WorldWideScience

Sample records for plant operating licenses

  1. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  2. Licensing operators for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    The human element in the operation of commercial nuclear power plants is of utmost importance. Not only must the operators be technically competent in the execution of numerous complicated tasks, they must be capable of working together as a team to diagnose dynamic plant conditions to ensure that their plants are operated safely. The significance of human interaction skills and crew communications has been demonstrated most vividly in TMI and Chernobyl. It follows that the NRC must retain its high standards for licensing operators. This paper discusses activities and initiatives being employed by the NRC to enhance the reliability of its licensing examinations, and to build a highly qualified examiner work force

  3. Psychological characteristics of licensed nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajwaj, T.; Ford, T.; McGee, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The safe production of electricity by nuclear power plants has been the focus of considerable attention. Much of this concern has been focused on equipment and procedural issues, with less attention to the psychological factors that affect the operations staff of the plants, i.e., those individuals who are most directly responsible for a plant's operations. Stress and type A qualities would be significant for these individuals because of their relationships to job performance and health. Of equal significance would be work-related factors, such as job involvement and work pressure. Also of interest would be hostile tendencies because of the need for cooperation and communications among operations staff. Two variables could influence these psychological factors. One is the degree of responsibility for a plant's nuclear reactors. The individuals with the greatest responsibility are licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). There are also individuals with less direct responsibilities who are not licensed. A second variable is the operating status of the plant, whether or not the plant is currently producing electricity. Relative to ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants, these data suggest a positive view of licensed operators. Of interest are the greater stress scores in the licensed staff of the operating plant in contrast with their peers in the nonoperating plant

  4. Selection/licensing of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, L.M.

    1983-07-01

    An important aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety is the reactor operator in the control room. The operators are the first individuals to deal with an emergency situation, and thus, effective performance on their part is essential for safe plant operations. Important issues pertaining to NPP reactor operators would fall within the personnel subsystem of our safety system analysis. While there are many potential aspects of the personnel subsystem, a key first step in this focus is the selection of individuals - attempting to choose individuals for the job of reactor operator who will safely perform the job. This requires a valid (job-related) selection process. Some background information on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process used for selecting NPP reactor operators is briefly presented and a description of a research endeavor now underway at Battelle for developing a valid reactor operator licensing examination is included

  5. Ignalina plant licensing process, international co-operation and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystedt, P.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge for Lithuania as a country with regained independence was to perform a licensing review in a way never done before in the country and in a time schedule that was extremely short. The work included establishing of the licensing base, strengthening the regulatory authority and organising the technical support, establish and implement a safety improvement program, production of the safety case and review of the safety case, and to derive a conclusion regarding whether to issue a licence or not. This was to be done together with other tasks, such as implementation of modifications included in the safety improvement programme at Ignalina, implementation of a new storage for spent fuel and, most important of all, to manage the operational safety at the plant. The achievements are impressive seen in view of the point of start and in view of the time and resources that have been available. Lithuania has put forward a unique safety documentation of an RBMK reactor and presented an in-depth safety evaluation in full openness to Western experts, giving the unique possibility to compare the safety of the Ignalina reactors to Western standards. The co-operation that has been established between Lithuania and Western experts through different assistance programmes is of outmost value, for all involved parties. Co-operation should continue as one element of the challenges for the future

  6. 78 FR 46255 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear... nuclear power plant. Compliance with the provisions of the rule is required by June 20, 2014. This... environmental effect of renewing the operating license of a nuclear power plant. This document is necessary to...

  7. Personality Factors and Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Initial License Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita-Cochrane, Cynthia

    Commercial nuclear power utilities are under pressure to effectively recruit and retain licensed reactor operators in light of poor candidate training completion rates and recent candidate failures on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license exam. One candidate failure can cost a utility over $400,000, making the successful licensing of new operators a critical path to operational excellence. This study was designed to discover if the NEO-PI-3, a 5-factor measure of personality, could improve selection in nuclear utilities by identifying personality factors that predict license candidate success. Two large U.S. commercial nuclear power corporations provided potential participant contact information and candidate results on the 2014 NRC exam from their nuclear power units nation-wide. License candidates who participated (n = 75) completed the NEO-PI-3 personality test and results were compared to 3 outcomes on the NRC exam: written exam, simulated operating exam, and overall exam result. Significant correlations were found between several personality factors and both written and operating exam outcomes on the NRC exam. Further, a regression analysis indicated that personality factors, particularly Conscientiousness, predicted simulated operating exam scores. The results of this study may be used to support the use of the NEO-PI-3 to improve operator selection as an addition to the current selection protocol. Positive social change implications from this study include support for the use of a personality measure by utilities to improve their return-on-investment in candidates and by individual candidates to avoid career failures. The results of this study may also positively impact the public by supporting the safe and reliable operation of commercial nuclear power utilities in the United States.

  8. 78 FR 37281 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... factors: (1) License renewal will involve nuclear power plants for which the environmental impacts of...) Changes in the environment around nuclear power plants are gradual and predictable. The 1996 GEIS improved... environmental impacts that may occur from renewing commercial nuclear power plant operating licenses; (2...

  9. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  10. The licensing procedure for construction and operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, J.E.L.

    1980-03-01

    The licensing procedure for the construction and operation of the nuclear power plants in Brazil is analysed, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency orientation. The risks related to the nuclear energy is also emphasized. (A.L.) [pt

  11. Comparison of licensing activities for operating plants designed by Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a comparison of a number of licensing activities for the operating Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plants with emphasis on Rancho Seco. The factors selected were a comparison of staff resources expended in FY84, active licensing action reviews, implementation of NUREG-0737 modifications, exemptions to regulations, SALP reports, enforcement actions, and Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The eight licensed operating plants examined are as follows: Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1), Crystal River Unit 3, Davis Besse, Oconee Units 1, 2, and 3, Rancho Seco, and Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1)

  12. Guide to the selection, training, and licensing or certification of reprocessing plant operators. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 55, establishes procedures and criteria for the licensing of operators, including senior operators, in ''Production and Utilization Facilities'', which includes plants for reprocessing irradiated fuel. A training guide is presented which will facilitate the licensing of operators for nuclear reprocessing plants by offering generalized descriptions of the basic principles (theory) and the unit operations (mechanics) employed in reprocessing spent fuels. In the present volume, details about the portions of a training program that are of major interest to management are presented

  13. Guide to the selection, training, and licensing or certification of reprocessing plant operators. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-06-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 55, establishes procedures and criteria for the licensing of operators, including senior operators, in ''Production and Utilization Facilities'', which includes plants for reprocessing irradiated fuel. A training guide is presented which will facilitate the licensing of operators for nuclear reprocessing plants by offering generalized descriptions of the basic principles (theory) and the unit operations (mechanics) employed in reprocessing spent fuels. In the present volume, details about the portions of a training program that are of major interest to management are presented. (JSR)

  14. A Post Licensing Study of Community Effects at Two Operating Nuclear Power Plants. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Bruce J.; And Others

    In an effort to identify and assess the social, economic, and political effects of nuclear power plant construction and operation upon two host communities (Plymouth, Massachusetts and Waterford, Connecticut), a post-licensing review revealed that the primary impact of the nuclear power plants in both communities was an increase in the property…

  15. Role of cognitive models of operators in the design, operation and licensing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Cognitive models of the behavior of nuclear power plant operators - that is, models developed in terms of human properties rather than external task characteristics - are assuming increasingly important roles in plant design, operation and licensing. This is partly due to an increased concern for human decision making during unfamiliar plant conditions, and partly due to problems that arise when modern information technology is used to support operators in complex situations. Some of the problems identified during work on interface design and risk analysis are described. First, the question of categories of models is raised. Next, the use of cognitive models for system design is discussed. The use of the available cognitive models for more effective operator training is also advocated. The need for using cognitive models in risk analysis is also emphasized. Finally, the sources of human performance data, that is, event reports, incident analysis, experiments, and training simulators are mentioned, and the need for a consistent framework for data analysis based on cognitive models is discussed

  16. Analyses of operating license renewal for nuclear power plants in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Goro

    2007-01-01

    Although the originally-approved operating period for nuclear power plants in the U.S. is 40 years, the operating periods of many plants have been extended by license renewal for another 20 years. On the other hand, in Japan, plant life management is carried out assuming long-term operation of the plant, and the electric power company submits reports, such as aging technology assessment, and receives evaluation by the authorities. In this paper, the situation regarding plant life management was investigated and a Japan-U.S. comparison was made. As a result, differences were found in the procedure, the background, the manpower, the review period, etc. in Japan and the U.S. but there is no difference between Japan and the U.S. in aiming for a check of the integrity of components, assuming long-term operation for 60 years. Moreover, trend analysis using the overseas fault database of INSS examined the effect on the preservation activities of a license renewal. As a result, there is a tendency for license renewal not to be applied for in units in which the number of aging faults increases with the increase in elapsed years. The U.S. license renewal system was considered to be effective in plant life management, and suggested the validity of plant life management in Japan which is employing the equivalent system to the U.S. (author)

  17. 77 FR 29701 - Impact of Construction (Under a Combined License) of New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... construct and operate new nuclear power plants (NPPs) on multi-unit sites to provide an evaluation of the... License) of New Nuclear Power Plants on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites (Package). ML112630039 Federal...

  18. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  19. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  20. Nuclear power plant simulators for operator licensing and training. Part I. The need for plant-reference simulators. Part II. The use of plant-reference simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.L.; Bolton, P.A.; Shikiar, R.; Saari, L.M.

    1984-05-01

    Part I of this report presents technical justification for the use of plant-reference simulators in the licensing and training of nuclear power plant operators and examines alternatives to the use of plant-reference simulators. The technical rationale is based on research on the use of simulators in other industries, psychological learning and testing principles, expert opinion and user opinion. Part II discusses the central considerations in using plant-reference simulators for licensing examination of nuclear power plant operators and for incorporating simulators into nuclear power plant training programs. Recommendations are presented for the administration of simulator examinations in operator licensing that reflect the goal of maximizing both reliability and validity in the examination process. A series of organizational tasks that promote the acceptance, use, and effectiveness of simulator training as part of the onsite training program is delineated

  1. Recruitment training and licensing of operating personnel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    This article covers the step-by-step and most rigid recruitment, training, and licensing procedures undertaken in the selection for personnel involved in nuclear power plant operations. These procedures are true to all countries. However, for developing countries such as the Philippines, a bachelor's degree may be required as compared with the U.S. wherein a high school diploma is the minimum requirement. Because of the complexity of a nuclear facility, the work will require highly capable individuals with mature judgement who can render correct decisions even under highly stressed conditions. Thus during the selection and recruitment of applicants for the operator position, they are not only given aptitude tests but are also subjected to a series of psychological examintions. Once they are accepted, they are made to undergo a comprehensive and in-depth training to ensure that they will be capable of operating the nuclear power plant safely and effectively. Finally, those prospective operators have to pass licensing examinations in order to prove their competence and skills. Retraining programs follow after their training to maintain their skills. (RTD)

  2. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 52 - Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Combined Licenses To Construct and Operate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Combined Licenses To Construct and Operate Nuclear Power Reactors of Identical Design at Multiple Sites N Appendix N... FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Pt. 52, App. N Appendix N to Part 52—Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant...

  3. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  4. Technological evaluation for the extension of the operation license to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C. R.; Medina A, A. L.

    2010-01-01

    At the present time one of the tendencies in the nuclear industry is the renovation of operation licenses of the nuclear power plants, with the purpose of prolonging their operation 20 years more than the time settled down in their original license, which is of 30 years for the case of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. This allows the electric power generation for a major period of time and to a relatively low price, giving this way a bigger competitiveness to the power stations of nuclear power. However, to request the license extension of the nuclear power plant requires to get ready the documentation and necessary studies for: to maintain a high level of security, to optimize the operation, maintenance and service life of the structures, systems and components, to maintain an acceptable level of performance, to maximize the recovery of the investment about the service of the nuclear power plant and to preserve the sure conditions for a major operation period at the license time. This paper describes the studies conducted by the Materials Technology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) to substantiate the required documentation for obtaining the extension of operating license of the nuclear power plant. These studies are focused mainly in the reactor pressure vessels of both units, as well as in the deposit of noble metals and the influence of the sludges (crud s) in this deposit. (Author)

  5. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 50 - Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To Construct and Licenses To Operate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To Construct and Licenses To Operate Nuclear Power Reactors of Identical Design at Multiple Sites N Appendix N... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App.N Appendix N to Part 50—Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To...

  6. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  7. On the reform of nuclear licensing procedures for plants and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecheler, H.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear licensing procedures require basic reforming. In doing so, there must be a differentiation between (concrete) licensing of plants and (abstract) decisions on site provision. The provision of sites is exercised directly by the diets of the Laender. For this purpose they enact planning laws on sites for nuclear power plants of different sizes. As far as the Federal law is touched upon (especially the Federal act on construction), the Federal legislator has to concede competences to the Laender. No. 6 of section 7 II of the Atomic Energy Act would have to be deleted. The plant licensing procedure is to be limited to a mere safety check-up of a concrete plant. Licensing prerequisites of the Atomic Energy Act are to be made more precise by the Federal legislator, namely by deciding unequivocally the purpose of the law, whether priority is given to promotion or to protection, and by making the enacting of tangible regulations a duty. When these licensing prerequisites exist, the law has to concede the applicant a plain title to licensing. (orig.) [de

  8. Nuclear plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazda, P.A.; Bhatt, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    During the next 10 years, nuclear plant license renewal is expected to become a significant issue. Recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies have shown license renewal to be technically and economically feasible. Filing an application for license renewal with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) entails verifying that the systems, structures, and components essential for safety will continue to perform their safety functions throughout the license renewal period. This paper discusses the current proposed requirements for this verification and the current industry knowledge regarding age-related degradation of structures. Elements of a license renewal program incorporating NRC requirements and industry knowledge including a schedule are presented. Degradation mechanisms for structural components, their significance to nuclear plant structures, and industry-suggested age-related degradation management options are also reviewed

  9. ASTM standards associated with PWR and BWR power plant licensing, operation and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; McElroy, R.J.; Gold, R.; Lippincott, E.P.; Lowe, A.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers ASTM Standards that are available, under revision, and are being considered in support of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) licensing, regulation, operation, surveillance and life attainment. The current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and E10.05 and their Task Groups (TG) are described. A very important aspect of these efforts is the preparation, revision, and balloting of standards identified in the ASTM E706 Standard on Master Matrix for Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessel (PV) Surveillance Standards. The current version (E706-87) of the Master Matrix identifies 21 ASTM LWR physics-dosimetry-metallurgy standards for Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Support Structure (SS) surveillance programs, whereas, for the next revision 34 standards are identified. The need for national and international coordination of Standards Technology Development, Transfer and Training (STDTT) is considered in this and other Symposium papers that address specific standards related physics-dosimetry-metallurgy issues. 69 refs

  10. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the errata page

  11. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  13. The licensing process of the design modifications of Cernavoda 2 NPP resulting from the operating experience of CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, L.

    2005-01-01

    The CANDU 6 plant now under construction in Cernavoda include over two hundred significant improvements made in order to comply with current codes and standards and licensing requirements relative to the operating CANDU 6 in Romania. These evolutionary improvements are incorporated in CANDU 6 design taking advance of CANDU operating experience, of the designer company research and development and technical advances worldwide in order to further enhance safety, reliability and economics. This paper gives a general idea of the evaluation of the modifications of the Cernavoda 2 nuclear power plant against the design of Cernavoda 1 and states the safety principles and requirements which are the basis for this evaluation. (author)

  14. Challenges in the Licensing of New Nuclear Power Plant, Service Life Extension of Operating Ones (Safeguards-Safety-Security Aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA), as the Hungarian nuclear regulator is faced with dual challenges meant by the licensing of the planned construction of two AES-2006 type nuclear power plant units and the licensing of the service life extension of the existing units that have been operating for more than 30 years. The HAEA has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. Accordingly, the licensing scope covers safeguards, safety as well as security. The paper shows the current status of the Hungarian nuclear programme and the future plans, as well as summarizes the regulatory approach followed by HAEA. (author)

  15. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar 1990) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  16. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  17. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  18. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  19. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1990-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  20. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  1. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis

  2. Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC's review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative

  3. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  4. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units are provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  5. Generic evaluation of feedwater transients and small break loss-of-coolant accidents in GE-designed operating plants and near-term operating license applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The results are presented of a generic evaluation of feedwater transients, small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), and other TMI-2-related events for General Electric Company (GE)-designed operating plants and near-term operating license applications to confirm or establish the bases for the continued safe operation of the operating plants. The results of this evaluation are presented in this report in the form of a set of findings and recommendations in each of the principal review areas. Additional review of the accident is continuing and further information is being obtained and evaluated. Any new information will be reviewed and modifications will be made as appropriate

  6. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  7. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  8. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  9. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  10. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  11. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  13. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  14. Licensing requirements regarding the qualification of operating personnel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The legal requirements regarding the qualifications of operating personnel in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are outlined as in article 7 of the Atomic Energy Act. For the responsible operating personnel the requisite competence and reliability are legally required; for subordinate personnel the law requires only the necessary knowledge. The requisite competence and the necessary knowledge have been further specified in a set of guidelines by the authorities; work on specification of reliability requirements is under way. Essential elements of the requisite competence of responsible operating personnel are their professional qualification, their safety-related knowledge, their abilities, their practical experience, and - for the responsible shift personnel - their nuclear, plant-related training as well as a written and oral examination. Requalification is indispensible for keeping the requisite competence on a level in accordance with the current state of science and technology. Facts concerning the personal reliability of the responsible operating personnel are assessed by the competent authorities on the basis of information available at other state institutions. For the responsible shift personnel, physical and psychological fitness are important factors contributing to their reliability. The necessary knowledge subordinate operating personnel must possess with respect to plant safety and safety of the personnel is assured via instruction on safety and via special briefings at the working place. Lack of safety-related knowledge has to be compensated for by assigning an experienced permanent supervisor for each activity in question. Current work on qualification of operating personnel concentrates on training, including simulator training, of responsible shift personnel. (author)

  15. Investment issues in nuclear plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynon, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    A method that determines the operating lives for existing nuclear power plants is discussed. These assumptions are the basis for projections of electricity supply through 2020 reported in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 1999. To determine if plants will seek license renewal, one must first determine if they will be operating to the end of their current licenses. This determination is based on an economic test that assumes an investment of $150/kW will be required after 30 yr of operation for plants with older designs. This expenditure is intended to be equivalent to the cost that would be associated with any of several needs such as a one0time investment to replace aging equipment (steam generators), a series of investments to fix age-related degradation, increases in operating costs, or costs associated with decreased performance. This investment is compared with the cost of building and operating the lowest-cost new plant over the same 10-yr period. If a plant fails this test, it is assumed to be retired after 30 yr of service. All other plants are then considered candidates for license renewal. The method used to determine if it is economic to apply for license renewal and operate plants for an additional 20 yr is to assume that plants face an investment of $250 million after 40 yr of operation to refurbish aging components. This investment is compared with the lowest-cost new plant alternative evaluated over the same 20 yr that the nuclear plant would operate. If the nuclear plant is the lowest cost option, it is projected to continue to operate. EIA projects that it would be economic to extend the operating licenses for 3.7 GW of capacity (6 units)

  16. Licensing of nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Recommendations are presented for the licensing of nuclear reactor operators in units licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all physical persons designated by the Operating Organization of the nuclear reactor or reactors to execute any of the following functional activities: a) to manipulate the controls of a definite reactor b) to direct the authorized activities of the reactor operators licesed according to the present recommendations. (F.E.) [pt

  17. Experience acquired by Furnas for licensing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.J.C. da; Xavier, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    The system for licensing of Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant-Unit 1 is presented. The process phases for reactor construction and operation are described: preliminary site approval; bases for safety review; partial construction permits; final construction permits; emission of final report of safety analysis; initial operation license and permanent operation license. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Nuclear power plant licensing in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, J.S.C.; Waddington, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear power plant licensing practice which has evolved over three decades provides a regulatory framework that promotes safe design and operation of CANDU power plants. From the very outset, it recognizes the need for simple and reliable safety systems which are separate from the systems that are normally used to produce electricity. Further, it requires the reliability of safety systems be demonstrated by routine tests during plant operation. Over the three decades, the analysis requirements to demonstrate the performance and reliability of plant systems that have a role in the detection and mitigating of accidents have also evolved. Today's requirements are defined in consultative documents C-6 and C-98. One recurring theme throughout the evolution of the licensing practice is the maxim of prescribing only basic safety requirements and rules so that designers and operators have the freedom to devise the best possible design features and operating practices

  19. Why operators fail licensing examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, D.R.; Zerbo, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    A survey was conducted among nuclear utility operators who have taken NRC licensing examinations to determine which factors they considered important in their success or failure. The operators also compared the actual NRC examination with their expectations prior to taking the examination. The results of the survey supplement NRC statistics with regard to failure rates. Over 350 operators and 20 utilities participated in the survey and a good cross section of the nuclear community is represented. Reactor theory and emergency procedures are important areas in which operators found NRC emphasis to be different than expected. Observation Training and Design Lecture Series are two training segments which appear to require improvement. Recommendations are made for the use of data collected through this survey and for continuation of the effort to give operators a mechanism of supplying feedback to the training and licensing process

  20. Regulator process for the authorization of an amendment to the operation license of a nuclear power plant in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.; Espinosa V, J.M.; Salgado, J.R.; Mamani, Y.R.

    2005-01-01

    The regulator process by which an authorization is granted from an amendment to the License of Operation of a nuclear power station in Mexico is described. It makes an appointment the effective legal mark, the technical characteristics of the modification, the evaluation process and deposition upon oath of tests and finally the elaboration of the Safety report and the Technical Verdict that is a correspondent for the regulator organism to the Secretary of Energy, the one that in turn is the responsible of granting the amendment the License just as it establishes it the Law. (Author)

  1. Analysis of replies to an IAEA questionnaire on procedures for accreditation of training programmes and for authorization and licensing of nuclear power plant operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The intent of this survey was to gather data and present results to facilitate the international exchange of information and experience in this field. This was accomplished using a questionnaire developed by the IAEA that was sent in September, 1989 to the thirty-one Member States having nuclear power plants operating or under construction. Of these, twenty-one responses were received. The questionnaire was constructed in two parts: (1) Accreditation of Training Programmes; and (2) Authorization and (Formal) Licensing of Operations Personnel. The analysis was conducted by IAEA staff with the assistance of consultants and resulted in an identification of the commonalities and differences in approach on these issues. An advisory group subsequently considered this analysis, interpreted the results relative to the original responses, and reached conclusions that are contained in this document

  2. 10 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Environmental Effect of Renewing the Operating License of a Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... health effect which will not ever be mitigated (for example no cancer cure in the next thousand years... license and is to be used in accordance with § 51.95(c). On a 10-year cycle, the Commission intends to... negligible during refurbishment because best management practices are expected to be employed to control soil...

  3. 78 FR 37324 - Preparation of Environmental Reports for Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Environmental Reports for Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal Applications AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... for Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal Applications.'' This regulatory guide provides guidance to... renewal of a nuclear power plant operating license. Applicants should use this regulatory guide when...

  4. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.; Rumble, E.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  5. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, J [Duke Engineering and Services, Marlborough, MA (United States); Rumble, E; Rodwell, E [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  6. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Marlborough, MA (United States); Rumble, E.; Rodwell, E. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  7. Qualification, training, licensing/authorization and retraining of operating personnel in nuclear power plants. Noteworthy topics identified by evaluation of the practices in countries of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraut, A.; Pfeffer, W.

    1987-01-01

    In the report EUR 10118 '' Qualification, training, licensing and retraining of operating shift personnel in nuclear power plants'' the current practice in the countries of the European Communities as well as the procedures and programmes applied in Sweden, Switzerland and the USA are outlined and evaluated. The intent was to derive fundamental and generally valid concepts concerning shift-staff training and other relevant aspects. Those items were identified that seemed to be noteworthy because they give some guidance on how to achieve and maintain the qualification of the shift staff of NPPs or how to improve the staffing of the control room. These noteworthy topics identified by evaluation of the practice in countries of the European Communities and also elsewhere are presented in the publication at hand. The report addresses the following topics: tasks of the shift personnel, nomenclature for different grades of the personnel; shift staffing and staffing of the control room; criteria for personnel selection when recruiting new shift staff; personnel qualification necessary for recruitment; training of shift personnel; retraining and preservation of qualification standards; training facilities, especially simulators; responsibility for training; licensing/authorization; retirement from shift work. Consideration of these more general aspects and concepts may lead to improvement in training. The job descriptions given in the Annex to the document are only intended to give a general understanding of the typical designations, tasks and responsibilities of shift staff

  8. Aging management review for license renewal and plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinckel, M.A.; Young, G.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: United States nuclear power plants are initially licensed for a period of 40-years. The 40-year term, which was established by the Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s, is believed to be based on engineering judgement and is consistent with the typical amortization schedule for purchasing fossil power plants. Under 10 CFR Part 54, the license renewal rule, additional terms of 20-years may be obtained through the preparation of a license renewal application that must be reviewed and approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The license renewal rule requires that applicants perform ageing management reviews on passive long-lived structures and components to demonstrate that ageing will be managed during the period of extended operation (i.e., additional 20 years of operation). ageing of active components, which are excluded from 10 CFR Part 54, is accomplished through the Maintenance Rule, 10 CFR Part 65, using performance-based monitoring. The license renewal rule, 10 CFR Part 54, was initially published in 1991. After significant interaction with the nuclear industry from 1991 through 1994, the NRC revised the rule in 1995 to focus on passive long-lived structures and components. In 1998, the first two applications for license renewal were submitted to the NRC by Baltimore Gas and Electric for the two-unit Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant and by Duke Energy for the three-unit Oconee nuclear power plant. In March 2000, the NRC approved the application for the two-unit Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant for an additional 20 years. Two months later, the NRC approved the renewal of the operating licenses for the three-unit Oconee nuclear station. The NRC completed these reviews in a timely, predictable, and stable manner. As of February 2002, the NRC has approved renewal of operating licenses for eight nuclear units and has applications under review for 15 more units. Twelve additional companies have notified the NRC of their intention to seek

  9. Licensing of New Nuclear Power Plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Garry; Miller, Doug

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory process for new power plant licensing in Canada, from receipt of the initial application to commercial operation, can be divided into three phases: - Environmental Assessment (EA) and License to Prepare Site; - License to Construct; and - License to Operate. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) does not have provisions for combined licenses for site preparation, construction, or operation. Separate licenses must, therefore, be granted for each phase, and would be issued in sequence. However, applications to prepare a site, to construct and to operate a new nuclear power plant could be assessed in parallel. The total duration from the application for the License to Prepare Site to the issuance of the License to Operate (which is a prerequisite for first fuel load) has been established as 9 years subject to certain factors. To help facilitate this timeline, the CNSC has undertaken an aggressive program of documenting regulatory practices, requirements and guidance to assist applicants in submitting complete applications. Working level procedures to assist CNSC staff in their review of submissions are also under development. Extensive program and project management has been introduced to ensure that timelines will be achieved. In parallel with the above activities, regulatory oversight measures to be employed during site preparation activities and plant construction and commissioning are also being developed. On the international front, the CNSC is participating in the MDEP program to leverage the resources and knowledge of other national regulatory authorities in reviews the CNSC is undertaking. The CNSC also participates in IAEA and other international activities to utilize/adapt international practices as appropriate in Canada. (authors)

  10. Safety and licensing of nuclear heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.; Hilborn, J.W.; Lynch, G.F.; McAuley, S.J.

    1989-09-01

    World attention continues to focus on nuclear district heating, a low-cost energy from a non-polluting fuel. It offers long-term security for countries currently dependent on fossil fuels, and can reduce the burden of fossil fuel transportation on railways and roads. Current initiatives encompass large, centralized heating plants and small plants supplying individual institutions. The former are variants of their power reactor cousins but with enhanced safety features. The latter face the safety and licensing challenges of urban siting and remotely monitored operation, through use of intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. Small heating reactor designs are compared, and the features of the SLOWPOKE Energy System, in the forefront of these designs, are summarized. The challenge of public perception must be met by clearly presenting the characteristics of small heating reactors in terms of scale and transparent safety in design and operation, and by explaining the local benefits

  11. 77 FR 11173 - Renewal of Facility Operating License No. NPF-30, Union Electric Company, Callaway Plant, Unit 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... . NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS): You may access publicly-available... order to serve documents through the Electronic Information Exchange System, users will be required to... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-483; NRC-2012-0001] Renewal of Facility Operating...

  12. Post licensing case study of community effects at two operating nuclear power plants. Final report, March 1975--March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, B.J.; Peelle, E.; Bjornstad, D.J.; Mattingly, T.J. Jr.; Soderstrom, J.; DeVault, R.C.

    1976-06-01

    The social, economic, and political/institutional impacts of two operating nuclear power complexes on two New England communities are studied. The report includes discussions of the study design and objectives, profiles of the towns of Plymouth, Massachusetts, and Waterford, Connecticut, and analysis of the social, economic, and political impacts as observed by members of the ORNL staff. Results are presented from an attitude survey as well as a social impact classification schema devised as a methodological tool

  13. Post licensing case study of community effects at two operating nuclear power plants. Final report, March 1975--March 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdy, B.J.; Peelle, E.; Bjornstad, D.J.; Mattingly, T.J. Jr.; Soderstrom, J.; DeVault, R.C.

    1976-06-01

    The social, economic, and political/institutional impacts of two operating nuclear power complexes on two New England communities are studied. The report includes discussions of the study design and objectives, profiles of the towns of Plymouth, Massachusetts, and Waterford, Connecticut, and analysis of the social, economic, and political impacts as observed by members of the ORNL staff. Results are presented from an attitude survey as well as a social impact classification schema devised as a methodological tool.

  14. Development and licensing of a melting plant for Chernobyl scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappok, M.; Zunk, H.; Fashevsky, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    One decade after the accident at unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a melting plant for radioactively contaminated metallic materials, the so-called SURF facility, is being planned and licensed for erection in the direct neighbourhood of the NPP area. Main goal is the recycling of the material largely decontaminated by the melting process, by means of manufacturing of casks and containers for waste disposal and of shielding equipment. The melting plant will be part of the Ukrainian waste handling centre (CPPRO). The technology is based on the long-term experience gained at Siempelkamp's CARLA plant in Krefeld. Within 1995 and 1996 the licensing conditions were defined, the licensing documents prepared and the formal procedure initiated. The complex is scheduled to start operation in 2001, in case the necessary financing is allocated. To this end the proposed site of the facility has undergone the state assessment. The technical documentation for construction is at the stage of development. (author)

  15. License renewal - an idea whose time has come. Hatch nuclear plant license renewal program: an actual example of application of the license renewal rule to the Intake Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandiwala, F.; Evans, W.P.

    1999-01-01

    After the NRC issued a revised license renewal rule in May 1995, the nuclear industry focussed on developing generic industry for implementing the rule and testing the guidance through various demonstration programs and work products in conjunction with the NRC. In addition, plant-specific programs also proceeded forward. These activities show that implementation issues continue to exist. Since the issuance of the rule, the NRC has issued a draft standard review plan for license renewal (SRP-LR), working draft, September 1997. Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNC) has begun development work on a license renewal application for Plant Hatch Units 1 and 2. Plant Hatch Units 1 and 2 are BWR 4, Mark I plants whose operating licenses expire in 2014 and 2018, respectively. The Plant Hatch initiative also involves teaming with other boiling water reactors (BWRs) to develop the license renewal technology within the BWR fleet, and to support Plant Hatch by providing an oversight role for the application process. The teaming effort involved two other utilities, each being assigned to prepare a common report on a mechanical system or a structure. The common report could be presented to the NRC with modifications to suit the individual plants, thereby saving time and money, and hopefully resulting in quicker approval by the NRC. The desired license renewal process end result is a renewed license with up to a 20 year extension (10CFR 54.31(b)). (orig.)

  16. Nuclear power plant licensing: opportunities for improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    On April 20, 1977, the Commission directed that recently completed licensing actions be reviewed by the staff for the purpose of identifying ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of NRC nuclear power plant licensing activities. This report summarizes the results of a study undertaken by an internal ad hoc Study Group established in response to that directive. The Study Group limited its considerations to safety and environmental review activities. The background, scope, assumptions and objectives of the study are discussed. A prime assumption of this study was that improvements in the efficiency should not be permitted to reduce the current quality achieved in the licensing process. This consideration underlies the conclusions and recommendations of the study

  17. Cogeneration plants in Italy: Licensing aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscaglione, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper focusses on administrative/bureaucratic problems relative to the licensing of cogeneration plants in Italy. The current stumbling block appears to lie in organizational difficulties relative to the coordination of various Government authorized safety committees responsible for the drafting up of suitable legislation governing cogeneration plant fire safety aspects. The author cites the possible environmental benefits in terms of air pollution abatement that could have been had with the timely start-up of a new 7 MW plant (in Lombardia) still awaiting its go-ahead authorization

  18. NRC licensing of uranium enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing a rule making that establishes the licensing requirements for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants. Although implementation of this rule making is timed to correspond with receipt of a license application for the Louisiana Energy Services centrifuge enrichment plant, the rule making is applicable to all uranium enrichment technologies. If ownership of the US gaseous diffusion plants and/or atomic vapor laser isotope separation is transferred to a private or government corporation, these plants also would be licensable under the new rule making. The Safeguards Studies Department was tasked by the NRC to provide technical assistance in support of the rule making and guidance preparation process. The initial and primary effort of this task involved the characterization of the potential safeguards concerns associated with a commercial enrichment plant, and the licensing issues associated with these concerns. The primary safeguards considerations were identified as detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of unauthorized production of material of low strategic significance, and detection of production of uranium enriched to >10% 235 U. The primary safeguards concerns identified were (1) large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, (2) the inability to shutdown some technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and (3) the flexibility of some technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could prevent conventional material control and accounting programs from detecting the production and removal of 5 kg 235 U as highly enriched uranium. Safeguards techniques were identified to mitigate these concerns

  19. Renewal of operating licenses: the U.S. model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.; Tveiten, B.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly half of the American nuclear power plants by now have been granted permits allowing them to be operated for twenty years more than originally planned. Procedures to this effect are under way for one quarter of U.S. nuclear power plants. For the operators, plant life extension, as a rule, is economically preferable to building new baseload plants or buying electricity from other sources. In the licensing procedures, the U.S. regulatory authority examines both environmental aspects and safety aspects of extended operation. The technical basis of assessment is the GALL report (Generic Aging Lessons Learnt) which by now has become the consolidated yardstick used by the authorities for safety assessment. In these procedures, the licensee is required to present updated design documents and, if applicable, extend or create from scratch programs of aging management. The case of the oldest nuclear power plant in operation in the United States is described to show the steps of an American licensing and administrative court procedure. Granting renewed operating permits began before President Bush's term and will continue independent of the change in government in 2008. (orig.)

  20. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol.4, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  1. Regulatory framework for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Alcaniz, T.; Esteban Barriendos, M.

    1995-01-01

    As the framework of standards and requirements covering each phase of nuclear power plant project and operation developed, plant owners defined their licensing commitments (codes, rules and design requirements) during the project and construction phase before start-up and incorporated regulatory requirements imposed by the regulatory Body during the licensing process prior to operation. This produces a regulatory framework for operating a plant. It includes the Licensing Basis, which is the starting point for analyzing and incorporating new requirements, and for re-evaluation of existing ones. This presentation focuses on the problems of applying this regulatory framework to new operating activities, in particular to new projects, analyzing new requirements, and reconsidering existing ones. Clearly establishing a plant's licensing basis allows all organizations involved in plant operation to apply the requirements in a more rational way. (Author)

  2. New nuclear plant design and licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangdilok, W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes latest developments in the nuclear power reactor technology with emphasis on three areas: (1) the US technology of advanced passive light water reactors (AP600 and S BWR), (2) regulatory processes that certify their safety, and (3) current engineering concerns. The goal is to provide and insight of how the government's regulatory agency guarantees public safety by looking into how new passive safety features were designed and tested by vendors and how they were re-evaluated and retested by the US NRC. The paper then discusses the US 1989 nuclear licensing reform (10 CFR Part 52) whose objectives are to promote the standardization of nuclear power plants and provide for the early and definitive resolution of site and design issues before plants are built. The new licensing process avoids the unpredictability nd escalated construction cost under the old licensing process. Finally, the paper summarizes engineering concerns found in current light water reactors that may not go away in the new design. The concerns are related the material and water chemistry technology in dealing with corrosion problems in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems (PWRs and BWRs). These engineering concerns include core shroud cracking (BWRs), jet pump hold-down beam cracking (BWRs), steam generator tube stress corrosion cracking (PWR)

  3. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regularory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program

  4. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program

  5. Quality assurance for nuclear power plants licensing aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovoy, W.F.G.

    1976-02-01

    For the nuclear industry, specific criteria must be implemented to provide sufficient assurance that nuclear plants will be constructed and operated to conform with design, regulatory and code requirements. In Israel the inspections or audits are performed by the IAEC Licensing Division. Local position on ANSI QA standards as well as the eighteen criteria are shown. Lists of American standards are presented. The responsibility for quality assurance is not shared, but reinforced by each responsible unit in the supply chain. (B.G.)

  6. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  7. Business planning for license renewal and plant acquisitions. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, Edward L.; Grimes, Chris; Walters, Doug; Doroshuk, Barth; Gasper, Joe; Salmon, Harry; Bier, Vicki M.; Hagen, Ronald; Richardson, Charles J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Subsequent to Calvert Cliffs and Oconee license renewals in 2000, many plants have not applied for license renewal. Industry is moving to standardize and streamline the process to make it as efficient and effective as possible. At the same time, it is focusing on business practices and competitiveness of nuclear plants in the long-term market-both under regulated and deregulated state formats. In addition, new acquisitions and consolidation in the nuclear market have created several large owner-operators that have specialized business needs. Speakers with experience in the foregoing facets have been selected from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Nuclear Energy Institute, and utilities to address the business challenges facing them now and in the future. (authors)

  8. WIPP - Pre-Licensing and Operations: Developer and Regulator Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, Tom; Patterson, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a disposal system for defense-related transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. Developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), WIPP is located in Southeastern New Mexico: radioactive waste is disposed of 2,150 feet underground in an ancient layer of salt with a total capacity of 6.2 million cubic feet of waste. Congress authorized the development and construction of WIPP in 1980 for the express purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States. This paper makes a historical review of the site development, site operations (waste disposal operations started in 1999), communications between US EPA and DOE, the chronology of pre-licensing and pre-operations, the operational phase and the regulatory challenges, and the lessons learned after 12 years of operations

  9. Qualification, training, licensing/authorization and retraining of operating personnel in nuclear power plants. Some requirements and practices commonly shared in the European Community Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pele, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    At the end of the fifties a treaty was signed instituting between six countries of the European Community for Atomic Energy, or in brief, Euratom. This treaty, in addition to the Common Market Treaty and the Coal and Steel one, constitutes the legal frame of the European Community which, at present, comprises 12 Member States. A commission, the so-called Commission of the European Communities (or in brief CEC) has to implement the provisions laid down in the treaties. Qualification, training, licensing and re-training of operating personnel have been the subjects of an in-depth exchange of views and information in the frame of the work conducted by the Commission. The evaluation of the regulations and practices in countries of the EC and some other countries having a large nuclear energy program, has led to the identification of some generally valid concepts. This synthesis, made with the assistance of a consultant, is now published under the form of an EUR report (EUR 10981). The main topics addressed within this report are the following: shift staffing and staffing of the control room, personnel selection, qualifications necessary for recruitment, training and retraining, and licensing/authorization

  10. Standard format and content of license applications for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The standard format suggested for use in applications for licenses to possess and use special nuclear materials in Pu processing and fuel fabrication plants is presented. It covers general description of the plant, summary safety assessment, site characteristics, principal design criteria, plant design, process systems, waste confinement and management, radiation protection, accident safety analysis, conduct of operations, operating controls and limits, and quality assurance

  11. 78 FR 37325 - License Renewal of Nuclear Power Plants; Generic Environmental Impact Statement and Standard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Nuclear Power Plants; Generic Environmental Impact Statement and Standard Review Plans for Environmental... for Nuclear Power Plants, Supplement 1: Operating License Renewal'' (ESRP). The ESRP serves as a guide... published a final rule, ``Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating...

  12. Economic implications of nuclear plant license renewal in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    The NRC and the nuclear industry struggled for many years with the development of a viable license renewal rule. Now that a workable rule appears to have been developed, and the first license renewal applicants have received renewed licenses, the floodgates have opened and a large number of nuclear utilities have announced intentions to seek renewed NRC operating licenses. In this time when profound changes are being experienced in the electric generation markets in the United States, nuclear plant license renewal can have several economic effects that should be considered by utilities prior to the pursuit of an NRC license renewal. This paper examines some of the factors that may be affected by the prospect of an additional 20-year operating life of a nuclear plant. (author)

  13. House passes energy bill with one-step plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The US House of Representatives which has traditionally been wary of measures that would allow nuclear power to expand, came down strongly on the side of nuclear when it approved a much-amended omnibus energy bill on May 27 by a vote of 381 to 37. The key for the nuclear industry is the presence in the bill (H.R. 776) of language on one-step power plant licensing that was taken directly from the Senate energy bill (S. 2166) that passed in February. This means that when the House and Senate work out a compromise version of the legislation, one-step licensing is almost certain to be carried through--and become law once the final bill is signed by President George Bush, which is expected later this year. The House's endorsement of nuclear power--both as it exists now, and as it could be with the introduction of new plant designs and an end to the long hiatus in plant orders by utilities--went beyond one-step licensing. Debate on the House floor prior to Memorial Day totally transformed the nuclear-related part of the energy bill. H.R. 776 was reported to the floor by the Rules Committee with language by the Interior and Insular Affairs Committee that would have created a nominal one-step system, with a full evidentiary hearing prior to plant construction but also allowing an intervenor who later presents new information on the plant to get another full evidentiary hearing after construction but before operation. This would effectively duplicate the two-step process that existed for all plants now in service, and which utilities no longer want to endure

  14. Guidelines and workbook for assessment of organization and administration of utilities seeking operating license for a nuclear power plant. Guidelines for utility organization and administration plan. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, J.A.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.N.; Sommers, P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    The Guidelines are intended to provide guidance to the user in preparing a written plan for a proposed nuclear organization and administration. The Guidelines allow for individual approaches to organizational structures to account for differences in plant size, number of operating units, number of plant sites, and the individual utility approach to providing technical support. These unique approaches, however, should meet the criteria of a reasoned, fully developed, and logically consistent focus on the user's organization in terms of organization of work, policies and procedures, staffing, and external relationships

  15. Operating plant safety analysis needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.Y.; Love, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective for nuclear power station owners is to operate and manage their plants safely. However, there is also a need to provide economical electric power, which requires that the unit be operated as efficiently as possible, consistent with the safety requirements. The objectives cited above can be achieved through the identification and use of available margins inherent in the plant design. As a result of conservative licensing and analytical approaches taken in the past, many of these margins may be found in the safety analysis limits within which plants currently operate. Improvements in the accuracy of the safety analysis, and a more realistic treatment of plant initial and boundary conditions, can make this margin available for a variety of uses which enhance plant performance, help to reduce O and M costs, and may help to extend licensed operation. Opportunities for improvement exist in several areas in the accident analysis normally performed for Chapter 15 of the FSAR. For example, recent modifications to the ECCS rule, 10CFR50.46 and Appendix K, allow use of margins previously unavailable in the analysis of the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). To take advantage of this regulatory change, new methods are being developed to analyze both the large and small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As this margin is used, enhancements in the analysis of other transients will become necessary. The paper discusses accident analysis methods, future development needs, and analysis margin utilization in specific accident scenarios

  16. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  17. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  18. Safety aspects of nuclear plant licensing in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.H.F.

    1975-01-01

    The legislative authority is laid down in the Atomic Energy Control Act, 1946, declaring atomic energy a matter of national interest and establishing the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) as the competent body for regulating all aspects of atomic energy. The Act also vests a Minister designated by the Government with research and exploitation functions; thus, by Ministerial order, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was established in 1952 as a State-owned company. The Nuclear Liability Act, 1970, channels all liability for nuclear damage to the operator of a nuclear installation and requires him to obtain insurance in the amount of $75 million, part of which may be re-insured by the Government. The licensing requirements comprise the issuance of a site approval, a construction licence and an operating licence. The AECB is assisted in its licensing functions by its Nuclear Plant Licensing Directorate and by the Reactor Safety Advisory Committee co-operating with each other in making extensive safety assessments of a licence application. A site evaluation report, a preliminary safety report and a final safety report are required in relation to the siting, construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. The Canadian reactor safety philosophy is based on the concept of defence in depth, implemented through a multi-step approach, which includes avoidance of malfunctions, provision of special safety systems, periodic inspection and testing, and avoidance of human errors. Specific criteria and principles have evolved in applying this basic safety philosophy and radiation protection standards are derived from international recommendations. Stringent control is exercised over the management of radioactive waste and management facilities must meet the engineering and procedural requirements of AECB before they can be placed in operation. (author)

  19. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, Number 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program

  20. Inspection of licensed nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornburg, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Inspection of licensed nuclear power plants in the United States is performed by the Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE), United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. IE has several key functions : a) Inspection of licensees and investigation of incidents, occurrences and allegations. b) Detection and correction of safety and security problems. c) Enforcement of rules, regulations, and Commission orders. d) Feedback to the industry and others regarding safety experience. e) Informing the public and others. Major enforcement actions and events involving operating power reactors for the past several years will be summarized. (author)

  1. Licensing new nuclear energy plants in the 90s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H. III; Bishop, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the framework for nuclear regulation in the United States was established by Congress in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA). Under the AEA, the nuclear power program in the United States was launched with a technology just being developed and a nuclear power industry in its infancy. The regulations fashioned by the Atomic Energy Commission under the AEA took into account the evolving state of the technology and the emerging industry in those formative years. The process required a utility desiring to build and operate a nuclear power plant to obtain two separate licenses: one authorizing construction and one authorizing operation. At the construction permit stage, generally only preliminary design information was available and a construction permit could be issued with as little as ten to fifteen percent of the facility design completed. Thereafter, design completion, along with research and development required to address open technical issues, progressed in tandem with construction in what is fairly characterized as a design-as-you-go process. Only as plant construction approached completion was the adequacy of the final design evaluated in connection with the operating license review process

  2. U.S. regulatory requirements for nuclear plant license renewal: The B and W Owners Group License Renewal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudinger, Deborah K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the current U.S. Regulatory Requirements for License Renewal and describes the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B and WOG) Generic License Renewal Program (GLRP). The B and W owners, recognizing the need to obtain the maximum life for their nuclear generating units, embarked on a program to renew the licenses of the seven reactors in accordance with the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and further defined by Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulation Part 54 (10 CFR 54). These reactors, owned by five separate utilities, are Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) ranging in net rated capacity from approximately 800 to 900 MW. The plants, predominately constructed in the 70s, have USNRC Operating Licenses that expire between 2013 to 2017. (author)

  3. Licensing Support Experience of the BN-600 Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, N.; Sintsov, A.

    2013-01-01

    License procedure - Main principle: • All works, including fatigue tests of new types of fuel, are carried out at the unit 3 Beloyarsk nuclear power plants with the BN-600 reactor with the justification of the regulatory body. • Justification procedure is standard for all power units and independent from the reactor types. • The regulatory body and independent experts or technical support organizations, which can be involved in this work by the regulatory body, review SAR, operational manuals and other operator documents. • Safety requirements (i.e. Federal rules and codes). The project and design documents shall meet safety requirements. • The technical and organizational measures for safety guarantee shall meet well-known results of the research investigations or shall be experimental validate

  4. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  5. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, this standard will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  6. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

  7. Effects of Californian PRC 25500 on nuclear power plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The California Public Resources Code 25500 established the Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission on January 7, 1976. This Act mandated that the Commission process applications for new power plants within very specific timeframes. The paper presents the intent and timing of the two-phase licensing procedure and illustrates the effect of this procedure on power plants already into the NRC licensing process and on power plants which are in the beginning of the site selection process

  8. The Role of License Renewal in PLiM for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.G.

    2012-01-01

    At the 2nd International Symposium on Nuclear Power Plant Life Management (PLiM) in 2007, it was reported that the NRC had approved renewal of operating licenses for 48 nuclear units, which would allow operation for up to 60 years (i.e., an additional 20 years from the original 40-year license term). Of the 104 operating nuclear units in the U.S. in 2007, it was anticipated that almost 100% would eventually pursue license renewal. At that time, it was also concluded that the regulatory process was stable and predictable for license renewal, and that successful PLiM activities were helping to ensure the safety, economic, and political factors in the U.S. remained favorable for continued success with license renewal. The status of license renewal in 2012 is even better than it was in 2007. As of April 2012, the NRC has approved renewal of the operating licenses for 71 nuclear units and has applications under review for 15 more units. In addition, nuclear plant owners of at least 14 more units have announced plans to submit license renewal applications over the next few years. This brings the total of renewed licenses and announced plans for license renewal to 96% of the 104 currently operating nuclear units in the U.S. The prediction that almost 100% would eventually pursue license renewal is assured. This positive trend for long term operation of nuclear power plants in the U.S. is attributed to: (1) the success of PLiM activities in achieving an excellent safety record for the nuclear power industry and in ensuring on-going positive economics for nuclear plant operation, and (2) the stable and predictable regulatory process for license renewal. U.S. efforts are now underway to consider long term operation for more than 60 years and the process of preparing a second round of license renewals for up to 80 years of operation is likely to begin within the next few years. (author)

  9. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  10. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  11. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 4, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the division of licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 4, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  13. The problem of licensing and safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.A. da.

    1987-01-01

    The historical evolution of licensing process of nuclear power plants is presented. The designs carried out by FURNAS for constructing Angra-1 reactor and its contribution to the Brazilian CNEN in de licensing process, are evaluated. The aims of FURNAS Research Programs are determined and the safety goals are established. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. NPP long term operation in Spain - First application for license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francia, L.; Gorrochategui, I.; Marcos, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In the operation of the Spanish nuclear power plants (NPP), safety is always the prime consideration. Plant Life Management Programmes have been set up with the strategic objective to operate the NPPs as long as they are considered safe and reliable. The safety of each NPP is reviewed by the Spanish nuclear regulatory authority (CSN) under a continuous process. In addition, experience is gained from operating the plants and from exchanges with operators of similar units. Current Spanish regulatory framework for renewing NPP operating licenses requires performing a Periodic Safety Review (PSR) to be performed every 10 years and submitted when applying for a new renewal of the NPP operating license. A few years ago, CSN issued a document regarding the licensing requirements that nuclear power plants should meet in order to be granted with an operating license for long term operation (i.e, operation beyond the original plant design life, typically 40 years). Besides the traditional PSR requirements, specific requirements regarding to long term operation (LTO) include: - An Aging Management and Evaluation Program, including the identification and evaluation of Time Limited Aging Analysis (TLAA). - An updated Radiological Impact Study. - A review and assessment of regulation/standard applicability. Garona NPP (GE, BWR/3 design) operated by Spanish utility Nuclenor from 1971 has a current operating license up to 2009. A decision was made to apply for a new operating license, being Garona plant the first one in Spain to face with the new long term operation requirements. The paper will provide an overview of the methodology used in Spain to address and perform the required analyses to support the LTO application for the operating license renewal. In particular, focus will be paid on the project developed in Garona (2002-2006) whose result has been the first Spanish application for License Renewal for LTO. Also it will be reported the ongoing work necessary to

  15. Environmental assessment for final rule on nuclear power plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The Atomic Energy Act and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations provide for the renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses beyond their initial 40-year term. The Act and NRC regulations, however, do not specify the procedures, criteria, and standards that must be satisfied in order to renew a license. The NRC is promulgating a rule (10 CFR Part 54) to codify such requirements prior to the receipt of applications for license renewal. The NRC has assessed the possible environmental effects of promulgating requirements in 10 CFR Part 54 now rather than employing such requirements in an ad hoc manner in individual licensing actions. The final part 54 rule requires the development of information and analyses to identify aging problems of systems, structures, and components unique to license renewal that will be of concern during the period of extended operation and will not be controlled by existing effective programs. In general, licensee activities for license renewal may involve replacement, refurbishment, inspection, testing, or monitoring. Such actions will be generally be within the range of similar actions taken for plants during the initial operating term. These actions would be primarily confined within the plants with potential for only minor disruption to the environment. It is unlikely that these actions would change the operating conditions of plants in ways that would change the environmental effects already being experienced. Relicensing under existing regulations would also be primarily focused on aging degradation and would likely result in requirements similar to those that will result from relicensing under the final rule

  16. Generic environmental impact statement for license renewal of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    Volume 2 of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants contains the appendices. These include: (A) General characterisitics and environmental settings of domestic nuclear plants, (B) Definition of impact initiators, (C) Socioeconomics and case studies, (D) Aquatic organisms and human health, (E) Radiation protection considerations, (F) Methodology for assessing impacts to aquatic ecology and water resources, (G) Postulated accidents, and (H) Environmental statutes and regulations affecting license renewal

  17. TMI-related requirements for new operating licenses. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    There are four types of TMI-related requirements and actions approved by the Commission for new operating licenses: (1) those required to be completed by a license applicant prior to receiving a fuel-loading and low-power testing license, (2) those required to be completed by a license applicant prior to receiving a license to operate at appreciable power levels up to full power, (3) those the NRC will take prior to issuing a fuel-loading and low-power testing or a full-power operating license, and (4) those required to be completed by a licensee prior to a specified date. In this report, only those dated requirements that have already been issued are of interest. Other dated requirements are expected to be issued in the future as work progresses in accordance with the TMI Action Plan. This report summarizes the several parts of the list of TMI-related requirements approved by the Commission for new operating licenses

  18. Essays on the economics of licensing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    Regulation and licensing of nuclear power plants by the United States Atomic Energy Commission and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission are discussed. Chapter 1 overviews the licensing process and issues raised in licensing cases. Based on a sample of plants licensed between 1967 and 1978, a statistical study of the impact of public participation in licensing is performed. The study concludes that public participation has had a major impact on licensing and power-plant costs. The impact is due to a fundamental weakness of the Commissions: their inability to resolve certain issues related to acceptable social risk. The study has important policy implications for reforming the Federal licensing process. Chapter 2 contains an analysis of the Price-Anderson Act, a Federal program for compensating victims of large nuclear accidents. The Price-Anderson Act is placed within the context of generalized federal disaster relief. A model is developed that allows an evaluation programs on the basis of moral hazard and equity principles. Chapter 3 analyzes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's treatment of its mandatory antitrust review of applicants for nuclear power plants. The main conclusion of the chapter is that the reviews have not addressed the central economic issues of antitrust that are relevant to nuclear power. Instead, the reviews contribute to further cartelization of the electric utility industry. While politically expedient, the reviews are counter-productive to the development of an optimal industry structure

  19. Public comments on the proposed 10 CFR Part 51 rule for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses and supporting documents: Review of concerns and NRC staff response. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review of public comments provided in response to the NRC's proposed amendments to 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 51, which establish new requirements for the environmental review of applications for the renewal of operating licenses of nuclear power plants. The public comments include those submitted in writing, as well as those provided at public meetings that were held with other Federal agencies, State agencies, nuclear industry representatives, public interest groups, and the general public. This report also contains the NRC staff response to the various concerns raised, and highlights the changes made to the final rule and the supporting documents in response to these concerns

  20. The Licensing of New Nuclear Power Plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzke, C.

    2008-01-01

    After an introduction dealing with the nuclear Renaissance in Europe and the specific situation of Germany and of Italy, the article focuses on the question of licensing processes for new reactors. New nuclear power plant projects involve a substantial investment and electric utilities will only take this decision if the licensing and regulatory risk can be adequately managed. Licensing processes should be predictable and efficient in order to give sufficient assurance to applicants. The article discusses best practice in licensing by giving some examples of suitable licensing processes of other countries. It also highlights international initiatives aimed at harmonizing safety requirements for new reactors and a multinational cooperation in reactor design review. These issues should be carefully considered by any country wanting to get new nuclear started. [it

  1. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenhaus, W.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture is divided into three parts: 1) the legal conception and requirements of the German Atomic Energy Law (with special view on construction and operation of nuclear power plants), 2) the role of the Federation ('Bund') and the 'Laender' in the field of atomic energy and the Radiation Protection Ordinance (especially for licensing and supervision of nuclear power plants), 3) the function, participants, types and sequence of the strongly formalised licensing procedure for nuclear power plants, technical assessment in the frame of this procedure, content of a licence, possibility for altering the licence at a later date, role of administrative courts, continual supervision. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Technical evaluation of the electrical, instrumentation, and control design aspects of the proposed license amendment Revision 1 for single-loop operation of Browns Ferry Nuclear Plants (Docket No. 50-259, Unit 1; Docket No. 50-260, Unit 2; Docket No. 50-296, Unit 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donich, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the proposed changes to the plant reactor protection system by the licensee of Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station, Units 1, 2, and 3, to account for single-loop plant operation. This evaluation is restricted to only the electrical, instrumentation and control design aspects of proposed changes to the plant technical specifications for single-loop operation beyond 24 hours. Conclusion is that the license amendment for single-loop operation has met the review criteria provided sufficient administrative controls are in effect, and any anomalous control room indicators are corrected or warning-tagged for the duration of single-loop operation

  3. Legal questions concerning the licensing procedure of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, B.

    1978-01-01

    The publication contains 4 articles which deal with legal practice and problems of the licensing procedure in the Federal Republic of Germany: 1) Actions brought by joint boards from the constitutional point of view (Burmeister, J.); 2) court review of the assessment of technical and economic questions concerning the licensing of power plant construction (Ossenbuehl, F.); 3) the site plan approval procedure as a legal problem (Friauf, K.H.); 4) legal questions concerning the immediate enforceability (Papier, H.J.). (HP) [de

  4. Nuclear safety requirements for operation licensing of Egyptian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    From the view of responsibility for health and nuclear safety, this work creates a framework for the application of nuclear regulatory rules to ensure safe operation for the sake of obtaining or maintaining operation licensing for nuclear research reactors. It has been performed according to the recommendations of the IAEA for research reactor safety regulations which clearly states that the scope of the application should include all research reactors being designed, constructed, commissioned, operated, modified or decommissioned. From that concept, the present work establishes a model structure and a computer logic program for a regulatory licensing system (RLS code). It applies both the regulatory inspection and enforcement regulatory rules on the different licensing process stages. The present established RLS code is then applied to the Egyptian Research Reactors, namely; the first ET-RR-1, which was constructed and still operating since 1961, and the second MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2) which is now in the preliminary operation stage. The results showed that for the ET-RR-1 reactor, all operational activities, including maintenance, in-service inspection, renewal, modification and experiments should meet the appropriate regulatory compliance action program. Also, the results showed that for the new MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2), all commissioning and operational stages should also meet the regulatory inspection and enforcement action program of the operational licensing safety requirements. (author)

  5. Decentralization of operating reactor licensing reviews: NRR Pilot Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1984-07-01

    This report, which has incorporated comments received from the Commission and ACRS, describes the program for decentralization of selected operating reactor licensing technical review activities. The 2-year pilot program will be reviewed to verify that safety is enhanced as anticipated by the incorporation of prescribed management techniques and application of resources. If the program fails to operate as designed, it will be terminated

  6. Environmental licensing issues for cogeneration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, G.S.; Bibbo, R.V.

    1990-01-01

    The siting and licensing of cogeneration and independent power production (IPP) facilities is a complex process involving a number of interrelated engineering, economic, and environmental impact considerations. Important considerations for the siting and licensing of such facilities include air quality control and air quality impacts, water supply and wastewater disposal, and applicable noise criteria and noise impact considerations. Air quality control and air quality impact considerations for power generation facilities are commonly reviewed in the public forum, and most project developers are generally aware of the key air quality licensing issues. These issues include Best Available Control Technology (BACT) demonstration requirements, and air quality modeling requirements. BACT is a case-by-case determination, which causes uncertainty, in that developers have difficulty in projecting the cost of required control systems. Continuing developments in control technology may cause this problem to continue in the 1990's. Air quality modeling can be a problem in hilly terrain or within or near an urban environment, which could delay or preclude permitting of a new cogeneration or IPP facility in such locations. This paper discusses several environmental issues which are less frequently addressed than air quality issues, namely water/wastewater and noise. The design features of typical cogeneration and IPP facilities that affect water supply requirements, wastewater volumes, and noise emissions are discussed. Then, the site selection and impact review process are examined to identify typical constraints and trade-offs that can develop relative to water, wastewater, and noise issues. Trends in permit review requirements for water, wastewater, and noise are examined. Finally, innovative approaches that can be used to resolve potential development constraints for water, wastewater, and noise issues are discussed

  7. Operator licensing examination standards for power reactors. Interim revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    These examination standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the processes associated with initial and requalification examinations. The standards also ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations for all applicants. These standards are for guidance purposes and are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations (i.e., 10 CFR Part 55), and they are subject to revision or other changes in internal operator licensing policy. This interim revision permits facility licensees to prepare their initial operator licensing examinations on a voluntary basis pending an amendment to 10 CFR Part 55 that will require facility participation. The NRC intends to solicit comments on this revision during the rulemaking process and to issue a final Revision 8 in conjunction with the final rule

  8. 75 FR 61521 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... revises the charcoal testing criteria in Technical Specification 5.5.9, ``Ventilation Filter Testing... staffing from two to four, allow in-plant protective actions to be performed by personnel assigned to other functions, and replace a Mechanical Maintenance person with a Non-Licensed Operator. Date of issuance...

  9. 76 FR 73727 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ..., Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2 (DCCNP-2), Berrien County, Michigan; Date of amendment request... Counsel, Indiana Michigan Power Company, One Cook Place, Bridgman, MI 49106. NRC Acting Branch Chief: Thomas J. Wengert. Notice of Issuance of Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses During the period...

  10. Experience with refuse-fuelled industrial heating power stations during licensing, construction and operation. Continental heating power plant, Korbach; Erfahrungen mit EBS-Industrieheizkraftwerken in Genehmigung, Bau und Betrieb. Industrieheizkraftwerk Continental, Korbach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, F. [MVV Energie Industrial Solutions West GmbH, Sollingen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In this project, all licensing-relevant boundary conditions of the site were clarified beforehand and were taken into account in the conception of the plant. Particular regard was given to the fact that the plant will be sited in a water protection area and to the area's pre-pollution history. The licensing procedure showed that the stipulations of the 17. BImSchV and other protective regulations are insufficient in the opinion of some citizens, who expect a deterioration of their living conditions and even health problems arising from a technical systems that are not state of the art. The legal representatives of the concerned citizens assume a lack of basic data and wrong assumptions for the licensing procedure. Greater transparence by better advance information may lead to a more objective discussion but it cannot quench citizens' fears. (orig.)

  11. The development of reactor operator license examination question bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Hwan; Woo, S. M.; Kam, S. C.; Nam, K. J.; Lim, H. P.

    2001-12-01

    The number of NPP keeps increasing therefore there is more need of reactor operators. This trend requires the more efficiency in managing the license examination. Question bank system will help us to develop good quality examination materials and keep them in it. The ultimate purpose of the bank system is for selecting qualified reactor operators who are primarily responsible for the safety of reactor operation in NPP

  12. Free and Licensed Operating Systems: Direct Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Hagman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When developers comparing open with proprietary code, which should be a civilized debate often degenerates into a flame war. This paper presents a report on code quality metrics that have been collected from four major operating systems on an industrial scale is as follows: FreeBSD, Linux, OpenSolaris and Windows Research Kernel (WRK. This article is not a mysterious crime and it can be concluded as the main finding no significant differences in the quality of the code of these systems.

  13. 78 FR 17450 - Notice of Issuance of Materials License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc., Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery.... SUA- 1341 to Uranium One USA, Inc. (Uranium One) for its Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR... Commission License No. SUA-1341 For Uranium One USA, Inc., Irigaray and Christensen Ranch Projects (Willow...

  14. Analysis of license renewal at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagayama, Munehiro

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. NRC had implemented the rules for LR (License Renewal) of NPPs (Nuclear Power Plants) and the LR rules allow plus 20-year operation of NPPs adding to initial 40-year term for reactor license. The U.S. NRC has already issued ROL (Renewed Operating License) for over forty NPPs. The Atomic Energy Act do not limit the number of LR, so the fleet of U.S. Nuclear, including agency, industry and academy, is continuing efforts to develop rules for SLR (Subsequent License Renewal). The framework of SLR rules has been developed and there is a plan of implementation of SLR for a pilot plant on FY 2018. The total operating term of a SLR plant is 80-year. The LR/SLR of NPPs is effective for stable power supply, greenhouse gas suppression, maintenance of technology, and securing employment. These profits will return to society. It is important to maintain required function of SSCs (Structure, System, and Components) for period of long term operation of NPPs. The U.S. fleet has established integrated ageing management strategy and each NPPs is developing their maintenance plans for long term operation. These adequate maintenance plans may enable to achieve good capacity factor of LR applied NPPs. In this report, domestic LR position will be considered by referring the good performance of U.S. NPPs which entered long term operation beyond 40-year and some conditions such as energy security. (author)

  15. Finnish experiences on licensing and using of programmable digital systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Maskuniitty, M.; Heimburger, H.; Hall, L.E.; Manninen, T.

    1993-01-01

    Finnish utility companies, Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima (TVO), and the licensing authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), are preparing for a new nuclear power plant in Finland. Plant vendors are proposing programmable digital automation systems for both the safety-related and the operational I and C (instrumentation and control) systems in this new unit. Also in existing plant units the replacement of certain old analog systems with state-of-the-art digital ones will become necessary in the years to come. Licensing of programmable systems for safety critical applications requires a new approach due to the special properties and failure modes of these systems. The major difficulties seem to be in the assessment and quantification of software reliability. The Technical Research Centre of Finland has in co-operation with the authority and the utilities conducted a project (AJA) to develop domestically applicable licensing requirements, guidelines and practices. International standards, guidelines and licensing practices have been analyzed in order to specify national licensing requirements. The paper describes and discusses the findings and experiences of the AJA project so far. The experience in introducing advanced programmable digital control and computer systems in the operating nuclear power plants will be covered briefly. Although these systems are not safety-related but systems of more general interest regarding nuclear safety, some routines regarding the licensing of safety- related systems have been followed. In these backfitting and replacement projects some experience have been gained in how to license safety-related programmable systems. (Author) 31 refs., 2 figs

  16. 76 FR 55723 - Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2 License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ...-basis accident or severe accident is minor, and that the results of such accidents continue to be... the Fukushima accident is unlikely to occur at any TVA plant. Nonetheless, the effort has resulted in... the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident, concluded that continued operation and continued licensing activities...

  17. 77 FR 26321 - Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Commission (NRC or the Commission) has issued renewed Facility Operating License No. R- 112, held by Reed... License No. R-112 will expire 20 years from its date of issuance. The renewed facility operating license...

  18. 78 FR 29393 - University of Missouri-Columbia Facility Operating License No. R-103

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... Facility Operating License No. R-103 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: License renewal... the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-103 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the... application for the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-103, which, currently authorizes the licensee...

  19. Regulatory analysis for final rule on nuclear power plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for the final rule (10 CFR Part 54) that defines the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's requirements for renewing the operating licenses of commercial nuclear power plants. A set of four specific alternatives for the safety review of license renewal applications is defined and evaluated. These are: Alternative A-current licensing basis; Alternative B-extension of Alternative A to require assessment and managing of aging; Alternative C -- extension of Alternative B to require assessment of design differences against selected new-plant standards using probabilistic risk assessment; and Alternative D -- extension of Alternative B to require compliance with all new-plant standards. A quantitative comparison of the four alternatives in terms of impact-to-value ratio is presented, and Alternative B is the most cost-beneficial safety review alternative

  20. Public perspectives on proposed license renewal regulations for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.; Hughes, A.; Seth, S.

    1991-01-01

    On 17 July 1990, the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued for public comment its proposed rule for renewing the operating licenses of nuclear power plants (55 FR 29043). This solicitation marked the fourth time that NRC has Invited public comments on its efforts to develop regulatory requirements for re licensing nuclear power plants. Previously, NRC solicited public comments on establishing a policy statement on plant life extension, and on the issues and options for license renewal discussed in NUREG-1317. On 13-14 November 1989, NRC held a public workshop where the NRC staff discussed a conceptual approach to the rule and solicited written comments on the regulatory philosophy, conceptual rule, and on certain questions. NRC is taking into account all comments received in its development of the final rule which is scheduled for issuance in the summer of 1991

  1. Renewing the licenses of US nuclear plants: An assessment of the socioeconomic impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, M.; Saulsbury, J.W.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, increased national attention has been focused on the potential effects of renewing, or not renewing, the licenses of nuclear power plants as the oldest of them approach the end of the 40-year operating period allowed by their original licenses. As part of a larger study for the US Nuclear Regulatory commission (NRC), the authors conducted an assessment of the potential socioeconomic impacts to those communities throughout the country in which nuclear power plants are located and which, therefore, are most directly affected by renewal of nuclear power plant licenses. This paper focuses on six key issues that are traditionally considered essential in the assessment of social impacts: Population; housing; tax payments; local public services; land use and development; and economic structure

  2. License renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberry, S.

    1993-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the process of license renewal for nuclear power plants. It explains what is meant by license renewal, the significance of license renewal, and goes over key elements involved in the process of license renewal. Those key elements are NRC requirements embodied in 10 CFR Part 54 (Reactor Safety) and 10 CFR Part 51 (Environmental Issues). In addition Industry Reports must be developed and reviewed. License renewal is essentially the process of applying for a 20 year extension to the original 40 year operating license granted for the plant. This is a very long term process, which involves a lot of preparation, and compliance with regulatory rules and guidelines. In general it is a process which is expected to begin when plants reach an operating lifetime of 20 years. It has provisions for allowing the public to become involved in the review process

  3. Green County Nuclear Power Plant. License application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Green County reactor, a PWR to be supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, will be a baseload generating facility planned to provide for mass transit and other public agency electrical needs. The plant is scheduled for completion by 1983 and will have a generating capacity of about 1200 MW(e). (FS)

  4. Licensing and safety of nuclear power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, F.C.

    1981-09-01

    An overview of the regulatory framework and licensing process for nuclear power plants in Canada is given along with an outline of the evolution of the safety philosophy followed and some comments on how this philosophy and process could be applied by a country embarking on a nuclear power program

  5. Nuclear regulation. License renewal questions for nuclear plants need to be resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fultz, Keith O.; Kruslicky, Mary Ann; McDowell, William D. Jr.; Coleman, Robert L.

    1989-04-01

    A December 1986 pipe rupture at Virginia Power's Surry unit 2 nuclear power plant injured eight workers; four later died. As a result of this accident, Representative Edward J. Markey requested GAO to examine the Surry accident and assess the problems confronting aging nuclear plants. In March 1988 we reported our findings concerning the accident and a July 1987 incident at the Trojan nuclear plant in Oregon. This report addresses problems confronting aging nuclear plants by examining the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) program to develop a license renewal policy and accompanying regulations, and the initiatives underway by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the electric utility industry to extend the operating lives of these plants. Nuclear power has become second only to coal as the largest producer of electricity in the United States. The 110 nuclear plants currently in service are operated by 54 utilities, provide about 20 percent of the nation's electricity, and represent a capital investment of over $200 billion. The Atomic Energy Act authorizes NRC to issue nuclear plant operating licenses for up to 40 years and provides for license extensions beyond the initial operating period. The act does not, however, stipulate the criteria for evaluating a utility request to operate a nuclear plant longer than 40 years. The oldest operating license currently in effect will expire in the year 2000. According to NRC, about one-half of the existing operating licenses will terminate by the year 2015, and most licenses will expire by about 2030. Many utilities will have to decide in the early 1990s whether to continue operating older nuclear plants or to construct new generating capacity. A clear understanding of the terms and conditions governing the license renewal process will be a key element in deciding how to meet future electricity demand. Although NRC has developed 3 possible license renewal policy options and identified 15 areas of regulatory uncertainty that

  6. Regulator process for the authorization of an amendment to the operation license of a nuclear power plant in Mexico; Proceso regulador para la autorizacion de una enmienda a la licencia de operacion de una central nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Espinosa V, J.M.; Salgado, J.R.; Mamani, Y.R. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The regulator process by which an authorization is granted from an amendment to the License of Operation of a nuclear power station in Mexico is described. It makes an appointment the effective legal mark, the technical characteristics of the modification, the evaluation process and deposition upon oath of tests and finally the elaboration of the Safety report and the Technical Verdict that is a correspondent for the regulator organism to the Secretary of Energy, the one that in turn is the responsible of granting the amendment the License just as it establishes it the Law. (Author)

  7. Overview of the role of economics in plant life management license renewal in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.G.; Nelson, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a revised rule in 10 CFR Part 54 that provides the requirements for an operating nuclear plant to seek license renewal. U.S. nuclear power plants obtain a 40-year initial operating license, but under 10 CFR Part 54, additional terms of 20-years each may be obtained through license renewal. Prior to 1995, the estimated cost just to prepare a license renewal application was about $40 million. Under the revised rule, the cost to prepare an application was reduced to about $10 million or less. Although the revised rule generated considerable interest, the decision to seek license renewal is fundamentally an economic decision. In 1995, many people believed that only a select few operating nuclear plants would pursue license renewal and that most would operate for no more than 40 years. The primary reason for this belief was that the cost of keeping U.S. nuclear plants running did not appear to be competitive with other forms of electricity generation. By 1998, the economic conditions in the U.S. were changing dramatically. Electricity deregulation was moving ahead, the need for electricity was growing, and the operating costs for nuclear power plants were declining. Also, in 1998, the first two applications for license renewal were submitted to the NRC by Baltimore Gas and Electric for the two-unit Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant and by Duke Energy for the three-unit Oconee nuclear power plant. The U.S. nuclear industry was somewhat skeptical that the NRC could complete the license renewal process in a timely and predictable manner. This skepticism was due to the protracted and unpredictable process used by the NRC to approve the original operating licenses, especially in the 1980's and early 1990's. In March 2000, the NRC approved the renewal of the 40-year operating licenses for the two-unit Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant for an additional 20 years. Two months later, the NRC approved the

  8. Incorporation of severe accidents in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Rabello, Sidney Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Severe accidents are the result of multiple faults that occur in nuclear power plants as a consequence from the combination of latent failures and active faults, such as equipment, procedures and operator failures, which leads to partial or total melting of the reactor core. Regardless of active and latent failures related to the plant management and maintenance, aspects of the latent failures related to the plant design still remain. The lessons learned from the TMI accident in the U.S.A., Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union and, more recently, in Fukushima, Japan, suggest that severe accidents must necessarily be part of design-basis of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the normative basis of the licensing of nuclear power plants concerning to severe accidents in countries having nuclear power plants under construction or in operation. It was addressed not only the new designs of nuclear power plants in the world, but also the design changes in plants that are in operation for decades. Included in this list are the Brazilian nuclear power plants, Angra-1, Angra-2, and Angra-3. This paper also reviews the current status of licensing in Brazil and Brazilian standards related to severe accidents. It also discusses the impact of severe accidents in the emergency plans of nuclear power plants. (author)

  9. Incorporation of severe accidents in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Rabello, Sidney Luiz, E-mail: bayout@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: sidney@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Severe accidents are the result of multiple faults that occur in nuclear power plants as a consequence from the combination of latent failures and active faults, such as equipment, procedures and operator failures, which leads to partial or total melting of the reactor core. Regardless of active and latent failures related to the plant management and maintenance, aspects of the latent failures related to the plant design still remain. The lessons learned from the TMI accident in the U.S.A., Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union and, more recently, in Fukushima, Japan, suggest that severe accidents must necessarily be part of design-basis of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the normative basis of the licensing of nuclear power plants concerning to severe accidents in countries having nuclear power plants under construction or in operation. It was addressed not only the new designs of nuclear power plants in the world, but also the design changes in plants that are in operation for decades. Included in this list are the Brazilian nuclear power plants, Angra-1, Angra-2, and Angra-3. This paper also reviews the current status of licensing in Brazil and Brazilian standards related to severe accidents. It also discusses the impact of severe accidents in the emergency plans of nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. Generic environmental impact statement for license renewal of nuclear plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This GEIS examines the possible environmental impacts that could occur as a result of renewing the licenses of individual nuclear power plants under 10 CFR 54. To the extent possible, it establishes the bounds and significance of these potential impacts. The analysis encompasses all operating light-water reactors. For each type of environmental impact, the GEIS attempts to establish generic findings covering as many plants as possible. While plant and site-specific information is used in developing the generic findings, the NRC does not intend for the GEIS to be a compilation of individual plant environmental impacts statements. This document has three principal objectives: (1) to provide an understanding of the types and severity of environmental impacts that may occur as a result of license renewal, (2) to identify and assess those impacts that are expected to be generic to license renewal, and (3) to support rulemaking (10 CFR 51) to define the number and scope of issues that need to be addressed by the applicants in plant-by-plant license renewal proceedings

  11. Licensing Process for Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan and its comparison with other Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) was established in January 2001 with the promulgation of the Ordinance, No-III of 2001. Pakistan is one of the countries in the world who intend to expand its nuclear power program for energy generation upto 8800 MWe by 2030. Presently, there are two research reactors and three nuclear power plants in operation and two power plants are under various stages of construction which are expected to be in commercial operation in 2016. It is obvious that the primary responsibility of ensuring safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) operation rests with the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). However, PNRA's prime mission is to ensure the safe operation of nuclear and radiation facilities, safe use of radioactive sources and protection of the radiation workers, general public and the environment from the harmful hazards of radiation by formulating and implementing effective regulations. Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority issues authorizations for nuclear power plants in three stages i.e. site permit, construction license and operation license after detailed safety review. This paper presents the licensing process for NPPs in Pakistan and its comparison with SSG-12, USA and Finland

  12. Current status of LTO licensing programme for Bohunice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borak, J.; Kupca, L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of long term operation (LTO) licensing programme for Bohunice nuclear power plant is to demonstrate that the relevant structures and components shall perform their functions throughout the entire LTO period during which they shall meet all the relevant safety requirements. All the activities-which should result in utility's request to obtain the licence for LTO-must be performed in line with the relevant legal basis. As of May 2012, the anticipated duration of currently running programme is thirteen months. All relevant documentation, required by the established legal basis, shall be submitted to the licensing authority one year before the Unit 3 design life expiry. (author)

  13. Status of the Monticello nuclear generating plant lead plant license renewal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    In 1988, the Monticello nuclear generating plant was chosen by the US Department of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute to serve as the lead boiling water reactor in the lead plant license renewal program. The purpose of the lead plant license renewal program is to provide insights during the development of and to demonstrate the license renewal regulatory process with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The work being performed in three phases: (1) preparation of the technical basis for license renewal; (2) development of the technical basis into a formal license renewal application; and (3) review of the application by the NRC. This paper discusses the systems and structures identified as important to license renewal in accordance with 10CFR54 as well as the plant documents and programs that were used in going through the identification process. The systems and structures important to license renewal will then provide insights into how structures and components were identified that are required to be evaluated for aging, the elements of the aging evaluations, and the effective programs used to manage potentially significant aging

  14. The licensing practice on nuclear power plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S P

    1994-12-31

    The evolution of Korean regulatory system has tightly coupled with development ot Korean nuclear power program. The nuclear power plant licensing has become a major regulatory function of the government when the construction of the Kori NPP Unit 1 started in early 1970s. During this period, domestic laws and regulations applicable to the licensing of NPP were not yet fully developed. Therefore the vendor countries` laws and regulations were applied as mandatory requirement. Beginning in the early 19808, component approach was used and contracts were awarded separately for major components of the plants, thus enabling more domestic industries to participate in the projects. The two-step licensing system was incorporated into the law. In the third phase from 1987, major efforts have been concentrated on the maximum participation of local industries. The overriding priority for selecting suppliers was the condition of higher nuclear technology transfer to Korea. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) was established in 1990 as an independent regulatory expert organization. 1 tab., 4 figs.

  15. The licensing practice on nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of Korean regulatory system has tightly coupled with development ot Korean nuclear power program. The nuclear power plant licensing has become a major regulatory function of the government when the construction of the Kori NPP Unit 1 started in early 1970s. During this period, domestic laws and regulations applicable to the licensing of NPP were not yet fully developed. Therefore the vendor countries' laws and regulations were applied as mandatory requirement. Beginning in the early 19808, component approach was used and contracts were awarded separately for major components of the plants, thus enabling more domestic industries to participate in the projects. The two-step licensing system was incorporated into the law. In the third phase from 1987, major efforts have been concentrated on the maximum participation of local industries. The overriding priority for selecting suppliers was the condition of higher nuclear technology transfer to Korea. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) was established in 1990 as an independent regulatory expert organization

  16. Evaluation of the contribution of license renewal of nuclear power plants to fault reduction in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Goro

    2008-01-01

    Although nuclear power plants in the U.S. were originally permitted to operate for 40 years, operating periods of many plants have been extended by license renewal for another 20 years. On the other hand, plant life management of nuclear power plants in Japan is carried out assuming long-term operation, and the licensee submits aging technology assessment reports before the plant has been operating commercially for 30 years, and then every ten years thereafter, and receives an evaluation by the authorities. In this paper, trend analysis using the INSS database on faults at nuclear power plants overseas, state of implementation of relevant aging management programs, and the effects of license renewal on preservation activities are examined. It is shown that the aging management program identified that many of the cases of fatigue, FAC, and a closed cycle cooling system have been addressed. As a result of analyzing the fault number for each unit, the number of aging faults trends to decrease after applying for license renewal. Therefore, the U.S. license renewal system is considered to be effective for plant life management, and hence the plant life management in Japan, which is substantially equivalent to the U.S. system, is valid. (author)

  17. Role of simulators in licensing and operator qualification in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronau, D.; Kuhn, A.

    1994-01-01

    According to the Guidelines issued by the licensing authorities, in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) comprehensive simulator training is demanded to obtain and preserve technical qualification. Due to the fact that knowledge is imparted most effectively by means of simulators, German utilities even go beyond the minimum times the authorities require for simulator training. To this purpose, the utilities have a special simulator training center available which is equipped with different full-scope simulators so that - depending on plant type and generation - the most appropriate simulator can be used. Plant-specific full-scope simulators are not absolutely necessary when the main emphasis is put on comprehension training. The reason therefor is the high automation degree in real plants, which requires manual interventions not earlier than half an hour after an accident has occurred. As, consequently, no immediate actions have to be practised, essentially more time in simulator training remains to cover unforeseen event sequences which require a high degree of physical and thermal hydraulic understanding. In case of great differences between real plant and full-scope simulator available a plant-specific part-task simulator, which takes all safety-relevant systems into account, may be used successfully, as shown by the experience gained with the Nuclear Functional Trainer (FTN). Furthermore, part-task simulators may relieve full-scope simulators in time so that sufficient capacity for extended simulator training is available. (orig.) (11 figs.)

  18. Simulator training and licensing examination for nuclear power station operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pingsheng

    2007-01-01

    For the recruitment, training and position qualification of the simulator instructors and feedback of training effect, the management approaches are formulated in 'The System for Simulator Training and Licensing Examination of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station Operators'. The concrete requirements on the professional knowledge, work experience and foreign language ability of a simulator instructor are put forward. The process of instructor training is designed. The training items include the trainer training, pedagogy training, time management training, operation activities training during outage of unit, 'shadow' training and on-the-jot training on simulator courses. Job rotation is realized between simulator instructor and licensing personnel on site. New simulator instructor must pass the qualification identification. After a duration of 2 years, re-qualification has to be carried out. On the basis of the operator training method introduced from EDF (electricite De France), some new courses are developed and the improvement on the initial training, retaining courses, the technical support and the experience feedback by using the simulator is done also. (authors)

  19. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  20. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's antitrust review of nuclear power plants: the conditioning of licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, D.W.; Delaney, J.B.; Honeycutt, T.C.

    1976-04-01

    The 1970 amendments to Section 105 of the Atomic Energy Act require the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to conduct a prelicensing antitrust review of applications for licenses to construct and operate nuclear power plants. The Commission must make a finding as to whether the granting of a license 'would create or maintain a situation inconsistent with the antitrust laws,' and it has the authority to issue or continue a license, to refuse to issue a license, to rescind or amend a license, and to issue a license with conditions that it deems appropriate. This report provides information about the antitrust license conditions that have resulted from the NRC's antitrust review process. The process itself is described and a catalog of the applications requiring antitrust license conditions is presented. For each application, the license conditions are put into the general categories of unit access, transmission services, coordination, and contractual provisions. For completeness, the report also catalogs applications requiring no antitrust license conditions, and lists applications that were exempted from the 1970 amendments, are the subject of litigation, or have been withdrawn

  1. 77 FR 56877 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... steam bypass system to the condenser not be available. ADVs are also available to limit the releases... evaluated? Response: No. There are no changes to design, no changes to operating procedures and the revised... tube rupture (SGTR) event is one of the design basis accidents that are analyzed as part of a plant's...

  2. Licensing of nuclear power plants, immediate implementation, constitutional appeal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, K.P.

    1980-01-01

    The decision relates to part of the licensing procedure of the Muelheim-Kaerlich Nuclear Power Station. The subject of the complaint of unconstitutionality is the immediate execution of the 7th clearance within the framework of the 1st partial permit, which had been confined by the Rhineland-Palatinate Higher Administrative Court in a decision of May 2, 1977 (DVBl. 1977, p. 730). The Federal Constitutional Court regards the complaint of unconstitutionality as being unfounded. The court expresses itself especially on the assessment, under consnitutional aspects, of the material rules and rules of procedure pertaining to the licensing of nuclear power plants and of major changes in such plants. Moreover, the dissenting opinions of Justices Dr. Simon and Professor Heussner are quoted in excerpts. The comment by K.- P. Winters regards as the nucleus of the decision and of the dissenting vote the statements about the guarantee functions procedural rules have in ensuring effective protection of human rights. In his view, these statements of constitutional law are of fundamental significance for problems of atomic law and radiation protection law. (HSCH) [de

  3. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program has been established whereby an annual NUREG report will be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirement areas. This report, the second volume of a three-volume series, addresses the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs) at licensed plants. The data contained in these NUREG reports are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System (SIMS) database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by NRC regional personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of the status of implementation and verification of the 27 safety issues designated as USIs and to make this information available to other interested parties, including the public. A corollary purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Comparison of the inspection practices in relation to the control room operator and shift supervisor licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, Ilari; Koizumi, Hiroyoshi; Manzella, Pietro

    1998-01-01

    leave detailed work in this area to the operating organisations but monitor the process on a sample basis. There are however a number of other detailed differences highlighted in the report which could provide background material to those who work in this area. There are two other recent studies on training activities of nuclear power plant personnel, namely OECD/NEA PWG 1 study and a study made by the IAEA. These studies give a broader view on training activities and offer good background material also for this study. This CNRA/WGIP study concentrates on the regulatory inspection of control room operator competence and authorisation. In many countries licensing of the control room operators is made by the regulatory body

  5. Social license to operate: case from brazilian mining industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Ana Lúcia F.; Demajorovic, Jacques; Aledo, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The approach of the Social License to Operate (SLO) emerges as an important element in academic discussions and business practices related to extractive industries. It appears that in productive activities with great potential to produce economic, social and environmental impacts, conventional approaches based on legal compliance no longer sufficient to legitimize the actions of companies and engagement stakeholders. Studies highlight the need of mining activities receiving a SLO "issued" by companies stakeholders, including society, government, non-governmental organizations, media and communities. However, local communities appears as major stakeholders in governance arrangements, by virtue of its proximity to extractive areas and ability to affect the company's results. Stakeholders with unmet expectations can generate conflicts and risks to the company, the knowledge of these expectations and an awareness of company managers of the importance of Social License to Operate (SLO), can generate strategies and mitigating actions to prevent and or minimize possible conflicts. The concept of SLO arises in engineering extractive industry, when you need to respond to social challenges, beyond the usual environmental challenges, technological and management. According to Franks and Cohen (2012) there is a tendency of engineering sectors, sustainability, environmental, safety and especially in risk mappings, treat the technological issues in a neutral manner, separating the technological research projects of social influences. I want to contribute to the advancement of the debate on stakeholder engagement and adopting as focus on the company's relationship with the community, the aim of this study was to understand how a social project held by one of the largest mining companies in Brazil contributed to the process of SLO. This methodological procedure adopted was a qualitative, descriptive, and exploratory interviews with the communities located in rural areas of direct

  6. Licensing method for new nuclear power plant: A study on decision making modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, N; Ohaga, E. O.; Jung, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a study on decision making modeling for a licensing method of a new nuclear power plant. SWOT analysis provides the licensing alternatives attributes, then the expectation from either COL or two step licensing method is decided by inputting the output from the Hurwitz mathematical model. From the analysis, COL shows the best candidate for both optimistic and pessimistic conditions

  7. Licensing method for new nuclear power plant: A study on decision making modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, N; Ohaga, E. O.; Jung, J. C. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This work provides a study on decision making modeling for a licensing method of a new nuclear power plant. SWOT analysis provides the licensing alternatives attributes, then the expectation from either COL or two step licensing method is decided by inputting the output from the Hurwitz mathematical model. From the analysis, COL shows the best candidate for both optimistic and pessimistic conditions.

  8. Recent developments in Canadian nuclear power plant licensing practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchildon, P.

    1985-06-01

    This paper examines the dominant factors which have influenced the safety evaluation and licensing process of current 600 MW reactors. It describes possible modifications to the process which are being considered for the licensing of a second 600 MW reactor at Point Lepreau. The key element is a firm licensing agreement covering the entire licensing cycle, to be established between the proponent and the AECB before a construction licence is issued. Progress accomplished to date in reaching such an agreement is described

  9. 78 FR 4467 - UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 52-016; NRC-2008-0250] UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3, Exemption 1.0 Background UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE), on behalf of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Project, LLC and UniStar Nuclear Operating Services...

  10. Impact of New Radiation Safety Standards on Licensing Requirements of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohal, P.; Subasic, D.; Valcic, I.

    1996-01-01

    As the outcomes of the newly introduced safety philosophies, new and more strict safety design requirements for nuclear installation are expected to be introduced. New in-depth defence measures should be incorporated into the design and operation procedure for a nuclear installation, to compensate for potential failures in protection or safety measures. The new requirements will also apply to licensing of NPP's operation as well as to licensing of nuclear sites, especially for radioactive waste disposal sites. This paper intends to give an overview of possible impacts of new internationally agreed basic safety standards with respect to NPP and related technologies. Recently issued new basic safety standards for radiation protection are introducing some new safety principles which may have essential impact on future licensing requirements regarding nuclear power plants and radioactive waste installations. These new standards recognize exposures under normal conditions ('practices') and intervention conditions. The term interventions describes the human activities that seek to reduce the existing radiation exposure or existing likelihood of incurring exposure which is not part of a controlled practice. The other new development in safety standards is the introduction of so called potential exposure based on the experience gained from a number of radiation accidents. This exposure is not expected to be delivered with certainty but it may result from an accident at a source or owing to an event or sequence of events of a probabilistic nature, including equipment failures and operating errors. (author)

  11. Survey of probabilistic methods in safety and risk assessment for nuclear power plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    After an overview about the goals and general methods of probabilistic approaches in nuclear safety the main features of probabilistic safety or risk assessment (PRA) methods are discussed. Mostly in practical applications not a full-fledged PRA is applied but rather various levels of analysis leading from unavailability assessment of systems over the more complex analysis of the probable core damage stages up to the assessment of the overall health effects on the total population from a certain practice. The various types of application are discussed in relation to their limitation and benefits for different stages of design or operation of nuclear power plants. This gives guidance for licensing staff to judge the usefulness of the various methods for their licensing decisions. Examples of the application of probabilistic methods in several countries are given. Two appendices on reliability analysis and on containment and consequence analysis provide some more details on these subjects. (author)

  12. Operation and Licensing of Mixed Cores in Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Nuclear fuel is a highly complex material that is subject to continuous development and is produced by a range of manufacturers. During operation of a nuclear power plant, the nuclear fuel is subject to extreme conditions of temperature, corroding environment and irradiation, and many different designs of fuel have been manufactured with differing fuel materials, cladding materials and assembly structure to ensure these conditions. The core of an operating power plant can contain hundreds of fuel assemblies, and where there is more than a single design of a fuel assembly in the core, whether through a change of fuel vendor, introduction of an improved design or for some other reason, the core is described as a mixed core. The task of ensuring that the different assembly types do not interact in a harmful manner, causing, for example, differing flow resistance resulting in under cooling, is an important part of ensuring nuclear safety. This report has compiled the latest information on the operational experience of mixed cores and the tools and techniques that are used to analyse the core operation and demonstrate that there are no safety related problems with its operation. This publication is a result of a technical meeting in 2011 and a series of consultants meetings

  13. System 80+ Design and Licensing : Improving Plant Reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    The U. S. nuclear industry is striving to improve plant reliability and availability through improved plant design, component designs and plant maintenance. In an effort to improve safety and to demonstrate that commercial nuclear power is economically competitive with other energy sources, the utilities, nuclear vendors, architect engineers and constructors, and component suppliers are all participating in an industry-wide effort to develop improved Light Water Reactor (LWR) designs that are based upon the many years of successful LWR operation. In an age when the world faces the environmental pressures of the greenhouse effect and acid rain, electricity generated from nuclear energy must play an increasing role in the energy picture of Korea, the United States and the rest of the world. This paper discusses the plant availability requirement that has been established by the industry-wide effort mentioned above. After briefly describing Combustion Engineering's program for development of the System 80 Plus standard design and the participation of the Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in the program, the paper then describes the design features that are being incorporated into System 80+. The industry ALRR Program has established a very ambitious criterion of 87% for the plant availability of future nuclear units. To satisfy such a requirement, the next generation of nuclear plants will include a great many design improvements that reflect the hundreds of years of operating experience that we have accrued. C-ESA's System 80+ will include a number of design changes that improve operating margins and make the plant easier to operate and maintain. Not surprisingly, there is a great deal of overlap between improved safety and improved reliability. In the end, our design will satisfy the future needs of the utilities, the regulators, and the public. C-E is very pleased that KAERI is working with US to achieve these important goals

  14. Operation monitor for plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tetsufumi; Kanemoto, Shigeru.

    1991-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, states of each of equipment in the plant are monitored accurately even under such a operation condition that the power is changed. That is, the fundamental idea is based on a model comparison method. A deviation between an output signal upon normal plant state obtained in a forecasting model device and that of the objective equipment in the plant are compared with a predetermined value. The result of the comparison is inputted to an alarm device to alarm the abnormality of the states of the equipment to an operator. The device of the present invention thus constituted can monitor the abnormality of the operation of equipment accurately even under such a condition that a power level fluctuates. As a result, it can remarkably contribute to mitigate operator's monitoring operation under the condition such as during load following operation. (I.S.)

  15. Kvanefjeld refinery pilot plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, Damien; Furfaro, Domenic

    2016-01-01

    Greenland Minerals and Energy is a junior project development company which is listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (asx:GGG). It is developing the Kvanefjeld rare earth and uranium project located in the southern tip of Greenland. The project has completed a Feasibility Study and is currently in the permitting phase. Last year was a busy time for the company as it completed a Feasibility Study, a mining licence application (draft submitted in December 2015) and pilot plant operations. Beneficiation pilot plant operations were completed at GTK in Finland in April 2015. This pilot plant treated approximately 30 tonnes of ore to producing almost 2 tonnes of rare earth mineral concentrate. Later in the year a hydrometallurgical pilot plant was performed which mimicked the Refinery process. This pilot plant was performed at Outotec’s Pori Research laboratories in Finland from September till October 2015. The pilot plant treated approximately 200 kilograms of concentrate over 4 split operating campaigns. Each campaign was performed to focus on the performance of a specific part of the refinery flowsheet. This allowed for full operating focus on a single unit operation to ensure that it was operating correctly. The pilot plant operations were quite successful with no major issues with the flowsheet identified through continuous operation. Some fine tuning of conditions was required to ensure adequate removal of impurities was performed with recycle streams incorporated. Overall the leach extractions observed in the pilot plant exceeded the design assumptions in the Feasibility Study. These programs were partially funded by the EURARE program. The EURARE program aims to encourage the sustainable development of European based rare earth projects. This has the goal of allowing Europe to become less reliant on importation of these key raw materials. The professionalism and performance of both GTK and Outotec contributed significantly to the success of the pilot plant

  16. Conduct of regulatory review and assessment during the licensing process for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the Code of Practice on Governmental Organization for the Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-G) and is concerned with the review and assessment by the regulatory body of all information submitted in support of licence applications, in the various phases of the licensing process. The purpose of the Guide is to provide information, recommendations and guidance for the conduct of these activities. The scope of the review and assessment will encompass the safety aspects of siting, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of each nuclear power plant

  17. 47 CFR 13.201 - Qualifying for a commercial operator license or endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... class of license or endorsement specified below must pass, or otherwise receive credit for, the... endorsement. 13.201 Section 13.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS Examination System § 13.201 Qualifying for a commercial operator license or endorsement...

  18. Project 2019 of Garona Nuclear power plant. First project to licensing renew more than 40 years in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, R. A.; Torralbo, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    NUCLENOR has been developing lifetime management and modernisation activities at Santa Maria de Garona NPP since the end of the 80's and the plant is now in optimum technical conditions to continue in operation beyond its original lifetime planned in the design (40 years). In the USA, the country of origin of the project, a good number of power plants with a similar design, age and history to SMG are in the process of obtaining or have already obtained, a licensing extension of up to 60 years from the NRC. In Spain, the activities required for requesting a long-term operating licensing extension include the Ageing Assessment and Management of the plant systems, structures and components, in accordance with the american regulation 10CFR54, a Radiological Impact Study for the new operating period, and an Analysis of New Legislation, not included in the licensing bases and considered to be important to safety by the CSN. With a view to obtaining a renewal of the current operating permit for the period 2009-2019, NUCLENOR has launched the Proyecto 2019, which extends to technical and licensing aspects, as it involves all the company's personnel. (Author)

  19. Plant operator performance evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Mitsuko; Kubota, Ryuji.

    1989-01-01

    A plant operator performance evaluation system to analyze plant operation records during accident training and to identify and classify operator errors has been developed for the purpose of supporting realization of a training and education system for plant operators. A knowledge engineering technique was applied to evaluation of operator behavior by both even-based and symptom-based procedures, in various situations including event transition due to multiple failures or operational errors. The system classifies the identified errors as to their single and double types based on Swain's error classification and the error levels reflecting Rasmussen's cognitive level, and it also evaluates the effect of errors on plant state and then classifies error influence, using 'knowledge for phenomena and operations', as represented by frames. It has additional functions for analysis of error statistics and knowledge acquisition support of 'knowledge for operations'. The system was applied to a training analysis for a scram event in a BWR plant, and its error analysis function was confirmed to be effective by operational experts. (author)

  20. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, M. L.

    2012-10-01

    So that the construction stages, of operation, closing, dismantlement and the radioactive waste disposal of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are carried out in Mexico, is necessary that the operator has a license, permission or authorization for each stage. In Mexico, these licenses, permissions or authorizations are granted by the Energy Secretariat with base in the verdict of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The operation licenses ar the moment effective for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) they will expire respectively in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit 1 and Unit 2, for what the CNSNS has begun its preparation before a potential solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. Defining the process to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this phase as normalization, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc., is the task that intends to be carried out the regulator body so that the evaluation process is effective and efficient, so much for the same regulator body as for the licensee. This work exposes the advance that the CNSNS has in this aspect and is centered specifically in the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude, taking as base what the regulator body of the United States of North America (US NRC) established and following to the IAEA. Also, this work includes statistical of electric power production in Mexico, licensing antecedents for the NPP-L V, a world perspective of the license renovations and the regulation of the US NRC related to the license renovation of a NPP. (Author)

  1. Licensing process in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiippana, Petteri

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act, the use of nuclear energy constitutes operations subject to license. The licensing process and conditions for granting a license is defined in the legislation. The licenses are applied from and granted by the Government. This paper discusses briefly the licensing process in Finland and also the roles and responsibilities of main stakeholders in licensing. Licensing of a nuclear power plant in Finland has three steps. The first step is the Decision in Principle (DiP). Goal of DiP is to decide whether using nuclear power is for the overall good for the Finnish society. The second step is Construction License (CL) and the goal of CL phase is to determine whether the design of the proposed plant is safe and that the participating organisations are capable of constructing the plant to meet safety goals. The third step is the Operating License (OL) and the goal of the OL phase is to determine whether the plant operates safely and licensee is capable to operate the plant safely. Main stakeholders in the licensing process in Finland are the utility (licensee) interested in using nuclear power in Finland, Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Government, Parliament, STUK, the municipality siting the plant and the general public. Government grants all licenses, and Parliament has to ratify Government's Decision in Principle. STUK has to assess the safety of the license applications in each step and give statement to the Ministry. Municipality has to agree to site the plant. Both STUK and the municipality have a veto right in the licensing process

  2. Fuel performance of licensed nuclear power plants through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    General aspects of fuel element design and specific design data for typical Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors are presented. Based on a literature search, failure modes and specific failures incurred through December 31, 1974 are described, together with a discussion of those problems which have had a significant impact upon plant operation. The relationship between fuel element failures and the resultant coolant activity/radioactive gaseous effluents upon radiation exposure, plant availability and capacity factors, economic impact, and waste management, are discussed. An assessment was made regarding the generation, availability, and use of fuel performance data

  3. Role of conceptual models in nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.D.; Moran, T.P.; Brown, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A crucial objective in plant operation (and perhaps licensing) ought to be to explicitly train operators to develop, perhaps with computer aids, robust conceptual models of the plants they control. The question is whether we are actually able to develop robust conceptual models and validate their robustness. Cognitive science is just beginning to come to grips with this problem. This paper describes some of the evolving technology for building conceptual models of physical mechanisms and some of the implications of such models in the context of nuclear power plant operation

  4. 77 FR 70837 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... intervene shall be filed in accordance with the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing... request: The proposed change will delete Function 14, SG [Steam Generator] Water Level--Low, Coincident... capability to shut down the reactor when required on Low--Low Steam Generator water level. The ability to...

  5. 78 FR 16876 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... intervene shall be filed in accordance with the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing... proposes to replace the VHS with an onsite diesel generator as the AAC power source providing this... power source (the VHS) with an additional onsite AAC power source (diesel generator). This equipment can...

  6. 77 FR 63343 - Biweekly Notice: Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... in accordance with the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10... for an inoperable diesel generator (DG). A commensurate change is also proposed to extend the maximum... alternating current power source (i.e., a supplemental diesel generator) with the capability to power any E...

  7. 77 FR 73684 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... in accordance with the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10... emergency diesel generator, and the stored lube oil inventory will also continue to require that a 7-day supply be available for each diesel generator. The changes are consistent with NRC-approved Technical...

  8. 77 FR 67679 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... diesel generator surveillance requirements. Margin of safety is related to the ability of the fission... evaluated; or (3) involve a significant reduction in a margin of safety. The basis for this proposed... accordance with the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10 CFR Part 2...

  9. 78 FR 14126 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... in accordance with the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10... of the document. The E-Filing system also distributes an email notice that provides access to the... Completion Time has no impact on the consequences of any design basis accident since the consequences of an...

  10. Computer aids for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    For some time, particularly since the TMI accident, nuclear power plant operators have been aware of the difficulties involved in diagnosing accidents and returning plants to their stable, safe operating mode. There are various possible solutions to these problems: improve control organization during accident situations, rewrite control procedures, integrate safety engineers in shifts, improve control rooms, and implement additional computer aids. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the efforts undertaken by EDF over the last few years in this field

  11. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program has been established whereby an annual NUREG report will be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirement areas. This report, the third volume of a three-volume series, addresses the status of generic safety issues (GSIs) at licensed plants. Volume 1 addressed the status of Three Mile Island Action Plan requirements and was published in March 1991. Volume 2 addressed the status of implementation and verification of unresolved safety issues and was published in May 1991. The annual NUREG report will combine these three areas in a single volume to be published in late 1991. The data contained in these NUREG reports are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System (SIMS) database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by NRC regional personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of the status of implementation and verification of the 34 GSIs and sub-issues that have been resolved by the NRC and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This NUREG report also serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until a request for action by licensees is issued by NRC. 3 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Long Term Operation R and D to Investigate the Technical Basis for Life Extension and License Renewal Decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaertner, John

    2012-01-01

    Establishing an improved technical basis for long term operation of existing plants is a nuclear industry priority. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has responded with a comprehensive Long Term Operation (LTO) Program addressing this need for existing nuclear power plants world-wide. The program supports both the business decisions necessary to achieve high performance operation and the licensing requirements for operation beyond 60 years. The program selects its R and D priorities in a structured and objective way with much industry input to provide useful results for decisions in the 2014 to 2019 time frame. The program is highly collaborative with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and with EPRI-member utilities. The R and D portfolio includes materials aging (metals, concrete, and cables), modernization of information and control technology, enhanced safety analysis, advanced fuel design, demonstration plant activities, life cycle management, and identification of aging management program need for subsequent license renewal. The program has focussed stakeholders world-wide on the technical issues of long term operation, and it is on-track to provide practical results for life extension and license renewal decisions. (author)

  13. Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustard, Larry D.; Harrison, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE co-sponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 'pilot-plant' efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankees Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. These include (1) development of a methodology for identifying systems, structures, and components important to license renewal, (2) development of industry reports that describe industry-accepted approaches for license renewal of ten important classes of equipment, (3) development of technical basis to support license renewal, and (4) interaction/negotiation with the NRC through the Nuclear Management Resources Council (NUMARC) regarding appropriate regulatory requirements for license renewal. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions and ongoing activities of the DOE effort

  14. Evaluation of experience and trends in international co-operation in nuclear safety and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadie, K.B.; Strohl, P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper traces the development of co-operation in nuclear safety technology between the OECD Member countries which began as early as 1965 and is now organised under the auspices of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The principal objective is to exchange and evaluate information on relevant R and D and hence broaden the technical basis for decision-making by licensing authorities in the different countries. The membership of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations combines expertise in nuclear safety R and D and in licensing questions so that licensing procedures in the different countries may be exposed continuously to the influence of overall technological progress. The Committee actively seeks to narrow the differences between administrative procedures and traditional legal practices in Member countries as these affect the licensing of nuclear installations, primarily by assessing and comparing the methods employed. The paper shows how the Committee's working arrangements provide for maximum flexibility: the various co-ordinated programmes are selected after in-depth evaluation of potential areas of priority and are implemented through ad hoc Working Groups, specialist meetings or task forces, or in the form of special studies involving all interested countries. The results, conclusions and recommendations emerging from each programme are reviewed by the Committee before dissemination. Hitherto the greater part of the Committee's activities has been concerned with the safety of light water reactors and related subjects, but more attention is now being given to other topics such as LMFBR safety technology and the safety of fuel cycle facilities, particularly those at the end of the process, the so-called ''back-end'' plants. The paper discusses certain problems and constraints encountered in implementing the programme, some of which stem from Member countries' different degrees of penetration

  15. 75 FR 23808 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... most adverse moderation conditions feasible by unborated water. By meeting this criteria, the removal... Risk Assessment in Risk-Informed Decisions On Plant-Specific Changes to the Licensing Basis,'' and RG 1...

  16. The comparison of license management procedure for nuclear power plant in China and United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zusheng

    2006-01-01

    'Tow steps' license management procedure for nuclear power plant has been performed bas- ted on the requirement of 10CFR Part50-DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES in United States since last century fifties. In order to ulterior reduce the risk of investment and technical for new construction nuclear power plants, new regulations 'One step' license management procedure-10CFR Part52-EARLY SITE PERMITS; STANDARD DESIGN CERTIFICATIONS; AND COMBINED LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS issued in 1989. The new regulations has been adopted by new design of nuclear power plant, for example AP1000. ‘The similar tow steps’ license management procedure for nuclear power plant has been performed basted on the requirement of HAFO01/01 Rules for the Implementation of Regulations on the Safety Regulation for Civilian Nuclear Installations of the People's Re- public of China Part One: Application and Issuance of Safety License for Nuclear Power Plant (December 1993) in China since last century nineties. This article introduces and compares the requirements and characteristics of above license management procedure for nuclear power plant in China and United States. (author)

  17. Organizing nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, H.W.; Rekittke, K.

    1987-01-01

    With the preliminary culmination in the convoy plants of the high standard of engineered safeguards in German nuclear power plants developed over the past twenty years, the interest of operators has now increasingly turned to problems which had not been in the focus of attention before. One of these problems is the organization of nuclear power plant operation. In order to enlarge the basis of knowledge, which is documented also in the rules published by the Kerntechnischer Ausschuss (Nuclear Technology Committee), the German Federal Minister of the Interior has commissioned a study of the organizational structures of nuclear power plants. The findings of that study are covered in the article. Two representative nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany were selected for the study, one of them a single-unit plant run by an independent operating company in the form of a private company under German law (GmbH), the other a dual-unit plant operated as a dependent unit of a utility. The two enterprises have different structures of organization. (orig.) [de

  18. The art and trend of nuclear power plants aging management and licenses renewal activity In USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhimin; Li Jinsong; Zhang Mengyi

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly introduced the history and the art of nuclear power plants licenses renewal in United State. The aims, working scope, methodology, the art and trend of aging management and its role in license renewal process in United State nuclear power plants license renewal process were discussed in details. Furthermore, the aging management current research focus in United State was described. Then, take into account the AP serials Pressurized Water Reactor and nuclear safety requirements in the regulatory and safety guide in China, some suggestions and recommendation on nuclear power plants aging management were introduced, which will be helpful when we developed related aging management works in China. (authors)

  19. 77 FR 68155 - The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... considering an application for the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-84 (Application), which... the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-84, which currently authorizes the licensee to operate...

  20. Operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, P.

    1988-04-01

    The textbook for training nuclear power plant personnel is centred on the most important aspects of operating modes of WWER-440 reactors. Attention is devoted to the steady state operation of the unit, shutdown, overhaul with refuelling, physical and power start-up. Also given are the regulations of shift operation and the duties of individual categories of personnel during the shift and during the change of shifts. (Z.M.). 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustard, L.D.; Harrison, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs

  2. Manufacturers' support to plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuschel, D.

    1996-01-01

    For more than 30 years now, safety and availablity of German nuclear power plants has been a common interest of the plant owners and the manufacturing company KWU. This longstanding collaboration for a common goal has created a safety culture unprecented in other countries, and a partnership worth to be continued. Due to the nuclear power phaseout policy, the priority today is on maintaining and safeguarding economically efficient operation of existing power plants. KWU have been adapting their business strategy to the change in the market, and are prepared to stick to this line. Thus KWU and plant operators see to it that the acquired competence in nuclear power plant technology will remain to be concentrated in the hands of the manufacturers. Continuing the partnership in this field, and encouraged by the placement of orders for the future EPR and the SWR 1000, KWU and plant operators will be in the position to offer a sound option for future decisions about construction of new nuclear power plants in Germany. (orig.) [de

  3. 75 FR 16524 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company, Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Company, Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC... the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1 (PNPP). The license provides, among other things, that the... date for all operating nuclear power plants, but noted that the Commission's regulations provide...

  4. The licensing of nuclear power plants in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.

    1980-01-01

    In Brazil the governmental organization responsible for the licensing of NPPs is the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), the Brazilian Regulatory Body. A description of CNEN's organization, responsabilities and working methods, as well as the present situation of the Brazilian NPPs undergoing licensing, has recently been presented. In this paper the experience gained by CNEN in the course of licensing Brazilian NPPs Units I and II is discussed. CNEN's present day technical competence and its future trends are analysed with regard to in-house capacity, foreign consultants and research contracts with Brazilian Universities. Finally, the immediate need for a Safety research programm in support of licensing is discussed. Manpower needs and major areas for such a programm are also indicated. (orig./RW)

  5. Nuclear power plants: recent developments in Brazil relating to the legal aspect of installation - erection - operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1981-10-01

    A Federal statutory system governs the setting up and operation of nuclear power plants in Brazil. This paper describes the general regulatory framework for electric utilities and in particular analyses the licensing procedure for nuclear installations. (NEA) [fr

  6. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenhaus, W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the legal background, the role of the 'Bund' (Federation) and the 'Laender' (States) in the field of atomic energy and radiation protection law and the licensing procedure for nuclear power plants. (RW) [de

  7. Lessons learned from the licensing process for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, P.W.; Clare, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of licensing a specific liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), the Clinch River Breader Reactor Plant (CRBRP). It was a success story in that the licensing process was accomplished in a very short time span. The actions of the applicant and the actions of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in response are presented and discussed to provide guidance to future efforts to license unconventional reactors. The history is told from the perspective of the authors. As such, some of the reasons given for success or lack of success are subjective interpretations. Nevertheless, the authors' positions provided them an excellent viewpoint to make these judgements. During the second phase of the licensing process, they were the CRBRP Technical Director and the Licensing Manager, respectively, for the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the prime contractor for the reactor plant

  8. 76 FR 62868 - Washington State University; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-76

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ...; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-76 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of issuance of renewed facility operating license No. R- 76. ADDRESSES: You can access.... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the Commission) has issued renewed Facility Operating License No. R-76...

  9. 77 FR 34093 - License Renewal for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC's AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and... Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant site near Lusby... Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC (CCNPP) submitted an application to the NRC to renew NRC License SNM-2505...

  10. Criteria and Planning Guidance for Ex-Plant Harvesting to Support Subsequent License Renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Knobbs, Katherine J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-07

    As U.S. nuclear power plants look to subsequent license renewal (SLR) to operate for a 20-year period beyond 60 years, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the industry will be addressing technical issues around the capability of long-lived passive components to meet their functionality objectives. A key challenge will be to better understand likely materials degradation mechanisms in these components and their impacts on component functionality and margins to safety. Research addressing many of the remaining technical gaps in these areas for SLR may greatly benefit from materials sampled from plants (decommissioned or operating). Because of the cost and inefficiency of piecemeal sampling, there is a need for a strategic and systematic approach to sampling materials from structures, systems, and components (SSC) in both operating and decommissioned plants. This document describes a potential approach for sampling (harvesting) materials that focuses on prioritizing materials for sampling using a number of criteria. These criteria are based on an evaluation of technical gaps identified in the literature, research needs to address these technical gaps, and lessons learned from previous harvesting campaigns. The document also describes a process for planning future harvesting campaigns; such a plan would include an understanding of the harvesting priorities, available materials, and the planned use of the materials to address the technical gaps.

  11. Standard format and content for the physical protection section of a license application (for facilities other than nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The document presented has been prepared as an aid to uniformity and completeness in the preparation and review of the physical protection section of license applications. It is applicable to fuel reprocessing plants, fuel manufacturing plants, SNM tranportation, or other special nuclear material operations involving the possession and use of uranium 235 (contained in uranium enriched to 20 percent or more in the U-235 isotope), uranium 233, or plutonium alone or in any combination in a quantity of 5000 grams or more computed by the formula: grams = (grams contained U-235) + 2.5 (grams U-233 + grams plutonium). The document is not intended to be used for nuclear power plants. The information specified is the minimum needed for a license application. Additional information may be required for completion of the staff review of a particular application

  12. NUPLEX Licensing Subcommittee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.W.; Allen, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The NUPLEX Licensing Subcommittee was organized to seek a formal license renewal mechanism that institutionalizes the current licensing basis and consequent level of safety of a plant as the legitimate standard for acceptance and approval of an application for extended operation. Along with defining the most workable approach to and scope of review for license renewal, this paper explains the reasons why a regulatory framework is needed by the early 1990s. The initial results of development work on two key issues, licensing criteria and hearing process, are also presented. at this point six potential license renewal criteria have emerged: evaluation of existing monitoring/maintenance programs, revalidation of current licensing basis, conformance to special regulations, evaluation to a safety goal, plant performance history, and environmental assessment. The work on a hearing process has led to the development of two models for future consideration: hybrid legislative and hybrid adjudicatory

  13. Plant operation state monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Babuchi, Katsumi; Arato, Toshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The system of the present invention accurately monitors a plant operation state of a plant, such as a nuclear power plant and a thermal power plant by using high temperature water, based on water quality informations. That is, water quality informations for the objective portion by using an electrochemical water quality sensor disposed in the objective portion to be monitored in the plant are continuously extracted for a predetermined period of time. Water quality is evaluated based on the extracted information. Obtained results for water quality evaluation and predetermined reference values of the plant operation handling are compared. Necessary part among the results of the measurement is displayed or recorded. The predetermined period of time described above is a period that the water quality information reaches at least a predetermined value or a period that the predetermined value is estimated by the water quality information, and it is defined as a period capable of measuring the information for three months continuously. The measurement is preferably conducted continuously in a period up to each periodical inspection on about every one year. (I.S.)

  14. 77 FR 33243 - Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses Involving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... expansion process, thermal expansion mismatch between the tube and tubesheet, and from the differential... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0125] Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating...

  15. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, M. de L.

    2013-10-01

    At the present time the operation licenses in force for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) will expire in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit-1 and Unit-2, respectively, for which the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) has begun its preparation to assist a solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. The present work has the purpose of defining the steps to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this process, as the normative, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc. so that the evaluation process will be effective and efficient, as much for the regulator organ as for the licensee. The advance carried out in the continuation of the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude is also exposed, taking like base the requirements established by the CNSNS, the regulator organ of the United States (US NRC), and the IAEA for license renovation solicitude of this type. A summary of the licenses granted from the beginning of commercial operation of the NPP-L V is included, both units and the amendments to these licenses, explaining the reason of the amendment shortly and in the dates they were granted. A brief exposition of the nuclear power plants to world level that have received extension of its operation is included. The normative that can be applied in a life extension evaluation is presented, the evaluation process to continue with the guides of the US NRC, the reach of the evaluation and the minimum information required to the licensee that should accompany to their solicitude. (author)

  16. Licensing the First Nuclear Power Plant. INSAG-26. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to policy makers and nuclear safety regulatory bodies in IAEA Member States planning to establish their first nuclear power plant. It outlines the key challenges with suggestions on how the regulator and policy makers might address them and also prepare for further development of nuclear power in the country. INSAG believes that development of technical competence of the national regulatory body is a necessary condition for the safe development of nuclear power. Therefore, regulatory infrastructure development should be a national policy requirement, as opposed to being a challenge only for the regulator. A major challenge in the deployment of the first nuclear power plant is the development of the underlying nuclear safety infrastructure and knowledge base. Since an independent regulatory body is an important part of such infrastructure, its establishment and development must be addressed at an early stage and adequate resources must be made available for this purpose. This is to ensure smooth and efficient conduct of the licensing process and regulatory oversight of the first nuclear power plant through an informed decision making process. It is essential that the legal framework starts to be implemented with a main component being the issuance of a nuclear law establishing fundamental principles and defining the responsibilities of the principal organizations, particularly the operating organization and the regulatory body. The regulatory body on its part should develop the regulatory framework that includes the establishment of regulations against which the nuclear power project will be assessed, definition of the licensing steps and corresponding documentation to be submitted by the applicant, and the implementation of a quality management system. It is expected that the 'reference plant' concept will be employed whereby the country's first nuclear power plant would have essentially the same design and safety features as a

  17. The licensing of nuclear plants as an example of conflicts of authority in parallel licensing procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henseler, P.

    1982-01-01

    Although the results obtained cannot be translated into installation licences related to the clean air act or to building codes without reservations, they can be generalized as follows: If several authorities have to assess one and the same project in independent procedures, they do not only have to use the metric used for subject-specific licensing prerequisites, but also the one used for the common weal. Then the spheres of responsibility require division. Oriented towards the purpose of the relevant laws, it has to be settled first for the sake of which public interest the authorities involved substantiate of a licensing reservation at all. All the decisions which fall within the sphere of responsibility of a certain authority are reserved and may not be prejudged by other authorities involved by issuing acts of regulation with externally binding effects. Insofar as similar or related public interests are to be considered in several licencing procedures (to be conducted) and insofar as there is no possibility of assigning the safeguarding of these interests to a special field of activity of one of the authorities involved, diverging results have to be accepted. (orig./HP) [de

  18. 77 FR 25753 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... thermal shock are bounded by the current analyses. Systems will continue to operate within their design.... Markley. Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Docket No. 50-247, Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 2... the SG tube below the top of the SG tubesheet from periodic inspections. In addition, this amendment...

  19. 78 FR 31978 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... (iii) the filing has been submitted in a timely fashion based on the availability of the subsequent...-up during the current operating cycle. Basis for proposed no significant hazards consideration... most reactive state throughout the operating cycle. Basis for proposed no significant hazards...

  20. 77 FR 66486 - Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses Involving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... available; and (iii) the filing has been submitted in a timely fashion based on the availability of the....12 to >= 1.17. The change is required to support the LSCS, Unit 2, Cycle 15, operation. Cycle 15 will be the first cycle of operation with a mixed core containing the following fuel types: Global Nuclear...

  1. Administration in an operating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, K.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of strict administrative procedures in the daily work is being demonstrated by commenting on events that occured in the operation of German nuclear power plants. The procedure for working in an area of the plant (pressurized medium, high-radioactive level, explosive of flammable mediums), where special measures for safe working have to be taken, is discussed in detail. The administrative problems during refuelling time are further on mentioned, especially the problems connected with administering more than 1,000 people with respect to health protection and sabotage protection. Some general comments on the influences from external causes (authorities, courts, etc.) are given. (orig./ORU) [de

  2. Overview of plant life management for long term operation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.S.; Vincze, P.; Bychkov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Many IAEA member states have given high priority to licensing their nuclear power plants to operate for terms longer than the time frame originally anticipated (generally 40 years). The task of managing plant ageing is assigned in most member states to an engineering specialty called 'plant life management' (PLiM) applying a systematic analysis methodology to System Structure Components (SSCs) ageing. In many countries, the safety performance of nuclear power plants is periodically assessed and characterized via the periodic safety review (PSR) process. Regulatory review and acceptance of PSRs constitutes for these countries the licensing requirement for continued operation of the plant to the following PSR cycle (usually 10 years). In the USA and in other countries operating US designed plants, instead of PSR process, a license renewal application (LRA) process is followed, which requires certain prerequisites such as ageing management programs, particularly for passive irreplaceable SSCs. Active components are normally addressed via the maintenance rule (MR) requirements and other established regulatory processes. A third group of member states have adopted a combined approach that incorporates elements of both the PSR process and selected LRA specific requirements, such as time limited ageing analysis. The article ends with some IAEA recommendations for the implementation of national PLiM programs

  3. Effects of delaying the operation of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.J.; Rainey, J.A.; Tepel, R.C.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1983-12-01

    This report documents a study of an actual 24-month nuclear power plant licensing delay. A representative utility was chosen for examination. The research was oriented toward determination of the licensing delay's impact on the utility's operating results, ratepayers, and security issues. The methodology utilized to estimate those impacts involved the recursive interaction of a generation costing program to estimate replacement fuel costs and a financial regulatory model to concomitantly determine the impact on the utility, its ratepayers and security issues. The latter model was executed under six alternate scenarios: (1) no delay in the plant's operation; (2) a 24-month delay; (3) a 24-month delay but further assuming all replacement power was generated by coal-fired plants; (4) a 24-month delay assuming all replacement power from oil-fired plants; (5) no delay but assuming the capital cost of the plant was twice as large; and (6) a 24-month delay with the capital cost of the plant twice as large. Three primary conclusions were made. First, under all scenarios, a 24-month delay in operation of the plant has an adverse impact on the utility's internal generation of funds. Second, although electricity rates are not appreciably affected by the delay, the direction of electricity price changes is contingent on the source of fuel used for replacement power. Finally, a 24-month delay has an adverse impact on the indicators used to evaluate the financial soundness of the utility in all cases under consideration

  4. 77 FR 43374 - Biweekly Notice, Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Specifications (TSs) governing the Containment Enclosure Emergency Air Cleanup System (CEEACS). The proposed... qualified RWST/non-seismic spent fuel pool (SFP) purification loop interface. This change would only be.... The SFP Purification Loop is not credited for safe shutdown of the plant or accident mitigation. A...

  5. 78 FR 38078 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... essentially leak tight barrier against the uncontrolled release of radioactivity to the environment for... frequency currently required by TS. Industry experience supports the conclusion that Type B and C testing...-OCS-GEH-520, ``AP1000 Plant Startup Human Factors Engineering Design Verification Plan,'' from...

  6. 78 FR 51219 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... the remaining relevant safety barriers for defueled plants (i.e., fuel cladding and spent fuel cooling... reduction in margin of safety because containment structure fission product barrier design margin is... previously evaluated; or (3) involve a significant reduction in a margin of safety. The basis for this...

  7. 47 CFR 90.473 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of internal transmitter control... Transmitter Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.473 Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points. An internal transmitter control system may be operated...

  8. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  9. Nuclear power plant licensing and supervision in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrhardt, H.J.; Gottschalk, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly describes nuclear power plant licensing and supervision in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Peculiarities due to the federal structure of the FRG are outlined paying due regard to the long tradition of using consultation by qualified and independent technical experts. The participating authorities, commissions, expert organizations, vendors, utilities and the public as well as their respective competences are mentioned. Also, the hierarchy in nuclear legislation by means of ordinances, administrative regulations, guidelines and technical standards is pointed out. Typical examples are presented. The paper ends in mentioning important items concerning the evaluation of operating experience, recurrent tests, backfitting, lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident, safety research concerning accident management measures, on-site and off-site emergency planning, as well as qualification and occupational training of the responsible shift personnel. (orig.)

  10. 78 FR 67402 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... and 6.2 use custom language to define the requirements of the regulation. Basis for proposed no... the requirement for organizational independence of the operations, health physics, and quality...

  11. The Monticello license renewal project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, J.M.; Harrison, D.L.; Pickens, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    Today, 111 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States. The operating license of the oldest operating plant will expire in 2003, one-third of the existing operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the newest plant's operating license will expire in 2033. The National Energy Strategy (NES) prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) assumes that 70 percent of the current operating plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration. Power from current operating plants can assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth and improved U.S. competitiveness. In order to preserve this energy resource, three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of License Renewal Applications (LRAs); (2) development of technical criteria and bases for monitoring, refurbishing or replacing plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process by a plant obtaining a renewed license. Since 1986, the DOE has been working with the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of a nuclear power plant by renewing the operating license. The Monticello Lead Plant demonstration project was initiated in September 1988, following the Pilot Plant studies. This paper is primarily focused on the status and insights gained from the Northern States Power Company (NSP) Monticello Lead Plant demonstration project. The following information is included: (1) Current Status - Monticello License Renewal Application; (2) Economic Analysis; (3) License Renewal Regulatory Uncertainty Issues; (4) Key Decisions; (5) Management Structure; (6) Technical and Licensing Perspective; (7) NRC Interactions; (8) Summary

  12. Probabilistic safety analysis : a new nuclear power plants licensing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F.S. de.

    1982-04-01

    After a brief retrospect of the application of Probabilistic Safety Analysis in the nuclear field, the basic differences between the deterministic licensing method, currently in use, and the probabilistic method are explained. Next, the two main proposals (by the AIF and the ACRS) concerning the establishment of the so-called quantitative safety goals (or simply 'safety goals') are separately presented and afterwards compared in their most fundamental aspects. Finally, some recent applications and future possibilities are discussed. (Author) [pt

  13. Decommissioning of the nuclear licensed facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center; cleanup of nuclear licensed facility 57 and monitoring of operations and operating feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estivie, D.; Bohar, M.P.; Jeanjacques, M.; Binet, C.; Bremond, M.P.; Poyau, C.; Mandard, L.; Boissonneau, J.F.; Fouquereau, A.; Pichereau, E.

    2008-01-01

    This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA Licensed Nuclear Facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is now it is located in a built-up area. It is presented like example the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. It was developed a method applied to establish the multi-annual budget, monitor the progress of operations and integrate, as work continues, the operating feedback. (author)

  14. The impact of safety standards updating for design purposes in nuclear power plants licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Rabello, Sidney Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian experience of nuclear power plants licensing was consolidated by the use of the Brazilian, American, German and IAEA standards. Independently of the set of norms, standards or guides to be used, this set should be in consonance with the state-of-art or the current state of knowledge in science and technology. In the general design criteria of US NRC or German BMI, or in the Brazilian norms (CNEN) or even, in the IAEA standards, this aspect is always emphasized. On the other hand, the international operational experience of nuclear reactors (for example, TMI accident) also contributes to the updating of norms and standards. The use of new technologies (for example, digital technology) impels the norms and standards to adopt new design criteria related to the new technological context. Moreover, we must add the particular vision that each country can have concerning to specific topics in nuclear safety. This work discusses how the norms, standards and guides used in the nuclear licensing are being reviewed to cope with the requirement of the state-of-art. In order to accomplish this aim we took some general design criteria to exemplify how they are fulfilled, mainly those related directly with the protection of the defense-in-depth barriers: primary coolant system, containment vessel and containment systems, including external events and severe accidents. In complement to the deterministic analysis, it is also discussed the design criteria related to the human factors engineering and probabilistic safety analysis, including severe accidents aspects. (author)

  15. Licensing of nuclear power plants. The case of Sweden in an international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michanek, Gabriel; Soederholm, Patrik

    2009-01-01

    Efficient power plant licensing procedures are essential for the functioning of deregulated electricity markets. The purpose of this paper is to review and analyse the licensing process for nuclear power plants in Sweden, and in part contrast the Swedish case with the corresponding approaches in a selection of other countries. This approach permits a discussion of how licensing processes can be altered and what the benefits and drawbacks of such changes are. The paper highlights and discusses a number of important legal issues and implications, including, for instance: (a) the role of political versus impartial decision-making bodies; (b) the tension between national policy goals and implementation at the local level; (c) public participation and access to justice; (d) consistency and clarity of the legal system; and (e) the introduction of license time limits. (author)

  16. The impact of reliability centered maintenance on plant prospects for license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.O.; Nakahara, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Much attention has been directed in recent years to means of extending nuclear power plant life. As many plants enter their third decade of service, the questions loom large of how to keep aging plants reliable, as well as how to assure reliability and safety to an extent sufficient to warrant license renewal at the end of the current licensing term. Concurrently the nuclear industry has seen a growing interest in reducing the cost and complexity of maintenance activities while at the same time improving plant reliability and availability. Attainment of these seemingly contradictory aims is being aided by the introduction of a maintenance philosophy developed originally by the airline industry and subsequently applied with great success both in that industry and the U.S. military services. Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), in its basic form, may be described as a consideration of reliability and maintenance problems from a systems level approach, allowing a focus on preservation of system functions as the aim of a maintenance program optimized for both safety and economics. It is this systematic view of plant maintenance, with the emphasis on preservation of overall functions rather than individual parts and components which sets RCM apart from past nuclear plant maintenance philosophies. It is also the factor which makes application of RCM an ideal first step in development of strategies for life extension and license renewal, both for aging plants, and for plants just beginning their first license term

  17. 77 FR 28626 - Biweekly Notice, Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... and resistance to accelerated corrosion from potential abnormal chemistry conditions. The fuel rod... cladding corrosion rate and maintaining the benefits of mechanical strength and resistance to accelerated... operation. Undervoltage protection will generate a loss of power (LOP) DG start if a loss of voltage or...

  18. 78 FR 1267 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... CFR 51.22(b), no environmental impact statement or environmental assessment need be prepared for these.... The operational and management controls, as described in Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 08-09... in Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 08-09, Revision 6, would be implemented concurrent with the full...

  19. 77 FR 76078 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... amendment revised the scope of Cyber Security Plan (CSP) Implementation Schedule Milestone 6 and paragraph 2... technical cyber security controls only. The operational and management controls, as described in Nuclear... the cyber security program (Milestone 8). Thus, all CSP activities would be fully implemented by the...

  20. 78 FR 28248 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... necessary to minimize bypassing of the ice condenser by the hot steam and air mixture released into the lower compartment during a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This ensures that most of the gases pass through... proposed change does not involve a change in the operational limits or the design capabilities of the...

  1. 77 FR 22808 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... and the basic operation of installed equipment is unchanged. Therefore, the proposed amendment does... Electric Station, Unit 3 (Waterford 3), Technical Requirements Manual: (a) TS 3.4.6, ``Chemistry,'' (b) TS... Technical Specifications (TS) 3.4.6 (Chemistry), TS 3.7.5 (Flood Protection), TS 3.7.9 (Sealed Source...

  2. 77 FR 60146 - Biweekly Notice: Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses and Combined Licenses...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... previously available; and (iii) the filing has been submitted in a timely fashion based on the availability... closed; their position would be verified once per operating cycle. Basis for proposed no significant... new SR 3.4.11.4. Note 3 to SR 3.4.11.1 eliminated the requirement to cycle the Unit 2 Pressurizer...

  3. Environmental Standard Review Plan for the review of license renewal applications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.; Kim, T.J.; Reynolds, S.

    1991-08-01

    The Environmental Standard Review Plan for the Review of License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants (ESRP-LR) is to be used by the NRC staff when performing environmental reviews of applications for the renewal of power reactor licenses. The use of the ESRP-LR provides a framework for the staff to determine whether or not environmental issues important to license renewal have been identified and the impacts evaluated and provides acceptance standards to help the reviewers comply with the National Environmental Policy Act

  4. Review of the Brazilian experience in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.; Laborne, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Survey of the licensing of the Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is presented. The organization and technical expertise of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, the Brazilian Regulatory Body, is reviewed with regard to in-house experience, foreign consultants, agreements with regulatory bodies of other countries and research contracts with Brazilian univerisities. The application of the two-stage licensing process and the stage of development of Brazilian nuclear standards is described. Finally, the paper speculates about the future role of probabilistic risk assessment in the Brazilian licensing process

  5. An international comparison of regulatory organizations and licensing procedures for new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredimas, Alexandre; Nuttall, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers measures needed to license new nuclear power plants efficiently. We base our analysis on international standards and a comparison of the national regulatory and licensing framework in seven countries (Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, the UK and the USA). We split the review into the organization of regulatory responsibilities and the licensing process. We propose a set of considerations that should be incorporated into national solutions. While conscious of the different cultural fundamentals of each region, we hope this paper will help fuel an emerging debate on this highly topical issue

  6. VGH Mannheim: legitimacy of the decommissioning license for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    The contribution describes the details of the court (VGH) decision on the legitimacy of the decommissioning license for the NPP Obrigheim. Inhabitants of the neighborhood (3 to 4.5 km distance from the NPP) are suspect hazards for life, health and property due to the dismantling of the nuclear power plant in case of an accident during the licensed measures or a terroristic attack with radioactive matter release.

  7. Selection, training, qualification and licensing of Three Mile Island reactor operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eytchison, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The various programs which were intended to staff Three Mile Island with competent, trained operators and supervisors are reviewed. The analysis includes a review of the regulations concerning operator training and licensing, and describes how the requirements were implemented by the NRC, Metropolitan Edison Company, and Babcock and Wilcox Company. Finally the programs conducted by these three organisations are evaluated. (U.K.)

  8. 78 FR 40519 - Cooper Nuclear Station; Application and Amendment to Facility Operating License Involving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-298; NRC-2013-0139] Cooper Nuclear Station; Application and Amendment to Facility Operating License Involving Proposed No Significant Hazards..., issued to Nebraska Public Power District (the licensee), for operation of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS...

  9. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program has been established whereby an annual NUREG series report will be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirement areas. The data contained in this report are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by personnel in the NRC regions. This report has been prepared in order to provide a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of all the TMI Action Plan requirements at licensed reactors, and to make this information available to other interested parties, including the public. A corollary purpose of this report is for it to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed facilities

  10. Status of long term operation of nuclear power plants in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, G., E-mail: gyoung4@entergy.com [Entergy Nuclear, License Renewal, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    As of early-2014, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has renewed the operating licenses for 73 of the 100 U.S. operating nuclear units, allowing for up to 60 years of safe operation. In addition, the NRC has license renewal applications under review for 18 more units and up to 8 additional units have announced plans to submit applications by 2018. This brings the total of renewed licenses and announced plans for renewal to 99% of the operating nuclear units in the U.S. In addition, by the end of 2014, there will be 38 nuclear plants that will have operated for more than 40 years and will be eligible to seek a subsequent license renewal to allow operation up to 80 years. Although some of the operating nuclear units are expected to shutdown due to economic issues, most of the remaining operating plant owners are keeping the option open for long term operation beyond 60 years. NRC and the U.S. nuclear industry have made significant progress in preparing the way for subsequent license renewal applications. This presentation covers the status of the U.S. license renewal process and issues being addressed for possible applications for subsequent renewals for up to 80 years of operation. (author)

  11. Qualification, training, licensing and retraining of operating shift personnel in nuclear power plants. Presentation of different procedures in the countries of the European Community, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, W.; Kraut, A.

    1985-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating and compiling the procedures to reach the necessary qualification applied in the countries of the European Community, Sweden, Spain, Switzerland and the United States of America. Additionally to the presentation of practice the report is to show similarities - as far as they were identified - and special topics or aspects worth mentioning. In the report the following topics are dealt with: tasks of the shift personnel, nomenclature for different groups of personnel; shift staffing of the control room; criteria for personnel selection when new shift staff; personnel qualification necessary for recruitment; training of shift personnel; retraining for preservation of the qualification standard; training facilities, especially simulators; licensing or authorization of shift personnel; training and education organization. The study is based on the evaluation of EC documents as well as well as general publications and reports. To check the results and to integrate some lacking information the report was discussed in a meeting of an ad hoc subgroup of the CEC working group dealing with the safety of light-water reactors, joined by specialists from Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. 121 refs

  12. 76 FR 52699 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... proposes to credit the automatic trip of the main turbine upon the initiation of a manual reactor trip for... credited manual reactor trip action that is part of the current licensing basis. Considerable defense-in... more robust AREVA Advanced W17 high thermal performance (HTP) fuel at Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN...

  13. 75 FR 48370 - Biweekly Notice Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... ensures the timely transfer of plant safety system loads to the Emergency Diesel Generators in the event a... a margin of safety. The basis for this proposed determination for each amendment request is shown... Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10 CFR Part 2. Interested person(s...

  14. Nuclear power plant operational data compilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberberg, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electricite de France R and D Division has set up a nuclear power plant operational data compilation system. This data bank, created through American documents allows results about plant operation and operational material behaviour to be given. At present, French units at commercial operation are taken into account. Results obtained after five years of data bank operation are given. (author)

  15. Information to be submitted in support of licensing applications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the Agency's Safety Series No.50-C-G, entitled ''Governmental Organization for the Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants: A Code of Practice''. It is concerned with the content of documents which should be submitted to the regulatory body by the applicant/licensee in support of licensing applications, with a possible method of classifying these documents and with the scheduling of their submission to the regulatory body at each major stage of the licensing process

  16. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  17. A new approach to the nuclear power plant site licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidron, A A [Israel Electric Corp. Ltd., Haifa (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    The Israel Electric Corporation Ltd.(IEC) conducted a survey to determine the geotechnical suitability of the Shivta Site for the purpose of erecting a Nuclear Power Station and presented the results in a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) to the Licensing Division of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission (LD). The studies for selecting a site in the NW Negev were conducted by multi-disciplinary teams of Israeli and US professionals, beginning in 1982, over a twelve-year period. The investigations involved comprehensive geological, geophysical, geotechnical, hydrological, as well as geomorphic and pedologic evaluations of the region and the then- proposed site locale. The prior studies were completed using highly advanced and modern tools and approaches and provided a significant amount of information related to the tectonic and seismic characteristics of the NW Negev region. (author).

  18. A review of electric cable aging effects and monitoring programs for plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofaro, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    As commercial nuclear power plants approach the end of their original license period, some utilities are considering the possibility of license renewal. The requirements for applying for license renewal are specified in the License Renewal Rule, which is in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR54). Among the requirements specified in the rule is the performance of an Integrated Plant Assessment (IPA) which identifies and lists structures and components subject to an aging management review. The intent of this requirement is to ensure that aging degradation will not adversely affect plant safety during the license renewal period. The aging management review includes an identification of the aging effects and monitoring programs for components within the scope of the rule. Among the components within the scope are electric cables since they are passive, long-lived components that are not replaced on a periodic basis. This paper examines the aging causes and effects of electric cables, along with the programs that are typically used to ensure that proper aging management practices are in place to monitor and mitigate the effects of aging on electric cables

  19. Intelligent operation system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Toshihiko; Fukumoto, Akira; Suto, Osamu; Naito, Norio.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power plants consist of many systems and are operated by skillful operators with plenty of knowledge and experience of nuclear plants. Recently, plant automation or computerized operator support systems have come to be utilized, but the synthetic judgment of plant operation and management remains as human roles. Toshiba is of the opinion that the activities (planning, operation and maintenance) should be integrated, and man-machine interface should be human-friendly. We have begun to develop the intelligent operation system aiming at reducing the operator's role within the fundamental judgment through the use of artificial intelligence. (author)

  20. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov)

  1. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  2. Decommissioning and decontamination of licensed reactor facilities and demonstration nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.; Erickson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    Decommissioning of licensed reactors and demonstration nuclear power plants has been accomplished by mothballing (protective storage), entombment, and dismantling or a combination of these three. The alternative selected by a licensee seems to be primarily based on cost. A licensee must, however, show that the decommissioning process provides adequate protection of the health and safety of the public and no adverse impact on the environment. To date the NRC has approved each of the alternatives in the decommissioning of different facilities. The decommissioning of small research reactors has been accomplished primarily by dismantling. Licensed nuclear power plants, however, have been decommissioned primarily by being placed in a mothballed state in which they continue to retain a reactor license and the associated licensee responsibilities

  3. Off-site preparedness and nuclear-power-plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The first year and a half in which off-site emergency preparedness issues have been litigated before the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards of the NRC have surfaced unique problems of proof for the applicant as well as the staff. These problems seem to be abating as the boards and the parties become more comfortable with the field and its issues, and as FEMA-NRC emergency management expertise gains credibility. Emergency preparedness presentations have also improved as the parties have become more sensitive to the seasonality of the preparedness case, and have increasingly attempted to raise it at a time when a fully developed set of facts is available for the record. Off-site preparedness issues are only now beginning to be raised on appeal to the NRC appeals board, the full commission, and the courts. Helpful guidance on what constitutes an adequate record in this area will undoubtedly be forthcoming in decisions handed down by these bodies in the months ahead

  4. AECL's support to operating plants world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeez, S.; Kakaria, B.K.; Hinchley, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Through their operating records, CANDU reactors have established themselves as a successful and cost-effective source of electricity in Canada and abroad. They have proven to be safe, reliable and economical. A variety of factors have contributed to the enviable CANDU record, such as a sound design based on proven principles supported by effective development programs, along with dedicated plant owners committed to excellence in safely maintaining and operating their plants. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU designer, has continuously maintained a close relationship with owners/operators of the plants in Canada, Argentina, Romania and South Korea. AECL and the plant operators have all benefited from this strengthening relationship by sharing experience and information. CANDU plant operators have been required to respond decisively to the economic realities of downward cost pressures and deregulation. Operating, Maintenance and Administration (OM and A) costs are being given a new focus as plant owners review each cost element to improve the economic returns from their investments. Amongst the three main OM and A constituents, plant maintenance costs are the most variable and have the largest influence on effective plant operations. The correlation between effective plant maintenance and high capacity factors shows clearly the importance of proactive maintenance planning to reduce the frequency and duration of forced plant outages and their negative impacts on plant economics. This paper describes the management processes and organizational structures m AECL that support plant operations and maintenance in operating CANDU plants with cost effective products and services. (author)

  5. Review of operational aids for nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many approaches are being explored to improve the safety of nuclear plant operations. One approach is to supply high-quality, relevant information by means of computer-based diagnostic systems to assist plant operators in performing their operational and safety-related roles. The evaluation of operational aids to ensure safe plant operations is a necessary function of NRC. This work has two purposes: to collect limited data on a diversity of operational aids, and to provide a method for evaluating the safety implications of the functions of proposed operational aids. After a discussion of the method evaluation now under study, this paper outlines this data collection to date

  6. Simulators predict power plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, R.

    2002-07-01

    Mix the complexity of a new construction or major retrofit project with today's 'do more with less', a pinch of 'personnel inexperience,' and a dash of 'unintended consequences', and you have got a recipe for insomnia. Advanced simulation tools, however, can help you wring out your design train your operators before the first wire is terminated and just may be get a good night's rest. The article describes several examples of uses of simulation tools. Esscor recently completed a simulation project for a major US utility exploring the potential for furnace/duct implosion that could result from adding higher volumetric flow induced-draft fans and selective catalytic reduction to a 650-MW coal-fired plant. CAF Electronics Inc. provided a full-scope simulator for Alstom's KA24-1 combined-cycle power plant in Paris, France. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are being used by the Gas Technology Institute to simulate the performance of the next generation of pulverized coal combustors. 5 figs.

  7. Factor best of ALWR features into operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes how many features of advanced light-water reactor designs are applicable to existing plants. While no new plants are being ordered, some advanced features have found their way into existing units and have been incorporated into the design of plants being built overseas. Ironically, two of the advanced light-water reactor (ALWR) plant designs--the ABWR and the System 80+--were finally approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the end of last year. Yet US utilities are probably further away from ordering a new nuclear unit than they ever have been. But that doesn't make the program irrelevant. Design advances from this program can affect the economics of nuclear power at a time when owner/operators are striving to compete in a less restrictive market for generation. Advances that can be considered by operating plants emanate from two major programs: (1) the standard plant designs which began in the late 1970s and (2) the ALWR program which sought--successfully, although it took a decade--to precertify designs and lessen the licensing burden on those contemplating a new unit. By using proven technology to simplify plants with higher design margins and enhanced safety features, the ALWR program's goal was to make new plants less expensive, safer, and easier to operate and maintain than their predecessors

  8. Licensing issues in the context of terrorist attacks on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danwitz, T. von

    2002-01-01

    The terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in September 2001 has prompted enhanced nuclear risk awareness among the German population. But in the current public debate about the safety of nuclear power plants in Germany in times of new dimensions of danger, aspects such as the role of the constitutional law, the German Atomic Energy Act, and the regulatory system governing nuclear power plant licensing in the context of protection and safety have not been addressed. The author therefore discusses the German nuclear power plant licensing law and administrative regime, elaborating on the significance attributed in those bodies of law to risks like terrorist attacks on nuclear power plants. (orig./CB) [de

  9. Modeling Operating Modes during Plant Life Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Lind, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Modelling process plants during normal operation requires a set a basic assumptions to define the desired functionalities which lead to fullfillment of the operational goal(-s) for the plant. However during during start-up and shut down as well as during batch operation an ensemble of interrelated...... modes are required to cover the whole operational window of a processs plant including intermediary operating modes. Development of such an model ensemble for a plant would constitute a systematic way of defining the possible plant operating modes and thus provide a platform for also defining a set...... of candidate control structures. The present contribution focuses on development of a model ensemble for a plant with an illustartive example for a bioreactor. Starting from a functional model a process plant may be conceptually designed and qualitative operating models may be developed to cover the different...

  10. Aseismic Design Licensings and guidelines for nuclear power plant in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Kazumi [Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes Aseismic Design Licensing for Japanese Nuclear Power Plants which includes system, procedures and brief contents concerned application, permit and inspection, and the `Examination Guide for Aseismic Design of the Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities` which focused principals of seismic design loads, load combinations, and allowable limits. (J.P.N.)

  11. Aseismic Design Licensings and guidelines for nuclear power plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Kazumi

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes Aseismic Design Licensing for Japanese Nuclear Power Plants which includes system, procedures and brief contents concerned application, permit and inspection, and the 'Examination Guide for Aseismic Design of the Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities' which focused principals of seismic design loads, load combinations, and allowable limits. (J.P.N.)

  12. Comparison of Plant Life Management Approaches for Long Term Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kisig

    2012-01-01

    Plant life management can be defined as the integration of ageing and economic planning to maintain a high level of safety and optimize operations. Many Member States have given high priority to long term operation of nuclear power plants beyond the time frame originally anticipated (e. g. 30 or 40 years). Out of a total of 445 (369 GWe) operating nuclear power plants, 349 units (297 GWe) have been in operation for more than 20 years (as of November 2011). The need for engineering support to operation, maintenance, safety review and life management for long term operation as well as education and training in the field is increasingly evident. In addition the Fukushima accident has rendered all stake holders even more attentive to safety concerns and to the provision of beyond safety measures in the preparation and scrutiny of applications for operational design life extensions. In many countries, the safety performance of NPPs is periodically followed and characterized via the periodic safety review (PSR) approach. The regulatory The regulatory review and acceptance of the PSR gives the licensee the permission to operate the plant for up to the end of the next PSR cycle (usually 10 years). In the USA and other countries operating US designed plants, the license renewal application is based on the five pre-requisite requirements and ageing management programme for passive long life system structure and components(SSCs) and active systems is adequately addressed by the maintenance rule (MR) requirements and other established regulatory processes. Other Member States have adopted a combined approach that incorporates elements of both PSR and additional LRA specific requirements primarily focused on time limited ageing analysis. Taking into account this variety of approaches, the international atomic energy agency (IAEA) initiated work for collecting and sharing information among Member States about good practices on plant life management for long term operation in

  13. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  14. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as 'endangered' when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A 'threatened' classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals

  15. Cause trending analysis for licensing operational events in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dewei

    2005-01-01

    The human causal factors for all human error licensing operational events on Daya Bay nuclear power station since 1993 to 2003 are categorized, the trend of these causal factors is analyzed. The emphasis is placed on analyzing the deficiencies on complying with and executing regulations and procedures. The results provide directional reference for nuclear power station to improve human performance. (author)

  16. 76 FR 61391 - Biweekly Notice Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... ''Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10 CFR part 2. Interested person(s) should... to be operable in MODES 1, 2, and 3, as well as in MODE 4 when a steam generator (SG) is relied upon... stored diesel fuel oil inventory will require that a 7 day supply be available for each diesel generator...

  17. 76 FR 39136 - Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving Proposed No Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... the Commission's ``Rules of Practice for Domestic Licensing Proceedings'' in 10 CFR part 2. Interested... Generator (SG) Program,'' to exclude a portion of the tubes below the top of the steam generator tubesheet from periodic steam generator tube inspections during Refueling Outage 14 and the subsequent operating...

  18. Plant configuration and the D and D licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Eugenio; Carboneras, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals primarily with the decommissioning after termination of normal operations and planned final shutdown. However, most provisions also apply to decommissioning after an abnormal event that has resulted in serious damage or contamination at a facility. (authors)

  19. Integrated Life Cycle Management: A Strategy for Plants to Extend Operating Lifetimes Safely with High Operational Reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselman, Thomas; Bruck, Paul; Mengers, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear plant operators are studying the possibility of extending their existing generating facilities operating lifetime to 60 years and beyond. Many nuclear plants have been granted licenses to operate their facilities beyond the original 40 year term; however, in order to optimize the long term operating strategies, plant decision-makers need a consistent approach to support their options. This paper proposes a standard methodology to support effective decision-making for the long-term management of selected station assets. Methods detailed are intended to be used by nuclear plant site management, equipment reliability personnel, long term planners, capital asset planners, license renewal staff, and others that intend to look at operation between the current time and the end of operation. This methodology, named Integrated Life Cycle Management (ILCM), will provide a technical basis to assist decision makers regarding the timing of large capital investments required to get to the end of operation safely and with high plant reliability. ILCM seeks to identify end of life cycle failure probabilities for individual plant large capital assets and attendant costs associated with their refurbishment or replacement. It will provide a standard basis for evaluation of replacement and refurbishment options for these components. ILCM will also develop methods to integrate the individual assets over the entire plant thus assisting nuclear plant decision-makers in their facility long term operating strategies. (author)

  20. NRC's license renewal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akstulewicz, Francis

    1991-01-01

    In order to provide for the continuity of the current generation of nuclear power plant operating licenses and at the same time ensure the health and safety of the public, and the quality of the environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a goal of developing and issuing regulations and regulatory guidance for license renewal in the early 1990s. This paper will discuss some of those activities underway to achieve this goal. More specifically, this paper will discuss the Commission's regulatory philosophy for license renewal and the two major license renewal rule makings currently underway. The first is the development of a new Part 54 to address procedural and technical requirements for license renewal; the second is a revision to existing Part 51 to exclude environmental issues and impacts from consideration during the license renewal process. (author)

  1. Intervention in independent spent fuel storage facility license application proceedings for storage on the power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the intervention in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process for currently operating Independent Spent fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) projects at Carolina Power and Light's Company's H.B. Robinson, Duke Power Company's Oconee, and Virginia Power Company's Surry. In addition, intervention at dry storage facilities that are currently under development are also described. The utilities and reactors include Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's Calvert Cliffs, Public Service Company of Colorado's Fort St. Vrain plant, Northern States Power Company's Prairie Island, Wisconsin Electric Power Company's Point Beach, and Consumers Power Company's Palisades

  2. Operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook gives a systematic introduction into the operational and maintenance activities in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Subjects: (1) Setup and operational behaviour of power reactors, (2) setup of nuclear power plants, (3) radiation protection and nuclear safety, (4) nuclear fuel, (5) constructional layout of nuclear power plants, (6) management, and (7) maintenance. 158 figs., 56 tabs

  3. The licensing of nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdue, M.

    1988-01-01

    The siting of a nuclear power plant inevitably raises complex technical, social and political issues. In Australia, the idea has been mooted, but never progressed to reality (in Victoria legislation specifically bans such a proposal). The conflicts engendered, however, by, say, a proposal to establish a high-temperature toxic waste incinerator; toxic waste dump; chemical factory or other potentially dangerous industry, raise similar problems which are familiar on the Australian scene. In this article the author examines the American way of investigating a contentious proposal and concludes that standard trial-type hearings are not necessarily the most efficient way of dealing with complex and competing issues and concerns

  4. Organization and practices on regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, P.

    1979-01-01

    The actual organisation, practices and experience of the JEN Nuclear Safety Department on the regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain, are presented. Topics to be covered are: The structure, organisation, staff and principal functional areas of the NSD, the academic qualifications and work experience of the NSD personnel, recruiting and training, the conduct of the regulatory review during the licensing process and working procedures, the manpower and coverage of the different technical areas, the principal problems and conclusions. (author)

  5. Design basis programs and improvements in plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE and G) Company operates three commercial nuclear power plants in southern New Jersey. The three plants are of different designs and vintages (two pressurized water reactors licensed in 1976 and 1980 and one boiling water reactor licensed in 1986). As the industry recognized the need to develop design basis programs, PSE and G also realized the need after a voluntary 52-day shutdown of one unit because of electrical design basis problems. In its drive to be a premier electric utility, PSE and G has been aggressively active in developing design basis documents (DBDs) with supporting projects and refined uses to obtain the expected value and see the return on investment. Progress on Salem is nearly 75% complete, while Hope Creek is 20% complete. To data, PSE and G has experienced success in the use of DBDs in areas such as development of plant modifications, development of the reliability-centered maintenance program, procedure upgrades, improved document retrieval, resolution of regulatory issues, and training. The paper examines the design basis development process, supporting projects, and expected improvements in plant operations as a result of these efforts

  6. License renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fable, D.; Prah, M.; Vrankic, K.; Lebegner, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about license renewal process, as defined by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Atomic Energy Act and NRC regulations limit commercial power reactor licenses to an initial 40 years but also permit such licenses to be renewed. This original 40-year term for reactor licenses was based on economic and antitrust considerations not on limitations of nuclear technology. Due to this selected time period; however, some structures and components may have been engineered on the basis of an expected 40-year service life. The NRC has established a timely license renewal process and clear requirements codified in 10 CFR Part 51 and 10 CFR Part 54, that are needed to assure safe plant operation for extended plant life. The timely renewal of licenses for an additional 20 years, where appropriate to renew them, may be important to ensuring an adequate energy supply during the first half of the 21st Century. License renewal rests on the determination that currently operating plants continue to maintain adequate levels of safety, and over the plant's life, this level has been enhanced through maintenance of the licensing bases, with appropriate adjustments to address new information from industry operating experience. Additionally, NRC activities have provided ongoing assurance that the licensing bases will continue to provide an acceptable level of safety. This paper provides additional discussion of license renewal costs, as one of key elements in evaluation of license renewal justifiability. Including structure of costs, approximately value and two different approaches, conservative and typical. Current status and position of Nuclear Power Plant Krsko, related to license renewal process, will be briefly presented in this paper. NPP Krsko is designed based on NRC Regulations, so requirements from 10 CFR 51, and 10 CFR 54, are applicable to NPP Krsko, as well. Finally, this paper will give an overview of current status of

  7. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the safety philosophy adopted in Canada, the safety criteria and regulatory requirements necessary for the application of this philosophy to reactor design and operation, and finally the means by which compliance with Board requirements is effected. It is emphasized that the effectiveness of regulatory control depends not only on the underlying philosophy but also on the detailed way in which it is applied. (orig./HP) [de

  8. 77 FR 7613 - Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-264; NRC-2012-0026] Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Facility Operating License No. R-108 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the Dow Chemical Company...

  9. Licensed operating reactors. Operating units status report, data as of 2-28-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices and IE Headquarters; and the third section is an appendix containing comparative statistics of U.S. nuclear/fossil capacity, identification of nuclear power plants within regional Electric Reliability Councils, the relative status of U.S. nuclear electric production to all U.S. electric production by state, and selected Edison Electric Institute operating statistics. Throughout the report, statistical factors for periods greater than a report month, or for more than one unit, are computed as the arithmetic average of each unit's individual operating statistics. The statistical factors for each unit for the report month are computed from actual power production for the month. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely re-computed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics

  10. An analyser for power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, A.E.; Wulff, W.

    1990-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of power plants is essential. Power plant operators need a forecast of what the plant will do when its current state is disturbed. The in-line plant analyser provides precisely this information at relatively low cost. The plant analyser scheme uses a mathematical model of the dynamic behaviour of the plant to establish a numerical simulation. Over a period of time, the simulation is calibrated with measurements from the particular plant in which it is used. The analyser then provides a reference against which to evaluate the plant's current behaviour. It can be used to alert the operator to any atypical excursions or combinations of readings that indicate malfunction or off-normal conditions that, as the Three Mile Island event suggests, are not easily recognised by operators. In a look-ahead mode, it can forecast the behaviour resulting from an intended change in settings or operating conditions. Then, when such changes are made, the plant's behaviour can be tracked against the forecast in order to assure that the plant is behaving as expected. It can be used to investigate malfunctions that have occurred and test possible adjustments in operating procedures. Finally, it can be used to consider how far from the limits of performance the elements of the plant are operating. Then by adjusting settings, the required power can be generated with as little stress as possible on the equipment. (6 figures) (Author)

  11. Fatigue assessments in operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosselin, S.R.; Deardorff, A.F.; Peltola, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    In November 1991, the ASME Section XI Task Group on Operating Plant Fatigue Assessment was formed to develop criteria and evaluation methodology for evaluating the effects of cyclic operation in operating nuclear power plants. The objective was to develop guidelines for inclusion in Section XI that could be used by plant operators in evaluating fatigue concerns and their impact on serviceability. This paper discusses the work performed by the Task Group. It explores the concept of ''Fatigue Design Basis'' versus ''Fatigue Operating Basis'' by examining the roles of ASME Section III and ASME Section XI in the design and operation of the nuclear power plants. Guidelines are summarized that may help plant operators perform effective design transient cycle evaluations and optimize cycle counting and fatigue usage tracking. The alternative fatigue evaluation approach using flaw tolerance is also introduced

  12. NEP Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2. License application, general and financial information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A license application is presented for 2 pressurized water reactors at a proposed location in Charlestown RI. Each reactor will have a net capacity of 1150 MW. Cooling water will be supplied by the Atlantic Ocean. NEP-1 is scheduled for operation in 1983 and NEP-2 in 1985

  13. The operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1992-01-01

    The duties to be performed in managing the operation of a nuclear power plant are highly diverse, as will be explained in this contribution by the examples of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Station. The excellent safety record and the high availabilities of German nuclear power plants demonstrate that their operators have adopted the right approaches. Systematic evaluation of the operating experience accumulated inhouse and in other plants is of great significance in removing weak spots and improving operation. The manifold and complex activities in the structure of organization and of activities in a nuclear power plant require a high degree of division of labor. (orig.) [de

  14. Testing, licensing, and code requirements for seismic isolation systems (for nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an earthquake hazard mitigation strategy for nuclear reactor power plants is rapidly receiving interest throughout the world. Seismic isolation has already been used on at least two French PWR plants, was to have been used for plants to be built in Iran, and is under serious consideration for advanced LMR plants (in the US, UK, France, and Japan). In addition, there is a growing use of seismic isolation throughout the world for other critical facilities such as hospitals, emergency facilities, buildings with very high-cost equipment (e.g., computers) and as a strategy to reduce loss of life and expensive equipment in earthquakes. Such a design approach is in complete contrast to the conventional seismic design strategy in which the structure and components are provided with sufficient strength and ductility to resist the earthquake forces and to prevent structural collapses or failure. The use of seismic isolation for nuclear plants can, therefore, be expected to be a significant licensing issue. For isolation, the licensing process must shift away in large measure from the superstructure and concentrate on the behavior of the seismic isolation system. This paper is not intended to promote the advantages of seismic isolation system, but to explore in some detail those technical issues which must be satisfactorily addressed to achieve full licensability of the use of seismic isolation as a viable, attractive and economical alternative to current traditional design approaches. Special problems and topics associated with testing and codes and standards development are addressed. A positive program for approach or strategy to secure licensing is presented

  15. Testing, licensing, and code requirements for seismic isolation systems (for nuclear power plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an earthquake hazard mitigation strategy for nuclear reactor power plants is rapidly receiving interest throughout the world. Seismic isolation has already been used on at least two French PWR plants, was to have been used for plants to be built in Iran, and is under serious consideration for advanced LMR plants (in the US, UK, France, and Japan). In addition, there is a growing use of seismic isolation throughout the world for other critical facilities such as hospitals, emergency facilities, buildings with very high-cost equipment (e.g., computers) and as a strategy to reduce loss of life and expensive equipment in earthquakes. Such a design approach is in complete contrast to the conventional seismic design strategy in which the structure and components are provided with sufficient strength and ductility to resist the earthquake forces and to prevent structural collapses or failure. The use of seismic isolation for nuclear plants can, therefore, be expected to be a significant licensing issue. For isolation, the licensing process must shift away in large measure from the superstructure and concentrate on the behavior of the seismic isolation system. This paper is not intended to promote the advantages of seismic isolation system, but to explore in some detail those technical issues which must be satisfactorily addressed to achieve full licensability of the use of seismic isolation as a viable, attractive and economical alternative to current traditional design approaches. Special problems and topics associated with testing and codes and standards development are addressed. A positive program for approach or strategy to secure licensing is presented.

  16. Operational characteristics of nuclear power plants - modelling of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studovic, M.

    1984-01-01

    By operational experience of nuclear power plants and realize dlevel of availability of plant, systems and componenst reliabiliuty, operational safety and public protection, as a source on nature of distrurbances in power plant systems and lessons drawn by the TMI-2, in th epaper are discussed: examination of design safety for ultimate ensuring of safe operational conditions of the nuclear power plant; significance of the adequate action for keeping proess parameters in prescribed limits and reactor cooling rquirements; developed systems for measurements detection and monitoring all critical parameters in the nuclear steam supply system; contents of theoretical investigation and mathematical modeling of the physical phenomena and process in nuclear power plant system and components as software, supporting for ensuring of operational safety and new access in staff education process; program and progress of the investigation of some physical phenomena and mathematical modeling of nuclear plant transients, prepared at faculty of mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. (author)

  17. Human equation in operating a nuclear-power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island has forced the nuclear industry to acknowledge a badly neglected aspect of nuclear-power-plant safety - the human equation. The industry now appears to recognize the importance of operator selection, training, motivation, and licensing, and the need to design a system from the point of view of communication, information retrieval, record keeping, and human factors psychology. As a result, the relatively small initiatives that were begun a few years ago by the EPRI are now being greatly expanded

  18. License - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods ...t list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods © Satoshi ... Policy | Contact Us License - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ...

  19. Team performance measures for abnormal plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Seaver, D.A.; Holmes, C.W.; Gaddy, C.D.; Toquam, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    In order to work effectively, control room crews need to possess well-developed team skills. Extensive research supports the notion that improved quality and effectiveness are possible when a group works together, rather than as individuals. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recognized the role of team performance in plant safety and has attempted to evaluate licensee performance as part of audits, inspections, and reviews. However, reliable and valid criteria for team performance have not yet been adequately developed. The purpose of the present research was to develop such reliable and valid measures of team skills. Seven dimensions of team skill performance were developed on the basis of input from NRC operator licensing examiners and from the results of previous research and experience in the area. These dimensions included two-way communications, resource management, inquiry, advocacy, conflict resolution/decision-making, stress management, and team spirit. Several different types of rating formats were developed for use with these dimensions, including a modified Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) format and a Behavioral Frequency format. Following pilot-testing and revision, observer and control room crew ratings of team performance were obtained using 14 control room crews responding to simulator scenarios at a BWR and a PWR reactor. It is concluded, overall, that the Behavioral Frequency ratings appeared quite promising as a measure of team skills but that additional statistical analyses and other follow-up research are needed to refine several of the team skills dimensions and to make the scales fully functional in an applied setting

  20. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of December 31, 1995. Volume 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the operating data report submitted by licensees for each unit. This report is divided into two sections: the first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 availability factors, capacity factors, and forced outage rates are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensees and notes to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  1. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  2. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 02-28-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactor Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  3. Licensed operating reactors status summary report data as of January 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, I.

    1989-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information, such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience, and non-power reactors in the United States

  4. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of 8-31-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  5. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of 9-30-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices. IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  6. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of December 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  7. Licensed operating reactors status summary report data as of April 30, 1983. Vol. 7, No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  8. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of October 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  9. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of May 31, 1983. Volume 7, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  10. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 11-30-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information, such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience, and non-power reactors in the United States

  11. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 11-30-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The operating units status report - licensed operating reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  12. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of 08-31-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  13. Taxonomy of the nuclear plant operator's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Fullerton, A.M.; Frey, P.R.; Dougherty, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    A program is presently under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define the functional design requirements of operational aids for nuclear power plant operators. A first and important step in defining these requirements is to develop an understanding of the operator's role or function. This paper describes a taxonomy of operator functions that applies during all operational modes and conditions of the plant. Other topics such as the influence of automation, role acceptance, and the operator's role during emergencies are also discussed. This systematic approach has revealed several areas which have potential for improving the operator's ability to perform his role

  14. Plant life time management for safe long term operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burket, Danes

    2010-01-01

    The topics discussed include LTO (long-term operation) and licensing procedure in general and specifically for the Dukovany NPP, components of an LTO programme, the PLIM (plant life management) concept for Dukovany and Temelin, the LTO implementation project for Dukovany, LTO strategy, LTO risk study, international verification. The Conclusions include the following items: (i) Technical-economic study of Dukovany NPP LTO demonstrates technical feasibility and economic profitability of Dukovany NPP LTO with perspective for up to 60 years of operation. (ii) Safety part of Program for assurance of Dukovany NPP LTO complies with IAEA SALTO recommendations. (iii) Dukovany NPP LTO programme incorporated IAEA SALTO Peer Review Mission recommendations. (iv) LTO Implementation Project for 2009-2015 was approved with major targets to renew operational permission and prepare NPP for operation up to 60 years. (v) Preparation of Temelin NPP LTO programme has been started. (P.A.)

  15. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  16. Nuclear power plant attempts in Turkey and the first licensed site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bektur, Y.; Bezdegumeli, U.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, detailed information regarding Turkey's past attempts for the construction of a nuclear power plant (NPP) and site survey studies conducted for this plant is given. Also, some important characteristics of the first licensed site, namely Akkuyu, are summarized. There were four attempts made for the construction of an NPP in the past. However, all of them failed due to technical, economical and/or some other reasons. Akkuyu site has been selected among around 25 candidate sites for the reasons that bulky materials can be transported there by sea; it is located near the major electricity demand centers; soil-structure interaction and slab stability are suitable for the construction of an NPP; its surrounding is one of the most sparsely populated areas of Turkey; and it is seismically the most stable region in earthquake-prone Turkey, e.g. Turkish Electricity Authority (TEK) was granted a site license for the Akkuyu in 1976. (author)

  17. Analysis of public comments on the proposed rule on nuclear power plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report provides a summary and analysis of public comments on the proposed license renewal rule for the nuclear power plants (10 CFR Part 54) published in the Federal Register on 17 July 1990. It also documents the NRC's resolution of the issues raised by the commenters. Comments from 121 organizations and 76 individuals were reviewed and analyzed to identify the issues, including those pertaining to the adequacy of the licensing basis, the performance of an integrated plant assessment, backfit considerations, and need for public hearings. The analysis included grouping of commenters' views according to the issues raised. The public comments analyzed in this report were taken into consideration in the development of the final rule and revisions to the supporting documents

  18. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I and C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, RT

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l and C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l and C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States

  19. Selected review of regulatory standards and licensing issues for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.; Thomas, F.A.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents a compilation and description of current foreign regulatory standards and licensing issues in the areas of interest associated with Siting, Structural Engineering, Metallurgy and Materials, and Mechanical Engineering. In addition, summary comparisons of the requirements of both the US and foreign nuclear power plant regulatory standards are provided. The selected foreign countries surveyed include Canada, France, Japan, Sweden, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the Federal Republic of Germany

  20. Nuclear power plant operation 2016. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2017-05-15

    A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2016, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from nuclear power plants in Germany. Reports about nuclear power plants in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain will be published in a further issue.

  1. Thermal power plant design and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Power Plant: Design and Operation deals with various aspects of a thermal power plant, providing a new dimension to the subject, with focus on operating practices and troubleshooting, as well as technology and design. Its author has a 40-long association with thermal power plants in design as well as field engineering, sharing his experience with professional engineers under various training capacities, such as training programs for graduate engineers and operating personnel. Thermal Power Plant presents practical content on coal-, gas-, oil-, peat- and biomass-fueled thermal power

  2. Operations quality assurance for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This standard covers the quality assurance of all activities concerned with the operation and maintenance of plant equipment and systems in CANDU-based nuclear power plants during the operations phase, the period between the completion of commissioning and the start of decommissioning

  3. Plant Operation: Work Week, Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A four-day work week for maintenance workers in the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado, reduces absenteeism and increases productivity; a basic manual for physical plant directors is reviewed. (Author/MLF)

  4. Expert report of ENSI on the request of EKKB AG for a general license - Project 'New nuclear power plant to replace the Beznau plant'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The 'Ersatz Kernkraftwerk Beznau AG' (EKKB) Company submitted to the Swiss Federal Inspectorate of Nuclear Safety (ENSI) a request for a general license for a new power plant to be built near to the Beznau power plants. According to the law, all damage risks with a probability higher than 10 -4 /a must be taken into account through protection measures. The considered risks concern the power plant itself as well as the population in the neighbourhood and the environment. The purpose of the general license is to demonstrate that the site chosen for the foreseen power plant is acceptable and that the risks can be counteracted through adequate measures. The buildings of the power plant and their partition on the Beznau Island in the Aare River are briefly described. The reactor is a Light Water Reactor of third generation with a maximum electrical power of 1450 MW el ±20%. The main cooling is provided by a hybrid system of water evaporation and air heating, what reduces the plume at the exit of the cooling tower. First, it is demonstrated that, in the case of a very unlikely severe accident in the power plant, the people in the neighbourhood can be evacuated quickly. Then, numerous types of possible accidents in the neighbourhood of the power plant are analyzed in order to settle their possible negative influence on the operation of the power plant: bursting of gas containers on the neighbouring roads and railways, fires of all types of hydrocarbons, air pollution through chloride gas, etc. The check by ENSI of the EKKB studies on the potential danger for the power plant through neighbouring industrial plants, roads or railways demonstrated that none of the considered accidents presents an unacceptable risk for the power plant: on the one hand, these plants are located too far from the power plant, so that a sensible injury to the power plant safety can be excluded; on the other, the protection of the power plant can be guaranteed through appropriate technical

  5. Will nuclear power plant standardization reduce the licensing impact on construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.M.; Bingham, W.G.; Keith, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The NRC and the nuclear industry have been pursuing standardization quite vigorously in an effort to reduce the cost and schedule for the design and construction of nuclear power plants. The NRC is currently reviewing standard plant applications submitted under each of four standardization options. In addition, the NRC has published Standard Review Plans and Standard Technical Specifications. Although problems exist in the implementation of standardization and in areas unaffected by standardization, each of these standardization methods has the potential to reduce the licensing impact on construction

  6. Expert report of ENSI on the request of KKN AG for a general license - Project 'New nuclear power plant Niederamt'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The 'Kernkraftwerk Niederamt AG' (KKN) Company submitted to the Swiss Federal Inspectorate of Nuclear Safety (ENSI) a request for a general license for a new power plant to be built near to the Goesgen power plant. According to the law, all damage risks with a probability higher than 10 -4 /a must be taken into account through protection measures. The considered risks concern the power plant itself as well as the population in the neighbourhood and the environment. The purpose of the general license is to demonstrate that the site chosen for the foreseen power plant is acceptable and that the risks can be counteracted through adequate measures. The buildings of the power plant and their partition over the two banks of the Aare River are briefly described. The reactor is a Light Water Reactor of third generation with a maximum thermal power of 5.8 GW th . The main cooling is provided by a hybrid system of water evaporation and air heating, what reduces the plume at the exit of the cooling tower. First, it is demonstrated that, in the case of a very unlikely severe accident in the power plant, the people in the neighbourhood can be evacuated quickly. Then, numerous types of possible accidents in the neighbourhood of the power plant are analyzed in order to settle their possible negative influence on the operation of the power plant: bursting of gas containers on the neighbouring roads and railways, fires of all types of hydrocarbons, air pollution through chloride gas, etc. The check by ENSI of the KKN studies on the potential danger for the power plant through neighbouring industrial plants, roads or railways demonstrated that none of the considered accidents presents an unacceptable risk for the power plant: on the one hand, these plants are located too far from the power plant, so that a sensible injury to the power plant safety can be excluded; on the other, the protection of the power plant can be guaranteed through appropriate technical measures. The power

  7. Obtaining college credit for licensed operator courses at the Wolf Creek Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, C.W.; Coulthard, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The presentation examined alternatives to formal college courses as a means to obtain college credit toward a baccalaureate degree for station operations personnel. The focus is on the American Council on Education (ACE-PONSI) program which evaluates and makes credit recommendations for courses sponsored by organizations, like utilities, whose primary function is not education. Significant elements of the licensed operator program were prepared for an ACE-PONSI review and determined to be equivalent to college level nuclear engineering technology course work. The ACE-PONSI evaluation provides a good foundation and a significant amount of the training program evaluation required prior to the INPO accreditation effort

  8. License renewal in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brons, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear plants in the United States are licensed for 40 years, a length specified in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which laid out much of the regulatory basis for the commercial nuclear industry. The Act, however, made provision for license renewal. The original 40-year license period was chosen arbitrarily by the U.S. Congress because it was the typical period over which utilities recovered their investment in electricity generating plants. Nuclear plants, however, are subject to a rigorous program of Nuclear Regulatory Commission oversight, maintenance and equipment replacement. In effect, they must be in the same operating condition on the last day of their licenses as they were on the first. As the industry matured, it became apparent that there was no physical limitation on the continued operation of nuclear plants past 40 years. The industry turned its attention toward license renewal. When the issue was first raised, the NRC considered stringent process equivalent to seeking a new operating license for each plant. The complexity, length and cost of the process made it unlikely that many nuclear plants would seek license renewal. The nuclear industry worked successfully with NRC on the application of generic principles to license renewal, however, and in 1995, the NRC issued an efficient, tightly-focused rule that made license renewal a safe, viable option. To extend the operating license for a reactor, a company must demonstrate to the NRC that aging effects will be adequately managed during the renewal terms, thus ensuring equipment functionality. The rule allows licensees to apply for extensions of up to 20 years. The first license renewal application was filed in 1998 by the owner of the two-unit Calvert Cliffs plant. Shortly thereafter, an application was filed for the three-unit Oconee Nuclear Station. The NRC renewed the licenses for all five units in 2000, and since then, five more licenses have been renewed. The NRC has received 37

  9. Operational safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1987-01-01

    The operational safety of nuclear power plants has become an important safety issue since the Chernobyl accident. A description is given of the various aspects of operational safety, including the importance of human factors, responsibility, the role and training of the operator, the operator-machine interface, commissioning and operating procedures, experience feedback, and maintenance. The lessons to be learnt from Chernobyl are considered with respect to operator errors and the management of severe accidents. Training of personnel, operating experience feedback, actions to be taken in case of severe accidents, and international cooperation in the field of operational safety, are also discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Training of power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftwerksschule, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    In Germany, professional training of power plant operating personnel became an important issue in the fifties, when power plant parameters as well as complexity of instrumentation and control increased considerably. Working Groups of VGB Technische Vereiningung der Grosskraftwerketreiber e.v. (Association of Large Power Plant Operators) developed a professional career for power plant operating personnel and defined pre-requisites, scope and objectives of training. In 1957 the German utilities founded KRAFTWERKSSCHULE E.V. (kws) as a school for theoretical training and for guidance of practical training in the power plants. KWS is a non-profit organisation and independent of authorities. Today KWS has 127 members in Germany and in 6 other countries. The objectives of KWS include the training of: -Kraftwerker (control room operators; - Kraftwerksmesiter (shift supervisors); and - shift engineers; according the guidelines of the VGB

  11. The critical safety functions and plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Church, J.F.; Cross, M.T.; Guinn, W.M.; Porter, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    The operator's role in nuclear safety is outlined and the concept of ''safety functions'' introduced. Safety functions are a group of actions that prevent core melt or minimize radiation releases to the general public. They can be used to provide a hierarchy of practical plant protection that an operator should use. The plant safety evaluation uses four inputs in predicting the results of an event: the event initiator, the plant design, the initial plant conditions and setup, and the operator actions. If any of these inputs are not as assumed in the evaluation, confidence that the consequences will be as predicted is reduced. Based on the safety evaluation, the operator has three roles in assuring that the consequences of an event will be no worse than the predicted acceptable results: Maintain plant setup in readiness to properly respond. Operate the plant in a manner such that fewer, milder events minimize the frequency and the severity of adverse events. Monitor the plant to verify that the safety functions are accomplished. The operator needs a systematic approach to mitigating the consequences of an event. The concept of safety functions introduces this systematic approach and presents a hierarchy of protection. If the operator has difficulty identifying an event for any reason, the systematic safety function approach allows accomplishing the overall path of mitigating consequences. Ten functions designed to protect against core melt, preserve containment integrity, prevent indirect release of radioactivity, and maintain vital auxiliaries needed to support the other safety functions are identified

  12. 76 FR 81992 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background PPL Bell Bend, LLC... for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This reactor is to be identified as Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant (BBNPP... based upon the U.S. EPR reference COL (RCOL) application for UniStar's Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power...

  13. Qualification of nuclear power plant operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    With the ultimate aim of reducing the possibility of human error in nuclear power plant operations, the Guidebook discusses the organizational aspects, the staffing requirements, the educational systems and qualifications, the competence requirements, the ways to establish, preserve and verify competence, the specific aspects of personnel management and training for nuclear power plant operations, and finally the particular situations and difficulties to be overcome by utilities starting their first nuclear power plant. An important aspect presented in the Guidebook is the experience in training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel in various countries: Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Czechoslovakia, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States of America

  14. Evaluation of nuclear power plant operator's ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Li; He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the quantitative research on nuclear power plant (NPP) operator's psychological characteristics and performance, the Borda's method of fuzzy mathematics combined with the character of operator's task is used to evaluate their abilities. The result provides the reference for operator's reliability research and psychological evaluation. (author)

  15. Preliminary evaluation of licensing issues associated with U. S. -sited CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Erp, J B

    1977-12-01

    The principal safety-related characteristics of current CANDU-PHW power plants are described, and a distinction between those characteristics which are intrinsic to the CANDU-PHW system and those that are not is presented. An outline is given of the main features of the Canadian safety and licensing approach. Differences between the U.S. and Canadian approach to safety and licensing are discussed. Some of the main results of the safety analyses, routinely performed for CANDU-PHW reactors, are presented. U.S.-NRC General Design Criteria are evaluated as regards their applicability to CANDU-PHW reactors; vice-versa the CANDU-PHW reactor is evaluated with respect to its conformance to the U.S.-NRC General Design Criteria. A number of design modifications are proposed to be incorporated into the CANDU-PHW reactor in order to facilitate its introduction into the U.S.

  16. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner's Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section

  17. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  18. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1992) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. ne data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  19. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of 6-30-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the U.S. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the U.S. energy situation as a whole

  20. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  1. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT -- LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  2. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 07-31-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  3. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of July 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  4. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  5. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of October 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, I.

    1987-12-01

    The operating units status report - licensed operating reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  6. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of May 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  7. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  8. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 12-31-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  9. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  10. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 9-30-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  11. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of 2-28-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The Operating Units Status Report- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  12. Plant Operation Station for HTR-PM Low Power and Shutdown operation Probabilistic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Tong Jiejuan

    2014-01-01

    Full range Probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) is one of key conditions for nuclear power plant (NPP) licensing according to the requirement of nuclear safety regulatory authority. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Pebble-bed Module (HTR-PM) has developed construction design and prepared for the charging license application. So after the normal power operation PSA submitted for review, the Low power and Shutdown operation Probabilistic safety analysis (LSPSA) also begin. The results of LSPSA will together with prior normal power PSA results to demonstrate the safety level of HTR-PM NPP Plant Operation Station (POS) is one of important terms in LSPSA. The definition of POS lays the foundation for LSPSA modeling. POS provides initial and boundary conditions for the following event tree and fault tree model development. The aim of this paper is to describe the state-of-the-art of POS definition for HTR-PM LSPSA. As for the first attempt to the high temperature gas cooled reactor module plant, the methodology and procedure of POS definition refers to the LWR LSPSA guidance, and adds to plant initial status analysis due to the HTR-PM characteristics. A specific set of POS grouping vectors is investigate and suggested for HTR-PM NPP, which reflects the characteristics of plant modularization and on-line refueling. As a result, seven POSs are given according to the grouping vectors at the end of the paper. They will be used to the LSPSA modelling and adjusted if necessary. The papers ’work may provide reference to the analogous NPP LSPSA. (author)

  13. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0010] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power... comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  14. Activities of the TUV experts during the period of construction and commissioning of a nuclear power plant ordered by the licensing authorities of the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dommke, J.; Fendler, H.

    1977-01-01

    The inspection organisations in the Federal Republic of Germany (Technische Uberwachungs-Vereine) are independent systems grouped on a regional basis. The competent licensing authorities of the various Lander consult them concerning assessments for site selection and the design, construction, commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants. Furthermore the TUV experts inspect the manufacture of components in the suppliers' facilities and on site. (NEA) [fr

  15. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  16. ALARA for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is outlined in connection with nuclear power plant operations. The basis of the concept is reviewed and a specific example of ALARA action is presented. (author)

  17. Development of nuclear plant Operation Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koide, I.; Okada, T.; Ishida, K. [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Recently it has become more important to detect a change in operational characteristics and to take appropriate corrective actions before it deteriorates to an incident in nuclear power plants. Therefore, aiming at earlier detection of a tendency change, swifter corrective actions and more effective application of operational data, we have developed Operation Management System which automatically acquires, accumulates and observes operational data of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station through cycles. (author)

  18. Development of nuclear plant Operation Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, I.; Okada, T.; Ishida, K.

    1998-01-01

    Recently it has become more important to detect a change in operational characteristics and to take appropriate corrective actions before it deteriorates to an incident in nuclear power plants. Therefore, aiming at earlier detection of a tendency change, swifter corrective actions and more effective application of operational data, we have developed Operation Management System which automatically acquires, accumulates and observes operational data of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station through cycles. (author)

  19. Answers to questions at public meetings regarding implementation of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 on operators' licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document presents questions and answers based on the transcripts of four public meetings (and from written questions submitted after the meetings) conducted from April 9 to April 20, 1987 by the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The meetings discussed implementation of the Commission's final rule governing Operators' Licenses and Conforming Amendments (10 CFR Parts 55 and 50). The rule became effective May 26, 1987 and is intended to clarify the regulations for issuing licenses to operators and senior operators; revise the requirements and scope of written examinations and operating tests for operators and senior operators, require a simulation facility; clarify procedures for administering requalification examinations; and describe the form and content for operator license applications

  20. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  1. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-03-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  2. Safe operation of power plants. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freymeyer, P.

    1977-01-01

    Electrotechniques were given a dominating role in the construction of nuclear power plants. The operation of power plants - particularly nuclear power plants - is impossible without the use of electrotechnical and control means. Despite of all reserve in the development and despite of the conservative attitude it is necessary to use the newest results of development and to incite the development ot new electronic systems for the solution of these tasks. (orig.) [de

  3. Increase of hydroelectric power plant operation reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshumbaev, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    The new design of the turbine of hydroelectric power plant (HPP) is executed in the form of a pipe with plates. Proposed solution allows increasing the hydroelectric power plant capacity at existing head and water flow. At that time the HPP turbine reliability is increase, its operation performances are improving. Design efficiency is effective mostly for small-scale and micro-HPP due to reliable operation, low-end technology, and harmless ecological application. (author)

  4. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1994-03-01

    In the third quarter of 1993, all of Finland's four nuclear power plant units were in power operation, with the exception of the annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa units. The load factor average of the plant units was 83.6 %. None of the events which occurred during this annual quarter had any bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  5. Operation and maintenance in Genkai PWR Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shojiro

    1984-01-01

    The No.1 PWR plant with 559 MW capacity in the Genkai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., required about 115 days for the regular inspection in fiscal 1982 and thereafter, although more maintenance work was done. But No.2 plant of the same type required not more than 80 days. In most cases, the period of one operation cycle was from 10 to 12 months, but in the third operation cycle of No.2 plant, it is expected to be 13 months. The capacity ratio of the whole power station was 75.2% at the end of fiscal 1983. These operational records all exceeded the Japanese average. The plants are two-loop Westinghouse type PWRs, and No.1 plant started the commercial operation of anti h and the increment of P 0 + . (author) apacity ratio of No.1 plant was 71.6%, and that of No.2 plant was 85.5%. The intergranular attack on steam generator tubes was found first in the fifth regular inspection, and also in the sixth and seventh inspections, and the faulty tubes were plugged. The prevention of its spread is the largest problem. The in-service quality assurance activity, the personnel training program and the effort of upgrading the plant availability are reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. Plant operation monitoring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Tsugio; Matsuki, Tsutomu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for monitoring the operation of a nuclear power plant during operation, which improves the safety and reliability of operation without increasing an operator's burden. Namely, a chief in charge orally instruct an operation to an operator upon the operation of a plant constituent equipment. The operator points the equipment and calls the name. Actual operation instruction for the equipment is inputted after confirmation by oral response. The voices of theses series of operation instruction/point-calling/response confirmation are taken into a voice recognition processing device. The processing device discriminates each of the person who calls, and discriminates the content of the calls and objective equipments to be operated. Then, the series of procedures and contents of the operation for the equipments previously disposed in the data base are compared with the order of inputted calls, discriminated contents and the objective equipments to be operated. If they are not agreed with each other, the operation instruction is blocked even if actual operation instructions are inputted. (I.S.)

  7. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-275 and 50-323)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    Supplement 27 to the Safety Evaluation Report for Pacific Gas and Electric Company's application for a license to operate Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-275), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses the revisions to the license conditions and to the Technical Specifications as they relate to Amendment 10 to Diablo Canyon, Unit 1 Facility Operating License, DPR-76

  8. Experience in Cuba in the licensing during import, commissioning and operation of an Irradiator LLCo ISOGAMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forteza, Yamil Lopez; Reyes, Yolanda Perez; Garcia, Jose R. Quevedo; Molina, Igor I. Sarabia; Gonzalez, Leonel Omarovich; Zubiaur, Omar Cruz

    2013-01-01

    This work presented the experiences during the process of licensing an irradiator ISOGAMMA LLCo model according to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy (IAEA). Aspects of the safety assessment are detailed, as well as control and verification requirements for radiation safety and security at different stages of the process (import, transportation, installation irradiator loading 60Co sources, commissioning and operation) of irradiator recently installed in Cuba. The results of the evaluation carried a source of reference and consultation necessary for the work of the regulator to consider for similar processes that lie ahead in other facilities irradiation

  9. Quality assurance during operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modemann, G.

    1990-01-01

    The demands of the licensing authorities and the Nuclear Safety Regulations (KTA Rules) on the one hand and the utility's requirements on the other hand have led to the quality assurance system for the operation of nuclear power plants. One part of the system is the organizational structure for the distribution of all tasks and responsibilities to qualified staff members; all checks are carried out by experts who are independent of the executing staff if necessary. The other part of the system comprises the procedural structures for operation, maintenance, inspection, repair and modifications as well as for procurement and preparation of materials and spare parts. The application and efficiency of the quality assurance system is supervised and periodically checked by an independent department. (orig.) [de

  10. On the plant operators performance during earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Abe, M.; Niwa, H.; Yoneda, T.; Matsunaga, M.; Suzuki, T.

    1994-01-01

    There is little data on which to judge the performance of plant operators during and after strong earthquakes. In order to obtain such data to enhance the reliability on the plant operation, a Japanese utility and a power plant manufacturer carried out a vibration test using a shaking table. The purpose of the test was to investigate operator performance, i.e., the quickness and correctness in switch handling and panel meter read-out. The movement of chairs during earthquake as also of interest, because if the chairs moved significantly or turned over during a strong earthquake, some arresting mechanism would be required for the chair. Although there were differences between the simulated earthquake motions used and actual earthquakes mainly due to the specifications of the shaking table, the earthquake motions had almost no influence on the operators of their capability (performance) for operating the simulated console and the personal computers

  11. Regulatory challenges related to the licensing of a new nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maris, M.

    2010-01-01

    Assuring the safety and security of nuclear power plants is recognized world-wide as a challenge for all stakeholders. Particular attention goes to plants planned to be built in countries with not sufficiently developed industrial and regulatory infrastructure and experience. A construction and commissioning project, which is usually an international undertaking, gives opportunities to all national stakeholders to develop further their organisations and competences. In the present paper the duties of a regulatory body are recalled as well as the human resources and competences needed for the licensing of a new nuclear power plant. The regulatory body and its technical safety organization(s) should be strengthened and the international cooperation should contribute to this in a systematic and coordinated way. In particular, the donor country should support the necessary development of the regulatory competences and of an effective safety assessment process supporting the national licensing process. Appropriate support can be provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and through other bi-lateral or multi-lateral programmes

  12. Licensing the First Nuclear Power Plant. INSAG-26. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to policy makers and nuclear safety regulatory bodies in IAEA Member States planning to establish their first nuclear power plant. It outlines the key challenges with suggestions on how the regulator and policy makers might address them and also prepare for further development of nuclear power in the country. INSAG believes that development of technical competence of the national regulatory body is a necessary condition for the safe development of nuclear power. Therefore, regulatory infrastructure development should be a national policy requirement, as opposed to being a challenge only for the regulator. A major challenge in the deployment of the first nuclear power plant is the development of the underlying nuclear safety infrastructure and knowledge base. Since an independent regulatory body is an important part of such infrastructure, its establishment and development must be addressed at an early stage and adequate resources must be made available for this purpose. This is to ensure smooth and efficient conduct of the licensing process and regulatory oversight of the first nuclear power plant through an informed decision making process. It is essential that the legal framework starts to be implemented with a main component being the issuance of a nuclear law establishing fundamental principles and defining the responsibilities of the principal organizations, particularly the operating organization and the regulatory body. The regulatory body on its part should develop the regulatory framework that includes the establishment of regulations against which the nuclear power project will be assessed, definition of the licensing steps and corresponding documentation to be submitted by the applicant, and the implementation of a quality management system. It is expected that the 'reference plant' concept will be employed whereby the country's first nuclear power plant would have essentially the same design and safety

  13. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report: Data as of February 29, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  15. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of April 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  16. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report as of February 29, 1984. Volume 8, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  17. Visualization study of operators' plant knowledge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Tarou; Furuta, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Shinji

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear plants are typically very complicated systems and are required extremely high level safety on the operations. Since it is never possible to include all the possible anomaly scenarios in education/training curriculum, plant knowledge formation is desired for operators to enable thein to act against unexpected anomalies based on knowledge base decision making. The authors have been conducted a study on operators' plant knowledge model for the purpose of supporting operators' effort in forming this kind of plant knowledge. In this report, an integrated plant knowledge model consisting of configuration space, causality space, goal space and status space is proposed. The authors examined appropriateness of this model and developed a prototype system to support knowledge formation by visualizing the operators' knowledge model and decision making process in knowledge-based actions with this model on a software system. Finally the feasibility of this prototype as a supportive method in operator education/training to enhance operators' ability in knowledge-based performance has been evaluated. (author)

  18. Nuclear power plant diagnostics - Safety aspects and licensing. Report of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was to review developed systems and methods in diagnostics in the scope of their impacts and importance to the safety of Nuclear Power Plants. Papers presented on TCM came from different sources, from developers, from manufacturers, from licensing authorities and from NPP personal. They reflect up to date status in the given subject. Participants of TCM formulated three working groups to elaborate different questions which were raised during the discussions. Their results are reflected in the three chapter titles of the given material. Annex 1 to this document contains presentations made at the Technical Committee Meeting. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Research of the Power Plant Operational Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koismynina Nina M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the algorithm of the power plant operational modes research is offered. According to this algorithm the program for the modes analysis and connection power transformers choice is developed. The program can be used as educational means for studying of the power plant electric part, at the same time basic data are provided. Also the program can be used for the analysis of the working power plants modes. Checks of the entered data completeness and a choice correctness of the operational modes are provided in the program; in all cases of a deviation from the correct decisions to the user the relevant information is given.

  20. Future of nuclear licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are outlined: Comparison of US and best foreign experience in nuclear power plant construction and operation; Status of licensing and construction; Observed attributes; Reduced construction time; Fewer reactor trips; Higher capacity factor; Diesel generator reliability; Steam generator tube leakage; and US regulatory initiatives: NRC efforts and industry efforts

  1. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-02-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa plant units were held during the report period. All events during this quarter are classified as Level hero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below authorised limits. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  2. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  3. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  4. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory

  5. Modifications at operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, T.J.; Gazda, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications at operating nuclear power plants offer the structural engineer many challenges in the areas of scheduling of work, field adjustments, and engineering staff planning. The scheduling of structural modification work for operating nuclear power plants is normally closely tied to planned or unplanned outages of the plant. Coordination between the structural engineering effort, the operating plant staff, and the contractor who will be performing the modifications is essential to ensure that all work can be completed within the allotted time. Due to the inaccessibility of some areas in operating nuclear power plants or the short time available to perform the structural engineering in the case of an unscheduled outrage, field verification of a design is not always possible prior to initiating the construction of the modification. This requires the structural engineer to work closely with the contractor to promptly resolve problems due to unanticipated interferences or material procurement problems that may arise during the course of construction. The engineering staff planning for structural modifications at an operating nuclear power plant must be flexible enough to permit rapid response to the common ''fire drills,'' but controlled enough to ensure technically correct designs and to minimize the expenditure of man-hours and the resulting engineering cost

  6. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Pekka

    1987-07-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. No event in the report period, or in the whole year of 1986, essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. For remedying certain defects found in the adminstrative procedures concerning plant operation and maintenance, the Loviisa power plant was shut down for several days in September

  7. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Pekka

    1987-05-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the perssonnel or the environment. For remedying certain defects found in the administrative procedures concerning plant operation and maintenance, the Loviisa power plant was shut down for several days

  8. Operator support system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Nobuyuki; Tai, Ichiro; Sudo, Osamu; Naito, Norio.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear power generation in Japan maintains the high capacity factor, and its proportion taken in the total generated electric power exceeded 1/4, thus it has become the indispensable energy source. Recently moreover, the nuclear power plants which are harmonious with operators and easy to operate are demanded. For realizing this, the technical development such as the heightening of operation watching performance, the adoption of automation, and the improvement of various man-machine systems for reducing the burden of operators has been advanced by utilizing electronic techniques. In this paper, the trend of the man-machine systems in nuclear power plants, the positioning of operation support system, the support in the aspects of information, action and knowledge, the example of a new central control board, the operation support system using a computer, an operation support expert system and the problems hereafter are described. As the development of the man-machine system in nuclear power plants, the upgrading from a present new central control board system PODIA through A-PODIA, in which the operational function to deal with various phenomena arising in plants and safety control function are added, to 1-PODIA, in which knowledge engineering technology is adopted, is expected. (Kako, I.)

  9. Operation reports of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The requirements aiming to standardize the program of nuclear power plant operation report, required by Brazilian Energy Commission - CNEN - to evaluate the activities related to the nuclear technical safety and to the radiation protection during the units operational phase, are showed. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Professional adaptability of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xuhong; Huang Xiangrui

    2006-01-01

    The paper concerns in the results of analysis for nuclear power plant (NPP) operator job and analysis for human errors related NPP accidents. Based on the principle of ergonomics a full psychological selection system of the professional adaptability of NPP operators including cognitive ability, personality and psychological health was established. The application way and importance of the professional adaptability research are discussed. (authors)

  11. Summary of operating experience in Swiss nuclear power plants 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    In 1993 the Swiss nuclear power plants produced their third highest combined annual output. The contribution to the total electricity generation in the country was close to 37%. Replacement of the steam generators in Beznau Unit 1 resulted in a longer than usual annual outage. For the other four units the availability figures were close to, or exceeded, those of previous years. The energy utilization was, however, lowered due to load reduction in autumn resulting from unusually high production by the hydro-electric power plants. The steam generator replacement at Beznau enabled an increase in electrical power of about 2% without increase in reactor power. With the approval of the Swiss government in December 1992, the output of the Muehleberg power plant was increased in two stages by a total of 10%. The application for an unlimited operating license for Beznau Unit 2, and for a power uprate at the Leibstadt power plant, are still pending. The average number of scrams at the Swiss plants remained stable, at less than one scram per reactor year. As a result of experience in the Swedish nuclear power plant at Barsebaeck, the suction strainers of the emergency core cooling systems of the boiling water reactors at Muehleberg and Leibstadt were replaced by strainers with larger surface areas. The re-inspection of crack indications previously detected in the core shroud of the Muehleberg reactor and the penetration tubes in the reactor pressure vessel closure head of Beznau revealed no growth during the intervening operating periods. Following the completion of installation activities during the annual outages at Beznau Unit 1, Goesgen and Leibstadt, all Swiss nuclear power plants are now equipped with filtered containment venting systems. (author) figs., tabs

  12. Unmanned operation of Hydro Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regula, E.

    2008-01-01

    Intentions to launch unmanned operation are no news, the very first occurred in Hydro Power Plants (HPP) at the time when the first computer technology was implemented into process of power generation, i.e. no later than in 1960 s . ENEL entering Slovenske elektrarne not only revived but significantly accelerated the implementation process of unmanned operation. Experience of ENEL says that unmanned operation means better reliability of the HPP and this is the priority. (author)

  13. Operation control device for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Osamu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To render the controlling functions of a central control console more centralized by constituting the operation controls for a nuclear power plant with computer systems having substantially independent functions such as those of plant monitor controls, reactor monitor management and CRT display and decreasing interactions between each of the systems. Constitution: An input/output device for the input of process data for a nuclear power plant and indication data for a plant control console is connected to a plant supervisory and control computer system and a display computer system, the plant supervisory control computer system and a reactor and management computer system are connected with a CRT display control device, a printer and a CRT display input/output device, and the display computer system is connected with the CRT display control device and the CRT display unit on the central control console, whereby process input can be processed and displayed at high speed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  14. Increasing operational efficiency in a radioactive waste processing plant - 16100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, T.W.; Watson, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    The solid waste plant at Harwell in Oxfordshire, contains a purpose built facility to input, assay, visually inspect and sort remote handled intermediate level radioactive waste (RHILW). The facility includes a suite of remote handling cells, known as the head-end cells (HEC), which waste must pass through in order to be repackaged. Some newly created waste from decommissioning works on site passes through the cells, but the vast majority of waste for processing is historical waste, stored in below ground tube stores. Existing containers are not suitable for long term storage, many are already badly corroded, so the waste must be efficiently processed and repackaged in order to achieve passive safety. The Harwell site is currently being decommissioned and the land is being restored. The site is being progressively de-licensed, and redeveloped as a business park, which can only be completed when all the nuclear liabilities have been removed. The recovery and processing of old waste in the solid waste plant is a key project linked to de-licensing of a section of the site. Increasing the operational efficiency of the waste processing plant could shorten the time needed to clear the site and has the potential to save money for the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The waste processing facility was constructed in the mid 1990's, and commissioned in 1999. Since operations began, the yearly throughput of the cells has increased significantly every year. To achieve targets set out in the lifetime plan (LTP) for the site, throughput must continue to increase. The operations department has measured the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) of the process for the last few years, and has used continuous improvement techniques to decrease the average cycle time. Philosophies from operational management practices such as 'lean' and 'kaizen' have been employed successfully to drive out losses and increase plant efficiency. This paper will describe how the solid waste plant

  15. Development of JOYO Plant Operation Management Expert Tool (JOYPET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michino, Masanobu; Terano, Toshihiro; Hanawa, Mikio; Aoki, Hiroshi; Okubo, Toshiyuki

    2000-03-01

    The Operation and Maintenance Support Systems for JOYO are being developed, with the aim of ensuring the stable and safe operation of JOYO and improving operational reliability of future FBR plants. Plant Operation Management Expert Tool named JOYPET had been developed as one of the Operation and Maintenance Support Systems, which helps plant operation management. The following functions were developed and applied. (1) Papers management (Plant status management) function for maintenance activities, (2) Isolation management support function for plant operation, (3) Automatically drawing function of plant operation schedule, (4) Isolation judgment function for plant operation. By use this system, the plant management of JOYO was able to improved reliability and reduced manpower. (author)

  16. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Components Under NRC's Export Licensing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant... 110—Illustrative List of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority 1. Assemblies and components especially designed or prepared for use in gas centrifuges. Note: The...

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-275 and 50-323)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    Supplement 34 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG ampersand E) for licenses to operate Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-275 and 50-323, respectively) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement documents the NRC staff review of the Long-Term Seismic Program conducted by PG ampersand E in response to License Condition 2.C.(7) of Facility Operating License DPR-80, the Diablo Canyon Unit 1 operating license. 111 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs

  18. Concept licensing procedure for an HTR-module nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, G.; Will, M.

    1990-01-01

    In April 1987 the companies Siemens and Interatom applied in the West German state of Lower Saxony for a concept licensing procedure to be initiated for an HTR-Module nuclear power plant. In addition to a safety analysis report, numerous additional papers were submitted to the authorized experts. In April 1989 proceedings were suspended for political and legal reasons. By this time both the fire protection report and the plant security concept report had been completed. The safety concept review was continued by order of the Federal Minister for Research and Technology. The draft safety concept report was completed in July 1989. The final version was completed at the end of 1989. (orig.)

  19. Artificial intelligence aid to efficient plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildberger, A.M.; Pack, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    As the nuclear power industry matures, it is becoming more and more important that plants be operated in an efficient, cost-effective manner, without, of course, any decrease in the essential margins of safety. Indeed, most opportunities for improved efficiency have little or no relation to nuclear safety, but are based on trade-offs among operator controllable parameters both within and external to the reactor itself. While these trade-offs are describable in terms of basic physical theory, thermodynamics, and the mathematics of control systems, their actual application is highly plant specific and influenced even by the day-to-day condition of the various plant components. This paper proposes the use of artificial intelligence techniques to construct a computer-based expert assistant to the plant operator for the purpose of aiding him in improving the efficiency of plant operation on a routine basis. The proposed system, which only advises the human operator, seems more amenable to the current regulatory approach than a truly automated control system even if the latter provides for manual override

  20. VGH Mannheim: legitimacy of the decommissioning license for a nuclear power plant; VGH Mannheim: Rechtmaessigkeit der Stilllegungsgenehmigung fuer ein Kernkraftwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2015-03-16

    The contribution describes the details of the court (VGH) decision on the legitimacy of the decommissioning license for the NPP Obrigheim. Inhabitants of the neighborhood (3 to 4.5 km distance from the NPP) are suspect hazards for life, health and property due to the dismantling of the nuclear power plant in case of an accident during the licensed measures or a terroristic attack with radioactive matter release.

  1. Operator training simulator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozuka, Hiromi

    1977-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, training of the operators is important. In Japan, presently there are two training centers, one is BWR operation training center at Okuma-cho, Fukushima Prefecture, and another the nuclear power generation training center in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture, where the operators of PWR nuclear power plants are trained. This report describes the BWR operation training center briefly. Operation of a nuclear power plant is divided into three stages of start-up, steady state operation, and shut down. Start-up is divided into the cold-state start-up after the shut down for prolonged period due to periodical inspection or others and the hot-state start-up from stand-by condition after the shut down for a short time. In the cold-state start-up, the correction of reactivity change and the heating-up control to avoid excessive thermal stress to the primary system components are important. The BWR operation training center offers the next three courses, namely beginner's course, retraining course and specific training course. The training period is 12 weeks and the number of trainees is eight/course in the beginner's course. The simulator was manufactured by modeling No. 3 plant of Fukushima First Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co. The simulator is composed of the mimic central control panel and the digital computer. The software system comprises the monitor to supervise the whole program execution, the logic model simulating the plant interlock system and the dynamic model simulating the plant physical phenomena. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Licensing of the Process Uranium Plant Mineral, Retortillo-Santidad; Licenciamiento de la Planta de Proceso de Mineral de Uranio Retortillo-Sanidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez Arroyo, E.; Colilla Peletero, J.; Bellon del Rosal, F.; Mancipe Jimenez, D. C.; Garrido Delgado, C.; Garcia-Bermejo Fernandez, R.

    2013-07-01

    Berkeley Minera Spain, S.A. provides for the operation of the concession Retortillo-Santidad (Salamanca) mining and construction of a beneficiation plant of uranium ore, for the production of uranium concentrate (Yellow cake). In Spain, the project Quercus, ENUSA, obtained the last prior authorization in 1979. Since then, there has been a continuous evolution in the aspects technical and regulatory. This paper is the documentation and content necessary for the licensing of a uranium production plant. In particular, to obtain the prior authorization as radioactive installation of 1st category (RINR).

  3. New trends in the evaluation and implementation of the safety-related operating experience associated with NRC-licensed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelson, C.; Heltemes, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This article is an overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission program for the evaluation and dissemination of the safety-related operating experience associated with all NRC-licensed reactors. It discusses the historical background and past problems that led to the recent formation of NRC's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) and details its activities, organization, staffing, and proposed analysis and evaluation methodology. The programs of industry organizations and nuclear plant licensees and the integration of foreign operating experience are included in the overview. The problems and limitations of the Licensee Event Report (LER) program and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data system program are discussed. The AEOD analysis and evaluation methodology program includes some new improvements in the assessment of safety-related operating experience. Of particular note is the sequence coding and search procedure being developed by AEOD under a contract with the Nuclear Safety Information Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This computer-based retrieval system will have markedly improved search strategy capability for such items as commoncause failures or complex system interactions involving various failure sequences and other relationships associated with an event. The system retrieves failure data and information on the principal LER occurrence and on related component and system responses. The computer-generated Power Reactor Watch List enables AEOD to monitor all critical or unusual situations warranting close attention because of potential public health and safety. This listing is supported by a preestablished computer search strategy of the historical data base permitting identification of all past events and statistical information that are applicable to the situation being watched

  4. Backfitting possibilities of process instrumentation during planning, construction or operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.E.; Schemmel, R.R.; Warren, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The necessity for backfitting existing C and I equipment in nuclear power plants arises as a result of new licensing requirements being imposed or through a need for improved performance as experience with operating plants becomes available. These changes arise either because additional process variables need to be monitored; improved sensors need to be installed (to increase safety or operating margin); more directly sense the processes; or to address concerns in signal conditioning, control algorithms, control system strategy, or safety system design. This paper discusses examples of backfitting experiences on existing plants and some being developed for future improvements

  5. Permanent cessation of Tokai power plant's operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.

    1998-01-01

    Tokai power plant (166MWe, Magnox type: GCR) is the first commercial reactor in Japan and has been kept operating stable since its commissioning in July 1996. During this period it has produced electricity of approximately 27.7 billion KWh (as of March 1997) and its stable operation has contributed greatly to the stable supply of electricity in Japan. Furthermore, technologies in various fields have been developed, demonstrated and accumulated through the construction and operation of Tokai power plant. It also contributes to training for many nuclear engineers, and constructions and operations of nuclear power stations by other Japanese power companies. As a pioneer, it has been achieved to develop and popularize Japanese nuclear power generation. On the other hand, Tokai power plant has small capacity in its electric power output, even though the size of the reactor and heat exchangers are rather bigger than those of LWR due to the characteristics of GCR. Therefore, the generation cost is higher than the LWR. Since there is no plant whose reactor type is the same as that of Tokai power plant, the costs for maintenance and fuel cycle are relatively higher than that of LWR. Finally we concluded that the longer we operate it, the less we can take advantage of it economically. As a result of the evaluation for the future operation of Tokai power plant including the current status for supply of electricity by the Japanese utilities and study of decommissioning by Japanese government, we decided to have a plan of stopping its commercial operation of Tokai power plant in the end of March, 1998, when we completely consume its fuel that we possess. From now on, we set about performing necessary studies and researches on the field of plant characterization, remote-cutting, waste disposal for carrying out the decommissioning of Tokai power plant safely and economically. We are going to prepare the decommissioning planning for Tokai power plant in a few years based on the

  6. Allocation of responsibilities between central and local authorities concerning nuclear power plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines Belgian regulations on licences to construct and operate nuclear power plants in the context of implementation of the 1980 Act concerning regionalisation. It also reviews the relevant nuclear legislation in certain other countries. (NEA) [fr

  7. CANDU 9 operator plant display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueman, R.; Webster, A.; MacBeth, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    To meet evolving client and regulatory needs, AECL has adopted an evolutionary approach to the design of the CANDU 9 control centre. That is, the design incorporates feedback from existing stations, reflects the growing diversity in the roles and responsibilities of the operating staff, and reduces costs associated with plant capital and operations, maintenance and administration (OM and A), through the appropriate introduction of new technologies. Underlying this approach is a refined engineering design process that cost-effectively integrates operational feedback and human factors engineering to define the operating staff information and information presentation requirements. Based on this approach, the CANDU 9 control centre will provide utility operating staff with the means to achieve improved operations and reduced OM and A costs. One of the design features that will contribute to the improved operational capabilities of the control centre is a new Plant Display System (PDS) that is separate from the digital control system. The PDS will be used to implement non-safety panel, and console video display systems within the CANDU 9 main control room (MCR). This paper presents a detailed description of the CANDU 9 Plant Display System and features that provide increased operational capabilities. (author)

  8. The critical safety functions and plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Church, J.F.; Porter, N.J.; Cross, M.T.; Guinn, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    The paper outlines the operator's role in nuclear safety and introduces the concept of ''safety functions''. Safety functions are a group of actions that prevent core melt or minimize radiation releases to the general public. They can be used to provide a hierarchy of practical plant protection that an operator should use. ''An accident identical to that at Three Mile Island is not going to happen again'', said the Rogovin investigators. The concepts put forward in this paper are intended to help the operator avoid serious consequence from the next unexpected threat. On the basis of the safety evaluation, the operator has three roles in assuring that the consequences of an event will be no worse than the predicted acceptable results. These three operator roles are: first, maintain plant setup in readiness to properly respond; second, operate the plant in a manner such that fewer, milder events minimize the frequency and the severity of adverse events; third, the operator needs to monitor the plant to verify that the safety functions are accomplished. The operator needs a systematic approach to mitigating the consequences of an event. The concept of ''safety function'' introduces that systematic approach and prevents a hierarchy of protection. If the operator has difficulty in identifying an event for any reason, the systematic safety function approach allows ones to accomplish the overall path of mitigating consequences. There are ten identified functions designed to protect against core melt, preserve containment integrity, prevent indirect release of radioactivity, and maintain vital auxiliaries needed to support the other safety functions. The paper describes in detail the operator's role and the safety functions, and provides many examples of the use of alternative success paths to accomplish the safety function

  9. Method of operating a nuclear turbine plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiraku; Ootawara, Yasuhiko; Imai, Tetsu

    1985-04-25

    A method is presented to prevent the lowering in the reactor feedwater temperature thereby secure necessary amount of steams even in a plant operation under low load. The feedwater temperature of a nuclear reactor is detected at the low load region of the plant and high enthalpy steams are supplied to a high pressure feedwater heater by opening a supply stream extract switching valve. This enables to maintain the feedwater temperature in the nuclear reactor at a constant level.

  10. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of October 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the Errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  11. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 07-31-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  12. Opportunistic tri-band carrier aggregation in licensed spectrum for multi-operator 5G hetnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymuk, Taras; Kyryk, Maryan; Klymash, Mykhailo; Jo, Minho; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Kotyra, Andrzej; Zhanpeisova, Aizhan; Kozbekova, Ainur

    2017-08-01

    Increasing capacity of mobile networks is a real challenge due to rapid increasing of traffic demands and spectrum scarcity. Carrier aggregation technology is aimed to increase the user data rate by combining the throughput of few spectrum bands, even if they are not physically collocated. Utilization of unlicensed Wi-Fi 5 GHz band for mobile transmission opens new perspectives for carrier aggregation due to vast amount of spectrum range, which can be available for aggregation to supplement data rates for end users. There are many solutions proposed to enable mobile data transmission in unlicensed band without disturbing interference for the existing Wi-Fi users. The paper presents a new approach for opportunistic carrier aggregation in licensed and unlicensed band for multi-operator 5G network. It allows multiple network operators to utilize unlicensed spectrum opportunistically if it is not currently used by Wi-Fi or other mobile network operators. Performance of the proposed approach has been simulated in case of two competing operators. Simulation results reveal that applying the proposed method ensures achieving satisfactory performance of carrier aggregation for the case of two network operators.

  13. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of August 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of May 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, I.

    1988-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resource Management from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operation units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by the NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  15. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of 3-31-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the Errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  16. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of April 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  17. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of December 31, 1985. Volume 10, No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the Errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  18. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, P.

    1986-08-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. (author)

  19. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosson, C.

    1989-05-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  20. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.; Koponen, H.; Nevander, O.; Paltemaa, R.; Poellaenen, I.; Rannila, P.; Valtonen, K.; Vilkamo, O.

    1988-02-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  1. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimburger, H.

    1988-08-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  2. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.

    1985-09-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and capacity factors of the plants. (author)

  3. Wind power plant in grid operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heier, S.

    1993-01-01

    There are new prospects for electrical energy supply in coastal regions and on islands if one succeeds in integrating the available wind energy, dependent on the weather, into existing and to be developed supply structures. Apart from the supply of energy, effects on the grid and on the electrical consumer are gaining in importance. For wind power plants, the operating behaviour is appreciably determined by the electro-technical concept. The mechanical/electrical energy conversion with the corresponding grid connection and plant control play an important part here. Results of measurements and computer simulation make the differences in the behaviour of wind power plants clear. (orig.) [de

  4. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.; Lehtinen, P.

    1985-11-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. (author)

  5. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.

    1988-09-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hzard to the personnel or the environment

  6. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tubulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  7. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.

    1985-01-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants in the second quarter of the year 1984 concentrates on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and availability of the plants. (author)

  8. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost all the time in the first quarter of 1992. The load factor average was 99.8%. All events which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale were level 0/below scale on the Scale. Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site remained well below authorised limits. Only quantities of radioactive material insignificant to radiation exposure, originating from the nuclear power plants, were detected in samples collected in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants

  9. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.

    1985-05-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants in the third quarter of the year 1984 concentrates on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and capacity factors of the plants. (author)

  10. NUMARC view of license renewal criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act and the implementing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) permit the renewal of nuclear plant operating licenses upon expiration of their 40-year license term. However, the regulatory process by which license renewal may be accomplished and the requirements for the scope and content of renewal applications are yet to be established. On August 29, 1988, the NRC published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding the subject of license renewal. This Advanced Notice and the NUREG which it references, NUREG-1317, Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal, provide the most recent regulatory thought on this issue. The basic issue addressed by NUREG-1317 is the definition of an adequate licensing basis for the renewal of a plant license. The report contemplates three alternatives in this regard. This paper discusses each of these three proposals. The NUMARC NUPLEX Working Group endorses a license renewal process based on a plant's current licensing basis along with an evaluation of the pertinent components, systems, and structures affected by age-related degradation. The NUMARC NUPLEX Working group believes that an appropriate scope for NRC review of the license renewal application should focus on those safety-significant structures systems, and components subject to significant age-related degradation that are not subject to existing recognized effective replacement, refurbishment, or inspection programs. The paper also briefly discusses NUMARC's view of the role of the Backfit Rule in the license renewal process

  11. Computer simulation of thermal plant operations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Kelly, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book describes thermal plant simulation, that is, dynamic simulation of plants which produce, exchange and otherwise utilize heat as their working medium. Directed at chemical, mechanical and control engineers involved with operations, control and optimization and operator training, the book gives the mathematical formulation and use of simulation models of the equipment and systems typically found in these industries. The author has adopted a fundamental approach to the subject. The initial chapters provide an overview of simulation concepts and describe a suitable computer environment.

  12. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-08-01

    In the Quarterly Reports on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants such events and observations are described relating to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the plants' workers and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in commercial operation during the whole first quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 99.1 %. Failures have been detected in the uppermost spacing lattices of nuclear fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors. Further investigations into the significance of the failures have been initiated. In this quarter, renewed cooling systems for the instrumentation area were introduced at Loviisa 1. The modifications made in the systems serve to ensure reliable cooling of the area even during the hottest summer months when the possibility exists that the temperature of the automation equipment could rise too high causing malfunctions which could endanger plant safety. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below prescribed limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  13. NRC licensing speedup. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, June 18, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Joseph Hendrie, Acting Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was the principal witness at a June 18, 1981 hearing on whether the NRC is responsible for idling and delaying nuclear plants at a high cost to consumers. Congress is considering an interim licensing procedure that will allow plants to operate before safety hearings are completed. NRC evidence suggests that most plant delays are only projected ones, and that utilities must bear the blame for slippage in most construction schedules. Mr. Hendrie discussed the status of the nine impacted plants on the NRC list and outlined steps the Commission is taking to improve efficiency without impairing safety. His testimony and letters, statements, and other materials submitted for the record make up the hearing report

  14. Academic training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increasing emphasis being placed upon academic training of nuclear power plant operators, it is important that institutions of higher education develop and implement programs which will meet the educational needs of operational personnel in the nuclear industry. Two primary objectives must be satisfied by these programs if they are to be effective in meeting the needs of the industry. One objective is for academic quality. The other primary objective is for programs to address the specialized needs of the nuclear plant operator and to be relevant to the operator's job. The Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University, therefore, has developed a total program for these objectives, which delivers the programs, and/or appropriate parts thereto, at ten nuclear plant sites and with other plants in the planning stage. The Center for Nuclear Studies program leads to a Bachelor of Professional Studies degree in nuclear industrial operations, which is offered through the university college of Memphis State University

  15. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised

  16. Survey of extreme load design regulatory agency licensing requirements for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J D

    1976-04-01

    Since 1965, when extreme load requirements began to be considered explicitly in nuclear power plant design, there has been a gradual divergence in requirements imposed by national regulatory agencies. However, nuclear plant safety is an international problem because of the potential international effects of any postulated plant failure. For this reason this paper has been prepared in an attempt to highlight the differences in national criteria currently used in the extreme load design of nuclear plant facilities. No attempt has been made to evaluate the relative merit of the criteria established by the various national regulatory agencies. This paper presents the results of a recent survey made of national atomic energy regulatory agencies and major nuclear steam supply design agencies, which requested a summary of current licensing criteria associated with earthquake, extreme wind (tornado), flood, airplane crash and accident (pipe break) loads applicable within the various national jurisdictions. Also presented are a number of comparisons which are meant to illustrate the differences in national regulatory criteria.

  17. Survey of extreme load design regulatory agency licensing requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Since 1965, when extreme load requirements began to be considered explicitly in nuclear power plant design, there has been a gradual divergence in requirements imposed by national regulatory agencies. However, nuclear plant safety is an international problem because of the potential international effects of any postulated plant failure. For this reason this paper has been prepared in an attempt to highlight the differences in national criteria currently used in the extreme load design of nuclear plant facilities. No attempt has been made to evaluate the relative merit of the criteria established by the various national regulatory agencies. This paper presents the results of a recent survey made of national atomic energy regulatory agencies and major nuclear steam supply design agencies, which requested a summary of current licensing criteria associated with earthquake, extreme wind (tornado), flood, airplane crash and accident (pipe break) loads applicable within the various national jurisdictions. Also presented are a number of comparisons which are meant to illustrate the differences in national regulatory criteria. (Auth.)

  18. 77 FR 33782 - License Amendment To Construct and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium One Americas; Ludeman AGENCY: Nuclear... provided the first time that a document is referenced. The Ludeman facility In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery... request to amend Source Material License SUA-1341 to construct and operate a new in situ leach uranium...

  19. CNRA/CSNI workshop on licensing and operating experience of computer-based I and C systems - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The OECD Workshop on Licensing and Operating Experience of Computer-Based I and C Systems, was sponsored by both the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It was organised in collaboration with the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB), the Czech Power Board CEZ a.s., I and C Energo a.s. and the Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague. The objectives of the Workshop were to exchange the experience gained by both the regulators and the industry in different countries in the licensing and operation of computer-based I and C systems, to discuss the existing differences in their licensing approaches in various countries, to consider the safety aspects of their practical use, and to discuss the ways of promoting future international co-operation in the given area. The scope of the Workshop included: - review of the progress made since the CNRA/CSNI workshop which was held in 1996 - current and future regulatory needs and/or requirements for the computer-based I and C systems - progress made in software life cycle activities, including verification and validation, and safety/hazards analysis - benefits of applying the computer-based I and C systems to improve plant performance and safety. The Technical Sessions and Discussion Sessions covered the following topics: Opening Session: Advances made in the use and planning of computer-based I and C systems; Topic 1: National and international standards and guides for computer-based safety systems; Topic 2: Regulatory aspects; Topic 3: Analysis and assessment of digital I and C systems; Topic 4: Software life cycle activities; Topic 4: Experience with applications, system aspects, potential limits and future trends and needs; Final Session: Workshop summary. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for people with experience in licensing, developing, manufacturing, implementing, maintaining or

  20. Contestable Licensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zvika Neeman; Gerhard O. Orosel

    2000-01-01

    We analyze a model of repeated franchise bidding for natural monopoly with contestable licensing - a franchisee halds an (exclusive) license to operate a franchise until another rm offers to pay more for it. In a world where quality is observable but not veri able, the simple regulatory scheme we describe combines market-like incentives with regulatory oversight to generate efficient outcomes.

  1. Experiences Gained from Independent Assessment in Licensing of Advanced I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Arndt B.; Wach, Dieter H.

    2003-01-01

    Operational benefits and enlarged functionality of modern technology, but also the physical and the technological aging of conventional instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, are motivations for modernization of I and C systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). In case of safety-relevant I and C systems, the licensing authorities require the demonstration of sufficient safety of the systems.In several countries ongoing research and development projects are directed to provide a scientific basis and engineering solutions for cost-effective assessment of software-based I and C systems important to safety in NPPs. International initiatives have been started to develop a harmonized safety assessment methodology. The Institute for Safety Technology (ISTec) has been engaged in national and international programs as well as in establishing a two-phase qualification approach, which comprises a generic plant-independent qualification of hardware and software components and a plant-specific system qualification phase.In both generic qualification and plant-specific system qualification, ISTec has been involved as an independent third-party assessor for the relevant state authority. This paper reports experiences from the ISTec involvement in the assessment projects, e.g., in the assessment of the I and C important to safety in the new German High-Flux Research Reactor (FRM-2) in Munich and in the assessments of I and C modernization in NPPs of foreign countries (Bohunice, Slovak Republic; Paks, Hungary; and others). Conclusions are drawn from the experiences with respect to the practicability of the two-phase qualification concept and from the major findings in the plant-specific I and C assessments

  2. Load-following operation of PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jong Hwa; Oh, Soo Yul; Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-01

    The load-following operation of nuclear power plants will become inevitable due to the increased nuclear share in the total electricity generation. As a groundwork for the load-following capability of the Korean next generation PWRs, the state-of-the-art has been reviewed. The core control principles and methods are the main subject in this review as well as the impact of load-following operations on the fuel performance and on the mechanical integrity of components. To begin with, it was described what the load-following operation is and in what view point the technology should be reviewed. Afterwards the load-following method, performance and problems in domestic 900 MWe class PWRs were discussed, and domestic R and D works were summarized. Foreign technologies were also reviewed. They include Mode G and Mode X of Foratom, D and L bank method of KWU, the method using PSCEA of ABB-CE, and MSHIM of Westinghouse. The load-following related special features of Foratom`s N4 plant, KWU`s plants, ABB-CE`s Systems 80+, and Westinghouse`s AP600 were described in each technology review. The review concluded that the capability of N4 plant with Mode X is the best and the methods in System, 80+ and AP600 would require verifications for the continued and usual load-following operation. It was recommended that the load-following operation experiences in domestic PWRs under operation be required to settle down the capability for the future. In addition, a more enhanced technology is required for the Korean next generation PWR regardless what the reference plant concept is. 30 figs., 19 tabs., 75 refs. (Author).

  3. Community engagement as conflict prevention: Understanding the social license to operate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knih, Dejana

    This thesis examines community engagement as a form of conflict prevention in order to obtain the social license to operate (SLO) in Alberta's oil and gas industry. It does this by answering the question: what are the key elements of the Social License to Operate and how can these elements be applied to community engagement/consultation in a way that prevents conflicts in Alberta's oil and gas industry? The underlying assumption of this thesis is that building good relationships and working collaboratively functions as a form of conflict prevention and that this in turn leads to the SLO. This thesis outlines the key features of both successful community engagement and of the SLO, to provide a guideline for what is needed to obtain the SLO. Data was collected from semi-structured interviews and through a literature review. The data analysis concluded that there are direct parallels between the key elements of effective community engagement and the key elements of the SLO as identified in the interviews. These parallels are: knowing the community, addressing community needs, corporate social responsibility, relationship building, follow through and evidence for what has been done, executive buy-in, excellent communication, and open dialogue, all within a process which is principled (there is trust, understanding, transparency and respect), inclusive, dynamic, flexible, ongoing, and long-term. Moreover, the key elements of effective community engagement and of the SLO identified in the interviews also overlapped with those found in the literature review, with only one exception. The literature review explicitly named early involvement as a key element of both effective community engagement and the SLO, whereas the interview participants only explicitly indicated it as a key factor of community engagement and implied it to be a key element of the SLO.

  4. Preliminary statement on general policy for rulemaking to improve nuclear power plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    In June 1977 an NRC study group seeking to identify ways to improve the effectiveness of NRC nuclear power plant licensing procedures, recommended (among other measures) that rulemaking should be considered for the generic resolution of certain major issues that are presently litigated in individual licensing proceedings (NUREG--0292). In response to a Commission directive, the staff prepared an interim statement of general policy and plans for rulemaking, which the Commission approved for publication n the Federal Register at Affirmation Session 78-7 held on October 26, 1978. This interim policy statement fully supports Executive Order 12044 of March 23, 1978, requesting improvement of existing and future government regulations so as to be as simple and clear as possible and avoid imposing unnecessary burdens on the economy, on individuals, on public and private organizations, or on State and local governments. This NUREG publication includes the full text of the Federal Register notice published concurrently. Also provided are Enclosures A and B which contain more complete information than is presented in the FR notice regarding the selection and discussion of issues proposed by the staff for generic rulemaking. However, the discussion of issues avoids being overly specific about the likely outcome of rulemaking in order to stimulate creative public and industry comments as desirable inputs to shaping the ultimate form of generic rules

  5. Summary and analysis of public comments on NUREG-1317: Regulatory options for nuclear plant license renewal: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.M.; Seth, S.S.

    1989-03-01

    On August 29, 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on nuclear plant license renewal and solicited public comments on NUREG-1317, ''Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal.'' NUREG-1317 presents a discussion of fifteen topics involving technical, environmental, and procedural issues and poses a set of related questions. As part of its ongoing task for the NRC, The MITRE Corporation has summarized and analyzed the public comments received. Fifty-three written comments were received. Of these, 83 percent were from nuclear industry representatives; the remaining comments represented federal and state agencies, public interest groups, and a private citizen

  6. Haddam Neck Plant. Annual operating report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Gross electrical power generated was 2,464,308 MWh(e) with the reactor on line 4,417 hrs. Information is presented concerning operations, power generation, shutdowns, corrective maintenance, primary coolant chemistry, occupational radiation exposure, release of radioactive materials, reportable occurrences, changes in plant, technical specifications, core vi start-up, containment leak testing, and core v and vi refueling

  7. A diagnosis system for plant operation support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundheimer, S.; Lorenzetti, J.; Lamana, C.

    1990-01-01

    The present article describes a diagnosis system for abnormal power plant events. The design is modular and uses a shell written in C languaje and a knowledge basis that can be changed easily. At present the system works with a reduced knowledge for primary and secondery leacks. The mitigation procedure is being written with the help of operation staff

  8. Improved core monitoring for improved plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.P.

    1987-01-01

    Westinghouse has recently installed a core on-line surveillance, monitoring and operations systems (COSMOS), which uses only currently available core and plant data to accurately reconstruct the core average axial and radial power distributions. This information is provided to the operator in an immediately usable, human-engineered format and is accumulated for use in application programs that provide improved core performance predictive tools and a data base for improved fuel management. Dynamic on-line real-time axial and radial core monitoring supports a variety of plant operations to provide a favorable cost/benefit ratio for such a system. Benefits include: (1) relaxation or elimination of certain technical specifications to reduce surveillance and reporting requirements and allow higher availability factors, (2) improved information displays, predictive tools, and control strategies to support more efficient core control and reduce effluent production, and (3) expanded burnup data base for improved fuel management. Such systems can be backfit into operating plants without changing the existing instrumentation and control system and can frequently be implemented on existing plant computer capacity

  9. Plant life management for long term operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The world's fleet of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is approximately 20 years old on average, and most plants are believed to be able to operate for 60 years or more. The design life of a NPP is typically 30 to 40 years. This may be extended by 10 to 20 years, or more, provided that the plant can demonstrate by analysis, trending, equipment and system upgrades, increased vigilance, testing, ageing management, and other means that license renewal presents no threat to public health and safety. The basic goal of Plant Life Management (PLiM) is to satisfy requirements for safe long-term supplies of electricity in an economically competitive way. The basic goal of the operating company and the owners to operate as long as economically reasonable and possible from safety point of view. PLiM is a management tool for doing that. PLiM is a system of programmes and procedures to satisfy safety requirements for safe operation and for power production in a competitive way and for time which is rational from technical and economical point of view. PLiM is not only a technical system, it is also an attitude of the operational company to keep the plant in operation as long as possible from safety and business point of view. The common objectives of PLiM assessment is to help and review the pre-conditions for PLiM and long-term operation approaches. PLiM should not be associated with extension of operational life-time of the NPP only. It is an owner's attitude and rational approach of the operating company to run the business economically and safely. The effectiveness of PLiM Programme can be assessed by three complementary kinds of assessment: self-assessment, peer review and comprehensive programme review by the plant owner/ operator. IAEA will provide the assessment service for peer review of PLiM. Preparation for a PLiM Assessment service will be initiated only after the IAEA has been formally approached by a MS and funding (e.g. an existing Technical cooperation project) has

  10. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This document catalogs roughly 5300 knowledges and abilities of reactor operators and senior reactor operators. It results from a reanalysis of much larger job-task analysis data base compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Knowledges and abilities are cataloged for 45 major power plant systems and 38 emergency evolutions, grouped according to 11 fundamental safety functions (e.g., reactivity control and reactor coolant system inventory control). With appropriate sampling from this catalog, operator licensing examinations having content validity can be developed. A structured sampling procedure for this catalog is under development by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and will be published as a companion document, ''Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations'' (NUREG-1121). The examinations developed by using the catalog and handbook will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55

  11. Assessment of job-related educational qualifications for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, L.M.; Melber, B.D.; White, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    This report identifies job-related educational qualifications for the nuclear power plant licensed operator positions of reactor operator (RO), senior reactor operator (SRO), and shift supervisor (SS). The extent to which college engineering curriculum covers job-related academic knowledge was assessed. The approach used was to have subject matter experts in the field of general and nuclear engineering curriculum systematically compare college engineering program content to specific academic knowledge identified by a job analysis as necessary for licensed operators. In addition, these experts made judgments concerning levels of formal engineering education necessary for application of knowledge on the job, based on job samples from a job analysis of activities under selected normal and emergency operating sequences

  12. Modeling Operating Modes for the Monju Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2012-01-01

    The specification of supervision and control tasks in complex processes requires definition of plant states on various levels of abstraction related to plant operation in start-up, normal operation and shut-down. Modes of plant operation are often specified in relation to a plant decomposition in...... for the Japanese fast breeder reactor plant MONJU....

  13. 76 FR 21917 - Biweekly Notice; Applications and Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses Involving No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... define a new time limit for restoring inoperable reactor coolant system (RCS) leakage detection... PWR [pressurized- water reactor] Operability Requirements and Actions for RCS Leakage Instrumentation... requirements for the RCS leakage detection instrumentation and reduces the time allowed for the plant to...

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-09-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear safety and radiation protection which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing modifications at the nuclear power plants and issues relating to the use of nuclear energy which are of general interest are also reported. The reports include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the first quarter of 1993, a primary feedwater system pipe break occurred at Loviisa 2, in a section of piping after a feedwater pump. The break was erosion-corrosion induced. Repairs and inspections interrupted power generation for seven days. On the International Nuclear Event Scale the event is classified as a level 2 incident. Other events in the first quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear safety and radiation protection

  15. Operating experience in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany kept their portion of power supply into the public grid system constant in 1983, compared to 1982. The generation had an absolute increase of 3.6% and amounts now to 65.9 TWh. Particularly mentioned should be the generation of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Plant which is holding the 'World Record' with 9.969 TWh. The availability of the plants was generally satisfactory, as far as long-term retrofit measures with long outage periods were not necessary, as it was the case in Brunsbuettel and Wuergassen. The planned retrofit phases have been completed in all power plants. As far as safety is concerned, there was no reason to recommended a change of the present fundamental planning- and operation aspects. (orig.) [de

  16. Licensing evaluation of CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants relative to U.S. regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erp, J.B. van

    1978-01-01

    Differences between the U.S. and Canadian approach to safety and licensing are discussed. U.S. regulatory requirements are evaluated as regards their applicability to CANDU-PHW reactors; vice-versa the CANDU-PHW reactor is evaluated with respect to current Regulatory Requirements and Guides. A number of design modifications are proposed to be incorporated into the CANDU-PHW reactor in order to facilitate its introduction into the U.S. These modifications are proposed solely for the purpose of maintaining consistency within the current U.S. regulatory system and not out of a need to improve the safety of current-design CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants. A number of issues are identified which still require resolution. Most of these issues are concerned with design areas not (yet) covered by the ASME code. (author)

  17. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of March 31, 1986. Volume 10, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, Items 20 through 24 in Section 2, the vendor capacity factors on page 1-7, and actual vs potential energy production on page 1-2 are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation on page 1-2 are computed as a arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely recomputed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics. It is hoped this status report proves informative and helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in analyzing trends in the nuclear industry which might have safety implications, or in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  18. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of October 31, 1985. Volume 9, No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, Items 20 through 24 in Section 2, the vendor capacity factors on page 1-7, and actual vs potential energy production on page 1-2 are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation on page 1-2 are computed as an arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely re-computed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics

  19. Operating the plant, quality assurance, and the job of the operating staff, Volume Twelve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes operating the plant (the role of the operator, the control room, plant technical specifications, plant operating procedures, initial startup program, BWR/PWR plant startup, BWR/PWR steady state power operation, BWR/PWR transient operation, emergency operation), quality assurance (what is quality, what is quality control, quality assurance includes quality control, government regulation and quality assurance, administrative controls for nuclear power plants, the necessity of reviews and audits, practical quality assurance), and the job of the operating staff (the plant operating staff, plant safety, first aid and resuscitation, general plant hazards, personnel protective equipment, handling chemicals, handling compressed gas, equipment repair and maintenance, communicating with others

  20. Outline and operations of benzene plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, S; Hirooka, N; Nakamura, M; Goto, T

    1983-01-01

    An account is given of plant which can process 130,000 tonnes of by-product coke oven gas light oil (GLO) per year (via hydrodesulfurization, extraction and distillation) to produce benzene, toluene and xylene. The flowsheets and component equipment of the various production processes are explained, together with special features such as the production of hydrogen from coke oven gas by the PSA process and the processing of GLO by the ARCO process. Plant operation is outlined and the results of performance tests are noted.

  1. Kursk ASSET brings praise for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    An Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) visited Kursk on 19-31 July 1992 - the first time such a group had been to a RBMK reactor site. Kursk is a four unit station and the IAEA Team was able to consider safety significant events over its 45 reactor-year history. all four units have good operating records, with lifetime load factors of 70-80%. The ASSET's aim was to consider the plants current safety provisions for prevention of accidents and incidents. ASSET recommendations may cover the design and operability of the plant, personnel or operating procedures. At Kursk the Team found that ''highly qualified plant management and a very dedicated and knowledgeable operating staff'' was a major asset. They found a sound maintenance programme although some aspects of the facility appeared neglected. This was attributed to Russian industrial priorities that focused on functionality rather than appearance. it was in the test and maintenance personnel that the ASSET mission found the safety culture weakest. Some of their recommendations are reported in this article. (Author)

  2. Decontamination of operational nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    In order to reduce the radiation fields around nuclear power plants, and, consequently, to limit the radiation exposure of and dose commitments to the operating and maintenance personnel, the contamination build-up should be kept to a minimum. The most fruitful approach, from the point of view of economics and efficiency, is to tackle the problems of contamination and decontamination in the design and construction phases of the reactor. To do this, knowledge gained from the operation of existing power reactors should be used to make improvements in new designs. New structural materials with low corrosion rates or whose constituents are not activated by neutrons should also be used. For older reactors, in most cases it is already too late to incorporate design changes without extensive and expensive modifications. For these plants, decontamination remains the most efficient way to reduce radiation fields. The aim of this report is to deal with the different decontamination methods that may be applied to nuclear power plant circuits and equipment during operation. The factors that have to be considered in determining the type and the extent of the methods used are the engineering and the planning of the decontamination operation and the treatment of the resulting waste generated during the process are also discussed

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-12-01

    During the second quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1 and the resulting inspections and repairs at both Loviisa plant units brought about an outage the overall duration of which was 32 days. The annual maintenance outages of the TVO plant units were arranged during the report period and their combined duration was 31.5 days. Nuclear electricity accounted for 35.3% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 83.0%. Three events occurred during the report period which are classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale: feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1, control rod withdrawal at TVO I in a test during an outage when the hydraulic scram system was rendered inoperable and erroneous fuel bundle transfers during control rod drives maintenance at TVO II. Other events during this quarter are classified as Level Zero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. Only small amounts of nuclides originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  4. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-12-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations related to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing plant modifications and general matters relating to the use of nuclear energy are also reported. A summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, and tabulated data on the plants' production and their load factors are also given. At the Loviisa 1 plant unit one of two specially-backed AC busbars was lost during the second quarter of 1993. A ca. 30 minute voltage break caused malfunctions in the plant unit's electrical equipment and rendered inoperable certain components important to safety. The event is rated on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) at level 1. In inspections carried out at TVO II during the annual maintenance outage, the number of cracks detected in control rod structural material was higher than usual. When cracks occur, part of boron carbide, the power regulating medium in control rods, may wash into the reactor water and control rod shutdown capability may be impaired. The event is rated on the INES at level 1. Other events in the second quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  5. Licensing and regulatory control of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurer, H.

    1975-01-01

    Legal basis; licensing requirements by the Atomic Energy Act, national law, international law and recommendations, and by technical rules and standards; licensing process: types of licences, responsibilities, sequence of the procedure; role of technical advisory bodies, enforcement of licensing actions. (HP) [de

  6. Licensing and Operations of the Clive, Utah Low-Level Containerized Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility- A Continuation of Excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, M. R.; Cade, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Envirocare's Containerized Waste Facility (CWF) is the first commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility to be licensed in the 21st century and the first new site to be opened and operated since the late 1970's. The licensing of this facility has been the culmination of over a decade's effort by Envirocare of Utah at their Clive, Utah site. With the authorization to receive and dispose of higher activity containerized Class A low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), this facility has provided critical access to disposal for the nuclear power industry, as well as the related research and medical communities. This paper chronicles the licensing history and operational efforts designed to address the disposal of containerized LLRW in accordance with state and federal regulations

  7. Licensing and Operations of the Clive, Utah Low-Level Containerized Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility- A Continuation of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, M. R.; Cade, M. S.

    2002-02-25

    Envirocare's Containerized Waste Facility (CWF) is the first commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility to be licensed in the 21st century and the first new site to be opened and operated since the late 1970's. The licensing of this facility has been the culmination of over a decade's effort by Envirocare of Utah at their Clive, Utah site. With the authorization to receive and dispose of higher activity containerized Class A low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), this facility has provided critical access to disposal for the nuclear power industry, as well as the related research and medical communities. This paper chronicles the licensing history and operational efforts designed to address the disposal of containerized LLRW in accordance with state and federal regulations.

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the full-term operating license for San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-206)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The safety evaluation report for the full-term operating license application filed by the Southern California Edison Company and the San Diego Gas and Electric Company has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in San Diego County, California. The staff has evaluated the issues related to the conversion of the provisional operating license to a full-term operating license and concluded that the facility can continue to be operated without endangering the health and safety of the public following the license conversion. 43 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Administrative controls and quality assurance for the operational phase of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This standard provides requirements and recommendations for an adminstrative controls and quality assurance program to help ensure that activities associated with nuclear power plant operation are carried out without undue risk to the health and safety of the public. This standard applies to all activities affecting those functions important to the safety of nuclear power plant structures, systems, and components. Activities included are: design changes, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning and decontaminating, erecting, installing, inspecting, testing, operating, maintaining, repairing, refueling, modifying and decomissioning. This standard is not specifically intended for application to test, mobile or experimental reactors, nor reactors not subject to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing

  10. 75 FR 53321 - Prospective Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Natural Plant Extracts From Incense Cedar as Pest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Natural Plant Extracts From Incense Cedar as Pest Control Agents and...,629,387, ``Compounds for Pest Control and Methods for Their Use,'' issued December 8, 2009; and U.S. Pat. No. 7,129,271, ``Compounds for Pest Control and Methods for Their Use,'' issued October 31, 2006...

  11. 76 FR 81994 - UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 52-016; NRC-2008-0250] UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3; Exemption 1.0 Background: UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE) submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission ) a...

  12. Plant status control - with an operational focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    In the Nuclear industry, we have done a very good job of designing, developing, constructing, and improving our nuclear facilities. We have, however, often been inconsistent in documenting the details of our facilities, clearly addressing the rules around facility operation, and controlling and tracking the temporary, or permanent changes to our facilities. The reality is, that once we build a facility, we then must operate the facility, for it to be viable. Further we must operate it safely and efficiently for the facility to produce its product, and be acceptable to the public. Unfortunately, when we design and build these large, complicated facilities, we cannot project all the nuances of facility operation, although we can recognize this potential gap, and prepare for it. In order to allow for the complexities of the real world, we must provide the individuals who are tasked with operating our nuclear facilities, with the tools and processes to deal with 'all the nuances' of facility operation. This discussion will focus on the concepts behind a key process for ensuring that we meet our design and operating needs for our facilities, as well as recognizing and dealing with the potential gaps. The key process is 'Plant Status Control', and the discussion will have a primary focus on the needs of the end users, that being the individuals that have the immediate and current accountability for control and safety of the facility, the equipment, the staff, and ultimately the public, that being our Operations staff, and the Shift Manager. (author)

  13. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-05-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole fourth quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 94.7 % (the whole year 90.9 %). All the events in the last annual quarter, which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale, were below scale/level 0. Also the events which occurred in the other quarters of the year 1991 were rated at the scale's lowest levels. Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site remained well below authorised limits. Only quantities of radioactive material insignificant to radiation exposure originating in nuclear power plants were detected in the samples collected in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1994-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of the Finnish NPPs describe nuclear and radiation safety related events and observations which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Safety improvements at the plants and general matters relating to the use of nuclear energy are also reported. A summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, and tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors are also given. One event during the last quarter of 1993 was rated on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) as level 1. During this event at Loviisa 2, the secondary circuit emergency feedwater system was erroneously isolated from automatic start-up readiness. The error went unnoticed for 4.5 hours. During 1993 one level 2 incident and three level 1 incidents occurred at the Finnish NPPs. (8 figs., 4 tabs.)

  15. Training of nuclear power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-04-01

    A collection is presented containing 11 papers submitted at a conference on the selection and education of specialists for operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The conference was attended by specialists from universities and colleges, research institutes and production plants. It debated the methods and aims of both general and specialized theoretical and practical personnel education, the proposals for teaching centre equipment, the use of simulators, computers and other aids in the teaching process; training on school reactors was included. A proposal was put forward of the system of education, the teaching process itself, the content of the basic theoretical subjects, and the method of testing pupils' knowledge. The importance was stressed of establishing a national coordination centre to safeguard the syllabus, methodology, teaching aids, and also the training proper. The system of personnel education in the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary, is presented as an example. (M.S.)

  16. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES).

  17. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES)

  18. Training for operators and plant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverge, J.; Moroni, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    For many years, EDF has been making a lot of efforts to develop and to provide appropriate training to each of the different categories of personnel who participate in nuclear power plants operation and maintenance. With regard to training related to incidents and accidents management, if is important, among others, to make the difference between training of personnel on shift (plant operating teams and safety engineers) and training of personnel who makes up the emergency response teams that would be called upon in the event of a nuclear accident. Because of different origins, different backgrounds and especially different functions if an accident occurs on a unit, these two populations need completely different trainings. The training that EDF provides to these two categories of personnel is presented separately in the following pages. In both cases, links between functions to be sustained and characteristics of the training are tried to be shown. In conclusion, general perspectives on training evolution in EDF are given. 8 refs

  19. Training device for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A simulated nuclear energy power plant system with visible internal working components comprising a reactor adapted to contain a liquid with heating elements submerged in the liquid and capable of heating the liquid to an elevated temperature, a steam generator containing water and a heat exchanger means to receive the liquid at an elevated temperature, transform the water to steam, and return the spent liquid to the reactor; a steam turbine receiving high energy steam to drive the turbine and discharging low energy steam to a condenser where the low energy steam is condensed to water which is returned to the steam generator; an electric generator driven by the turbine; indicating means to identify the physical status of the reactor and its contents; and manual and automatic controls to selectively establish normal or abnormal operating conditions in the reactor, steam generator, pressurizer, turbine, electric generator, condenser, and pumps; and to be selectively adjusted to bring the reactor to acceptable operating condition after being placed in an abnormal operation. This device is particularly useful as an education device in demonstrating nuclear reactor operations and in training operating personnel for nuclear reactor systems and also as a device for conducting research on various safety systems to improve the safety of nuclear power plants

  20. Shutdown requirements in licensing of research reactors and consequences for operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Stein, J.

    1983-01-01

    Most countries start their nuclear life with the setup of a research reactor. Most countries have at this time no licensing authority established which can act on existing laws, rules and regulations. Thus, most countries have during this starting phase to rely on the regulations fixed by international institutions such as the IAEA (or by national institutions as the former NRC in US, which happens to take place more often from reasons below). This implies a specific responsibility for international regulations since they have to be very clear and unique. Moreover they have to be applicable to all plants they are set forth for and they have to give no unavoidable restrictions on the use of the plant. Additionally some recheck of the rules based on national rules in forth will be of help. The enrichment reduction for research reactors gave frequent cause to look at the existing IAEA-publications for research reactors. They are laid down in the safety series no. 35 edited 1971. I will only discuss here specific parts of these considerations or requirements. Since the authors' personal impressions are that the published considerations are neither that clear nor that less restrictive as necessary the subsequent discussion is carried out. One of the confusing points of the existing IAEA-regulations is the lengthy discussion of reactivity considerations for critical assemblies first, no similar separate discussion for research reactors and a second discussion titled 'control-rod considerations' under the main title 'considerations applying to critical assemblies and research reactor'. This discussion will be restricted to the latter since the critical assemblies with their timely Constance of maximum excess reactivity do not present any problem for all shut-down conditions

  1. Expert systems to assist plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Mori, Nobuyuki; Wada, Norio

    1985-01-01

    Large-scale real-time process control systems, such as those for electric power dispatching, large thermal and nuclear power stations, steel mill plants and manufacturing automation systems, need expert systems to assist operator's decision. The expert systems newly developed to fulfill the requirement are founded on OKBS (object oriented knowledge based system). OKBS provides various object types: fuzzy logic type, production rule type, frame type, state transition type, abstract data type and input/output transformation type. (author)

  2. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-03-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole third quarter of 1991. Longer interruptions in electricity generation were caused by the annual maintenances of the Loviisa plant units. The load factor average was 81.7 %. In a test conducted during the annual maintenance outage of Loviisa 1 it was detected that the check valve of the discharge line of one pressurized emergency make-up tank did not open sufficiently at the tank's hydrostatic pressure. In connection with a 1988 modification, a too tightly dimensioned bearing had been mounted on the valve's axle rod and the valve had not been duly tested after the operation. The event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale). Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site were below authorised limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive materials originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  3. Streamlining the license renewal review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozier, J.; Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.

    2001-01-01

    The staff of the NRC has been developing three regulatory guidance documents for license renewal: the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (SRP-LR), and Regulatory Guide (RG) for Standard Format and Content for Applications to Renew Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses. These documents are designed to streamline the license renewal review process by providing clear guidance for license renewal applicants and the NRC staff in preparing and reviewing license renewal applications. The GALL report systematically catalogs aging effects on structures and components; identifies the relevant existing plant programs; and evaluates the existing programs against the attributes considered necessary for an aging management program to be acceptable for license renewal. The GALL report also provides guidance for the augmentation of existing plant programs for license renewal. The revised SRP-LR allows an applicant to reference the GALL report to preclude further NRC staff evaluation if the plant's existing programs meet the criteria described in the GALL report. During the review process, the NRC staff will focus primarily on existing programs that should be augmented or new programs developed specifically for license renewal. The Regulatory Guide is expected to endorse the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) guideline, NEI 95-10, Revision 2, entitled 'Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule', which provides guidance for preparing a license renewal application. This paper will provide an introduction to the GALL report, SRP-LR, Regulatory Guide, and NEI 95-10 to show how these documents are interrelated and how they will be used to streamline the license renewal review process. This topic will be of interest to domestic power utilities considering license renewal and international ICONE participants seeking state-of-the-art information about license renewal in the United States

  4. The intelligent customer: considerations around build-own-operate business and licensing models for small modular reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.

    2014-01-01

    An organization planning a proposal for a build-own-operate business model needs to address expanded licensee responsibilities under this model, associated regulatory impacts and how this affects their role as an 'intelligent customer'. This is particularly important for cases where builder-owner-operators plan to manufacture factory-fuelled designs and ship them to a site for installation and operation. The primary responsibility for safe conduct of licensed activities rests with the licensee. A build-own-operate model expands the scope of licensed activities to include design, manufacturing, transport, construction, and operation. The licensee must be able to demonstrate they are qualified to conduct all licensed activities including sufficient competent resources within the licensee's organization to oversee('Intelligent Customer') any work it commissions externally and the subsequent flow down through of the supply chain. This paper examines aspects that organizations need to assess the suitability of approaches that it may take to maintain in-house expertise for the control and oversight of licensed activities at all times. It considers the approach to identification of: core capabilities the licensee would need to understand its safety case under a build-own-operate model to manage licensed activities in accordance with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Acta licensee's 'intelligent customer' capabilities in particular around understanding, specifying, overseeing and accepting work undertaken on its behalf by contractors. While this paper is focused on small modular reactors, being an intelligent customer applies to large commercial or research reactors equally; the size of reactor is immaterial.

  5. The intelligent customer: considerations around build-own-operate business and licensing models for small modular reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K., E-mail: kenneth.jones@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An organization planning a proposal for a build-own-operate business model needs to address expanded licensee responsibilities under this model, associated regulatory impacts and how this affects their role as an 'intelligent customer'. This is particularly important for cases where builder-owner-operators plan to manufacture factory-fuelled designs and ship them to a site for installation and operation. The primary responsibility for safe conduct of licensed activities rests with the licensee. A build-own-operate model expands the scope of licensed activities to include design, manufacturing, transport, construction, and operation. The licensee must be able to demonstrate they are qualified to conduct all licensed activities including sufficient competent resources within the licensee's organization to oversee('Intelligent Customer') any work it commissions externally and the subsequent flow down through of the supply chain. This paper examines aspects that organizations need to assess the suitability of approaches that it may take to maintain in-house expertise for the control and oversight of licensed activities at all times. It considers the approach to identification of: core capabilities the licensee would need to understand its safety case under a build-own-operate model to manage licensed activities in accordance with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Acta licensee's 'intelligent customer' capabilities in particular around understanding, specifying, overseeing and accepting work undertaken on its behalf by contractors. While this paper is focused on small modular reactors, being an intelligent customer applies to large commercial or research reactors equally; the size of reactor is immaterial.

  6. Safety goals for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This report presents and discusses the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's, Policy Statement on Safety Goals for the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants. The safety goals have been formulated in terms of qualitative goals and quantitative design objectives. The qualitative goals state that the risk to any individual member of the public from nuclear power plant operation should not be a significant contributor to that individual's risk of accidental death or injury and that the societal risks should be comparable to or less than those of viable competing technologies. The quantitative design objectives state that the average risks to individual and the societal risks of nuclear power plant operation should not exceed 0.1% of certain other risks to which members of the US population are exposed. A subsidiary quantitative design objective is established for the frequency of large-scale core melt. The significance of the goals and objectives, their bases and rationale, and the plan to evaluate the goals are provided. In addition, public comments on the 1982 proposed policy statement and responses to a series of questions that accompanied the 1982 statement are summarized

  7. Trends in CANDU licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.; Grant, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Modern utilities view nuclear power more and more as a commodity - it must compete 'today' with current alternatives to attract their investment. With its long construction times and large capital investment, nuclear plants are vulnerable to delays once they have been committed. There are two related issues. Where the purchaser and the regulator are experienced in CANDU, the thrust is a very practical one: to identify and resolve major licensing risks at a very early stage in the project. Thus for a Canadian project, the designer (AECL) and the prospective purchaser would deal directly with the AECB. However CANDU has also been successfully licensed in other countries, including Korea, Romania, Argentina, India and Pakistan. Each of these countries has its own regulatory agency responsible for licensing the plant. In addition, however, the foreign customer and regulator may seek input from the AECB, up to and including a statement of licensability in Canada; this is not normally needed for a ''repeat'' plant and/or if the customer is experienced in CANDU, but can be requested if the plant configuration has been modified significantly from an already-operating CANDU. It is thus the responsibility of the designer to initiate early discussions with the AECB so the foreign CANDU meets the expectations of its customers

  8. Aging management of reactor internals and license renewal of US PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H. T. [Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Age-related degradation mechanisms of key components are subject to aging management review by utilities considering plant license renewal. The management of aging effects in PWR internals must be demonstrated as specified in the US NRC Standard Review. The US NRC staff has also issued a Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report that documents the staff's basis for determining when existing generic programs are adequate to manage aging without change and when existing generic programs should be augmented for license renewal. The EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has been conducting studies to develop technical bases and guidelines to support aging management of PWR internals, with a particular attention to utility License Renewal commitments. The strategic approach taken by the MRP includes: developing an overall aging management framework, defining degradation mechanism screening values, categorizing and ranking internals components based on screening, performing functionality analyses and safety evaluation, and developing inspection and evaluation guidelines associated with each category of components. Screening criteria are developed for the following potential internals degradation mechanisms: - Stress Corrosion Cracking [Excluding Irradiation Effects]; - Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; - Thermal Aging Embrittlement; - Irradiation Embrittlement; - Void Swelling; - Stress Relaxation and Creep [Irradiation-enhanced]; - Wear; - Fatigue. The ranking and categorization calls to bin internals components into four categories: - Category A: component items for which aging degradation significance is minimal and aging effects are below the screening criteria; - Category C: 'lead' component items for which aging degradation significance is high or moderate and aging effects are above screening levels; - Category B: component items above screening levels but are not 'lead' component items and aging degradation significance

  9. 47 CFR 25.137 - Application requirements for earth stations operating with non-U.S. licensed space stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... space stations. (a) Earth station applicants or entities filing a “letter of intent” or “Petition for... Union. (d) Earth station applicants requesting authority to operate with a non-U.S.-licensed space... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application requirements for earth stations...

  10. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-08-01

    During the first quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. Nuclear electricity accounted for 32.5% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 99.0%. An international nuclear event scale has been introduced for the classification of nuclear power plant events according to their nuclear and radiation safety significance. The scale first undergoes about a year long trial period in several countries. on the scale, events are divided into levels from 1 to 7 of which events at Level 7 are the most serious. Furthermore, Level 0 (Below Scale) is used for events with no safety significance. All events which occurred at the Finnish nuclear power plants this quarter are classified as Level 0. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. At the Loviisa plant, a back-up emergency feedwater system independent of the plant's other systems has been introduced which offers a new, alternative means of removing residual heat from the reactor. Owing to this system, the risk of a severe accident has been further reduced. At the TVO plants, systems have been introduced by which accident sequences which lead to containment failure could be eliminated and the consequences of a potential severe accident could be mitigated. In this report, also the release of short-lived radioactive materials along the transfer route of an irradiated sample is described which occured at the FiR 1 research reactor. The amounts of radioactive materials individuals received in their bodies in connection with this event were very low

  11. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance

  12. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Aggarwal, S.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance.

  13. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Aggarwal, S.K. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance.

  14. Life Limiting Issues for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselman, Thomas; Gaertner, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which identified and characterized life limiting issues for consideration by nuclear plant owners in their decision to extend plant life or seek subsequent license renewal. As nuclear plants operate for longer periods, the risk that a condition in the plant or an event that occurs, at the plant or elsewhere, will cause a plant owner not to extend plant life increases. The Fukushima accident has made this concept concrete. This paper defines 'Life Limiting' concepts for nuclear plants. It identifies the highest risk conditions and events that may limit duration of continued operation in nuclear plants and employs a survey to prioritize these concerns. Methods for evaluating these risks and changing the capability of systems, structures, and components (SSC) to reduce and manage this risk in long term operation are presented. Integrated obsolescence -the existence of an accumulation of events or condition that can threaten long term operation- is discussed. Many of the life limiting conditions or events may be controllable by early identification, recognition, and mitigation of the potential threat. The recognition of conditions may allow measures to be taken to mitigate the condition. Recognition of the potential for events that may be life limiting may allow actions to be taken that will minimize the likelihood or consequences of the event. These actions may include enhanced research on the expected behavior of the SSC, risk assessment and management, and enhanced monitoring and aging management at the plant. (author)

  15. Method of operating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Tasuku.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of operating a plant in which the inside of a reactor container is filled with inert gases. That is, the pressure at the inside of the pressure vessel is controlled based on the values sent from an absolute pressure gage and a pressure low gage during usual operation. A pressure high alarm and a pressure high scram signal are generated from a pressure high detector and a scram pressure detector. With such a constitution, since the pressure at the inside of the reactor is always kept at a slightly positive level relative to the surrounding atmospheric pressure even when high atmospheric pressure approaches to the plant site, air does not flow into the reactor container. Accordingly, the oxygen concentration is not increased. When a low atmospheric pressure approaches, the control operation for the pressure at the inside of the container is not necessary. The amount of the inert gases consumed and the amount of radioactive materials released to the atmosphere are decreased. The method of the present invention improves the safety and the reliability of the reactor operation. (N.H.)

  16. Operating experience with nuclear power plants 2015. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2016-07-01

    The VGB Technical Committee ''Nuclear Plant Operation'' has been exchanging operating experience about nuclear power plants for more than 30 years. Plant operators from several European countries are participating in the exchange. A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2015, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from Germany. The second part of this report will focus on nuclear power plant in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain.

  17. The long term operation of nuclear power plants in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.G.

    2015-01-01

    The NRC has so far granted the renewal license for 73 nuclear reactors in the US but because of economic issues some power plants that got a renewal license are planned to be decommissioned earlier: for instance the Oyster Creek reactor will be stopped definitely in 2019 after a 50 year operating life, another example is the Kewaunee plant that closed mid 2013 while this reactor had been allowed to operate till 2033. The economy concern is the falling price of natural gas that make gas-burning power plants more competitive than nuclear stations. The reactors at risk are the oldest and the smallest ones but in the non-deregulated sector the economic benefit is important for the most powerful reactors to be allowed to operate over 40 and 60 years. A renewal request is composed of a safety assessment of the plant and the assessment of its environmental impact. The safety assessment relies on an Integrated Plant Assessment and on a Time-Limited Ageing Analyses. In order to prepare the second renewal campaign that will allow some reactors to operate up to 80 years, NRC, DOE and EPRI have begun first to identify potential concerns concerning material degradation and secondly to develop an adequate ageing management strategy. (A.C.)

  18. Human factors in nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, Z.A.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive effort is being devoted to developing a comprehensive human factor program that encompasses establishment of a data base for human error prediction using past operation experience in commercial nuclear power plants. Some of the main results of such an effort are reported including data retrieval and classification systems which have been developed to assist in estimation of operator error rates. Also, statistical methods are developed to relate operator error data to reactor type, age, and specific technical design features. Results reported in this paper are based on an analysis of LER's covering a six-year period for LWR's. Developments presently include a computer data management program, statistical model, and detailed error taxonomy

  19. Japanese regulatory practices on licensing, inspection, operational supervision and related standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuta, Yoshinori

    1991-01-01

    Japanese view on the safety of nuclear power plants is based on the concept that the primary responsibility for securing safety lies on electric power companies, installers of reactors. Under this concept, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), in the course of designing and construction, has been performed an examination of the basic design and the detailed design of nuclear power plants, and in each stage of construction, a pre-operational inspection process. In addition, MITI, in operating stage, has been made throughgoing investigations on the cases of troubles and incidents as well as accidents that may affect operation, forcing utilities to take measures to prevent recurrence, and implementing safety regulation based on the 'preventive maintenance' including elaborate checkings and overhaulings at the periodical inspections conducted for a period of three to four months after every 12-month operation cycle under the laws and regulations. This paper discusses the current status of nuclear power development in Japan, safety regulatory systems, views on safety and future prospects of securing safety. (orig.)

  20. The need for legislative framework (licensing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krech, H.

    1977-01-01

    For reasons of public acceptance the basis of a licensing system should be laid down in a law, details can be fixed in regulations below the law-level. The competence for licensing nuclear installations should be attributed to one body, which is not a the same time charged with the promotion of nuclear energy. The licensing authority has to be provided with sufficient technical advice, given by experts organized in advisory bodies. Normally a licensing procedure is split into several steps (site approval, construction permit, operation licence), each step can be subdivided. Some general aspects of licensing conditions (personal, technical and financial) as well as of the licensing procedure are outlined. The participation of the public is of particular importance but also involves most intricate problems. The paper concludes with some critical remarks on the role of administrative courts with respect to the licensing of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de