Molecular detection can be optimised through the automatic purification of nucleic acids from pathogens by columns or robotics. New variants of PCR, such as simple or multiplex nested PCR in a single closed tube, co-operative-PCR and real-time monitoring of amplicons or quantitative PCR, allow high sensitivity in the detection of one or several pathogens in a single assay. The latest development in the analysis of nucleic acids is micro-array technology, but it requires generic DNA/RNA extraction and pre-amplification methods to increase detection sensitivity. The advances in research that will result from the sequencing of many plant pathogen genomes, especially now in the era of proteomics, represent a new source of information for the future development of sensitive and specific detection techniques for these microorganisms.

  6. Foliar aphid feeding recruits rhizosphere bacteria and primes plant immunity against pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria in pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boyoung; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2012-07-01

    Plants modulate defence signalling networks in response to different biotic stresses. The present study evaluated the effect of a phloem-sucking aphid on plant defence mechanisms in pepper (Capsicum annuum) during subsequent pathogen attacks on leaves and rhizosphere bacteria on roots. Plants were pretreated with aphids and/or the chemical trigger benzothiadiazol (BTH) 7 d before being challenged with two pathogenic bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria (Xav) as a compatible pathogen and X. axonopodis pv. glycines (Xag) as an incompatible (non-host) pathogen. Disease severity was noticeably lower in aphid- and BTH + aphid-treated plants than in controls. Although treatment with BTH or aphids alone did not affect the hypersensitive response (HR) against Xag strain 8ra, the combination treatment had a synergistic effect on the HR. The aphid population was reduced by BTH pretreatment and by combination treatment with BTH and bacterial pathogens in a synergistic manner. Analysis of the expression of the defence-related genes Capsicum annum pathogenesis-related gene 9 (CaPR9), chitinase 2 (CaCHI2), SAR8·2 and Lipoxygenase1 (CaLOX1) revealed that aphid infestation resulted in the priming of the systemic defence responses against compatible and incompatible pathogens. Conversely, pre-challenge with the compatible pathogen Xav on pepper leaves significantly reduced aphid numbers. Aphid infestation increased the population of the beneficial Bacillus subtilis GB03 but reduced that of the pathogenic Ralstonia solanacearum SL1931. The expression of defence-related genes in the root and leaf after aphid feeding indicated that the above-ground aphid infestation elicited salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling throughout the whole plant. The findings of this study show that aphid feeding elicits plant resistance responses and attracts beneficial bacterial populations to help the plant cope with subsequent pathogen attacks.

  7. Insights into Cross-Kingdom Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

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    Morgan W.B. Kirzinger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant and human pathogens have evolved disease factors to successfully exploit their respective hosts. Phytopathogens utilize specific determinants that help to breach reinforced cell walls and manipulate plant physiology to facilitate the disease process, while human pathogens use determinants for exploiting mammalian physiology and overcoming highly developed adaptive immune responses. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of seemingly dedicated human pathogens to cause plant disease, and specialized plant pathogens to cause human disease. Such microbes represent interesting systems for studying the evolution of cross-kingdom pathogenicity, and the benefits and tradeoffs of exploiting multiple hosts with drastically different morphologies and physiologies. This review will explore cross-kingdom pathogenicity, where plants and humans are common hosts. We illustrate that while cross-kingdom pathogenicity appears to be maintained, the directionality of host association (plant to human, or human to plant is difficult to determine. Cross-kingdom human pathogens, and their potential plant reservoirs, have important implications for the emergence of infectious diseases.

  8. Plants as a habitat for beneficial and/or human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Heather L; Triplett, Eric W

    2008-01-01

    Non-plant pathogenic endophytic bacteria can promote plant growth, improve nitrogen nutrition, and, in some cases, are human pathogens. Recent work in several laboratories has shown that enteric bacteria are common inhabitants of the interior of plants. These observations led to the experiments that showed the entry into plants of enteric human pathogens such as Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7. The extent of endophytic colonization by strains is regulated by plant defenses and several genetic determinants necessary for this interior colonization in endophytic bacteria have been identified. The genomes of four endophytic bacteria now available should promote discovery of other genes that contribute to this phenotype. Common virulence factors in plant and animal pathogens have also been described in bacteria that can infect both plant and animal models. Future directions in all of these areas are proposed.

  9. Fluorescence techniques to detect and to assess viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause major economic losses in commercial crop production worldwide every year. The current methods used to detect and to assess the viability of bacterial pathogens and to test seed lots or plants for contamination are usually based on plate assays or on serological techni

  10. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Commonalities and differences of T3SSs in rhizobia and plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria and rhizobia infect higher plants albeit the interactions with their hosts are principally distinct and lead to completely different phenotypic outcomes, either pathogenic or mutualistic, respectively. Bacterial protein delivery to plant host plays an essential role in determining the phenotypic outcome of plant-bacteria interactions. The involvement of type III secretion systems (T3SSs) in mediating animal- and plant-pathogen interactions was discovered in the mid-80's and is now recognized as a multiprotein nanomachine dedicated to trans-kingdom movement of effector proteins. The discovery of T3SS in bacteria with symbiotic lifestyles broadened its role beyond virulence. In most T3SS-positive bacterial pathogens, virulence is largely dependent on functional T3SSs, while in rhizobia the system is dispensable for nodulation and can affect positively or negatively the mutualistic associations with their hosts. This review focuses on recent comparative genome analyses in plant pathogens and rhizobia that uncovered similarities and variations among T3SSs in their genetic organization, regulatory networks and type III secreted proteins and discusses the evolutionary adaptations of T3SSs and type III secreted proteins that might account for the distinguishable phenotypes and host range characteristics of plant pathogens and symbionts.

  12. [Production of inhibiting plant growth and development hormones by pathogenic for legumes Pseudomonas genus bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankevich, L A

    2013-01-01

    It has been studied the ability of pathogenic for legumes pathovars of Pseudomonas genus to produce ethylene and abscisic acid in vitro. A direct correlation between the level of ethylene production by agent of bacterial pea burn--Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi and level of its aggressiveness for plants has been found. It is shown that the amount of abscisic acid synthesized by pathogenic for legumes Pseudomonas genus bacteria correlates with their aggressiveness for plants.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plant leaf extracts against pathogenic bacteria

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    Atikya Farjana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine antibacterial activity of water, oil and methanol extracts of guava (Psidium guajava, green tea (Camellia sinensis, neem (Azadirachta indica and marigold (Calendula officinalis against different species of bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Methods: Antibacterial activity of plant extracts was measured by agar well diffusion method. Results: Boiled water extracts of guava leaf showed the largest zone of inhibition (22 mm against V. parahaemolyticus. Water extracts of green tea leaf at boiling and room temperature showed 17.5 mm and 19 mm zone of inhibitions against V. parahaemolyticus and S. aureus, respectively. Boiled water extract of neem leaf showed moderate zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli (10 mm and Klebsiella spp. (11 mm. Water and oil extracts of marigold leaf at both boiling and room temperature did not show any zone of inhibition against any of the tested microorganisms. Methanol extracts of both guava and green tea leaves showed same zone of inhibition against Pseudomonus spp. (18 mm. Methanol extract of neem leaf showed antibacterial acitivity against Klebsiella spp. (16 mm and Vibrio cholerae (14 mm and that of marigold leaf showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus (18 mm and Klebsiella spp. (12 mm. Conclusions: The results from the study suggest that the leaves of guava, green tea, neem and marigold show anibacterial activity against different bacterial species. They could be used as alternatives to common antimicrobial agents for treatment of bacterial infections.

  14. Prevalence of plant beneficial and human pathogenic bacteria isolated from salad vegetables in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, Angamuthu; Babu, Subramanian

    2017-03-14

    The study aimed at enumerating, identifying and categorizing the endophytic cultivable bacterial community in selected salad vegetables (carrot, cucumber, tomato and onion). Vegetable samples were collected from markets of two vegetable hot spot growing areas, during two different crop harvest seasons. Crude and diluted vegetable extracts were plated and the population of endophytic bacteria was assessed based on morphologically distinguishable colonies. The bacterial isolates were identified by growth in selective media, biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The endophytic population was found to be comparably higher in cucumber and tomato in both of the sampling locations, whereas lower in carrot and onion. Bacterial isolates belonged to 5 classes covering 46 distinct species belonging to 19 genera. Human opportunistic pathogens were predominant in carrot and onion, whereas plant beneficial bacteria dominated in cucumber and tomato. Out of the 104 isolates, 16.25% are human pathogens and 26.5% are human opportunistic pathogens. Existence of a high population of plant beneficial bacteria was found to have suppressed the population of plant and human pathogens. There is a greater potential to study the native endophytic plant beneficial bacteria for developing them as biocontrol agents against human pathogens that are harboured by plants.

  15. Frontiers for research on the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria: fundamentals for sustainability: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cindy E; Barny, Marie-Anne; Berge, Odile; Kinkel, Linda L; Lacroix, Christelle

    2017-02-01

    Methods to ensure the health of crops owe their efficacy to the extent to which we understand the ecology and biology of environmental microorganisms and the conditions under which their interactions with plants lead to losses in crop quality or yield. However, in the pursuit of this knowledge, notions of the ecology of plant-pathogenic microorganisms have been reduced to a plant-centric and agro-centric focus. With increasing global change, i.e. changes that encompass not only climate, but also biodiversity, the geographical distribution of biomes, human demographic and socio-economic adaptations and land use, new plant health problems will emerge via a range of processes influenced by these changes. Hence, knowledge of the ecology of plant pathogens will play an increasingly important role in the anticipation and response to disease emergence. Here, we present our opinion on the major challenges facing the study of the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria. We argue that the discovery of markedly novel insights into the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria is most likely to happen within a framework of more extensive scales of space, time and biotic interactions than those that currently guide much of the research on these bacteria. This will set a context that is more propitious for the discovery of unsuspected drivers of the survival and diversification of plant-pathogenic bacteria and of the factors most critical for disease emergence, and will set the foundation for new approaches to the sustainable management of plant health. We describe the contextual background of, justification for and specific research questions with regard to the following challenges: Development of terminology to describe plant-bacterial relationships in terms of bacterial fitness. Definition of the full scope of the environments in which plant-pathogenic bacteria reside or survive. Delineation of pertinent phylogenetic contours of plant-pathogenic bacteria and naming of strains

  16. Colonization of plants by human pathogenic bacteria in the course of organic vegetable production

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    Andreas eHofmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing numbers of outbreaks caused by the consumption of vegetables contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria were reported. The application of organic fertilizers during vegetable production is one of the possible reasons for contamination with those pathogens. In this study laboratory experiments in axenic and soil systems following common practices in organic farming were conducted to identify the minimal dose needed for bacterial colonization of plants and to identify possible factors like bacterial species or serovariation, plant species or organic fertilizer types used, influencing the success of plant colonization by human pathogenic bacteria. Spinach and corn salad were chosen as model plants and were inoculated with different concentrations of Salmonella enterica sv. Weltevreden, Listeria monocytogenes sv. 4b and EGD-E sv. 1/2a either directly (axenic system or via agricultural soil amended with spiked organic fertilizers (soil system. In addition to PCR- and culture-based detection methods, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was applied in order to localize bacteria on or in plant tissues. Our results demonstrate that shoots were colonized by the pathogenic bacteria at inoculation doses as low as 4x10CFU/ml in the axenic system or 4x105CFU/g in the soil system. In addition, plant species dependent effects were observed. Spinach was colonized more often and at lower inoculation doses compared to corn salad. Differential colonization sites on roots, depending on the plant species could be detected using FISH-CLSM analysis. Furthermore, the transfer of pathogenic bacteria to plants via organic fertilizers was observed more often and at lower initial inoculation doses when fertilization was performed with inoculated slurry compared to inoculated manure. Finally, it could be shown that by introducing a simple washing step, the bacterial contamination was reduced in most cases or even was removed completely in

  17. Long-Term Storage of Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria in Sterile Distilled Water

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola S. Iacobellis; DeVay, James E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was made to determine the effectiveness of the preservation of plant-pathogenic bacteria in sterile distilled water. After 20 or 24 years of storage in distilled water, a very high percentage (90 to 92%) of the isolates of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. were still alive. Moreover, 12 of 13 viable (after 24 years) isolates of P. syringae subsp. syringae maintained their ability to produce syringomycin and were pathogenic to bean seedlings. The water-stored cells of t...

  18. Influent pathogenic bacteria may go straight into effluent in full scale wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jannie Munk; Nierychlo, Marta; Albertsen, Mads

    Incoming microorganisms to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are usually considered to be adsorbed onto the activated sludge flocs, consumed by protozoan or to just die off. Analyses of the effluent generally show a very high degree of reduction of pathogens supporting this assumption. Thus......, it is assumed that the bacteria present in the effluent comprise primarily of those bacteria that thrive/grow in the plants. However, standard techniques for detecting bacteria in the effluent, particularly pathogens, are based on culture-dependent methods, which may give erroneous results by underestimating...... in influent, process tank and effluent in the 14 WWTPs showed that the microbial communities in incoming wastewater were very similar across the plants. The same was observed for communities in the activated sludge in the process tanks. In contrast, the effluent community was in some WWTPs very similar...

  19. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts from Brazil against fish pathogenic bacteria

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    Castro, S.B.R.; Leal, C.A.G.; Freire, F.R.; Carvalho, D.A.; Oliveira, D.F.; Figueiredo, H.C.P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Brazilian plants extracts against fish pathogenic bacteria. Forty six methanolic extracts were screened to identify their antibacterial properties against Streptococcus agalactiae, Flavobacterium columnare and Aeromonas hydrophila. Thirty one extracts showed antibacterial activity. PMID:24031303

  20. Molecular detection of plant pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Chandrashekar; Sharanaiah, Umesha; Shivamallu, Chandan

    2012-03-01

    The application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to molecular diagnostics holds great promise for the early identification of agriculturally important plant pathogens. Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomoans axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae are phytopathogenic bacteria, which can infect vegetables, cause severe yield loss. PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) is a simple and powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in amplified DNA. The technique of PCR-SSCP is being exploited so far, only to detect and diagnose human bacterial pathogens in addition to plant pathogenic fungi. Selective media and serology are the commonly used methods for the detection of plant pathogens in infected plant materials. In this study, we developed PCR-SSCP technique to identify phytopathogenic bacteria. The PCR product was denatured and separated on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. SSCP banding patterns were detected by silver staining of nucleic acids. We tested over 56 isolates of R. solanacearum, 44 isolates of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and 20 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. With the use of universal primer 16S rRNA, we could discriminate such species at the genus and species levels. Species-specific patterns were obtained for bacteria R. solanacearum, X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and X. oryzae pv. oryzae. The potential use of PCR-SSCP technique for the detection and diagnosis of phytobacterial pathogens is discussed in the present paper.

  1. Molecular detection of plant pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandrashekar Srinivasa; Umesha Sharanaiah; Chandan Shivamallu

    2012-01-01

    The application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to molecular diagnostics holds great promise for the early identification of agriculturally important plant pathogens.Ralstonia solanacearum,Xanthomoans axonopodis pv.vesicatoria,and Xanthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae are phytopathogenic bacteria,which can infect vegetables,cause severe yield loss.PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) is a simple and powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in amplified DNA.The technique of PCR-SSCP is being exploited so far,only to detect and diagnose human bacterial pathogens in addition to plant pathogenic fungi.Selective media and serology are the commonly used methods for the detection of plant pathogens in infected plant materials.In this study,we developed PCR-SSCP technique to identify phytopathogenic bacteria.The PCR product was denatured and separated on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel.SSCP banding patterns were detected by silver staining of nucleic acids.We tested over 56 isolates of R. solanacearum,44 isolates of X. axonopodis pv.vesicatoria,and 20 isolates of X.oryzae pv.oryzae.With the use of universal primer 16S rRNA,we could discriminate such species at the genus and species levels.Speciesspecific patterns were obtained for bacteria R.solanacearum,X.axonopodis pv.vesicatoria,and X.oryzae pv.oryzae.The potential use of PCR-SSCP technique for the detection and diagnosis of phytobacterial pathogens is discussed in the present paper.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Hirokazu; Endou, Fumiko; Furukawa, Soichi; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kouichi; Anzai, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Solvent extracts from the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap) were prepared using eight different organic solvents, and examined for antibacterial activity against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria. All solvent extracts showed higher antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria than against gram negative bacteria. The TLC-bioautography analysis of the extracts revealed that a yellow spot was detected at Rf value of 0.85, which showed strong antibacterial activity. The UV, MS, and NMR analyses revealed that the antibacterial compound was plumbagin.

  3. Harpins, multifunctional proteins secreted by gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Seon; Kim, Wooki; Lee, Chanhui; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2013-10-01

    Harpins are glycine-rich and heat-stable proteins that are secreted through type III secretion system in gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria. Many studies show that these proteins are mostly targeted to the extracellular space of plant tissues, unlike bacterial effector proteins that act inside the plant cells. Over the two decades since the first harpin of pathogen origin, HrpN of Erwinia amylovora, was reported in 1992 as a cell-free elicitor of hypersensitive response (HR), diverse functional aspects of harpins have been determined. Some harpins were shown to have virulence activity, probably because of their involvement in the translocation of effector proteins into plant cytoplasm. Based on this function, harpins are now considered to be translocators. Their abilities of pore formation in the artificial membrane, binding to lipid components, and oligomerization are consistent with this idea. When harpins are applied to plants directly or expressed in plant cells, these proteins trigger diverse beneficial responses such as induction of defense responses against diverse pathogens and insects and enhancement of plant growth. Therefore, in this review, we will summarize the functions of harpins as virulence factors (or translocators) of bacterial pathogens, elicitors of HR and immune responses, and plant growth enhancers.

  4. Hrp mutant bacteria as biocontrol agents: toward a sustainable approach in the fight against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemian, Mathieu; Zhou, Binbin; Deslandes, Laurent; Marco, Yves; Trémousaygue, Dominique

    2013-10-01

    Sustainable agriculture necessitates development of environmentally safe methods to protect plants against pathogens. Among these methods, application of biocontrol agents has been efficiently used to minimize disease development. Here we review current understanding of mechanisms involved in biocontrol of the main Gram-phytopathogenic bacteria-induced diseases by plant inoculation with strains mutated in hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes. These mutants are able to penetrate plant tissues and to stimulate basal resistance of plants. Novel protection mechanisms involving the phytohormone abscisic acid appear to play key roles in the biocontrol of wilt disease induced by Ralstonia solanacearum in Arabidopsis thaliana. Fully understanding these mechanisms and extending the studies to other pathosystems are still required to evaluate their importance in disease protection.

  5. Responses to Elevated c-di-GMP Levels in Mutualistic and Pathogenic Plant-Interacting Bacteria

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    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Aragón, Isabel M.; Prada-Ramírez, Harold A.; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Ramos, Cayo; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Despite a recent burst of research, knowledge on c-di-GMP signaling pathways remains largely fragmentary and molecular mechanisms of regulation and even c-di-GMP targets are yet unknown for most bacteria. Besides genomics or bioinformatics, accompanying alternative approaches are necessary to reveal c-di-GMP regulation in bacteria with complex lifestyles. We have approached this study by artificially altering the c-di-GMP economy of diverse pathogenic and mutualistic plant-interacting bacteria and examining the effects on the interaction with their respective host plants. Phytopathogenic Pseudomonas and symbiotic Rhizobium strains with enhanced levels of intracellular c-di-GMP displayed common free-living responses: reduction of motility, increased production of extracellular polysaccharides and enhanced biofilm formation. Regarding the interaction with the host plants, P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi cells containing high c-di-GMP levels formed larger knots on olive plants which, however, displayed reduced necrosis. In contrast, development of disease symptoms in P. syringae-tomato or P. syringae-bean interactions did not seem significantly affected by high c-di-GMP. On the other hand, increasing c-di-GMP levels in symbiotic R. etli and R. leguminosarum strains favoured the early stages of the interaction since enhanced adhesion to plant roots, but decreased symbiotic efficiency as plant growth and nitrogen contents were reduced. Our results remark the importance of c-di-GMP economy for plant-interacting bacteria and show the usefulness of our approach to reveal particular stages during plant-bacteria associations which are sensitive to changes in c-di-GMP levels. PMID:24626229

  6. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts on foodborne bacterial pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial foodborne diseases are caused by consumption of foods contaminated with bacteria and/or their toxins. In this study, we evaluated antibacterial properties of twelve different extracts including turmeric, lemon and different kinds of teas against four major pathogenic foodborne bacteria inc...

  7. Peracetic Acid (PAA Disinfection: Inactivation of Microbial Indicators and Pathogenic Bacteria in a Municipal Wastewater Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bonetta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have noted that treated and untreated wastewaters are primary contributors of a variety of pathogenic microorganisms to the aquatic ecosystem. Conventional wastewater treatment may not be sufficient to achieve microbiologically safe effluent to be discharged into natural waters or reused, thus requiring wastewater effluents to be disinfected. In recent years, peracetic acid (PAA has been adopted as a disinfectant for wastewater effluents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the disinfection efficiency of PAA at low doses (range 0.99–2.10 mg/L against microbial indicators and pathogenic bacteria in a municipal wastewater plant. Samples of untreated sewage and effluents before and after PAA treatment were collected seasonally for 1 year and were analysed for pathogenic Campylobacter, Salmonella spp., E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli virulence genes using molecular methods; moreover, the detection of specific microbial indicators (E. coli, faecal coliforms, enterococci, C. perfringens and Salmonella spp. were carried out using culturing methods. Salmonella spp. DNA was found in all untreated sewage and effluent before PAA treatment, whereas it was recovered in 50% of the samples collected after PAA treatment. Although E. coli O157:H7 was never identified, the occurrence of Shiga-like toxin I amplicons was identified in 75% of the untreated sewage samples, in 50% of the effluents assayed before PAA treatment, and in 25% of the effluents assayed after PAA treatment, whereas the stx2 gene was never found. Campylobacter coli was only detected in one effluent sample before PAA treatment. In the effluents after PAA treatment, a lower load of indicator bacteria was observed compared to the effluents before treatment. The results of this study highlight that the use of low doses of PAA seems to lead to an improvement of the microbiological quality of the effluent, although it is not sufficient to guarantee its suitability for irrigation

  8. The application of flow cytometry and fluorescent probe technology for detection and assessment of viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional methods to detect and assess the viability of plant pathogenic bacteria are usually based on plating assays or serological techniques. Plating assays provide information about the number of viable cells, expressed as colony-forming units, but are time-consuming and laborious.

  9. The application of flow cytometry and fluorescent probe technology for detection and assessment of viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional methods to detect and assess the viability of plant pathogenic bacteria are usually based on plating assays or serological techniques. Plating assays provide information about the number of viable cells, expressed as colony-forming units, but are time-consuming and laborious. Serologica

  10. Effect of essential oil of Origanum rotundifolium on some plant pathogenic bacteria, seed germination and plant growth of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Kotan, Recep; Karagöz, Kenan; Dikbaş, Neslihan; Ćakmakçi, Ramazan; Ćakir, Ahmet; Kordali, Şaban; Özer, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine effect of Origanum rotundifolium's essential oil on some plant pathogenic bacterias, seed germination and plant growth of tomato. Xanthomonas axanopodis pv. vesicatoria strain (Xcv-761) and Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. michiganensis strain (Cmm) inoculated to tomato seed. The seeds were tested for germination in vitro and disease severity and some plant growth parameters in vivo. In vitro assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil treatment in seeds inoculated with Xcv-761 and at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil and streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. The least infected cotiledon number was observed at 500 µg/ml streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. In vivo assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 250 µl/ml essential oil teratment in tomato inoculated with Cmm. Lowest disease severity, is seen in the CMM infected seeds with 250 µl/ml essential oil application these results were statistically significant when compared with pathogen infected seeds. Similarly, in application conducted with XCV-761 infected seed, the lowest disease severity was observed for seeds as a result of 250 µl/ml essential oil application. Also according to the results obtained from essential oil application of CMM infected seeds conducted with 62,5 µl/ml dose; while disease severity was found statistically insignificant compared to 250 µl/ml to essential oil application, ıt was found statistically significant compared to pathogen infected seeds. The results showed that essential oil of O. rotundifolium has a potential for some suppressed plant disease when it is used in appropriate dose.

  11. In vitro antibacterial activity of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in Vietnam against human pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Thuy Thu; Kim, Hyungrok; Tran, Vu Khac; Le Dang, Quang; Nguyen, Hoa Thi; Kim, Hun; Kim, In Seon; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background Medicinal plants are widely used for the treatment of different infectious diseases. Infectious diseases caused by bacteria have a large impact on public health. This study aimed to determine the in vitro antibacterial activity of the medicinal plants traditionally used in Vietnam against the bacterial strains associated with infectious diseases. Methods Methanol extracts of twelve Vietnamese medicinal plants were tested for their antibacterial activity against five bacterial speci...

  12. EFFICACY OF EXTRACTS OF SIX MEDICINAL PLANTS OF INDIA AGAINST SOME PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indranil Bhattacharjee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the pathogenic multi-drug resistant bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus niacini, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Paenibacillus koreensis, Paenibacillus larvae larvae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas flourescens, Pseudomonas putida and Staphylocccus aureus was tested against aqueous, acetone and ethanol extracts of mature leaves of Mimosa pudica Linn. (Mimosaceae and Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae, stems of Michelia champaca Linn. (Magnoliaceae and Musa paradisiaca Linn.(Musaceae, roots of Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae and Murraya koenigii Linn. (Rutaceae by agar well diffusion method. Gatifloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against all the reference bacteria. Though all the extracts were found effective, the ethanol extract showed maximum inhibition against the test microorganisms followed by acetone and aqueous extract. Bacillus niacini is the most resistant bacteria and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most sensitive bacteria against all the extracts used. MIC values of each bacterium were also determined

  13. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Mazzola, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the produci

  14. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Mazzola, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the produci

  15. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Mazzola, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the

  16. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Jos M; Mazzola, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the producing bacteria in the highly competitive but resource-limited soil environments through direct suppression. Although specific antibiotics may enhance producer persistence when challenged by competitors or predators in soil habitats, at subinhibitory concentrations antibiotics exhibit a diversity of other roles in the life history of the producing bacteria. Many processes modulated by antibiotics may be inherently critical to the producing bacterium, such as the acquisition of substrates or initiation of developmental changes that will ensure survival under stressful conditions. Antibiotics may also have roles in more complex interactions, including in virulence on host plants or in shaping the outcomes of multitrophic interactions. The innate functions of antibiotics to producing bacteria in their native ecosystem are just beginning to emerge, but current knowledge already reveals a breadth of activities well beyond the historical perspective of antibiotics as weaponry in microbial conflicts.

  17. Toxicity of twenty-two plant essential oils against pathogenic bacteria of vegetables and mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović, Biljana; Potočnik, Ivana; Rekanović, Emil; Stepanović, Miloš; Kostić, Miroslav; Ristić, Mihajlo; Milijašević-Marčić, Svetlana

    2016-12-01

    ASBTRACT Toxicity of twenty-two essential oils to three bacterial pathogens in different horticultural systems: Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (causing blight of bean), Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (bacterial wilt and canker of tomato), and Pseudomonas tolaasii (causal agent of bacterial brown blotch on cultivated mushrooms) was tested. Control of bacterial diseases is very difficult due to antibiotic resistance and ineffectiveness of chemical products, to that essential oils offer a promising alternative. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations are determined by applying a single drop of oil onto the inner side of each plate cover in macrodilution assays. Among all tested substances, the strongest and broadest activity was shown by the oils of wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus. Carvacrol (64.0-75.8%) was the dominant component of oregano oils, while geranial (40.7%) and neral (26.7%) were the major constituents of lemongrass oil. Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli was the most sensitive to plant essential oils, being susceptible to 19 oils, while 11 oils were bactericidal to the pathogen. Sixteen oils inhibited the growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and seven oils showed bactericidal effects to the pathogen. The least sensitive species was Pseudomonas tolaasii as five oils inhibited bacterial growth and two oils were bactericidal. Wintergreen, oregano, and lemongrass oils should be formulated as potential biochemical bactericides against different horticultural pathogens.

  18. Autoinducer-2 of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora and other plant-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Geider, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Autoinducers are important for cellular communication of bacteria. The luxS gene has a central role in the synthesis of autoinducer-2 (AI-2). The gene was identified in a shotgun library of Erwinia amylovora and primers designed for PCR amplification from bacterial DNA. Supernatants of several Erwinia amylovora strains were assayed for AI-2 activity with a Vibrio harveyi mutant and were positive. Many other plant-associated bacteria also showed AI-2 activity such as Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia tasmaniensis. The luxS genes of several bacteria were cloned, sequenced, and complemented Escherichia coli strain DH5alpha and a Salmonella typhimurium mutant, both defective in luxS, for synthesis of AI-2. Assays to detect AI-2 activity in culture supernatants of several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars failed, which may indicate the absence of AI-2 or synthesis of another type. Several reporter strains did not detect synthesis of an acyl homoserine lactone (AHL, AI-1) by Erwinia amylovora, but confirmed AHL-synthesis for Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica and Pantoea stewartii.

  19. Antibacterial activity of commercially available plant-derived essential oils against oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardají, D K R; Reis, E B; Medeiros, T C T; Lucarini, R; Crotti, A E M; Martins, C H G

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the antibacterial activity of 15 commercially available plant-derived essential oils (EOs) against a panel of oral pathogens. The broth microdilution method afforded the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the assayed EOs. The EO obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Lauraceae) (CZ-EO) displayed moderate activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Actinomyces naeslundii (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Prevotella nigrescens (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL) and Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 200 μg/mL; MBC = 400 μg/mL). (Z)-isosafrole (85.3%) was the main chemical component of this oil. We did not detect cinnamaldehyde, previously described as the major constituent of CZ-EO, in specimens collected in other countries.

  20. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Papadakis

    Full Text Available A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics.

  1. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, George; Skandalis, Nicholas; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Glynos, Paraskevas; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-01-01

    A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance) for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics.

  2. Screening and Scoring of Antimicrobial and Biological Activities of Italian Vulnerary Plants against Major Oral Pathogenic Bacteria

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    Gianmaria F. Ferrazzano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the activity of Italian vulnerary plants against the most important oral pathogenic bacteria. This estimate was accomplished through a fivefold process: (a a review of ethnobotanical and microbiological data concerning the Italian vulnerary plants; (b the development of a scoring system to rank the plants; (c the comparative assessment of microbiological properties; (d the assessment of potential cytotoxic effects on keratinocyte-like cells and gingival fibroblasts in culture by XTT cell viability assay; (e clinical evaluation of the most suitable plant extract as antibacterial agent in a home-made mouthwash. The study assays hexane (H, ethanol (E, and water (W extracts from 72 plants. The agar diffusion method was used to evaluate the activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces viscosus. Twenty-two plants showed appreciable activity. The extracts showing the strongest antibacterial power were those from Cotinus coggygria Scop., Equisetum hyemale L., Helichrysum litoreum Guss, Juniperus communis L., and Phyllitis scolopendrium (L. Newman subsp. scolopendrium. The potential cytotoxic effect of these extracts was assessed. On the basis of these observations, a mouth-rinse containing the ethanolic extract of H. litoreum has been tested in vivo, resulting in reduction of the salivary concentration of S. mutans.

  3. Evaluation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Fermented Plant Products for Antagonistic Activity Against Urinary Tract Pathogen Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Tzu-Min; Lin, Pei-Pei; Hsieh, You-Miin

    2017-08-05

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in infants and the elderly; they are also the most common among nosocomial infections. The treatment of UTIs usually involves a short-term course of antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to identify the strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that can inhibit the urinary tract pathogen Staphylococcus saprophyticus, as alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, we collected 370 LAB strains from fermented plant products and reference strains from the Bioresources Collection and Research Center (BCRC). Using spent culture supernatants (SCS), we then screened these LAB strains with for antimicrobial effects on urinary tract pathogens by the well-diffusion assay. Seven LAB strains-PM2, PM68, PM78, PM201, PM206, PM229, and RY2-exhibited inhibitory activity and were evaluated for anti-growth activity against urinary tract pathogens by the co-culture inhibition assay. Anti-adhesion and anti-invasion activities against urinary tract pathogens were evaluated using the SV-HUC-1 urothelial cell cultures. The results revealed that the survival rate of S. saprophyticus ranged from 0.9-2.96%, with the pH continuously decreasing after co-culture with LAB strains for 4 h. In the competitive adhesion assay, the exclusion and competition groups performed better than the displacement group. In the SV-HUC-1 cell invasion assay, PM201, PM206, PM229, and RY2 were found to inhibit the invasion of SV-HUC-1 cells by S. saprophyticus BCRC 10786. To conclude, RY2, PM229, and PM68 strains exhibited inhibitory activity against the urinary tract pathogen S. saprophyticus.

  4. Pathogen Phytosensing: Plants to Report Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal Stewart

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time systems that provide evidence of pathogen contamination in crops can be an important new line of early defense in agricultural centers. Plants possess defense mechanisms to protect against pathogen attack. Inducible plant defense is controlled by signal transduction pathways, inducible promoters and cis-regulatory elements corresponding to key genes involved in defense, and pathogen-specific responses. Identified inducible promoters and cis-acting elements could be utilized in plant sentinels, or ‘phytosensors’, by fusing these to reporter genes to produce plants with altered phenotypes in response to the presence of pathogens. Here, we have employed cis-acting elements from promoter regions of pathogen inducible genes as well as those responsive to the plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene. Synthetic promoters were constructed by combining various regulatory elements supplemented with the enhancer elements from the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter to increase basal level of the GUS expression. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was first assessed in transient expression assays using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and then examined for efficacy in stably transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. Histochemical and fluorometric GUS expression analyses showed that both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants responded to elicitor and phytohormone treatments with increased GUS expression when compared to untreated plants. Pathogen-inducible phytosensor studies were initiated by analyzing the sensitivity of the synthetic promoters against virus infection. Transgenic tobacco plants infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus showed an increase in GUS expression when compared to mock-inoculated control plants, whereas Tobacco mosaic virus infection caused no changes in GUS expression. Further research, using these transgenic plants against a range of different

  5. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF THREE MEDICINAL PLANTS OF KUMAUN HIMALAYA AGAINST SOME PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. SATI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial property of methanol, ethanol and hexane extracts of Berberis aristata, Chenopodium ambrosioides and Tinospora cordifolia grown in Kumaun Himalayan were investigated against some pathogenic gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas phaseoli and Erwinia chrysanthemi using disc diffusion method. Methanol extract of B. aristata was found with highest inhibitory activity against E. chrysanthemi (ZOI, 11±0.3mm. Whereas lowest inhibition was recorded in ethanolic extract of B. aristata against E. coli. The hexane extract of B. aristata and methanolic extract of C. ambrosioides were found totally inactive against all the pathogens tested.

  6. Metabolic Environments and Genomic Features Associated with Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions between Bacteria and Plants is accepted for publication in MPMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Park, Byung H [ORNL; Syed, Mustafa H [ORNL; Klotz, Martin G [University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Most bacterial symbionts of plants are phenotypically characterized by their parasitic or matualistic relationship with the host; however, the genomic characteristics that likely discriminate mutualistic symbionts from pathogens of plants are poorly understood. This study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 54 plant-symbiontic bacteria, 27 mutualists and 27 pathogens, to discover genomic determinants of their parasitic and mutualistic nature in terms of protein family domains, KEGG orthologous groups, metabolic pathways and families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). We further used all bacteria with sequenced genomesl, published microarrays and transcriptomics experimental datasets, and literature to validate and to explore results of the comparison. The analysis revealed that genomes of mutualists are larger in size and higher in GC content and encode greater molecular, functional and metabolic diversity than the investigated genomes of pathogens. This enriched molecular and functional enzyme diversity included constructive biosynthetic signatures of CAZymes and metabolic pathways in genomes of mutualists compared with catabolic signatures dominant in the genomes of pathogens. Another discriminative characteristic of mutualists is the co-occurence of gene clusters required for the expression and function of nitrogenase and RuBisCO. Analysis of previously published experimental data indicate that nitrogen-fixing mutualists may employ Rubisco to fix CO2 not in the canonical Calvin-Benson-Basham cycle but in a novel metabolic pathway, here called Rubisco-based glycolysis , to increase efficiency of sugar utilization during the symbiosis with plants. An important discriminative characteristic of plant pathogenic bacteria is two groups of genes likely encoding effector proteins involved in host invasion and a genomic locus encoding a putative secretion system that includes a DUF1525 domain protein conserved in pathogens of plants and of other organisms. The

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Plant Extracts Against Food-Borne Pathogens and Spoilage Bacteria In Vitro and on Poultry Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some plant extracts are known to contain substances that inhibit the growth of bacteria; therefore, experiments were conducted to examine the ability of extracts of pomegranate, orange, and lemon peels to inhibit the growth of five bacteria associated with processed poultry. The antibacterial activi...

  8. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Some Traditionally Used Medicinal Plants against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Marasini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide increase of multidrug resistance in both community- and health-care associated bacterial infections has impaired the current antimicrobial therapy, warranting the search for other alternatives. We aimed to find the in vitro antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of 16 different traditionally used medicinal plants of Nepal against 13 clinical and 2 reference bacterial species using microbroth dilution method. The evaluated plants species were found to exert a range of in vitro growth inhibitory action against the tested bacterial species, and Cynodon dactylon was found to exhibit moderate inhibitory action against 13 bacterial species including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhi, and S. typhimurium. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of tested ethanolic extracts were found from 31 to >25,000 μg/mL. Notably, ethanolic extracts of Cinnamomum camphora, Curculigo orchioides, and Curcuma longa exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes with a MIC of 49, 49, and 195 μg/mL, respectively; whereas chloroform fraction of Cynodon dactylon exhibited best antibacterial activity against S. aureus with a MIC of 31 μg/mL. Among all, C. dactylon, C. camphora, C. orchioides, and C. longa plant extracts displayed a potential antibacterial activity of MIC < 100 μg/mL.

  9. Biological screening of araripe basin medicinal plants using Artemia salina Leach and pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Galberto M da Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many medicinal plant species from the Araripe Basin are widely known and used in folk medicine and for commercial manufacturing of phytotherapeutic products. Few ethnobotanical and pharmacological studies have been undertaken in this region, however, in spite of the great cultural and biological diversity found there. Materials and Methods : Extracts of 11 plant species collected from Cearα state, Brazil, were subjected to the brine shrimp lethality test in order to detect potential sources of novel cytotoxic, antitumor compounds. The larvicidal activity, based on the percentage of larval mortality, was evaluated after 24 h exposure to the treatments. Results: All species tested showed good larvicidal activity as compared to a reference compound and literature data. The extract from Vanillosmopsis arborea was the most active with an LC 50 of 3.9 μg/ml. Best results were shown by Lantana montevidensis against Pseudomonas aeruginosa [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 8μg/ml] and Escherichia coli (MIC 32 μg/ml, Zanthoxylum rhoifolium against E. coli (MIC, 256 μg/ml and Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 64 μg/ml and Croton zenhtneri against S. aureus (MIC 64 μg/ml. Conclusion: Chemical tests indicated that a wide variety of natural product classes was present in those extracts that showed significant activities in the bioassays.

  10. Stepwise screening of microorganisms for commercial use in biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Biological Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, J.; Postma, J.; Nicot, P.; Ruocco, M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new biocontrol products against plant diseases requires screening of high numbers of candidate antagonists. Antagonists for commercial use have to fulfill many different requirements. Besides being active against the specific targeted plant pathogens they must be safe and cost-eff

  11. Persistence and Potential Viable but Non-culturable State of Pathogenic Bacteria during Storage of Digestates from Agricultural Biogas Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynaud, Geraldine; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Ziebal, Christine; Cuny, Anais; Druilhe, Céline; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Wéry, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of on-farm anaerobic digestion as a process for making profitable use of animal by-products, factors leading to the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates remain poorly described. Here, a microcosm approach was used to evaluate the persistence of three pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella enterica Derby, Campylobacter coli and Listeria monocytogenes) in digestates from farms, stored for later land spreading. Nine samples, including raw digestates, liquid fractions of digestate and composted digestates, were inoculated with each pathogen and maintained for 40 days at 24°C. Concentrations of pathogens were monitored using culture and qPCR methods. The persistence of L. monocytogenes, detected up to 20 days after inoculation, was higher than that of Salmonella Derby, detected for 7–20 days, and of C. coli (not detected after 7 days). In some digestates, the concentration of the pathogens by qPCR assay was several orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of culturable cells, suggesting a potential loss of culturability and induction of Viable but Non-Culturable (VBNC) state. The potential VBNC state which was generally not observed in the same digestate for the three pathogens, occurred more frequently for C. coli and L. monocytogenes than for Salmonella Derby. Composting a digestate reduced the persistence of seeded L. monocytogenes but promoted the maintenance of Salmonella Derby. The effect of NH4+/NH3 on the culturability of C. coli and Salmonella Derby was also shown. The loss of culturability may be the underlying mechanism for the regrowth of pathogens. We have also demonstrated the importance of using molecular tools to monitor pathogens in environmental samples since culture methods may underestimate cell concentration. Our results underline the importance of considering VBNC cells when evaluating the sanitary effect of an anaerobic digestion process and the persistence of pathogens during the storage of

  12. Persistence and potential Viable but Non-culturable state of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates from agricultural biogas plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Maynaud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of on-farm anaerobic digestion as a process for making profitable use of animal by-products, factors leading to the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates remain poorly described. Here, a microcosm approach was used to evaluate the persistence of three pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella enterica Derby, Campylobacter coli and Listeria monocytogenes in digestates from farms, stored for later land spreading. Nine samples, including raw digestates, liquid fractions of digestate and composted digestates, were inoculated with each pathogen and maintained for 40 days at 24°C. Concentrations of pathogens were monitored using culture and qPCR methods. The persistence of L. monocytogenes, detected up to 20 days after inoculation, was higher than that of Salmonella Derby, detected for 7-20 days, and of C. coli (not detected after 7 days. In some digestates, the concentration of the pathogens by qPCR assay was several orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of culturable cells, suggesting a potential loss of culturability and induction of Viable but Non-Culturable (VBNC state. The potential VBNC state which was generally not observed in the same digestate for the three pathogens, occurred more frequently for C. coli and L. monocytogenes than for Salmonella Derby. Composting a digestate reduced the persistence of seeded L. monocytogenes but promoted the maintenance of Salmonella Derby. The effect of NH4+/NH3 on the culturability of C. coli and Salmonella Derby was also shown.The loss of culturability may be the underlying mechanism for the regrowth of pathogens. We have also demonstrated the importance of using molecular tools to monitor pathogens in environmental samples since culture methods may underestimate cell concentration. Our results underline the importance of considering VBNC cells when evaluating the sanitary effect of an anaerobic digestion process and the persistence of pathogens during

  13. Plant pathogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  14. Plant pathogen resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  15. Deep Characterization of the Microbiomes of Calophya spp. (Hemiptera: Calophyidae Gall-Inducing Psyllids Reveals the Absence of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria and Three Dominant Endosymbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will A Overholt

    Full Text Available Bacteria associated with sap-feeding insect herbivores include not only symbionts that may increase their hosts' fitness but also harmful plant pathogens. Calophya spp. gall-inducing psyllids (Hemiptera: Calophyidae are being investigated for their potential as biological control agents of the noxious weed, Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolia, in Florida. Although there are no examples of plant pathogen transmission by members of the family Calophyidae, several insects in the superfamily Psylloidea are known to transmit pathogenic bacteria in the genera Candidatus Liberibacter and Candidatus Phytoplasma. To determine whether Calophya spp. harbor potentially harmful plant pathogenic bacteria, we sequenced small subunit (SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene amplicons generated from individuals from four Calophya spp. populations: All microbial SSU gene sequences fell into the bacterial domain, with 98-99% belonging to the Proteobacteria. The Calophya microbiomes contained a relatively simple community, with 49-79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% detected, and only 5-8 OTUs with greater than 1% abundance. Candidatus Carsonella showed the highest relative abundance, with OTUs from this candidate genus representing between 51-65% of all recovered sequences. The next most abundant clade observed was an unclassified Enterobacteriacae group closely related to bacteria from the genera Buchnera and Blochmannia that ranged from 20-31% in relative abundance. Wolbachia populations were the third most abundant group and represented 7-27% of the diversity in microbial OTUs. No SSU rRNA gene sequences from putative pathogenic bacteria from the genera Ca. Liberibacter or Ca. Phytoplasma were detected in the microbiomes of the four Calophya populations. The probability that infected psyllids were present in our colonies, but were not sampled, was extremley low (1.39 x 10(-10. As far as we are aware, our study is the first to characterize the microbiome of

  16. Empirical prediction and validation of antibacterial inhibitory effects of various plant essential oils on common pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir Evrendilek, Gulsun

    2015-06-02

    In this study, fractional compound composition, antioxidant capacity, and phenolic substance content of 14 plant essential oils-anise (Pimpinella anisum), bay leaves (Laurus nobilis), cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum verum), clove (Eugenia caryophyllata), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), hop (Humulus lupulus), Istanbul oregano (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum), Izmir oregano (Origanum onites), mint (Mentha piperita), myrtus (Myrtus communis), orange peel (Citrus sinensis), sage (Salvia officinalis), thyme (Thymbra spicata), and Turkish oregano (Origanum minutiflorum)--were related to inhibition of 10 bacteria through multiple linear or non-linear (M(N)LR) models-four Gram-positive bacteria of Listeria innocua, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis, and six Gram-negative bacteria of Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Klebsiella oxytoca. A total of 65 compounds with different antioxidant capacity, phenolic substance content and antibacterial properties were detected with 14 plant essential oils. The best-fit M(N)LR models indicated that relative to anise essential oil, the essential oils of oreganos, cinnamon, and thyme had consistently high inhibitory effects, while orange peel essential oil had consistently a low inhibitory effect. Regression analysis indicated that beta-bisabolene (Turkish and Istanbul oreganos), and terpinolene (thyme) were found to be the most inhibitory compounds regardless of the bacteria type tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nyctanthes arbortristis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita G. Aggarwal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nature has provided a complete storehouse of knowledge of drug. Herbal drugs constitute a major part in all traditional systems of medicines. Since ancient times mankind has exploited nature for all kind of useful production and enjoyed the colors, flavors and fragrances of flowers, food etc. Rigveda, the book supplies curious information on this subject. Despite the importance of western medicines, towards the end of the 20th century there again began a revival of interest in traditional medicines not only in developing countries, but also in the developed countries. The resurgence of plant based medicine is mainly due to the increasing evidences of the health hazards associated with the indiscriminate use of the modern medicine such as antibiotic, steroids and other synthetic drug. The plants used in the traditional system of medicine of India and china are now receiving much scientific attention. With the continuous use of antibiotics, microorganisms have become resistant. So, it is necessary to evaluate, in a scientific base, the potential use of folk medicine for the treatment of infectious disease produced by common pathogens. Thus it was thought worthwhile to carry out the systematic chemical examination of Nyctanthes arbortristis. Studies had been conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of leaves of Nyctanthes arbortristis. It belongs to the family verbenaceae. The plant material was collected from herbal local nursery, and was stored for further studies. The different solvent extracts were prepared on the basis of polarity. Phytochemical analytical tests were carried out for preliminary investigation. Antimicrobial activities were evaluated using pathogenic microbes. The different solvent extracts of test material showed marked antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganism. The results showed that the test plant material was susceptible to different microorganism.

  18. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae) against Selected Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagacha, John M.; Dossaji, Saifuddin F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils (EOs) of Tagetes minuta against three phytopathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis. The essential oils were extracted using steam distillation method in a modified Clevenger-type apparatus while antibacterial activity of the EOs was evaluated by disc diffusion method. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used for analysis of the chemical profile of the EOs. Twenty compounds corresponding to 96% of the total essential oils were identified with 70% and 30% of the identified components being monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, respectively. The essential oils of T. minuta revealed promising antibacterial activities against the test pathogens with Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola being the most susceptible with mean inhibition zone diameters of 41.83 and 44.83 mm after 24 and 48 hours, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the EOs on the test bacteria were in the ranges of 24–48 mg/mL and 95–190 mg/mL, respectively. These findings provide a scientific basis for the use of T. minuta essential oils as a botanical pesticide for management of phytopathogenic bacteria. PMID:27721831

  19. Protein export according to schedule: architecture, assembly, and regulation of type III secretion systems from plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Flagellar and translocation-associated type III secretion (T3S) systems are present in most gram-negative plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria and are often essential for bacterial motility or pathogenicity. The architectures of the complex membrane-spanning secretion apparatuses of both systems are similar, but they are associated with different extracellular appendages, including the flagellar hook and filament or the needle/pilus structures of translocation-associated T3S systems. The needle/pilus is connected to a bacterial translocon that is inserted into the host plasma membrane and mediates the transkingdom transport of bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. During the last 3 to 5 years, significant progress has been made in the characterization of membrane-associated core components and extracellular structures of T3S systems. Furthermore, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators that control T3S gene expression and substrate specificity have been described. Given the architecture of the T3S system, it is assumed that extracellular components of the secretion apparatus are secreted prior to effector proteins, suggesting that there is a hierarchy in T3S. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of T3S system components and associated control proteins from both plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria.

  20. Functional identiifcation of phenazine biosynthesis genes in plant pathogenic bacteriaPseudomonas syringae pv.tomato and Xanthomonas oryzaepv.oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen; XU You-ping; Jean-Pierre Munyampundu; XU Xin; QI Xian-fei; GU Yuan; CAI Xin-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Phenazines are secondary metabolites with broad spectrum antibiotic activity and thus show high potential in biological control of pathogens. In this study, we identiifed phenazine biosynthesis (phz) genes in two genome-completed plant pathogenic bacteriaPseudomonas syringae pv.tomato(Pst) DC3000 andXanthomonas oryzaepv.oryzae(Xoo) PXO99A. Unlike the phz genes in typical phenazine-producing pseudomonads,phz homologs inPst DC3000 andXoo PXO99A consisted of phzC/D/E/F/G andphzC/E1/E2/F/G, respectively, and the both were not organized into an operon. Detection experiments demonstrated that phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) ofPst DC3000 accumulated to 13.4 μg L–1, while that ofXoo PXO99A was almost undetectable. Moreover,Pst DC3000 was resistant to 1 mg mL–1 PCA, whileXoo PXO99A was sensitive to 50 μg mL–1 PCA. Furthermore, mutation ofphzF blocked the PCA production and signiifcantly reduced the pathogenicity ofPst DC3000 in tomato, while the complementary strains restored these phenotypes. These results revealed thatPst DC3000 produces low level of and is resistant to phenazines and thus is unable to be biologicaly controled by phenazines. Additionaly,phz-mediated PCA production is required for ful pathogenicity ofPst DC3000. To our knowledge, this is the ifrst report of PCA production and its function in pathogenicity of a plant pathogenicP. syringaestrain.

  1. Effect of root exudates of various plants on composition of bacteria and fungi communities with special regard to pathogenic soil-borne fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Piętka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies conducted in the years 1996 - 1998 was to determine the composition of bacteria and fungi populations in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, spring wheat, soybean and potato, and in non-rhizosphere soil. Besides, the effect of root exudates of these plants on the formation of pathogenic fungi communities was established. The microbiological analysis showed that the greatest tolal number of bacteria was found in the rhizospheres of potato and soybean, and the lowest number in non-rhizosphere soil. The smallest total number of fungi was found in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, and the largest in the rhizosphere of soybean. Pathogenic fungi dominated in the rhizospheres of soybean and potato, while non-rhizosphere soil was the poorest in these microorganisms. Among the pathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, F.culmorum and F.solani were most frequently isolated. Soybean roots exudated the greatest amount of aminoacids, and acidic aminoacids, which have a positive effect on the development of phytopathogens, dominated in their content. On the other hand, the best quantitative and qualitative composition of aminoacids was found out in the root exudates of winter wheat, since they conlained big amounts of alkaline and aromatic aminoacids.

  2. In vitro antibacterial and chemical properties of essential oils including native plants from Brazil against pathogenic and resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Probst, Isabella da Silva; Andrade, Bruna Fernanda Murbach Teles; Alves, Fernanda Cristina Bérgamo; Albano, Mariana; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Doyama, Julio Toshimi; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Fernandes Júnior, Ary

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobials products from plants have increased in importance due to the therapeutic potential in the treatment of infectious diseases. Therefore, we aimed to examine the chemical characterisation (GC-MS) of essential oils (EO) from seven plants and measure antibacterial activities against bacterial strains isolated from clinical human specimens (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and sensitive (MSSA), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium) and foods (Salmonella Enteritidis). Assays were performed using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and MIC90%) (mg/mL) by agar dilution and time kill curve methods (log CFU/mL) to aiming synergism between EO. EO chemical analysis showed a predominance of terpenes and its derivatives. The highest antibacterial activities were with Cinnamomun zeylanicum (0.25 mg/mL on almost bacteria tested) and Caryophyllus aromaticus EO (2.40 mg/mL on Salmonella Enteritidis), and the lowest activity was with Eugenia uniflora (from 50.80 mg/mL against MSSA to 92.40 mg/mL against both Salmonella sources and P. aeruginosa) EO. The time kill curve assays revealed the occurrence of bactericide synergism in combinations of C. aromaticus and C. zeylanicum with Rosmarinus. officinalis. Thus, the antibacterial activities of the EO were large and this can also be explained by complex chemical composition of the oils tested in this study and the synergistic effect of these EO, yet requires further investigation because these interactions between the various chemical compounds can increase or reduce (antagonism effect) the inhibitory effect of essential oils against bacterial strains.

  3. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  4. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  5. Mucosal immunity to pathogenic intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Behnsen, Judith; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly dynamic environment in which the host constantly interacts with trillions of commensal microorganisms, known as the microbiota, and periodically interacts with pathogens of diverse nature. In this Review, we discuss how mucosal immunity is controlled in response to enteric bacterial pathogens, with a focus on the species that cause morbidity and mortality in humans. We explain how the microbiota can shape the immune response to pathogenic bacteria, and we detail innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that drive protective immunity against these pathogens. The vast diversity of the microbiota, pathogens and immune responses encountered in the intestines precludes discussion of all of the relevant players in this Review. Instead, we aim to provide a representative overview of how the intestinal immune system responds to pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  7. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-juan WANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However, the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq has been identified as a likely global regulator involved in the bacteria response to this environment. In addition, microgravity effects on bacterial pathogenicity may threaten astronauts' health. The present paper will focus on microgravity-induced alterations of pathogenicity and relative mechanism in various opportunistic pathogens.

  8. Practical benefits of knowing the enemy: modern molecular tools for diagnosing the etiology of bacterial diseases and understanding the taxonomy and diversity of plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Carolee T; Koike, Steven T

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the identity of bacterial plant pathogens is essential to strategic and sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. This knowledge is critical for growers, diagnosticians, extension agents, and others dealing with crops. However, such identifications are linked to bacterial taxonomy, a complicated and changing discipline that depends on methods and information that are often not used by those who are diagnosing field problems. Modern molecular tools for fingerprinting and sequencing allow for pathogen identification in the absence of distinguishing or conveniently tested phenotypic characteristics. These methods are also useful in studying the etiology and epidemiology of phytopathogenic bacteria from epidemics, as was done in numerous studies conducted in California's Salinas Valley. Multilocus and whole-genome sequence analyses are becoming the cornerstones of studies of microbial diversity and bacterial taxonomy. Whole-genome sequence analysis needs to become adequately accessible, automated, and affordable in order to be used routinely for identification and epidemiology. The power of molecular tools in accurately identifying bacterial pathogenesis is therefore of value to the farmer, diagnostician, phytobacteriologist, and taxonomist.

  9. Natural occurrence and pathogenicity of Xanthomonas bacteria on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    The bacterial genus Xanthomonas consists of several species of economic importance, among which. Xanthomonas ... of economic importance as they affect the production of different crops ..... significantly greater than for the others. As a result, ..... NW (ed) Laboratory guide for identification of plant pathogenic bacteria, 2nd ...

  10. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae) against Selected Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Muthee Gakuubi; Wagacha, John M.; Saifuddin F. Dossaji; Wycliffe Wanzala

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils (EOs) of Tagetes minuta against three phytopathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis. The essential oils were extracted using steam distillation method in a modified Clevenger-type apparatus while antibacterial activity of the EOs was evaluated by disc diffusion method. Gas chromatogr...

  11. The non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis of plants as a test system for drugs against malaria and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, J; Schwender, J; Mueller, C; Lichtenthaler, H K

    2000-12-01

    Two plant test systems are presented in the search for new inhibitors of the non-mevalonate isoprenoid pathway. A derivative of clomazone appears to be an inhibitor of the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate/methylerythritol 4-phosphate (DOXP/MEP) pathway of isoprenoid formation.

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection and identification of plant pathogenic bacteria (in particular for Erwinia amylovora and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoskova, Blanka; Janse, Jaap D

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the most commonly used serological diagnostic technique. A number of different ELISA formats can be used for the detection of bacterial plant pathogens and in particular Erwinia amylovora and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

  13. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...

  14. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...

  15. Cooperative Reinforcement of Ionic Liquid and Reactive Solvent on Enzymatic Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester as an In Vitro Inhibitor of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that lipases in ionic liquids (ILs possess higher enzyme activity, stability and selectivity; however, reaction equilibrium is always limited by product inhibition, and the product is difficult to separate from non-volatile ILs using distillation. To solve this problem, using trialkylphosphine oxide (TOPO as a complexing agent, a novel biphase of reactive solvent and IL was firstly reported for caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE production from methyl caffeate (MC and 2-phenylethanol (PE catalyzed by lipase via transesterification. The effects of the reaction parameters and their action mechanism were investigated, and the inhibition of CAPE against bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum was firstly measured. The MC conversion of 98.83% ± 0.76% and CAPE yield of 96.29% ± 0.07% were obtained by response surface methodology in the 25 g/L TOPO-cyclohexane/[Bmim][Tf2N] (1:1, v/v; the complex stoichiometry calculation and FTIR spectrum confirmed that the reversible hydrogen-bond complexation between TOPO and caffeates significantly enhances the cooperative effect of two phases on the lipase-catalyzed reaction. The temperature was reduced by 14 °C; the MC concentration increased by 3.33-fold; the ratio of catalyst to donor decreased by 4.5-fold; and Km decreased 1.08-fold. The EC50 of CAPE against R. solanacearum was 0.17–0.75 mg/mL, suggesting that CAPE is a potential in vitro inhibitor of plant pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Plant and pathogen nutrient acquisition strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urooj eFatima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients are indispensable elements required for the growth of all living organisms including plants and pathogens. Phyllosphere, rhizosphere, apoplast, phloem, xylem and cell organelles are the nutrient niches in plants that are the target of bacterial pathogens. Depending upon nutrients availability, the pathogen adapts various acquisition strategies and inhabits the specific niche. In this review, we discuss the nutrient composition of different niches in plants, the mechanisms involved in the recognition of nutrient niche and the sophisticated strategies used by the bacterial pathogens for acquiring nutrients. We provide insight into various nutrient acquisition strategies used by necrotrophic, biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic bacteria. Specifically we discuss both modulation of bacterial machinery and manipulation of host machinery. In addition, we highlight the current status of our understanding about the nutrient acquisition strategies used by bacterial pathogens, namely targeting the sugar transporters that are dedicated for the plant’s growth and development. Bacterial strategies for altering the plant cell membrane permeability to enhance the release of nutrients are also enumerated along with in-depth analysis of molecular mechanisms behind these strategies. The information presented in this review will be useful to understand the plant-pathogen interaction in nutrient perspective.

  17. Interrelationships of food safety and plant pathology: the life cycle of human pathogens on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Jeri D; Schroeder, Brenda K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial food-borne pathogens use plants as vectors between animal hosts, all the while following the life cycle script of plant-associated bacteria. Similar to phytobacteria, Salmonella, pathogenic Escherichia coli, and cross-domain pathogens have a foothold in agricultural production areas. The commonality of environmental contamination translates to contact with plants. Because of the chronic absence of kill steps against human pathogens for fresh produce, arrival on plants leads to persistence and the risk of human illness. Significant research progress is revealing mechanisms used by human pathogens to colonize plants and important biological interactions between and among bacteria in planta. These findings articulate the difficulty of eliminating or reducing the pathogen from plants. The plant itself may be an untapped key to clean produce. This review highlights the life of human pathogens outside an animal host, focusing on the role of plants, and illustrates areas that are ripe for future investigation.

  18. Antimicrobial Effect of Filipendula ulmaria Plant Extract Against Selected Foodborne Pathogenic and Spoilage Bacteria in Laboratory Media, Fish Flesh and Fish Roe Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Proestos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-methanol extract from Filipendula ulmaria contains a variety of phenolic compounds, such as caffeic, p-coumaric and vanillic acid, myricetin, etc, which demonstrate antibacterial activity. Monitoring this activity in the broth using absorbance measurements showed that species of the Enterobacteriaceae family were more resistant than other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria tested. Acidic environment enhanced the antibacterial activity of Filipendula ulmaria extract when it was tested against Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Listeria monocytogenes Scott A. The efficacy of Filipendula ulmaria extract against selected foodborne psychrotrophic bacteria was also tested using solid laboratory media and low incubation temperatures for better simulation of food preservation conditions. Higher concentrations of the extract, compared to minimum inhibitory concentration determined in the broth, were needed for satisfactory inhibition of spoilage bacteria. Potential use of Filipendula ulmaria extract as natural food preservative was also examined against natural spoilage flora and inoculated pathogenic bacteria on fish flesh and fish roe product (tarama salad. No significant differences of viable populations of spoilage or pathogenic bacteria were found between the treated samples and controls. Further trials of Filipendula ulmaria extract should be carried out in acidic foods with low fat and protein content, supplemented with additional adjuncts, in order to explore its potential as effective natural food antimicrobial agent.

  19. Plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria versus pathogenic infections: an example of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RWL-1 and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheem Shahzad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogenic attacks are one of the major threats to the growth and productivity of crop plants. Currently, instead of synthetic fungicides, the use of plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes has been considered intriguingly eco-friendly in nature. Here, we aimed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antagonistic approach by using seed-borne endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RWL-1 against pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. The results revealed significant suppression of pathogenic fungal growth by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in vitro. Further to this, we inoculated tomato plants with RWL-1 and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in the root zone. The results showed that the growth attributes and biomass were significantly enhanced by endophytic-inoculation during disease incidence as compared to F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici infected plants. Under pathogenic infection, the RWL-1-applied plants showed increased amino acid metabolism of cell wall related (e.g., aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine (Ser, and proline (Pro as compared to diseased plants. In case of endogenous phytohormones, significantly lower amount of jasmonic acid (JA and higher amount of salicylic acid (SA contents was recorded in RWL-1-treated diseased plants. The phytohormones regulation in disease incidences might be correlated with the ability of RWL-1 to produce organic acids (e.g., succinic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and citric acid during the inoculation and infection of tomato plants. The current findings suggest that RWL-1 inoculation promoted and rescued plant growth by modulating defense hormones and regulating amino acids. This suggests that bacterial endophytes could be used for possible control of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in an eco-friendly way.

  20. Plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria versus pathogenic infections: an example of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RWL-1 and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Raheem; Khan, Abdul Latif; Bilal, Saqib

    2017-01-01

    Fungal pathogenic attacks are one of the major threats to the growth and productivity of crop plants. Currently, instead of synthetic fungicides, the use of plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes has been considered intriguingly eco-friendly in nature. Here, we aimed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antagonistic approach by using seed-borne endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RWL-1 against pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. The results revealed significant suppression of pathogenic fungal growth by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in vitro. Further to this, we inoculated tomato plants with RWL-1 and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in the root zone. The results showed that the growth attributes and biomass were significantly enhanced by endophytic-inoculation during disease incidence as compared to F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici infected plants. Under pathogenic infection, the RWL-1-applied plants showed increased amino acid metabolism of cell wall related (e.g., aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine (Ser), and proline (Pro)) as compared to diseased plants. In case of endogenous phytohormones, significantly lower amount of jasmonic acid (JA) and higher amount of salicylic acid (SA) contents was recorded in RWL-1-treated diseased plants. The phytohormones regulation in disease incidences might be correlated with the ability of RWL-1 to produce organic acids (e.g., succinic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and citric acid) during the inoculation and infection of tomato plants. The current findings suggest that RWL-1 inoculation promoted and rescued plant growth by modulating defense hormones and regulating amino acids. This suggests that bacterial endophytes could be used for possible control of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in an eco-friendly way. PMID:28321368

  1. Quorum sensing signal molecules (acylated homoserine lactones) in Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, K.F.

    2005-01-01

    and plant-pathogenic bacteria. A total of 59 strains, representing 9 different fish pathogenic species, were tested against 2 AHL monitor bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 [pZLR4] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026) in a well diffusion assay and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Representative...

  2. Practical benefits of knowing the enemy: Modern molecular tools for diagnosing the etiology of bacterial diseases and understanding the taxonomy and diversity of plant pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the identity of bacterial plant pathogens is essential to strategic and sustainable disease management. However, such identifications are linked to bacterial taxonomy, a complicated and changing discipline that depends on methods and information that often are not used by those who are diagn...

  3. Monograph: In vitro efficacy of 30 ethnomedicinal plants used by Indian aborigines against 6 multidrug resistant Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Chandra Sahu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor in vitro antibacterial activities of leaf extracts of 30 common and noncommon plants used by aborigines in Kalahandi district, Odisha, against 6 clinically isolated multidrug resistant (MDR Gram-positive bacteria of 3 genera, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus. Methods: The antibiotic sensitivity patterns of 6 bacterial strains were studied with the diskdiffusion method with 1 7 antibiotics belonging to 8 classes. Monitored plants have ethnomedicinal use and several are used as traditional medicines. Antibacterial properties were studied with the agar-well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of plants were determined by the microbroth-dilution method. Results: Ethanolic plant-extracts had the better antibacterial potencies in comparison to their corresponding aqueous extracts. Plants with most conspicuous antibacterial properties in controlling MDR strains of Gram-positive bacteria were aqueous and ethanolic extracts of plants, Ixora coccinea, Nyctanthes arbor-tristis, Polycythaemia rubra, Pongamia pinnata and Syzygium cumini, Carthamus tinctorius, Cucurbita maxima, Murraya koenigii, Leucas aspera, Plumbago indica and Psidium guajava. Ethanolic extracts of most plants had phytochemicals, alkaloids, glycosides, terpenoids, reducing sugars, saponins, tannins, flavonoids and steroids. Conclusions: These plants could be used further for the isolation of pure compounds to be used as complementary non-microbial antimicrobial medicines.

  4. Ecological niche of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Fodor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Disease ecology is a new approach to the understanding of the spread and dynamics of pathogens in natural and man-made environments. Defining and describing the ecological niche of the pathogens is one of the major tasks for ecological theory, as well as for practitioners preoccupied with the control and forecasting of established and emerging diseases. Niche theory has been periodically revised, not including in an explicit way the pathogens. However, many progresses have been achieved in niche modeling of disease spread, but few attempts were made to construct a theoretical frame for the ecological niche of pathogens. The paper is a review of the knowledge accumulated during last decades in the niche theory of pathogens and proposes an ecological approach in research. It quest for new control methods in what concerns forest plant pathogens, with a special emphasis on fungi like organisms of the genus Phytophthora. Species of Phytophthora are the most successful plant pathogens of the moment, affecting forest and agricultural systems worldwide, many of them being invasive alien organisms in many ecosystems. The hyperspace of their ecological niche is defined by hosts, environment and human interference, as main axes. To select most important variables within the hyperspace, is important for the understanding of the complex role of pathogens in the ecosystems as well as for control programs. Biotic relationships within ecosystem of host-pathogen couple are depicted by ecological network and specific metrics attached to this. The star shaped network is characterized by few high degree nodes, by short path lengths and relatively low connectivity, premises for a rapid disturbance spread.

  5. Ecological niche of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Fodor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease ecology is a new approach to the understanding of the spread and dynamics of pathogens in natural and man-made environments. Defining and describing the ecological niche of the pathogens is one of the major tasks for ecological theory, as well as for practitioners preoccupied with the control and forecasting of established and emerging diseases. Niche theory has been periodically revised, not including in an explicit way the pathogens. However, many progresses have been achieved in niche modeling of disease spread, but few attempts were made to construct a theoretical frame for the ecological niche of pathogens. The paper is a review of the knowledge accumulated during last decades in the niche theory of pathogens and proposes an ecological approach in research. It quest for new control methods in what concerns forest plant pathogens, with a special emphasis on fungi like organisms of the genus Phytophthora. Species of Phytophthora are the most successful plant pathogens of the moment, affecting forest and agricultural systems worldwide, many of them being invasive alien organisms in many ecosystems. The hyperspace of their ecological niche is defined by hosts, environment and human interference, as main axes. To select most important variables within the hyperspace, is important the understanding of the complex role of pathogens in the ecosystems as well as for control programs. Biotic relationships within ecosystem of host-pathogen couple are depicted by ecological network and specific metrics attached to this. The star shaped network is characterized by few high degree nodes, by short path lengths and relatively low connectivity, premises for a rapid disturbance spread. 

  6. EVALUATION OF ANTI-BACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF LOCAL FLORA OF BUNDELKHAND REGION OF JHANSI- INDIA AGAINST PLANT PATHOGENIC BACTERIA Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazada Siddiqui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Twenty plants namely Acacia nilotica (L. Willd.ex delil, Ageratum conyzoides Linn, Boerhaavia diffusa Linn., Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers, Cleome viscosa L, Datura stramonium Linn, Euphorbia hirta Linn, Ficus benghalensis Linn, Hyptis suaveolens (Linn poit, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Linn, Jatropha gossypifolia Linn, Phyllanthus niruri webster, Prosopis juliflora, Polyalthia longifolia, Sida cordifolia, Tephrosia purpurea (Linn. Pers, Tridax procumbens Linn, Zizyphus jujube Linn, Solanum nigrum Linn, were collected from different localities and screened for their antibacterial activity against phytopathogenic bacterium, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Among all the tested species, nine plant species viz Acacia nilotica, Ageratum conyzoied, Boerhaavia diffusa, Cleome viscose, Datura stramonium, Euphorbia hirta, Hyptis suaveolens, Hibiscus rosa sinensis, Prosopis juliflora and Tridex procumbens showed medium to light antibacterial activity against the selected pathogens. Significant antibacterial activity was observed in aqueous extracts of Prosopsis juliflora, Hyptis suaveolens, Euphorbia hirta and Acacia nilotica

  7. Insect symbiotic bacteria harbour viral pathogens for transovarial transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Chen, Yong; Liu, Yuyan; Chen, Qian; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Yi; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-03-06

    Many insects, including mosquitoes, planthoppers, aphids and leafhoppers, are the hosts of bacterial symbionts and the vectors for transmitting viral pathogens(1-3). In general, symbiotic bacteria can indirectly affect viral transmission by enhancing immunity and resistance to viruses in insects(3-5). Whether symbiotic bacteria can directly interact with the virus and mediate its transmission has been unknown. Here, we show that an insect symbiotic bacterium directly harbours a viral pathogen and mediates its transovarial transmission to offspring. We observe rice dwarf virus (a plant reovirus) binding to the envelopes of the bacterium Sulcia, a common obligate symbiont of leafhoppers(6-8), allowing the virus to exploit the ancient oocyte entry path of Sulcia in rice leafhopper vectors. Such virus-bacterium binding is mediated by the specific interaction of the viral capsid protein and the Sulcia outer membrane protein. Treatment with antibiotics or antibodies against Sulcia outer membrane protein interferes with this interaction and strongly prevents viral transmission to insect offspring. This newly discovered virus-bacterium interaction represents the first evidence that a viral pathogen can directly exploit a symbiotic bacterium for its transmission. We believe that such a model of virus-bacterium communication is a common phenomenon in nature.

  8. A Proposal for a Genome Similarity-Based Taxonomy for Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria that Is Sufficiently Precise to Reflect Phylogeny, Host Range, and Outbreak Affiliation Applied to Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato as a Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatzer, Boris A; Weisberg, Alexandra J; Monteil, Caroline L; Elmarakeby, Haitham A; Sheppard, Samuel K; Heath, Lenwood S

    2017-01-01

    Taxonomy of plant pathogenic bacteria is challenging because pathogens of different crops often belong to the same named species but current taxonomy does not provide names for bacteria below the subspecies level. The introduction of the host range-based pathovar system in the 1980s provided a temporary solution to this problem but has many limitations. The affordability of genome sequencing now provides the opportunity for developing a new genome-based taxonomic framework. We already proposed to name individual bacterial isolates based on pairwise genome similarity. Here, we expand on this idea and propose to use genome similarity-based codes, which we now call life identification numbers (LINs), to describe and name bacterial taxa. Using 93 genomes of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato, LINs were compared with a P. syringae genome tree whereby the assigned LINs were found to be informative of a majority of phylogenetic relationships. LINs also reflected host range and outbreak association for strains of P. syringae pathovar actinidiae, a pathovar for which many genome sequences are available. We conclude that LINs could provide the basis for a new taxonomic framework to address the shortcomings of the current pathovar system and to complement the current taxonomic system of bacteria in general.

  9. Vector-borne bacterial plant pathogens: Interactions with hemipteran insects and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Perilla-Henao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemipteran insects are devastating pests of crops due to their wide host range, rapid reproduction, and ability to transmit numerous plant-infecting pathogens as vectors. While the field of plant-virus-vector interactions has flourished in recent years, plant-bacteria-vector interactions remain poorly understood. Leafhoppers and psyllids are by far the most important vectors of bacterial pathogens, yet there are still significant gaps in our understanding of their feeding behavior, salivary secretions, and plant responses as compared to important viral vectors, such as whiteflies and aphids. Even with an incomplete understanding of plant-bacteria-vector interactions, some common themes have emerged: 1 all known vector-borne bacteria share the ability to propagate in the plant and insect host; 2 particular hemipteran families appear to be incapable of transmitting vector-borne bacteria; 3 all known vector-borne bacteria have highly reduced genomes and coding capacity, resulting in host-dependence; and 4 vector-borne bacteria encode proteins that are essential for colonization of specific hosts, though only a few types of proteins have been investigated. Here, we review the current knowledge on important vector-borne bacterial pathogens, including Xylella fastidiosa, Spiroplasma spp., Liberibacter spp., and 'Candidatus Phytoplasma spp.’. We then highlight recent approaches used in the study of vector-borne bacteria. Finally, we discuss the application of this knowledge for control and future directions that will need to be addressed in the field of vector-plant-bacteria interactions.

  10. Bioactive proteins against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Z. Sitohy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is likely that both human nutrition and the nutrition of livestock are benefited by the presence of bioactive proteins within their respective diet regimes. Bioactive proteins have been defined as specific protein fragments that positively impact bodily functions or conditions and may, ultimately, influence overall human health. The ingestion of bioactive proteins may have an effect on the major body systems—namely, the cardiovascular, digestive, immune and nervous systems. According to their functional properties, bioactive proteins may be classified as antimicrobial, antithrombotic, antihypertensive, opioid, immune-modulatory, mineral binding and anti-oxidative. There are many examples of biologically active food proteins and active peptides that can be obtained from various food protein sources. They have a physiological significance beyond the pure nutritional requirements; in other wordsthey have the acquisition of nitrogen for normal growth and maintenance. Objective: This study aims to specify and characterize the extent and mode of action of bioactive proteins in their native form, (glycinin, glycinin basic sub-unit and β-conglycinin against specific main pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. We will be using standard media while identifying the main constituents responsible for this action. Methods: Glycinin, basic sub-unit and β-conglycinin were isolated from soybean protein and tested for their antimicrobial action against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, They were thencompared to the properties of penicillin. Methylated soybean protein and also methylated chickpea protein (MSP and MCP, with isoelectric points around pI 8, were prepared by esterifying. 83 % of their free carboxyl groups and their interactions with Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were examined. Results: The three divisions of cationic proteins exhibited antibacterial

  11. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rodrigo; Garbeva, Paolina; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2013-09-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protective microbial shield and to overcome the innate plant defense mechanisms in order to cause disease. A third group of microorganisms that can be found in the rhizosphere are the true and opportunistic human pathogenic bacteria, which can be carried on or in plant tissue and may cause disease when introduced into debilitated humans. Although the importance of the rhizosphere microbiome for plant growth has been widely recognized, for the vast majority of rhizosphere microorganisms no knowledge exists. To enhance plant growth and health, it is essential to know which microorganism is present in the rhizosphere microbiome and what they are doing. Here, we review the main functions of rhizosphere microorganisms and how they impact on health and disease. We discuss the mechanisms involved in the multitrophic interactions and chemical dialogues that occur in the rhizosphere. Finally, we highlight several strategies to redirect or reshape the rhizosphere microbiome in favor of microorganisms that are beneficial to plant growth and health. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial pathogen phytosensing in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Mazarei, Mitra; Rudis, Mary R; Fethe, Michael H; Peng, Yanhui; Millwood, Reginald J; Schoene, Gisele; Burris, Jason N; Stewart, C Neal

    2013-01-01

    Plants are subject to attack by a wide range of phytopathogens. Current pathogen detection methods and technologies are largely constrained to those occurring post-symptomatically. Recent efforts were made to generate plant sentinels (phytosensors) that can be used for sensing and reporting pathogen contamination in crops. Engineered phytosensors indicating the presence of plant pathogens as early-warning sentinels potentially have tremendous utility as wide-area detectors. We previously showed that synthetic promoters containing pathogen and/or defence signalling inducible cis-acting regulatory elements (RE) fused to a fluorescent protein (FP) reporter could detect phytopathogenic bacteria in a transient phytosensing system. Here, we further advanced this phytosensing system by developing stable transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants containing candidate constructs. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was examined in response to biotic (bacterial pathogens) or chemical (plant signal molecules salicylic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate) treatments using stably transgenic plants. The treated plants were visualized using epifluorescence microscopy and quantified using spectrofluorometry for FP synthesis upon induction. Time-course analyses of FP synthesis showed that both transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants were capable to respond in predictable ways to pathogen and chemical treatments. These results provide insights into the potential applications of transgenic plants as phytosensors and the implementation of emerging technologies for monitoring plant disease outbreaks in agricultural fields.

  13. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  14. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  15. Plants versus pathogens: an evolutionary arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Gleason, Cynthia A; Foley, Rhonda C; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy B; Singh, Karam B

    2010-05-20

    The analysis of plant-pathogen interactions is a rapidly moving research field and one that is very important for productive agricultural systems. The focus of this review is on the evolution of plant defence responses and the coevolution of their pathogens, primarily from a molecular-genetic perspective. It explores the evolution of the major types of plant defence responses including pathogen associated molecular patterns and effector triggered immunity as well as the forces driving pathogen evolution, such as the mechanisms by which pathogen lineages and species evolve. Advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling, stomatal regulation, R gene-effector interactions and host specific toxins are used to highlight recent insights into the coevolutionary arms race between pathogens and plants. Finally, the review considers the intriguing question of how plants have evolved the ability to distinguish friends such as rhizobia and mycorrhiza from their many foes.

  16. Plant and pathogen nutrient acquisition strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima, Urooj; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients are indispensable elements required for the growth of all living organisms including plants and pathogens. Phyllosphere, rhizosphere, apoplast, phloem, xylem, and cell organelles are the nutrient niches in plants that are the target of bacterial pathogens. Depending upon nutrients availability, the pathogen adapts various acquisition strategies and inhabits the specific niche. In this review, we discuss the nutrient composition of different niches in plants, the mechanisms involved ...

  17. Electrical detection of pathogenic bacteria via immobilized antimicrobial peptides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manu S. Mannoor; Siyan Zhang; A. James Link; Michael C. McAlpine; Charles Lieber

    2010-01-01

    The development of a robust and portable biosensor for the detection of pathogenic bacteria could impact areas ranging from waterquality monitoring to testing of pharmaceutical products for bacterial contamination...

  18. Interactions between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumler, Andreas J; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2016-07-07

    The microbiome has an important role in human health. Changes in the microbiota can confer resistance to or promote infection by pathogenic bacteria. Antibiotics have a profound impact on the microbiota that alters the nutritional landscape of the gut and can lead to the expansion of pathogenic populations. Pathogenic bacteria exploit microbiota-derived sources of carbon and nitrogen as nutrients and regulatory signals to promote their own growth and virulence. By eliciting inflammation, these bacteria alter the intestinal environment and use unique systems for respiration and metal acquisition to drive their expansion. Unravelling the interactions between the microbiota, the host and pathogenic bacteria will produce strategies for manipulating the microbiota against infectious diseases.

  19. Plant Pathogenic Bacteria Utilize Biofilm Growth-associated Repressor (BigR), a Novel Winged-helix Redox Switch, to Control Hydrogen Sulfide Detoxification under Hypoxia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Barbosa, Rosicler L.; Soprano, Adriana S.; Campos, Bruna M.; de Souza, Tiago A.; Tonoli, Celisa C. C.; Leme, Adriana F. P.; Murakami, Mario T.; Benedetti, Celso E.

    2011-01-01

    Winged-helix transcriptional factors play important roles in the control of gene expression in many organisms. In the plant pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the winged-helix protein BigR, a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, regulates transcription of the bigR operon involved in bacterial biofilm growth. Previous studies showed that BigR represses transcription of its own operon through the occupation of the RNA polymerase-binding site; however, the signals that modulate its activity and the biological function of its operon are still poorly understood. Here we show that although BigR is a homodimer similar to metal sensors, it functions as a novel redox switch that derepresses transcription upon oxidation. Crystal structures of reduced and oxidized BigR reveal that formation of a disulfide bridge involving two critical cysteines induces conformational changes in the dimer that remarkably alter the topography of the winged-helix DNA-binding interface, precluding DNA binding. This structural mechanism of DNA association-dissociation is novel among winged-helix factors. Moreover, we demonstrate that the bigR operon is required for hydrogen sulfide detoxification through the action of a sulfur dioxygenase (Blh) and sulfite exporter. As hydrogen sulfide strongly inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, it must be eliminated to allow aerobic growth under low oxygen tension, an environmental condition found in bacterial biofilms, xylem vessels, and root tissues. Accordingly, we show that the bigR operon is critical to sustain bacterial growth under hypoxia. These results suggest that BigR integrates the transcriptional regulation of a sulfur oxidation pathway to an oxidative signal through a thiol-based redox switch. PMID:21632538

  20. Genomic and evolutionary comparisons of diazotrophic and pathogenic bacteria of the order Rhizobiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Ana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species belonging to the Rhizobiales are intriguing and extensively researched for including both bacteria with the ability to fix nitrogen when in symbiosis with leguminous plants and pathogenic bacteria to animals and plants. Similarities between the strategies adopted by pathogenic and symbiotic Rhizobiales have been described, as well as high variability related to events of horizontal gene transfer. Although it is well known that chromosomal rearrangements, mutations and horizontal gene transfer influence the dynamics of bacterial genomes, in Rhizobiales, the scenario that determine pathogenic or symbiotic lifestyle are not clear and there are very few studies of comparative genomic between these classes of prokaryotic microorganisms trying to delineate the evolutionary characterization of symbiosis and pathogenesis. Results Non-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria and bacteria involved in bioremediation closer to symbionts and pathogens in study may assist in the origin and ancestry genes and the gene flow occurring in Rhizobiales. The genomic comparisons of 19 species of Rhizobiales, including nitrogen-fixing, bioremediators and pathogens resulted in 33 common clusters to biological nitrogen fixation and pathogenesis, 15 clusters exclusive to all nitrogen-fixing bacteria and bacteria involved in bioremediation, 13 clusters found in only some nitrogen-fixing and bioremediation bacteria, 01 cluster exclusive to some symbionts, and 01 cluster found only in some pathogens analyzed. In BBH performed to all strains studied, 77 common genes were obtained, 17 of which were related to biological nitrogen fixation and pathogenesis. Phylogenetic reconstructions for Fix, Nif, Nod, Vir, and Trb showed possible horizontal gene transfer events, grouping species of different phenotypes. Conclusions The presence of symbiotic and virulence genes in both pathogens and symbionts does not seem to be the only determinant factor for lifestyle

  1. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  2. Natural occurrence and pathogenicity of Xanthomonas bacteria on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... Several economical and ornamental plants were assessed for wilting in South and Southwest Ethiopia. ... The pathogenicity of three Xcm isolates to five plant species was tested in a factorial experiment ...

  3. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alix M Denoncourt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  4. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoncourt, Alix M; Paquet, Valérie E; Charette, Steve J

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  5. Anti-biotic Effect of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water on Plant Bacterial / Fungal Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    津野, 和宣; 中村, 悌一

    2012-01-01

    The anti-biotic effect of slightly acidic electrolyzed water on plant pathogen was determined. The spores of 4 kinds of fungal pathogen and 17 kinds of plant pathogenic bacteria were applied at different concentration.###Slightly acidic electrolyzed water showed strong growth inhibition in germination of fungi spores tested. In addition, by the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water for 30 sec., all kinds of bacteria tested were inhibited to grow on the medium.###The anti-biotic ef...

  6. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.;

    2007-01-01

    Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against...... alternative for combating pathogenic bacteria....

  7. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa D Cunha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

  8. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eGijzen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  9. Multiple sample flow through immunomagnetic separator for concentrating pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotariu, Ovidiu [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Ogden, Iain D [Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); MacRae, Marion [Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Udrea, Laura Elena [National Institute of R-D for Technical Physics I.F.T. Iasi, Mangeron 47 Blvd., Iasi (Romania); Strachan, Norval J C [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-21

    The standard method of immunomagnetic separation for isolating pathogenic bacteria from food and environmental matrices processes 1 ml volumes. Pathogens present at low levels (<0.5 pathogenic bacteria/g) will not be consistently detected by this method. Here a multiple sample flow through immunomagnetic separator has been designed and tested to process large volume samples (50 to 250 ml). Preliminary results show >97% recovery of polydisperse magnetic particles (diameter range 1 to 8 {mu}m) containing 29-33% w/w Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} content. Between 70 and 130 times more of the pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli O157 is recovered from PBS compared with the standard 1 ml method. Also, the recovery of E. coli O157 from beef mince homogenates, after a 4 h incubation at 42 deg. C, is between 80 and 180 times higher than the standard 1 ml method.

  10. Foliar endophytic fungi as potential protectors from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Jiménez-Alemán, Guillermo H; Boland, Wilhelm

    2014-10-01

    In defensive ant-plant interactions myrmecophytic plants express reduced chemical defense in their leaves to protect themselves from pathogens, and it seems that mutualistic partners are required to make up for this lack of defensive function. Previously, we reported that mutualistic ants confer plants of Acacia hindsii protection from pathogens, and that the protection is given by the ant-associated bacteria. Here, we examined whether foliar endophytic fungi may potentially act as a new partner, in addition to mutualistic ants and their bacteria inhabitants, involved in the protection from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants. Fungal endophytes were isolated from the asymptomatic leaves of A. hindsii plants for further molecular identification of 18S rRNA gene. Inhibitory effects of fungal endophytes were tested against Pseudomonas plant pathogens. Our findings support a potential role of fungal endophytes in pathogen the protection mechanisms against pathogens in myrmecophytic plants and provide the evidence of novel fungal endophytes capable of biosynthesizing bioactive metabolites.

  11. A common origin of rickettsiae and certain plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburg, W G; Woese, C R; Dobson, M E; Weiss, E

    1985-11-01

    On the basis of ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons, the rickettsia Rochalimaea quintana has been found to be a member of subgroup 2 of the alpha subdivision of the so-called purple bacteria, which is one of about ten major eubacterial divisions. Within subgroup alpha-2, R. quintana is specifically related to the agrobacteria and rhizobacteria, organisms that also have close associations with eukaryotic cells. This genealogical grouping of the rickettsiae with certain plant pathogens and intracellular symbionts suggests a possible evolution of the rickettsiae from plant-associated bacteria.

  12. Natural soil reservoirs for human pathogenic and fecal indicator bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiroli, Maria L; Falkinham, Joseph; Favre-Bonte, Sabine; Nazaret, Sylvie; Piveteau, Pascal; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Delaquis, Pascal; Hartmann, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Soils receive inputs of human pathogenic and indicator bacteria through land application of animal manures or sewage sludge, and inputs by wildlife. Soil is an extremely heterogeneous substrate and contains meso- and macrofauna that may be reservoirs for bacteria of human health concern. The ability to detect and quantify bacteria of human health concern is important in risk assessments and in evaluating the efficacy of agricultural soil management practices that are protective of crop quality and protective of adjacent water resources. The present chapter describes the distribution of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in soils. Methods for detecting and quantifying soilborne bacteria including extraction, enrichment using immunomagnetic capture, culturing, molecular detection and deep sequencing of metagenomic DNA to detect pathogens are overviewed. Methods for strain phenotypic and genotypic characterization are presented, as well as how comparison with clinical isolates can inform the potential for human health risk.

  13. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  14. Identification and Pathogenicity of Phytopathogenic Bacteria Associated with Soft Rot Disease of Girasole Tuber

    OpenAIRE

    Mamdoh Ewis ISMAIL; Abdel-Monaim, Montaser Fawzy; Yasser Mahmoud MOSTAFA

    2012-01-01

    During 2010-2011 growing seasons six bacterial isolates were separated from naturally infected girasole plants tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) cv. �Balady�, showing soft rot, collected from experimental Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, in El-Minia University, Egypt. Pathogenicity tests showed various virulence for the bacteria isolated from girasole tubers, found pathogenic. These organisms were characterized as rod-shaped, Gram negative, ?-methyl-d-glucoside medium, reducing substances f...

  15. 土壤拮抗细菌的分离与抗植物病原真菌活性初步研究%Preliminary Study on Isolating Antagonistic Bacteria f rom Soil and Antagonistic Activity Against Plant Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春来; 李新民; 王爽; 夏吉星; 杨帆; 刘宇; 苏宝华

    2015-01-01

    为了分离筛选出土壤中对植物病原真菌具有拮抗作用的细菌,以4种土传病害病原菌为诱导菌株,采用土壤颗粒撒布法,从不同生态区农田土壤样本中分离得到55株拮抗细菌菌株。测定了部分拮抗菌株及发酵滤液对植物病原菌的拮抗作用。结果表明:分离获得的细菌菌株对病原真菌均表现出一定程度的抑制作用,其中对菜豆根腐病菌(Fusarium solani)、小麦赤霉病菌(Fusarium graminearum)、番茄枯萎病菌(Fusarium oxysporum)菌丝抑制率达60%以上的拮抗菌株,分别有1、12和8株。9株拮抗菌发酵滤液对大豆菌核病菌(Sclerotinia sclerotiorum)、水稻稻瘟病菌(Pyricularia grisea)、玉米大斑病菌(Setosphaeria turcica)、小麦根腐病菌(Bipolaris sorokiniana)、水稻恶苗病菌(Fusarium moniliforme)和马铃薯早疫病菌(Alternaria so‐lani)6种植物病原菌表现出较高的抑菌效果,其中YS7菌株发酵产物对玉米大斑病菌、小麦根腐病菌、水稻恶苗病菌均表现较强的抑菌活性,对玉米大斑病菌抑菌圈直径最大达到了56.2 mm。从抗菌谱上看,27株拮抗菌株代谢产物对4种以上的拮抗对象表现有抑菌活性,表明拮抗菌株代谢产物具有较为广谱的抑菌效果。%In order to screen antagonistic bacteria in soil for plant pathogens bio‐control .55 antagonistic bacteria strains were isolated from soil samples in different ecological regions by the soil sprinkling method baited with 4 soil borne diseases .Part of antagonistic bacteria strains were evaluated for the antagonistic activity against plant pathogens .The result showed that more than 60% mycelial inhibition against Fusarium solani ,Fusarium graminearum ,Fusarium oxysporum were 1 ,12 and 8 stains ,respectively .Fermentation filtrate of 9 antagonis‐tic bacteria strains showed higher inhibition effect for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum ,Pyricularia grisea

  16. [Free-living amoebae as vehicles of pathogenic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derda, Monika; Sułek-Stankiewicz, Anna; Hadaś, Edward

    2006-01-01

    The free-living amoebae are ubiquitous organisms. They are found in humid soil and all water reservoirs, i.e. fresh, sea, freezing and hot water. They mainly feed on bacteria. Pathogenic properties of amoebae and the mechanisms underlying pathological changes induced during human infection have not yet been fully elucidated. They are the causative agents of primary amoebic meningo-encephalitis (PAM), granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE), a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system, amebic keratitis (AK), a chronic eye infection; amebic pneumitis (AP), a chronic lung infection, and skin infection. Only a few isolates are strongly and permanently pathogenic to humans. Some isolates lose their pathogenic properties after one passage. It has been assumed that such "temporary", unstable pathogenic properties of the amoebae may be caused by internal factors carried by them. It is generally known that the free-living amoebae may be naturally infected with pathogenic bacteria, which have the ability to survive for a long time and to proliferate in the amoebae cells. The role of the amoeba in the process of maintaining, propagating and transmitting human pathogens has not been well recognized. It has been suggested that some infections can be acquired by inhaling aerosols containing amoebae cells filled with bacteria. The presence of bacteria inside the free-living amoebae possess a great challenge to organisations responsible for testing and inspecting the quality and cleanliness of surface waters, swimming pools and drinking water intakes.

  17. [Analysis of Pathogenic Bacteria in Reclaimed Water and Impact of UV Disinfection on the Removal of Pathogenic Bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ming; Wang, Lei

    2016-02-15

    In the study, 454-pyrosequencing technology was employed to investigate the species of pathogenic bacteria and the proportion of each pathogen in secondary effluent. Culture-based, qPCR and Q-RT-PCR methods were employed to analyze the removal of indicator (E. coli) and pathogen (Salmonella and Mycobacterium) by ultraviolet (UV) disinfection at a dose of 60 mJ x Cm(-2). The results showed that 11 kinds of pathogenic bacteria were found and the most abundant potentially pathogenic bacteria in the secondary effluent were affiliated with the genera of Clostridium (2.96%), Arcobacter (0.82%) and Mycobacterium (0.36%). 99.9% of culturable E. coli and Salmonella were removed by UV disinfection (60 mJ x cm(-2), however, less than 90% of culturable Mycobacterium were removed. The removal efficiencies of viable E. coli, Salmonella and Mycobacterium were low. Q-RT-PCR seemed to be a promising method for evaluating viable microorganisms in samples. Besides, pathogenic bacteria entered into VBNC state at a UV dose of 60 mJ x cm(-2). Other advanced treatment processes were needed to ensure safe utilization of reclaimed water.

  18. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  19. Presence of Pathogenic Bacteria and Viruses in the Daycare Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, Tobias; Engelund, Eva Høy; Permin, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    The number of children in daycare centers (DCCs) is rising. This increases exposure to microorganisms and infectious diseases. Little is known about which bacteria and viruses are present in the DCC environment and where they are located. In the study described in this article, the authors set out...... to determine the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses and to find the most contaminated fomites in DCCs. Fifteen locations in each DCC were sampled for bacteria, respiratory viruses, and gastrointestinal viruses. The locations were in the toilet, kitchen, and playroom areas and included nursery...... pillows, toys, and tables, among other things. Coliform bacteria were primarily found in the toilet and kitchen areas whereas nasopharyngeal bacteria were found mostly on toys and fabric surfaces in the playroom. Respiratory viruses were omnipresent in the DCC environment, especially on the toys....

  20. Presence of Pathogenic Bacteria and Viruses in the Daycare Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibfelt, Tobias; Engelund, Eva Hoy; Permin, Anders; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Andersen, Leif Percival

    2015-10-01

    The number of children in daycare centers (DCCs) is rising. This increases exposure to microorganisms and infectious diseases. Little is known about which bacteria and viruses are present in the DCC environment and where they are located. In the study described in this article, the authors set out to determine the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses and to find the most contaminated fomites in DCCs. Fifteen locations in each DCC were sampled for bacteria, respiratory viruses, and gastrointestinal viruses. The locations were in the toilet, kitchen, and playroom areas and included nursery pillows, toys, and tables, among other things. Coliform bacteria were primarily found in the toilet and kitchen areas whereas nasopharyngeal bacteria were found mostly on toys and fabric surfaces in the playroom. Respiratory viruses were omnipresent in the DCC environment, especially on the toys.

  1. The xylan utilization system of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris controls epiphytic life and reveals common features with oligotrophic bacteria and animal gut symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déjean, Guillaume; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Boulanger, Alice; Darrasse, Armelle; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Girard, Anne-Laure; Carrére, Sébastien; Jamet, Stevie; Zischek, Claudine; Lautier, Martine; Solé, Magali; Büttner, Daniela; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu

    2013-05-01

    Xylan is a major structural component of plant cell wall and the second most abundant plant polysaccharide in nature. Here, by combining genomic and functional analyses, we provide a comprehensive picture of xylan utilization by Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) and highlight its role in the adaptation of this epiphytic phytopathogen to the phyllosphere. The xylanolytic activity of Xcc depends on xylan-deconstruction enzymes but also on transporters, including two TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs) which belong to operons necessary for efficient growth in the presence of xylo-oligosaccharides and for optimal survival on plant leaves. Genes of this xylan utilization system are specifically induced by xylo-oligosaccharides and repressed by a LacI-family regulator named XylR. Part of the xylanolytic machinery of Xcc, including TBDT genes, displays a high degree of conservation with the xylose-regulon of the oligotrophic aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Moreover, it shares common features, including the presence of TBDTs, with the xylan utilization systems of Bacteroides ovatus and Prevotella bryantii, two gut symbionts. These similarities and our results support an important role for TBDTs and xylan utilization systems for bacterial adaptation in the phyllosphere, oligotrophic environments and animal guts.

  2. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  3. Disccusion on the Mechnism of Resistance of the Polysaccharide of Lentinus Edodes against Pathogenic Bacteria and Virus of Plant%香菇多糖对植物真菌和病毒病害的抗病机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杰; 王开运

    2011-01-01

    香菇多糖(LNT)属于真菌多糖,具有与葡聚糖激发子类似的抑病、抗病活性,可诱导植株或细胞产生并积累抗病性物质,如植保素、几丁质酶等.综述了食用菌香菇中的有效成分香菇多糖对植物真菌及病毒病害抗病机理等方面的研究.为多糖类物质作为杀菌剂的开发和用于防治植物病毒病等病害提供一定的理论依据.%Lentinus edodes, the polysaccharide extracted from one kind of edible fungi. The polysaccharide of lentinus edodes (or lentinan) has some antiviral mechanisms, which can primary blunt virus outside and induce the host resistance (increase chitinase activity andβ-1,3- glucanase activity). Disccusion on the mechanism of resistance of the polysaccharide of Lentinus edodes against pathogenic bacteria and virus of Plant was made for its extensive application in the future.

  4. Unraveling Plant Responses to Bacterial Pathogens through Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Zimaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens.

  5. Unraveling plant responses to bacterial pathogens through proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Zimaro, Tamara

    2011-11-03

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens. Copyright 2011 Tamara Zimaro et al.

  6. Microbial Forensics and Plant Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    New awareness of the vulnerability of a nation's agricultural infrastructure to the intentional introduction of pathogens or pests has led to the enhancement of programs for prevention and preparedness. A necessary component of a balanced bio-security plan is the capability to determine whether an ...

  7. Novel Micro-organisms controlling plant pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Köhl, J

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to control of pathogen caused diseases on leaves, fruits and ears in plants, such as apple scab (Venturia inaequalis by treatment of plant with an isolate of Cladosporium cladosporioides. The treatment is effective in both prevention and treatment of the fungal infection

  8. EPCOT, NASA and plant pathogens in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R

    1996-01-01

    Cooperative work between NASA and Walt Disney World's EPCOT Land Pavilion is described. Joint efforts include research about allelopathy in multi-species plant cropping in CELSS, LEDs as light sources in hydroponic systems, and the growth of plant pathogens in space.

  9. Frost related dieback in Estonian energy plantations of willows in relation to fertilisation and pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.; Nejad, P. [Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7026, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Heinsoo, K. [Institute of Zoology and Botany, Estonian Agricultural University, Riia 181, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Granhall, U. [Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7025, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    Two 9-year old Estonian Salix plantations suffering from dieback were studied: one situated on poor mineral soil and divided into fertilised and unfertilised plots (Saare plantation) and another growing on a well-decomposed and nitrogen-rich organic soil, without fertiliser application (Kambja plantation). Bacteria from internal tissues of visually damaged shoots from seven clones were isolated in spring and autumn. The strains were subsequently biochemically characterised and tested for ice nucleation activity and pathogenicity on Salix. Some strains were also analysed with 16S rRNA. High numbers of culturable bacteria were found, belonging mainly to Erwinia, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas spp. Fertilised plots were significantly more colonised by bacteria than unfertilised plots and also more extensively damaged, showing a lower density of living plants after 7 years of culture. More ice nucleation active (INA) strains were found in Saare fertilised plots and at Kambja than in Saare unfertilised plots. Likewise, most pathogenic strains were isolated from Saare fertilised plots and from Kambja. For some of the willow clones studied, dieback appeared to be related to both clonal frost sensitivity and abundance of INA and pathogenic bacteria. The plantations probably suffered from the presence of high amounts of pathogens and from frost related injuries aggravated by INA bacteria. Most probably the fertilisation at Saare and the nitrogen-rich soil at Kambja created a favourable environment for bacterial development and led to high dieback levels after the first harvest. (author)

  10. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyun Jeon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed.

  11. Effects of rainfall acidification on plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, D. S.; Cowling, E. B.

    1978-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The chemical nature of the aqueous microenvironment at the infection court is a potentially significant factor in the successful dissemination, establishment, and survival of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Acidic rainfall has a potential for influencing not only the pathogen, but also the host organism, and the host-pathogen complex. Although host-pathogen interactions add a degree of complexity to the study of abiotic environmental stress of plants, it is our hope, through the use of a combination of general concepts, theoretical postulations, and experimental data, to describe the potential role that rainfall acidity may play in the often subtle balance between populations of plants and populations of plant pathogens. The direct effects of acidic precipitation on vegetation are becoming increasingly better understood. The indirect consequences of both acute and chronic exposure of vegetation to acidic precipitation are very complex, however. Their effect is variable in time, and involves a variety of potential interactions which are only partially understood.

  12. Salmonella, a cross-kingdom pathogen infecting humans and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schikora, Adam

    2013-06-01

    Infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella strains are constant and are a non-negligible threat to the human population. In the last two decades, salmonellosis outbreaks have increasingly been associated with infected fruits and vegetables. For a long time, Salmonellae were assumed to survive on plants after a more or less accidental infection. However, this notion has recently been challenged. Studies on the infection mechanism in vegetal hosts, as well as on plant immune systems, revealed an active infection process resembling in certain features the infection in animals. On one hand, Salmonella requires the type III secretion systems to effectively infect plants and to suppress their resistance mechanisms. On the other hand, plants recognize these bacteria and react to the infection with an induced defense mechanism similar to the reaction to other plant pathogens. In this review, we present the newest reports on the interaction between Salmonellae and plants. We discuss the possible ways used by these bacteria to infect plants as well as the plant responses to the infection. The recent findings indicate that plants play a central role in the dissemination of Salmonella within the ecosystem.

  13. Antibacterial effect of Gracilaria verrucosa bioactive on fish pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Maftuch,; Isma Kurniawati; Awaludin Adam; I’ah Zamzami

    2016-01-01

    Gracilaria verrucosa seaweed is a type of seaweed commonly found in water. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of G. verrucosa on fish pathogenic bacteria to support fish farming. The method used in this research was the separation of G. verrucosa fractions using column chromatography. The active antibacterial fraction of G. verrucosa which is obtained from column chromatography indicated fractions containing antibacterial compounds. It was fraction number 3 by using an eluent ...

  14. Pathogen and biological contamination management in plant tissue culture: phytopathogens, vitro pathogens, and vitro pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassells, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    The ability to establish and grow plant cell, organ, and tissue cultures has been widely exploited for basic and applied research, and for the commercial production of plants (micro-propagation). Regardless of whether the application is for research or commerce, it is essential that the cultures be established in vitro free of biological contamination and be maintained as aseptic cultures during manipulation, growth, and storage. The risks from microbial contamination are spurious experimental results due to the effects of latent contaminants or losses of valuable experimental or commercial cultures. Much of the emphasis in culture contamination management historically focussed on the elimination of phytopathogens and the maintenance of cultures free from laboratory contamination by environmental bacteria, fungi (collectively referred to as "vitro pathogens", i.e. pathogens or environmental micro-organisms which cause culture losses), and micro-arthropods ("vitro pests"). Microbial contamination of plant tissue cultures is due to the high nutrient availability in the almost universally used Murashige and Skoog (Physiol Plant 15:473-497, 1962) basal medium or variants of it. In recent years, it has been shown that many plants, especially perennials, are at least locally endophytically colonized intercellularly by bacteria. The latter, and intracellular pathogenic bacteria and viruses/viroids, may pass latently into culture and be spread horizontally and vertically in cultures. Growth of some potentially cultivable endophytes may be suppressed by the high salt and sugar content of the Murashige and Skoog basal medium and suboptimal temperatures for their growth in plant tissue growth rooms. The management of contamination in tissue culture involves three stages: disease screening (syn. disease indexing) of the stock plants with disease and endophyte elimination where detected; establishment and pathogen and contaminant screening of established initial cultures

  15. Foliar endophytic fungi as potential protectors from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants

    OpenAIRE

    González-Teuber, M.; Jimenez-Aleman, G.; W Boland

    2014-01-01

    In defensive ant-plant interactions myrmecophytic plants express reduced chemical defense in their leaves to protect themselves from pathogens, and it seems that mutualistic partners are required to make up for this lack of defensive function. Previously, we reported that mutualistic ants confer plants of Acacia hindsii protection from pathogens, and that the protection is given by the ant-associated bacteria. Here, we examined whether foliar endophytic fungi may potentially act as a new part...

  16. 植物病原真菌拮抗细菌的筛选鉴定及活性成分分析%Isolation and Identification of Antagonistic Bacteria (RN-61, RN-88) against Ten Different Plant Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任建军; 师光禄; 高美娟; 王有年

    2014-01-01

    In order to screen the broad-spectrum antifungl bacteria in plant protection , 103 bacterial strains were isolated from soil samples from different agricultural sites in Beijing.Bacteria-pathogen co-cultured method and filtrated-metablites meth-od were used to screen antifungal bacteria.The bacteria with the highest antifungal activity were identified with their bio-chemical characteristics and were selected for further identification by partial sequence analysis of their 16 S rRNA genes. The bacteria of RN-61and RN-88 were the effective antifungal strains against ten kind pathogens between all the samples. 16 S rRNA squence of RN-61 shared 99%similarity with that of Bacillus subtilis subsp.subtilis str, named Bacillus subtilis RN-61(GenBank accession no.KC840668), and the16 S rRNA squence of RN-88 also shared 99%similarity with that of P seudomonas fluorescens, named Pseudomonas fluorescens RN-88.The optimum saturation of the solution (NH4)2SO4 for the antifungal protein extracting was also studied.The protein from the saturation of 80%(NH4)2SO4 showed the best an-tifungal effect (P<0.05).The diameterof the pathogen was 29.0 mmafter 96 h.%为了获得应用于植物病害防治的高效广谱拮抗细菌菌株,从采自北京不同农田区的土样中分离得到103株细菌,采用平板对峙培养法、发酵产物活性测定法,并根据16 S rRNA基因序列分析以及生理生化反应鉴定、筛选了拮抗菌株。选用不同饱和度的( NH4)2 SO4溶液提取拮抗蛋白并分析其抗菌活性。结果表明:分离的菌株中,菌株RN-61和RN-88对供试的10种病原真菌均具有明显的抑制作用;菌株RN-61和RN-88的发酵液对桃褐腐病菌的抑制率较大,分别为87.31%和80.15%( P<0.05);对棉花红腐病菌、辣椒炭疽病菌的抑制率低于40%(P<0.05)。 RN-61与枯草芽孢杆菌相似度最高,为99%,确定其为芽孢杆菌属的枯草芽孢杆菌(Bacillus subtilis RN-61

  17. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  18. How filamentous pathogens co-opt plants; the ins and outs of eukaryotic effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on effectors secreted by pathogens during host attack has dominated the field of molecular plant-microbe interactions over recent years. Functional analysis of type III secreted effectors that are injected by pathogenic bacteria into host cells has significantly advanced the field and demon...

  19. HERBASPIRILLUM-LIKE BACTERIA IN BANANA PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Olmar B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Diazotrophic bacteria isolated from banana plants were characterized by morphological and physiological aspects. Three different groups of these plant-bacteria could be established. Two of them showed similarity to species of the Herbaspirillum genus. The third one was different because used only a few carbon substrates and produced water diffusible compounds that fluoresced under UV light. All three bacterial groups were thin rods with mono or bipolar flagella, presented negative reaction in Gram stain, showed catalase activity, were able to reduce nitrate and grew better in semi-solid JNFb medium at 31ºC. The nitrogenase activity was detected in semi-solid N-free JNFb medium and expressed higher values when pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.0 (groups I and II and 6.0 to 6.5 (group III. The diazotrophs isolated from banana plants were distinct from species of Herbaspirillum previously identified in gramineous plants.

  20. Suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agtmaal, van M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil borne plant pathogens considerably reduce crop yields worldwide and are difficult to control due to their ”masked” occurrence  in the heterogeneous soil environment. This hampers the efficacy of chemical - and microbiological control agents.   Outbreaks of crop diseas

  1. Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, M.D.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of evolution, fungi have adapted to occupy specific niches, from symbiotically inhabiting the flora of the intestinal tract of mammals to saprophytic growth on leaf litter resting on the forest floor. In Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols, expert researchers in the field d

  2. Combating Pathogenic Microorganisms Using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials: A Minireview of the Mechanistic Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in exploring the potential of plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs as an alternative therapeutic strategy to combat microbial infections. Historically, plant extracts have been used as a safe, effective, and natural remedy for ailments and diseases in traditional medicine. Extensive research in the last two decades has identified a plethora of PDAs with a wide spectrum of activity against a variety of fungal and bacterial pathogens causing infections in humans and animals. Active components of many plant extracts have been characterized and are commercially available; however, research delineating the mechanistic basis of their antimicrobial action is scanty. This review highlights the potential of various plant-derived compounds to control pathogenic bacteria, especially the diverse effects exerted by plant compounds on various virulence factors that are critical for pathogenicity inside the host. In addition, the potential effect of PDAs on gut microbiota is discussed.

  3. Speciation in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Silvia; Tabima, Javier F; Mideros, Maria F; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Matute, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    The process of speciation, by definition, involves evolution of one or more reproductive isolating mechanisms that split a single species into two that can no longer interbreed. Determination of which processes are responsible for speciation is important yet challenging. Several studies have proposed that speciation in pathogens is heavily influenced by host-pathogen dynamics and that traits that mediate such interactions (e.g., host mobility, reproductive mode of the pathogen, complexity of the life cycle, and host specificity) must lead to reproductive isolation and ultimately affect speciation rates. In this review, we summarize the main evolutionary processes that lead to speciation of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens and provide an outline of how speciation can be studied rigorously, including novel genetic/genomic developments.

  4. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  5. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  6. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.V.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  7. Progress in Research of Bacteria Fertilizer Strengthening Resistance of Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria fertilizer is used most widely among all kinds of microbial fertilizers. We summarize the research headway of bacteria fertilizer. It mainly focuses on bacteria fertilizer improving the stress resistance of plant. Then we can offer basis to research and exploit bacteria fertilizer. These bacteria include azotobacter, photosynthetic bacteria, Bacillus mucilaginosus siliceous, phosphorus bacteria, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR), effective microorganism(EM).

  8. Modeling the interactions between pathogenic bacteria, bacteriophage and immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Yin (Joey); Weitz, Joshua S.

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in the use of bacteriophage (phage), or virus that infects bacteria, as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, little is known about the theoretical mechanism by which phage therapy may work. In particular, interactions between the bacteria, the phage and the host immune response crucially influences the outcome of the therapy. Few models of phage therapy have incorporated all these three components, and existing models suffer from unrealistic assumptions such as unbounded growth of the immune response. We propose a model of phage therapy with an emphasis on nonlinear feedback arising from interactions with bacteria and the immune response. Our model shows a synergistic effect between the phage and the immune response which underlies a possible mechanism for phage to catalyze the elimination of bacteria even when neither the immune response nor phage could do so alone. We study the significance of this effect for different parameters of infection and immune response, and discuss its implications for phage therapy.

  9. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Elicits a Sugarcane Defense Response Against a Pathogenic Bacteria Xanthomonas albilineans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Fabiano; Estevez, Yandi; Bernal, Aydiloide; Perez, Juana; Cavalcanti, Janaina; Santana, Ignacio; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2006-01-01

    A new role for the plant growth-promoting nitrogen-fixing endophytic bacteria Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus has been identified and characterized while it is involved in the sugarcane-Xanthomonas albilineans pathogenic interactions. Living G.diazotrophicus possess and/or produce elicitor molecules which activate the sugarcane defense response resulting in the plant resistance to X. albilineans, in this particular case controlling the pathogen transmission to emerging agamic shoots. A total of 47 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments (TDFs) were identified by cDNA-AFLP. Transcripts showed significant homologies to genes of the ethylene signaling pathway (26%), proteins regulates by auxins (9%), β-1,3 Glucanase proteins (6%) and ubiquitin genes (4%), all major signaling mechanisms. Results point toward a form of induction of systemic resistance in sugarcane-G. diazotrophicus interactions which protect the plant against X. albilineans attack. PMID:19516988

  10. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Elicits a Sugarcane Defense Response Against a Pathogenic Bacteria Xanthomonas albilineans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Ariel D; Vinagre, Fabiano; Estevez, Yandi; Bernal, Aydiloide; Perez, Juana; Cavalcanti, Janaina; Santana, Ignacio; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2006-09-01

    A new role for the plant growth-promoting nitrogen-fixing endophytic bacteria Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus has been identified and characterized while it is involved in the sugarcane-Xanthomonas albilineans pathogenic interactions. Living G.diazotrophicus possess and/or produce elicitor molecules which activate the sugarcane defense response resulting in the plant resistance to X. albilineans, in this particular case controlling the pathogen transmission to emerging agamic shoots. A total of 47 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments (TDFs) were identified by cDNA-AFLP. Transcripts showed significant homologies to genes of the ethylene signaling pathway (26%), proteins regulates by auxins (9%), beta-1,3 Glucanase proteins (6%) and ubiquitin genes (4%), all major signaling mechanisms. Results point toward a form of induction of systemic resistance in sugarcane-G. diazotrophicus interactions which protect the plant against X. albilineans attack.

  11. Paleogene radiation of a plant pathogenic mushroom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P A Coetzee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global movement and speciation of fungal plant pathogens is important, especially because of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas. Understanding the biogeography and origin of these plant pathogens can provide insights regarding their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant pathogenic mushroom genus Armillaria and the currently accepted premise that vicariance accounts for the extant distribution of the species. METHODS: The phylogeny of a selection of Armillaria species was reconstructed based on Maximum Parsimony (MP, Maximum Likelihood (ML and Bayesian Inference (BI. A timeline was then placed on the divergence of lineages using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock approach. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analyses of sequenced data for three combined nuclear regions provided strong support for three major geographically defined clades: Holarctic, South American-Australasian and African. Molecular dating placed the initial radiation of the genus at 54 million years ago within the Early Paleogene, postdating the tectonic break-up of Gondwana. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution of extant Armillaria species is the result of ancient long-distance dispersal rather than vicariance due to continental drift. As these finding are contrary to most prior vicariance hypotheses for fungi, our results highlight the important role of long-distance dispersal in the radiation of fungal pathogens from the Southern Hemisphere.

  12. Identification and Pathogenicity of Phytopathogenic Bacteria Associated with Soft Rot Disease of Girasole Tuber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdoh Ewis ISMAIL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During 2010-2011 growing seasons six bacterial isolates were separated from naturally infected girasole plants tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L. cv. Balady, showing soft rot, collected from experimental Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, in El-Minia University, Egypt. Pathogenicity tests showed various virulence for the bacteria isolated from girasole tubers, found pathogenic. These organisms were characterized as rod-shaped, Gram negative, ?-methyl-d-glucoside medium, reducing substances from sucrose, phos, phatase activity and deep cavities on pectate medium. Otherwise, diagnostic tests suggested that the pathogen was Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora. The isolated bacteria caused soft rot of wounded tubers when inoculated into tissues. The bacterial isolates were compared for their degree of pathogenicity as well as for differences in specific symptoms, induced in different hosts. The tested isolates could infect several host ranges, such as fruits of apricot, apple, olive, lemon, squash, eggplant and potato tubers, bulbs and garlic and onion cloves, roots radish, carrot, sweet potato and rape. On the other hand, no symptoms were exhibited on pods of bean and cowpea, faba bean, fruits of pepper and tomato. The extracts of experimentally diseased girasole tubers were active in pectinase and also in caboxymethyl cellulose at pH 6 compared to enzyme activities in healthy tissues. Also, the isolated bacteria increased the total and reducing sugars in infected tissues.

  13. Identification and Pathogenicity of Phytopathogenic Bacteria Associated with Soft Rot Disease of Girasole Tuber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdoh Ewis ISMAIL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During 2010-2011 growing seasons six bacterial isolates were separated from naturally infected girasole plants tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L. cv. �Balady�, showing soft rot, collected from experimental Farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, in El-Minia University, Egypt. Pathogenicity tests showed various virulence for the bacteria isolated from girasole tubers, found pathogenic. These organisms were characterized as rod-shaped, Gram negative, ?-methyl-d-glucoside medium, reducing substances from sucrose, phos, phatase activity and deep cavities on pectate medium. Otherwise, diagnostic tests suggested that the pathogen was Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora. The isolated bacteria caused soft rot of wounded tubers when inoculated into tissues. The bacterial isolates were compared for their degree of pathogenicity as well as for differences in specific symptoms, induced in different hosts. The tested isolates could infect several host ranges, such as fruits of apricot, apple, olive, lemon, squash, eggplant and potato tubers, bulbs and garlic and onion cloves, roots radish, carrot, sweet potato and rape. On the other hand, no symptoms were exhibited on pods of bean and cowpea, faba bean, fruits of pepper and tomato. The extracts of experimentally diseased girasole tubers were active in pectinase and also in caboxymethyl cellulose at pH 6 compared to enzyme activities in healthy tissues. Also, the isolated bacteria increased the total and reducing sugars in infected tissues.

  14. Quorum sensing signal molecules (acylated homoserine lactones) in Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, K.F.

    2005-01-01

    and plant-pathogenic bacteria. A total of 59 strains, representing 9 different fish pathogenic species, were tested against 2 AHL monitor bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 [pZLR4] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026) in a well diffusion assay and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Representative...... salmonicida and Vibrio splendidus were also positive. Aeromonas species produced N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (BHL) and N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (HHL) and 1 additional product, whereas N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (OHHL) and HHL were detected in Vibrio salmonicida. N-3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine...... lactone (OOHL) and N-3-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OHL) were detected in Y. ruckeii. AHLs were not detected from strains of Photobacterium damselae, Flavobacterium psychrophilum or Moritella viscosa. AHLs were extracted from fish infected with Y. ruckeri but not from fish infected with A. salmonicida...

  15. A new pentaplex-nested PCR to detect five pathogenic bacteria in free living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, L; Gregorio, I; García, A; Fernández, M T; Goñi, P; Clavel, A; Peleato, M L; Fillat, M F

    2013-02-01

    Changes in water use and anthropogenic activity have major impacts on the quality of natural aquatic ecosystems, water distribution and wastewater plants. One of the main problems is the presence of some pathogenic microorganisms that are resistant to disinfection procedures when they are hosted by free living amoeba and that in many cases are hardly detectable by culture-based procedures. In this work we report a sensitive, low-cost procedure consisting of a pentaplex-nested PCR that allows simultaneous detection of Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp., Vibrio cholerae and the microcystin-producing cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa. The method has been used to detect the presence of these pathogenic bacteria in water and inside free living amoeba. Its validation in 72 samples obtained from different water sources from Aragon (Spain) evidences that Mycobacterium and Pseudomonas spp are prevailing as amoeba-resistant bacteria.

  16. Antibacterial effect of Gracilaria verrucosa bioactive on fish pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maftuch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gracilaria verrucosa seaweed is a type of seaweed commonly found in water. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of G. verrucosa on fish pathogenic bacteria to support fish farming. The method used in this research was the separation of G. verrucosa fractions using column chromatography. The active antibacterial fraction of G. verrucosa which is obtained from column chromatography indicated fractions containing antibacterial compounds. It was fraction number 3 by using an eluent 16 (ethanol: 4 (ethyl acetate. Furthermore, based on phytochemical screening, ultraviolet spectrophotometer and LC–MS analysis, antibacterial compounds contained in those fraction number 3 are Alkaloid, Flavonoid, Tannin, Phenolic compound. Based on LC–MS and UV–Vis analysis, flavonoid group, Quercetin-7-methyl-ether is a dominant group of the antibacterial compound on fraction no. 3. This fraction had moderate antibacterial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and had weak antibacterial activity against Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio algynoliticus bacteria.

  17. Fate of pathogenic bacteria in microcosms mimicking human body sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Francesco; Ghidini, Valentina; Tafi, Maria Carla; Boaretti, Marzia; Lleo, Maria M

    2013-07-01

    During the infectious process, pathogens may reach anatomical sites where they are exposed to substances interfering with their growth. These substances can include molecules produced by the host, and his resident microbial population, as well as exogenous antibacterial drugs. Suboptimal concentrations of inhibitory molecules and stress conditions found in vivo (high or low temperatures, lack of oxygen, extreme pH) might induce in bacteria the activation of survival mechanisms blocking their division capability but allowing them to stay alive. These "dormant" bacteria can be reactivated in particular circumstances and would be able to express their virulence traits. In this study, it was evaluated the effect of some environmental conditions, such as optimal and suboptimal temperatures, direct light and antibiotic sub-inhibitory concentrations doses of antibiotic, on the human pathogens Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis when incubated in fluids accumulated in the body of patients with different pathologies. It is shown that inoculation in a number of accumulated body fluids and the presence of gentamicin, reliable conditions encountered during pathological states, induce stress-responding strategies enabling bacteria to persist in microcosms mimicking the human body. Significant differences were detected in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species with E. faecalis surviving, as starved or viable but non-culturable forms, in any microcosm and condition tested and E. coli activating a viable but non-culturable state only in some clinical samples. The persistence of bacteria under these conditions, being non-culturable, might explain some recurrent infections without isolation of the causative agent after application of the standard microbiological methods.

  18. Endobiotic bacteria and their pathogenic potential in cnidarian tentacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuett, Christian; Doepke, Hilke

    2010-09-01

    Endobiotic bacteria colonize the tentacles of cnidaria. This paper provides first insight into the bacterial spectrum and its potential of pathogenic activities inside four cnidarian species. Sample material originating from Scottish waters comprises the jellyfish species Cyanea capillata and C. lamarckii, hydrozoa Tubularia indivisa and sea anemone Sagartia elegans. Mixed cultures of endobiotic bacteria, pure cultures selected on basis of haemolysis, but also lyophilized samples were prepared from tentacles and used for DGGE-profiling with subsequent phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA fragments. Bacteria were detected in each of the cnidarian species tested. Twenty-one bacterial species including four groups of closely related organisms were found in culture material. The species within these groups could not be differentiated from each other (one group of Pseudoalteromonas spp., two groups of Shewanella spp., one group of Vibrio spp.). Each of the hosts exhibits a specific endobacterial spectrum. Solely Cyanea lamarckii harboured Moritella viscosa. Only in Cyanea capillata, members of the Shewanella group #2 and the species Pseudoalteromonas arctica, Shewanella violacea, Sulfitobacter pontiacus and Arcobacter butzleri were detected. Hydrozoa Tubularia indivisa provided an amazingly wide spectrum of nine bacterial species. Exclusively, in the sea anemone Sagartia elegans, the bacterial species P. aliena was found. Overall eleven bacterial species detected were described recently as novel species. Four 16S rDNA fragments generated from lyophilized material displayed extremely low relationship to their next neighbours. These organisms are regarded as members of the endobiotic “terra incognita”. Since the origin of cnidarian toxins is unclear, the possible pathogenic activity of endobiotic bacteria has to be taken into account. Literature data show that their next neighbours display an interesting diversity of haemolytic, septicaemic and necrotic actions including

  19. The structures of lipopolysaccharides from plant-associated gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Antonio; Newman, Mari-Anne; Lanzetta, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    by plant cells can lead to the triggering of defence responses or to the priming of the plant to respond more rapidly and/or to a greater degree to subsequent pathogen challenge. LPSs are thus key molecules in the interactions between bacteria and plants, either in symbiosis or pathogenesis. Since LPSs......Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) have multiple roles in plant-microbe interactions. LPSs contribute to the low permeabilities of bacterial outer membranes, which act as barriers to protect bacteria from plant-derived antimicrobial substances. Conversely, perception of LPSs...... is an important prerequisite for any further understanding of the biological processes in plant-microbe interactions. Moreover, the LPSs from Gram-negative bacteria - especially those originating from plant-associated bacteria - are a great source of novel monosaccharides with unusual and occasionally astounding...

  20. Perception of pathogenic or beneficial bacteria and their evasion of host immunity: pattern recognition receptors in the frontline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie eTrda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants are continuously monitoring the presence of microorganisms to establish an adapted response. Plants commonly use pattern recognition receptors (PRRs to perceive microbe- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs/PAMPs which are microorganism molecular signatures. Located at the plant plasma membrane, the PRRs are generally receptor-like kinases (RLKs or receptor-like proteins (RLPs. MAMP detection will lead to the establishment of a plant defense program called MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI. In this review, we overview the RLKs and RLPs that assure early recognition and control of pathogenic or beneficial bacteria. We also highlight the crucial function of PRRs during plant-microbe interactions, with a special emphasis on the receptors of the bacterial flagellin and peptidoglycan. In addition, we discuss the multiple strategies used by bacteria to evade PRR-mediated recognition.

  1. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zinab Mohsenipour; Mehdi Hassanshahian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobrot...

  2. The Genetic and Molecular Basis of Plant Resistance to Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Thomas Lubberstedt; Mingliang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens have evolved numerous strategies to obtain nutritive materials from their host,and plants in turn have evolved the preformed physical and chemical barriers as well as sophisticated two-tiered immune system to combat pathogen attacks.Genetically,plant resistance to pathogens can be divided into qualitative and quantitative disease resistance,conditioned by major gene(s) and multiple genes with minor effects,respectively.Qualitative disease resistance has been mostly detected in plant defense against biotrophic pathogens,whereas quantitative disease resistance is involved in defense response to all plant pathogens,from biotrophs,hemibiotrophs to necrotrophs.Plant resistance is achieved through interception of pathogen-derived effectors and elicitation of defense response.In recent years,great progress has been made related to the molecular basis underlying host-pathogen interactions.In this review,we would like to provide an update on genetic and molecular aspects of plant resistance to pathogens.

  3. Bacteria used in the biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes: populations, mechanisms of action, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Baoyu; Yang, Jinkui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2007-08-01

    As a group of important natural enemies of nematode pests, nematophagous bacteria exhibit diverse modes of action: these include parasitizing; producing toxins, antibiotics, or enzymes; competing for nutrients; inducing systemic resistance of plants; and promoting plant health. They act synergistically on nematodes through the direct suppression of nematodes, promoting plant growth, and facilitating the rhizosphere colonization and activity of microbial antagonists. This review details the nematophagous bacteria known to date, including parasitic bacteria, opportunistic parasitic bacteria, rhizobacteria, Cry protein-forming bacteria, endophytic bacteria and symbiotic bacteria. We focus on recent research developments concerning their pathogenic mechanisms at the biochemical and molecular levels. Increased understanding of the molecular basis of the various pathogenic mechanisms of the nematophagous bacteria could potentially enhance their value as effective biological control agents. We also review a number of molecular biological approaches currently used in the study of bacterial pathogenesis in nematodes. We discuss their merits, limitations and potential uses.

  4. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  5. Pathogenic and Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) Bacteria causing Dieback of Willows in Short Rotation Forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, Pajand

    2005-03-01

    To find out whether bacteria isolated from diseased plant parts can be the main causal agent for the dieback appearing in Salix energy forestry plantations in Sweden during the last few years, and if the joint effects of bacteria and frost injury are synergistic, extensive sampling of shoots from diseased Salix plants was performed. We performed several laboratory and greenhouse investigations and used evaluation techniques on the functions of the Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) bacteria. We carried out a comparison between spring and autumn bacterial communities isolated from within (endophytically) and surface (epiphytically) plant tissues of Salix viminalis. Seasonal variation of bacteria in willow clones with different levels of frost sensitivity and symptoms of bacterial damage was also investigated. We further focussed on possible effect of fertilisation and nutrient availability on the bacterial community in relation to plant dieback in Estonian willow plantations. The identification and detection of INA bacteria which cause damage in combination with frost to willow (Salix spp) plants in late fall, winter and spring was performed using BIOLOG MicroPlate, biochemical tests, selective INA primers and 16S rDNA analysis. To distinguish the character for differentiation between these bacteria morphologically and with respect to growing ability different culture media were used. We studied the temperature, at which ice nucleation occurred for individual bacteria, estimated the population of INA bacteria, effect of growth limiting factors, and evaluated the effect of chemical and physical agents for disruption and possible inhibition of INA among individual bacterial strains. The concentration of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus on INA is discussed. We demonstrate that among the bacterial isolates recovered from the willow plantations, there were many that were capable of ice nucleation at temperatures between -2 and -10 deg C, many that were capable of inducing a

  6. The antimicrobial spectra of selected Penicillia against some pathogenic bacteria and yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Chauhan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The antagonista activity of eight isolaies of penicillia bas been studied against 13 pathogenic organisms, which included 6 Gram-positive bacteria, 4 Gram-negative bacteria and 3 yeasts.

  7. Investigating the Effectiveness of Centaureacyanus Extracts on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Structures of Six Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Mohsenipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, the treatments of infectious disease are regarded difficult due to increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria, which the reason may be placing of microorganisms in a structure named biofilm. Biofilms are complex structures consisting of surface-attached bacteria. Therefore, it is essential to find new compounds in order to remove and inhibit biofilms. This study aimed to examine the antibacterial activities of alcoholic extracts of Centaurea cyanus on the biofilm structures and planktonic form of six pathogen bacteria(Staphylococcusaureus, Bacilluscereus, Streptococcuspneumoniae, Pseudomonasaeruginosa, Escherichiacoli and Klebsiellapneumonia. Methods: Antimicrobial activities of the alcoholic plant extracts against the planktonic form of bacteria were assessed via using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were determined by a macrobroth dilution technique and anti-biofilm effects were scrutinized by microtiter plate method. Results: The results of this study confirmed high ability of C.cyanus extracts against the biofilm of the tested bacteria as well as their free-living forms. To inhibit bacterial growth, ethanolic extracts proved to be more effective than methanolic extracts. Anti-biofilm effects of plant extracts were associated with the solvent type and extract concentration. C.cyanus extracts were reported to be most efficient to inhibit biofilm formation of E. coli (84/26% and S. pneumoniae(83/14%. The greatest eradication of biofilm structures were observed on S. pneumonia biofilm (75.66%, and the highest decrease in metabolic activity was reported in S.aureus biofilms (71/85%. Conclusion: In this study the high capacity of C. cyanus extracts to encounter with whit biofilm was emphasized. Moreover, it was demonstrated that these extracts possess an appropriate potential to become active principles of new drugs.

  8. Nanoformulated antibiotics: the next step for pathogenic bacteria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saúde, Amanda Caroline Marques; Cherobim, Mariana Dornelles; Amaral, André Corrêa; Dias, Simoní Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of infectious bacteria to current antibiotics is a worldwide problem. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of nanostructured molecules against pathogens as an innovative methodology for the development of novel drugs. Currently, 95% of properties limited pharmacies applicability such as low solubility, short half-life in the circulatory system, toxicity associated to controlled release and immunogenicity. Furthermore, nanobiotechnology provides a different perspective for modifying these properties and allows innovative drug development. In this context, this review aims to describe different methods, polymers, and drugs used to obtain and analyze nanostructures associated with antibiotics as an unconventional and innovative tool for bacterial control. Biotechnology provides a different perspective for modifying drug properties and allows innovative drug development. This review describes nanostructures in association with antibiotics as an unconventional and innovative tool for bacterial control.

  9. Evolutionary aspects of collective motility in pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic bacteria that can use its single polar flagellum to swim through liquids. It can move collectively over semisolid surfaces, a behavior called swarming. It can also settle and form surface-attached communities called biofilms that protect them from antibiotics. The transition from single motility (swimming) to collective motility (swarming) is biologically relevant as it enables exploring environments that a single bacterium cannot explore on its own. It is also clinically relevant since swarming and biofilm formation are thought to be antagonistic. We investigate the mechanisms of bacterial collective motility using a multidisciplinary approach that combines mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and microbial genetics. We aim to identify how these mechanisms may evolve under the selective pressure of population expansion, and consequently reinforce or hinder collective motility. In particular, we clarify the role of growth rate and motility in invasive populations.

  10. Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria

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    Fontes Belchor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes. Methods A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99 mixture, applied for 5min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish. The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1- ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O3/mL for 5 min; 2- 100% oxygen for 5 min; 3- baseline: no gas was used. Results The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups. Conclusion A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  11. EFEITO DO EXTRATO DE SUCUPIRA (Pterodon emarginatus Vog. SOBRE O DESENVOLVIMENTO DE FUNGOS E BACTÉRIAS FITOPATOGÊNICOS EFFECT OF THE SUCUPIRA (Pterodon emarginatus Vog. EXTRACT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PLANT PATHOGENIC FUNGI AND BACTERIA

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    Marcos Gomes da Cunha

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do extrato de favas de sucupira (Pterodon emarginatus sobre o desenvolvimento de fungos e bactérias fitopatogênicos. Na avaliação sobre o desenvolvimento micelial de fungos, o extrato de sucupira e o fungicida tebuconazole reduziram significativamente o crescimento micelial de Alternaria brassicae, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani e Ceratocystis fimbriata. Entretanto, tebuconazole foi significativamente superior ao extrato de sucupira, exceto para o fungo A. brassicae. O índice de eficácia do extrato de sucupira foi de 70%, 74%, 62% e 82% para os fungos A. brassicae, F. oxysporum, R. solani, C. fimbriata, respectivamente. A eficácia do tebuconazole foi de 93,6% para A. brassicae e 100% para os outros fungos. Na avaliação sobre o crescimento de colônias bacterianas, à medida que se aumentou à concentração do extrato de sucupira, a eficiência foi gradativamente aumentada. Contudo, houve inversão do efeito sobre o halo de inibição das colônias no tratamento com 100% do extrato. A alta viscosidade do extrato pode ter afetado negativamente a sua dispersão no meio de cultura (BDA e, conseqüentemente, produzido menor halo de inibição. O extrato de sucupira a 10% foi significativamente o melhor tratamento; entretanto, o mesmo extrato, nas concentrações de 1% e 100%, apresentou redução significativa do desenvolvimento das colônias de Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Xhantomonas campestris pv. campestris e Pseudomonas syringae, em relação à testemunha.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Sucupira; crescimento micelial; fungicida.

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect ";in vitro"; of the sucupira extract (Pterodon emarginatus on plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The sucupira extract was

  12. Tree species effects on pathogen-suppressive capacities of soil bacteria across two tropical dry forests in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklund, Kristen; Powers, Jennifer; Kinkel, Linda

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotic-producing bacteria in the genus Streptomyces can inhibit soil-borne plant pathogens, and have the potential to mediate the impacts of disease on plant communities. Little is known about how antibiotic production varies among soil communities in tropical forests, despite a long history of interest in the role of soil-borne pathogens in these ecosystems. Our objective was to determine how tree species and soils influence variation in antibiotic-mediated pathogen suppression among Streptomyces communities in two tropical dry forest sites (Santa Rosa and Palo Verde). We targeted tree species that co-occur in both sites and used a culture-based functional assay to quantify pathogen-suppressive capacities of Streptomyces communities beneath 50 focal trees. We also measured host-associated litter and soil element concentrations as potential mechanisms by which trees may influence soil microbes. Pathogen-suppressive capacities of Streptomyces communities varied within and among tree species, and inhibitory phenotypes were significantly related to soil and litter element concentrations. Average proportions of inhibitory Streptomyces in soils from the same tree species varied between 1.6 and 3.3-fold between sites. Densities and proportions of pathogen-suppressive bacteria were always higher in Santa Rosa than Palo Verde. Our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in the potential for antibiotic-mediated disease suppression is shaped by tree species, site, and soil characteristics, which could have significant implications for understanding plant community composition and diversity in tropical dry forests.

  13. The xylem as battleground for plant hosts and vascular wilt pathogens

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    Koste eYadeta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular wilts are among the most destructive plant diseases that occur in annual crops as well as in woody perennials. These diseases are generally caused by soil-borne bacteria, fungi and oomycetes that infect through the roots and enter the water-conducting xylem vessels where they proliferate and obstruct the transportation of water and minerals. As a consequence, leaves wilt and die, which may lead to impairment of the whole plant and eventually to death of the plant. Cultural, chemical and biological measures to control this group of plant pathogens are generally ineffective, and the most effective control strategy is the use of genetic resistance. Owing to the fact that vascular wilt pathogens live deep in the interior of their host plants, studies into the biology of vascular pathogens are complicated. However, to design novel strategies to combat vascular wilt diseases, understanding the (molecular biology of vascular pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying plant defense against these pathogens is crucial. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on interactions of vascular wilt pathogens with their host plants, with emphasis on host defense responses against this group of pathogens.

  14. Uncovering plant-pathogen crosstalk through apoplastic proteomic studies

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    Bertrand eDelaunois

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens have evolved by developing different strategies to infect their host, which in turn have elaborated immune responses to counter the pathogen invasion. The apoplast, including the cell wall and extracellular space outside the plasma membrane, is one of the first compartments where pathogen-host interaction occurs. The plant cell wall is composed of a complex network of polysaccharides polymers and glycoproteins and serves as a natural physical barrier against pathogen invasion. The apoplastic fluid, circulating through the cell wall and intercellular spaces, provides a means for delivering molecules and facilitating intercellular communications. Some plant-pathogen interactions lead to plant cell wall degradation allowing pathogens to penetrate into the cells. In turn, the plant immune system recognizes microbial- or damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or DAMPs and initiates a set of basal immune responses, including the strengthening of the plant cell wall. The establishment of defense requires the regulation of a wide variety of proteins that are involved at different levels, from receptor perception of the pathogen via signaling mechanisms to the strengthening of the cell wall or degradation of the pathogen itself. A fine regulation of apoplastic proteins is therefore essential for rapid and effective pathogen perception and for maintaining cell wall integrity. This review aims to provide insight into analyses using proteomic approaches of the apoplast to highlight the modulation of the apoplastic protein patterns during pathogen infection and to unravel the key players involved in plant-pathogen interaction.

  15. Insect pathogenicity in plant-beneficial pseudomonads: phylogenetic distribution and comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flury, Pascale; Aellen, Nora; Ruffner, Beat; Pechy-Tarr, Maria; Fataar, Shakira; Metla, Zane; Dominguez-Ferreras, Ana; Bloemberg, Guido; Frey, Joachim; Goesmann, Alexander; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Duffy, Brion; Hofte, Monica; Blom, Jochen; Smits, Theo H M; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas occupy diverse environments. The Pseudomonas fluorescens group is particularly well-known for its plant-beneficial properties including pathogen suppression. Recent observations that some strains of this group also cause lethal infections in insect larvae, however,

  16. Effects of Ethanolic Ferolagu angulata Extract on Pathogenic Gastrointestinal Bacteria and Probiotic Bacteria in Skimmed Milk Medium

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    Reza Naghiha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:    Due to excessive consumption of synthetic drugs, drug resistance rate of pathogenic bacteria is increasing and there is an ever-increasing need to find new safe compounds to tackle this problem. This study was conducted to investigate the consequences of chavill extract on the growth and viability of gastrointestinal pathogenic bacterium and probiotics bacteria. Methods:    The experiment contained three levels of the chavill extract concentrations (0, 1 and 3% which were added to the milk free fat in accompany with three probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and lactobacillus plantaram and a pathogenic gastrointestinal bacterium (Salmonella typhimurium. Bacterial inoculums (1×107 CFU/ml with different concentrations of chavill extract were added to skimmed milk medium and bacteria growth were enumerated. Results:  The concentration of 1% chavill extract significantly increased the total count of probiotic bacteria compared to the control group, while the number of pathogenic bacteria was decreased. At 3% chavill extract the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantaram were increased. On the other hand, it prevented the growth of Salmonella typhimurium Conclusion:   Chavill extracts would play as an alternative to antibiotics in pharmacological studies to decreases harmful bacteria and increase probiotic bacteria.

  17. Plant expansins in bacteria and fungi: evolution by horizontal gene transfer and independent domain fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Doran, Nicole; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been described as a common mechanism of transferring genetic material between prokaryotes, whereas genetic transfers from eukaryotes to prokaryotes have been rarely documented. Here we report a rare case of HGT in which plant expansin genes that code for plant cell-wall loosening proteins were transferred from plants to bacteria, fungi, and amoebozoa. In several cases, the species in which the expansin gene was found is either in intimate association with plants or is a known plant pathogen. Our analyses suggest that at least two independent genetic transfers occurred from plants to bacteria and fungi. These events were followed by multiple HGT events within bacteria and fungi. We have also observed that in bacteria expansin genes have been independently fused to DNA fragments that code for an endoglucanase domain or for a carbohydrate binding module, pointing to functional convergence at the molecular level. Furthermore, the functional similarities between microbial expansins and their plant xenologs suggest that these proteins mediate microbial-plant interactions by altering the plant cell wall and therefore may provide adaptive advantages to these species. The evolution of these nonplant expansins represents a unique case in which bacteria and fungi have found innovative and adaptive ways to interact with and infect plants by acquiring genes from their host. This evolutionary paradigm suggests that despite their low frequency such HGT events may have significantly contributed to the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species.

  18. Monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria from livestock animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, Jürgen

    2006-06-01

    Facing the problem of development and spreading of bacterial resistance, preventive strategies are considered the most appropriate means to counteract. The establishment of corresponding management options relies on scientifically defensible efforts to obtain objective data on the prevalence of bacterial resistance in healthy and diseased livestock. Additionally, detailed statistics are needed on the overall amount of antimicrobial agents dispensed in Germany. The collection of valid data on the prevalence of resistance requires representative and cross-sectional studies. The German national antimicrobial resistance monitoring of the Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) determines the current quantitative resistance level of life-stock pathogens, in order to permit the evaluation and surveillance of the distribution of resistances on a valid basis. Essential key features determining the design of these studies comprise (1) a statistically valid sampling program. This incorporates regional differences in animal population density, (2) the avoidance of "copy strains", (3) testing of no more than two bacterial strains belonging to one species per herd, (4) testing only if no antimicrobial therapy preceded sample collection, and (5) the use of standardized methods [e.g. microdilution broth method to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC)]. The analysis and interpretation of this data permits reliable identification and definition of epidemiological characteristics of resistance and its development in animal associated bacteria, such as geographically and time wise differentiated profiles on its prevalence, the emergence of unknown phenotypes of resistance and an assessment of the threat resistant bacteria from animals pose for humans. In applied antimicrobial therapy, the data can serve as a decision guidance in choosing the antimicrobial agent most adapted to the prevailing epidemiological situation. The susceptibility testing

  19. Isolation of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria from carpets of mosques in Tripoli, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahouma, Amal; Elghamoudi, Abdunabi; Nashnoush, Halima; Belhaj, Khalifa; Tawil, Khaled; Sifaw Ghenghesh, Khalifa

    2010-01-01

    Objective Isolation of potentially pathogenic bacteria from carpets in hospitals has been reported earlier, but not from carpets in mosques. The aim of the present study is to determine the pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria that may exist on the carpets of mosques in Tripoli, Libya. Methods Dust samples from carpets were collected from 57 mosques in Tripoli. Samples were examined for pathogenic bacteria using standard bacteriological procedures. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to antimicrobial agents was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results Of dust samples examined, Salmonella spp. was detected in two samples (3.5%, 1 in group B and 1 in group C1), Escherichia coli in 16 samples (28.1%), Aeromonas spp. in one sample (1.8%), and Staphylococcus aureus in 12 samples (21.1%). Multiple drug resistance was observed in >16.7% of E. coli and in 25% of S. aureus. Conclusion Contamination of carpets in mosques of Tripoli with antibiotic-resistant pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria may pose a health risk to worshipers, particularly, the very young, the old and the immunecompromised. Worshipers are encouraged to use personal praying mats when praying in mosques. PMID:21483559

  20. In Vitro Studies of Chromone-Tetrazoles against Pathogenic Protozoa, Bacteria, and Fungi

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    Pedro A. Cano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies to fourteen previously synthesized chromone-tetrazoles and four novel fluorine-containing analogs were conducted against pathogenic protozoan (Entamoeba histolytica, pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and human fungal pathogens (Sporothrix schenckii, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis, which have become in a serious health problem, mainly in tropical countries.

  1. In Vitro Studies of Chromone-Tetrazoles against Pathogenic Protozoa, Bacteria, and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Pedro A; Islas-Jácome, Alejandro; Rangel-Serrano, Ángeles; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Martínez-Richa, Antonio; Gámez-Montaño, Rocío

    2015-07-08

    In vitro studies to fourteen previously synthesized chromone-tetrazoles and four novel fluorine-containing analogs were conducted against pathogenic protozoan (Entamoeba histolytica), pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus), and human fungal pathogens (Sporothrix schenckii, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis), which have become in a serious health problem, mainly in tropical countries.

  2. [Advances in humans and animals opportunistic pathogens from environment infecting plants by crossing kingdoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Wu, Yixin; He, Pengfei

    2016-02-04

    Some pathogenic microorganisms ubiquitous in the environment could cross kingdoms to infect diverse hosts. Several cross-kingdom human pathogens were summarized in this paper, including Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeuriginosa. They are ubiquitous in the nature and could cause plant diseases using the same or different infection strategies with which they infect humans and broaden host range. Among these bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae causes top rot disease of maize in the nature, revealing some plants in the environment could serve as a reservoir of various pathogens which might infect animals and probably humans when conditions are favorable, and even potentially harm food. Research on these cross-kingdom pathogens may play a very important role in the epidemiology of human, animal and plant diseases and be a hot topic in environment science.

  3. Understanding the plant-pathogen interactions in the context of proteomics-generated apoplastic proteins inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Lee, So Eui; Agrawal, Ganesh K; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sangryeol; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Sun T

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular space between cell wall and plasma membrane acts as the first battle field between plants and pathogens. Bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes that colonize the living plant tissues are encased in this narrow region in the initial step of infection. Therefore, the apoplastic region is believed to be an interface which mediates the first crosstalk between host and pathogen. The secreted proteins and other metabolites, derived from both host and pathogen, interact in this apoplastic region and govern the final relationship between them. Hence, investigation of protein secretion and apoplastic interaction could provide a better understanding of plant-microbe interaction. Here, we are briefly discussing the methods available for the isolation and normalization of the apoplastic proteins, as well as the current state of secretome studies focused on the in-planta interaction between the host and the pathogen.

  4. Diversity of honey stores and their impact on pathogenic bacteria of the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Silvio; Denner, Andreas; Bobiş, Otilia; Forsgren, Eva; Moritz, Robin F A

    2014-10-01

    Honeybee colonies offer an excellent environment for microbial pathogen development. The highest virulent, colony killing, bacterial agents are Paenibacillus larvae causing American foulbrood (AFB), and European foulbrood (EFB) associated bacteria. Besides the innate immune defense, honeybees evolved behavioral defenses to combat infections. Foraging of antimicrobial plant compounds plays a key role for this "social immunity" behavior. Secondary plant metabolites in floral nectar are known for their antimicrobial effects. Yet, these compounds are highly plant specific, and the effects on bee health will depend on the floral origin of the honey produced. As worker bees not only feed themselves, but also the larvae and other colony members, honey is a prime candidate acting as self-medication agent in honeybee colonies to prevent or decrease infections. Here, we test eight AFB and EFB bacterial strains and the growth inhibitory activity of three honey types. Using a high-throughput cell growth assay, we show that all honeys have high growth inhibitory activity and the two monofloral honeys appeared to be strain specific. The specificity of the monofloral honeys and the strong antimicrobial potential of the polyfloral honey suggest that the diversity of honeys in the honey stores of a colony may be highly adaptive for its "social immunity" against the highly diverse suite of pathogens encountered in nature. This ecological diversity may therefore operate similar to the well-known effects of host genetic variance in the arms race between host and parasite.

  5. Evolution and genome architecture in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Mareike; Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2017-08-07

    The fungal kingdom comprises some of the most devastating plant pathogens. Sequencing the genomes of fungal pathogens has shown a remarkable variability in genome size and architecture. Population genomic data enable us to understand the mechanisms and the history of changes in genome size and adaptive evolution in plant pathogens. Although transposable elements predominantly have negative effects on their host, fungal pathogens provide prominent examples of advantageous associations between rapidly evolving transposable elements and virulence genes that cause variation in virulence phenotypes. By providing homogeneous environments at large regional scales, managed ecosystems, such as modern agriculture, can be conducive for the rapid evolution and dispersal of pathogens. In this Review, we summarize key examples from fungal plant pathogen genomics and discuss evolutionary processes in pathogenic fungi in the context of molecular evolution, population genomics and agriculture.

  6. Mutualism versus pathogenesis: the give-and-take in plant-bacteria interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, María J; Domínguez-Ferreras, Ana; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan; Olivares, José

    2009-03-01

    Pathogenic bacteria and mutualistic rhizobia are able to invade and establish chronic infections within their host plants. The success of these plant-bacteria interactions requires evasion of the plant innate immunity by either avoiding recognition or by suppressing host defences. The primary plant innate immunity is triggered upon recognition of common microbe-associated molecular patterns. Different studies reveal striking similarities between the molecular bases underlying the perception of rhizobial nodulation factors and microbe-associated molecular patterns from plant pathogens. However, in contrast to general elicitors, nodulation factors can control plant defences when recognized by their cognate legumes. Nevertheless, in response to rhizobial infection, legumes show transient or local defence-like responses suggesting that Rhizobium is perceived as an intruder although the plant immunity is controlled. Whether these responses are involved in limiting the number of infections or whether they are required for the progression of the interaction is not yet clear. Further similarities in both plant-pathogen and Rhizobium-legume associations are factors such as surface polysaccharides, quorum sensing signals and secreted proteins, which play important roles in modulating plant defence responses and determining the outcome of the interactions.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of yeasts against some pathogenic bacteria

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    Gamal Younis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to isolate and identify yeast species from milk and meat products, and to test their antimicrobial activity against some bacterial species. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 milk and meat products samples were collected from random sellers and super markets in New Damietta city, Damietta, Egypt. Samples were subjected to yeast isolation procedures and tested for its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. In addition, all yeast species isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of khs (kievitone hydratase and pelA (pectate degrading enzyme genes. Results: The recovery rate of yeasts from sausage was 20% (2/10 followed by kareish cheese, processed cheese, and butter 10% (1/10 each as well as raw milk 9% (9/100, and fruit yoghurt 30% (6/20. Different yeast species were recovered, namely, Candida kefyr (5 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4 isolates, Candida intermedia (3 isolates, Candida tropicalis (2 isolates, Candida lusitaniae (2 isolates, and Candida krusei (1 isolate. khs gene was detected in all S. cerevisiae isolates, however, pelA gene was not detected in all identified yeast species. Antimicrobial activity of recovered yeasts against the selected bacterial species showed high activity with C. intermedia against S. aureus and E. coli, C. kefyr against E. coli, and C. lusitaniae against S. aureus. Moderate activities were obtained with C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and S. cerevisiae against E. coli; meanwhile, all the tested yeasts revealed a very low antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The obtained results confirmed that some kinds of yeasts have the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds that could inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria and these antimicrobial activity of yeasts enables them to be one of the novel agents in controlling spoilage of food.

  8. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracell

  9. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the

  10. The top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens that threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant pathogenic oomycete taxa based on scientific and economic importance. In total, ...

  11. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracell

  12. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamoun, Sophien; Furzer, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D G; Judelson, Howard S; Ali, Gul Shad; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Roy, Sanjoy Guha; Schena, Leonardo; Zambounis, Antonios; Panabières, Franck; Cahill, David; Ruocco, Michelina; Figueiredo, Andreia; Chen, Xiao-Ren; Hulvey, Jon; Stam, Remco; Lamour, Kurt; Gijzen, Mark; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Tomé, Daniel F A; Tör, Mahmut; Van Den Ackerveken, Guido; McDowell, John; Daayf, Fouad; Fry, William E; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele; Meijer, Harold J G; Petre, Benjamin; Ristaino, Jean; Yoshida, Kentaro; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens which threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant-pathogenic oomycete species based on scientific and economic importance. In tot

  13. Against friend and foe: type 6 effectors in plant-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial secretion systems play critical roles in communication with neighboring bacteria and in the modulation of host immune responses via the secretion of small proteins called effectors. Several secretion systems have been identified and these are denoted types I-VII. Of these, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) and its effectors were only recently elucidated. Most studies on the role and significance of the T6SS and its effectors have focused on human pathogens. In this review, type 6 effectors from plant-associated beneficial and pathogenic bacteria are discussed, including effectors from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Dickeya dadanti, Rhizobium leguminosarum, Pectobacterium atroseptium, Ralstonia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas protegens. Type 6 effectors act in symbiosis, biofilm formation, virulence, and interbacterial competition. Understanding the impact of type 6 effectors on pathogenesis will contribute to the management of bacterial pathogens in crop plants by allowing the manipulation of intra and inter-specific interactions.

  14. The Venturia Apple Pathosystem: Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Plant Defense Responses

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    Gopaljee Jha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed.

  15. Methylobacterium-induced endophyte community changes correspond with protection of plants against pathogen attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardanov, Pavlo; Sessitsch, Angela; Häggman, Hely; Kozyrovska, Natalia; Pirttilä, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Plant inoculation with endophytic bacteria that normally live inside the plant without harming the host is a highly promising approach for biological disease control. The mechanism of resistance induction by beneficial bacteria is poorly understood, because pathways are only partly known and systemic responses are typically not seen. The innate endophytic community structures change in response to external factors such as inoculation, and bacterial endophytes can exhibit direct or indirect antagonism towards pathogens. Earlier we showed that resistance induction by an endophytic Methylobacterium sp. in potato towards Pectobacterium atrosepticum was dependent on the density of the inoculum, whereas the bacterium itself had no antagonistic activity. To elucidate the role of innate endophyte communities in plant responses, we studied community changes in both in vitro and greenhouse experiments using various combinations of plants, endophyte inoculants, and pathogens. Induction of resistance was studied in several potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars by Methylobacterium sp. IMBG290 against the pathogens P. atrosepticum, Phytophthora infestans and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and in pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) by M. extorquens DSM13060 against Gremmeniella abietina. The capacities of the inoculated endophytic Methylobacterium spp. strains to induce resistance were dependent on the plant cultivar, pathogen, and on the density of Methylobacterium spp. inoculum. Composition of the endophyte community changed in response to inoculation in shoot tissues and correlated with resistance or susceptibility to the disease. Our results demonstrate that endophytic Methylobacterium spp. strains have varying effects on plant disease resistance, which can be modulated through the endophyte community of the host.

  16. Plant-bacteria interactions in the removal of pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2013-06-01

    Rhizoremediation surged in popularity among scientist as an attractive strategy because plant roots provide a rich niche for bacteria to grow at the expense of root exudates; in turn bacteria act as biocatalysts that remove pollutants. The complexity of the beneficial relationships between plants and bacteria is an exciting area of research which has shown steady progress in the last decade. Despite the advances in the field, specific aspects of the interactions between contaminant-degrading rhizobacteria and plants are still unknown; including the expression of degradation genes in the rhizosphere, the influence of horizontal gene transfer in rhizoremediation, and the possibilities of the selection of specific bacteria by plant rhizosphere. We discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the plant-bacteria interactions during rhizoremediation of organic compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Preliminary Phytochemical Screening of Moringa oleifera on Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogah James Ode

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of higher plants and their extracts to treat infections is an old practice in traditional African medicine. However, scientific research has shown that bioactive compounds in plants are valuable medically in the treatment of infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms. This research work is aimed to evaluate the antibacterial potential of Moringa oleifera extracts on standard microorganisms strains as well as multi-drug resistant strains of medical importance. Acetone, aqueous, ethanol and chloroform extracts of bark, leaves and seeds of Moringa oleifera were investigated for antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. The preliminary phytochemical screening and antibacterial assay were carried out using chemicals and agar well diffusion method respectively. The results of phytochemicals analysis revealed differences in the presence of alkaloids, reducing sugars, saponins and volatile oil in all the extracts. Tannins were present in the extract of leaves while terpenes were present in the extract of bark and leaves. Phlobatannins and flavonoids were absent in all the extracts. The antibacterial assay results showed that M. oleifera extracts exhibited broad spectrum activity against four to six bacteria isolates as indicated by the zone of inhibition ranging from 10 to 36mm with variation in the percentage sensitivity of < 100%, = 100% and >100% depending on the plant part and solvent used. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and bactericidal concentration (MBC ranged from 100mg/ml to 450mg/ml and 250mg/ml to 500mg/ml respectively against the isolates used. Standard antibiotic disc (Ofloxacin- 5μg inhibited the growth of all the tested bacteria isolates except P. mirabilis. The results of this research work showed that M. oleifera has great potential as antibacterial compounds against Gram

  18. Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R; Dukovcic, Stephanie R; Dierksen, Karen P; Carlyle, Calvin A; Caldwell, Bruce A; Trempy, Janine E

    2008-09-01

    Cell-based biosensors have been proposed for use as function-based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food-associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food-associated pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Erythrophore cell response to food‐associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R.; Dukovcic, Stephanie R.; Dierksen, Karen P.; Carlyle, Calvin A.; Caldwell, Bruce A.; Trempy, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cell‐based biosensors have been proposed for use as function‐based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food‐associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non‐pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non‐pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food‐associated pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21261862

  20. Bacteria isolated from parasitic nematodes--a potential novel vector of pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Salisbury, Vyv; Humphrey, Tom J; Stafford, Kathryn; Perkins, Sarah E

    2009-12-21

    Bacterial pathogens are ubiquitous in soil and water - concurrently so are free-living helminths that feed on bacteria. These helminths fall into two categories; the non-parasitic and the parasitic. The former have been the focus of previous work, finding that bacterial pathogens inside helminths are conferred survival advantages over and above bacteria alone in the environment, and that accidental ingestion of non-parasitic helminths can cause systemic infection in vertebrate hosts. Here, we determine the potential for bacteria to be associated with parasitic helminths. After culturing helminths from fecal samples obtained from livestock the external bacteria were removed. Two-hundred parasitic helminths from three different species were homogenised and the bacteria that were internal to the helminths were isolated and cultured. Eleven different bacterial isolates were found; of which eight were indentified. The bacteria identified included known human and cattle pathogens. We concluded that bacteria of livestock can be isolated in parasitic helminths and that this suggests a mechanism by which bacteria, pathogenic or otherwise, can be transmitted between individuals. The potential for helminths to play a role as pathogen vectors poses a potential livestock and human health risk. Further work is required to assess the epidemiological impact of this finding.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of development and pathogenesis in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Akanksha; Jeon, Junhyun

    2017-08-01

    Evidently, epigenetics is at forefront in explaining the mechanisms underlying the success of human pathogens and in the identification of pathogen-induced modifications within host plants. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting the role of epigenetics in the modulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. In this review, we attempt to highlight and discuss the role of epigenetics in the regulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal phytopathogens using Magnaporthe oryzae, a devastating fungal plant pathogen, as a model system. With the perspective of wide application in the understanding of the development, pathogenesis and control of other fungal pathogens, we attempt to provide a synthesized view of the epigenetic studies conducted on M. oryzae to date. First, we discuss the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications in M. oryzae and their impact on fungal development and pathogenicity. Second, we highlight the unexplored epigenetic mechanisms and areas of research that should be considered in the near future to construct a holistic view of epigenetic functioning in M. oryzae and other fungal plant pathogens. Importantly, the development of a complete understanding of the modulation of epigenetic regulation in fungal pathogens can help in the identification of target points to combat fungal pathogenesis. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  2. Gorilla gorilla gorilla gut: a potential reservoir of pathogenic bacteria as revealed using culturomics and molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Fadi; Keita, Mamadou B; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric; Raoult, Didier

    2014-11-24

    Wild apes are considered to be the most serious reservoir and source of zoonoses. However, little data are available about the gut microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in gorillas. For this propose, a total of 48 fecal samples obtained from 21 Gorilla gorilla gorilla individuals (as revealed via microsatellite analysis) were screened for human bacterial pathogens using culturomics and molecular techniques. By applying culturomics to one index gorilla and using specific media supplemented by plants, we tested 12,800 colonies and identified 147 different bacterial species, including 5 new species. Many opportunistic pathogens were isolated, including 8 frequently associated with human diseases; Mycobacterium bolletii, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium botulinum. The genus Treponema accounted for 27.4% of the total reads identified at the genus level via 454 pyrosequencing. Using specific real-time PCR on 48 gorilla fecal samples, in addition to classical human pathogens, we also observed the fastidious bacteria Bartonella spp. Borrelia spp., Coxiella burnetii and Tropheryma whipplei in the gorilla population. We estimated that the prevalence of these pathogens vary between 4.76% and 85.7%. Therefore, gorillas share many bacterial pathogens with humans suggesting that they could be a reservoir for their emergence.

  3. Abundance of sewage-pollution indicator and human pathogenic bacteria in a tropical estuarine complex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagvenkar, G.S.; Ramaiah, N.

    Studies on abundance and types of various pollution indicator bacterial populations from tropical estuaries are rare. This study was aimed to estimate current levels of pollution indicator as well as many groups of human pathogenic bacteria...

  4. Aerobic pathogenic bacteria in post-operative wounds at the Moi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-02

    Dec 2, 2002 ... urease, coagulase, triple sugar iron). Disc diffusion ... Results: Staphylococcus aureus species were the most common pathogenic bacteria isolated from the .... inhibition diameter was measured using a transparent ruler and ...

  5. Signatures of Conformational Stability and Oxidation Resistance in Proteomes of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Vidovic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein oxidation is known to compromise vital cellular functions. Therefore, invading pathogenic bacteria must resist damage inflicted by host defenses via reactive oxygen species. Using comparative genomics and experimental approaches, we provide multiple lines of evidence that proteins from pathogenic bacteria have acquired resistance to oxidative stress by an increased conformational stability. Representative pathogens exhibited higher survival upon HSP90 inhibition and a less-oxidation-prone proteome. A proteome signature of the 46 pathogenic bacteria encompasses 14 physicochemical features related to increasing protein conformational stability. By purifying ten representative proteins, we demonstrate in vitro that proteins with a pathogen-like signature are more resistant to oxidative stress as a consequence of their increased conformational stability. A compositional signature of the pathogens’ proteomes allowed the design of protein fragments more resilient to both unfolding and carbonylation, validating the relationship between conformational stability and oxidability with implications for synthetic biology and antimicrobial strategies.

  6. Reinforcing effects of non-pathogenic bacteria and predation risk: from physiology to life history

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2014-01-01

    The important ecological role of predation risk in shaping populations, communities and ecosystems is becoming increasingly clear. In this context, synergistic effects between predation risk and other natural stressors on prey organisms are gaining attention. Although non-pathogenic bacteria can be widespread in aquatic ecosystems their role in mediating effects of predation risk has been ignored. We here address the hypothesis that non-pathogenic bacteria may reinforce the negative effects o...

  7. Antibacterial activity of some medicinal mangroves against antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeysinghe P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of the leaves and bark of mangrove plants, Avicennia marina, A. officinalis, Bruguiera sexangula, Exoecaria agallocha, Lumnitzera racemosa, and Rhizophora apiculata was evaluated against antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus sp. Soxhlet extracts of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol and water were prepared and evaluated the antibacterial activity using agar diffusion method. Most of the plant extracts showed promising antibacterial activity against both bacterial species. However, higher antibacterial activity was observed for Staphylococcus aureus than Proteus sp. The highest antibacterial activity was shown by ethyl acetate of mature leaf extracts of E. agallocha for Staphylococcus aureus. All ethyl acetate extracts showed higher inhibition against S. aureus while some extracts of chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanol gave inhibition against Proteus sp. None of the petroleum ether and aqueous extracts showed inhibition against Proteus sp. All fresh plant materials did also show more antibacterial activity against both bacterial strains than did dried plant extracts. Antibacterial activity of fresh and dried plant materials reduced for both bacterial strains with time after extraction. Since L. racemosa and A. marina gave the best inhibition for bacterial species, they were used for further investigations. Charcoal treated plant extracts of L. racemosa and A. marina were able to inhibit both bacterial strains more than those of untreated plant extracts. Phytochemical screening of mature leaf, bark of L. racemosa and leaf extracts of A. marina has been carried out and revealed that leaf and bark contained alkaloids, steroids, triterpenoids and flavonoids. None of the above extracts indicate the presence of saponins and cardiac glycosides. Separated bands of extracts by TLC analysis showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  8. A systems biology perspective on plant-microbe interactions: biochemical and structural targets of pathogen effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Leighton; Birch, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Plants have biochemical defences against stresses from predators, parasites and pathogens. In this review we discuss the interaction of plant defences with microbial pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and oomycetes, and viruses. We examine principles of complex dynamic networks that allow identification of network components that are differentially and predictably sensitive to perturbation, thus making them likely effector targets. We relate these principles to recent developments in our understanding of known effector targets in plant-pathogen systems, and propose a systems-level framework for the interpretation and modelling of host-microbe interactions mediated by effectors. We describe this framework briefly, and conclude by discussing useful experimental approaches for populating this framework.

  9. Evolution of temperate pathogens: the bacteriophage/bacteria paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Arthur L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taking as a pattern, the T4 and lambda viruses interacting with each other and with their Gram-negative host, Escherichia coli, a general model is constructed for the evolution of 'gentle' or temperate pathogens. This model is not simply either pure group or kin selection, but probably is common in a variety of host-parasite pairs in various taxonomic groups. The proposed mechanism is that for its own benefit the pathogen evolved ways to protect its host from attack by other pathogens and this has incidentally protected the host. Although appropriate mechanisms would have been developed and excluded related viral species and also other quite different pathogens, the important advance would have been when other individuals of the same species that arrive at the host subsequent to the first infecting one were excluded. Results Such a class of mechanisms would not compete one genotype with another, but simply would be of benefit to the first pathogen that had attacked a host organism. Conclusion This would tend to protect and extend the life of the host against the detrimental effects of a secondarily infecting pathogen. This leads to the pathogens becoming more temperate via the now favorable co-evolution with its host, which basically protects both host and virus against other pathogens but may cause slowing of the growth of the primary infecting pathogen. Evolution by a 'gentle' strategy would be favored as long as the increased wellbeing of the host also favored the eventual transmission of the early infecting pathogen to other hosts.

  10. Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-bacteria associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Birgit E; Hynes, Michael F; Alexandre, Gladys M

    2016-04-01

    Beneficial plant-microbe associations play critical roles in plant health. Bacterial chemotaxis provides a competitive advantage to motile flagellated bacteria in colonization of plant root surfaces, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of beneficial associations. Chemotaxis signaling enables motile soil bacteria to sense and respond to gradients of chemical compounds released by plant roots. This process allows bacteria to actively swim towards plant roots and is thus critical for competitive root surface colonization. The complete genome sequences of several plant-associated bacterial species indicate the presence of multiple chemotaxis systems and a large number of chemoreceptors. Further, most soil bacteria are motile and capable of chemotaxis, and chemotaxis-encoding genes are enriched in the bacteria found in the rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. This review compares the architecture and diversity of chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-associated bacteria and discusses their relevance to the rhizosphere lifestyle. While it is unclear how controlling chemotaxis via multiple parallel chemotaxis systems provides a competitive advantage to certain bacterial species, the presence of a larger number of chemoreceptors is likely to contribute to the ability of motile bacteria to survive in the soil and to compete for root surface colonization.

  11. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eDing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed.

  12. Presence of Pathogenic Bacteria and Viruses in the Daycare Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, Tobias; Engelund, Eva Hoy; Permin, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    The number of children in daycare centers (DCCs) is rising. This increases exposure to microorganisms and infectious diseases. Little is known about which bacteria and viruses are present in the DCC environment and where they are located. In the study described in this article, the authors set out...... pillows, toys, and tables, among other things. Coliform bacteria were primarily found in the toilet and kitchen areas whereas nasopharyngeal bacteria were found mostly on toys and fabric surfaces in the playroom. Respiratory viruses were omnipresent in the DCC environment, especially on the toys....

  13. A mathematical model for expected time to extinction of pathogenic bacteria through antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Nandi, S.; Roy, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Application of antibiotics in human system to prevent bacterial diseases like Gastritis, Ulcers, Meningitis, Pneumonia and Gonorrhea are indispensable. Antibiotics saved innumerable lives and continue to be a strong support for therapeutic application against pathogenic bacteria. In human system, bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria gets into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria. In this process, immature bacteria releases enzyme which is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. After complete formation of cell wall, immature bacteria are converted to mature or virulent bacteria which are harmful to us during bacterial infections. Use of antibiotics as drug inhibits the bacterial cell wall formation. After application of antibiotics within body, the released bacterial enzyme binds with antibiotic molecule instead of its functional site during the cell wall synthesis in a competitive inhibition approach. As a consequence, the bacterial cell-wall formation as well as maturation process of pathogenic bacteria is halted and the disease is cured with lysis of bacterial cells. With this idea, a mathematical model has been developed in the present research investigation to review the inhibition of biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall by the application of antibiotics as drug in the light of enzyme kinetics. This approach helps to estimate the expected time to extinction of the pathogenic bacteria. Our mathematical approach based on the enzyme kinetic model for finding out expected time to extinction contributes favorable results for understanding of disease dynamics. Analytical and numerical results based on simulated findings validate our mathematical model.

  14. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Megacities as Sources for Pathogenic Bacteria in Rivers and Their Fate Downstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Rainer Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor sanitation, poor treatments of waste water, as well as catastrophic floods introduce pathogenic bacteria into rivers, infecting and killing many people. The goal of clean water for everyone has to be achieved with a still growing human population and their rapid concentration in large cities, often megacities. How long introduced pathogens survive in rivers and what their niches are remain poorly known but essential to control water-borne diseases in megacities. Biofilms are often niches for various pathogens because they possess high resistances against environmental stress. They also facilitate gene transfers of antibiotic resistance genes which become an increasing health problem. Beside biofilms, amoebae are carriers of pathogenic bacteria and niches for their survival. An overview about our current understanding of the fate and niches of pathogens in rivers, the multitude of microbial community interactions, and the impact of severe flooding, a prerequisite to control pathogens in polluted rivers, is given.

  16. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemencia M Rojas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area.

  17. The cuticle and plant defense to pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre eMetraux

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle provides a physical barrier against water loss and protects against irradiation, xenobiotics and pathogens. Components of the cuticle are perceived by invading fungi and activate developmental processes during pathogenesis. In addition, cuticle alterations of various types induce a syndrome of reactions that often results in resistance to necrotrophs. This article reviews the current knowledge on the role of the cuticle in relation to the perception of pathogens and activation of defenses.

  18. The specificationof nano-structure superficial layers in some of the pathogen bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilla Jalalpoor

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The superficial layer is a part of the cellular envelop that is seen in bacteria and archaea. This superficial layer is a single layer structure composed of subordinate proteins or glycoproteins. The superficial layer is the outer most cellular structure that is in the exchange and reaction around environment with bacteria. This structure has very diversity in bacteria different types.Materials and Method: The related articles to superficial layer were extracted of these articles: Pubmed, Elsevier Science, and Yahoo, from 1995 to 2010 years. For this purpose keywords were searched including superficial layer, pathogenesis, pathogen bacteria,Results: There is consensus in the case of the superficial layer and about the existence of this superficial structure lead to increased pathogenesis in bacteria, in all of the research articles.Conclusion: S-layers in pathogen bacteria with bacteria protection against bacteriophages and phagocytosis, resistance against low pH, adhesion, stabilisation of the membrane and providing adhesion sites for exoproteins caused pathogenesis, infection resistant and antibiotic resistant in host.The result of this study shows the prevalence of considerable S-layer in pathogen bacteria and this matter identified the bacteria generator importance of this structure in the laboratory

  19. Recent developments in pathogen detection arrays: implications for fungal plant pathogens and use in practica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, B.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The failure to adequately identify plant pathogens from culture-based morphological techniques has led to the development of culture-independent molecular approaches. Increasingly, diagnostic laboratories are pursuing fast routine methods that provide reliable identification, sensitive detection, an

  20. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZy

  1. Diaporthe: a genus of endophytic, saprobic and plant pathogenic fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, R.R.; Glienke, C.; Videira, S.I.R.; Lombard, L.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Diaporthe (Phomopsis) species have often been reported as plant pathogens, non-pathogenic endophytes or saprobes, commonly isolated from a wide range of hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to resolve the taxonomy and phylogeny of a large collection of Diaporthe species occurring on diver

  2. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinab Mohsenipour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobroth dilution technique. Anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to disc diffusion test (MIC and MBC, the ability of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts for inhibition of bacteria in planktonic form was confirmed. In dealing with biofilm structures, the inhibitory effect of the extracts was directly correlated to their concentration. Except for the inhibition of biofilm formation, efficacy of each extract was independent from type of solvent. Conclusion: According to the potential of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts to inhibit the test bacteria in planktonic and biofilm form, it can be suggested that Thymus vulgaris(T. vulgaris extracts can be applied as antimicrobial agents against the pathogenic bacteria particularly in biofilm forms.

  3. Genome comparison of the epiphytic bacteria Erwinia billingiae and E. tasmaniensis with the pear pathogen E. pyrifoliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhl Heiner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Erwinia includes plant-associated pathogenic and non-pathogenic Enterobacteria. Important pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight and E. pyrifoliae causing bacterial shoot blight of pear in Asia belong to this genus. The species E. tasmaniensis and E. billingiae are epiphytic bacteria and may represent antagonists for biocontrol of fire blight. The presence of genes that are putatively involved in virulence in E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae is of special interest for these species in consequence. Results Here we provide the complete genome sequences of the pathogenic E. pyrifoliae strain Ep1/96 with a size of 4.1 Mb and of the non-pathogenic species E. billingiae strain Eb661 with a size of 5.4 Mb, de novo determined by conventional Sanger sequencing and next generation sequencing techniques. Genome comparison reveals large inversions resulting from homologous recombination events. Furthermore, comparison of deduced proteins highlights a relation of E. billingiae strain Eb661 to E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 and a distance to E. pyrifoliae for the overall gene content as well as for the presence of encoded proteins representing virulence factors for the pathogenic species. Pathogenicity of E. pyrifoliae is supposed to have evolved by accumulation of potential virulence factors. E. pyrifoliae carries factors for type III secretion and cell invasion. Other genes described as virulence factors for E. amylovora are involved in the production of exopolysaccharides, the utilization of plant metabolites such as sorbitol and sucrose. Some virulence-associated genes of the pathogenic species are present in E. tasmaniensis but mostly absent in E. billingiae. Conclusion The data of the genome analyses correspond to the pathogenic lifestyle of E. pyrifoliae and underlines the epiphytic localization of E. tasmaniensis and E. billingiae as a saprophyte.

  4. Plant defenses against parasitic plants show similarities to those induced by herbivores and pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin B. Runyon; Mark C. Mescher; Consuelo M. De Moraes

    2010-01-01

    Herbivores and pathogens come quickly to mind when one thinks of the biotic challenges faced by plants. Important but less appreciated enemies are parasitic plants, which can have important consequences for the fitness and survival of their hosts. Our knowledge of plant perception, signaling and response to herbivores and pathogens has expanded rapidly in recent years...

  5. Antibacterial Effects of (Mentha X Piperita L. Hydroalcoholic Extract on the Six Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zandi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Iran is the richest country in terms of distribution of medicinal plants. The antimicrobial effect of plant extracts and essential oils is well known and they are used as a good substitute in food industry to control food-borne pathogens. Due to the antibacterial activity of plant extracts and their efficacy against microorganisms, the aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of peppermint extract in order to control pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Piperita L., which is one of the species of mint; was used in this invitro-experimental study. The extraction was performed by percolation method. Well - agar method was used for antibacterial effects of extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC were done for six standard bacteria using microdilution method. The test was performed 3 times for each bacterium. Data were analyzed by using SPSS version 16 and t-test. Results: The lowest MIC of peppermint extract on examined microorganisms were observed for Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis (3.25 mg/ ml. Also the maximum diameter of inhibition zone, was related to Staphylococcus aureus (32 mm. Conclusion: Results of this study indicated that peppermint extract has a favorable control effect on the growth of food borne pathogens, which can be used as a perfect preservative for keeping food.

  6. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination) and chromatin r...

  7. Antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria in transgenic plant fields

    OpenAIRE

    Demaneche, S.; Sanguin, H.; Pote, J.; Navarro, Elisabeth; Bernillon, D.; Mavingui, P.; Wildi, W.; Vogel, T M; Simonet, P

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the prevalence and polymorphism of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria and their potential to be transferred horizontally is required to evaluate the likelihood and ecological (and possibly clinical) consequences of the transfer of these genes from transgenic plants to soil bacteria. In this study, we combined culture-dependent and -independent approaches to study the prevalence and diversity of bla genes in soil bacteria and the potential impact that a 110-successive-y...

  8. Antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria in transgenic plant fields

    OpenAIRE

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Sanguin, Hervé; Poté, John; Navarro, Elisabeth; Bernillon, Dominique; Mavingui, Patrick; Wildi, Walter; Vogel, Timothy M.; Simonet, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the prevalence and polymorphism of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria and their potential to be transferred horizontally is required to evaluate the likelihood and ecological (and possibly clinical) consequences of the transfer of these genes from transgenic plants to soil bacteria. In this study, we combined culture-dependent and -independent approaches to study the prevalence and diversity of bla genes in soil bacteria and the potential impact that a 10-successive-ye...

  9. Antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria in transgenic plant fields

    OpenAIRE

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Sanguin, Hervé; Poté, John; Navarro, Elisabeth; Bernillon, Dominique; Mavingui, Patrick; Wildi, Walter; Vogel, Timothy,; Simonet, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the prevalence and polymorphism of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria and their potential to be transferred horizontally is required to evaluate the likelihood and ecological (and possibly clinical) consequences of the transfer of these genes from transgenic plants to soil bacteria. In this study, we combined culture-dependent and -independent approaches to study the prevalence and diversity of bla genes in soil bacteria and the potential impact that a 10-successive-y...

  10. Engineered resistance against fungal plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honée, G.

    1999-01-01

    Development of genetic engineering technology and molecular characterization of plant defense responses have provided strategies for controlling plant diseases additional to those based on chemical control or classical breeding programs. Most of these alternative strategies are based on the overprod

  11. Frost-related dieback of Swedish and Estonian Salix plantations due to pathogenic and ice nucleation-active bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.

    2004-07-01

    During the past decade, important dieback has been observed in short-rotation forestry plantations of Salix viminalis and S. dasyclados in Sweden and Estonia, plantations from which the isolation of ice nucleation-active (INA) and pathogenic bacteria has also been reported. This thesis investigates the connection between bacterial infection and frost as a possible cause for such damage, and the role played by internal and external factors (e.g. plant frost sensitivity, fertilisation) in the dieback observed. Bacterial floras isolated from ten Salix clones growing on fertilised/unfertilised mineral soil or nitrogen-rich organic soil, were studied. Culturable bacterial communities present both in internal necrotic tissues and on the plant surface (i.e. epiphytes) were isolated on two occasions (spring and autumn). The strains were biochemically characterised (with gram, oxidase and fluorescence tests), and tested for ice nucleation-activity. Their pathogenic properties were studied with and without association to a freezing stress. Certain strains were eventually identified with BIOLOG plates and 16S rRNA analysis. A high number of culturable bacterial strains was found in the plant samplings, belonging mainly to Erwinia and Sphingomonas spp.; pathogenic and INA communities being mostly Erwinia-, Sphingomonas- and Xanthomonas-like. The generally higher plant dieback noted in the field on nutrient-rich soils and for frost sensitive clones was found connected to higher numbers of pathogenic and INA bacteria in the plants. We thus confirm Salix dieback to be related to a synergistic effect of frost and bacterial infection, possibly aggravated by fertilisation.

  12. Detection and Diagnostics of Plant Pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gullino, M.L.; Bonants, P.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This book is part of the Plant Pathology in the 21st Century Series, started in the occasion of the IX International Congress of Plant Pathology, Torino, 2008. In conjunction with the Xth International Congress of Plant Pathology, held in Beijing in August 2013. Although deriving from a Congress, th

  13. A reservoir of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in asymptomatic hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Perron

    Full Text Available The population genetics of pathogenic bacteria has been intensively studied in order to understand the spread of disease and the evolution of virulence and drug resistance. However, much less attention has been paid to bacterial carriage populations, which inhabit hosts without producing disease. Since new virulent strains that cause disease can be recruited from the carriage population of bacteria, our understanding of infectious disease is seriously incomplete without knowledge on the population structure of pathogenic bacteria living in an asymptomatic host. We report the first extensive survey of the abundance and diversity of a human pathogen in asymptomatic animal hosts. We have found that asymptomatic swine from livestock productions frequently carry populations of Salmonella enterica with a broad range of drug-resistant strains and genetic diversity greatly exceeding that previously described. This study shows how agricultural practice and human intervention may lead and influence the evolution of a hidden reservoir of pathogens, with important implications for human health.

  14. Transgenic plants and associated bacteria for phytoremediation of chlorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aken, Benoit; Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2010-01-01

    Phytoremediation is the use of plants for the treatment of environmental pollution, including chlorinated organics. Although conceptually very attractive, removal and biodegradation of chlorinated pollutants by plants is a rather slow and inefficient process resulting in incomplete treatment and potential release of toxic metabolites into the environment. In order to overcome inherent limitations of plant metabolic capabilities, plants have been genetically modified, following a strategy similar to the development of transgenic crops: genes from bacteria, fungi, and mammals involved in the metabolism of organic contaminants, such as cytochrome P-450 and glutathione S-transferase, have been introduced into higher plants, resulting in significant improvement of tolerance, removal, and degradation of pollutants. Recently, plant-associated bacteria have been recognized playing a significant role in phytoremediation, leading to the development of genetically modified rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria with improved biodegradation capabilities. Transgenic plants and associated bacteria constitute a new generation of genetically modified organisms for efficient and environmental-friendly treatment of polluted soil and water. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of transgenic plants and bacteria for the treatment of chlorinated pollutants, including chlorinated solvents, polychlorinated phenols, and chlorinated herbicides.

  15. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Sumera; Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1-19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82-116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48-1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice.

  16. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa F. Castiblanco; George W. Sundin

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extrac-ellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multi-cellular behavior.

  17. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extracellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multicellular behavior. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Recognition of bacterial plant pathogens: local, systemic and transgenerational immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elizabeth; Yadeta, Koste A; Coaker, Gitta

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial pathogens can cause multiple plant diseases and plants rely on their innate immune system to recognize and actively respond to these microbes. The plant innate immune system comprises extracellular pattern recognition receptors that recognize conserved microbial patterns and intracellular nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that recognize specific bacterial effectors delivered into host cells. Plants lack the adaptive immune branch present in animals, but still afford flexibility to pathogen attack through systemic and transgenerational resistance. Here, we focus on current research in plant immune responses against bacterial pathogens. Recent studies shed light onto the activation and inactivation of pattern recognition receptors and systemic acquired resistance. New research has also uncovered additional layers of complexity surrounding NLR immune receptor activation, cooperation and sub-cellular localizations. Taken together, these recent advances bring us closer to understanding the web of molecular interactions responsible for coordinating defense responses and ultimately resistance.

  19. STUDY ON ADHERENCE ABILITY OF PERIODONTAL PATHOGENS AND CARIOGENIC BACTERIA TO HYDROXYAPATITE DISKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Min-feng; LI De-yi; LI Zong-lin

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the adherence activity of six representative periodontopathic and cariogenic bacteria to hydroxyapatite disks. Methods Six periodontopathic and cariogenic bacteria of P. gingivalis, A.actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum, S. sanguis, A. viscosus and S. mutans were cultured in modified MD-300 chemostat according to total fifteen experimental groups of single-specie and each pair of periodontal pathogens and cariogenic bacteria, respectively. After 1h attached live bacteria on removable hydroxyapatite disks was analyzed by culture technologies to evaluate the adherence level. Results The adherence activity of periodontopathic and cariogenic bacteria to HA was in the following order: S. sanguis > A. viscosus > S. mutans > A. actinomycetemcomitans > F. nucleatum > P. gingivalis. The number of periodontopathic bacteria to HA was enhanced by S.sanguis and A. viscosus, respectively. When mix-cultivated with S. mutans, the colonization of P. gingivalis was reduced significantly( P<0.001 ). Periodontopathic bacteria had no effect on the adherence activity of S. mutans and A. viscosus, except S. sanguis. Conclusion It was showed that the adherence activity of periodontal pathogens was weaker than that of cariogenic bacteria and emphasized the importance of bacterial adherence in determining the level of bacterial colonization on tooth surfaces. It was suggested that periodontopathic bacteria can utilize initial colonizers to become those predominant bacteria in periodontal ecosystem, which maybe have close relation to the periodontopathic mechanism.

  20. DNA extraction protocol for rapid PCR detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually all current assays for foodborne pathogens, including PCR assays, are conducted after lengthy cultural enrichment of the sample to increase the concentration of the target organism. This delays detection by many hours, prevents quantitation, and limits the ability to detect multiple organ...

  1. Isolation and characterization of soil Streptomyces species as potential biological control agents against fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-05-01

    The use of antagonist microorganisms against fungal plant pathogens is an attractive and ecologically alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Streptomyces are beneficial soil bacteria and potential candidates for biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization and antagonist activity of soil streptomycetes from the Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, a Natural protected area in Campeche, Mexico. The results showed morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization of six actinomycetes and their inhibitory activity against Curvularia sp., Aspergillus niger, Helminthosporium sp. and Fusarium sp. One isolate, identified as Streptomyces sp. CACIS-1.16CA showed the potential to inhibit additional pathogens as Alternaria sp., Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. with percentages ranging from 47 to 90 %. This study identified a streptomycete strain with a broad antagonist activity that could be used for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi.

  2. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors.

  3. THE USE OF PLANTS TO PROTECT PLANTS AND FOOD AGAINST FUNGAL PATHOGENS: A REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuping, D S S; Eloff, J N

    2017-01-01

    Plant fungal pathogens play a crucial role in the profitability, quality and quantity of plant production. These phytopathogens are persistent in avoiding plant defences causing diseases and quality losses around the world that amount to billions of US dollars annually. To control the scourge of plant fungal diseases, farmers have used fungicides to manage the damage of plant pathogenic fungi. Drawbacks such as development of resistance and environmental toxicity associated with these chemicals have motivated researchers and cultivators to investigate other possibilities. Several databases were accessed to determine work done on protecting plants against plant fungal pathogens with plant extracts using search terms "plant fungal pathogen", "plant extracts" and "phytopathogens". Proposals are made on the best extractants and bioassay techniques to be used. In addition to chemical fungicides, biological agents have been used to deal with plant fungal diseases. There are many examples where plant extracts or plant derived compounds have been used as commercial deterrents of fungi on a large scale in agricultural and horticultural setups. One advantage of this approach is that plant extracts usually contain more than one antifungal compound. Consequently the development of resistance of pathogens may be lower if the different compounds affect a different metabolic process. Plants cultivated using plants extracts may also be marketed as organically produced. Many papers have been published on effective antimicrobial compounds present in plant extracts focusing on applications in human health. More research is required to develop suitable, sustainable, effective, cheaper botanical products that can be used to help overcome the scourge of plant fungal diseases. Scientists who have worked only on using plants to control human and animal fungal pathogens should consider the advantages of focusing on plant fungal pathogens. This approach could not only potentially increase

  4. Migrate or evolve: options for plant pathogens under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2013-07-01

    Findings on climate change influence on plant pathogens are often inconsistent and context dependent. Knowledge of pathogens affecting agricultural crops and natural plant communities remains fragmented along disciplinary lines. By broadening the perspective beyond agriculture, this review integrates cross-disciplinary knowledge to show that at scales relevant to climate change, accelerated evolution and changing geographic distribution will be the main implications for pathogens. New races may evolve rapidly under elevated temperature and CO2 , as evolutionary forces act on massive pathogen populations boosted by a combination of increased fecundity and infection cycles under favourable microclimate within enlarged canopy. Changing geographic distribution will bring together diverse lineages/genotypes that do not share common ecological niche, potentially increasing pathogen diversity. However, the uncertainty of model predictions and a lack of synthesis of fragmented knowledge remain as major deficiencies in knowledge. The review contends that the failure to consider scale and human intervention through new technology are major sources of uncertainty. Recognizing that improved biophysical models alone will not reduce uncertainty, it proposes a generic framework to increase focus and outlines ways to integrate biophysical elements and technology change with human intervention scenarios to minimize uncertainty. To synthesize knowledge of pathogen biology and life history, the review borrows the concept of 'fitness' from population biology as a comprehensive measure of pathogen strengths and vulnerabilities, and explores the implications of pathogen mode of nutrition to fitness and its interactions with plants suffering chronic abiotic stress under climate change. Current and future disease management options can then be judged for their ability to impair pathogenic and saprophytic fitness. The review pinpoints improving confidence in model prediction by minimizing

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Some Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated From Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis. Materials and Methods Ninety-six samples were obtained from vaginal discharge of women with bacterial vaginosis by a gynecologist with a Dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth. Then were immediately sent to the laboratory in cold chain for further assessment. Afterward, culture was transferred on blood agar, EMB, Palcam and differential diagnosis environments. Then cultures were incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C. Lactobacillus reuteri strains were cultured in MRS environment and transferred to laboratory. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus reuteri inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and antibiogram. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software v.16. Results The results of this study demonstrated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of most Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use, contraceptive methods and douching were 61%, 55%, 42% and 13%, respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial. Conclusions Our findings indicated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria that

  6. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) secretory component binds to commensal bacteria and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cecelia; Takizawa, Fumio; Sunyer, J Oriol; Salinas, Irene

    2017-02-02

    Commensal bacteria co-exist on the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The host's mucosal immune system must tolerate commensals while fighting pathogens. One of the mechanisms used by the mucosal immune system to maintain homeostasis is the secretion of immunoglobulins (Igs) across epithelial barriers, which is achieved via the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). Rainbow trout pIgR is known to transport IgT and IgM across epithelia. However, other biological functions for trout pIgR or trout secretory component (tSC) remain unknown. This study investigates the interaction of tSC with commensal bacteria, pathogenic bacteria and a fungal pathogen. Our results show that the majority of trout skin and gut bacteria are coated in vivo by tSC. In vitro, tSC present in mucus coats trout commensal isolates such as Microbacterium sp., Staphylococcus warneri, Flectobacillus major, Arthrobacter stackebrantii, and Flavobacterium sp. and the pathogens Vibrio anguillarum and Edwardsiella ictaluri with coating levels ranging from 8% to 70%. Moreover, we found that the majority of tSC is in free form in trout mucus and free tSC is able to directly bind bacteria. We propose that binding of free SC to commensal bacteria is a key and conserved mechanism for maintenance of microbial communities in vertebrate mucosal surfaces.

  7. Plant systems for recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Sandra; Kemmerling, Birgit

    2009-12-01

    Research of the last decade has revealed that plant immunity consists of different layers of defense that have evolved by the co-evolutional battle of plants with its pathogens. Particular light has been shed on PAMP- (pathogen-associated molecular pattern) triggered immunity (PTI) mediated by pattern recognition receptors. Striking similarities exist between the plant and animal innate immune system that point for a common optimized mechanism that has evolved independently in both kingdoms. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) from both kingdoms consist of leucine-rich repeat receptor complexes that allow recognition of invading pathogens at the cell surface. In plants, PRRs like FLS2 and EFR are controlled by a co-receptor SERK3/BAK1, also a leucine-rich repeat receptor that dimerizes with the PRRs to support their function. Pathogens can inject effector proteins into the plant cells to suppress the immune responses initiated after perception of PAMPs by PRRs via inhibition or degradation of the receptors. Plants have acquired the ability to recognize the presence of some of these effector proteins which leads to a quick and hypersensitive response to arrest and terminate pathogen growth.

  8. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rocheli de; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-12-01

    Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  9. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheli de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPlant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  10. How do filamentous pathogens deliver effector proteins into plant cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Petre

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens.

  11. How Do Filamentous Pathogens Deliver Effector Proteins into Plant Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Kamoun, Sophien

    2014-01-01

    Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens. PMID:24586116

  12. Antimicrobial Potential Of Azadirachta Indica Against Pathogenic Bacteria And Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Drugs from natural sources are used for treating various diseases since the ancient times. From the literature it is clear that various type of pharmacological and biological activities are associated with Azadirachta indica. Theleave oil of A. indica is known to have good antimicrobial potential. The oil of A. indica leaves, was tested against the different infectious microorganisms [Gram positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria], such as bacterial strains; S. aureus, E. coli, B. cerus, P. vulgaris, S. typhi, K. pneumonae, S. dysenterae and Fungal strains; F. oxysporum, A. flavus, A. fumigates, A. niger, C. albicans, Cladosporium sp., M. canis, M. gypseum, T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, P. notatum and P. citrinum etc.The results showed that level of antimicrobial activities of the A.indica oil depends on both the protein and carbohydrate contents. Generally, the high level of protein and carbohydrate contents of extract had better antimicrobial activities.

  13. The use of plants to protect plants and food against fungal pathogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of plants to protect plants and food against fungal pathogens: a review. ... associated with these chemicals have motivated researchers and cultivators to ... may be lower if the different compounds affect a different metabolic process.

  14. Antimicrobial effect of natural dyes on some pathogenic bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... Key words: Antimicrobial activity, natural dyes, textile. INTRODUCTION ... To prepare aqueous dye solutions of these plants, 10 g of each of the powders .... antibacterial treatments to repeated laundering, Text Chem Color.

  15. Changing fitness of a necrotrophic plant pathogen under increasing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabburg, Rosalie; Obanor, Friday; Aitken, Elizabeth; Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2015-08-01

    Warmer temperatures associated with climate change are expected to have a direct impact on plant pathogens, challenging crops and altering plant disease profiles in the future. In this study, we have investigated the effect of increasing temperature on the pathogenic fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum, an important necrotrophic plant pathogen associated with crown rot disease of wheat in Australia. Eleven wheat lines with different levels of crown rot resistance were artificially inoculated with F. pseudograminearum and maintained at four diurnal temperatures 15/15°C, 20/15°C, 25/15°C and 28/15°C in a controlled glasshouse. To quantify the success of F. pseudograminearum three fitness measures, these being disease severity, pathogen biomass in stem base and flag leaf node, and deoxynivalenol (DON) in stem base and flag leaf node of mature plants were used. F. pseudograminearum showed superior overall fitness at 15/15°C, and this was reduced with increasing temperature. Pathogen fitness was significantly influenced by the level of crown rot resistance of wheat lines, but the influence of line declined with increasing temperature. Lines that exhibited superior crown rot resistance in the field were generally associated with reduced overall pathogen fitness. However, the relative performance of the wheat lines was dependent on the measure of pathogen fitness, and lines that were associated with one reduced measure of pathogen fitness did not always reduce another. There was a strong correlation between DON in stem base tissue and disease severity, but length of browning was not a good predictor of Fusarium biomass in the stem base. We report that a combination of host resistance and rising temperature will reduce pathogen fitness under increasing temperature, but further studies combining the effect of rising CO2 are essential for more realistic assessments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Plant growth promoting bacteria from cow dung based biodynamic preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, T K; Rao, D L N

    2014-12-01

    Indigenous formulations based on cow dung fermentation are commonly used in organic farming. Three biodynamic preparations viz., Panchagavya (PG), BD500 and 'Cow pat pit' (CPP) showed high counts of lactobacilli (10(9) ml(-1)) and yeasts (10(4) ml(-1)). Actinomycetes were present only in CPP (10(4) ml(-1)) and absent in the other two. Seven bacterial isolates from these ferments were identified by a polyphasic approach: Bacillus safensis (PG1), Bacillus cereus (PG2, PG4 PG5), Bacillus subtilis (BD2) Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (BD3) and Bacillus licheniformis (CPP1). This is the first report of L. xylanilyticus and B. licheniformis in biodynamic preparations. Only three carbon sources-dextrose, sucrose and trehalose out of 21 tested were utilized by all the bacteria. None could utilize arabinose, dulcitol, galactose, inositol, inulin, melibiose, raffinose, rhamnose and sorbitol. All the strains produced indole acetic acid (1.8-3.7 μg ml(-1) culture filtrate) and ammonia. None could fix nitrogen; but all except B. safensis and B. licheniformis could solubilize phosphorous from insoluble tri-calcium phosphate. All the strains except L. xylaniliticus exhibited antagonism to the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia bataticola whereas none could inhibit Sclerotium rolfsi. In green house experiment in soil microcosms, bacterial inoculation significantly promoted growth of maize; plant dry weight increased by ~21 % due to inoculation with B. cereus (PG2). Results provide a basis for understanding the beneficial effects of biodynamic preparations and industrial deployment of the strains.

  17. Isolation and characterization of plant growth promoting endophytic diazotrophic bacteria from Korean rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sang Hye; Gururani, Mayank Anand; Chun, Se-Chul

    2014-01-20

    We have isolated 576 endophytic bacteria from the leaves, stems, and roots of 10 rice cultivars and identified 12 of them as diazotrophic bacteria using a specific primer set of nif gene. Through 16S rDNA sequence analysis, nifH genes were confirmed in the two species of Penibacillus, three species of Microbacterium, three Bacillus species, and four species of Klebsiella. Rice seeds treated with these plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) showed improved plant growth, increased height and dry weight and antagonistic effects against fungal pathogens. In addition, auxin and siderophore producing ability, and phosphate solubilizing activity were studied for the possible mechanisms of plant growth promotion. Among 12 isolates tested, 10 strains have shown higher auxin producing activity, 6 isolates were confirmed as strains with high siderophore producing activity while 4 isolates turned out to have high phosphate-solubilizing activity. These results strongly suggest that the endophytic diazotrophic bacteria characterized in this study could be successfully used to promote plant growth and inducing fungal resistance in plants.

  18. Host-Pathogen Interactions: VII. Plant Pathogens Secrete Proteins which Inhibit Enzymes of the Host Capable of Attacking the Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersheim, P; Valent, B S

    1974-05-01

    The results presented demonstrate that microbial pathogens of plants have the ability to secrete proteins which effectively inhibit an enzyme synthesized by the host; an enzyme whose substrate is a constituent of the cell wall of the pathogen. The system in which this was discovered is the anthracnose-causing fungal pathogen (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and its host, the French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). An endo-beta-1, 3-glucanase present in the bean leaves is specifically inhibited by a protein secreted by C. lindemuthianum. The cell walls of C. lindemuthianum are shown to be composed largely of a 1, 3-glucan.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants used by aborigines of Kalahandi, Orissa, India against multidrug resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debasmita Dubey; Mahesh C Sahu; Shakti Rath; Bimoch Projna Paty; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial potency of 20 non-edible and/or poisonous plants used by an aborigine tribe (Kandha) of Kalahandi district for infectious diseases. Methods: Over a period of 5 months from two hospitals, 10 pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Acinetobacter sp., Citrobacter freundii (C. freundii), Chromobacterium violeceum (C. violeceum),Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella sp., Proteus sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) and Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) were isolated to pure axenic cultures from clinical samples. Water and ethanolic extracts of leaves and barks were concentrated before monitoring antimicrobial activity by agar-well diffusion method. Results: All bacterial strains isolated were multidrug resistant. Ethanolic extract of most plants had effective antimicrobial activity against all the isolated multidrug resistant bacteria. Plants, Anthocephalus cadamba (A. cadamba) and Pterocarpus santalinus (P. santalinus) had antibacterial effect on all used bacteria. Water extract of several plants too had effective antimicrobial activity for all bacteria used. Effective in vitro control of MDR strains of Acinetobacter sp., C. freundii, Proteus sp. and P. aeruginosa, the most potential urinary tract infection causing organisms by plant extracts of all major plant used herein is recorded. MDR C. violaceum isolated from skin lesions was found to be resistant to imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and amoxyclav and was found sensitive to 13 plant extracts. Conclusion: Effective in vitro control of MDR strains of Acinetobacter sp.,C. freundii, Proteus sp. and P. aeruginosa; enteropathogenic bacteria, E. coli, S. typhi, Klebsiella sp. and V. cholerae were found to be well controlled by all plant extracts used.

  20. Inhibitory effect of Xenorhabdus nematophila TB on plant pathogens Phytophthora capsici and Botrytis cinerea in vitro and in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangling; Zhang, Manrang; Tang, Qian; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Xing

    2014-03-06

    Entomopathogenic bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. produce secondary metabolites with potential antimicrobial activity for use in agricultural productions. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of X. nematophila TB culture on plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora capsici. The cell-free filtrate of TB culture showed strong inhibitory effects (>90%) on mycelial growth of both pathogens. The methanol-extracted bioactive compounds (methanol extract) of TB culture also had strong inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and spore germinations of both pathogens. The methanol extract (1000 μg/mL) and cell-free filtrate both showed strong therapeutic and protective effects (>70%) on grey mold both in detached tomato fruits and plants, and leaf scorch in pepper plants. This study demonstrates X. nematophila TB produces antimicrobial metabolites of strong activity on plant pathogens, with great potential for controlling tomato grey mold and pepper leaf scorch and being used in integrated disease control to reduce chemical application.

  1. Genomic research for important pathogenic bacteria in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG RuiFu; GUO XiaoKui; YANG Jian; JIANG YongQiang; PANG Bo; CHEN Chen; YAO YuFeng; QIN JinHong; LI QingTian

    2009-01-01

    Rapid accumulation of bacterial genomic data offered an unprecedented opportunity to understand bacterial biology from a holistic view of point. We can thus closely look at the way in which a pathogen is evolved, and these data has been applied to molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics, and screening of novel diagnostic, vaccine and drug targets. The newly developed high-throughput low-cost sequencing technologies, such as 454, Solexa and SOLiD, will promote the acquisition and application of genomic data in new research areas that we dared not imagine previously, such as the metagenomics of human gastric-intestinal tract, for better and comprehensive understanding of human health and disease.

  2. A mathematical model for removal of human pathogenic viruses and bacteria by slow sand filtration under variable operational conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, J.F.; Berg, H.H.J.L. van den; Colin, M.; Dullemont, Y.; Hijnen, W.A.M.; Magic-Knezev, A.; Oorthuizen, W.A.; Wubbels, G.

    2013-01-01

    Slow sand filtration (SSF) in drinking water production removes pathogenic microorganisms, but detection limits and variable operational conditions complicate assessment of removal efficiency. Therefore, amodel was developed to predict removal ofhuman pathogenic viruses and bacteria as a function of

  3. Children with asthma by school age display aberrant immune responses to pathogenic airway bacteria as infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2014-01-01

    childhood asthma. We hypothesized that children with asthma have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. ObjectiveWe aimed to assess the bacterial immune response in asymptomatic infants and the association with later development of asthma by age 7 years. MethodsThe Copenhagen...... (P = .001), and IL-10 (P = .028), whereas there were no differences in T-cell activation or peripheral T-cell composition. ConclusionsChildren with asthma by school age exhibited an aberrant immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We propose that an abnormal immune response to pathogenic......BackgroundAsthma is a highly prevalent chronic lung disease that commonly originates in early childhood. Colonization of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial strains Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with increased risk of later...

  4. 'Add, stir and reduce': Yersinia spp. as model bacteria for pathogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alan; Thomson, Nicholas R; Reuter, Sandra; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic species in the Yersinia genus have historically been targets for research aimed at understanding how bacteria evolve into mammalian pathogens. The advent of large-scale population genomic studies has greatly accelerated the progress in this field, and Yersinia pestis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica have once again acted as model organisms to help shape our understanding of the evolutionary processes involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we highlight the gene gain, gene loss and genome rearrangement events that have been identified by genomic studies in pathogenic Yersinia species, and we discuss how these findings are changing our understanding of pathogen evolution. Finally, as these traits are also found in the genomes of other species in the Enterobacteriaceae, we suggest that they provide a blueprint for the evolution of enteropathogenic bacteria.

  5. Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yannan; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Ragush, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short...... cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated...... treatment of the wastewater with a 2–3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human...

  6. Methylobacterium-induced endophyte community changes correspond with protection of plants against pathogen attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo Ardanov

    Full Text Available Plant inoculation with endophytic bacteria that normally live inside the plant without harming the host is a highly promising approach for biological disease control. The mechanism of resistance induction by beneficial bacteria is poorly understood, because pathways are only partly known and systemic responses are typically not seen. The innate endophytic community structures change in response to external factors such as inoculation, and bacterial endophytes can exhibit direct or indirect antagonism towards pathogens. Earlier we showed that resistance induction by an endophytic Methylobacterium sp. in potato towards Pectobacterium atrosepticum was dependent on the density of the inoculum, whereas the bacterium itself had no antagonistic activity. To elucidate the role of innate endophyte communities in plant responses, we studied community changes in both in vitro and greenhouse experiments using various combinations of plants, endophyte inoculants, and pathogens. Induction of resistance was studied in several potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cultivars by Methylobacterium sp. IMBG290 against the pathogens P. atrosepticum, Phytophthora infestans and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and in pine (Pinus sylvestris L. by M. extorquens DSM13060 against Gremmeniella abietina. The capacities of the inoculated endophytic Methylobacterium spp. strains to induce resistance were dependent on the plant cultivar, pathogen, and on the density of Methylobacterium spp. inoculum. Composition of the endophyte community changed in response to inoculation in shoot tissues and correlated with resistance or susceptibility to the disease. Our results demonstrate that endophytic Methylobacterium spp. strains have varying effects on plant disease resistance, which can be modulated through the endophyte community of the host.

  7. Cell signaling in the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Liu, Yaxiong; Tang, Ruihua; Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Ye, Linjie; Jin, Mingliang; Huang, Qingsheng; Shi, Junling

    2015-06-01

    Cell signaling is an essential part in the complex system of communication that governs basic cellular activities and coordinates cell actions. The ability of cells to perceive and correctly respond to their microenvironment is essential for cell survival and basic biological function. In the defense from pathogenic bacteria, the immune cells exert their function through various signaling pathways. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of cell signaling in the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and immune cells, focusing on neutrophils and macrophages, which are part of the innate immunity, and also T cells, which are components of the adaptive immune system.

  8. Detection of Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria using Bacteriophage Tail Spike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poshtiban, Somayyeh

    Foodborne infections are worldwide health problem with tremendous social and financial impacts. Efforts are focused on developing accurate and reliable technologies for detection of food contaminations in early stages preferably on-site. This thesis focuses on interfacing engineering and biology by combining phage receptor binding proteins (RBPs) with engineered platforms including microresonator-based biosensors, magnetic particles and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to develop bacterial detection sensors. We used phage RBPs as target specific bioreceptors to develop an enhanced microresonator array for bacterial detection. These resonator beams are optimized to feature a high natural frequency while offer large surface area for capture of bacteria. Theoretical analysis indicates a high mass sensitivity with a threshold for the detection of a single bacterial cell. We used phage RBPs as target specific bioreceptors, and successfully demonstrated the application of these phage RBB-immobilized arrays for specific detection of C. jejuni cells. We also developed a RBP-derivatized magnetic pre-enrichment method as an upstream sample preparation method to improve sensitivity and specificity of PCR for detection of bacterial cells in various food samples. The combination of RBP-based magnetic separation and real-time PCR allowed the detection of small number of bacteria in artificially contaminated food samples without any need for time consuming pre-enrichment step through culturing. We also looked into integration of the RBP-based magnetic separation with PCR onto a single microfluidic lab-on-a-chip to reduce the overall turnaround time.

  9. Comparison of fecal indicators with pathogenic bacteria and rotavirus in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew S.; Layton, Alice C.; Mailloux, Brian J; Culligan, Patricia J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Sayler, Gary S.; Feighery, John; McKay, Larry; Knappett, Peter S.K.; Alexandrova, Ekaterina; Arbit, Talia; Emch, Michael; Escamilla, Veronica; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Streatfield, P. Kim; Yunus, Mohammad; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is routinely analyzed for fecal indicators but direct comparisons of fecal indicators to the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens are rare. This study was conducted in rural Bangladesh where the human population density is high, sanitation is poor, and groundwater pumped from shallow tubewells is often contaminated with fecal bacteria. Five indicator microorganisms (E. coli, total coliform, F+RNA coliphage, Bacteroides and human-associated Bacteroides) and various environmental parameters were compared to the direct detection of waterborne pathogens by quantitative PCR in groundwater pumped from 50 tubewells. Rotavirus was detected in groundwater filtrate from the largest proportion of tubewells (40%), followed by Shigella (10%), Vibrio (10%), and pathogenic E. coli (8%). Spearman rank correlations and sensitivity-specificity calculations indicate that some, but not all, combinations of indicators and environmental parameters can predict the presence of pathogens. Culture-dependent fecal indicator bacteria measured on a single date did not predict total bacterial pathogens, but annually averaged monthly measurements of culturable E. coli did improve prediction for total bacterial pathogens. A qPCR-based E. coli assay was the best indicator for the bacterial pathogens. F+RNA coliphage were neither correlated nor sufficiently sensitive towards rotavirus, but were predictive of bacterial pathogens. Since groundwater cannot be excluded as a significant source of diarrheal disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries with similar characteristics, the need to develop more effective methods for screening tubewells with respect to microbial contamination is necessary. PMID:22705866

  10. AOTF hyperspectral microscopic imaging for foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bosoon; Lee, Sangdae; Yoon, Seung-Chul; Sundaram, Jaya; Windham, William R.; Hinton, Arthur, Jr.; Lawrence, Kurt C.

    2011-06-01

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method which provides both spatial and spectral information can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The AOTF-based hyperspectral microscope imaging method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilm formed by Salmonella enteritidis as well as Escherichia coli. The intensity of spectral imagery and the pattern of spectral distribution varied with system parameters (integration time and gain) of HMI system. The preliminary results demonstrated determination of optimum parameter values of HMI system and the integration time must be no more than 250 ms for quality image acquisition from biofilm formed by S. enteritidis. Among the contiguous spectral imagery between 450 and 800 nm, the intensity of spectral images at 498, 522, 550 and 594 nm were distinctive for biofilm; whereas, the intensity of spectral images at 546 nm was distinctive for E. coli. For more accurate comparison of intensity from spectral images, a calibration protocol, using neutral density filters and multiple exposures, need to be developed to standardize image acquisition. For the identification or classification of unknown food pathogen samples, ground truth regions-of-interest pixels need to be selected for "spectrally pure fingerprints" for the Salmonella and E. coli species.

  11. Antibacterial activity of different honeys against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voidarou, C; Alexopoulos, A; Plessas, S; Karapanou, A; Mantzourani, I; Stavropoulou, E; Fotou, K; Tzora, A; Skoufos, I; Bezirtzoglou, E

    2011-12-01

    To study the antimicrobial activity of honey, 60 samples of various botanical origin were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against 16 clinical pathogens and their respective reference strains. The microbiological quality of honeys and the antibiotic susceptibility of the various isolates were also examined. The bioassay applied for determining the antimicrobial effect employs the well-agar diffusion method and the estimation of minimum active dilution which produces a 1mm diameter inhibition zone. All honey samples, despite their origin (coniferous, citrus, thyme or polyfloral), showed antibacterial activity against the pathogenic and their respective reference strains at variable levels. Coniferous and thyme honeys showed the highest activity with an average minimum dilution of 17.4 and 19.2% (w/v) followed by citrus and polyfloral honeys with 20.8 and 23.8% respectively. Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were proven to be up to 60% more resistant than their equal reference strains thus emphasizing the variability in the antibacterial effect of honey and the need for further research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Antimicrobial activities of ant Ponericin W1 against plant pathogens in vitro and the disease resistance in its transgenic Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Fang; Sun, Peng-Wei; Tang, Ding-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit a broad antimicrobial spectrum. The application of AMPs from non-plant organisms attracts considerable attention in plant disease resistance engineering. Ponericin W1, isolated from the venom of ant (Pachycondyla goeldii), shows antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae); however, it is not clear whether Ponericin W1 is effective against plant pathogens. The results of this study indicated synthesized Ponericin W1 inhibited mycelial growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Botrytis cinerea, as well as hyphal growth and spore production of Fusarium graminearum. Besides, Ponericin W1 exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. After codon optimization, Ponericin W1 gene was constructed into plant expression vector, and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip method. The Ponericin W1 was located in intercellular space of the transgenic plants as expected. Compared with the wild-type plants, there were ungerminated spores and less hyphal, conidia on the leaves of transgenic plants after innoculation with the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum. After innoculation with the pathogenic bac-terium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the baceria in the leaves of transgenic plants was significantly less than the wild-type plants, indicating that the transgenic plants displayed enhanced disease resistance to pathogens. These results demonstrate a potential use of Ponericin W1 in genetic engineering for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance.

  13. Molecular diversity at the plant-pathogen interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, John M; Simon, Stacey A

    2008-01-01

    Plants have evolved a robust innate immune system that exhibits striking similarities as well as significant differences with various metazoan innate immune systems. For example, plants are capable of perceiving pathogen-associated molecular patterns through pattern recognition receptors that bear structural similarities to animal Toll-like receptors. In addition, plants have evolved a second surveillance system based on cytoplasmic "NB-LRR" proteins (nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat) that are structurally similar to animal nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors. Plant NB-LRR proteins do not detect PAMPs; rather, they perceive effector proteins that pathogens secrete into plant cells to promote virulence. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the molecular functionality and evolution of these immune surveillance genes.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Seed-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    water. Four rice seeds were placed between each pair of moistured filter papers. The trays ... sterile drop of water. A cover slip was put on ..... ited by the risk of environmental pollution and .... Discoloration of rice of"rice in the Philippines. Plant.

  15. Silencing and Innate Immunity in Plant Defense Against Viral and Non-Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Zvereva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The frontline of plant defense against non-viral pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and oomycetes is provided by transmembrane pattern recognition receptors that detect conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, leading to pattern-triggered immunity (PTI. To counteract this innate defense, pathogens deploy effector proteins with a primary function to suppress PTI. In specific cases, plants have evolved intracellular resistance (R proteins detecting isolate-specific pathogen effectors, leading to effector-triggered immunity (ETI, an amplified version of PTI, often associated with hypersensitive response (HR and programmed cell death (PCD. In the case of plant viruses, no conserved PAMP was identified so far and the primary plant defense is thought to be based mainly on RNA silencing, an evolutionary conserved, sequence-specific mechanism that regulates gene expression and chromatin states and represses invasive nucleic acids such as transposons. Endogenous silencing pathways generate 21-24 nt small (sRNAs, miRNAs and short interfering (siRNAs, that repress genes post-transcriptionally and/or transcriptionally. Four distinct Dicer-like (DCL proteins, which normally produce endogenous miRNAs and siRNAs, all contribute to the biogenesis of viral siRNAs in infected plants. Growing evidence indicates that RNA silencing also contributes to plant defense against non-viral pathogens. Conversely, PTI-based innate responses may contribute to antiviral defense. Intracellular R proteins of the same NB-LRR family are able to recognize both non-viral effectors and avirulence (Avr proteins of RNA viruses, and, as a result, trigger HR and PCD in virus-resistant hosts. In some cases, viral Avr proteins also function as silencing suppressors. We hypothesize that RNA silencing and innate immunity (PTI and ETI function in concert to fight plant viruses. Viruses counteract this dual defense by effectors that suppress both PTI-/ETI-based innate responses

  16. Current Perspectives on Viable but Non-Culturable (VBNC Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thandavarayan eRamamurthy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Under stress conditions, many species of bacteria enter into starvation mode of metabolism or a physiologically viable but non-culturable (VBNC state. Several human pathogenic bacteria have been reported to enter into the VBNC state under these conditions. The pathogenic VBNC bacteria cannot be grown using conventional culture media, although they continue to retain their viability and express their virulence. Though there have been debates on the VBNC concept in the past, several molecular studies have shown that not only VBNC state can be induced under in vitro conditions but also that resuscitation from this state is possible under appropriate conditions. The most notable advance in resuscitating VBNC bacteria is the discovery of resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf, which is a bacterial cytokines found in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. VBNC state is a survival strategy adopted by the bacteria, which has important implication in several fields, including environmental monitoring, food technology and infectious disease management and hence it is important to investigate the association of bacterial pathogens under VBNC state and the water/foodborne outbreaks. In this review, we describe various aspects of VBNC bacteria, which include their proteomic and genetic profiles under the VBNC state, conditions of resuscitation, methods of detection, antibiotic resistance and observations on Rpf.

  17. The production and detoxification of a potent cytotoxin, nitric oxide, by pathogenic enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkenberg, Anke; Runkel, Sebastian; Richardson, David J; Rowley, Gary

    2011-12-01

    The nitrogen cycle is based on several redox reactions that are mainly accomplished by prokaryotic organisms, some archaea and a few eukaryotes, which use these reactions for assimilatory, dissimilatory or respiratory purposes. One group is the Enterobacteriaceae family of Gammaproteobacteria, which have their natural habitats in soil, marine environments or the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Some of the genera are pathogenic and usually associated with intestinal infections. Our body possesses several physical and chemical defence mechanisms to prevent pathogenic enteric bacteria from invading the gastrointestinal tract. One response of the innate immune system is to activate macrophages, which produce the potent cytotoxin nitric oxide (NO). However, some pathogens have evolved the ability to detoxify NO to less toxic compounds, such as the neuropharmacological agent and greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N₂O), which enables them to overcome the host's attack. The same mechanisms may be used by bacteria producing NO endogenously as a by-product of anaerobic nitrate respiration. In the present review, we provide a brief introduction into the NO detoxification mechanisms of two members of the Enterobacteriaceae family: Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. These are discussed as comparative non-pathogenic and pathogenic model systems in order to investigate the importance of detoxifying NO and producing N₂O for the pathogenicity of enteric bacteria.

  18. The use of fluorescent probes to assess viability of the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis by flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Breeuwer, P.; Abee, T.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Determination of the viability of bacteria by the conventional plating technique is a time-consuming process. Methods based on enzyme activity or membrane integrity are much faster and may be good alternatives. Assessment of the viability of suspensions of the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter

  19. Interactions of some common pathogenic bacteria with Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huws, Sharon A; Morley, Robert J; Jones, Martin V; Brown, Michael R W; Smith, Anthony W

    2008-05-01

    Protozoan grazing is a major trophic pathway whereby the biomass re-enters the food web. Nonetheless, not all bacteria are digested by protozoa and the number known to evade digestion, resulting in their environmental augmentation, is increasing. We investigated the interactions of Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), with the amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga. There was evidence of predation of all bacterial species except L. monocytogenes and S. aureus, where extracellular numbers were significantly higher when cultured with amoebae compared with growth in the absence of amoebae. Intracellular growth kinetic experiments and fluorescent confocal microscopy suggest that S. aureus survived and may even multiply within A. polyphaga, whereas there was no apparent intra-amoebal replication of L. monocytogenes and higher numbers were likely sustained on metabolic waste products released during coculture.

  20. Vaccines based on the cell surface carbohydrates of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugate vaccines, in which a cell surface carbohydrate from a micro-organism is covalently attached to an appropriate carrier protein are proving to be the most effective means to generate protective immune responses to prevent a wide range of diseases. The technology appears to be generic and applicable to a wide range of pathogens, as long as antibodies against surface carbohydrates help protect against infection. Three such vaccines, against Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis Group C and seven serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae, have already been licensed and many others are in development. This article discusses the rationale for the development and use of glycoconjugate vaccines, the mechanisms by which they elicit T cell-dependent immune responses and the implications of this for vaccine development, the role of physicochemical methods in the characterisation and quality control of these vaccines, and the novel products which are under development.

  1. DNA extraction protocol for rapid PCR detection of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Jeffrey D; Paoli, George C

    2013-11-01

    Twelve reagents were evaluated to develop a direct DNA extraction method suitable for PCR detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Many reagents exhibited strong PCR inhibition, requiring significant dilution of the extract with a corresponding reduction in sensitivity. Most reagents also exhibited much lower recovery of DNA from the gram-positive test organism (Listeria monocytogenes) than from the gram-negative organism (Escherichia coli O157:H7), preventing unbiased detection and quantitation of both organisms. The 5× HotSHOT+Tween reagent exhibited minimal inhibition and high extraction efficiency for both test organisms, providing a 15-min single-tube DNA-extraction protocol suitable for highly sensitive quantitative PCR assays. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Genomic research for important pathogenic bacteria in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Rapid accumulation of bacterial genomic data offered an unprecedented opportunity to understand bacterial biology from a holistic view of point.We can thus closely look at the way in which a pathogen is evolved,and these data has been applied to molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics,and screening of novel diagnostic,vaccine and drug targets.The newly developed high-throughput low-cost sequencing technologies,such as 454,Solexa and SOLiD,will promote the acquisition and application of genomic data in new research areas that we dared not imagine previously,such as the metagenomics of human gastric-intestinal tract,for better and comprehensive understanding of human health and disease.

  3. Specific interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria--as revealed by different combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaderlund, Lotta; Arthurson, Veronica; Granhall, Ulf; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-05-15

    The interactions between two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Paenibacillus brasilensis PB177, two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) and one pathogenic fungus (Microdochium nivale) were investigated on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cultivar Tarso) in a greenhouse trial. PB177, but not SBW25, had strong inhibitory effects on M. nivale in dual culture plate assays. The results from the greenhouse experiment show very specific interactions; e.g. the two AM fungi react differently when interacting with the same bacteria on plants. G. intraradices (single inoculation or together with SBW25) increased plant dry weight on M. nivale infested plants, suggesting that the pathogenic fungus is counteracted by G. intraradices, but PB177 inhibited this positive effect. This is an example of two completely different reactions between the same AM fungus and two species of bacteria, previously known to enhance plant growth and inhibit pathogens. When searching for plant growth promoting microorganisms it is therefore important to test for the most suitable combination of plant, bacteria and fungi in order to get satisfactory plant growth benefits.

  4. Fungicide resistance assays for fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Gary A; Rivera, Viviana V

    2012-01-01

    Fungicide resistance assays are useful to determine if a fungal pathogen has developed resistance to a fungicide used to manage the disease it causes. Laboratory assays are used to determine loss of sensitivity, or resistance, to a fungicide and can explain fungicide failures and for developing successful fungicide recommendations in the field. Laboratory assays for fungicide resistance are conducted by measuring reductions in growth or spore germination of fungi in the presence of fungicide, or by molecular procedures. This chapter describes two techniques for measuring fungicide resistance, using the sugarbeet leaf spot fungus Cercospora beticola as a model for the protocol. Two procedures are described for fungicides from two different classes; growth reduction for triazole (sterol demethylation inhibitor; DMI) fungicides, and inhibition of spore germination for quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides.

  5. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and their secretion in plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Christian P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2014-01-01

    Approximately a tenth of all described fungal species can cause diseases in plants. A common feature of this process is the necessity to pass through the plant cell wall, an important barrier against pathogen attack. To this end, fungi possess a diverse array of secreted enzymes to depolymerize the main structural polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. Recent advances in genomic and systems-level studies have begun to unravel this diversity and have pinpointed cell wall-degrading enzyme (CWDE) families that are specifically present or enhanced in plant-pathogenic fungi. In this review, we discuss differences between the CWDE arsenal of plant-pathogenic and non-plant-pathogenic fungi, highlight the importance of individual enzyme families for pathogenesis, illustrate the secretory pathway that transports CWDEs out of the fungal cell, and report the transcriptional regulation of expression of CWDE genes in both saprophytic and phytopathogenic fungi.

  6. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Mariea Gahan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted.

  7. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Jacinta; Schmalenberger, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic, and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S) in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax, and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted. PMID:25566295

  8. Phenotypic variation in the plant pathogenic bacterium Acidovorax citrulli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Kumar Shrestha

    Full Text Available Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB of cucurbits, a disease that threatens the cucurbit industry worldwide. Despite the economic importance of BFB, little is known about pathogenicity and fitness strategies of the bacterium. We have observed the phenomenon of phenotypic variation in A. citrulli. Here we report the characterization of phenotypic variants (PVs of two strains, M6 and 7a1, isolated from melon and watermelon, respectively. Phenotypic variation was observed following growth in rich medium, as well as upon isolation of bacteria from inoculated plants or exposure to several stresses, including heat, salt and acidic conditions. When grown on nutrient agar, all PV colonies possessed a translucent appearance, in contrast to parental strain colonies that were opaque. After 72 h, PV colonies were bigger than parental colonies, and had a fuzzy appearance relative to parental strain colonies that are relatively smooth. A. citrulli colonies are generally surrounded by haloes detectable by the naked eye. These haloes are formed by type IV pilus (T4P-mediated twitching motility that occurs at the edge of the colony. No twitching haloes could be detected around colonies of both M6 and 7a1 PVs, and microscopy observations confirmed that indeed the PVs did not perform twitching motility. In agreement with these results, transmission electron microscopy revealed that M6 and 7a1 PVs do not produce T4P under tested conditions. PVs also differed from their parental strain in swimming motility and biofilm formation, and interestingly, all assessed variants were less virulent than their corresponding parental strains in seed transmission assays. Slight alterations could be detected in some DNA fingerprinting profiles of 7a1 variants relative to the parental strain, while no differences at all could be seen among M6 variants and parental strain, suggesting that, at least in the latter, phenotypic variation is mediated by slight genetic

  9. Adhesion to the yeast cell surface as a mechanism for trapping pathogenic bacteria by Saccharomyces probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, F C P; Martins, F S; Souza, E L S; Pimenta, P F P; Araujo, H R C; Castro, I M; Brandão, R L; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2012-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of probiotics as an adjuvant for the prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal pathology. The great advantage of therapy with probiotics is that they have few side effects such as selection of resistant bacteria or disturbance of the intestinal microbiota, which occur when antibiotics are used. Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the surface of probiotics instead of onto intestinal receptors could explain part of the probiotic effect. Thus, this study evaluated the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the cell wall of Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains UFMG 905, W303 and BY4741. To understand the mechanism of adhesion of pathogens to yeast, cell-wall mutants of the parental strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 were used because of the difficulty of mutating polyploid yeast, as is the case for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces boulardii. The tests of adhesion showed that, among 11 enteropathogenic bacteria tested, only Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi adhered to the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741. The presence of mannose, and to some extent bile salts, inhibited this adhesion, which was not dependent on yeast viability. Among 44 cell-wall mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, five lost the ability to fix the bacteria. Electron microscopy showed that the phenomenon of yeast-bacteria adhesion occurred both in vitro and in vivo (in the digestive tract of dixenic mice). In conclusion, some pathogenic bacteria were captured on the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, thus preventing their adhesion to specific receptors on the intestinal epithelium and their subsequent invasion of the host.

  10. Pathogenic amoebae in power-plant cooling lakes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-06-01

    Cooling waters and associated algae and sediments from four northern and four southern/western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. Unheated control waters and algae/sediments from four northern and five southern/western sites were also tested. When comparing results from the test versus control sites, a significantly higher proportion (P less than or equal to 0.05) of the samples from the test sites were positive for thermophilic amoeba, thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic Naegleria. The difference in number of samples positive for thermophilic Naegleria between heated and unheated waters, however, was attributable predominantly to the northern waters and algae/sediments. While two of four northern test sites yielded pathogenic Naegleria, seven of the eight isolates were obtained from one site. Seasonality effects relative to the isolation of the pathogen were also noted at this site. One pathogen was isolated from a southwestern test site. Pathogens were not isolated from any control sites. Some of the pathogenic isolates were analyzed serologically and classified as pathogenic Naegleria fowleri. Salinity, pH, conductivity, and bacteriological profiles did not obviously correlate with the presence or absence of pathogenic Naegleria. While thermal addition was significantly associated with the presence of thermophilic Naegleria (P less than or equal to 0.05), the data implicate other as yet undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic thermophile. Until further delineation of these parameters is effected, generalizations cannot be made concerning the effect of thermal impact on the growth of pathogenic amoeba in a particular cooling system.

  11. Paraben resistance in bacteria from sewage treatment plant effluents in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Krishna Kumar; Sivakumar, Senthilkumari; Sampath, Srimurali; Shanmugam, Govindaraj; Sundaresan, Umamaheswari; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran

    2013-01-01

    Parabens, the antimicrobial preservatives used in cosmetics, food and pharmaceuticals, are often detected in the aquatic environment. Generally, sewage treatment plants (STPs) receive community sewage containing parabens, which are ultimately released into streams/rivers. In this study, bacteria in STP effluents were evaluated for their resistance to parabens. The susceptibility was in the order of Staphylococcus aureus > Bacillus sp. >Escherichia coli > Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Gram-negative bacteria showed less susceptibility than their control and Gram-positive bacteria. Further, the bacteria were more sensitive towards butyl and ethyl parabens. Interestingly, the strains showed resistance to ≥5 mg of parabens, which is equivalent to or higher than reported environmental concentrations. The increase in paraben chain length did not enhance the susceptibility in all cases and it was understood that the activity may differ for each bacterium in the environment. This is the first profile on paraben resistance in common pathogens of Indian STPs. Paraben resistance may be developed due to continuous exposure even at sub-inhibitory and/or chronic levels in the environment and this resistance may be transferred to other pathogenic bacteria in receiving waters. Thus the study demonstrates the effectiveness of the disc diffusion method in environmental bacterial resistance assessment and addresses the risk involved in the use of parabens.

  12. White Band Disease (type I) of endangered caribbean acroporid corals is caused by pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, David I; Vollmer, Steven V

    2011-01-01

    Diseases affecting coral reefs have increased exponentially over the last three decades and contributed to their decline, particularly in the Caribbean. In most cases, the responsible pathogens have not been isolated, often due to the difficulty in isolating and culturing marine bacteria. White Band Disease (WBD) has caused unprecedented declines in the Caribbean acroporid corals, resulting in their listings as threatened on the US Threatened and Endangered Species List and critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. Yet, despite the importance of WBD, the probable pathogen(s) have not yet been determined. Here we present in situ transmission data from a series of filtrate and antibiotic treatments of disease tissue that indicate that WBD is contagious and caused by bacterial pathogen(s). Additionally our data suggest that Ampicillin could be considered as a treatment for WBD (type I).

  13. Inverted methoxypyridinium phthalocyanines for PDI of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Leandro M O; Sousa, Andreina; Gomes, Maria C; Faustino, Maria A F; Almeida, Adelaide; Silva, Artur M S; Neves, Maria G P M S; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Ângela; Tomé, João P C

    2015-10-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) are photoactive molecules that can absorb and emit light in a large range of the UV-Vis spectrum with recognized potential for medical applications. Considering the biomedical applications an important limitation of these compounds is their low solubility in water. The use of suitable pyridinium groups on Pc is a good strategy to solve this drawback and to make them more effective to photoinactivate Gram-negative bacteria via a photodynamic inactivation (PDI) approach. Herein, an easy synthetic access to obtain inverted tetra- and octa-methoxypyridinium phthalocyanines (compounds 5 and 6) and also their efficiency to photoinactivate a recombinant bioluminescent strain of Escherichia coli is described. The obtained results were compared with the ones obtained when more conventional thiopyridinium phthalocyanines (compounds 7 and 8) were used. This innovative study comparing thiopyridinium and inverted methoxypyridinium moieties on cationic Pc is reported for the first time taking into account the efficiency of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation, water solubility and uptake properties.

  14. Pathogen-free screening of bacteria-specific hybridomas for selecting high-quality monoclonal antibodies against pathogen bacteria as illustrated for Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Vaisanen-Tunkelrott, Marja-Liisa; Moreau, Karine; Lamourette, Patricia; Créminon, Christophe; Volland, Hervé

    2013-05-31

    Antibodies are potent biological tools increasingly used as detection, diagnostic and therapeutic reagents. Many technological advances have optimized and facilitated production and screening of monoclonal antibodies. We report here an original method to screen for antibodies targeting biosafety level 2 or 3 pathogens without the fastidious handling inherent to pathogen use. A double ELISA screening was performed using as coated antigen transformed Escherichia coli expressing at its surface a protein specific to the pathogenic bacteria versus control untransformed E. coli. This method was applied to Legionella, using the surface-exposed Mip protein (macrophage infectivity potentiator). This screening proved to be an excellent means of selecting mAbs that bind Legionella pneumophila 1 surface-exposed Mip protein. This method also appears more biologically relevant than screening using the recombinant Mip protein alone and less tedious than a test performed directly on Legionella bacteria. We obtained 21 mAbs that bind strongly to L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 13, and we validated their use in a rapid ELISA (performed in 4.5 h) and an immunochromatographic test (20 min).

  15. Functional Diversity of Tandem Substrate-Binding Domains in ABC Transporters from Pathogenic Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulyani, Faizah; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Vujicic - Zagar, Andreja; Guskov, Albert; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter GInPQ is an essential uptake system for amino acids in gram-positive pathogens and related nonpathogenic bacteria. The transporter has tandem substrate-binding domains (SBDs) fused to each transmembrane domain, giving rise to four SBDs per functional transp

  16. Classification of gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria with hyperspectral microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical method with hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) has potential for identification of foodborne pathogenic bacteria from microcolonies rapidly with a cell level. A HMI system that provides both spatial and spectral information could be an effective tool for analyzing spectral characteristic...

  17. Hyperspectral microscope imaging methods to classify gram-positive and gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acousto-optic tunable filter-based hyperspectral microscope imaging method has potential for identification of foodborne pathogenic bacteria from microcolony rapidly with a single cell level. We have successfully developed the method to acquire quality hyperspectral microscopic images from variou...

  18. A preliminary study on the pathogenicity of Bacillus licheniformis bacteria in immunodepressed mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Jensen, N.E.; Giese, Steen Bjørck

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenicity of 13 strains of Bacillus licheniformis was studied in immunodepressed mice. The strains had been isolated from cases of bovine abortions (n=5), bovine feedstuffs (n=3), soil (n=l), and grain products (n=2). The origin of two strains was unknown. Groups of 10 mice were inoculate...... intravenously with B. licheniformis bacteria at doses from...

  19. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in a mixed urban watershed as revealed by pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing ...

  20. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Some Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated From Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eslami; Karimiravesh; Taheri; Azargashb

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis. ...

  1. Plant integrity: an important factor in plant-pathogen interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta Zofia; Llorente, Briardo; Cvitanich, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    the hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, in the Sarpo Mira–P. infestans interactions, the plant’s meristems, the stalks or both, seem to be associated with the development of the hypersensitive response and both the plant’s roots and shoots contain antimicrobial compounds when...

  2. Antimicrobial and efflux pump inhibitory activity of caffeoylquinic acids from Artemisia absinthium against gram-positive pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis C Fiamegos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4',5'-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4',5'-ODCQA from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3',5'-ODCQA, 4',5'-ODCQA was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4',5'-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3',5'-ODCQA was ineffective. These initial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the

  3. Bioaccumulation of pathogenic bacteria and amoeba by zebra mussels and their presence in watercourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosteo, R; Goñi, P; Miguel, N; Abadías, J; Valero, P; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (the zebra mussel) has been invading freshwater bodies in Europe since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Filter-feeding organisms can accumulate and concentrate both chemical and biological contaminants in their tissues. Therefore, zebra mussels are recognized as indicators of freshwater quality. In this work, the capacity of the zebra mussel to accumulate human pathogenic bacteria and protozoa has been evaluated and the sanitary risk associated with their presence in surface water has also been assessed. The results show a good correlation between the pathogenic bacteria concentration in zebra mussels and in watercourses. Zebra mussels could therefore be used as an indicator of biological contamination. The bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp.) and parasites (Cryptosporidium oocysts and free-living amoebae) detected in these mussels reflect a potential sanitary risk in water.

  4. The prevalence of foodborne pathogenic bacteria on cutting boards and their ecological correlation with background biota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsumi Ishida

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study implemented the pyrosequencing technique and real-time quantitative PCR to determine the prevalence of foodborne pathogenic bacteria (FPB and as well as the ecological correlations of background biota and FPB present on restaurant cutting boards (CBs collected in Seri Kembangan, Malaysia. The prevalence of FPB in high background biota (HBB was lower (0.24% compared to that of low background biota (LBB (0.54%. In addition, a multiple linear regression analysis indicated that only HBB had a significant ecological correlation with FPB. Furthermore, statistical analysis revealed that the combinations of Clostridiales, Flavobacteriales, and Lactobacillales orders in HBB had significant negative associations with FPB, suggesting that these bacteria may interact to ensure survivability and impair the growth of pathogenic bacteria.

  5. Some Pathogenic Bacteria of Livestock Origin as a Cause of Foodborne Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Kusumaningsih

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Food are essentialy required for cell metabolism in human physiologyc. Food should be free from biological, chemical, and physical contamination and also hazardous substances. All of them are able to disrupt physiological homeostatis resulting disorder or diseases. Diseases resulted by those contaminant are called food borne disease. One of the important contaminants is biological contaminant especially pathogenic bacterias. Some pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter spp., Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter sakazakii, Shigella, are able to cause symptomatic diseases. Overall, the general symptoms of the diseases due to pathogenic bacterial infection are gastric pain, nausea, vomit, headache, loss of appetite, fever, and also dehydration.

  6. Applicability of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy as an alternative to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrojado, Cátia; Pereira, Carla; Tomé, João P C; Faustino, Maria A F; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-10-01

    Aquaculture activities are increasing worldwide, stimulated by the progressive reduction of natural fish stocks in the oceans. However, these activities also suffer heavy production and financial losses resulting from fish infections caused by microbial pathogens, including multidrug resistant bacteria. Therefore, strategies to control fish infections are urgently needed, in order to make aquaculture industry more sustainable. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has emerged as an alternative to treat diseases and prevent the development of antibiotic resistance by pathogenic bacteria. The aim of this work was to evaluate the applicability of aPDT to inactivate pathogenic fish bacteria. To reach this objective a cationic porphyrin Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF was tested against nine pathogenic bacteria isolated from a semi-intensive aquaculture system and against the cultivable bacteria of the aquaculture system. The ecological impact of aPDT in the aquatic environment was also tested on the natural bacterial community, using the overall bacterial community structure and the cultivable bacteria as indicators. Photodynamic inactivation of bacterial isolates and of cultivable bacteria was assessed counting the number of colonies. The impact of aPDT in the overall bacterial community structure of the aquaculture water was evaluated by denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that, in the presence of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF, the growth of bacterial isolates was inhibited, resulting in a decrease of ≈7-8 log after 60-270 min of irradiation. Cultivable bacteria were also considerably affected, showing decreases up to the detection limit (≈2 log decrease on cell survival), but the inactivation rate varied significantly with the sampling period. The DGGE fingerprint analyses revealed changes in the bacterial community structure caused by the combination of aPDT and light. The results indicate that aPDT can be regarded as a new approach to control fish

  7. Antifungal Substances from Streptomyces sp. A3265 Antagonistic to Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Nguyen; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, we identified a Streptomyces sp., A3265, as exhibiting potent antifungal activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, including Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Rhizoctonia solani. This strain also exhibited a biocontrolling effect against ginseng root rot and damping-off disease, common diseases of ginseng and other crops. In this study, we isolated two antifungal substances responsible for this biocontrolling effect via Diaion HP-20 and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, medium pressure liquid chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. These compounds were identified as guanidylfungin A and methyl guanidylfungin A by spectroscopic methods. These compounds exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against various plant pathogenic fungi as well as against bacteria.

  8. Avirulence proteins of plant pathogens: determinants of victory and defeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luderer, R.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The simplest way to explain the biochemical basis of the gene-for-gene concept is by direct interaction between a pathogen-derived avirulence (Avr) gene product and a receptor protein, which is encoded by the matching resistance (R) gene of the host plant. The number of R genes for which the

  9. The Top 10 fungal pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dean, R.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Pretorius, Z.A.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Pietro, Di A.; Spanu, P.D.; Rudd, J.J.; Dickman, M.; Kahmann, R.; Ellis, J.; Foster, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to survey all fungal pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate which fungal pathogens they would place in a ‘Top 10’ based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 495 votes from the international co

  10. Splash : the dispersal of fungal plant pathogens in rain events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat, A.

    2000-01-01

    Models were developed to study splash dispersal of fungal plant pathogens in space and time. The models incorporate the main mechanisms involved in splash dispersal, that is 1. A raindrop hits the thin water film on the crop surface containing spores and spores are dispersed in the splashing rain dr

  11. The Top 10 fungal pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dean, R.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Pretorius, Z.A.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Pietro, Di A.; Spanu, P.D.; Rudd, J.J.; Dickman, M.; Kahmann, R.; Ellis, J.; Foster, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to survey all fungal pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate which fungal pathogens they would place in a ‘Top 10’ based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 495 votes from the international

  12. The Top 10 fungal pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dean, R.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Pretorius, Z.A.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Pietro, Di A.; Spanu, P.D.; Rudd, J.J.; Dickman, M.; Kahmann, R.; Ellis, J.; Foster, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to survey all fungal pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate which fungal pathogens they would place in a ‘Top 10’ based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 495 votes from the international co

  13. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, D.M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; McSpadden Gardener, B.B.; Thomashow, L.S.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and i

  14. Improving ITS sequence data for identification of plant pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Henrik Nilsson; Kevin D. Hyde; Julia Pawłowska; Martin Ryberg; Leho Tedersoo; Anders Bjørnsgard Aas; Siti A. Alias; Artur Alves; Cajsa Lisa Anderson; Alexandre Antonelli; A. Elizabeth Arnold; Barbara Bahnmann; Mohammad Bahram; Johan Bengtsson-Palme; Anna Berlin; Sara Branco; Putarak Chomnunti; Asha Dissanayake; Rein Drenkhan; Hanna Friberg; Tobias Guldberg Frøslev; Bettina Halwachs; Martin Hartmann; Beatrice Henricot; Ruvishika Jayawardena; Ari Jumpponen; Håvard Kauserud; Sonja Koskela; Tomasz Kulik; Kare Liimatainen; Björn D. Lindahl; Daniel Lindner; Jian-Kui Liu; Sajeewa Maharachchikumbura; Dimuthu Manamgoda; Svante Martinsson; Maria Alice Neves; Tuula Niskanen; Stephan Nylinder; Olinto Liparini Pereira; Danilo Batista Pinho; Teresita M. Porter; Valentin Queloz; Taavi Riit; Marisol Sánchez-García; Filipe de Sousa; Emil Stefańczyk; Mariusz Tadych; Susumu Takamatsu; Qing Tian; Dhanushka Udayanga; Martin Unterseher; Zheng Wang; Saowanee Wikee; Jiye Yan; Ellen Larsson; Karl-Henrik Larsson; Urmas Kõljalg; Kessy Abarenkov

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi are a large and diverse assemblage of eukaryotes with substantial impacts on natural ecosystems and human endeavours. These taxa often have complex and poorly understood life cycles, lack observable, discriminatory morphological characters, and may not be amenable to in vitro culturing. As a result, species identification is frequently difficult...

  15. UV Light Inactivation of Human and Plant Pathogens in Unfiltered Surface Irrigation Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 108 or 109 CFU/liter for bacteria or 104 or 105 zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively. PMID:24242253

  16. UV light inactivation of human and plant pathogens in unfiltered surface irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-02-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 10(8) or 10(9) CFU/liter for bacteria or 10(4) or 10(5) zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively.

  17. Plant growth promoting bacteria in Brachiaria brizantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mylenne Calciolari Pinheiro; Figueiredo, Aline Fernandes; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Cardoso, Elke Jurandy Bran Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Brachiaria brizantha is considered one of the preferred fodders among farmers for having high forage yield and large production of root mass. The association of beneficial bacteria with these grasses can be very valuable in the recovery of the pasture areas with nutritional deficiency. With the aim of studying this possibility, we carried out the sampling of soil and roots of B. brizantha in three areas (Nova Odessa-SP, São Carlos-SP and Campo Verde-MT, Brazil). Seventy-two bacterial strains were isolated and used in tests to evaluate their biotechnological potential. Almost all isolates presented at least one positive feature. Sixty-eight isolates produced analogues of indole-3-acetic acid, ten showed nitrogenase activity when subjected to the method of increasing the concentration of total nitrogen (total N) in the culture medium and sixty-five isolates showed nitrogenase activity when subjected to acetylene reduction technique. The partial sequencing of 16S rRNA of these isolates allowed the identification of seven main groups, with the prevalence of those affiliated to the genus Stenotrophomonas (69 %). At the end, this work elected the strains C4 (Pseudomonadaceae) and C7 (Rhodospirillaceae) as promising organisms for the development of inoculants due to their higher nitrogenase activity.

  18. Survival of pathogenic bacteria in compost with special reference to Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Chun-ming; Koichi Inoue; Shunji Inanaga; Takashi Someya

    2005-01-01

    Application of compost in agricultural practice could potentially cause contamination of foodstuffs with pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli O157: H7 ( E. Coli O157). We investigated pathogenic bacteria in compost collected from the compost facilities, and evaluated the survival of E. coli K12 and O157 in laboratory experiments. Out of 19 compost product samples, coliform bacteria and salmonella were detected in 7 and 3 samples respectively. The number of coliform bacteria was 1.8 × 102 to 2.5 × 106 CFU/g dw and that of salmonella was 4.2 × 101 to 6.0 × 103 CFU/g dw. Moreover, coliform bacteria, fecal coliform, E. coli and salmonella were detected during composting at 54℃ to 67℃. The results indicated that moisture content was a very important factor to the heat sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in compost, E. coli in compost of high moisture content was more sensitive than that in compost of low moisture content, cells harvested in logarithmic phase was more sensitive than these in stationary phase, and E. coli K12 was more sensitive than E. coli O157. Based on the D values, the lethal time of E. coli K12 and O157 from 108 to 100 CFU/g dw were 16.3 and 28.8 min, respectively, at 60℃ in compost with 40% moisture content. However, some E. coli cells survived in composting process at 54℃ to 67℃. Water potential (low moisture content) and physiological aspects of bacteria (stationary phase) could explain only in part of the prolonged survival of E. coli in compost, and there should be some other factors that are conducive to bacterial survival in compost.

  19. Facilitation of phosphorus uptake in maize plants by mycorrhizosphere bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battini, Fabio; Grønlund, Mette; Agnolucci, Monica

    2017-01-01

    availability of soil P. This study investigated whether biofertilizers and bioenhancers, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their associated bacteria could enhance growth and P uptake in maize. Plants were grown with or without mycorrhizas in compartmented pots with radioactive P tracers and were...... inoculated with each of 10 selected bacteria isolated from AMF spores. Root colonization by AMF produced large plant growth responses, while seven bacterial strains further facilitated root growth and P uptake by promoting the development of AMF extraradical mycelium. Among the tested strains, Streptomyces...... sp. W94 produced the largest increases in uptake and translocation of 33P, while Streptomyces sp. W77 highly enhanced hyphal length specific uptake of 33P. The positive relationship between AMF-mediated P absorption and shoot P content was significantly influenced by the bacteria inoculants...

  20. Facilitation of phosphorus uptake in maize plants by mycorrhizosphere bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battini, Fabio; Grønlund, Mette; Agnolucci, Monica

    2017-01-01

    availability of soil P. This study investigated whether biofertilizers and bioenhancers, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their associated bacteria could enhance growth and P uptake in maize. Plants were grown with or without mycorrhizas in compartmented pots with radioactive P tracers and were...

  1. Endophytic bacteria with plant growth promoting and biocontrol abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malfanova, Natalia V.

    2013-01-01

    Since global food insecurity is one of the major problems faced by humanity, there is a necessity to increase plant productivity. For this, biofungicides and biofertilizers present an ecologically friendly alternative to their chemical counterparts. Among these bioinoculants, endophytic bacteria wit

  2. Endophytic bacteria with plant growth promoting and biocontrol abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malfanova, Natalia V.

    2013-01-01

    Since global food insecurity is one of the major problems faced by humanity, there is a necessity to increase plant productivity. For this, biofungicides and biofertilizers present an ecologically friendly alternative to their chemical counterparts. Among these bioinoculants, endophytic bacteria wit

  3. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Eslami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis, respectively.Materials and Methods: 96 samples from women with bacterial vaginosis discharge referred to health centers dependent Shahid Beheshti University in 91-92 were taken by a gynecologist with a dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth and were immediately sent to the lab location in cold chain for the next stages of investigation. From Thioglycollate and TSB medium was cultured on blood agar and EMB and Palkam and Differential diagnosis environments, and then incubated for 24 h at 37°C. Strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus were cultured in MRSA environment and were transfered to the lab. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, MIC methods and antibiogram, Lactobacillus rhamnosus inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria is checked. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS software v.16.Results: The results of this study show the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial vaginosis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Entrococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E.Coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of the large number of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use means of preventing pregnancy and douching, respectively, 61%, 55%, 42% and 13% respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial vaginosis infection

  4. Frost-related dieback of willows. Comparison of epiphytically and endophytically isolated bacteria from different Salix clones, with emphasis on ice nucleation activity, pathogenic properties and seasonal variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.; Nejad, P.; Ramstedt, M. [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Plant Pathology and Biocontrol Unit; Granhall, U. [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Department of Microbiology

    2005-01-01

    Swedish Salix plantation for biomass production have been suffering severe dieback during the past 10 years, possibly due to the combination of frost and bacterial disease. As opposed to summer and winter, spring and autumn are periods when epiphytic populations of ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria are generally high. The culturable bacterial floras from stems of diseased plant of four Salix viminalis clones were compared in spring and autumn. Both epiphytic and endophytic bacteria were isolated (i.e. from plant surface and from tissues beneath the bark, respectively), characterised and tested for ice nucleating activity and pathogenicity. Some strains were also identified with BIOLOG and 16S rRNA. Endophytically isolated communities were generally more stable than epiphytes, both in number of isolates and type of bacteria. More types were found in autumn than in spring the same year, although the total number of strains isolated was rather constant. In contrast, more strains (and a higher percentage of the total community) expressed ice nucleating activity in spring than in autumn. The overall number of pathogenic strains remained stable but their proportion among the community tested on plants increased. A close relationship was observed between the dieback rates in the field and the percentage of pathogenic strains found in the different clones. The dominating bacterial type isolated, Sphingomonas spp., also contained the highest percentage of ice nucleation active pathogenic strains. (author)

  5. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Shahbazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS. The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%, limonene (11.50%, β-bourbonene (11.23%, cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%, trans-caryophyllene (1.04%, menthone (1.01%, menthol (1%, and terpinen-4-ol (0.99. The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL. Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent.

  6. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%), limonene (11.50%), β-bourbonene (11.23%), cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%), trans-caryophyllene (1.04%), menthone (1.01%), menthol (1%), and terpinen-4-ol (0.99). The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL). Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent.

  7. Virulence and pathogenicity of Candida albicans is enhanced in biofilms containing oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Morse, Daniel James; da Silva, Wander José; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; Wei, Xiaoqing; Wilson, Melanie; Milward, Paul; Lewis, Michael; Bradshaw, David; Williams, David Wynne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of bacteria on the virulence and pathogenicity of candidal biofilms. Mature biofilms (Candida albicans-only, bacteria-only, C. albicans with bacteria) were generated on acrylic and either analysed directly, or used to infect a reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Analyses included Candida hyphae enumeration and assessment of Candida virulence gene expression. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and Candida tissue invasion following biofilm infection of the RHOE were also measured. Candida hyphae were more prevalent (p biofilms also containing bacteria, with genes encoding secreted aspartyl-proteinases (SAP4/SAP6) and hyphal-wall protein (HWP1) up-regulated (p biofilm infections of RHOE. Multi-species infections exhibited higher hyphal proportions (p biofilms promoted Candida virulence, consideration should be given to the bacterial component when managing denture biofilm associated candidoses.

  8. Plant growth promoting bacteria from Crocus sativus rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2013-12-01

    Present study deals with the isolation of rhizobacteria and selection of plant growth promoting bacteria from Crocus sativus (Saffron) rhizosphere during its flowering period (October-November). Bacterial load was compared between rhizosphere and bulk soil by counting CFU/gm of roots and soil respectively, and was found to be ~40 times more in rhizosphere. In total 100 bacterial isolates were selected randomly from rhizosphere and bulk soil (50 each) and screened for in-vitro and in vivo plant growth promoting properties. The randomly isolated bacteria were identified by microscopy, biochemical tests and sequence homology of V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA gene. Polyphasic identification categorized Saffron rhizobacteria and bulk soil bacteria into sixteen different bacterial species with Bacillus aryabhattai (WRF5-rhizosphere; WBF3, WBF4A and WBF4B-bulk soil) common to both rhizosphere as well as bulk soil. Pseudomonas sp. in rhizosphere and Bacillus and Brevibacterium sp. in the bulk soil were the predominant genera respectively. The isolated rhizobacteria were screened for plant growth promotion activity like phosphate solubilization, siderophore and indole acetic acid production. 50 % produced siderophore and 33 % were able to solubilize phosphate whereas all the rhizobacterial isolates produced indole acetic acid. The six potential PGPR showing in vitro activities were used in pot trial to check their efficacy in vivo. These bacteria consortia demonstrated in vivo PGP activity and can be used as PGPR in Saffron as biofertilizers.This is the first report on the isolation of rhizobacteria from the Saffron rhizosphere, screening for plant growth promoting bacteria and their effect on the growth of Saffron plant.

  9. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  10. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Tran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  11. High incidence of plant growth-stimulating bacteria associated with the rhizosphere of wheat grown on salinated soil in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Validov, Shamil; Gafurova, Laziza; Kucharova, Zulfiya; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Soil salinization is increasing steadily in many parts of the world and causes major problems for plant productivity. Under these stress conditions, root-associated beneficial bacteria can help improve plant growth and nutrition. In this study, salt-tolerant bacteria from the rhizosphere of Uzbek wheat with potentially beneficial traits were isolated and characterized. Eight strains which initially positively affect the growth of wheat plants in vitro were investigated in detail. All eight strains are salt tolerant and have some of the following plant growth-beneficial properties: production of auxin, HCN, lipase or protease and wheat growth promotion. Using sequencing of part of the 16S rDNA, the eight new isolates were identified as Acinetobacter (two strains), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Bacillus cereus, Enterobacter hormaechei, Pantoae agglomerans and Alcaligenes faecalis. All these strains are potential human pathogens. Possible reasons for why these bacteria present in the rhizosphere and establish there are discussed.

  12. Efficient removal of pathogenic bacteria and viruses by multifunctional amine-modified magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Sihui; Yang, Yang; Shen, Zhiqiang; Shan, Junjun; Li, Yi; Yang, Shanshan; Zhu, Dandan

    2014-06-15

    A novel amine-functionalized magnetic Fe3O4-SiO2-NH2 nanoparticle was prepared by layer-by-layer method and used for rapid removal of both pathogenic bacteria and viruses from water. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, EDS, XRD, XPS, FT-IR, BET surface analysis, magnetic property tests and zeta-potential measurements, respectively, which demonstrated its well-defined core-shell structures and strong magnetic responsivity. Pathogenic bacteria and viruses are often needed to be removed conveniently because of a lot of co-existing conditions. The amine-modified nanoparticles we prepared were attractive for capturing a wide range of pathogens including not only bacteriophage f2 and virus (Poliovirus-1), but also various bacteria such as S. aureus, E. coli O157:H7, P. aeruginosa, Salmonella, and B. subtilis. Using as-prepared amine-functionalized MNPs as absorbent, the nonspecific removal efficiency of E. coli O157:H7 or virus was more than 97.39%, while it is only 29.8% with Fe3O4-SiO2 particles. From joint removal test of bacteria and virus, there are over 95.03% harmful E. coli O157:H7 that can be removed from mixed solution with polyclonal anti-E. coli O157:H7 antibody modified nanoparticles. Moreover, the synergy effective mechanism has also been suggested.

  13. Incidence of Bacteriocins Produced by Food-Related Lactic Acid Bacteria Active towards Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papadimitriou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the incidence of bacteriocins produced by 236 lactic acid bacteria (LAB food isolates against pathogenic or opportunistic pathogenic oral bacteria. This set of LAB contained several strains (≥17% producing bacteriocins active against food-related bacteria. Interestingly only Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 was able to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii, while Lactobacillus fermentum ACA-DC 179 and Lactobacillus plantarun ACA-DC 269 produced bacteriocins solely against Streptococcus oralis. Thus, the percentage of strains that were found to produce bacteriocins against oral bacteria was ~1.3%. The rarity of bacteriocins active against oral LAB pathogens produced by food-related LAB was unexpected given their close phylogenetic relationship. Nevertheless, when tested in inhibition assays, the potency of the bacteriocin(s of S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against the three oral streptococci was high. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis revealed that exposure of the target cells to the antimicrobial compounds caused major alterations of key cellular constituents. Our findings indicate that bacteriocins produced by food-related LAB against oral LAB may be rare, but deserve further investigation since, when discovered, they can be effective antimicrobials.

  14. Nisin and class IIa bacteriocin resistance among Listeria and other foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Malik, Ravinder Kumar; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Tejinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singroha, Garima; Vij, Shilpa; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    Food safety has been an important issue globally due to increasing foodborne diseases and change in food habits. To inactivate foodborne pathogens, various novel technologies such as biopreservation systems have been studied. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized peptides or proteins with antimicrobial activity produced by different groups of bacteria, but the bacteriocins produced by many lactic acid bacteria offer potential applications in food preservation. The use of bacteriocins in the food industry can help reduce the addition of chemical preservatives as well as the intensity of heat treatments, resulting in foods that are more naturally preserved. However, the development of highly tolerant and/or resistant strains may decrease the efficiency of bacteriocins as biopreservatives. Several mechanisms of bacteriocin resistance development have been proposed among various foodborne pathogens. The acquiring of resistance to bacteriocins can significantly affect physiological activity profile of bacteria, alter cell-envelope lipid composition, and also modify the antibiotic susceptibility/resistance profile of bacteria. This article presents a brief review on the scientific research about the various possible mechanisms involved in the development of resistance to nisin and Class IIa bacteriocins among the foodborne pathogens.

  15. Harpinxoo and Its Functional Domains Activate Pathogen-inducible Plant Promoters in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGJian-Ling; BAOZhi-Long; LIPing; CHENGuang-Yong; WANGJin-Sheng; DONGHan-Song

    2004-01-01

    Harpins are bacterial proteins that can enhance plant growth and defense against pathogens and insects. To elaborate whether harpins perform the diverse functions in coordination with the activation of specific promoters that contain particular elements, we cloned pathogen-inducible plant promoters PPP1, PPP2, and PPP3 from tobacco and investigated their responses to harpinxoo or its truncated fragments DEG, DIR, and DPR (domains for enhancing plant growth, insect resistance and pathogen resistance). PPP1 contains an internal repeat composed of two tandem 111bp fragments; 111bp in the repeat was deleted in PPP2. PPP3 contains a bacteria-inducible element; PPP1 and PPP2 additionally contain TAC-1 and Eli boxes inducible correspondingly by salicylic acid (SA) and elicitors. Function of cloned PPPs was confirmed based on their activation in transgenic Arabidopsis plants by Ralstonia solanacearum (Ralston) or SA. Harpinxoo, DEG, DIR, or DPR activated PPP1 and PPP2 but not PPP3, consistent with the presence of Eli boxes in promoters. PPP1 was ca. 3-fold more active than PPP2, suggesting that the internal repeat affects levels of the promoter activation.

  16. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrom Gary C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot. Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the

  17. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Clarke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, to replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacteria use chemical-directed regulation of flagellar rotation, a process known as chemotaxis, to move towards favorable environmental conditions. Chemotactic sensing of the plant surface is a potential mechanism through which foliar plant pathogens home in on wounds or stomata, but chemotactic systems in foliar plant pathogens are not well characterized. Comparative genomics of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto implicated annotated chemotaxis genes in the recent adaptations of one Pto lineage. We therefore characterized the chemosensory system of Pto. The Pto genome contains two primary chemotaxis gene clusters, che1 and che2. The che2 cluster is flanked by flagellar biosynthesis genes and similar to the canonical chemotaxis gene clusters of other bacteria based on sequence and synteny. Disruption of the primary phosphorelay kinase gene of the che2 cluster, cheA2, eliminated all swimming and surface motility at 21 °C but not 28 °C for Pto. The che1 cluster is located next to Type IV pili biosynthesis genes but disruption of cheA1 has no observable effect on twitching motility for Pto. Disruption of cheA2 also alters in planta fitness of the pathogen with strains lacking functional cheA2 being less fit in host plants but more fit in a non-host interaction.

  18. Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria: Mechanisms and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard R. Glick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide increases in both environmental damage and human population pressure have the unfortunate consequence that global food production may soon become insufficient to feed all of the world's people. It is therefore essential that agricultural productivity be significantly increased within the next few decades. To this end, agricultural practice is moving toward a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach. This includes both the increasing use of transgenic plants and plant growth-promoting bacteria as a part of mainstream agricultural practice. Here, a number of the mechanisms utilized by plant growth-promoting bacteria are discussed and considered. It is envisioned that in the not too distant future, plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB will begin to replace the use of chemicals in agriculture, horticulture, silviculture, and environmental cleanup strategies. While there may not be one simple strategy that can effectively promote the growth of all plants under all conditions, some of the strategies that are discussed already show great promise.

  19. Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria And Their Associated Resistance Genes in a Conventional Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2013-12-01

    With water scarcity as a pressing issue in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries, the treatment and reuse of municipal wastewater is increasingly being used as an alternative water source to supplement country water needs. Standards are in place to ensure a safe treated wastewater quality, however they do not regulate pathogenic bacteria and emerging contaminants. Information is lacking on the levels of risk to public health associated with these factors, the efficiency of conventional treatment strategies in removing them, and on wastewater treatment in Saudi Arabia in general. In this study, a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia is investigated to assess the efficiency of conventional treatment in meeting regulations and removing pathogens and emerging contaminants. The study found pathogenic bacterial genera, antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotic resistant bacteria, many of which were multi-resistant in plant discharges. It was found that although the treatments are able to meet traditional quality guidelines, there remains a risk from the discussed contaminants with wastewater reuse. A deeper understanding of this risk, and suggestions for more thorough guidelines and monitoring are needed.

  20. Cultivable endophytic bacteria from leaf bases of Agave tequilana and their role as plant growth promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Rodríguez,Julia del C.; Marcela De la Mora-Amutio; Luis A. Plascencia-Correa; Esmeralda Audelo-Regalado; Guardado, Francisco R.; Elías Hernández-Sánchez; Peña-Ramírez, Yuri J.; Adelfo Escalante; Miguel J. Beltrán-García; Tetsuya Ogura

    2015-01-01

    Agave tequilana Weber var. 'Azul' is grown for the production of tequila, inulin and syrup. Diverse bacteria inhabit plant tissues and play a crucial role for plant health and growth. In this study culturable endophytic bacteria were extracted from leaf bases of 100 healthy Agave tequilana plants. In plant tissue bacteria occurred at mean population densities of 3 million CFU/g of fresh plant tissue. Three hundred endophytic strains were isolated and 16s rDNA sequences grouped the bacteria in...

  1. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS BY MEANS OF PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ravlić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological control is the use of live beneficial organisms and products of their metabolism in the pests control. Plant pathogens can be used for weed control in three different ways: as classical, conservation and augmentative (inoculative and inundated biological control. Inundated biological control involves the use of bioherbicides (mycoherbicides or artificial breeding of pathogens and application in specific stages of crops and weeds. Biological control of weeds can be used where chemical herbicides are not allowed, if resistant weed species are present or in the integrated pest management against weeds with reduced herbicides doses and other non-chemical measures, but it has certain limitations and disadvantages.

  2. Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria that promote growth of ethnomedicinal plants in the subtropical forests of Meghalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongkhlaw, Fenella Mary War; Joshi, S R

    2014-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the endophytic and epiphytic bacteria associated with selected ethnomedicinal plants from the pristine subtropical forests of Meghalaya and analyse them for plant growth promotion and antagonistic ability. This study is an attempt to explore plant associated bacteria which are beneficial to host plants, and thus aid in the conservation of ethnomedicinal plants of the studied subtropical forests, which are dwindling due to exploitation. The plant growth promotion parameters like indole acetic acid (IAA) production, mineral phosphate solubilisation, acid phosphatase activity, presence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACC) gene, nitrogen fixation, cellulose digestion, chitin and pectin degrada- tion were screened among the isolates. The study revealed significant differences in bacterial population not only between the epiphytic and endophytic microhabitats, but also amongst the host plants. Out of the 70 isolated plant associated bacteria, Bacillus sp., Serratia sp., Pseudomonas sp., Pantoea sp., and Lysinibacillus sp. showed potent plant growth promotion properties. Bacillus siamensis C53 and B. subtilis cenB showed significant antagonistic activity against the tested pathogens. This study indicated the isolates inhabiting the plants prevalent in the subtropical sacred forests could be explored for use as plant growth promoters while practising the cultiva- tion and conservation of ethnomedicinal plants.

  3. New Trends in Impedimetric Biosensors for the Detection of Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixian Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of a rapid, sensitive, specific method for the foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection is of great importance to ensure food safety and security. In recent years impedimetric biosensors which integrate biological recognition technology and impedance have gained widespread application in the field of bacteria detection. This paper presents an overview on the progress and application of impedimetric biosensors for detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria, particularly the new trends in the past few years, including the new specific bio-recognition elements such as bacteriophage and lectin, the use of nanomaterials and microfluidics techniques. The applications of these new materials or techniques have provided unprecedented opportunities for the development of high-performance impedance bacteria biosensors. The significant developments of impedimetric biosensors for bacteria detection in the last five years have been reviewed according to the classification of with or without specific bio-recognition element. In addition, some microfluidics systems, which were used in the construction of impedimetric biosensors to improve analytical performance, are introduced in this review.

  4. Prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in Ixodes ricinus ticks in Central Bohemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klubal, Radek; Kopecky, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Sparagano, Olivier A E; Thomayerova, Jana; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the tick Ixodes ricinus were assessed in specimens unattached or attached to the skin of cats, dogs and humans, collected in the Czech Republic. The bacteria were detected by PCR in 97 of 142 pooled samples including 204 ticks, i.e. 1-7 ticks per sample, collected at the same time from one host. A fragment of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced from 32 randomly selected samples. The most frequent sequences were those related to Candidatus Midichloria midichlori (71% of cloned sequences), followed by Diplorickettsia (13%), Spiroplasma (3%), Rickettsia (3%), Pasteurella (3%), Morganella (3%), Pseudomonas (2%), Bacillus (1%), Methylobacterium (1%) and Phyllobacterium (1%). The phylogenetic analysis of Spiroplasma 16S rRNA gene sequences showed two groups related to Spiroplasma eriocheiris and Spiroplasma melliferum, respectively. Using group-specific primers, the following potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected: Borellia (in 20% of the 142 samples), Rickettsia (12%), Spiroplasma (5%), Diplorickettsia (5%) and Anaplasma (2%). In total, 68% of I. ricinus samples (97/142) contained detectable bacteria and 13% contained two or more putative pathogenic groups. The prevalence of tick-borne bacteria was similar to the observations in other European countries.

  5. Electrochemical impedance immunosensor for rapid detection of stressed pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekir, Karima; Barhoumi, Houcine; Braiek, Mohamed; Chrouda, Amani; Zine, Nadia; Abid, Nabil; Maaref, Abdelrazek; Bakhrouf, Amina; Ouada, Hafedh Ben; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we report the adaptation of bacteria to stress conditions that induce instability of their cultural, morphological, and enzymatic characters, on which the identification of pathogenic bacteria is based. These can raise serious issues during the characterization of bacteria. The timely detection of pathogens is also a subject of great importance. For this reason, our objective is oriented towards developing an immunosensing system for rapid detection and quantification of Staphylococcus aureus. Polyclonal anti-S. aureus are immobilized onto modified gold electrode by self-assembled molecular monolayer (SAM) method. The electrochemical performances of the developed immunosensor were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy through the monitoring of the charge transfer resistance at the modified solid/liquid interface using ferri-/ferrocyanide as redox probe. The developed immunosensor was applied to detect stressed and resuscitate bacteria. As a result, a stable and reproducible immunosensor with sensitivity of 15 kΩ/decade and a detection limit of 10 CFU/mL was obtained for the S. aureus concentrations ranging from 10(1) to 10(7) CFU/mL. A low deviation in the immunosensor response (±10 %) was signed when it is exposed to stressed and not stressed bacteria.

  6. Role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in RANKL-mediated bone destruction in periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiya, Mikihito; Giro, Gabriela; Taubman, Martin A.; Han, Xiaozhe; Mayer, Marcia P.A.; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence suggest that hyperimmune responses to periodontal bacteria result in the destruction of periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone. The etiological roles of periodontal bacteria in the onset and progression of periodontal disease (PD) are well documented. However, the mechanism underlying the engagement of periodontal bacteria in RANKL-mediated alveolar bone resorption remains unclear. Therefore, this review article addresses three critical subjects. First, we discuss earlier studies of immune intervention, ultimately leading to the identification of bacteria-reactive lymphocytes as the cellular source of osteoclast-induction factor lymphokine (now called RANKL) in the context of periodontal bone resorption. Next, we consider (1) the effects of periodontal bacteria on RANKL production from a variety of adaptive immune effector cells, as well as fibroblasts, in inflamed periodontal tissue and (2) the bifunctional roles (upregulation vs. downregulation) of LPS produced from periodontal bacteria in a RANKL-induced osteoclast-signal pathway. Future studies in these two areas could lead to new therapeutic approaches for the management of PD by down-modulating RANKL production and/or RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in the context of host immune responses against periodontal pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21523224

  7. Antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-negative pathogens, produced and delivered by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-11-15

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella . In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis . Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon-optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter PnisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host's viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations.

  8. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Alvaro D; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation, and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of "intact" intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections.

  9. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro D. Ortega

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of ‘intact’ intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections.

  10. Multiplex detection of plant pathogens through the Luminex MagPlex bead system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vlugt, René A A; van Raaij, Henry; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Bergervoet, Jan H W

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a versatile multiplex method for both the serological and molecular detection of plant pathogens. The Luminex MagPlex bead system uses small paramagnetic microspheres ("beads"), either coated with specific antibodies or oligonucleotides, which capture respectively viruses and/or bacteria or PCR products obtained from their genetic material. The Luminex MagPlex bead system allows true multiplex detection of up to 500 targets in a single sample on a routine basis. The liquid suspension nature of the method significantly improves (1) assay speed, (2) detection limits and (3) dynamic range. It can also considerably reduce labor and consumables costs.

  11. The biotechnological use and potential of plant pathogenic smut fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrügge, Michael; Kellner, Ronny; Schipper, Kerstin

    2013-04-01

    Plant pathogens of the family Ustilaginaceae parasitise mainly on grasses and cause smut disease. Among the best characterised members of this family are the covered smut fungus Ustilago hordei colonising barley and oat as well as the head smut Sporisorium reilianum and the corn smut Ustilago maydis, both infecting maize. Over the past years, U. maydis in particular has matured into a model system for diverse topics like plant-pathogen interaction, cellular transport processes or DNA repair. Consequently, a broad set of genetic, molecular and system biological methods has been established. This set currently serves as a strong foundation to improve existing and establish novel biotechnological applications. Here, we review four promising aspects covering different fields of applied science: (1) synthesis of secondary metabolites produced at fermenter level. (2) Lipases and other hydrolytic enzymes with potential roles in biocatalytic processes. (3) Degradation of ligno-cellulosic plant materials for biomass conversion. (4) Protein expression based on unconventional secretion, a novel approach inspired by basic research on mRNA transport. Thus, plant pathogenic Ustilaginaceae offer a great potential for future biotechnological applications by combining basic research and applied science.

  12. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs.

  13. Autonomously Sensing Hydrogels for the Rapid and Selective Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mir-Morteza Sadat; Laabei, Maisem; Jenkins, A Tobias A; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-12-01

    The development of a versatile approach for the rapid and sensitive detection of relevant pathogenic bacteria and autonomous signaling of the detection events in reporter hydrogel film coatings is reported. Exploiting chitosan hydrogel films equipped with chromogenic or fluorogenic reporter moieties, the presence of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is sensed within 1 h by detecting the characteristic enzymes α-glucosidase and elastase with limits of detection (LOD) hydrogels comprise an interesting platform for the rapid detection of bacteria.

  14. RESPONSE OF PLANT-BACTERIA INTERACTION MODELS TO NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Degrassi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using some models developed to study the plant-bacteria interaction mechanisms for the assessment of the impact of chronic exposure to nanoparticles. Rice-associated bacteria showed that some models are sensitive to the presence of NPs and allow a quantification of the effects. Further work needs to be performed in order to set appropriate reference baselines and standards to assess the impact of NPs on the proposed biological systems.

  15. Pathogenic infection and the oxidative defences in plant apoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwell, P P; Page, A; Piślewska, M; Wojtaszek, P

    2001-01-01

    The structural and functional continuum of the plant apoplast is the first site of contact with a pathogen and plays a crucial role in initiation and coordination of many defence responses. In this paper, we present an overview of the involvement of the plant apoplast in plant-pathogen interactions. The process of infection of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is analysed. The ultrastructural features of plant defence responses to fungal infection are then compared with those observed in plants or cell suspensions treated with various elicitors. Changes in cell walls and in whole plant cells responding to infection seem to be highly similar in all systems used. Model systems of French bean and white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) are then utilised to provide some biochemical characteristics of oxidative reactions in the apoplast evoked by elicitor treatment. The species specificity of various mechanisms generating reactive oxygen species is discussed, and some details of pH-dependent H2O2-generating activity of peroxidases are demonstrated. As its exocellular nature is an important feature of the oxidative burst, the major consequence of this event, i.e., the oxidative cross-linking of wall components during the papilla formation and strengthening of the walls, is analysed. Finally, the possible involvement of other wall-associated and developmentally regulated H2O2-generating mechanisms, like amine and oxalate oxidases, in plant defence is demonstrated. It is concluded that under stress conditions, such apoplastic mechanisms might be employed to increase plants' chances of survival.

  16. Detection of potential transgenic plant DNA recipients among soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Jean-Michel; Bernillon, Dominique; Kay, Elizabeth; Faugier, Aurélie; Rybalka, Oleksandra; Dessaux, Yves; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of gene transfer from transgenic plants to bacteria is dependent on gene number and the presence of homologous sequences. The large number of transgene copies in transplastomic (transgenes contained in the chloroplast genome) plant cells as well as the prokaryotic origin of the transgene, may thus significantly increase the likelihood of gene transfer to bacteria that colonize plant tissues. In order to assess the probability of such transfer, the length of homologous DNA sequences required between the transgene and the genome of the bacterial host was assessed. In addition, the probability that bacteria, which co-infect diseased plants, are transformable and have sequences similar to the flanking regions of the transgene was evaluated. Using Acinetobacter baylyi strain BD143 and transplastomic tobacco plants harboring the aadA gene (streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance), we found that sequences identical to the flanking regions containing as few as 55 nucleotides were sufficient for recombination to occur. Consequently, a collection of bacterial isolates able to colonize tobacco plant tissue infected by Ralstonia solanacearum strain K60 was obtained, screened for DNA sequence similarity with the chloroplastic genes accD and rbcL flanking the transgene, and tested for their ability to uptake extracellular DNA (broad host-range pBBR1MCS plasmids) by natural or electro-transformation. Results showed that among the 288 bacterial isolates tested, 8% presented DNA sequence similarity with one or both chloroplastic regions flanking the transgene. Two isolates, identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp., were able to integrate exogenous plasmid DNA by electro-transformation and natural transformation, respectively. Our data suggest that transplastomic plant DNA recipients might be present in soil bacterial communities.

  17. The diversity of citrus endophytic bacteria and their interactions with Xylella fastidiosa and host plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Lúcio Azevedo

    Full Text Available Abstract The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC and has been associated with important losses in commercial orchards of all sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.] cultivars. The development of this disease depends on the environmental conditions, including the endophytic microbial community associated with the host plant. Previous studies have shown that X. fastidiosa interacts with the endophytic community in xylem vessels as well as in the insect vector, resulting in a lower bacterial population and reduced CVC symptoms. The citrus endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium mesophilicum can trigger X. fastidiosa response in vitro, which results in reduced growth and induction of genes associated with energy production, stress, transport, and motility, indicating that X. fastidiosa has an adaptive response to M. mesophilicum. Although this response may result in reduced CVC symptoms, the colonization rate of the endophytic bacteria should be considered in studies that intend to use this endophyte to suppress CVC disease. Symbiotic control is a new strategy that uses symbiotic endophytes as biological control agents to antagonize or displace pathogens. Candidate endophytes for symbiotic control of CVC must occupy the xylem of host plants and attach to the precibarium of sharpshooter insects to access the pathogen. In the present review, we focus on interactions between endophytic bacteria from sweet orange plants and X. fastidiosa, especially those that may be candidates for control of CVC.

  18. Emission of bacteria and fungi in the air from wastewater treatment plants - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    An increase in global population, coupled with intensive development of industry and agriculture, has resulted in the generation and accumulation of large amounts of waste around the world. The spread of pathogenic microorganisms, endotoxins, odours and dust particles in the air is an inevitable consequence of waste production and waste management. Thus, the risk of infections associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has become of a particular importance in recent decades. Sewage and unstable sludge contain various pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and human and animal parasites. These microorganisms can be transmitted to the ambient air in wastewater droplets, which are generated during aeration or mechanical moving of the sewage. Bioaerosols generated during wastewater treatment may therefore pose a potential health hazard to workers of these plants or to habitants of their surroundings. The degree of human exposure to airborne bacteria, fungi, endotoxin and other allergens may vary significantly depending upon the type and the capacity of a plant, kind of the facilities, performed activities and meteorological conditions.

  19. Long-term social dynamics drive loss of function in pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum Andersen, Sandra; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    social dynamics shown to drive evolutionary change in vitro. We provide evidence to show that long-term behavioral dynamics observed in a pathogen are driven by selection to outcompete neighboring conspecific cells through social interactions. We find that Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, causing lung......Laboratory experiments show that social interactions between bacterial cells can drive evolutionary change at the population level, but significant challenges limit attempts to assess the relevance of these findings to natural populations, where selection pressures are unknown. We have increasingly...... in the host environment. More generally, we provide an example of how sequence analysis can be used to generate testable hypotheses about selection driving long-term phenotypic changes of pathogenic bacteria in situ....

  20. Rapid and high-throughput detection of highly pathogenic bacteria by Ibis PLEX-ID technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Jacob

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we describe the identification of highly pathogenic bacteria using an assay coupling biothreat group-specific PCR with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS run on an Ibis PLEX-ID high-throughput platform. The biothreat cluster assay identifies most of the potential bioterrorism-relevant microorganisms including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei, Brucella species, and Coxiella burnetii. DNA from 45 different reference materials with different formulations and different concentrations were chosen and sent to a service screening laboratory that uses the PCR/ESI-MS platform to provide a microbial identification service. The standard reference materials were produced out of a repository built up in the framework of the EU funded project "Establishment of Quality Assurances for Detection of Highly Pathogenic Bacteria of Potential Bioterrorism Risk" (EQADeBa. All samples were correctly identified at least to the genus level.

  1. Two-component signal transduction as potential drug targets in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Takafumi; Okamoto, Sho; Doi, Akihiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2010-04-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance among pathogenic bacteria from mink (Neovison vison) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaisen, Nanett Kvist; Lassen, Desireé Corvera Kløve; Chriél, Mariann

    2017-01-01

    of antimicrobial resistance among pathogenic bacteria isolated from Danish mink during the period 2014-2016. The aim of this investigation was to provide data on antimicrobial resistance and consumption, to serve as background knowledge for new veterinary guidelines for prudent and optimal antimicrobial usage...... of resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin. The antimicrobial consumption increased significantly during 2007-2012, and fluctuated at a high level during 2012-2016, except for a temporary drop in 2013-2014. The majority of the prescribed antimicrobials were aminopenicillins followed by tetracyclines...... and macrolides. Conclusions: The study showed that antimicrobial resistance was common in most pathogenic bacteria from mink, in particular hemolytic E. coli. There is a need of guidelines for prudent use of antimicrobials for mink....

  3. Transfer of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline in pathogenic bacteria from fish and aquaculture environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmetti, Elena; Korhonen, Jenni M; Heikkinen, Jouni; Morelli, Lorenzo; von Wright, Atte

    2009-04-01

    The transferability of a large plasmid that harbors a tetracycline resistance gene tet(S), to fish and human pathogens was assessed using electrotransformation and conjugation. The plasmid, originally isolated from fish intestinal Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KYA-7, has potent antagonistic activity against the selected recipients (Lactococcus garvieae and Listeria monocytogenes), preventing conjugation. Therefore the tetracycline resistance determinant was transferred via electroporation to L. garvieae. A transformant clone was used as the donor in conjugation experiments with three different L. monocytogenes strains. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from fish-associated lactic bacteria to L. monocytogenes, even if the donor L. garvieae was not the original host of the tetracycline resistance but experimentally created by electroporation. These results demonstrate that the antibiotic resistance genes in the fish intestinal bacteria have the potential to spread both to fish and human pathogens, posing a risk to aquaculture and consumer safety.

  4. Interactions of Methylotrophs with Plants and Other Heterotrophic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Iguchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylotrophs, which can utilize methane and/or methanol as sole carbon and energy sources, are key players in the carbon cycle between methane and CO2, the two most important greenhouse gases. This review describes the relationships between methylotrophs and plants, and between methanotrophs (methane-utilizers, a subset of methylotrophs and heterotrophic bacteria. Some plants emit methane and methanol from their leaves, and provide methylotrophs with habitats. Methanol-utilizing methylotrophs in the genus Methylobacterium are abundant in the phyllosphere and have the ability to promote the growth of some plants. Methanotrophs also inhabit the phyllosphere, and methanotrophs with high methane oxidation activities have been found on aquatic plants. Both plant and environmental factors are involved in shaping the methylotroph community on plants. Methanotrophic activity can be enhanced by heterotrophic bacteria that provide growth factors (e.g., cobalamin. Information regarding the biological interaction of methylotrophs with other organisms will facilitate a better understanding of the carbon cycle that is driven by methylotrophs.

  5. Lifestyles of the effector-rich: genome-enabled characterization of bacterial plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequencing of bacterial plant pathogens is providing transformative insights into the complex network of molecular plant-microbe interactions mediated by extracellular effectors during pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens sequenced to completion are phylogenetically diverse and vary significant...

  6. The Brucella suis Genome Reveals Fundamental Similarities between Animal and Plant Pathogens and Symbionts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ian T. Paulsen; Rekha Seshadri; Karen E. Nelson; Jonathan A. Eisen; John F. Heidelberg; Timothy D. Read; Robert J. Dodson; Lowell Umayam; Lauren M. Brinkac; Maureen J. Beanan; Sean C. Daugherty; Robert T. Deboy; A. Scott Durkin; James F. Kolonay; Ramana Madupu; William C. Nelson; Bola Ayodeji; Margaret Kraul; Jyoti Shetty; Joel Malek; Susan E. van Aken; Steven Riedmuller; Herve Tettelin; Steven R. Gill; Owen White; Steven L. Salzberg; David L. Hoover; Luther E. Lindler; Shirley M. Halling; Stephen M. Boyle; Claire M. Fraser

    2002-01-01

    .... Extensive gene synteny between B. suis chromosome 1 and the genome of the plant symbiont Mesorhizobium loti emphasizes the similarity between this animal pathogen and plant pathogens and symbionts...

  7. Nice to meet you: genetic, epigenetic and metabolic controls of plant perception of beneficial associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria in non-leguminous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, T L G; Ballesteros, H G F; Thiebaut, F; Ferreira, P C G; Hemerly, A S

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of rhizosphere diazotrophic bacteria are able to establish beneficial associations with plants, being able to associate to root surfaces or even endophytically colonize plant tissues. In common, both associative and endophytic types of colonization can result in beneficial outcomes to the plant leading to plant growth promotion, as well as increase in tolerance against biotic and abiotic stresses. An intriguing question in such associations is how plant cell surface perceives signals from other living organisms, thus sorting pathogens from beneficial ones, to transduce this information and activate proper responses that will finally culminate in plant adaptations to optimize their growth rates. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of genetic and epigenetic controls of plant-bacteria signaling and recognition during beneficial associations with associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria. Finally, we propose that "soil-rhizosphere-rhizoplane-endophytes-plant" could be considered as a single coordinated unit with dynamic components that integrate the plant with the environment to generate adaptive responses in plants to improve growth. The homeostasis of the whole system should recruit different levels of regulation, and recognition between the parties in a given environment might be one of the crucial factors coordinating these adaptive plant responses.

  8. Plant-pathogen interactions: what microarray tells about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodha, T D; Basak, J

    2012-01-01

    Plant defense responses are mediated by elementary regulatory proteins that affect expression of thousands of genes. Over the last decade, microarray technology has played a key role in deciphering the underlying networks of gene regulation in plants that lead to a wide variety of defence responses. Microarray is an important tool to quantify and profile the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously, with two main aims: (1) gene discovery and (2) global expression profiling. Several microarray technologies are currently in use; most include a glass slide platform with spotted cDNA or oligonucleotides. Till date, microarray technology has been used in the identification of regulatory genes, end-point defence genes, to understand the signal transduction processes underlying disease resistance and its intimate links to other physiological pathways. Microarray technology can be used for in-depth, simultaneous profiling of host/pathogen genes as the disease progresses from infection to resistance/susceptibility at different developmental stages of the host, which can be done in different environments, for clearer understanding of the processes involved. A thorough knowledge of plant disease resistance using successful combination of microarray and other high throughput techniques, as well as biochemical, genetic, and cell biological experiments is needed for practical application to secure and stabilize yield of many crop plants. This review starts with a brief introduction to microarray technology, followed by the basics of plant-pathogen interaction, the use of DNA microarrays over the last decade to unravel the mysteries of plant-pathogen interaction, and ends with the future prospects of this technology.

  9. Effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Yazawa, Satoru; Nakagawa, Yasutaka; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2015-04-15

    Alkyl parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical products. However, the mode of action of these chemicals has not been assessed thoroughly. In this study, we determined the effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi. All the fungi tested, were susceptible to parabens. The effect of linear alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi was related to the length of the alkyl chain. In addition, the antifungal activity was correlated with the paraben-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. The antifungal activity of linear alkyl parabens likely originates, at least in part, from their ability to inhibit the membrane respiratory chain, especially mitochondrial complex II. Additionally, we determined that some alkyl parabens inhibit Alternaria brassicicola infection of cabbage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O’Toole, George A; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and i...

  11. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gita Eslami; Sudabeh Taheri; Eznollah Azargashb; raheleh karimiravesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis, respectively.Materials and Methods: 96 samples from women with bacterial vaginosis di...

  12. Tobraviruses--plant pathogens and tools for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Stuart A

    2010-07-01

    The tobraviruses, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV), Pea early-browning virus (PEBV) and Pepper ringspot virus (PepRSV), are positive-strand RNA viruses with rod-shaped virus particles that are transmitted between plants by trichodorid nematodes. As a group, these viruses infect many plant species, with TRV having the widest host range. Recent studies have begun to dissect the interaction of TRV with potato, currently the most commercially important crop disease caused by any of the tobraviruses. As well as being successful plant pathogens, these viruses have become widely used as vectors for expression in plants of nonviral proteins or, more frequently, as initiators of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Precisely why tobraviruses should be so effective as VIGS vectors is not known; however, molecular studies of the mode of action of the tobravirus silencing suppressor protein are shedding some light on this process.

  13. COAGGREGATION AND COAGGREGATION INHIBITION BETWEEN PERIO-PATHOGENIC AND CARIOGENIC BACTERIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Rao; LI De-yi

    2005-01-01

    Objective To screen the coaggregating pairs between perio-pathogenic and cariogenic bacteria and to investigate the susceptibility of these coaggregations to inhibitors. Methods 4 strains of perio-pathogenic bacteria, Fusobacterium nuleatum (Fn) ATCC 10953, Actinobacilllus actinomycetem comitans (Aa) Y4, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) ATCC 33277,Prevotella intermedia (Pi) ATCC 25261 and 4 strains of cariogenic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans (Sm) Ingbritt, Streptococcus sanguis (Ss) 34, Actinomyces viscosus (Av) 19246 and Lactobacillus acidophilus (La) ATCC 4356 were used to determine the coaggregating degrees of various combinations of the above bacteria by a visual assay and a turbidimetric assay. Then more than +2(or 20%) coaggregation degrees' pairs were used to investigate the inhibitory effect of lactose and arginine and to identify the minimum of their coaggregation-inhibitory concentration. Results The coaggregation degrees of Fn-Av, Pg-Av, Fn-Sm, Fn-Ss, Fn-La and Pg-Ss pairs were higher than +2(20%). 3.0 ~ 6.0mmol/L of arginine were considerably effective to the above pairs except Fn-Av pair and the disaggregation degrees were 49% ~ 92%. The maximum of their disaggregation degree to Fn-Av pair was just 18%. 120 ~ 300mmol/L of lactose were significantly effective to Pg-Ss pair, the disaggregation degrees were 57% ~ 91%. They partially inhibited Pg-Av pair and were almost ineffective to Fn-G + pairs. Conclusion The coaggregations between perio-pathogenic and cariogenic bacteria are highly specific. Most of them are relatively sensitive to arginine.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization rapidly detects three different pathogenic bacteria in urinary tract infection samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Li, Yan; Wang, Ming; Pan, Xiao P; Tang, Yong F

    2010-11-01

    The detection of pathogenic bacteria in urine is an important criterion for diagnosing urinary tract infections (UTIs). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted, fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes, bacterial pathogens present in urine samples were identified within 3-4 h. In this study, three probes that are specific for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus were designed based on the conserved 16S RNA sequences, whereas probe Eub338 broadly recognizes all bacteria. We collected a total of 1000 urine samples, and 325 of these samples tested positive for a UTI via traditional culturing techniques; additionally, all 325 of these samples tested positive with the Eub338 probe in FISH analysis. FISH analyses with species-specific probes were performed in parallel to the test the ability to differentiate among several pathogenic bacteria. The samples for these experiments included 76 E. coli infected samples, 32 E. faecalis infected samples and 9 S. aureus infected samples. Compared to conventional methods of bacterial identification, the FISH method produced positive results for >90% of the samples tested. FISH has the potential to become an extremely useful diagnostic tool for UTIs because it has a quick turnaround time and high accuracy.

  15. In-situ detection of multiple pathogenic bacteria on food surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yating; Horikawa, Shin; Hu, Jiajia; Chen, I.-Hsuan; Hu, Jing; Barbaree, James M.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2015-05-01

    Real-time in-situ detection of pathogenic bacteria on fresh food surfaces was accomplished with phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors. The ME biosensor is constructed of a small rectangular strip of ME material that is coated with a biomolecular recognition element (phage, antibodies or proteins, etc.) that is specific to the target pathogen. This mass-sensitive ME biosensor is wirelessly actuated into mechanical resonance by an externally applied time-varying magnetic field. When the biosensor binds with target bacteria, the mass of the sensor increases, resulting in a decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. In order to compensate for nonspecific binding, control biosensors without phage were used in this experiment. In previous research, the biosensors were measured one by one. However, the simultaneous measurement of multiple sensors was accomplished in this research, and promises to greatly shorten the analysis time for bacterial detection. Additionally, the use of multiple biosensors enables the possibility of simultaneous detection of different pathogenic bacteria. This paper presents results of experiments in which multiple phage-based ME biosensors were simultaneously monitored. The E2 phage and JRB7 phage from a landscape phage library served as the bio-recognition element that have the capability of binding specifically with Salmonella typhimurium and B. anthracis spores, respectively. Real-time in-situ detection of Salmonella typhimurium and B. anthracis spores on food surfaces are presented.

  16. Neighborhood diversity of potentially pathogenic bacteria in drinking water from the city of Maroua, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy-Profitós, Jessica; Lee, Seungjun; Mouhaman, Arabi; Garabed, Rebecca; Moritz, Mark; Piperata, Barbara; Lee, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the spatial variation of potential gastrointestinal pathogens within drinking water sources and home storage containers in four neighborhoods in Maroua, Cameroon. Samples were collected from source (n = 28) and home containers (n = 60) in each study neighborhood. Pathogen contamination was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, targeting Campylobacter spp., Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (virulence genes, stx1 and stx2), and Salmonella spp. Microbial source tracking (MST) targeted three different host-specific markers: HF183 (human), Rum2Bac (ruminant) and GFD (poultry) to identify contamination sources. Staphylococcus aureus and the tetracycline-resistance gene (tetQ) were assessed to measure human hand contact and presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Pathogen/MST levels were compared statistically and spatially, and neighborhood variation was compared with previously collected demographic information. All the test fecal markers and pathogens (except Arcobacter) were detected in home and source samples. Two neighborhoods tested positive for most pathogens/MST while the others only tested positive for one or two. Spatial variation of pathogens/MST existed between sources, storage containers, and neighborhoods. Differing population density and ethno-economic characteristics could potentially explain variation. Future research should explore the influence of demographic and ethno-economic factors on water quality during microbial risk assessments in urban Africa.

  17. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria and their role in plant growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, H; Fraga, R

    1999-10-01

    The use of phosphate solubilizing bacteria as inoculants simultaneously increases P uptake by the plant and crop yield. Strains from the genera Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Rhizobium are among the most powerful phosphate solubilizers. The principal mechanism for mineral phosphate solubilization is the production of organic acids, and acid phosphatases play a major role in the mineralization of organic phosphorous in soil. Several phosphatase-encoding genes have been cloned and characterized and a few genes involved in mineral phosphate solubilization have been isolated. Therefore, genetic manipulation of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria to improve their ability to improve plant growth may include cloning genes involved in both mineral and organic phosphate solubilization, followed by their expression in selected rhizobacterial strains. Chromosomal insertion of these genes under appropriate promoters is an interesting approach.

  18. Isolation of lactic acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Jelena; Yüksel-Dadak, Aytül; Dröge, Stefan; König, Helmut

    2017-02-20

    Direct molecular approaches provide hints that lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the degradation process of organic material to methanogenetic substrates in biogas plants. However, their diversity in biogas fermenter samples has not been analyzed in detail yet. For that reason, five different biogas fermenters, which were fed mainly with maize silage and manure from cattle or pigs, were examined for the occurrence of lactic acid-forming bacteria. A total of 197 lactic acid-forming bacterial strains were isolated, which we assigned to 21 species, belonging to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Pseudoramibacter-related. A qualitative multiplex system and a real-time quantitative PCR could be developed for most isolates, realized by the selection of specific primers. Their role in biogas plants was discussed on the basis of the quantitative results and on physiological data of the isolates.

  19. Non-biting flying insects as carriers of pathogenic bacteria in a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Borges Kappel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Insects have been described as mechanical vectors of nosocomial infections. Methods Non-biting flying insects were collected inside a pediatric ward and neonatal-intensive care unit (ICU of a Brazilian tertiary hospital. Results Most (86.4% of them were found to carry one or more species of bacteria on their external surfaces. The bacteria isolated were Gram-positive bacilli (68.2% or cocci (40.9%, and Gram-negative bacilli (18.2%. Conclusions Insects collected inside a hospital were carrying pathogenic bacteria; therefore, one must consider the possibility they may act as mechanical vectors of infections, in especially for debilitated or immune-compromised patients in the hospital environments where the insects were collected.

  20. Detection and identification of intestinal pathogenic bacteria by hybridization to oligonucleotide microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Qun Jin; Jun-Wen Li; Sheng-Qi Wang; Fu-Huan Chao; Xin-Wei Wang; Zheng-Quan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the common intestinal pathogenic bacteria quickly and accurately.METHODS: A rapid (<3 h) experimental procedure was set up based upon the gene chip technology. Target genes were amplified and hybridized by oligonucleotide microarrays.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy strains of bacteria in pure culture belonging to 11 genera were successfully discriminated under comparatively same conditions, and a series of specific hybridization maps corresponding to each kind of bacteria were obtained. When this method was applied to 26 divided cultures, 25 (96.2%) were identified.CONCLUSION: Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus,Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus sp., Bacillus cereus,Vibrio cholerae, Enterococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Campylobacter jejuni can be detected and identified by our microarrays. The accuracy, range,and discrimination power of this assay can be continually improved by adding further oligonucleotides to the arrays without any significant increase of complexity or cost.

  1. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins.

  2. Pathogen filtration to control plant disease outbreak in greenhouse production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sangho; Krasnow, Charles; Bhalsod, Gemini; Granke, Leah; Harlan, Blair; Hausbeck, Mary; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Previous research has been extensively focused on understanding the fate and transport of human microbial pathogens in soil and water environments. However, little is known about the transport of plant pathogens, although these pathogens are often found in irrigation waters and could cause severe crop damage and economical loss. Water mold pathogens including Phytophthora spp. and Pythium spp. are infective to a wide range of vegetable and floriculture crops, and they are primarily harbored in soils and disseminated through water flow. It is challenging to control these pathogens because they often quickly develop resistance to many fungicides. Therefore, this multi-scale study aimed to investigate physical removal of plant pathogens from water by filtration, thus reducing the pathogen exposure risks to crops. In column-scale experiments, we studied controlling factors on the transport and retention of Phytophthora capsici zoospores in saturated columns packed with iron oxide coated-sand and uncoated-sand under varying solution chemistry. Biflagellate zoospores were less retained than encysted zoospores, and lower solution pH and greater iron oxide content increased the retention of encysted zoospores. These results provided insights on environmental dispersal of Phytophthora zoospores in natural soils as well as on developing cost-effective engineered filtration systems for pathogen removal. Using small-scale greenhouse filtration systems, we further investigated the performance of varying filter media (i.e., granular sand, iron oxide coated ceramic porous media, and activated carbon) in mitigating disease outbreaks of Phytophthora and Pythium for greenhouse-grown squash and poinsettia, respectively, in comparison with fungicide treatment. For squash, filtration by iron oxide coated media was more effective in reducing the Phytophthora infection, comparing to sand filtration and fungicide application. For poinsettia, sand filtration performed better in controlling

  3. Antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria in transgenic plant fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Sanguin, Hervé; Poté, John; Navarro, Elisabeth; Bernillon, Dominique; Mavingui, Patrick; Wildi, Walter; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2008-03-11

    Understanding the prevalence and polymorphism of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria and their potential to be transferred horizontally is required to evaluate the likelihood and ecological (and possibly clinical) consequences of the transfer of these genes from transgenic plants to soil bacteria. In this study, we combined culture-dependent and -independent approaches to study the prevalence and diversity of bla genes in soil bacteria and the potential impact that a 10-successive-year culture of the transgenic Bt176 corn, which has a blaTEM marker gene, could have had on the soil bacterial community. The bla gene encoding resistance to ampicillin belongs to the beta-lactam antibiotic family, which is widely used in medicine but is readily compromised by bacterial antibiotic resistance. Our results indicate that soil bacteria are naturally resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactam antibiotics, including the third cephalosporin generation, which has a slightly stronger discriminating effect on soil isolates than other cephalosporins. These high resistance levels for a wide range of antibiotics are partly due to the polymorphism of bla genes, which occur frequently among soil bacteria. The blaTEM116 gene of the transgenic corn Bt176 investigated here is among those frequently found, thus reducing any risk of introducing a new bacterial resistance trait from the transgenic material. In addition, no significant differences were observed in bacterial antibiotic-resistance levels between transgenic and nontransgenic corn fields, although the bacterial populations were different.

  4. Effect of poultry decontaminants concentration on growth kinetics for pathogenic and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, Elena; González de Caso, Beatriz; Prieto, Miguel; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2008-10-01

    Various chemical compounds are currently under review for final approval as poultry decontaminants in the European Union (EU). Concentration is among the factors considered by the EU authorities in the evaluation of these treatments. The aim of this research was to compare the growth parameters for pathogenic and spoilage bacteria in presence of high and low concentrations of poultry decontaminants to assess whether such treatments could involve a potential sanitary risk for consumers. Growth curves for Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Brochothrix thermosphacta were obtained at different levels of trisodium phosphate (TSP; 1.74%; 0.58%), acidified sodium chlorite (ASC; 210 ppm; 70 ppm) and citric acid (CA; 0.27%; 0.09%). The modified Gompertz equation was used as primary model to fit observed data. ASC and TSP were the most effective compounds in increasing lag phase (L) and reducing maximum growth rate (mu) in Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria were more influenced by CA. At high TSP levels, mu for Salmonella decreased. Low TSP levels increased mu for Salmonella and Listeria relative to control samples. In presence of 0.27% CA, Brochothrix showed the highest L and the lowest mu among strains tested. These results suggest that low TSP and high CA concentrations could favour the outgrowth of pathogenic bacteria (e.g. Salmonella) relative to spoilage bacteria, rending these treatments potentially dangerous for consumers. The findings of this study may be useful to the EU authorities and meat processors in their efforts to select adequate treatments for control of bacteria on poultry.

  5. SCREENING OF PLANT EXTRACTS FOR ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vatľák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was antimicrobial action of the methanolic extracts of Equisetum arvense L. and Urtica dioica L. against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix thermosphacta CCM 4769, Enterococcus raffinosus CCM 4216, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCM 1828, Paenobacillus larvae CCM 4483 and Staphylococcus epidermis CCM 4418 were determined by the disc diffusion method and the microbroth dilution method according to CLSI. Probit analysis was used in this experiment. Of the 2 plant extracts tested, all extracts showed antimicrobial activity against one or more species of microorganisms. The most antimicrobial activity showed methanolic plant extract of E. arvense against S. epidermis with disc diffusion method and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and plant extract Urtica dioica with disc diffusion method against P. aeruginosa and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and E. coli.

  6. Entomopathogenic and plant pathogenic nematodes as opposing forces in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Eric; Eleftherianos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are responsible for substantial damages within the agriculture industry every year, which is a challenge that has thus far gone largely unimpeded. Chemical nematicides have been employed with varying degrees of success, but their implementation can be cumbersome, and furthermore they could potentially be neutralising an otherwise positive effect from the entomopathogenic nematodes that coexist with plant-parasitic nematodes in soil environments and provide protection for plants against insect pests. Recent research has explored the potential of employing entomopathogenic nematodes to protect plants from plant-parasitic nematodes, while providing their standard degree of protection against insects. The interactions involved are highly complex, due to both the three-organism system and the assortment of variables present in a soil environment, but a strong collection of evidence has accumulated regarding the suppressive capacity of certain entomopathogenic nematodes and their mutualistic bacteria, in the context of limiting the infectivity of plant-parasitic nematodes. Specific factors produced by certain entomopathogenic nematode complexes during the process of insect infection appear to have a selectively nematicidal, or at least repellant, effect on plant-parasitic nematodes. Using this information, an opportunity has formed to adapt this relationship to large-scale, field conditions and potentially relieve the agricultural industry of one of its most substantial burdens. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fungal life-styles and ecosystem dynamics: biological aspects of plant pathogens, plant endophytes and saprophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Redman, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses various biochemical, genetic, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of fungi that express either symbiotic or saprophytic life-styles. An enormous pool of potential pathogens exists in both agricultural and natural ecosystems, and virtually all plant species are susceptible to one or more fungal pathogens. Fungal pathogens have the potential to impact on the genetic structure of populations of individual plant species, the composition of plant communities and the process of plant succession. Endophytic fungi exist for at least part of their life cycles within the tissues of a plant host. This group of fungi is distinguished from plant pathogens because they do not elicit significant disease symptoms. However, endophytes do maintain the genetic and biochemical mechanisms required for infection and colonization of plant hosts. Fungi that obtain chemical nutrients from dead organic matter are known as saprophytes and are critical to the dynamics and resilience of ecosystems. There are two modes of saprophytic growth: one in which biomolecules that are amenable to transport across cell walls and membranes are directly absorbed, and another in which fungi must actively convert complex biopolymers into subunit forms amenable to transportation into cells. Regardless of life-style, fungi employ similar biochemical mechanisms for the acquisition and conversion of nutrients into complex biomolecules that are necessary for vegetative growth, production and dissemination of progeny, organismal competition, and survival during periods of nutrient deprivation or environmental inclemency.

  8. Plant defenses against parasitic plants show similarities to those induced by herbivores and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, Justin B; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2010-08-01

    Herbivores and pathogens come quickly to mind when one thinks of the biotic challenges faced by plants. Important but less appreciated enemies are parasitic plants, which can have important consequences for the fitness and survival of their hosts. Our knowledge of plant perception, signaling, and response to herbivores and pathogens has expanded rapidly in recent years, but information is generally lacking for parasitic species. In a recent paper we reported that some of the same defense responses induced by herbivores and pathogens--notably increases in jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), and a hypersensitive-like response (HLR)--also occur in tomato plants upon attack by the parasitic plant Cuscuta pentagona (field dodder). Parasitism induced a distinct pattern of JA and SA accumulation, and growth trials using genetically-altered tomato hosts suggested that both JA and SA govern effective defenses against the parasite, though the extent of the response varied with host plant age. Here we discuss similarities between the induced responses we observed in response to Cuscuta parasitism to those previously described for herbivores and pathogens and present new data showing that trichomes should be added to the list of plant defenses that act against multiple enemies and across Kingdoms.

  9. Behaviour of co-inoculated pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on poultry following several decontamination treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Hernando, Alicia; Capita, Rosa; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The potential of chemical decontaminants to cause harmful effects on human health is among the causes of the rejection of antimicrobial treatments for removing surface contamination from poultry carcasses in the European Union. This study was undertaken to determine whether decontaminants might give a competitive advantage to pathogenic bacteria on poultry and involve a potential risk to consumer. A total of 144 chicken legs were co-inoculated with similar concentrations of pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis or Escherichia coli) and spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta or Pseudomonas fluorescens). Samples were dipped for 15min in solutions (w/v) of trisodium phosphate (12%; TSP), acidified sodium chlorite (1200ppm; ASC), citric acid (2%; CA), peroxyacids (220ppm; PA) or chlorine dioxide (50ppm; CD), or were left untreated (control). Microbiological analyses were carried out on day 0 and every 24h until day 7 of storage (at 10±1°C). The modified Gompertz equation was used as the primary model to fit observed data. TSP, ASC and CA were effective in extending the lag phase (L, ranging from 1.47±1.34days to 4.06±1.16days) and in decreasing the concentration of bacteria during the stationary phase (D, ranging from 2.46±0.51 log(10) cfu/cm(2) to 8.64±0.53 log(10) cfu/cm(2)), relative to the control samples (L values ranging from 0.59±0.38days and 2.52±2.28days, and D values ranging from 6.32±0.89 log(10) cfu/cm(2) to 9.39±0.39 log(10) cfu/cm(2), respectively). Both on untreated and on most decontaminated samples the overgrowth of spoilage bacteria among the species tested was observed throughout storage, suggesting that spoilage would occur prior to any noteworthy increase in the levels of pathogenic microorganisms. However, L. monocytogenes counts similar to, or higher than, those for spoilage bacteria were observed on samples treated with TSP, ASC or CA, suggesting that these

  10. Antibacterial Effect of Myrtus Communis Hydro-Alcoholic Extract on Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, due to the changes in the form of the resistance of pathogenic bacteria, discovering new antimicrobial drugs is under study. So, the aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of the extract of the myrtle herb on some of pathogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of myrtle herb was evaluated at 4 concentrations including 10-80 mg/ml on four strains of pathogenic bacteria using penetrative dissemination method together with the measuring diameter of the growth inhibition zone; then the results were compared to four conventional antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations were studied using macro dilution method. Results: Treatment by the concentration of 80 mg/ml extract of this herb showed the greatest effect on the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio cholera serotype Ogawa which had a significant difference with all other treatments and standard antibiotics (p> 0.05. The extract showed no effect on the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and just concentration of 80 mg/ml showed a little effect on E. coli and other antibiotics had no significant effect except tetracycline which has little effect on this strain. Minimum inhibitory concentration was 0.2 mg/ml for bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and the maximum for E.coli by 8 mg/ml.Conclusion: This study showed that under study bacteria were more resistant to the antibiotics and the extract of Myrtus communis leaves showed greatest antibacterial effect against S. aureus and V. cholerae cerotype Ogawa.

  11. Outer-inner membrane vesicles naturally secreted by gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Pérez-Cruz

    Full Text Available Outer-inner membrane vesicles (O-IMVs were recently described as a new type of membrane vesicle secreted by the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7T. Their formation is characterized by the protrusion of both outer and plasma membranes, which pulls cytoplasmic components into the vesicles. To demonstrate that this is not a singular phenomenon in a bacterium occurring in an extreme environment, the identification of O-IMVs in pathogenic bacteria was undertaken. With this aim, a structural study by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM was carried out, confirming that O-IMVs are also secreted by Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Acinetobacter baumannii AB41, in which they represent between 0.23% and 1.2% of total vesicles produced. DNA and ATP, which are components solely found in the cell cytoplasm, were identified within membrane vesicles of these strains. The presence of DNA inside the O-IMVs produced by N. gonorrhoeae was confirmed by gold DNA immunolabeling with a specific monoclonal IgM against double-stranded DNA. A proteomic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae-derived membrane vesicles identified proteins from the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. This confirmation of O-IMV extends the hitherto uniform definition of membrane vesicles in Gram-negative bacteria and explains the presence of components in membrane vesicles such as DNA, cytoplasmic and inner membrane proteins, as well as ATP, detected for the first time. The production of these O-IMVs by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria opens up new areas of study related to their involvement in lateral gene transfer, the transfer of cytoplasmic proteins, as well as the functionality and role of ATP detected in these new vesicles.

  12. Outer-inner membrane vesicles naturally secreted by gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cruz, Carla; Delgado, Lidia; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercade, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Outer-inner membrane vesicles (O-IMVs) were recently described as a new type of membrane vesicle secreted by the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7T. Their formation is characterized by the protrusion of both outer and plasma membranes, which pulls cytoplasmic components into the vesicles. To demonstrate that this is not a singular phenomenon in a bacterium occurring in an extreme environment, the identification of O-IMVs in pathogenic bacteria was undertaken. With this aim, a structural study by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) was carried out, confirming that O-IMVs are also secreted by Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Acinetobacter baumannii AB41, in which they represent between 0.23% and 1.2% of total vesicles produced. DNA and ATP, which are components solely found in the cell cytoplasm, were identified within membrane vesicles of these strains. The presence of DNA inside the O-IMVs produced by N. gonorrhoeae was confirmed by gold DNA immunolabeling with a specific monoclonal IgM against double-stranded DNA. A proteomic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae-derived membrane vesicles identified proteins from the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. This confirmation of O-IMV extends the hitherto uniform definition of membrane vesicles in Gram-negative bacteria and explains the presence of components in membrane vesicles such as DNA, cytoplasmic and inner membrane proteins, as well as ATP, detected for the first time. The production of these O-IMVs by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria opens up new areas of study related to their involvement in lateral gene transfer, the transfer of cytoplasmic proteins, as well as the functionality and role of ATP detected in these new vesicles.

  13. SERS based immuno-microwell arrays for multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Hankus, Mikella E.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2009-05-01

    A novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based immuno-microwell array has been developed for multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The immuno-microwell array was prepared by immobilizing the optical addressable immunomagnetic beads (IMB) into the microwell array on one end of a fiber optic bundle. The IMBs, magnetic beads coated with specific antibody to specific bacteria, were used for immunomagnetic separation (IMS) of corresponding bacteria. The magnetic separation by the homemade magnetic separation system was evaluated in terms of the influences of several important parameters including the beads concentration, the sample volume and the separation time. IMS separation efficiency of the model bacteria E.coli O157:H7 was 63% in 3 minutes. The microwell array was fabricated on hydrofluoric acid etched end of a fiber optic bundle containing 30,000 fiber elements. After being coated with silver, the microwell array was used as a uniform SERS substrate with the relative standard deviation of the SERS enhancement across the microwell array < 2% and the enhancement factor as high as 2.18 x 107. The antibody modified microwell array was prepared for bacteria immobilization into the microwell array, which was characterized by a sandwich immunoassay. To demonstrate the potential of multiplexed SERS detection with the immuno-microwell array, the SERS spectra of different Raman dye labeled magnetic beads as well as mixtures were measured on the mircrowell array. In bead mixture, different beads were identified by the characteristic SERS bands of the corresponding Raman label.

  14. Antimicrobial and efflux pump inhibitory activity of caffeoylquinic acids from Artemisia absinthium against gram-positive pathogenic bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiamegos, Y.C.; Kastritis, P.L.; Exarchou, V.; Han, H.; Bonvin, A.M.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Lewis, K.; Hamblin, M.R.; Tegos, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative

  15. Antimicrobial and efflux pump inhibitory activity of caffeoylquinic acids from Artemisia absinthium against Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiamegos, Y.C.; Kastritis, P.; Exarchou, V.; Han, H.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Vervoort, J.; Lewis, K.; Hamblin, M.R.; Tegos, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative

  16. Biotherapy for and protection against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections via action of probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mongkol Thirabunyanon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota in the human intestine play an important function in human health and disease. Gastrointestinal infections by foodborne pathogens are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such infections can be caused by contaminated foods or other sources which come in contact with human intestinal epithelial cells. In recent years, probiotics have been recommended as alternative biotherapeutic agents against intestinal pathogenic infections. Two genera of probiotics, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, are commercially valuable applications, several forms of which are available as capsules or in functional food products such as yogurt, fermented juices and sausages. Probiotics protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infection via several mechanisms. These include production of antimicrobial substances, competition for nutrient substrates, competitive exclusion, enhancement of intestinal barrier function, and immunomodulation. Probiotic bacteria have been documented as being effective in biotherapeutic applications against gastrointestinal pathogens, e.g. Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and rotaviruses. This alternative therapeutic application of probiotics to protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections may be of great importance for future medicinal use.

  17. Stenotrophomonas comparative genomics reveals genes and functions that differentiate beneficial and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Peyman; Starcher, Margaret R; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-06-18

    In recent years, the number of human infections caused by opportunistic pathogens has increased dramatically. Plant rhizospheres are one of the most typical natural reservoirs for these pathogens but they also represent a great source for beneficial microbes with potential for biotechnological applications. However, understanding the natural variation and possible differences between pathogens and beneficials is the main challenge in furthering these possibilities. The genus Stenotrophomonas contains representatives found to be associated with human and plant host. We used comparative genomics as well as transcriptomic and physiological approaches to detect significant borders between the Stenotrophomonas strains: the multi-drug resistant pathogenic S. maltophilia and the plant-associated strains S. maltophilia R551-3 and S. rhizophila DSM14405T (both are biocontrol agents). We found an overall high degree of sequence similarity between the genomes of all three strains. Despite the notable similarity in potential factors responsible for host invasion and antibiotic resistance, other factors including several crucial virulence factors and heat shock proteins were absent in the plant-associated DSM14405T. Instead, S. rhizophila DSM14405T possessed unique genes for the synthesis and transport of the plant-protective spermidine, plant cell-wall degrading enzymes, and high salinity tolerance. Moreover, the presence or absence of bacterial growth at 37°C was identified as a very simple method in differentiating between pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates. DSM14405T is not able to grow at this human-relevant temperature, most likely in great part due to the absence of heat shock genes and perhaps also because of the up-regulation at increased temperatures of several genes involved in a suicide mechanism. While this study is important for understanding the mechanisms behind the emerging pattern of infectious diseases, it is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to

  18. Behaviour of pathogenic and indicator bacteria during urban wastewater treatment and sludge composting, as revealed by quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wéry, Nathalie; Lhoutellier, Claire; Ducray, Florence; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Godon, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Two enteric pathogens, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, and two bacteria commonly used as indicators, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens, were monitored using quantitative real-time PCR during municipal wastewater treatment and sludge composting. The results were compared with those obtained using standard culture methods. A reduction of all bacteria was observed during wastewater treatment and during the thermophilic phase of composting. However, the bacterial groups studied behaved differently during the process, and the main differences were observed during biological treatment in activated sludge basins. In particular, Salmonella spp. and C. jejuni survived better during activated sludge treatment than E. coli. C. jejuni was the most resistant to wastewater treatment among the four bacterial groups. Overall, differences in survival were observed for all bacteria studied, when submitted to the same environmental pressure. This holds both for differences between indicators and pathogenic bacteria and between pathogenic bacteria. These results show the difficulty in defining reliable indicators.

  19. Evaluation of antibiotic resistance among isolated pathogenic bacteria from shrimp hatcheries in Bushehr province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Moghimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Rapid development of shrimp aquaculture has resulted in widespread use of antibiotics for preventing and curing diseases. In aquaculture, particularly shrimp hatcheries antibiotics are routinely used at therapeutic levels to treat disease and at sub-therapeutic levels as prophylactic agents to increase feed efficiency. Antibiotic residues in the environment are likely to lead to the development and maintenance of antibiotic resistance in microbial populations. The aim of this study was determine of antibiotic resistance to two shrimp pathogens Vibrio harveyi, V.alginolyticus, that they are agents of mortality in shrimp hatcheries. Material and Methods: After isolation and detection(by biochemical tests of two species of bacterial pathogens from three hatcheries of Bushehr province, bacterial strains were tested for sensitivity to antibiotics including erythromycin, streptomycin, oxytetracyclin, and trimetoprim by disk diffusion method. Results: Results showed that all isolated bacteria Vibrio harveyi from three hatcheries were sensitive to oxytetracyclin and trimetoprim, but to streptomycin were resistant, and to erythromycin in hatcheries A, B, C was intermediate, resistance, sensitive respectively. Bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus isolated from three hatcheries were resistant to streptomycin. But they isolated from a hatchery to the other antibiotics erythromycin, oxytetracyclin and trimetoprim were resistant, intermediate and intermediate, respectively. Also they isolated from B hatchery were resistant, sensitive and sensitive to erythromycin, oxytetracyclin and trimetoprim, respectively And from C hatchery were intermediate, sensitive and sensitive to antibiotics, respectively. Conclusion: Isolated bacteria showed the most resistance to streptomycin and erythromycin respectively. These antibiotics is used frequently in medicine and veterinary, with entrance of human and animal's bacteria resistance via waste and fluid water

  20. Method for detection of a few pathogenic bacteria and determination of live versus dead cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Chen, I.-Hsuan; Du, Songtao; Liu, Yuzhe; Wikle, Howard C.; Suh, Sang-Jin; Barbaree, James M.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a method for detection of a few pathogenic bacteria and determination of live versus dead cells. The method combines wireless phage-coated magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors and a surface-scanning dectector, enabling real-time monitoring of the growth of specific bacteria in a nutrient broth. The ME biosensor used in this investigation is composed of a strip-shaped ME resonator upon which an engineered bacteriophage is coated to capture a pathogen of interest. E2 phage with high binding affinity for Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model study. The specificity of E2 phage has been reported to be 1 in 105 background bacteria. The phage-coated ME biosensors were first exposed to a low-concentration Salmonella suspension to capture roughly 300 cells on the sensor surface. When the growth of Salmonella in the broth occurs, the mass of the biosensor increases, which results in a decrease in the biosensor's resonant frequency. Monitoring of this mass- induced resonant frequency change allows for real-time detection of the presence of Salmonella. Detection of a few bacteria is also possible by growing them to a sufficient number. The surface-scanning detector was used to measure resonant frequency changes of 25 biosensors sequentially in an automated manner as a function of time. This methodology offers direct, real-time detection, quantification, and viability determination of specific bacteria. The rate of the sensor's resonant frequency change was found to be largely dependent on the number of initially bound cells and the efficiency of cell growth.

  1. Complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae DSM 12163T and comparative genomic insights into plant pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erwinia pyrifoliae is a newly described necrotrophic pathogen, which causes fire blight on Asian (Nashi pear and is geographically restricted to Eastern Asia. Relatively little is known about its genetics compared to the closely related main fire blight pathogen E. amylovora. Results The genome of the type strain of E. pyrifoliae strain DSM 12163T, was sequenced using both 454 and Solexa pyrosequencing and annotated. The genome contains a circular chromosome of 4.026 Mb and four small plasmids. Based on their respective role in virulence in E. amylovora or related organisms, we identified several putative virulence factors, including type III and type VI secretion systems and their effectors, flagellar genes, sorbitol metabolism, iron uptake determinants, and quorum-sensing components. A deletion in the rpoS gene covering the most conserved region of the protein was identified which may contribute to the difference in virulence/host-range compared to E. amylovora. Comparative genomics with the pome fruit epiphyte Erwinia tasmaniensis Et1/99 showed that both species are overall highly similar, although specific differences were identified, for example the presence of some phage gene-containing regions and a high number of putative genomic islands containing transposases in the E. pyrifoliae DSM 12163T genome. Conclusions The E. pyrifoliae genome is an important addition to the published genome of E. tasmaniensis and the unfinished genome of E. amylovora providing a foundation for re-sequencing additional strains that may shed light on the evolution of the host-range and virulence/pathogenicity of this important group of plant-associated bacteria.

  2. The application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of common pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈愉生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the spectrum of common pathogenic bacteria of low respiratory tract infection by loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP)of nucleic acid test and to prove the clinical significance of this method.Methods A total of 289 qualified sputum samples from patients with lower respiratory tract infections in Fujian Province were detected by LAMP technique,and then the distribution of pathogenic bacteria was analyzed.The positive cases(the patients whose specific3

  3. Bacterial hybrid histidine kinases in plant-bacteria interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Stéphanie; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2016-10-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are essential for many bacteria to maintain homeostasis and adapt to environmental changes. Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a membrane-bound histidine kinase that senses stimuli, autophosphorylates in the transmitter region and then transfers the phosphoryl group to the receiver domain of a cytoplasmic response regulator that mediates appropriate changes in bacterial physiology. Although usually found on distinct proteins, the transmitter and receiver modules are sometimes fused into a so-called hybrid histidine kinase (HyHK). Such structure results in multiple phosphate transfers that are believed to provide extra-fine-tuning mechanisms and more regulatory checkpoints than classical phosphotransfers. HyHK-based regulation may be crucial for finely tuning gene expression in a heterogeneous environment such as the rhizosphere, where intricate plant-bacteria interactions occur. In this review, we focus on roles fulfilled by bacterial HyHKs in plant-associated bacteria, providing recent findings on the mechanistic of their signalling properties. Recent insights into understanding additive regulatory properties fulfilled by the tethered receiver domain of HyHKs are also addressed.

  4. RIPEN FRUITS OF INDIAN GINSENG: PHYTO-CHEMICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL EXAMINATION AGAINST HUMAN AND PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Singariya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ripen fruit extracts of Withania somniferawere evaluated against medically importantbacteria viz.Proteusmerabilis, Klebsiella pnemoniae, Agerobacterium tumefaciens(plant pathogenandone fungi Aspergillus niger.The dried and powdered ripen fruits were successively extracted with a seriesof non polar to polar solvents using soxhlet assembly. The antimicrobial assay was done by both discdiffusion and broth dilution methods. Glacial acetic acid extract of W. somniferashow highest activityagainst A. tumefaciens(plant pathogen and water extract againstK. pnemoniaeto varying degrees in theterms of high inhibition zone and activity index. A. tumefacienswas the most susceptible organism incompare to the other organism. Gentamycin and Ketoconazole, the standard antibacterial and antifungalused was effective against the bacteria and fungi. The extract of W. somniferaalso significantly (P>0.005inhibited the bacterial and fungal growth. The inhibitory effect is very identical in magnitude andcomparable with that of standard antibiotics used.

  5. Bioprospecting glacial ice for plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, Wilvis; Rondón, Johnma; Rengifo, Marcos; Ball, María M; Melfo, Alejandra; Gómez, Wileidy; Yarzábal, Luis Andrés

    2015-08-01

    Glaciers harbor a wide diversity of microorganisms, metabolically versatile, highly tolerant to multiple environmental stresses and potentially useful for biotechnological purposes. Among these, we hypothesized the presence of bacteria able to exhibit well-known plant growth promoting traits (PGP). These kinds of bacteria have been employed for the development of commercial biofertilizers; unfortunately, these biotechnological products have proven ineffective in colder climates, like the ones prevailing in mountainous ecosystems. In the present work, we prospected glacial ice collected from two small tropical glaciers, located above 4.900 m in the Venezuelan Andes, for cold-active PGP bacteria. The initial screening strategy allowed us to detect the best inorganic-P solubilizers at low temperatures, from a sub-sample of 50 bacterial isolates. Solubilization of tricalcium phosphate, aluminum- and iron-phosphate, occurred in liquid cultures at low temperatures and was dependent on medium acidification by gluconic acid production, when bacteria were supplied with an appropriate source of carbon. Besides, the isolates were psychrophilic and in some cases exhibited a broad range of growth-temperatures, from 4 °C to 30 °C. Additional PGP abilities, including phytohormone- and HCN production, siderophore excretion and inhibition of phytopathogens, were confirmed in vitro. Nucleotidic sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes allowed us to place the isolates within the Pseudomonas genus. Our results support the possible use of these strains to develop cold-active biofertilizers to be used in mountainous agriculture.

  6. Antibacterial activity of leaves extracts of Trifolium alexandrinum Linn. against pathogenic bacteria causing tropical diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul Viqar Khan; Qamar Uddin Ahmed; Indu Shukla; Athar Ali Khan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate antibacterial potential of Trifolium alexandrinum (T. alexandrinum) Linn. against seven gram positive and eleven gram negative hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains responsible for many tropical diseases. Methods: Non-polar and polar extracts of the leaves of T. alexandrinum i.e., hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol (MeOH) and aqueous (AQ) extracts at five different concentrations (1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/mL) were prepared to evaluate their antibacterial value. NCCL standards were strictly followed to perform antimicrobial disc susceptibility test using disc diffusion method. Results: Polar extracts demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. EtOAc and MeOH extracts showed maximum antibacterial activity with higher inhibition zone and were found effective against seventeen of the tested pathogens. While AQ plant extract inhibited the growth of sixteen of the test strains. EtOAc and MeOH plant extracts inhibited the growth of all seven gram positive and ten of the gram negative bacterial strains. Conclusions: The present study strongly confirms the effectiveness of crude leaves extracts against tested human pathogenic bacterial strains causing several tropical diseases. Since Egyptian clover is used as a fodder plant, it could be helpful in controlling various infectious diseases associated with cattle as well.

  7. Diarrhea-associated pathogens, lactobacilli and cellulolytic bacteria in equine feces: responses to antibiotic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Brittany E; Lawrence, Laurie M; Flythe, Michael D

    2013-09-27

    Antibiotics are important to equine medicine, but antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) can lead to poor performance and even mortality. AAD is attributed to disruption of the hindgut microbiota, which permits proliferation of pathogenic microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of common antibiotics on cellulolytic bacteria, lactobacilli, and AAD-associated pathogens in the feces of healthy horses. Fifteen horses were assigned to three treatment groups (blocked by age and sex): control (no antibiotics), trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (PO), or ceftiofur (IM). Fecal samples (n=8 per horse) were taken during dietary adaptation (3 weeks), antibiotic challenge (1 week), and withdrawal (1 week). Bacteria were enumerated by serial dilution and viable count. Cellulolytic bacteria decreased by >99% during administration of either antibiotic (Pantibiotic challenge period (PAntibiotic challenged horses also shed more salmonella than control horses (PAntibiotics had no effect on the number of Clostridium perfringens isolates. There was no detectable Clostridium difficile during adaptation or in any control horse. C. difficile increased (Pantibiotics, and were still detectable 1 week after withdrawal. These results indicate that antibiotics can disrupt the normal gastrointestinal microbiota and allow proliferation of Salmonella spp. and C. difficile.

  8. Isolation, amplification and characterization of foodborne pathogen disease bacteria gene for rapid kit test development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjayadi, M.; Santoso, I.; Kartika, I. R.; Kurniadewi, F.; Saamia, V.; Sofihan, W.; Nurkhasanah, D.

    2017-07-01

    There is a lot of public concern over food safety. Food-safety cases recently, including many food poisoning cases in both the developed and developing countries, considered to be the national security threats which involved police investigation. Quick and accurate detection methods are needed to handle the food poisoning cases with a big number of sufferers at the same time. Therefore, the research is aimed to develop a specific, sensitive, and rapid result molecular detection tool for foodborne pathogen bacteria. We, thus, propose genomic level approach with Polymerase Chain Reaction. The research has successfully produced a specific primer to perform amplification to fim-C S. typhi, E. coli, and pef Salmonella typhimurium genes. The electrophoresis result shows that amplification products are 95 base pairs, 121 base pairs, and 139 base pairs; and all three genes are in accordance with the size of the in silico to third genes bacteria. In conclusion, the research has been successfully designed a specific detection tool to three foodborne pathogen bacteria genes. Further stages test and the uses of Real-time PCR in the detection are still in the trial process for better detection method.

  9. Inhibition Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Food Born Pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouha Kasra-Kermanshahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Disease caused by consuming microbial contaminated food has increased significantly in recent years due to changes in the livelihoods and eating habits of the human populations. Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are three of the most important foodborne bacterial pathogens and can lead to foodborne diseases. Increased use of antibiotics, has led to development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of new types of effective and nontoxic antimicrobial compounds. Nowadays, the most extensive research and commercial practices are based on probiotic bacteria. Probiotics, specifically lactic acid bacteria are widely used in the food industry for fermentation but have gained attention from health professionals because of their potential beneficial effects. Now probiotic therapy is thought to be an effective way to improve the gut health and an alternative to antibiotic treatments. They contribute to food safety by their ability to inhibit the growth of several other bacteria. LAB can be used as protective cultures to compete with potential pathogens and other undesired organisms, thereby increasing the safety of the food product.

  10. Structure, Biology, and Therapeutic Application of Toxin–Antitoxin Systems in Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA systems have received increasing attention for their diverse identities, structures, and functional implications in cell cycle arrest and survival against environmental stresses such as nutrient deficiency, antibiotic treatments, and immune system attacks. In this review, we describe the biological functions and the auto-regulatory mechanisms of six different types of TA systems, among which the type II TA system has been most extensively studied. The functions of type II toxins include mRNA/tRNA cleavage, gyrase/ribosome poison, and protein phosphorylation, which can be neutralized by their cognate antitoxins. We mainly explore the similar but divergent structures of type II TA proteins from 12 important pathogenic bacteria, including various aspects of protein–protein interactions. Accumulating knowledge about the structure–function correlation of TA systems from pathogenic bacteria has facilitated a novel strategy to develop antibiotic drugs that target specific pathogens. These molecules could increase the intrinsic activity of the toxin by artificially interfering with the intermolecular network of the TA systems.

  11. Horizontal gene transfers link a human MRSA pathogen to contagious bovine mastitis bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brody

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance by many clinically important bacteria can be traced to horizontal gene transfer (HGT between related or evolutionarily distant microflora. Comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT DNA in emerging pathogens. We have adapted the multi-genome alignment tool EvoPrinter to facilitate discovery of HGT DNA sequences within bacterial genomes and within their mobile genetic elements. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EvoPrinter analysis of 13 different Staphylococcus aureus genomes revealed that one of the human isolates, the hospital epidemic methicillin-resistant MRSA252 strain, uniquely shares multiple putative HGT DNA sequences with different causative agents of bovine mastitis that are not found in the other human S. aureus isolates. MRSA252 shares over 14 different DNA sequence blocks with the bovine mastitis ET3 S. aureus strain RF122, and many of the HGT DNAs encode virulence factors. EvoPrinter analysis of the MRSA252 chromosome also uncovered virulence-factor encoding HGT events with the genome of Listeria monocytogenes and a Staphylococcus saprophyticus associated plasmid. Both bacteria are also causal agents of contagious bovine mastitis. CONCLUSIONS: EvoPrinter analysis reveals that the human MRSA252 strain uniquely shares multiple DNA sequence blocks with different causative agents of bovine mastitis, suggesting that HGT events may be occurring between these pathogens. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that inadvertently enhance the contact of human and livestock bacterial pathogens.

  12. Plant genes involved in harbouring symbiotic rhizobia or pathogenic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Isabelle; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Hopkins, Julie; Andrio, Emilie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Lecomte, Philippe; Puppo, Alain; Abad, Pierre; Favery, Bruno; Hérouart, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The establishment and development of plant-microorganism interactions involve impressive transcriptomic reprogramming of target plant genes. The symbiont (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and the root knot-nematode pathogen (Meloidogyne incognita) induce the formation of new root organs, the nodule and the gall, respectively. Using laser-assisted microdissection, we specifically monitored, at the cell level, Medicago gene expression in nodule zone II cells, which are preparing to receive rhizobia, and in gall giant and surrounding cells, which play an essential role in nematode feeding and constitute the typical root swollen structure, respectively. We revealed an important reprogramming of hormone pathways and C1 metabolism in both interactions, which may play key roles in nodule and gall neoformation, rhizobia endocytosis and nematode feeding. Common functions targeted by rhizobia and nematodes were mainly down-regulated, whereas the specificity of the interaction appeared to involve up-regulated genes. Our transcriptomic results provide powerful datasets to unravel the mechanisms involved in the accommodation of rhizobia and root-knot nematodes. Moreover, they raise the question of host specificity and the evolution of plant infection mechanisms by a symbiont and a pathogen.

  13. Indigenous bacteria may interfere with the biocontrol of plant diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Nobutaka; Akutsu, Katsumi

    2009-06-01

    Prodigiosin is a reddish antibiotic pigment that plays an important role in the biocontrol of plant diseases by the bacterium Serratia marcescens. However, its activity is unstable under agricultural conditions; further, it can be degraded by various environmental factors. To examine the effect of epiphytic microbes on the stability of prodigiosin used for biological control processes, we collected a total of 1,280 bacterial isolates from the phylloplane of cyclamen and tomato plants. Approximately 72% of the bacterial strains isolated from the cyclamen plants and 66% of those isolated from the tomato plants grew on minimal agar medium containing 100 μg ml-1 prodigiosin. Certain isolates obtained from both plant species exhibited prodigiosin-degrading activity. We compared the 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from the isolates with sequences in a database. The comparison revealed that the sequences determined for the prodigiosin-degrading isolates were homologous to those of the genera Pseudomonas, Caulobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingomonas, Janthinobacterium, Novosphingobium, and Rathayibacter. These results indicate that indigenous epiphytic microorganisms may interfere with the interaction between plant pathogens and biocontrol agents by degrading the antibiotics produced by the agents.

  14. Blocking the Transmission of a Noncirculative Vector-Borne Plant Pathogenic Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labroussaa, Fabien; Zeilinger, Adam R; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2016-07-01

    The successful control of insect-borne plant pathogens is often difficult to achieve due to the ecologically complex interactions among pathogens, vectors, and host plants. Disease management often relies on pesticides and other approaches that have limited long-term sustainability. To add a new tool to control vector-borne diseases, we attempted to block the transmission of a bacterial insect-transmitted pathogen, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, by disrupting bacteria-insect vector interactions. X. fastidiosa is known to attach to and colonize the cuticular surface of the mouthparts of vectors; a set of recombinant peptides was generated and the chemical affinities of these peptides to chitin and related carbohydrates was assayed in vitro. Two candidates, the X. fastidiosa hypothetical protein PD1764 and an N-terminal region of the hemagglutinin-like protein B (HxfB) showed affinity for these substrates. These proteins were provided to vectors via an artificial diet system in which insects acquire X. fastidiosa, followed by an inoculation access period on plants under greenhouse conditions. Both PD1764 and HxfAD1-3 significantly blocked transmission. Furthermore, bacterial populations within insects over a 10-day period demonstrated that these peptides inhibited cell adhesion to vectors but not bacterial multiplication, indicating that the mode of action of these peptides is restricted to limiting cell adhesion to insects, likely via competition for adhesion sites. These results open a new venue in the search for sustainable disease-control strategies that are pathogen specific and may have limited nontarget effects.

  15. Early immune response patterns to pathogenic bacteria are associated to increased risk of lower respiratory infections in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, N. H.; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Rasmussen, Mette Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal colonisation of the airways with respiratory pathogens is associated with increased risk of lower respiratory infections (LRI) in early childhood (1). Therefore, we hypothesized that children developing LRI have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We aimed...

  16. Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Salma [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the

  17. In vitro study of natural plant products against oral bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddiqui R; Siti AsmaH; Tang L; Jie CC; Rosliza AR; Roziawati Y

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of selected plant product against several bacterial which commonly causes oral infection.It was hope that in future,this product will become the remedy for treatment of oral infection and with the hope that it can substitute antibiotics.Methods:A total of 5 species of oral bacteria from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC)were employed in this study(S.mutans,S.aureus,P.aeruginosa,S.sobri-nus and L.salivarius).Three types of natural plants crude extracts were used (garlic,curry leaves and cloves).Bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects of these herbs were tested.Results:It was shown garlic had an-tibacterial effects on all bacteria.The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC in g/mL)of garlic towards S. aureus,P.aeruginosa,S.mutans,S.sobrinus and L.salivarius were 0.3,1.8,1.2,0.5 and 1.8,respectively. There was significant difference among the MIC of garlic on tested bacteria.It was more potent toward S.au-reus.The curry leaf solution on the other hand,did not show any zone of inhibition in all bacteria plates but adversely showed enhanced growth of those bacteria.Clove had shown its antibacterial effects on S.aureus and P.aeruginosa.The clove was more potent toward S.aureus with the MIC of 0.45 g/mL.P.aeruginosa was more sensitive to clove compared to garlic.For S.aureus,it was more sensitive to garlic compared to clove. Conclusion:The antibacterial activity of garlic and clove crude extracts shown in our study further confirm these natural plants'potential usage in therapeutic use for oral diseases or infections.This could be the platform for the interested party to do research and development on it and to produce oral health products which are more affordable for lower economic income groups and with fewer side effects as seen in synthetic drug.

  18. ISOLATION RATE OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA FROM SOME FOOD PRODUCTS IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Salari

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria usually cause disease in the gastrointestinal tract by colonization and growth in the gastrointestinal tract, where the micro organisms may invade the tissues of host or secretion of an exotoxin that is performed in food and then ingested by the host, examples of second group include: staphylococcal, Bacillus cereus, clostridial (C.botulinum and C.perfringens type A toxin. In this study pathogenic bacteria of 350 food products by culture method were investigated. The results were obtained as follows: Bacillus cereus 12 cases (3.4, Staphylococcus coagulase positive 25(7.1%, Staphylococcus coagulase negative 37 (10.6%, Streptococcus alpha hemolysis 18 (5.1%, Enterococcus 3(0.8% and Klebsiella 5(1.4%.

  19. Antibacterial properties and major bioactive components of cinnamon stick (Cinnamomum burmannii): activity against foodborne pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bin; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Brooks, John D; Corke, Harold

    2007-07-11

    Cinnamomum burmannii Blume (cinnamon stick) from Indonesia is a little-investigated spice. In this study, the antibacterial activity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of cinnamon stick extract were evaluated against five common foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella anatum). Cinnamon stick extract exhibited significant antibacterial properties. Major compounds in cinnamon stick were tentatively identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC-MS) as a predominant volatile oil component ((E)-cinnamaldehyde) and several polyphenols (mainly proanthocyanidins and (epi)catechins). Both (E)-cinnamaldehyde and proanthocyanidins significantly contributed to the antibacterial properties. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to observe morphological changes of bacteria treated with the crude extract of cinnamon stick and its major components. This study suggests that cinnamon stick and its bioactive components have potential for application as natural food preservatives.

  20. When Ribonucleases Come into Play in Pathogens: A Survey of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Jester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely acknowledged that RNA stability plays critical roles in bacterial adaptation and survival in different environments like those encountered when bacteria infect a host. Bacterial ribonucleases acting alone or in concert with regulatory RNAs or RNA binding proteins are the mediators of the regulatory outcome on RNA stability. We will give a current update of what is known about ribonucleases in the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis and will describe their established roles in virulence in several Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria that are imposing major health concerns worldwide. Implications on bacterial evolution through stabilization/transfer of genetic material (phage or plasmid DNA as a result of ribonucleases' functions will be covered. The role of ribonucleases in emergence of antibiotic resistance and new concepts in drug design will additionally be discussed.

  1. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila: disease modeling, lessons, and shortcomings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-02-15

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila-microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection.

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) as a Tool for the Identification and Differentiation of Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnowiec, Paulina; Lechowicz, Łukasz; Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Kaca, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Methods of human bacterial pathogen identification need to be fast, reliable, inexpensive, and time efficient. These requirements may be met by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. The method that is most often used for bacterial detection and identification is Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It enables biochemical scans of whole bacterial cells or parts thereof at infrared frequencies (4,000-600 cm(-1)). The recorded spectra must be subsequently transformed in order to minimize data variability and to amplify the chemically-based spectral differences in order to facilitate spectra interpretation and analysis. In the next step, the transformed spectra are analyzed by data reduction tools, regression techniques, and classification methods. Chemometric analysis of FTIR spectra is a basic technique for discriminating between bacteria at the genus, species, and clonal levels. Examples of bacterial pathogen identification and methods of differentiation up to the clonal level, based on infrared spectroscopy, are presented below.

  3. Protective effect of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus strain on infection with pathogenic bacteria in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizerwetter-Swida, M; Binek, M

    2009-01-01

    The probiotic potential of a Lactobacillus salivarius 3d strain isolated from chicken faeces was assessed in one day old chickens. Lactobacillus salivarius 3d was administered per os at a concentration of 10(8) cfu in 100 microl of PBS. The chickens were then challenged with pathogenic bacteria: Salmonella Enteritidis, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium perfringens. Samples of caecal contents and livers were collected after 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after infection. Lactobacilli and pathogenic bacterial cell counts were determined in the samples. This study showed that L. salivarius 3d reduced the number of Salmonella Enteritidis and Clostridium perfringens in the group of chickens treated with Lactobacillus. Therefore it may be concluded that L. salivarius 3d may be used as a potential probiotic for chickens.

  4. ESSENTIAL OILS OF CYMBOPOGON SP. IN THE CONTROL OF FOODBORNE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Florisvaldo BRUGNERA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the agar well diffusion technique was used to determine the antibacterial activity of Cymbopogon nardus (citronella and Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass essential oils, which were applied at different concentrations. The bacterial species used were the foodborne pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both essential oils presented antibacterial activity in most concentrations tested. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs founded were: 7.81μL/mL (S. aureus and 3.90μL/mL (E. coli and P. aeruginosa, for C. nardus essential oil; and 3.90μL/mL (S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa, for C. citratus essential oil. The essential oils used were shown as promising natural antibacterials for pathogenic bacteria control in the food industry.

  5. Bactericidal Effect of Gold-Chitosan Nanocomposites in Coculture Models of Pathogenic Bacteria and Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Gracia; Regiel-Futyra, Anna; Andreu, Vanesa; Sebastián, Víctor; Kyzioł, Agnieszka; Stochel, Grażyna; Arruebo, Manuel

    2017-05-31

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to develop resistance mechanisms to avoid the antimicrobial potential of antibiotics has become an increasing problem for the healthcare system. The search for more effective and selective antimicrobial materials, though not harmful to mammalian cells, seems imperative. Herein we propose the use of gold-chitosan nanocomposites as effective bactericidal materials avoiding damage to human cells. Nanocomposites were obtained by taking advantage of the reductive and stabilizing action of chitosan solutions on two different gold precursor concentrations. The resulting nanocomposites were added at different final concentrations to a coculture model formed by Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) or Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and human macrophages. Gold-chitosan colloids exhibited superior bactericidal ability against both bacterial models without showing cytotoxicity on human cells at the concentrations tested. Morphological and in vitro viability studies supported the feasibility of the infection model here described to test novel bactericidal nanomaterials. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy analyses pointed to the disruption of the bacterial wall as the lethal mechanism. Data obtained in the present study suggest that gold-chitosan nanocomposites are powerful and promising nanomaterials for reducing bacteria-associated infections, respecting the integrity of mammalian cells, and displaying high selectivity against the studied bacteria.

  6. Activation of type III interferon genes by pathogenic bacteria in infected epithelial cells and mouse placenta.

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    Hélène Bierne

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues.

  7. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

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    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701 after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages.

  8. Long-term social dynamics drive loss of function in pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum Andersen, Sandra; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that social interactions between bacterial cells can drive evolutionary change at the population level, but significant challenges limit attempts to assess the relevance of these findings to natural populations, where selection pressures are unknown. We have increasingly...... social dynamics shown to drive evolutionary change in vitro. We provide evidence to show that long-term behavioral dynamics observed in a pathogen are driven by selection to outcompete neighboring conspecific cells through social interactions. We find that Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, causing lung...

  9. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against sexually transmitted pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Nutan; Kulkarni, Sangeeta; Mane, Arati; Kulkarni, Roshan; Palshetker, Aparna; Singh, Kamalinder; Joshi, Swati; Risbud, Arun; Kulkarni, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) using vaginal or rectal microbicide-based intervention is one of the strategies for prevention of HIV infection. Herbal products have been used for treating STIs traditionally. Herein, we present in vitro activity of 10 plant extracts and their 34 fractions against three sexually transmitted/reproductive tract pathogens - Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Haemophilus ducreyi and Candida albicans. The plant parts were selected; the extracts/fractions were prepared and screened by disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory and minimum cidal concentrations were determined. The qualitative phytochemical analysis of selected extracts/fractions showing activity was performed. Of the extracts/fractions tested, three inhibited C. albicans, ten inhibited N. gonorrhoeae and five inhibited H. ducreyi growth. Our study demonstrated that Terminalia paniculata Roth. extracts/fractions inhibited growth of all three organisms. The ethyl acetate fraction of Syzygium cumini Linn. and Bridelia retusa (L.) Spreng. extracts was found to inhibit N. gonorrhoeae at lowest concentrations.

  10. Host cell modulation by human, animal and plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Siv G E; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2004-04-01

    Members of the alpha-proteobacteria display a broad range of interactions with higher eukaryotes. Some are pathogens of humans, such as Rickettsia and Bartonella that are associated with diseases like epidemic typhus, trench fever, cat scratch disease and bacillary angiomatosis. Others like the Brucella cause abortions in pregnant animals. Yet other species have evolved elaborate interactions with plants; in this group we find both plant symbionts and parasites. Despite radically different host preferences, extreme genome size variations and the absence of toxin genes, similarities in survival strategies and host cell interactions can be recognized among members of the alpha-proteobacteria. Here, we review some of these similarities, with a focus on strategies for modulation of the host target cell.

  11. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activities of Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata, and Citrus grandis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholeh Saeb

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading, and there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. The genus Citrus belongs to the family Rutaceae has many biologically active secondary metabolites. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial activity of essential oil and extract of Lemon (Citrus limon, Mandarin (Citrus reticulata and Pummelo (Citrus grandis against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi. Materials and Methods: The fresh Citrus leaves were shade-dried and powdered. Antimicrobial metabolites were extracted from them by 80% methanol for extract and using a Clevenger-type apparatus for essential oil. Eight different concentrations of the each leaf extract and essential oil were prepared. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay of Citrus leaves metabolites were subjected against four bacterial strains by agar disc diffusion and E-test method. Results: In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of different Citrus leaf extracts were determined against all four food-borne pathogens. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had potent antimicrobial activity against all four pathogens, and the C. limon leaf essential oil was effective on Gram-positive bacteria. S. typhi was resistant against two leaves essential oils. Conclusions: The results showed that there was no antimicrobial activity effect in all extracts on tested bacteria. In this study, the antibacterial effect of essential oil of Citrus leaves on four strains of pathogenic microorganisms was confirmed. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had the most powerful antimicrobial properties, suggesting its potential application as natural preservative in foods or an effective medicine against different pathogenic microbes. Key words: Antibacterial activity, E-test, Citr

  12. [Studies on rapid detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria by nucleic acid testing and related technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Wang, Mingzhong; Wang, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiumei

    2008-03-01

    The traditional methods of bacteria isolation, cultivation and identification are time-consuming, which can't meet the needs of the control and prevention of food-borne diseases. Recently, various kinds of rapid methods for food-borne pathogenic bacteria detection have emerged with the prompt development of nucleic acid testing technology. The application studies on polymerase chain reaction and the techniques derived from it, nucleic acid isothermal amplification, oligonucleotide microarray, immunomagnetic separation and DNA biosensing on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterohemorrhagic Escherchia coli, etc. were reviewed.

  13. The Genetic Diversity of Endophytic and Phyllosphere Bacteria from Several Indonesian Herbal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Devi Rachelia; Yogiara, Susan Soka; Stella Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal plants have been believed by Indonesians to be an alternative medicine to treat illnesses. The bioactivecompounds in the plant can be derived from secondary metabolites or from endophytic and phyllosphere bacteria whichcoexist within medicinal plants. A total of 18 endophytic bacteria and 32 phyllosphere bacteria were isolated from theherbal plants of Citrus sp., Pluchea indica, Curcuma longa, Nothopanax scuttelarium, Piper crocatum, andAndrographis paniculata. About 72% of endophytic ...

  14. Seeds of the Wild Progenitor of Maize Possess Bacteria That Antagonize Foodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Hanan R; Griffiths, Mansel W; Raizada, Manish N

    2017-02-10

    Endophytes are microorganisms that inhabit plant tissues without causing disease. Some endophytes help their hosts to combat pathogens. Here we explored the hypothesis that the plant-derived foods consumed by humans and other animals host endophytes that also antagonize foodborne pathogens or food-rotting agents. Our laboratory previously cultured a library of bacterial endophytes from different members of the maize/corn family (Zea) including wild relatives. Here, 190 of these endophytes were screened for their ability to antagonize four foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, and Salmonella enterica Newport) and a food spoiling agent (Pseudomonas fluorescens) using dual culture assays. Two Paenibacillus polymyxa endophytes (strains 3C6 and 3G11) were found to inhibit the growth of all five deleterious strains on agar. Using conserved polymerase chain reaction primers and sequencing, both beneficial endophytes were found to encode polymyxin genes, suggesting a potential antibacterial mechanism of action. Polymyxin production by both strains was confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Strains 3C6 and 3G11 originated, respectively, from the seeds of the wild Central American maize species Zea diploperennis, and the wild ancestor of modern maize, Zea mays ssp parviglumis (Parviglumis). As the latter is the direct ancestor of modern maize, we discuss the role its endophyte(s) may have played in promoting crop domestication by suppressing foodborne pathogens and/or food-spoilage agents.

  15. Viruses of the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Daohong; Fu, Yanping; Guoqing, Li; Ghabrial, Said A

    2013-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a notorious plant fungal pathogen with a broad host range including many important crops, such as oilseed rape, soybean, and numerous vegetable crops. Hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses have attracted much attention because of their potential as biological control agents for combating plant fungal diseases and for use in fundamental studies on fungal pathogenicity and other properties. This chapter describes several mycoviruses that were isolated from hypovirulent strains except for strain Sunf-M, which has a normal phenotype. These viruses include the geminivirus-like mycovirus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1 (SsHADV-1), Sclerotinia debilitation-associated RNA virus (SsDRV), Sclerotinia sclerotiorum RNA virus L (SsRV-L), Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirus 1 (SsHV-1), Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mitoviruses 1 and 2 (SsMV-1, SsMV-2), and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum partitivirus S (SsPV-S). Unlike many other fungi, incidences of mixed infections with two or more mycoviruses in S. sclerotiorum are particularly high and very common. The interaction between SsDRV and S. sclerotiorum is likely to be unique. The significance of these mycoviruses to fungal ecology and viral evolution and the potential for biological control of Sclerotinia diseases using mycoviruses are discussed.

  16. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly eDzhavakhiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or chemosensitization. Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of A. alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of F. sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  17. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly; Shcherbakova, Larisa; Semina, Yulia; Zhemchuzhina, Natalia; Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or "chemosensitization." Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin) combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole) applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole) combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of Alternaria alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of Fusarium sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  18. Phylogenomics and molecular signatures for species from the plant pathogen-containing order xanthomonadales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Sohail Naushad

    Full Text Available The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1-3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as

  19. A prebiotic role of Ecklonia cava improves the mortality of Edwardsiella tarda-infected zebrafish models via regulating the growth of lactic acid bacteria and pathogen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, WonWoo; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Ahn, Ginnae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the beneficial prebiotic roles of Ecklonia cava (E. cava, EC) were evaluated on the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pathogen bacteria and the mortality of pathogen-bacteria infected zebrafish model. The result showed that the original E. cava (EC) led to the highest growth effects on three LABs (Lactobacillus brevis, L. brevis; Lactobacillus pentosus, L. pentosus; Lactobacillus plantarum; L. plantarum) and it was dose-dependent manners. Also, EC, its Celluclast enzymatic (ECC) and 100% ethanol extracts (ECE) showed the anti-bacterial activities on the fish pathogenic bacteria such as (Edwardsiella tarda; E. tarda, Streptococcus iniae; S. iniae, and Vibrio harveyi; V. harveyi). Interestingly, EC induced the higher production of the secondary metabolites from L. plantarum in MRS medium. The secondary metabolites produced by EC significantly inhibited the growth of pathogen bacteria. In further in vivo study, the co-treatment of EC and L. plantarum improved the growth and mortality of E. tarda-infected zebrafish as regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS and COX2. Taken together, our present study suggests that the EC plays an important role as a potential prebiotic and has a protective effect against the infection caused by E. tarda injection in zebrafish. Also, our conclusion from this evidence is that EC can be used and applied as a useful prebiotic.

  20. Cultivable endophytic bacteria from heavy metal(loid)-tolerant plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Ponce, Brenda; Ramos-Garza, Juan; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Rivera-Orduña, Flor Nohemí; Chen, Wen Feng; Yan, Jun; Estrada-de Los Santos, Paulina; Wang, En Tao

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the interactions among endophytes, plants and heavy metal/arsenic contamination, root endophytic bacteria of Prosopis laevigata (Humb and Bonpl. ex Willd) and Sphaeralcea angustifolia grown in a heavy metal(loid)-contaminated zone in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, were isolated and characterized. Greater abundance and species richness were found in Prosopis than in Sphaeralcea and in the nutrient Pb-Zn-rich hill than in the poor nutrient and As-Cu-rich mine tailing. The 25 species identified among the 60 isolates formed three groups in the correspondence analysis, relating to Prosopis/hill (11 species), Prosopis/mine tailing (4 species) and Sphaeralcea/hill (4 species), with six species ungrouped. Most of the isolates showed high or extremely high resistance to arsenic, such as ≥100 mM for As(V) and ≥20 mM for As(III), in mineral medium. These results demonstrated that the abundance and community composition of root endophytic bacteria were strongly affected by the concentration and type of the heavy metals and metalloids (arsenic), as well as the plant species.

  1. Uniform categorization of biocommunication in bacteria, fungi and plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzany, Günther

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a coherent biocommunication categorization for the kingdoms of bacteria, fungi and plants. The investigation further shows that, besides biotic sign use in trans-, inter- and intraorganismic communication processes, a common trait is interpretation of abiotic influences as indicators to generate an appropriate adaptive behaviour. Far from being mechanistic interactions, communication processes within organisms and between organisms are sign-mediated interactions. Sign-mediated interactions are the precondition for every cooperation and coordination between at least two biological agents such as cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Signs of biocommunicative processes are chemical molecules in most cases. The signs that are used in a great variety of signaling processes follow syntactic (combinatorial), pragmatic (context-dependent) and semantic (content-specific) rules. These three levels of semiotic rules are helpful tools to investigate communication processes throughout all organismic kingdoms. It is not the aim to present the latest empirical data concerning communication in these three kingdoms but to present a unifying perspective that is able to interconnect transdisciplinary research on bacteria, fungi and plants. PMID:21541001

  2. Uniform categorization of biocommunication in bacteria,fungi and plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Günther; Witzany

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a coherent biocommunication categorization for the kingdoms of bacteria,fungi and plants. The investigation further shows that,besides biotic sign use in trans-,inter-and intraorganismic communication processes,a common trait is interpretation of abiotic influences as indicators to generate an appropriate adaptive behaviour.Far from being mechanistic interactions,communication processes within organisms and between organisms are sign-mediated interactions.Sign-mediated interactions are the precondition for every cooperation and coordination between at least two biological agents such as cells,tissues,organs and organisms.Signs of biocommunicative processes are chemical molecules in most cases.The signs that are used in a great variety of signaling processes follow syntactic(combinatorial) ,pragmatic(context-dependent) and semantic(contentspecific) rules.These three levels of semiotic rules are helpful tools to investigate communication processes throughout all organismic kingdoms.It is not the aim to present the latest empirical data concerning communication in these three kingdoms but to present a unifying perspective that is able to interconnect transdisciplinary research on bacteria,fungi and plants.

  3. Differential activity of a lectin from Solieria filiformis against human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Holanda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A lectin isolated from the red alga Solieria filiformis was evaluated for its effect on the growth of 8 gram-negative and 3 gram-positive bacteria cultivated in liquid medium (three independent experiments/bacterium. The lectin (500 µg/mL stimulated the growth of the gram-positive species Bacillus cereus and inhibited the growth of the gram-negative species Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus sp, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1000 µg/mL but the lectin (10-1000 µg/mL had no effect on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and B. subtilis, or on the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The purified lectin significantly reduced the cell density of gram-negative bacteria, although no changes in growth phases (log, exponential and of decline were observed. It is possible that the interaction of S. filiformis lectin with the cell surface receptors of gram-negative bacteria promotes alterations in the flow of nutrients, which would explain the bacteriostatic effect. Growth stimulation of the gram-positive bacterium B. cereus was more marked in the presence of the lectin at a concentration of 1000 µg/mL. The stimulation of the growth of B. cereus was not observed when the lectin was previously incubated with mannan (125 µg/mL, its hapten. Thus, we suggest the involvement of the binding site of the lectin in this effect. The present study reports the first data on the inhibition and stimulation of pathogenic bacterial cells by marine alga lectins.

  4. Microbial pathogens trigger host DNA double-strand breaks whose abundance is reduced by plant defense responses.

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    Junqi Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses and DNA damage repair are two fundamental processes that have been characterized extensively, but the links between them remain largely unknown. We report that multiple bacterial, fungal and oomycete plant pathogen species induce double-strand breaks (DSBs in host plant DNA. DNA damage detected by histone γ-H2AX abundance or DNA comet assays arose hours before the disease-associated necrosis caused by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Necrosis-inducing paraquat did not cause detectable DSBs at similar stages after application. Non-pathogenic E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria also did not induce DSBs. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is common during plant immune responses, ROS are known DNA damaging agents, and the infection-induced host ROS burst has been implicated as a cause of host DNA damage in animal studies. However, we found that DSB formation in Arabidopsis in response to P. syringae infection still occurs in the absence of the infection-associated oxidative burst mediated by AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Plant MAMP receptor stimulation or application of defense-activating salicylic acid or jasmonic acid failed to induce a detectable level of DSBs in the absence of introduced pathogens, further suggesting that pathogen activities beyond host defense activation cause infection-induced DNA damage. The abundance of infection-induced DSBs was reduced by salicylic acid and NPR1-mediated defenses, and by certain R gene-mediated defenses. Infection-induced formation of γ-H2AX still occurred in Arabidopsis atr/atm double mutants, suggesting the presence of an alternative mediator of pathogen-induced H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, pathogenic microorganisms can induce plant DNA damage. Plant defense mechanisms help to suppress rather than promote this damage, thereby contributing to the maintenance of genome integrity in somatic tissues.

  5. Isolation of Biosurfactant–Producing Bacteria with Antimicrobial Activity against Bacterial Pathogens

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    Siripun Sarin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to study biosurfactant producing bacteria isolated from soil and to determine their property and efficiency as biosurfactants in order to inhibit bacterial pathogens. The result showed that there were 8 bacterial isolates out of 136 isolates of the total biosurfactant producing bacteria screened that exhibited the diameter of clear zone more than 1.5 cm. in the oil spreading test. The highest potential of emulsifying activity (%EA24 of 54.4 and the maximum additive concentration, (%MAC of 24.2 was obtained from the fermentation broth of the G7 isolate which the G7 isolate was later identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Psuedomonas aeruginosa were the tested bacterial pathogens that were most sensitive to the acid precipitated biosurfactant obtained from P. fluorescens G7 with the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 41.6 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of 41.6 mg/ml compared with the acid precipitated bisurfactants of the other isolates used in the antimicrobial activity test. The type of the separated crude biosurfactant produced by P. fluorescens G7 analyzed later by using the rhamose test, TLC and FT-IR techniques was rhamnolipid.

  6. Pathogenic bacteria target NEDD8-conjugated cullins to hijack host-cell signaling pathways.

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    Grégory Jubelin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The cycle inhibiting factors (Cif, produced by pathogenic bacteria isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates, belong to a family of molecules called cyclomodulins that interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle. Cif blocks the cell cycle at both the G₁/S and G₂/M transitions by inducing the stabilization of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1 and p27(kip1. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 as a target of Cif. Cif co-compartmentalized with NEDD8 in the host cell nucleus and induced accumulation of NEDD8-conjugated cullins. This accumulation occurred early after cell infection and correlated with that of p21 and p27. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that Cif interacted with cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes (CRLs through binding with the neddylated forms of cullins 1, 2, 3, 4A and 4B subunits of CRL. Using an in vitro ubiquitylation assay, we demonstrate that Cif directly inhibits the neddylated CUL1-associated ubiquitin ligase activity. Consistent with this inhibition and the interaction of Cif with several neddylated cullins, we further observed that Cif modulates the cellular half-lives of various CRL targets, which might contribute to the pathogenic potential of diverse bacteria.

  7. Association with pathogenic bacteria affects life-history traits and population growth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, S Anaid; Mooring, Eric Q; Rens, Elisabeth G; Restif, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Determining the relationship between individual life-history traits and population dynamics is an essential step to understand and predict natural selection. Model organisms that can be conveniently studied experimentally at both levels are invaluable to test the rich body of theoretical literature in this area. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, despite being a well-established workhorse in genetics, has only recently received attention from ecologists and evolutionary biologists, especially with respect to its association with pathogenic bacteria. In order to start filling the gap between the two areas, we conducted a series of experiments aiming at measuring life-history traits as well as population growth of C. elegans in response to three different bacterial strains: Escherichia coli OP50, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Whereas previous studies had established that the latter two reduced the survival of nematodes feeding on them compared to E. coli OP50, we report for the first time an enhancement in reproductive success and population growth for worms feeding on S. enterica Typhimurium. Furthermore, we used an age-specific population dynamic model, parameterized using individual life-history assays, to successfully predict the growth of populations over three generations. This study paves the way for more detailed and quantitative experimental investigation of the ecology and evolution of C. elegans and the bacteria it interacts with, which could improve our understanding of the fate of opportunistic pathogens in the environment.

  8. [Two-component signal transduction as attractive drug targets in pathogenic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ryutaro; Igarashi, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Gene clusters contributing to processes such as cell growth and pathogenicity are often controlled by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs). TCS consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). TCSs are attractive as drug targets for antimicrobials because many HK and RR genes are coded on the bacterial genome though few are found in lower eukaryotes. The HK/RR signal transduction system is distinct from serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Specific inhibitors against TCS systems work differently from conventional antibiotics, and developing them into new drugs that are effective against various drug-resistant bacteria may be possible. Furthermore, inhibitors of TCSs that control virulence factors may reduce virulence without killing the pathogenic bacteria. Previous TCS inhibitors targeting the kinase domain of the histidine kinase sensor suffered from poor selectivity. Recent TCS inhibitors, however, target the sensory domains of the sensors blocking the quorum sensing system, or target the essential response regulator. These new targets are introduced, together with several specific TCSs that have the potential to serve as effective drug targets.

  9. Inexpensive and fast pathogenic bacteria screening using field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Nello; Bhalla, Nikhil; Heeran, Mel; Reyes Martinez, Juana; Sarkar, Amrita; Laabei, Maisem; Jolly, Pawan; Bowen, Chris R; Taylor, John T; Flitsch, Sabine; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-11-15

    While pathogenic bacteria contribute to a large number of globally important diseases and infections, current clinical diagnosis is based on processes that often involve culturing which can be time-consuming. Therefore, innovative, simple, rapid and low-cost solutions to effectively reduce the burden of bacterial infections are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate a label-free sensor for fast bacterial detection based on metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The electric charge of bacteria binding to the glycosylated gates of a MOSFET enables quantification in a straightforward manner. We show that the limit of quantitation is 1.9×10(5) CFU/mL with this simple device, which is more than 10,000-times lower than is achieved with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF) on the same modified surfaces. Moreover, the measurements are extremely fast and the sensor can be mass produced at trivial cost as a tool for initial screening of pathogens.

  10. Pathogenic bacteria target NEDD8-conjugated cullins to hijack host-cell signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubelin, Grégory; Taieb, Frédéric; Duda, David M; Hsu, Yun; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Nobe, Rika; Penary, Marie; Watrin, Claude; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Schulman, Brenda A; Stebbins, C Erec; Oswald, Eric

    2010-09-30

    The cycle inhibiting factors (Cif), produced by pathogenic bacteria isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates, belong to a family of molecules called cyclomodulins that interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle. Cif blocks the cell cycle at both the G₁/S and G₂/M transitions by inducing the stabilization of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1) and p27(kip1). Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 as a target of Cif. Cif co-compartmentalized with NEDD8 in the host cell nucleus and induced accumulation of NEDD8-conjugated cullins. This accumulation occurred early after cell infection and correlated with that of p21 and p27. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that Cif interacted with cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes (CRLs) through binding with the neddylated forms of cullins 1, 2, 3, 4A and 4B subunits of CRL. Using an in vitro ubiquitylation assay, we demonstrate that Cif directly inhibits the neddylated CUL1-associated ubiquitin ligase activity. Consistent with this inhibition and the interaction of Cif with several neddylated cullins, we further observed that Cif modulates the cellular half-lives of various CRL targets, which might contribute to the pathogenic potential of diverse bacteria.

  11. Induced release of a plant-defense volatile 'deceptively' attracts insect vectors to plants infected with a bacterial pathogen.

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    Rajinder S Mann

    Full Text Available Transmission of plant pathogens by insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the plant, insect, and pathogen. Pathogen-induced plant responses can include changes in volatile and nonvolatile secondary metabolites as well as major plant nutrients. Experiments were conducted to understand how a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las, affects host preference behavior of its psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama vector. D. citri were attracted to volatiles from pathogen-infected plants more than to those from non-infected counterparts. Las-infected plants were more attractive to D. citri adults than non-infected plants initially; however after feeding, psyllids subsequently dispersed to non-infected rather than infected plants as their preferred settling point. Experiments with Las-infected and non-infected plants under complete darkness yielded similar results to those recorded under light. The behavior of psyllids in response to infected versus non-infected plants was not influenced by whether or not they were carriers of the pathogen. Quantification of volatile release from non-infected and infected plants supported the hypothesis that odorants mediate psyllid preference. Significantly more methyl salicylate, yet less methyl anthranilate and D-limonene, was released by infected than non-infected plants. Methyl salicylate was attractive to psyllids, while methyl anthranilate did not affect their behavior. Feeding on citrus by D. citri adults also induced release of methyl salicylate, suggesting that it may be a cue revealing location of conspecifics on host plants. Infected plants were characterized by lower levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, zinc, and iron, as well as, higher levels of potassium and boron than non-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that host selection behavior of D. citri may be modified by bacterial infection of plants, which alters release of

  12. Identification of diverse mycoviruses through metatranscriptomics characterization of the viromes of five major fungal plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of plant pathogenic fungi by mycoviruses can attenuate their virulence on plants and vigor in culture. In this study, we described the viromes of 275 isolates of five widely dispersed plant pathogenic fungal species (Colletotrichum truncatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Phomopsis longicolla, ...

  13. Elimination of pathogenic bacteria in sewage sludge during the solar drying; Eliminacion de bacterias patogenas en lodos residuales durante el secado solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota Espericueta, Alma Delia; Ponce Corral, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, (Mexico)

    2008-11-15

    This paper describes the performance of a solar dryer capable of bacterial pathogen removal from the physicochemical sludge of the main wastewater treatment plant for Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The solar setup was proposed as an alternative solution, technically feasible, for reducing the volume of the 135 tons of sludge produced per day in this plant. The experimental-greenhouse prototype has a 4.5 m{sup 2} collection area, a 1 m{sup 3}-drying bed, and automatic systems for ventilation, extraction, and data acquisition. The automatic operation was controlled by temperature and humidity differences between internal and external conditions. Global solar radiation, pH and water content of the sludge were monitored. The overall effectiveness of the solar dryer was determined by assessing thermal and microbiological performance. Water content in sludge during the process was used as an indicator of thermal effectiveness. The microbiological elimination was quantified at different residence times considering two contamination indicators: faecal coliforms and Salmonella spp. Quantification of the pathogenic microorganisms was carried out by the multiple-tube fermentation technique presented in the Mexican regulation NOM-004-SEMARNAT-2002. The thermal results related to the water content showed an exponential decay that achieved up to a 99 % reduction. Regarding microbiological removal effectiveness, there was a strong dependence between the number of bacteria present and the water content in the sludge. As a consequence, with the removal of 92 % of water, it was verified that the elimination of faecal coliforms fell from 3.8x10{sup 6} to 1.6 MPN per gram of dried sludge; and for Salmonella spp. the reduction was from 1.5x10{sup 1}3 to 1.9x10{sup 3} MPN per gram of dried sludge. [Spanish] La presente investigacion describe el desempeno de un secador solar con respecto a la eliminacion de bacterias patogenas contenidas en lodos fisicoquimicos provenientes de la principal

  14. Activity of Some Iranian Plant Extracts against Multi-Drug Resistant Human Pathogens Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeide Saeidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plants used for traditional medicine contain a wide range of substances which can be used to treat various infectious diseases. Hence, antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of 6 plant species were studied against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed. Plant extract from leaf of Marribum vulgari, Saturja montana, Myrtus comminus L., Amaranthus retraflexus, seed of Cumminum cyminum L. and Peganum harmal specie was performed using rotary. Sampling was carry out from urine culture of hospitalized patients (Boo-Ali hospital, Zahedan, south-eastern of Iran suffered from urinary tract infections during the years 2010 and 2011. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bacterial concentration (MBC of plant extracts of plants on bacteria was determined using micro dilution broth method at 6 different concentrations. Results: The results show P. harmal and M. comminus L. were a potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae bacteria respectively. Moreover, all 6 plants extracts showed relatively same antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus saprophyticus and S. aureus and S. Montana extracts showed relatively same antibacterial activity against all Gram-negative bacteria and Morganella morgani was the more resistant bacteria for all plants extracts. Conclusion: This investigation showed that the mixes of P. harmal and M. comminus L. extracts have a potent antimicrobial activity against some Gram-positive pathogenic and Gram-negative bacteria. The present studies confirm the use of this extracts as antibacterial agent. Further research is required to evaluate the practical values of therapeutic applications.

  15. Biodiversity in agricultural soils, sustainable plant production and control of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Reinecke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens Soils are very heterogeneous substrates providing an environmental matrix with varying spatial and temporal gradients of pH, organic carbon, particle size distribution and moisture content. Chemical, physical as well as biological factors are operational and soil includes a vast variety of soil-dwelling invertebrates and microbes that interact with each other and the environment to influence plant productivity directly and indirectly. A review of recent literature on the role of soil biodiversity highlights the important role of soil invertebrates, notably earthworms, in influencing soil characteristics and soil borne plant pathogens. Earthworms are widely recognized as having critical functions in soil in regulating key processes that impact favourably on plant productivity and simultaneously eliminating or reducing soil borne diseases. The aim of this review is firstly to contribute towards a clarification of the role of soil biodiversity in general and to focus specifically on that of earthworms and their role in influencing plant pathogens and parasites. Evidence is provided that their activities can support plant productivity and suppress pathogens. Once the nature and extent of their role is better known and they are confirmed to support plant productivity to the extent that many soil biologists believe, the next logical step is to utilize knowledge of their ecology to create and manage favourable environmental conditions to ensure their survival and activity in agricultural soils. Agricultural management practices that favour soil organisms are also reviewed. Implementing these will make the services of soil biota available to improve and sustain agro-ecosystems. This requires a better understanding of the preferences and tolerance ranges of these organisms and their interactions before we can apply methodologies in general to manipulate environmental conditions to maximise the benefits that they may offer.

  16. Potential pathogenic bacteria in metalworking fluids and aerosols from a machining facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Sarah D; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-12-01

    The metalworking and machining industry utilizes recirculating metalworking fluids for integral aspects of the fabrication process. Despite the use of biocides, these fluids sustain substantial biological growth. Subsequently, the high-shear forces incurred during metalworking processing aerosolize bacterial cells and may cause dermatologic and respiratory effects in exposed workers. We quantified and identified the bacterial load for metalworking fluid and aerosol samples of a machining facility in the US Midwest during two seasons. To investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in fluid and air, we performed 16S rRNA gene surveys. The concentration of total bacterial cells (including culturable and nonculturable cells) was relatively constant throughout the study, averaging 5.1 × 10⁸ cells mL⁻¹ in the fluids and 4.8 × 10⁵ cells m⁻³ in the aerosols. We observed bacteria of potential epidemiologic significance from several different bacterial phyla in both fluids and aerosols. Most notably, Alcaligenes faecalis was identified through both direct sequencing and culturing in every sample collected. Elucidating the bacterial community with gene surveys showed that metalworking fluids were the source of the aerosolized bacteria in this facility.

  17. Control of Some Human Pathogenic Bacteria by Seed Extracts of Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mominul Islam Sheikh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of seed extracts of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. was investigated against 10 gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Disc diffusion method was used to test antibacterial activity. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC were determined by using standard procedures. The highest (effective inhibition zone of 16.67±0.47 mm was found at 250 mg/ml for Escherichia coli. On the other hand, the inhibition zones 15.00±0.82 mm for ethanol, 15.33±0.47 for methanol, and 15.67±0.82 for acetone were found against Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina lutea and Klebsiella pneumonia, respectively. MIC value (20 to 50 mg/ml and MBC value (40 to 60 mg/ml were measured against studied bacteria. On the basis of investigation, we can say, cumin seeds could be used as a source of new antibacterial agent for developing drugs to inhibit some human pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Control of Some Human Pathogenic Bacteria by Seed Extracts of Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mominul Islam Sheikh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of seed extracts of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. was investigated against 10 gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Disc diffusion method was used to test antibacterial activity. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC were determined by using standard procedures. The highest (effective inhibition zone of 16.67±0.47 mm was found at 250 mg/ml for Escherichia coli. On the other hand, the inhibition zones 15.00±0.82 mm for ethanol, 15.33±0.47 for methanol, and 15.67±0.82 for acetone were found against Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina lutea and Klebsiella pneumonia, respectively. MIC value (20 to 50 mg/ml and MBC value (40 to 60 mg/ml were measured against studied bacteria. On the basis of investigation, we can say, cumin seeds could be used as a source of new antibacterial agent for developing drugs to inhibit some human pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Channel formation by RTX-toxins of pathogenic bacteria: Basis of their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Roland

    2016-03-01

    The pore-forming cytolysins of the RTX-toxin (Repeats in ToXin) family are a relatively small fraction of a steadily increasing family of proteins that contain several functionally important glycine-rich and aspartate containing nonapeptide repeats. These cytolysins produced by a variety of Gram-negative bacteria form ion-permeable channels in erythrocytes and other eukaryotic cells. Hemolytic and cytolytic RTX-toxins represent pathogenicity factors of the toxin-producing bacteria and are very often important key factors in pathogenesis of the bacteria. Channel formation by RTX-toxins lead to the dissipation of ionic gradients and membrane potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of target cells, which results in cell death. Here we discuss channel formation and channel properties of some of the best known RTX-toxins, such as α-hemolysin (HlyA) of Escherichia coli and the uropathogenic EHEC strains, the adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT, CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis and the RTX-toxins (ApxI, ApxII and ApxIII) produced by different strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The channels formed by these RTX-toxins in lipid bilayers share some common properties such as cation selectivity and voltage-dependence. Furthermore the channels are transient and show frequent switching between different ion-conducting states. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  20. Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide produced by electroplated coatings to pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z H; Sakagami, Y; Osaka, T

    1998-05-01

    The ability of various electroplated coatings (cobalt, zinc, copper, and cobalt-containing alloys of nickel, zinc, chromium, etc.) to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) was determined by a drop-method antibacterial experiment. The amounts of H2O2 produced and metal ions dissolved from the surfaces of various electroplated coatings were measured and it was found that the inhibitory ability of coatings corresponded to the amounts of H2O2 produced. The more significant the inhibition of the coating to bacterial growth, the greater the amount of H2O2 production. In addition, the bacterial survival rates on the surfaces of coatings were almost zero when H2O2 was produced in amounts greater than 10(-6) mmol/cm2. However, the dominant concentrations of metal ions dissolved from coatings were outside of the bacterial lethal range.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of phenolics and glucosinolate hydrolysis products and their synergy with streptomycin against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Maria J; Borges, Anabela; Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Bennett, Richard N; Rosa, Eduardo S; Simões, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial effects of different classes of important and common dietary phytochemicals (5 simple phenolics - tyrosol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and chlorogenic acid; chalcone - phloridzin; flavan-3-ol - (-) epicatechin; seco-iridoid - oleuropein glucoside; 3 glucosinolate hydrolysis products - allylisothiocyanate, benzylisothiocyanate and 2-phenylethylisothiocyanate) against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Another objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dual combinations of streptomycin with the different phytochemicals on antibacterial activity. A disc diffusion assay was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the phytochemicals and 3 standard antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and streptomycin) against the four bacteria. The antimicrobial activity of single compounds and dual combinations (streptomycin-phytochemicals) were quantitatively assessed by measuring the inhibitory halos. The results showed that all of the isothiocyanates had significant antimicrobial activities, while the phenolics were much less efficient. No antimicrobial activity was observed with phloridzin. In general P. aeruginosa was the most sensitive microorganism and L. monocytogenes the most resistant. The application of dual combinations demonstrated synergy between streptomycin and gallic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, allylisothiocyanate and 2-phenylethylisothiocyanate against the Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, phytochemical products and more specifically the isothiocyanates were effective inhibitors of the in vitro growth of the Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Moreover, they can act synergistically with less efficient antibiotics to control bacterial growth.

  2. Native root-associated bacteria rescue a plant from a sudden-wilt disease that emerged during continuous cropping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Rakesh; Luu, Van Thi; Weinhold, Arne; Goldberg, Jay; Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-09-01

    Plants maintain microbial associations whose functions remain largely unknown. For the past 15 y, we have planted the annual postfire tobacco Nicotiana attenuata into an experimental field plot in the plant's native habitat, and for the last 8 y the number of plants dying from a sudden wilt disease has increased, leading to crop failure. Inadvertently we had recapitulated the common agricultural dilemma of pathogen buildup associated with continuous cropping for this native plant. Plants suffered sudden tissue collapse and black roots, symptoms similar to a Fusarium-Alternaria disease complex, recently characterized in a nearby native population and developed into an in vitro pathosystem for N. attenuata. With this in vitro disease system, different protection strategies (fungicide and inoculations with native root-associated bacterial and fungal isolates), together with a biochar soil amendment, were tested further in the field. A field trial with more than 900 plants in two field plots revealed that inoculation with a mixture of native bacterial isolates significantly reduced disease incidence and mortality in the infected field plot without influencing growth, herbivore resistance, or 32 defense and signaling metabolites known to mediate resistance against native herbivores. Tests in a subsequent year revealed that a core consortium of five bacteria was essential for disease reduction. This consortium, but not individual members of the root-associated bacteria community which this plant normally recruits during germination from native seed banks, provides enduring resistance against fungal diseases, demonstrating that native plants develop opportunistic mutualisms with prokaryotes that solve context-dependent ecological problems.

  3. [Distribution and antibiotics resistance related to nosocomial pathogenic bacteria infection in patients after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hai-ming; Song, Yue; Cao, Jian; Wu, Li-song; Dong, Ran

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the clinical distribution and antibiotics resistance of nosocomial infection caused pathogenic bacteria in patients after cardiac surgery. Clinical data from 612 patients after cardiac surgery under microbiologically documented nosocomial infection was retrospectively analyzed from January 2007 to December 2012. Identification on related bacterial was performed in an automatic ATB Expression system while antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by Kirby-Bauer method. were analyzed by WHONET5.4. There were 697 strains of clinical pathogenic bacilli isolates identified and 421 (60.4%) of them were isolated from sputum while 185 (26.5%) were from blood. Acinetobacter spp. (124 strains, 17.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85 strains, 12.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (50 strains, 7.2%) were the predominant Gram-negative bacilli while S. epidermidis (75 strains, 10.8%) was the predominant Gram-positive cocci. The predominant eumycete was Candida albicans (43 strains, 6.2%). from the susceptibility test showed that carbapenems, cefoperazone/sulbactam and piperacillin/tazobactam were the most active antibiotics. The detection of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) were 82.9% in S aureus and 95.9% in coagulase negative Staphylococcus. There was no Staphylococcus strains resistant to vancomycin found. Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus appeared the important pathogens in patients after cardiac surgery. Drug resistance to antibiotics was quite common. Prevention on nosocomial infection and rational use of antibiotics remained very important in reducing the amount of drug resistant strains.

  4. Antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of selected medicinal plants against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renisheya Joy Jeba Malar T; Johnson M; Mary Uthith M; Arthy A

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial potential of five medicinally important plants namely, Curcuma mangga (C. mangga) Valeton & Van Zijp, Ficus racemosa (F. racemosa) Roxb., Vitexnegundo (V. negundo) L., Ocimum basilicum (O. basilicum) L., and Etlingera elatior (E. elatior) K. Schum. against the human bacterial pathogens. Methods: The Klebsiella pneumonia (K.pneumonia ), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (ATCC 6538), Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) (MTCC 733), Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) were isolated from clinical samples. The bacteria were identified and confirmed by conventional microbiology procedure. Antimicrobial study was carried out by disc diffusion method against the pathogens by using the crude ethanolic extracts. Results: The results of the present study showed the presence of wide spectrum of antibacterial activities against all the above bacterial pathogens studied. The maximum zone of inhibition observed for each bacterium was as follows: S. typhi (12 mm), K. pneumonia (13 mm), P. vulgaris (20 mm), P. aeruginosa (16 mm) and S. aureus (12 mm).Conclusions:The present study demonstrates that the C. mangga, F. racemosa, V. negundo, O. basilicum, and E. elatior are potentially good sources of antibacterial agents against the pathogensviz., K. pneumonia, S. aureus, S. typhi, P. vulgaris and P. aeruginosa.

  5. Role of soil, crop debris, and a plant pathogen in Salmonella enterica contamination of tomato plants.

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    Jeri D Barak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the U.S., tomatoes have become the most implicated vehicle for produce-associated Salmonellosis with 12 outbreaks since 1998. Although unconfirmed, trace backs suggest pre-harvest contamination with Salmonella enterica. Routes of tomato crop contamination by S. enterica in the absence of direct artificial inoculation have not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work examined the role of contaminated soil, the potential for crop debris to act as inoculum from one crop to the next, and any interaction between the seedbourne plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and S. enterica on tomato plants. Our results show S. enterica can survive for up to six weeks in fallow soil with the ability to contaminate tomato plants. We found S. enterica can contaminate a subsequent crop via crop debris; however a fallow period between crop incorporation and subsequent seeding can affect contamination patterns. Throughout these studies, populations of S. enterica declined over time and there was no bacterial growth in either the phyllosphere or rhizoplane. The presence of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria on co-colonized tomato plants had no effect on the incidence of S. enterica tomato phyllosphere contamination. However, growth of S. enterica in the tomato phyllosphere occurred on co-colonized plants in the absence of plant disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: S. enterica contaminated soil can lead to contamination of the tomato phyllosphere. A six week lag period between soil contamination and tomato seeding did not deter subsequent crop contamination. In the absence of plant disease, presence of the bacterial plant pathogen, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was beneficial to S. enterica allowing multiplication of the human pathogen population. Any event leading to soil contamination with S. enterica could pose a public health risk with subsequent tomato production, especially in areas prone to bacterial spot disease.

  6. Evaluation of antibacterial effect of some Sinai medicinal plant extracts on bacteria isolated from bovine mastitis

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    Gamil S. G. Zeedan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bovine mastitis is the most economically important disease affecting dairy cattle worldwide from an economic, diagnostic and public-health point of view. The present study aimed to isolate and identify of bacteria causes mastitis in dairy cows and to evaluate the antibacterial activities of some selected medicinal plants extracts comparing antibiotics used in the treatment of mastitis in Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 203 milk samples of dairy cows were collected during the period from February to June 2013 at different Governorates in Egypt. The use clinical inspection and California mastitis test examination were provided efficient diagnostic tool for detection of clinical, subclinical mastitis and apparently normal health cattle. The collected milk samples were cultured on Nutrient, Blood agar, Mannitol salt, Edward’s and MacConkey agar plates supporting the growth of various types of bacteria for their biochemical studies and isolation. The antimicrobial activity of plants extracts (Jasonia montana and Artemisia herb albawith different solvent (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform and acetonewere studied in vitro against isolated bacteria from mastitis by paper desk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration method (MIC. Results: The prevalence of clinical, subclinical mastitis and normal healthy animals were 34.50%, 24.7% and 40.8% respectively. The major pathogens isolated from collected milk samples were Escherichia coli (22.16%, Staphylococcus aureus (20.19%, Streptococcus spp. (13.3%, Streptococcus agalactiae (12.8%, Streptococcus dysgalactia (0.5%, Pasteurella spp. (2.45%, Klebsiella spp. (1.47%and Pseudomonas spp. (0.45%. The highest antibacterial activity of J. montana plant extracted with acetone solvent against S. agalactiae, E. coli, S. aureus, Klebsiella spp and coagulase-negative Staphylococci with zone of inhibition values ± standard deviation (SD, ranging from 4.33±0.57 to 25.6±0.60 mm. The MIC values

  7. Allspice, cinnamon, and clove bud plant essential oils in edible apple films inactivate the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant essential oils (EOs) are rich sources of volatile terpenoids and phenolic compounds. Such compounds have the potential to inactivate pathogenic bacteria in the vapor phase. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing EOs can be used commercially to protect food against contaminati...

  8. Allspice, cinnamon and clove bud plant essential oils in edible apple films inactivate the foodbrone pathogens Escherichia coli Ol57:h7, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant essential oils (EOs) are rich sources of volatile terpenoids and phenolic compounds. Such compounds have the potential to inactivate pathogenic bacteria in the vapor phase. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing EOs can be used commercially to protect food against contamination...

  9. Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis MB73/2, a Soil Isolate Inhibiting the Growth of Plant Pathogens Dickeya spp. and Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Dorota M; Iwanicki, Adam; Ossowicki, Adam; Obuchowski, Michal; Jafra, Sylwia

    2013-05-16

    Bacillus subilis MB73/2 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated in Poland from a meadow soil sample. When tested in vitro, the strain shows strong antagonism toward plant pathogens-the soft rot-causing bacteria Dickeya spp. and the crown rot fungus Rhizoctonia solani. Here, we present the genome sequence of MB73/2.

  10. Resource and competitive dynamics shape the benefits of public goods cooperation in a plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Thomas G; Fuqua, Clay; Bever, James D

    2012-06-01

    Cooperative benefits depend on a variety of ecological factors. Many cooperative bacteria increase the population size of their groups by making a public good available. Increased local population size can alleviate the constraints of kin competition on the evolution of cooperation by enhancing the between-group fitness of cooperators. The cooperative pathogenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes infected plants to exude opines--resources that provide a nearly exclusive source of nutrient for the pathogen. We experimentally demonstrate that opines provide cooperative A. tumefaciens cells a within-group fitness advantage over saprophytic agrobacteria. Our results are congruent with a resource-consumer competition model, which predicts that cooperative, virulent agrobacteria are at a competitive disadvantage when opines are unavailable, but have an advantage when opines are available at sufficient levels. This model also predicts that freeloading agrobacteria that catabolize opines but cannot infect plants competitively displace the cooperative pathogen from all environments. However, we show that these cooperative public goods also promote increased local population size. A model built from the Price Equation shows that this effect on group size can contribute to the persistence of cooperative pathogenesis despite inherent kin competition for the benefits of pathogenesis.

  11. Enhancing plant productivity while suppressing biofilm growth in a windowfarm system using beneficial bacteria and ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjun; Ge, Chongtao; Bohrerova, Zuzana; Grewal, Parwinder S; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-07-01

    Common problems in a windowfarm system (a vertical and indoor hydroponic system) are phytopathogen infections in plants and excessive buildup of biofilms. The objectives of this study were (i) to promote plant health by making plants more resistant to infection by using beneficial biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas chlororaphis around the roots and (ii) to minimize biofilm buildup by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the water reservoir, thereby extending the lifespan of the whole system with minimal maintenance. Pseudomonas chlororaphis-treated lettuce grew significantly better than nontreated lettuce, as indicated by enhancement of color, mass, length, and number of leaves per head (p bacteria (4 log reduction) and algae (4 log reduction) in the water reservoirs and water tubing systems. Introduction of P. chlororaphis into the system promoted plant growth and reduced damage caused by the plant pathogen Pythium ultimum. UV irradiation of the water reservoir reduced algal and biofilm growth and extended the lifespan of the system.

  12. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZymes present in the Phytophthora infestans, Ph. ramorum, Ph. sojae and Pythium ultimum genomes compared to growth of these species on a range of different carbon sources. Growth on these carbon sources indicates that the size of enzyme families involved in degradation of cell-wall related substrates like cellulose, xylan and pectin is not always a good predictor of growth on these substrates. While a capacity to degrade xylan and cellulose exists the products are not fully saccharified and used as a carbon source. The Phytophthora genomes encode larger CAZyme sets when compared to Py. ultimum, and encode putative cutinases, GH12 xyloglucanases and GH10 xylanases that are missing in the Py. ultimum genome. Phytophthora spp. also encode a larger number of enzyme families and genes involved in pectin degradation. No loss or gain of complete enzyme families was found between the Phytophthora genomes, but there are some marked differences in the size of some enzyme families.

  13. Microbial pathogens in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Hamburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajonina, Caroline; Buzie, Christopher; Rubiandini, Rafi Herfini; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are among the major health problems associated with water and wastewater. Classical indicators of fecal contamination include total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens. These fecal indicators were monitored in order to obtain information regarding their evolution during wastewater treatment processes. Helminth eggs survive for a long duration in the environment and have a high potential for waterborne transmission, making them reliable contaminant indicators. A large quantity of helminth eggs was detected in the wastewater samples using the Bailanger method. Eggs were found in the influent and effluent with average concentration ranging from 11 to 50 eggs/L. Both E. coli and total coliforms concentrations were significantly 1- to 3-fold higher in influent than in effluent. The average concentrations of E. coli ranged from 2.5×10(3) to 4.4×10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/100 ml. Concentrations of total coliforms ranged from 3.6×10(3) to 7.9×10(5) CFU/100 ml. Clostridium perfringens was also detected in influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) at average concentrations ranging from 5.4×10(2) to 9.1×10(2) most probable number (MPN)/100 ml. Significant Spearman rank correlations were found between helminth eggs and microbial indicators (total coliform, E. coli, and C. perfringens) in the WWTP. There is therefore need for additional microbial pathogen monitoring in the WWTP to minimize public health risk.

  14. Copper-resistant bacteria enhance plant growth and copper phytoextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renxiu; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Yahua; Wang, Guiping; Xu, Yue; Shen, Zhenguo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of rhizospheric bacteria in solubilizing soil copper (Cu) and promoting plant growth. The Cu-resistant bacterium DGS6 was isolated from a natural Cu-contaminated soil and was identified as Pseudomonas sp. DGS6. This isolate solubilized Cu in Cu-contaminated soil and stimulated root elongation of maize and sunflower. Maize was more sensitive to inoculation with DGS6 than was sunflower and exhibited greater root elongation. In pot experiment, inoculation with DGS6 increased the shoot dry weight of maize by 49% and sunflower by 34%, and increased the root dry weight of maize by 85% and sunflower by 45%. Although the concentrations of Cu in inoculated and non-inoculated seedlings did not differ significantly, the total accumulation of Cu in the plants increased after inoculation. DGS6 showed a high ability to solubilize P and produce iron-chelating siderophores, as well as significantly improved the accumulation of P and Fe in both maize and sunflower shoots. In addition, DGS6 produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ACC deaminase, which suggests that it may modulate ethylene levels in plants. The bacterial strain DGS6 could be a good candidate for re-vegetation of Cu-contaminated sites. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of International Journal of Phytoremediation to view the supplemental file.

  15. Influence of ethereal oils extracted from Lamiaceae family plants on some pathogen microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Anita S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As pathogen microorganisms can be found in different kinds of food, using of natural antimicrobial compounds, like ethereal oils, could be important in the preservation of different groceries. To evaluate antimicrobial activity of ethereal oils extracted from Lamiaceae family plants - Rosmarinus officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., Majorana hortensis M o e n c h, and Salvia officinalis L screening of their effects against food borne bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and yeasts Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were applied. All investigated concentrations and pure Majorana hortensis and Thymus vulgaris ethereal oils showed microbicidal effect on majority of tested microorganisms.

  16. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF PLANT-ASSOCIATED BACTERIA AND THEIR POTENTIAL IN ENHANCING PHYTOREMEDIATION EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Piński

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants in order to cleanup pollutants including xenobiotics and heavy metals from soil, water and air. Inoculation of plants with plant growth promoting endophytic and rhizospheric bacteria can enhance efficiency of phytoremediation. Genomic analysis of four plant-associated strains belonging to the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia species revealed the presence of genes encoding proteins involved in plant growth promotion, biocontrol of phytopathogens, biodegradation of xenobiotics, heavy metals resistance and plant-bacteria-environment interaction. The results of this analysis suggest great potential of bacteria belonging to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia species in enhancing phytoremediation efficiency.

  17. The plant cell nucleus: a true arena for the fight between plants and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Laurent; Rivas, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is a fundamental feature shared by both plant and animal cells. Cellular factors involved in the transport of macromolecules through the nuclear envelope, including nucleoporins, importins and Ran-GTP related components, are conserved among a variety of eukaryotic systems. Interestingly, mutations in these nuclear components compromise resistance signalling, illustrating the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in plant innate immunity. Indeed, spatial restriction of defence regulators by the nuclear envelope and stimulus-induced nuclear translocation constitute an important level of defence-associated gene regulation in plants. A significant number of effectors from different microbial pathogens are targeted to the plant cell nucleus. In addition, key host factors, including resistance proteins, immunity components, transcription factors and transcriptional regulators shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and their level of nuclear accumulation determines the output of the defence response, further confirming the crucial role played by the nucleus during the interaction between plants and pathogens. Here, we discuss recent findings that situate the nucleus at the frontline of the mutual recognition between plants and invading microbes.

  18. Hydrogen cyanide in the rhizosphere: not suppressing plant pathogens, but rather regulating availability of phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Rijavec

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria produce chemical compounds with different benefits for the plant. Among them, HCN is recognized as a biocontrol agent, based on its ascribed toxicity against plant pathogens. Based on several past studies questioning the validity of this hypothesis, we have re-addressed the issue by designing a new set of in vitro experiments, to test if HCN-producing rhizobacteria could inhibit the growth of phytopathogens. The level of HCN produced by the rhizobacteria in vitro does not correlate with the observed biocontrol effects, thus disproving the biocontrol hypothesis. We developed a new concept, in which HCN does not act as a biocontrol agent, but rather is involved in geochemical processes in the substrate (e.g. chelation of metals, indirectly increasing the availability of phosphate. Since this scenario can be important for the pioneer plants living in oligotrophic alpine environments, we inoculated HCN producing bacteria into sterile mineral sand together with germinating plants and showed that the growth of the pioneer plant French sorrel was increased on granite-based substrate. No such effect could be observed for maize, where plantlets depend on the nutrients stored in the endosperm. To support our concept, we used KCN and mineral sand and showed that mineral mobilization and phosphate release could be caused by cyanide in vitro. We propose that in oligotrophic alpine environments, and possibly elsewhere, the main contribution of HCN is in the sequestration of metals and the consequential indirect increase of nutrient availability, which is beneficial for the rhizobacteria and their plant hosts.

  19. An image classification approach to analyze the suppression of plant immunity by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schikora Marek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enteric pathogen Salmonella is the causative agent of the majority of food-borne bacterial poisonings. Resent research revealed that colonization of plants by Salmonella is an active infection process. Salmonella changes the metabolism and adjust the plant host by suppressing the defense mechanisms. In this report we developed an automatic algorithm to quantify the symptoms caused by Salmonella infection on Arabidopsis. Results The algorithm is designed to attribute image pixels into one of the two classes: healthy and unhealthy. The task is solved in three steps. First, we perform segmentation to divide the image into foreground and background. In the second step, a support vector machine (SVM is applied to predict the class of each pixel belonging to the foreground. And finally, we do refinement by a neighborhood-check in order to omit all falsely classified pixels from the second step. The developed algorithm was tested on infection with the non-pathogenic E. coli and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and used to study the interaction between plants and Salmonella wild type and T3SS mutants. We proved that T3SS mutants of Salmonella are unable to suppress the plant defenses. Results obtained through the automatic analyses were further verified on biochemical and transcriptome levels. Conclusion This report presents an automatic pixel-based classification method for detecting “unhealthy” regions in leaf images. The proposed method was compared to existing method and showed a higher accuracy. We used this algorithm to study the impact of the human pathogenic bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium on plants immune system. The comparison between wild type bacteria and T3SS mutants showed similarity in the infection process in animals and in plants. Plant epidemiology is only one possible application of the proposed algorithm, it can be easily extended to other detection tasks, which also rely on color information, or

  20. Interactions of seedborne bacterial pathogens with host and non-host plants in relation to seed infestation and seedling transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabesh Dutta

    Full Text Available The ability of seed-borne bacterial pathogens (Acidovorax citrulli, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea to infest seeds of host and non-host plants (watermelon, tomato, pepper, and soybean and subsequent pathogen transmission to seedlings was investigated. A non-pathogenic, pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens was also included to assess a null-interacting situation with the same plant species. Flowers of host and non-host plants were inoculated with 1 × 10(6 colony forming units (CFUs/flower for each bacterial species and allowed to develop into fruits or umbels (in case of onion. Seeds harvested from each host/non-host bacterial species combination were assayed for respective bacteria by plating on semi-selective media. Additionally, seedlots for each host/non-host bacterial species combination were also assayed for pathogen transmission by seedling grow-out (SGO assays under greenhouse conditions. The mean percentage of seedlots infested with compatible and incompatible pathogens was 31.7 and 30.9% (by plating, respectively and they were not significantly different (P = 0.67. The percentage of seedlots infested with null-interacting bacterial species was 16.8% (by plating and it was significantly lower than the infested lots generated with compatible and incompatible bacterial pathogens (P = 0.03. None of the seedlots with incompatible/null-interacting bacteria developed symptoms on seedlings; however, when seedlings were assayed for epiphytic bacterial presence, 19.5 and 9.4% of the lots were positive, respectively. These results indicate that the seeds of non-host plants can become infested with incompatible and null-interacting bacterial species through flower colonization and they can be transmitted via epiphytic colonization of seedlings. In addition, it was also observed that flowers and seeds of non-host plants can be

  1. Interactions of Seedborne Bacterial Pathogens with Host and Non-Host Plants in Relation to Seed Infestation and Seedling Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bhabesh; Gitaitis, Ronald; Smith, Samuel; Langston, David

    2014-01-01

    The ability of seed-borne bacterial pathogens (Acidovorax citrulli, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea) to infest seeds of host and non-host plants (watermelon, tomato, pepper, and soybean) and subsequent pathogen transmission to seedlings was investigated. A non-pathogenic, pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens was also included to assess a null-interacting situation with the same plant species. Flowers of host and non-host plants were inoculated with 1×106 colony forming units (CFUs)/flower for each bacterial species and allowed to develop into fruits or umbels (in case of onion). Seeds harvested from each host/non-host bacterial species combination were assayed for respective bacteria by plating on semi-selective media. Additionally, seedlots for each host/non-host bacterial species combination were also assayed for pathogen transmission by seedling grow-out (SGO) assays under greenhouse conditions. The mean percentage of seedlots infested with compatible and incompatible pathogens was 31.7 and 30.9% (by plating), respectively and they were not significantly different (P = 0.67). The percentage of seedlots infested with null-interacting bacterial species was 16.8% (by plating) and it was significantly lower than the infested lots generated with compatible and incompatible bacterial pathogens (P = 0.03). None of the seedlots with incompatible/null-interacting bacteria developed symptoms on seedlings; however, when seedlings were assayed for epiphytic bacterial presence, 19.5 and 9.4% of the lots were positive, respectively. These results indicate that the seeds of non-host plants can become infested with incompatible and null-interacting bacterial species through flower colonization and they can be transmitted via epiphytic colonization of seedlings. In addition, it was also observed that flowers and seeds of non-host plants can be colonized

  2. Evolution of filamentous plant pathogens: gene exchange across eukaryotic kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Dacks, Joel B; Jenkinson, Joanna M; Thornton, Christopher R; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2006-09-19

    Filamentous fungi and oomycetes are eukaryotic microorganisms that grow by producing networks of thread-like hyphae, which secrete enzymes to break down complex nutrients, such as wood and plant material, and recover the resulting simple sugars and amino acids by osmotrophy. These organisms are extremely similar in both appearance and lifestyle and include some of the most economically important plant pathogens . However, the morphological similarity of fungi and oomycetes is misleading because they represent some of the most distantly related eukaryote evolutionary groupings, and their shared osmotrophic growth habit is interpreted as being the result of convergent evolution . The fungi branch with the animals, whereas the oomycetes branch with photosynthetic algae as part of the Chromalveolata . In this report, we provide strong phylogenetic evidence that multiple horizontal gene transfers (HGT) have occurred from filamentous ascomycete fungi to the distantly related oomycetes. We also present evidence that a subset of the associated gene families was initially the product of prokaryote-to-fungi HGT. The predicted functions of the gene products associated with fungi-to-oomycete HGT suggest that this process has played a significant role in the evolution of the osmotrophic, filamentous lifestyle on two separate branches of the eukaryote tree.

  3. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David M; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Gardener, Brian B McSpadden; Thomashow, Linda S

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and is not transferable between soils. Specific suppression owes its activity to the effects of individual or select groups of microorganisms and is transferable. The microbial basis of specific suppression to four diseases, Fusarium wilts, potato scab, apple replant disease, and take-all, is discussed. One of the best-described examples occurs in take-all decline soils. In Washington State, take-all decline results from the buildup of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. that produce the antifungal metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. Producers of this metabolite may have a broader role in disease-suppressive soils worldwide. By coupling molecular technologies with traditional approaches used in plant pathology and microbiology, it is possible to dissect the microbial composition and complex interactions in suppressive soils.

  4. The blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala, and the house fly, Musca domestica, as mechanical vectors of pathogenic bacteria in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwong, T; Srivoramas, T; Sueabsamran, P; Sukontason, K; Sanford, M R; Sukontason, K L

    2014-06-01

    The Oriental latrine fly, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and the house fly, Musca domestica L., (Diptera: Muscidae) are synanthropic flies which are adapted to live in close association with human habitations, thereby making them likely mechanical vectors of several pathogens to humans. There were two main aims of this study. The first aim was to determine the prevalence of these two fly species from five types of human habitations including: fresh-food markets, garbage piles, restaurants, school cafeterias and paddy fields, in the Muang Ubon Ratchathani and Warinchamrap districts of Ubon Ratchathani province of Northeast Thailand. Flies collection were conducted monthly from September 2010-October 2011 using a reconstructable funnel trap, containing 1 day-tainted beef offal as bait. A total of 7 750 flies (6 401 C. megacephala and 1 349 M.domestica) were collected. The second aim was to examine the potential of these flies to carry pathogenic bacteria. Bacteria were isolated from 994 individual flies collected using a sweep net (555 C. megacephala and 439 M. domestica). A total of 15 bacterial genera were isolated from the external surfaces, comprising ten genera of gram-negative bacteria and five gram-positive bacteria. The most common bacteria isolated from both species were coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Streptococcus group D non-enterococci. Human pathogenic enteric bacteria isolated were Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhi, Bacillus sp., and Enterococcus sp., of which S. typhi is the first report of isolation from these fly species. Other human pathogens included Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Not only were the number of C. megacephala positive for bacteria significantly higher than for M. domestica, but they were also carrying ~11-12 times greater bacterial load than M. domestica. These data suggest that both fly species should be considered potential

  5. P-Ser-HPr-a link between carbon metabolism and the virulence of some pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    HPr kinase/phosphorylase phosphorylates HPr, a phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, at serine-46. P-Ser-HPr is the central regulator of carbon metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria, but also plays a role in virulence development of certain...... pathogens. In Listeria monocytogenes, several virulence genes, which depend on the transcription activator PrfA, are repressed by glucose, fructose, etc., in a catabolite repressor (CcpA)-independent mechanism. However, the catabolite co-repressor P-Ser-HPr was found to inhibit the activity of Prf...... is probably also mediated via P-Ser-HPr, since ccpA disruption leads to elevated amounts of P-Ser-HPr. Indeed, a ccpA ptsH1 double mutant exhibited normal PrfA activity. In S. pyogenes, the expression of several virulence genes depends on the transcription activator Mga. Interestingly, the mga promoter...

  6. A study of bactericidal effect and optimization of pathogenic bacteria using TiO2 photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young; Park, Seung-Shik; Kim, Seung-Jai; Cho, Sung-Young

    2011-02-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in water by TiO2 catalysts was investigated in a batch reactor. After 30 min of irradiation with UV light in the presence of 1 mg/ml of TiO2, death ratio of S. choleraesuis subsp. and V. parahaemolyticus was 60% and 83%, respectively. And complete killing of the cells was achieved after 3 h of illumination in the presence of TiO2. We established the response surface methodology to investigate the effect of principal parameters on the pathogenic bacteria sterilization such as TiO2 concentration, pH and temperature. By applying response surface analysis to the bactericidal effect of S. almonella choleraesuis subsp. and V. parahaemolyticus, we found that the cell death ratio was influenced significantly by the first order term of TiO2 concentration.

  7. Prevalence of indicator and pathogenic bacteria in a tropical river of Western Ghats, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincy, M. V.; Brilliant, R.; Pradeepkumar, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    The Meenachil, the only river that flows through the heart of the Kottayam district of Kerala state, India was selected for the study. The present study has been carried out with an objective to systematically examine the prevalence of indicator and pathogenic microorganisms and to compare the microbiological quality of the river water during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Water samples from 44 different sites during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons were collected for the analysis. During the pre-monsoon period, the faecal coliform count ranged from 230 to 110,000 MPN/100 ml while there was a variation from 200 to 4600 MPN/100 ml during the post-monsoon period. When the faecal streptococci count was analysed, it ranged from 140 to 110,000 MPN/100 ml during the pre-monsoon and 70 to 4600 MPN/100 ml during the post-monsoon seasons, respectively. All the samples collected were found to have total viable count (TVC) higher than those prescribed by Bureau of Indian Standards (ISI 1991). Total viable counts were found in the range of 1.1 × 102 to 32 × 102 cfu/ml in the pre-monsoon and 1.0 × 102 to 26 × 102 cfu/ml in the post-monsoon. The presence of faecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli and potentially pathogenic bacteria, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella enterica in the Meenachil River indicates that the bacteriological quality of the Meenachil River is poor. Moreover, it sheds light to the fact that raw sewage is being dumped into the Meenachil River. Urban runoffs and effluents of rubber factories appear to be the important sources of faecal contamination in the river. From this study, we conclude that these water bodies pose significant public health hazards. Adequate sanitary infrastructure will help in preventing source water contamination. Besides this, public health education aimed at improving personal, household and community hygiene is urgent.

  8. Bacteriophages with Potential for Inactivation of Fish Pathogenic Bacteria: Survival, Host Specificity and Effect on Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda J. Silva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy may represent a viable alternative to antibiotics to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria. Its use, however, requires the awareness of novel kinetics phenomena not applied to conventional drug treatments. The main objective of this work was to isolate bacteriophages with potential to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria, without major effects on the structure of natural bacterial communities of aquaculture waters. The survival was determined in marine water, through quantification by the soft agar overlay technique. The host specificity was evaluated by cross infection. The ecological impact of phage addition on the structure of the bacterial community was evaluated by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. The survival period varied between 12 and 91 days, with a higher viability for Aeromonas salmonicida phages. The phages of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and of A. salmonicida infected bacteria of different families with a high efficacy of plating. The specific phages of pathogenic bacteria had no detectable impact on the structure of the bacterial community. In conclusion, V. parahaemolyticus and A. salmonicida phages show good survival time in marine water, have only a moderated impact on the overall bacterial community structure and the desired specificity for host pathogenic bacteria, being potential candidates for therapy of fish infectious diseases in marine aquaculture systems.

  9. Phenotypic and genetic diversity of rice seed-associated bacteria and their role in pathogenicity and biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottyn, B; Debode, J; Regalado, E; Mew, T W; Swings, J

    2009-09-01

    To study the phenotypic and genetic diversity of culturable bacteria associated with rice seed and to asses the antagonistic and pathogenic potential of the isolated bacteria. Seed of rice cultivar PSBRc14 was collected from farmers' fields of irrigated lowland in southern Luzon, Philippines. Isolations of distinct colonies yielded 498 isolates. Classification of the isolates according to similarities in cellular characteristics, whole-cell fatty acid composition, and colony appearance differentiated 101 morphotype groups. Predominant bacteria were Coryneform spp., Pantoea spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Other bacteria regularly present were Actinomycetes spp., Bacillus pumilus, B. subtilis, Burkholderia glumae, Enterobacter cloacae, Paenibacillus polymyxa, Staphylococcus spp. and Xanthomonas spp. The genetic diversity among isolates was assessed by BOX-PCR fingerprinting of genomic DNA and represented 284 fingerprint types (FPTs). Most FPTs (78%) were not shared among samples, while eight FPTs occurred frequently in the samples. Seven of these FPTs also occurred frequently in a previous collection made from rainfed lowlands of Iloilo island, Philippines. Sixteen per cent of the isolates inhibited in vitro the mycelial growth of the rice pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia grisea, whereas 4% were pathogens identified as Burkholderia glumae, Burkholderia gladioli and Acidovorax avenae ssp. avenae. This study reveals a broad morphological and genetic diversity of bacteria present on seed of a single rice cultivar. This line of work contributes to a better understanding of the microbial diversity present on rice seed and stresses its importance as a carrier of antagonists and pathogens.

  10. Phytophagous arthropods and a pathogen sharing a host plant: evidence for indirect plant-mediated interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaëlle Mouttet

    Full Text Available In ecological systems, indirect interactions between plant pathogens and phytophagous arthropods can arise when infestation by a first attacker alters the common host plant so that although a second attacker could be spatially or temporally separated from the first one, the former could be affected. The induction of plant defense reactions leading to the production of secondary metabolites is thought to have an important role since it involves antagonistic and/or synergistic cross-talks that may determine the outcome of such interactions. We carried out experiments under controlled conditions on young rose plants in order to assess the impact of these indirect interactions on life history traits of three pests: the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae, the aphid Rhodobium porosum Sanderson (Hemiptera: Aphididae and the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae. Our results indicated (i a bi-directional negative interaction between B. cinerea and R. porosum, which is conveyed by decreased aphid growth rate and reduced fungal lesion area, as well as (ii an indirect negative effect of B. cinerea on insect behavior. No indirect effect was observed between thrips and aphids. This research highlights several complex interactions that may be involved in structuring herbivore and plant pathogen communities within natural and managed ecosystems.

  11. Influence of river discharge on abundance and dissemination of heterotrophic, indicator and pathogenic bacteria along the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, V.R.; Srinivas, T.N.R.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.

    and pathogenic bacteria, has a vital position in marine pollution studies, as this gives an unswerving consequence of pollution on human health and also other marine biota. Hence it is crucial to observe microbial load in marine environments to warrant... of marine resources that pose a human health hazard and subsequent economic loss. Higher abundance of different bacteria was observed off Visakhapatnam city due to the intensive anthropogenic activities. Besides highlighting significant correlations...

  12. Single walled carbon nanotube-based electrical biosensor for the label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, S. M.; Baek, Y. K.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the development of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based electrical biosensor consisting of a two-terminal resistor, and report its use for the specific, label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria via changes in conductance. The ability of this biosensor to recognize....... This SWNT-based electrical biosensor will prove useful for the development of highly sensitive and specific handheld pathogen detectors....

  13. Plant-bacteria partnerships for the remediation of persistent organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Muhammad; Imran, Asma; Khan, Qaiser Mahmood; Afzal, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    High toxicity, bioaccumulation factor and widespread dispersal of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) cause environmental and human health hazards. The combined use of plants and bacteria is a promising approach for the remediation of soil and water contaminated with POPs. Plants provide residency and nutrients to their associated rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria. In return, the bacteria support plant growth by the degradation and detoxification of POPs. Moreover, they improve plant growth and health due to their innate plant growth-promoting mechanisms. This review provides a critical view of factors that affect absorption and translocation of POPs in plants and the limitations that plant have to deal with during the remediation of POPs. Moreover, the synergistic effects of plant-bacteria interactions in the phytoremediation of organic pollutants with special reference to POPs are discussed.

  14. Prewashing with acidified sodium chlorite reduces pathogenic bacteria in lightly fermented Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Yutaka; Bari, M L; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2005-05-01

    Efficacy of prewashing with acidified sodium chlorit