WorldWideScience

Sample records for plant operating experience

  1. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  2. Operating experience with nuclear power plants 2015. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2016-07-01

    The VGB Technical Committee ''Nuclear Plant Operation'' has been exchanging operating experience about nuclear power plants for more than 30 years. Plant operators from several European countries are participating in the exchange. A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2015, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from Germany. The second part of this report will focus on nuclear power plant in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain.

  3. Operating experience in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany kept their portion of power supply into the public grid system constant in 1983, compared to 1982. The generation had an absolute increase of 3.6% and amounts now to 65.9 TWh. Particularly mentioned should be the generation of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Plant which is holding the 'World Record' with 9.969 TWh. The availability of the plants was generally satisfactory, as far as long-term retrofit measures with long outage periods were not necessary, as it was the case in Brunsbuettel and Wuergassen. The planned retrofit phases have been completed in all power plants. As far as safety is concerned, there was no reason to recommended a change of the present fundamental planning- and operation aspects. (orig.) [de

  4. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES).

  5. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES)

  6. Operational experience with propulsion nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polunichev, V.

    2000-01-01

    Russia possesses a powerful icebreaker transport fleet which offers a solution for important socio-economic tasks of the country's northern regions by maintaining a year-round navigation along the Arctic Sea route. The total operating record of the propulsion nuclear reactors till now exceeds 150 reactor-years, their main equipment items operating life amounted to 120,000 h. Progressive design-constructional solutions being perfected continuously during 40 years of nuclear-powered ships creation in Russia and well proven technology of all components used in the marine nuclear reactors give grounds to recommend marine Nuclear Steam Supply Systems (NSSSs) of KLT-40 type as energy sources for heat and power cogeneration plants and sea water desalination complexes, particularly as floating installations. Co-generation stations are considered for deployment in the extreme north of Russia. Nuclear floating desalination complexes can be used for drinkable water production in coastal regions of Northern Africa, the Near East, India etc. (author)

  7. Operating experience review for the AP1000 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, T. E.; Lipner, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    Westinghouse is performing an update to the Operating Experience Review (OER) Report for the AP1000 project to account for operating experience since December 1996. Significant Operating Experience Reports, Significant Event Reports, Significant Event Notifications, Operations and Maintenance Reminders, Topical Reports, Event Analysis Reports and Licensee Event Reports were researched for pertinent input to the update. As a part of the OER, Westinghouse has also conducted operator interviews and observations during simulated plant operations and after operating events. The main purpose of the OER is to identify Human Factors Engineering (HFE) related safety issues from existing operating plant experience and to ensure that these issues are addressed in the new design. The issues and lessons learned regarding operating experience provide a basis for improving the plant design. (authors)

  8. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.5 TWh during 1998, which is the second highest yearly production ever. Production losses due to low demand totaled 5.1 TWh combined for all twelve units and production losses due to coastdown operation totaled an additional 0.5 TWh. The reason for this low power demand was a very good supply of water to the hydropower system. Hydroelectric power production was 73.6 TWh, an increase by roughly 5 TWh since 1997. Hence, the hydroelectric power production substantially exceeded the 64 TWh expected during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Remaining production sources, mainly fossil fuel electricity production combined with district heating, contributed with 10 TWh. The total electricity production was 154.2 TWh, the highest yearly production ever. The total electricity consumption including transmission losses was 143.5 TWh. This is also the highest consumption ever and an increase by one percent compared to 1997. The preliminary net result of the electric power trade shows a net export by 10.7 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production results. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is given in the 1998 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. Besides Oskarshamn 1, all plants have periodically been operated in load-following mode, mostly because of the abundant supply of hydropower. The energy availability for the three boiling water reactors at Forsmark averaged 93.3 % and for the three pressure water reactors at Ringhals 91.0 %, both figures are the highest ever noted. In the section `Special Reports` three events of importance to safety that occurred during 1998 are reported. The events were all rated as level 1 according to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) Figs, tabs.; Also available in Swedish

  9. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.5 TWh during 1998, which is the second highest yearly production ever. Production losses due to low demand totaled 5.1 TWh combined for all twelve units and production losses due to coastdown operation totaled an additional 0.5 TWh. The reason for this low power demand was a very good supply of water to the hydropower system. Hydroelectric power production was 73.6 TWh, an increase by roughly 5 TWh since 1997. Hence, the hydroelectric power production substantially exceeded the 64 TWh expected during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Remaining production sources, mainly fossil fuel electricity production combined with district heating, contributed with 10 TWh. The total electricity production was 154.2 TWh, the highest yearly production ever. The total electricity consumption including transmission losses was 143.5 TWh. This is also the highest consumption ever and an increase by one percent compared to 1997. The preliminary net result of the electric power trade shows a net export by 10.7 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production results. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is given in the 1998 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. Besides Oskarshamn 1, all plants have periodically been operated in load-following mode, mostly because of the abundant supply of hydropower. The energy availability for the three boiling water reactors at Forsmark averaged 93.3 % and for the three pressure water reactors at Ringhals 91.0 %, both figures are the highest ever noted. In the section 'Special Reports' three events of importance to safety that occurred during 1998 are reported. The events were all rated as level 1 according to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES)

  10. Treatment of operational experience of nuclear power plants in WANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the activities associated to the Operating Experience Programme of the World Association of Nuclear Operators. The programme manages the event reports submitted by the nuclear power plants to the WANO database for the preparation by the Operating Experience Central Team of some documents like the significant Operating Experience Reports and Significant Event Reports that help the stations to avoid similar events. (Author)

  11. Nuclear power plant operating experience. Annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, M.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports issued annually that summarizes the operating experience of US nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1978 data from 65 plants - 25 boiling water reactor plants and 40 pressurized water reactor plants. Discussion of radioactive effluents which has been a part of this report in previous years, has not been included in this issue because of late acquisition of data

  12. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  13. Flooding PSA with Plant Specific Operating Experiences of Korean PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Yang, Joon Yull

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to update the flooding PSA with Korean plant specific operating experience data and the appropriate estimation method for the flooding frequency to improve the PSA quality. The existing flooding PSA used the NPE (Nuclear Power Experience) database up to 1985 for the flooding frequency. They are all USA plant operating experiences. So an upgraded flooding frequency with Korean specific plant operation experience is required. We also propose a method of only using the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) data for the flooding frequency estimation in the case of the flooding area in the primary building even though the existing flooding PSA used both PWR and BWR (Boiled Water Reactor) data for all kinds of plant areas. We evaluate the CDF (Core Damage Frequency) with the modified flooding frequency and compare the results with that of the existing flooding PSA method

  14. Nuclear power plant operation experience - a feedback programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banica, I.; Sociu, F.; Margaritescu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An effective high quality maintenance programme is required for the safe reliable operation of a nuclear power plant. To achieve the objectives of such a programme, both plant management and staff must be highly dedicated and motivated to perform high quality work at all levels. Operating and maintenance experience data collections and analysis are necessary in order to enhance the safety of the plant and reliability of the structures systems and components throughout their operating life. Significant events, but also minor incident, may reveal important deficiencies or negative trends adverse to safety. Therefore, a computer processing system for collecting, classifying and evaluating abnormal events or findings concerning operating-maintenance and for feeding back the results of the lessons learned from experience into the design and the operation of our nuclear power plant is considered to be of paramount importance. (Author)

  15. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov)

  16. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  17. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Yoshioka, T.; Toyota, M.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    To develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on safety assurance and to endeavour to devise measures to improve plant availability, based on the careful analysis of causes that reduce plant availability. The paper discusses the results of studies on the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and operating experience of LWR nuclear power plants in Japan: operating experience with LWRs; improvements in LWR design during the past ten years; analysis of the factors affecting plant availability; (2) Assurance of safety and measures to increase availability: measures for safety and environmental protection; measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees; appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work; measures to increase plant availability; measures to improve reliability of equipment and components; (3) Future technical problems. (author)

  18. Configuration control during plant outages. A review of operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinador Veira, Miguel; El Kanbi, Semir [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport; Stephan, Jean-Luc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Martens, Johannes [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    After the occurrence of several significant events in nuclear power plants during shut-down modes of operation in the eighties, and from the results of probabilistic safety assessments completed in the nineties, it was clear that risk from low power and shutdown operational modes could not be neglected and had to be addressed by appropriate safety programs. A comprehensive review of operating experience from the last ten years has been conducted by the Joint Research Centre with the objective of deriving lessons learned and recommendations useful for nuclear regulatory bodies and utilities alike. This paper is focused on one particular challenge that any nuclear plant faces whenever it plans its next outage period: how to manage the configuration of all systems under a complex environment involving numerous concurrent activities, and how to make sure that systems are returned to their valid configuration before the plant resumes power operation. This study highlights the importance of conveying accurate but synthesized information on the status of the plant to the operators in the main control room. Many of the lessons learned are related to the alarm display in the control room and to the use of check lists to control the status of systems. Members of the industry and safety authorities may now use these recommendations and lessons learned to feed their own operating experience feedback programs, and check their applicability for specific sites.

  19. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    From the outset of nuclear power development in Japan, major emphasis has been placed on the safety of the nuclear power plants. There are now twelve nuclear power plants in operation with a total output of 6600 MWe. Their operating records were generally satisfactory, but in the 1974 to 1975 period, they experienced somewhat declined availability due to the repair work under the specific circumstances. After investigation of causes of troubles and the countermeasures thereof were made to ensure safety, they are now keeping good performance. In Japan, nuclear power plants are strictly subject to sufficient and careful inspection in compliance with the safety regulation, and are placed under stringent radiation control of employees. Under the various circumstances, however, the period of annual inspection tends to be prolonged more than originally planned, and this consequently is considered to be one of the causes of reduced availability. In order to develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on the assurance of safety and to endeavor to devise measures to improve availability of the plants, based on the careful analysis of causes which reduce plant availability. This paper discusses the results of studies made for the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and Operating Experience of LWR Nuclear Power Plants in Japan; a) Operating experience with light water reactors b) Improvements in design of light water reactors during the past ten years c) Analysis of the factors which affect plant availability; 2) Assurance of Safety and Measures to Increase Availability a) Measures for safety and environmental protection b) Measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees c) Appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work d) Measures to increase plant availability e) Measures to improve reliability of equipments and components; and 3) Future Technical Problems

  20. European Clearinghouse for Nuclear Power Plants Operational Experience Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Ramos, M.; Noel, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the European Union, in order to support the Community activities on operational experience, a centralized regional network on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback (European Clearinghouse on Operational Experience Feedback for Nuclear Power Plants) was established in 2008 at the EC JRC-IE, Petten (The Netherlands) on request of nuclear Safety Authorities of several Member States. Its main goal is to improve the communication and information sharing on OEF, to promote regional collaboration on analyses of operational experience and dissemination of the lessons learned. The enlarged EU Clearinghouse was launched in April 2010, and it is currently gathering the Regulatory Authorities of Finland, Hungary, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovenia, Switzerland, Bulgaria, Czec Republic, France, Germany, Slovak Republic, and Spain (these last six countries as observers). The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the IAEA, the EC Directorates General of the JRC and ENER are also part of the network. Recently, collaboration between some European Technical Support Organizations (such IRSN and GRS) and the EU Clearinghouse has been initiated. This paper explains in detail the objectives and organization of the EU Clearinghouse, as well as the most relevant activities carried out, like research work in trend analysis of events ocurred in NPP, topical reports on particular events, dissemination of the results, quarterly reports on events reported publicly and operational experience support to the members of the EU Clearinghouse. (Author)

  1. Operational experience, availability and reliability of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture - presents a survey on nuclear power production and plant performance in the Western World covering all reactor types and light-water reactors in particular and discusses key parameters such as load factors and non-availability analysis. - outlines the main reasons for the reliable performance of Swiss nuclear power plants - quality equipment - operator qualification and training - engineering know how on site - maintenance philosophy and outage planning - information system and feedback of experience - explains the management functions as applied at the Beznau Nuclear Power Station to ensure high power productivity and reliability - improvement - a feedback control system - analysis of production losses - optimization in shut-down planning - minimizing disturbances during plant operation - optimizing personnel qualification and efficiency. (orig.)

  2. Procedure for following external nuclear power plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has developed computer database and the procedure for following-up and investigating external nuclear operating experience and administrative requirements. The SNSA's primary goal is to investigate safety significant events in due time, to analyze them from the regulatory point of view and to ensure that meaningful lessons be learned and used for improvement of the safe operation of Slovenian Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. Moreover, we intend to make uniform format and method for reporting broader spectrum of events analyzed including low level event reporting. (author)

  3. Analysis of operating experience of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volta, G.; Amesz, J.; Mancini, G.

    1981-01-01

    The power reactors operating experience has been matter for studies at the Joint Research Centre of the C.E.C. with the aim of validating probabilistic analysis models and of setting up data banks concerning reliability, availability of components and systems and safety related events. The report shows problems encountered and solutions given to attain the goal. For what concerns validation, the need of more satisfactory models that could handle both the technical and the organizational aspects of an operating plant is shown. For what concerns the data banks the possibilities opened by a coherent international system of classification are underlined. (author)

  4. European clearinghouse on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranguelova, Vesselina; Bruynooghe, Christiane; Noel, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Learning from operational experience and applying this knowledge promptly and intelligently is one of the ways to improve the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Recent reviews of the effectiveness of Operational Experience Feedback (OEF) systems have pointed to the need for further improvement, with importance being placed on tailoring the information to the needs of the regulators. In 2007, at the request of a number of nuclear safety regulatory authorities in Europe, the Institute for Energy of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EC JRC) initiated a project on Nuclear Power Plant operational experience feedback, which adopts an integrated approach to the research needed to strengthen the European capabilities for assessment of NPP operational events and to promote the development of tools and mechanisms for the improved application of the lessons learned. Consequently, a so-called ''European Clearinghouse'' on NPP OEF was established, which includes scientific officers from the EC JRC, a number of European nuclear safety regulatory authorities and some of their Technical Support Organizations (TSOs). The paper discusses the activities implemented in 2008 within the framework of the European Clearinghouse on NPP OEF (hereinafter called the European NPP Clearinghouse) and provides an overview of the main conclusions drawn from the safety studies performed. Outlook of the activities carried out in 2009 are given. (orig.)

  5. Plant operator performance evaluation based on cognitive process analysis experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Fukuda, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to clarify plant operators' cognitive processes that has been performed, to improve the man-machine interface which supports their diagnoses and decisions. The cognitive processes under abnormal conditions were evaluated by protocol analyses interviews, etc. in the experiment using a plant training simulator. A cognitive process model is represented by a stochastic network, based on Rasmussen's decision making model. Each node of the network corresponds to an element of the cognitive process, such as observation, interpretation, execution, etc. Some observations were obtained as follows, by comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with the experiment results: A process to reconfirm the plant parameters after execution of a task and feedback paths from this process to the observation and the task definition of next task were observed. The feedback probability average and standard deviation should be determined for each incident type to explain correctly the individual differences in the cognitive processes. The tendency for the operator's cognitive level to change from skill-based to knowledge-based via rule-based behavior was observed during the feedback process

  6. Summary of operating experience in Swiss nuclear power plants 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    In 1993 the Swiss nuclear power plants produced their third highest combined annual output. The contribution to the total electricity generation in the country was close to 37%. Replacement of the steam generators in Beznau Unit 1 resulted in a longer than usual annual outage. For the other four units the availability figures were close to, or exceeded, those of previous years. The energy utilization was, however, lowered due to load reduction in autumn resulting from unusually high production by the hydro-electric power plants. The steam generator replacement at Beznau enabled an increase in electrical power of about 2% without increase in reactor power. With the approval of the Swiss government in December 1992, the output of the Muehleberg power plant was increased in two stages by a total of 10%. The application for an unlimited operating license for Beznau Unit 2, and for a power uprate at the Leibstadt power plant, are still pending. The average number of scrams at the Swiss plants remained stable, at less than one scram per reactor year. As a result of experience in the Swedish nuclear power plant at Barsebaeck, the suction strainers of the emergency core cooling systems of the boiling water reactors at Muehleberg and Leibstadt were replaced by strainers with larger surface areas. The re-inspection of crack indications previously detected in the core shroud of the Muehleberg reactor and the penetration tubes in the reactor pressure vessel closure head of Beznau revealed no growth during the intervening operating periods. Following the completion of installation activities during the annual outages at Beznau Unit 1, Goesgen and Leibstadt, all Swiss nuclear power plants are now equipped with filtered containment venting systems. (author) figs., tabs

  7. Highly active vitrification plant remote handling operational experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgate, I.

    1996-01-01

    All the main process plant and equipment at the Sellafield Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP) is enclosed in heavily shielded concrete walled cells. There is a large quantity of relatively complex plant and equipment which must be remotely operated, maintained or replaced in-cell in a severe environment. The WVP has five in-cell polar cranes which are of modular construction to aid replacement of failed components. Each can be withdrawn into a shielded cell extension for decontamination and hands-on maintenance. The cells have a total of 80 through wall tube positions to receive Master Slave Manipulators (MSMs). The MSMs are used where possible for ''pick and place'' purposes but are often called upon to position substantial pieces of mechanical equipment and thus are subject to heavy loading and high failure rates. An inward flow of air is maintained in the active cells. The discharged air passes through a filter cell where remote damper operation filter changing and maintenance is carried out by means of a PAR3000 manipulator. A Nuclear Engineered Advanced Teleoperated Robot (Neater) swabs the vitrified product container to ensure cleanliness before storage. There is a significant arising of solid radioactive waste from replaced in-cell items which undergoes sorting and size reduction in a breakdown cell equipped with a large reciprocating saw and a hydraulic shear. Improvements to the remote handling facilities made in the light of operational experience are described. (UK)

  8. Experience from construction and operation of Karachi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, S.M.N.

    1977-01-01

    Pakistan's first nuclear power plant (KANUPP) is owned and operated by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). It uses a heavy water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled reactor. Total installed capacity is 137 MW(e). It was designed, constructed and commissioned by Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd. (CGE) as Prime Contractor. Construction started in mid-1966 and was completed in mid 1970; commissioning started in early 1970 and was completed at the end of 1972. Intensive on-the-job training for 20 engineers and 15 operators was provided by CGE in Canada. Ten engineers also worked in CGE's design offices. With this key group of engineers and technicians PAEC had no difficulty in taking over the plant from CGE after completion. The construction of the plant in a developing country presented special problems to CGE. The relatively small local construction firms had limited experience and equipment. Construction plant, equipment and tools were scarce. Fabrication and workshop facilities of limited scope were available but their quotations were relatively high. A scarcity of engineering, technical and skilled manpower for the construction of the project left as the only alternative on-site training for carefully recruited technicians. The results were most gratifying and compared favourably with CGE's Canadian experience. Welding, pipe fitting, tubing work and electrical connections were excellent. The local staff's productivity and dedication were very good. In the commissioning period, PAEC and CGE engineers and technicians worked as one team, testing and debugging the equipment and systems and demonstrating the contractual performance warranties. This period extended to approximately three years due to many technical problems resulting from equipment failures, environmental problems, system problems, plant loading limitations in view of the relatively small size of the grid system and special requirement of fuel conditioning to avoid premature fuel

  9. 14th Biennial conference on reactor operating experience plant operations: The human element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the following areas of interest: enhancing operator performance; structured approaches to maintenance standards and reliability-centered maintenance; human issues in plant operations and management; test, research, and training reactor utilization; methods and applications of root-cause analysis; emergency operating procedure enhancement programs; test, research, and training reactor upgrades; valve maintenance and diagnostics; recent operating experiences; and current maintenance issues

  10. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience from the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience 2012-2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is an essential element of the international operating experience feedback system for nuclear power plants. Its fundamental objective is to contribute to improving safety of commercial nuclear power plants which are operated worldwide. IRS reports contain information on events of safety significance with important lessons learned which assist in reducing recurrence of events at other plants. This sixth publication, covering the period 2012 - 2014, follows the structure of the previous editions. It highlights important lessons based on a review of the approximately 240 event reports received from the participating countries over this period.

  11. Feedback of operating experience in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The feedback of operating experience of nuclear facilities to the designers, manufacturers, operators and regulators is one important means of maintaining and improving safety. The Atomic Energy Control Board`s Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety examined the means for feedback currently being employed, how effective they are and what improvements are advisable. The review found that the need for feedback of operating experience is well recognized within those institutions contributing to the safety of CANDU power reactors, and that the existing procedures are generally effective. Some recommendations, however, are submitted for improvement in the process.

  12. Feedback of operating experience in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The feedback of operating experience of nuclear facilities to the designers, manufacturers, operators and regulators is one important means of maintaining and improving safety. The Atomic Energy Control Board's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety examined the means for feedback currently being employed, how effective they are and what improvements are advisable. The review found that the need for feedback of operating experience is well recognized within those institutions contributing to the safety of CANDU power reactors, and that the existing procedures are generally effective. Some recommendations, however, are submitted for improvement in the process

  13. Experience in construction and operation of HWR plants in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madero, C.C.; Cosentino, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    ''ATUCHA I'', the first nuclear power plant in Argentina, is in commerical operation since 1974 with a high capacity factor. The reactor is based on the MZFR prototype designed by SIEMENS with natural uranium and heavy water and PWR technic. The plant was built by SIEMENS on a turnkey contract and was rated 340 MWe. The offer presented in that opportunity by KWU was based on two reactors (ATUCHA I type) inside one single containment, due to the limitation in power of the reactor. Subsequent changes in the nature of the contract resulted in an active participation of CNEA engineering groups in the erection and commissioning of the reactor. In 1978 the national government approved a nuclear power plan to install four 600 MWe HWR plants until 1995. To start implementing this program, CNEA called for tenders for the supply of components and services for the ATUCHA II plant, in connection with the establishment of a local engineering company and the supply and construction of a heavy water production plant. In 1980 a contract was signed with KWU and the local company ENACE was formed to act as architect engineer and site coordinator. The plant will be located in the ATUCHA I site and the reactor will be similar but double in power to that one. Following the schedule of the nuclear plan, CNEA has just started preliminary studies for the next nuclear plant. ENACE will be responsible for the preparation of an offer for an ATUCHA reactor type. Local engineering and manufacturing firms, upon request and coordination from CNEA, and evaluating the local capacity to participate in the design and construction of a CANDU type nuclear plant. Final decision on this fourth nuclear plant in Argentina will be taken middle 1983. (J.P.N.)

  14. Summary of operating experience in Swiss nuclear power plants 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    In 1994 the Swiss nuclear power plants produced their highest-ever combined annual output. Their contribution to total electricity generation in the country was 36%. At Muehleberg the power uprate, undertaken in 1993, was effective for the first time for an entire year. The larger capacity of the new steam generators installed in 1993 in unit 1 of the Beznau NPP allows for an electric output of 103% of nominal power. The plant efficiency of the Goesgen and Leibstadt units was increased by replacing the low pressure turbines by the new ones with a modern design. The application for a power uprate of the Leibstadt reactor is still pending. For the first time in Switzerland, one of the reactor units, Beznau 2, operated on an extended cycle of one and a half years, with no refuelling outage in 1994. In spite of the replacements of two of its three low pressure turbines, Goesgen had the shortest refuelling shutdown since the start of commercial operation. The average number of reactor scrams at the Swiss plants remained stable, at less than one scram per reactor year. Re-inspection of crack indications detected in 1990 in the core shroud of the Muehleberg reactor revealed no significant changes. A crack indication was found in one of the other welds inspected. The Swiss government issued a limited operating licence for Beznau 2 for the next ten years, i.e. until the end of 2004. The only other unit with a limited operating licence (until 2003) is Muehleberg. The remaining three reactor units, have no time limits on their operating licences, in accordance with the Atomic Law. Goesgen is the first Swiss nuclear power plant having now produced more than 100 billion kWh. As from January 1, 1995, the nominal net power of the largest Swiss reactor unit, Leibstadt, has been fixed at 1030 MW; that of the Goesgen NPP has been increased by 25 MW to 965 MW. (author) figs., tabs

  15. Summary of operating experience in Swiss nuclear power plants 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    In 1994 the Swiss nuclear power plants produced their highest-ever combined annual output. Their contribution to total electricity generation in the country was 36%. At Muehleberg the power uprate, undertaken in 1993, was effective for the first time for an entire year. The larger capacity of the new steam generators installed in 1993 in unit 1 of the Beznau NPP allows for an electric output of 103% of nominal power. The plant efficiency of the Goesgen and Leibstadt units was increased by replacing the low pressure turbines by the new ones with a modern design. The application for a power uprate of the Leibstadt reactor is still pending. For the first time in Switzerland, one of the reactor units, Beznau 2, operated on an extended cycle of one and a half years, with no refuelling outage in 1994. In spite of the replacements of two of its three low pressure turbines, Goesgen had the shortest refuelling shutdown since the start of commercial operation. The average number of reactor scrams at the Swiss plants remained stable, at less than one scram per reactor year. Re-inspection of crack indications detected in 1990 in the core shroud of the Muehleberg reactor revealed no significant changes. A crack indication was found in one of the other welds inspected. The Swiss government issued a limited operating licence for Beznau 2 for the next ten years, i.e. until the end of 2004. The only other unit with a limited operating licence (until 2003) is Muehleberg. The remaining three reactor units, have no time limits on their operating licences, in accordance with the Atomic Law. Goesgen is the first Swiss nuclear power plant having now produced more than 100 billion kWh. As from January 1, 1995, the nominal net power of the largest Swiss reactor unit, Leibstadt, has been fixed at 1030 MW; that of the Goesgen NPP has been increased by 25 MW to 965 MW. (author) figs., tabs.

  16. Operational experience with the Sizewell B integrated plant computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladner, J.E.J.; Alexander, N.C.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Westinghouse Integrated System for Centralised Operation (WISCO) is the primary plant control system at the Sizewell B Power Station. It comprises three subsystems; the High Integrity Control System (HICS), the Process Control System (PCS) and the Distributed Computer system (DCS). The HICS performs the control and data acquisition of nuclear safety significant plant systems. The PCS uses redundant data processing unit pairs. The workstations and servers of the DCS communicate with each other over a standard ethernet. The maintenance requirements for every plant system are covered by a Maintenance Strategy Report. The breakdown of these reports is listed. The WISCO system has performed exceptionally well. Due to the diagnostic information presented by the HICS, problems could normally be resolved within 24 hours. There have been some 200 outstanding modifications to the system. The procedure of modification is briefly described. (A.K.)

  17. Operating experience with nuclear power plants 2013; Betriebserfahrungen mit Kernkraftwerken 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-01

    The VGB Technical Committee 'Nuclear Plant Operation' has been exchanging operating experience about nuclear power plants for more than 30 years. Plant operators from several European countries are participating in the exchange. A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2013, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from Belgium, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain. (orig.)

  18. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 69.2 TWh during 2001, which is an increase of more than 25% compared to 2000. The hydroelectric power production increased to 78.3 TWh, 22% more than during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Wind power contributed 0.5 TWh, and remaining production sources, mainly from solid fuel plants combined with district heating, contributed 9.6 TWh. The electricity generation totalled 157.6 TWh, the highest annual production to date. The preliminary figures for export were 18.5 TWh and and for import 11.1 TWh. Operational statistics are presented for each Swedish reactor. Two events, given INES level 1 rating, are reported from Barsebaeck 2 and Ringhals 2.

  19. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 69.2 TWh during 2001, which is an increase of more than 25% compared to 2000. The hydroelectric power production increased to 78.3 TWh, 22% more than during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Wind power contributed 0.5 TWh, and remaining production sources, mainly from solid fuel plants combined with district heating, contributed 9.6 TWh. The electricity generation totalled 157.6 TWh, the highest annual production to date. The preliminary figures for export were 18.5 TWh and and for import 11.1 TWh. Operational statistics are presented for each Swedish reactor. Two events, given INES level 1 rating, are reported from Barsebaeck 2 and Ringhals 2

  20. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 65.6 TWh during 2002, which is a decrease compared to 2001. The energy capability factor for the 11 Swedish reactors averaged 80.8%. The PWRs at Ringhals averaged 87.6%, while the BWRs, not counting Oskarshamn 1, reached 89.2%. No events, which in accordance to conventions should be reported to IAEA, have occurred during 2002. Operational statistics are presented for each Swedish reactor. The hydroelectric power was 66 TWh, 16% lower than 2000. Wind power contributed 0.5 TWh, and remaining production sources, mainly from solid fuel plants combined with district heating, contributed 10.9 TWh. The electricity generation totalled 143 TWh, considerably less than the record high 2001 figure of 158.7 TWh. The preliminary figures for export were 14.8 TWh and and for import 20.1 TWh.

  1. Summary of Operating Experience in Swiss Nuclear Power Plants 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-15

    The five Swiss nuclear power units produced a net total of 23.6 TWh of electricity in 1999 - not as high as the all-time record (24.45 TWh in 1998), but nonetheless a solid operational performance. The nuclear share in overall electricity production was 35.3%, again lower than the previous year's 40%. In general, plant operation in 1999 was practically as undisturbed and as reliable as in 1998, reflecting the ongoing tradition of careful maintenance that contributes so much to keeping the plants in excellent condition. However, due to exceptional outage activities at Beznau 2 (steam generator replacement) and an unplanned shut-down at Goesgen to replace a hydrogen seal on the main generator, 1999 nuclear production could not match that of the previous year. Also, record hydro power production caused the nuclear share in total electricity production to drop. With the exception of Beznau 2, all refueling and maintenance outages were once again short. The Leibstadt outage lasted 26 days, Goesgen 33 days, Beznau 1 lasted 29 days, Beznau 2 89 days and Muehleberg 27 days. At Goesgen, MOX fuel was loaded for the third time in 1999. Of the 44 freshly-loaded fuel elements, 20 were MOX elements. Non-electrical energy supplies from the Beznau and Goesgen nuclear power plants functioned flawlessly. Beznau fed 143.6 GWh of heat energy into the Refuna district heating system, while Goesgen supplied 169 GWh of process heat to the neighboring Niedergoesgen cardboard factory. At the end of 1999 and the beginning of 2000 all Swiss nuclear units continued to operate flawlessly - notwithstanding the challenges posed by the 'Lothar' storm that hit Western Europe in late December and the so-called Y2K computer bug that threatened to hit shortly afterwards, during the 'millennial' change-over. (authors)

  2. Summary of Operating Experience in Swiss Nuclear Power Plants 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    The five Swiss nuclear power units produced a net total of 23.6 TWh of electricity in 1999 - not as high as the all-time record (24.45 TWh in 1998), but nonetheless a solid operational performance. The nuclear share in overall electricity production was 35.3%, again lower than the previous year's 40%. In general, plant operation in 1999 was practically as undisturbed and as reliable as in 1998, reflecting the ongoing tradition of careful maintenance that contributes so much to keeping the plants in excellent condition. However, due to exceptional outage activities at Beznau 2 (steam generator replacement) and an unplanned shut-down at Goesgen to replace a hydrogen seal on the main generator, 1999 nuclear production could not match that of the previous year. Also, record hydro power production caused the nuclear share in total electricity production to drop. With the exception of Beznau 2, all refueling and maintenance outages were once again short. The Leibstadt outage lasted 26 days, Goesgen 33 days, Beznau 1 lasted 29 days, Beznau 2 89 days and Muehleberg 27 days. At Goesgen, MOX fuel was loaded for the third time in 1999. Of the 44 freshly-loaded fuel elements, 20 were MOX elements. Non-electrical energy supplies from the Beznau and Goesgen nuclear power plants functioned flawlessly. Beznau fed 143.6 GWh of heat energy into the Refuna district heating system, while Goesgen supplied 169 GWh of process heat to the neighboring Niedergoesgen cardboard factory. At the end of 1999 and the beginning of 2000 all Swiss nuclear units continued to operate flawlessly - notwithstanding the challenges posed by the 'Lothar' storm that hit Western Europe in late December and the so-called Y2K computer bug that threatened to hit shortly afterwards, during the 'millennial' change-over. (authors)

  3. Operating experience with diesel generators in Belgian nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merny, R. [Association Vincotte, Avenue du Roi 157, B-1060 Bruxelles/Brussels (Belgium)

    1986-02-15

    Various problems have occurred on the diesel generators in the Belgian nuclear power plants, independently of the D.G. manufacturer or from the operating crew. Furthermore no individual part of the D.G. can be incriminated as being the main cause of the incidents. The incidents reported in this paper are chosen because of the importance for the safety or for the long repair period. The unavailability of a D.G. can only be detected by periodic tests and controls. Combined with a good preventive maintenance, the risks of incidents can be reduced. (author)

  4. Operating experience with diesel generators in Belgian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merny, R.

    1986-01-01

    Various problems have occurred on the diesel generators in the Belgian nuclear power plants, independently of the D.G. manufacturer or from the operating crew. Furthermore no individual part of the D.G. can be incriminated as being the main cause of the incidents. The incidents reported in this paper are chosen because of the importance for the safety or for the long repair period. The unavailability of a D.G. can only be detected by periodic tests and controls. Combined with a good preventive maintenance, the risks of incidents can be reduced. (author)

  5. Operating experience 1993 in Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    For many years, the Swedish nuclear power plants had a very good track record, compared with the international average. This trend was broken in 1993. During the year, six power plants were shut down for extended periods of time, for different safety-related reasons. During the autumn, a reactor containment leak was detected during scheduled containment leak rate testing at Barsebaeck 2. The unit was shut down for extensive investigation and corrective action for the rest of the year. Ringhals 2 was shut down last six months of the year as crack indications were found in a weld next to a control rod penetration in the reactor vessel head. Extensive tests and analyses revealed that the crack originated from the manufacturing of the vessel head and was of minor importance to safety. Oskarshamn 1 was shut down the whole year. Cracks in cold bent pipes in the residual heat removal system and cracks in the feedwater riser pipes lead to extensive replacement of piping, including pipes inside the reactor vessel. Decontamination of the reactor vessel was successful and attracted world wide interest. A programme for plant status verification was started in order to establish long-term operating conditions. Replacement of the pipe insulation and the inlet strainers in the core and containment spray systems solved the problems with clogging at certain failures in Barsebaeck, Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1 and 2. Six of the reactors had an extremely high availability, of about 90 per cent and more. By year end, eleven of the twelve reactors were in full power operation

  6. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd`s nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed`s nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight.

  7. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed's nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight

  8. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The total generation of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.1 TWh during 1999, which is slightly more than the mean value for the last five years. The total electricity consumption decreased by one percent, compared with 1998, to a total of 142.3 TWh, due to an unusually warm summer and autumn. The abundant supply of hydroelectric power resulted in comparatively extensive load-following operation by the nuclear plants during the year. Production losses due to low demand totalled 3.0 TWh. The closure of Barsebaeck 1 will result in a capacity reduction exceeding 4 TWh per year. The hydroelectric power production was 70 TWh, which was 6 TWh more than during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. The remaining production sources, mainly from solid fuel plants combined with district heating contributed 9 TWh. Electricity generation by means of wind power is still increasing. There are now about 470 wind power stations, which produced 0.3 TWh during the year. The total electricity generation totalled 149.8 TWh, a three percent decrease compared with 1998. The preliminary figures for export were 15.9 TWh and for import 8.4 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production result. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is provided in the 1999 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. The unit capability factor for the PWRs at Ringhals averaged 91%, while the BWRs averaged 82% mainly due to the extended outages. The BWR reactors at Forsmark averaged as much as 93%. Forsmark 1 experienced the shortest refuelling outage ever in Sweden, only 9 days and 20 hours. In May, Oskarshamn 2 passed a historical milestone - the unit produced 100 TWh since connection to the grid in 1974. The final production day for Barsebaeck 1, which had been in commercial operation since 1975, was on November 30 when a decision by the Swedish Government revoked the operating licence. Three safety-related events

  9. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In safety terms, operations of the Swedish nuclear power plants in 2003 can be summarized as having ben good, with a few exceptions: The thermal mixer problem at Barsebaeck-2; The Highest Permissible Limit Value excursion at OKG-3, which subjected the reactor pressure vessel to a too rapid temperature change; and An INES class 1 incident at Ringhals-1. The Barsebaeck and Ringhals events were not of such seriousness as to represent a threat to reactor safety, but they both had the effect of causing the Nuclear Power Inspectorate to question safety cultures at the plants. The mixer event resulted in a considerable production loss, with the reactor being shut down twice, making a total of five months. OKG-3 was shut down for almost two months during the autumn. Despite the above, production from Swedish NPPs was much the same as during 2002. Total electricity production amounted to 65 TWh (65.2 TWh in 2002). On the average the energy availability of the eleven reactors was 79%. The PWRs at Ringhals had an average energy availability of 89%, while the BWRs reached 76%

  10. Summary of operating experience in Swedish nuclear power plants 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    1994 was a record year for nuclear power in Sweden. For the second time, electricity generation from nuclear power exceeded 70 TWh (billions of kilowatt hours). Nuclear electricity generation corresponded to 51% of the total electricity generated in Sweden. Four units had an energy availability of more than 90%, while another five units had an availability of between 84 and 90%. This can be compared with an average international availability of 75%. Barsebaeck 2 was shut down during January to complete measures to correct a leak which was detected in the containment embedded steel plating in autumn 1993. During the year, a number of events occurred at Barsebaeck which were mainly caused by human error. A special evaluation of plant activities showed that the events occurred in connection with a reorganization which had been carried out. At year-end, it was discovered that the main steam line safety relief valves in Ringhals 2 were not correctly calibrated. The cause of the error was established and corrected and the safety relief valves at the other Ringhals PWRs were checked. Oskarshamn 1 was shut down for the whole year for a further inspection and modernization program. Manual inspections of the lower plenum of the reactor vessel were carried out for the first time ever in the world. The work methods, which have attracted considerable international interest, open up completely new dimensions for the maintenance and repair of reactor pressure vessels. The radiation doses to the personnel, which during 1993 were higher than usual, showed a marked decline in 1994. At the end of 1994, all of the Swedish nuclear power plants, apart from Oskarshamn 1, were in operation

  11. Operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, L.P.; Six, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company began operating a first-generation integrated safeguards system in the Plutonium Finishing Plant storage vaults. This Vault Safety and Inventory System is designed to integrate data into a computer-based nuclear material inventory monitoring system. The system gathers, in real time, measured physical parameters that generate nuclear material inventory status data for thousands of stored items and sends tailored report to the appropriate users. These data include canister temperature an bulge data reported to Plant Operations and Material Control and Accountability personnel, item presence and identification data reported to Material Control and Accountability personnel, and unauthorized item movement data reported to Security response forces and Material Control and Accountability personnel. The Westinghouse Hanford Company's experience and operational benefits in using this system for reduce radiation exposure, increase protection against insider threat, and real-time inventory control are discussed in this paper

  12. Power ramping/cycling experience and operational recommendations in KWU power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, R. von; Wunderlich, F.; Holzer, R.

    1980-01-01

    The power cycling and ramping experience of KWU is based on experiments in test and commercial reactors, and on evaluation of plant operation (PHWR, PWR and BWR). Power cycling of fuel rods have never lead to PCI failures. In ramping experiments, for fast ramps PCI failure thresholds of 480/420 W/cm are obtained at 12/23 GWd/t(U) burn-up for pressurized PWR fuel. No failures occurred during limited exceedance of the threshold with reduced ramp rate. Operational recommendations used by KWU are derived from experiments and plant experience. The effects of ramping considerations on plant operation is discussed. No rate restrictions are required for start-ups during an operating cycle or load follow operation within set limits for the distortion of the local power distribution. In a few situations, e.g. start-up after refueling, ramp rates of 1 to 5 %/h are recommended depending on plant and fuel design

  13. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    From a safety point of view, 2000 was - as were previous years - satisfactory. Total electricity production from the Swedish nuclear power stations amounted to 54.2 TWh, which was over 20% less than the 70.2 TWh produced in 1999. The two main reasons for the reduction were the closure of Barsebaeck 1 on 1st December 1999, and the cutback in output from all reactors due to the particularly good availability of hydro power in 2000. Some reactors were even shut down completely as a result of the low power demand, which has not happened previously. The quantity of unutilised production capacity as a result of these reductions amounted to 11.6 TWh. Costdown operation prior to the annual overhaul shutdowns, which makes better use of the fuel, represented a further 2.1 TWh of unutilised capacity. The average energy availability of the three PWRs at Ringhals was 82.0%, while that of the eight BWRs was 84.2%. Forsmark 3, Ringhals 3 and Oskarshamn 3 all had average availabilities of over 90%. Of five events with safety implications that occurred in the plants during the year, three are described under Special Reporting. One of them relates to the crack indications in welds that were found in an American PWR in the autumn, and which were subsequently also found in Ringhals 4.

  14. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    From a safety point of view, 2000 was - as were previous years - satisfactory. Total electricity production from the Swedish nuclear power stations amounted to 54.2 TWh, which was over 20% less than the 70.2 TWh produced in 1999. The two main reasons for the reduction were the closure of Barsebaeck 1 on 1st December 1999, and the cutback in output from all reactors due to the particularly good availability of hydro power in 2000. Some reactors were even shut down completely as a result of the low power demand, which has not happened previously. The quantity of unutilised production capacity as a result of these reductions amounted to 11.6 TWh. Costdown operation prior to the annual overhaul shutdowns, which makes better use of the fuel, represented a further 2.1 TWh of unutilised capacity. The average energy availability of the three PWRs at Ringhals was 82.0%, while that of the eight BWRs was 84.2%. Forsmark 3, Ringhals 3 and Oskarshamn 3 all had average availabilities of over 90%. Of five events with safety implications that occurred in the plants during the year, three are described under Special Reporting. One of them relates to the crack indications in welds that were found in an American PWR in the autumn, and which were subsequently also found in Ringhals 4

  15. Theory model and experiment research about the cognition reliability of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiang; Zhao Bingquan

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the reliability of NPP operation, the simulation research on the reliability of nuclear power plant operators is needed. Making use of simulator of nuclear power plant as research platform, and taking the present international reliability research model-human cognition reliability for reference, the part of the model is modified according to the actual status of Chinese nuclear power plant operators and the research model of Chinese nuclear power plant operators obtained based on two-parameter Weibull distribution. Experiments about the reliability of nuclear power plant operators are carried out using the two-parameter Weibull distribution research model. Compared with those in the world, the same results are achieved. The research would be beneficial to the operation safety of nuclear power plant

  16. Operational experience, availability and reliability of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1981-01-01

    This lecture presents a survey on nuclear power production and plant performance in the Western World covering all reactor types and light-water reactors in particular and discusses key parameters such as load factors and non-availability analysis, outlines the main reasons for the reliable performance of Swiss nuclear power plants and explains the management function as applied at the Beznau Nuclear Power Station to ensure high power productivity and reliability. (orig./RW)

  17. Self-assessment on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongtao; Ding Ying

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the purpose and function of self-assessment conducted by the responsible organizations of nuclear power plants, and describes the methods and requirements of self-assessment on operational experience feedback process to give a example. (authors)

  18. Operating experiences with Neutron Overpower Trip Systems in Ontario Hydro's CANDU nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnik, J.; Kozak, J.

    1991-01-01

    Operating experiences with Neutron Over Power Trip (NOP) Systems in different Ontario Hydro CANDU nuclear power plants are discussed. Lessons learned from the system operation and their impact on design improvements are presented. Retrofitting of additional tools, such as Shutdown System Monitoring computers, to improve operator interaction with the system is described. Experiences with the reliability of some of the NOP system components is also discussed. Options for future enhancements of system performance and operability are identified. (author)

  19. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, P.O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading

  20. Experience feedback of operation events in Ling'ao phase Ⅱ nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhi; Tao Shusheng; Sun Guochen; Zhang Zengqing

    2012-01-01

    As a new operating nuclear power plant, Ling'ao Phase Ⅱ occurred 20 pieces of operational events in one year of first cycle. By analyzing the events in this paper, the causes of the events are mainly concentrated in three aspects: interface between commissioning and operating, DCS system and the management of human factors. Finally, author gives some suggestions on experience feedback, as a reference to other similar nuclear power plants. (authors)

  1. Summary of operating experience at Swedish nuclear power plants in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The four owners on nuclear power plants in Sweden - The Swedish State Power Board, Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, Sydkraft AB and OKG AKTIEBOLAG - formed in 1980 the Nuclear Safety Board of the Swedish Utilities as a joint body for collaboration in safety matters. The Board participates in coordination of the safety work of the utilities and conducts its own safety projects, whereever this is more efficient than the utilities' working independently. The work of the Board shall contribute to optimizing safety in the operation of the Swedish nuclear power plants. The most important function of the Board is to collect, process and evaluate information on operational disturbances and incidents at Swedish and foreign nuclear power plants and then use the knowledge thus gained to improve the safety of the operation of the Swedish nuclear power plants (experience feedback). The work with Experience Feedback proceeds in three stages: Event follow-up, Fault analysis and Feedback of results. The Board runs a system for experience feedback (ERF). ERF is a computer-based information and communication system. ERF provides the Board with a daily update of operating experience in both Swedish and foreign nuclear power plants. Each Swedish nuclear power station supplies the ERF system with data on, among other things, operation and operational distrubances. Important experiences are thereby fed back to plant operation. Experience from foreign nuclear power stations can be of interest to the Swedish nuclear power plants. This information comes to RKS and is reviewed daily. The information that is considered relevant to Swedish plants is fed after analysis into the ERF system. Conversely, foreign nuclear power stations can obtain information from the operation of the Swedish plants. (author)

  2. Operational Experience from Swedish nuclear power plants 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A summary of two pages is given for each Swedish reactor with data on availability, scrams, radiation doses and important events during 1996. Special reports are presented on the following issues: Reactor core spray system inoperable at OKG-2, Containment pressure relief system incorrectly closed at Forsmark-1, Isolation condenser blocked for residual heat and continued operation with defective isolation valve at OKG-1; and Degraded pressure suppression function of the containment at Barsebaeck-2

  3. Economic Experience in Creation and Operation of Commercial Propulsion Nuclear Plants. Annex VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    This annex considers the reduction of capital costs in commercial nuclear power by employing commercial scale production and common technologies of equipment design and fabrication, based on the vast production and operation experience of Russian Federation nuclear propulsion plants. The performed consideration proves the expediency of adopting the most effective engineering solutions and approaches used for production of propulsion nuclear plants in the production of commercial nuclear power plants.

  4. Analysis of operating experience data in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Hirano, Masashi; Oikawa, Tetsukuni

    1991-09-01

    This report analyzes pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) experience involving loss of decay heat removal (DHR) during reactor shutdown. Referring to USNRC's Licensee Event Reports (LERs), OECD/NEA-IRS reports, etc., we selected 206 loss of DHR events which have occurred in PWRs between 1976 and 1990 and 48 events in BWRs between 1985 and 1990. Analysis of 197 events which have occurred in U.S. PWRs indicates that the following direct causes are major contributions resulting in loss of DHR during reactor shutdown: 1) Inadvertent automatic closure of the suction/isolation valves in residual heat removal (RHR) system, 2) RHR pump cavitation due to air entrainment in reduced coolant inventory condition, and 3) Loss of power to RHR pumps. Human factors deficiencies involving procedural inadequacies and personnel errors were identified as the most significant underlying or root causes of the loss of DHR events. Most of the errors were committed during maintenance, testing and repair works. As for 48 events in U.S. BWRs, the leading category of loss DHR events was the inadvertent automatic closure of the suction/isolation valves in RHR system, most of which were caused by human errors. This report describes the above analysis results and presents the events description for the selected significant events. As well, the brief descriptions of the 206 events in PWRs and 48 events in BWRs are provided in Appendix. (author)

  5. Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants

  6. Ten year experience in operation of a sewage sludge treatment plant using gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessel, T [Abwasserverband Ampergruppe, Eichenau/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.); Suess, A [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Bodenkultur und Pflanzenbau, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1984-01-01

    The first sewage sludge gamma irradiation plant in a technical scale, using Co-60 has been successfully working in Geiselbullach near Munich, FRG, since July 1973. More than 250,000 m/sup 3/ of liquid sludge has been disinfected during that time. Very simple plant design, fully automatic operation over 24 hours and high availability proved the practical applicability of such a facility in a sewage water purification plant without any specially skilled personnel. Beside wide investigations for hygienic aspects, changing of the physical sludge characteristics, effect of irradiated sludge on soil and plants the economic considerations were regarded as important. Experiments were undertaken to optimize the flexibility of the plant operation and to reduce the necessary radiation dose for minimizing the operation costs.

  7. Ten year experience in operation of a sewage sludge treatment plant using gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessel, T.; Suess, A.

    1984-01-01

    The first sewage sludge gamma irradiation plant in a technical scale, using Co-60 has been successfully working in Geiselbullach near Munich, FRG, since July 1973. More than 250,000 m 3 of liquid sludge has been disinfected during that time. Very simple plant design, fully automatic operation over 24 hours and high availability proved the practical applicability of such a facility in a sewage water purification plant without any specially skilled personnel. Beside wide investigations for hygienic aspects, changing of the physical sludge characteristics, effect of irradiated sludge on soil and plants the economic considerations were regarded as important. Experiments were undertaken to optimize the flexibility of the plant operation and to reduce the necessary radiation dose for minimizing the operation costs. (author)

  8. Nuclear power plant operating experiences from the IAEA / Nea incident reporting system 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an essential element of the international operating experience feedback system for nuclear power plants. The IRS is jointly operated and managed by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a semi-autonomous body within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a specialized agency within the United Nations System. (author)

  9. Lesson Learned from the Recent Operating Experience of Domestic Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Ju; Kim, Min-Chull; Koo, Bon-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Jae; Lee, Kyung-Won; Kim, Ji-Tae; Lee, Durk-Hun

    2007-01-01

    According to the public concerns, it seems that one of the main missions of a nuclear regulatory body is to collect operational experiences from various nuclear facilities, and to analyze their follow-up information. The extensive use of lessons learned from operating experiences to back fit safety systems, improve operator training and emergency procedures, and to focus more attention on human factors, safety culture and quality management systems are also desired. Collecting operational experiences has been mainly done regarding the incidents and major failures of components (so called 'event'), which usually demands lots of regulatory resources. This paper concentrates on new information, i.e. lesson learned from recent investigation results of domestic events which contain 5 years' experience. This information can induce many insights for improving operational safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs)

  10. U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, RL

    2003-01-01

    The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports

  11. Recent operating experience during startup testing at latest 1100 MWe BWR-5 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira; Tateishi, Mizuo; Kajikawa, Makoto; Hayase, Yuichi.

    1986-01-01

    In June and September 1985, the latest two 1100 Mwe BWR-5 nuclear power plants started commercial operation about ten days earlier than initially expected without any unscheduled shutdown. These latest plants, 2F-3 and K-1, are characterized by an improved core with new 8 x 8 fuel assemblies, highly reliable control systems, advanced control room system and turbine steam full bypass system for full load rejection (2F3). This paper describes the following operating experiences gained during their startup testing. 1) Continuous operation at full load rejection. 2) Stable operation at natural circulating flow condition. 3) 31 and 23 hour short time start up operation. 4) 100-75-100 %, 1-8-1-14 hours daily load following operation. (author)

  12. Magnesio-thermic reduction of UF4 to uranium metal : plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayekar, S.V.; Singh, H.; Meghal, A.M.; Koppiker, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium Metal Plant has switched over from calcio-thermy to magnesio-thermy for production of uranium ingots. In this paper, the plant operating experience for magnesio-thermic reduction is described. Based on trials, the production has been stepped up from 40 kg ingots to 200 kg ingots. The operating parameters optimised include : heating schedule, UF 4 quality, magnesium quantity and quality, and particle size. The effect of quality of refractory lining has been discussed. Conditions for lining are optimised with regard to type of material used and size. Developmental work has also been carried out on use of pelletised charge and on use of graphite sleeves. Some experience in the machining of ingots for removal of surface slag is also discussed. Impurity problems, occasionally encountered, have been investigated and results are discussed. Based on the experience gained, specifications for operation have been laid down, and areas for further improvement are identified. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Ageing degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plants: lessons learned from operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, M.; Zerger, B.; Duchac, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents main results of a comprehensive study performed by the European Clearinghouse on Operating Experience Feedback of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with the support of IRSN (Institut de Surete Nucleaire et de Radioprotection) and GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH). Physical ageing mechanisms of Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) that eventually lead to ageing related systems and components failures at nuclear power plants were the main focus of this study. The analysis of ageing related events involved operating experience reported by NPP operators in France, Germany, USA and to the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System on operating experience for the past 20 years. A list of relevant ageing related events was populated. Each ageing related event contained in the list was analyzed and results of analysis were summarized for each ageing degradation mechanism which appeared to be the dominant contributor or direct cause. This paper provides insights into ageing related operating experience as well as recommendations to deal with the physical ageing of nuclear power plant SSC important to safety. (authors)

  14. Proceedings of recent innovations and experience with plant monitoring and utility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchtman, I.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Recent Innovations and Experience with Plant Monitoring and Utility Operations. Topics covered include: a number of innovative actions recently applied at plants in the United States, Australia, and the People's Republic of China. A preview of forthcoming instrumentation and monitoring techniques, enhanced boiler and turbine operations and maintenance, determining root causes of boiler related problems, welding technique that eliminates high temperature, post weld heat treatment, successful application of a portable oil filtration skid, and a method of evaluation for high pressure turbine life assessment using the EPRI rotor life assessment software

  15. Operating experiences with passive systems and components in German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqua, M.

    1996-01-01

    Operating experience with passive systems and components is limited to the equipment installed in existing NPPs. In German power plants, this experience is available for equipment of the IAEA categories A, C and D. The presentation is focused on typical examples out of these three categories. An overview is given on the number of reported events and typical failure modes. Selected failures are discussed in detail. 1 ref., 6 figs, 7 tabs

  16. Operating experiences with passive systems and components in German nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maqua, M [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    Operating experience with passive systems and components is limited to the equipment installed in existing NPPs. In German power plants, this experience is available for equipment of the IAEA categories A, C and D. The presentation is focused on typical examples out of these three categories. An overview is given on the number of reported events and typical failure modes. Selected failures are discussed in detail. 1 ref., 6 figs, 7 tabs.

  17. Experience gained in the training of nuclear power plant operating personnel with nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, J.; Fueg, J.; Schlegel, G.

    1980-01-01

    The simulator of a PWR-type reactor with 1.200 MW was accomplished in September 1977. In January 1978, the simulator of a BWR-type reactor with 800 MW started operation. The American company Singer/Link supplied computer hardware and software; Kraftwerk Union AG supplied control room equipment, power plant data and acted as consulting engineers for the construction and acceptance of the simulators. This way it is ensured that the simulated process reflects the state of German nuclear engineering. (orig./DG) [de

  18. Best practices in the utilization and dissemination of operating experience at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1 entitled Fundamental Safety Principles: Safety Fundamentals states the need for operating organizations to establish a programme for the collection and analysis of operating experience in nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff of the organization and to relevant national and international organizations, operating experience is utilized and corrective actions are effectively implemented. This publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to nuclear installations and related institutions, including contractors and support organizations, to strengthen and enhance their own feedback process through the implementation of best practices in the utilization and dissemination of operating experience and to assess their effectiveness. Dissemination and utilization of internal and external operating experience is essential in supporting a proactive safety management approach of preventing events from occurring. Few new events reveal a completely new cause or failure mechanism. Although not recognized prior to the event, most subsequent investigations identify internal or external industry operating experience that, if applied effectively, would have prevented the event. Therefore, the establishment of an effective utilization and dissemination process is very beneficial in raising awareness of the organization and individuals of available operating experience, and focussing effort in the implementation of the lessons learnt. This leads to improved safety and reliability. The present publication is the outcome of a coordinated effort involving the participation of experts of nuclear organizations in several Member States. It was written to complement the publication IAEA Services Series No. 10 entitled PROSPER Guidelines - Guidelines for Peer Review and for Plant Self-assessment of

  19. Irradiated Concrete in Nuclear Power Plants: Bridging the Gap in Operational Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmann, Brian P.; Esselman, Thomas C.; Wall, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The world's fleet of operating nuclear power plants (NPP) has been in-service for more than 20 years. In order to support the increasing demand for inexpensive power, many plants will be required to operate beyond 40 years, which was the original licensing period for existing NPPs. Improved knowledge of the performance of irradiated concrete is required to form a technical basis for long term operation (operation to 80+ years) of nuclear plants around the world. To date, operating experience (OE) of concrete subjected to irradiation has been acceptable, but there is an absence of data on this topic for extended periods of operation. The lack of empirical data has contributed to the difficulty of quantifying the long term behavior of concrete that is experiencing irradiation. Programs are in place that address other degradation mechanisms of concrete, but a clear and focused program is required on the effects of radiation. This paper presents a review of the available literature on the topic of the long-term irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of concrete, and provides a proposed methodology for the characterization of irradiated concrete removed from shut down or decommissioned commercial plants. (author)

  20. Feedback of operation and maintenance experience into evolutionary plant design (HWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, K.R.; Sanatkumar, A.; Kwon, Oh-Cheol

    1999-01-01

    The process of feeding back operation and maintenance information into the CANDU plant design process has been in constant evolution since the beginning of the CANDU program. The commissioning and operation experience from the first commercial reactors at Pickering A and Bruce A was used extensively in the design of the first generation CANDU 6 Plants. These units have been in operation for 15 years, producing electricity at an average lifetime capacity factor of about 85%. In further advancing the CANDU 6 and 9 design, greater emphasis is placed on enhancements that can reduce operational costs and further improve plant performance by reducing the planned outage time. The plant design has been improved to facilitate maintenance scheduling, equipment isolation, maintenance and post maintenance testing. Individual tasks have been analyzed as well as the interaction between tasks during outages to reduce the down time required and simplify the execution of the work. This results in shorter outages, reduced radioactive dose and reduced costs. The Utilities have continued to play an important role in CANDU 6 Evolution. Specifically; the Korea Utility KEPCO has one of the original four CANDU 6 Plants and three of the most modem. Their feedback to the designers has been very helpful. One of the most important feedback processes is through the CANDU Owners Group, which provides information exchange between members. In India eight PHWRs of 220 MWe capacity are in operation. Four reactors, also of 220 MWe capacity are in advanced stages of construction. Site construction work of two units of 500 MWe PHWRs at Tarapur will be taken up shortly. Over the years, during construction and operation of these power stations, a large amount of experience has been accumulated. Operation and maintenance experience is shared with operating stations by intensive participation of design engineers in Station Operation Review meetings, trouble shooting and root cause analysis of problems

  1. Two-year experience of the Loviisa-1 nuclear power plant operation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmgren, A.; Simola, P.; Skyutta, P.; Malkov, Yu.V.; Mal'tsev, B.K.; Shasharin, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The description of experience of creation and operation of the Loviisa-1 nuclear power plant in Finland is presented. The main stages of power block development were the following: functional tests of systems and equipment, hydraulic tests of the reactor and primary circuit, inspection of equipment, hot testing, testing of protective envelope, second inspection, reactor assembling and fuel loading, physical and power start-up of the reactor, testing of the plant as a whole. Tests of the APP operation on load were particularly extensive. These tests were carried out on the 5, 15, 30, 50, 75 and 92 % thermal power levels of the reactor and covered: physical reactor tests, electric and dynamic tests of the power unit, tests with failures in equipment operation, chemical tests, studies of shielding effectiveness, thermal and guarantee tests. The positive experience of the Loviisa-1 nuclear power plant operation, reactor reliability, fuel element tightness, high efficiency (33.9 %) and satisfactory operation of turbo-generator confirm the success of the Loviisa-1 NPP project

  2. Civil ships propulsion reactor plants development and operation experience, and prospects for their improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyukov, V.I.; Kiryushin, A.I.; Panov, Yu.K.; Polunichev, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    Russia is alone country in the World possessing nuclear-powered icebreaker fleet. Phases of creation in Russia of several propulsion nuclear reactor plant generations are considered. By present 8 nuclear ice-breakers and a nuclear-powered cargo ship (lighter carrier) have been constructed, for which three of propulsion NSSS generations were developed. Their brief description, main performance indicators and results of operation since 1959 are given. It is shown that gradual evolution of NSSS design features has ensured creation of reliable, safe and environmentally friendly propulsion reactor plants. Issues of the propulsion NSSS life extension and improvement for new generation of nuclear ice-breakers, cargo ships, floating heat and power plants, sea water desalination and power generating complexes are considered with account for the gained operating experience. Activities on creation of new generation nuclear-powered ships and floating NPPs are considered as prospective sphere of Russia's collaboration with other countries of the World community. (author)

  3. Water-hammer experiences in the startup and early operation of the Shearon Harris plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.

    1987-01-01

    During the startup testing and initial operation of any power plant, systems undergo planned transients to confirm their ability to respond as designed. In addition to planned testing, unplanned transients infrequently occur as equipment is initially used. Some of both the planned and unplanned transients result in water-hammer events. Several water-hammer events experienced during preoperational testing, power ascension testing, and early operation of the Shearon Harris nuclear power plant are presented. The cause, effect, and corrective actions undertaken to prevent recurrence for each event discussed are provided. In addition, examples of preventive measures taken, based on industry experience accrued at other plants, to prevent a similar occurrence at Shearon Harris are discussed

  4. National symposium on commissioning and operating experiences in heavy water plants and associated chemical industries [Preprint volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    A symposium on commissioning and operating experiences in heavy water plants and associated chemical industries (SCOPEX-92) was organised to share the experience and exchange the ideas among plant operators, designers, consultants and vendors in the areas of operation, commissioning and equipment performance. This pre-print volume has been brought out as an integrated source of information on commissioning and operation of heavy water plants. The following aspects of heavy water plants are covered: commissioning and operation, instrumentation and control, and safety and environment. (V.R.)

  5. Experience with training of operating and maintenance personnel of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Cencinger, F.

    1988-01-01

    The system is described of the specialist training of personnel for Czechoslovak nuclear power plants. Training consists of basic training, vocational training and training for the respective job. Responsible for the training is the Research Institute for Nuclear Power Plants; actual training takes place at three training centres. Personnel are divided into seven categories for training purposes: senior technical and economic staff, shift leaders, whose work has immediate effect on nuclear safety, engineering and technical personnel of technical units, shift leaders of technical units, personnel in technical units, shift service personnel and operating personnel, maintenance workers. Experience with training courses run at the training centre is summed up. Since 1980 the Centre has been training personnel mainly for the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Recommendations are presented for training personnel for the Temelin nuclear power plant. (Z.M.)

  6. Surveillance and fault diagnosis for power plants in the Netherlands: operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkcan, E.; Ciftcioglu, O.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) surveillance and fault diagnosis systems in Dutch Borssele (PWR) and Dodewaard (BWR) power plants are summarized. Deterministic and stochastic models and artificial intelligence (AI) methodologies effectively process the information from the sensors. The processing is carried out by means of methods and algorithms that are collectively referred to Power Reactor Noise Fault Diagnosis. Two main schemes used are failure detection and instrument fault detection. In addition to conventional and advanced modern fault diagnosis methodologies involved, also the applications of emerging technologies in Dutch reactors are given and examples from operational experience are presented. (author)

  7. Operating experiences of gas purification system of Heavy Water Plant Talcher (Paper No. 1.11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Mohanty, P.R.; Pandey, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    The operating experiences with the purification system installed at Heavy Water Plant, Talcher for purification of feed synthesis gas from fertilizer plant is described. The purification system has performed satisfactorily even with levels of impurities as much as 15 to 20 ppm of oxygen and carbon monoxide. The system could not however be tested at designed gas throughput and on a sustained basis. However, increase in gas throughput upto the design value is not expected to pose any problem on the performance of the purification system. (author). 5 figs

  8. Radiation treatment of sewage sludge - experience with an operating pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, A.; Lessel, T.

    1977-01-01

    After an operation time of a pilot plant for the γ-irradiation of sewage sludge after 3 years promising results could be obtained for economic considerations, killing rate of pathogenes and radiation induced changes in sedimentation properties. Irradiated sewage sludge indicated nearly the same effect on soil and plant as untreated. No special trained personnel are necessary for maintenance because of the simple design. Successful experience during 18 months resulted in an increase of the daily capacity up to 120 m 3 from December 1975. (author)

  9. Study on application of operating experience to new nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Nam Pyo

    1991-01-01

    From the standpoint of designing the nuclear power plant, nine operating units have been designed and constructed as turn-key base by foreign Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Suppliers or as component base by foreign Architect/Engineer companies. In case of the component base project, the owner of electric company generally has merits that owner's operational experiences can be effectively incorporated from the beginning stage of design by A/E. Even though six nuclear units, Kori Units 3 and 4, Yonggwang Units 1 and 2, and Ulchin Units 1 and 2, were designed as component base by foreign A/E's, operational experience feedback from Kori Unit 1, such as design improvement and system upgrade, could not be reflected, because the design process of the following units started well ahead before Kori Unit 1 operating experience is obtained enough to reflect on future nuclear power plant design. It can be stated that foreign A/E's used their experience in designing nuclear projects on very limited basis

  10. Helium turbomachinery operating experience from gas turbine power plants and test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.

    2012-01-01

    The closed-cycle gas turbine, pioneered and deployed in Europe, is not well known in the USA. Since nuclear power plant studies currently being conducted in several countries involve the coupling of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a helium closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system, the experience gained from operated helium turbomachinery is the focus of this paper. A study done as early as 1945 foresaw the use of a helium closed-cycle gas turbine coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, and some two decades later this was investigated but not implemented because of lack of technology readiness. However, the first practical use of helium as a gas turbine working fluid was recognized for cryogenic processes, and the first two small fossil-fired helium gas turbines to operate were in the USA for air liquefaction and nitrogen production facilities. In the 1970's a larger helium gas turbine plant and helium test facilities were built and operated in Germany to establish technology bases for a projected future high efficiency large nuclear gas turbine power plant concept. This review paper covers the experience gained, and the lessons learned from the operation of helium gas turbine plants and related test facilities, and puts these into perspective since over three decades have passed since they were deployed. An understanding of the many unexpected events encountered, and how the problems, some of them serious, were resolved is important to avoid them being replicated in future helium turbomachines. The valuable lessons learned in the past, in many cases the hard way, particularly from the operation in Germany of the Oberhausen II 50 MWe helium gas turbine plant, and the technical know-how gained from the formidable HHV helium turbine test facility, are viewed as being germane in the context of current helium turbomachine design work being done for future high efficiency nuclear gas turbine plant concepts. - Highlights:

  11. Operational experience with nuclear power plants - outage statistics, causes and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsch, W.

    1980-01-01

    Whether operating experience is good or bad is not a question of the subjective impression. Availability, reliability, environmental influence, safety and economy are of a significance which cannot be expressed by figures. To what extent the result may be called good or bad can be noticed by comparing the results with the projected expected values or by comparing them with other plants locally or overseas. (orig.)

  12. Commissioning and operating experience of compressed air system of a reprocessing plant (Paper No. 5.10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.K.T.; Bajpai, D.D.; Mishra, A.K.; Kulkarni, H.B.; Raje, R.V.; Rajeshwar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Compressed air system is one of the most important utility systems, required in the continued operation of a radiochemical plant. Moisture and oil free compressed air is used in large scale for process control and process operations in reprocessing plants. Commissioning and operating experience of this system is described in detail, to indicate the importance of the system in the overall design and operation of such chemical plant. (author). 1 tab

  13. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience from the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience, 2005-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The fundamental objective of the Incident Reporting System (IRS) is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants which are operated worldwide. This fourth publication, covering the period 2005-2008, follows on the success of the previous three. It highlights important lessons learned based on a review of the approximately 200 event reports received from the participating countries over this period. The book is written both for a non-technical audience and for senior officials in industry and government who have decision making roles in the nuclear power industry.

  14. Best Practices in the Management of an Operating Experience Programme at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1) state the need for operating organizations to establish a programme for the feedback and analysis of operating experience in nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff of the organization and to the relevant national and international organizations and corrective actions are effectively implemented. In IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) and Peer Review of the effectiveness of the Operational Safety Performance Experience Review (PROSPER) missions, weaknesses in the management of operating experience (OE) programmes have been identified as one of the root causes of the recurrence of events. This publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to nuclear installation managers and related institutions, including contractors and support organizations, to strengthen and enhance the management of their OE processes. In this publication, a number of barriers to the successful management of an OE programme have been identified. Managers are encouraged to review and evaluate these barriers with a view to identifying and eliminating them within their own organizations

  15. Use of operational experience in fire safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Fire hazard has been identified as a major contributor to a plant's operational risk and the international nuclear power industry has been studying and developing tools for defending against this hazard. Considerable progress in design and regulatory requirements for fire safety, in fire protection technology and in related analytical techniques has been made in the past two decades. Substantial efforts have been undertaken worldwide to implement these advances in the interest of improving fire safety both at new and existing nuclear power plants. To assist in these efforts, the IAEA initiated a programme on fire safety that was intended to provide assistance to Member States in improving fire safety in nuclear power plants. In order to achieve this general objective, the IAEA programme aimed at the development of guidelines and good practices, the promotion of advanced fire safety assessment techniques, the exchange of state of the art information between practitioners and the provision of engineering safety advisory services and training in the implementation of internationally accepted practices. During the period 1993-1994, the IAEA activities related to fire safety concentrated on the development of guidelines and good practice documents related to fire safety and fire protection of operating plants. One of the first tasks was the development of a Safety Guide that formulates specific requirements with regard to the fire safety of operating nuclear power plants. Several documents, which provide advice on fire safety inspection, were developed to assist in its implementation. In the period 1995-1996, the programme focused on the preparation of guidelines for the systematic analysis of fire safety at nuclear power plants (NPPs). The IAEA programme on fire safety for 1997-1998 includes tasks aimed at promoting systematic assessment of fire safety related occurrences and dissemination of essential insights from this assessment. One of the topics addressed is the

  16. Best practices in identifying, reporting and screening operating experience at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1 entitled Fundamental Safety Principles: Safety Fundamentals states the need for operating organizations to establish a programme for the collection and analysis of operating experience in nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff of the organization and to relevant national and international organizations, and corrective actions are effectively implemented. This publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to nuclear installations, and related institutions including contractors and support organizations to strengthen and enhance their own feedback process through the implementation of best practices in identifying, reporting and screening processes and to assess the effectiveness of the above areas. To support a proactive safety management approach the nuclear installations are enhancing the operating experience feedback (OEF) processes. For this purpose, the nuclear industry is striving to collect more information on occurrences that are useful to address the early signs of declining performance and improve operational safety performance. In this environment a strong reporting culture that motivates people to identify and report issues is an important attribute. As a consequence, the number and diversity of issues identified increases, and there is a need to set thresholds of screening for further treatment. Thus, the establishment of an effective identification, reporting and screening process is very beneficial to streamline the efforts, and ensure that major incidents and latent weaknesses are being addressed and that operating experience is treated according to its significance. This leads to improved safety and production. This publication was written to complement the publication IAEA Services Series No. 10 - PROSPER Guidelines - Guidelines for Peer Review and for

  17. Nuclear power plant operating experiences from the IAEA/NEA Incident Reporting System 1999-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Incident reporting has become an increasingly important aspect of the operation and regulation of all public health and safety-related industries. Diverse industries such as aeronautics, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and explosives all depend on operating experience feedback to provide lessons learned about safety. The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an essential element of the system for feeding back international operating experience for nuclear power plants. IRS reports contain information on events of Safety significance with important lessons learned. These experiences assist in reducing or eliminating recurrence of events at other plants. The IRS is jointly operated and managed by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a semi-autonomous body within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It is important that sufficient national resources be allocated to enable timely and high quality reporting of events important to safety, and to share these events in the IRS database. The first report, which covered the period July 1996 - June 1999, was widely acclaimed and encouraged both agencies to prepare this second report in order to highlight important lessons learned from around 300 events reported to the IRS for the period July 1999 - December 2002. Several areas were selected in this report to show the range of important topics available in the IRS. These include different types of failure in a variety of plant systems, as well as human performance considerations. This report is primarily aimed at senior officials in industry and government who have decision-making roles in the nuclear power industry

  18. Requirements and Possibilities for Operational Experience Feedback from the Plant's Manufacturer's Point of View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimann, P.

    2010-01-01

    A large amount of nations has realized that nuclear energy can contribute sustainable to secure their national energy supply. In the last few years, apart from the established nuclear nations, other, often smaller countries have also decided for themselves to apply the nuclear option to secure their energy supply. This partly takes place in multi-national cooperation between neighboring countries on one side, as well as otherwise between different companies on the manufacturers'/utilities' side. The endeavor of building absolutely safe reactors and of operating them safely requires the necessity on different levels of considering existing and up to date experiences gained in all the nuclear projects' phases. The long time period of many years between the decision on building a nuclear power plant, the licensing procedure, the detailed planning, the construction phase and the commissioning of the plants, results in the necessity of having to incorporate the constant experience gain on all technical and administrative levels. This applies to the safety-related boundary conditions in the frame of a new-build project in the same way as for updating measures performed on existing plants. An often neglected fact, this also applies to the right choice of the guidelines to be applied, to an efficient and competent authority and utility body or to the integration of the appropriate technical specialists and experts. Therefore the utilities and their tasks are confronted with different requirements, depending on whether they are located in the country of responsible nuclear power plant utilities' head quarters or whether they are simply co-owners of a foreign plant. AREVA as company covering the complete nuclear cycle including the corresponding plant construction supports its partners in all project phases including the development of national institutions and knowledge transfer. All of AREVA's existing knowledge - even the recently obtained - is integrated directly in the

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear reprocessing plants French past experience and approach to future large scale operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean Jacques, M.; Maurel, J.J.; Maillet, J.

    1994-01-01

    Over the years, France has built up significant experience in dismantling nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities or various types of units representative of a modern reprocessing plant. However, only small or medium scale operations have been carried out so far. To prepare the future decommissioning of large size industrial facilities such as UP1 (Marcoule) and UP2 (La Hague), new technologies must be developed to maximize waste recycling and optimize direct operations by operators, taking the integrated dose and cost aspects into account. The decommissioning and dismantling methodology comprises: a preparation phase for inventory, choice and installation of tools and arrangement of working areas, a dismantling phase with decontamination, and a final contamination control phase. Detailed description of dismantling operations of the MA Pu finishing facility (La Hague) and of the RM2 radio metallurgical laboratory (CEA-Fontenay-aux-Roses) are given as examples. (J.S.). 3 tabs

  20. Experience in commissioning and scientific support of nuclear power plant operation in the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Endler, A.; Loth, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    In the German Democratic Republic two nuclear power plants equipped with four pressurized-water WWER-440-type reactors were commissioned in the years 1973-1979 and have since been in routine operation. The nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the GDR were constructed on the basis of projects developed and tested in the Soviet Union. Their main equipment was also supplied by the USSR. Under the technical supervision of USSR scientific institutions and design organizations, the construction, commissioning and operation of NPPs had to be prepared and organized by the design organizations, scientific institutions and the prospective user in the German Democratic Republic. To this effect, and to ensure nuclear safety, availability and maximum exploitation of nuclear fuel, it was necessary to develop national scientific capacities. The organizations of the USSR supply basic and supplementary documents prescribing the required extent of investigations to prove that the equipment and systems will meet the projected and operational conditions from loading to commercial operation. Concrete test programmes for commissioning and operational instructions are elaborated by national organizations. Pre-operational and initial startup tests are performed by the personnel of the plant, of enterprises and scientific institutions under the technical supervision of the design organizations of the USSR and the German Democratic Republic. Proceeding from experience gained for more than 15 years in the scientific support of commissioning and operation, the required training and disciplines of personnel are reported. The tasks to be met by the various disciplines are described. Furthermore, information is given on the main stages of commissioning and on a number of results. Finally, selected results of work in connection with operational assistance are reported

  1. 10 Years of operating experience of the valves in the safety systems on Caorso plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcuruto, S.; Pasquini, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Operating Experience (O.E.) of the valves in the safety related systems on Caorso plant has been analysed. The valves have been grouped according to system, type and manufacturer. All the data on the failures have been respectively drawn out by the O.E. data bank and, in some cases, they have been integrated by informations collected directly on the plant. The events and the relevant causes have been analysed, particularly taking into account the repetitive events. Most of the failures were discovered during the surveillance tests, giving a positive indication of the effectiveness of the periodic test program. It was also that concluded hardware problems caused more failures than human errors both during operation and maintenance. Abnormal distributions of failures on the valves and on their components have been found out. Weak components both mechanical and electrical and pertinent corrective measures have been identified, aimed to eliminate the recurring failure modes

  2. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1: Operating experience program and plant specific performance indicators (level 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodor, Vasile; Popa, Viorel

    1998-01-01

    The basis for the Operating Experience Program was set in place since early stages of the commissioning phase (1993), when a system based on the Canadian approach was implemented for reporting, reviewing, assessing and establishing of the necessary corrective action for unplanned events. This system provided excellent opportunity to train staff in unplanned event assessment methodology, and prepare the station for the formal reporting process following criticality in accordance with the licensing requirements. The formal process, set in place after criticality is described in Station Instruction Procedure SI-01365-P13 'Unplanned Event Report' and was developed under the supervision of Safety and Compliance Department. In parallel, a program for information exchange and trending of performance indicators was developed by Technical Services Department. The WANO recommendations following August 1997 Peer Review provided the opportunity for a better understanding and reconsideration of the Operating Experience Program. As a result, all the activities related to this topic were assigned to a new structure, within Safety and Compliance Department. As such an Operating Experience Group was created and a new program is now being developed in an integrated and centralized manner. The content of the paper is the following: - Overview; - Operating Experience Program; - Event Analysis (Unplanned Events Assessment System - UEIR Process- and Systematic Analysis of Operational Events - ACR Process); - Information Exchange Program; - Monitoring of Operating Experience - Plant Specific Performance Indicators; - Purpose; - Level 2 Performance Indicators. Four appendices are added containing: - A. Station performance indicators/targets (Level 2); - B. SPI (Station Performance Indicators - Level 2) - Graphics; - C. UEIR, LRS (Safety and Licensing Review Sheet), UEFR (Unplanned Event Follow-up Report), ACR and OPEX forms. (authors)

  3. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE: UPGRADED MPC AND A SYSTEMS FOR THE RADIOCHEMICAL PLANT OF THE SIBERIAN CHEMICAL COMBINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RODRIGUEZ, C.; GOLOSKOKOV, I.; FISHBONE, L.; GOODEY, K.; LOOMIS, M.; CRAIN, B. JR.; LARSEN, R.

    2003-01-01

    inventory procedures, and destructive and nondestructive assay equipment to perform neutron and gamma measurements on nuclear materials in process or storage. These MPC and A upgrades have been in operation at the SCC Radiochemical Plant for between 2 and 3 years. The operational experience gained by SCC during this period is currently being evaluated by SCC and ''lessons learned'' will be considered both for continued operation of the Radiochemical Plant MPC and A systems and similar MPC and A systems that are currently being planned for other Plant Sites of the SCC

  4. Engineering development of a digital replacement protection system at an operating US PWR nuclear power plant: Installation and operational experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.H. [Duke Power Co., Seneca, SC (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The existing Reactor Protection Systems (RPSs) at most US PWRs are systems which reflect 25 to 30 year-old designs, components and manufacturing techniques. Technological improvements, especially in relation to modern digital systems, offer improvements in functionality, performance, and reliability, as well as reductions in maintenance and operational burden. The Nuclear power industry and the US nuclear regulators are poised to move forward with the issues that have slowed the transition to modern digital replacements for nuclear power plant safety systems. The electric utility industry is now more than ever being driven by cost versus benefit decisions. Properly designed, engineered, and installed digital systems can provide adequate cost-benefit and allow continued nuclear generated electricity. This paper describes various issues and areas related to an ongoing RPS replacement demonstration project which are pertinant for a typical US nuclear plant to consider cost-effective replacement of an aging analog RPS with a modern digital RPS. The following subject areas relative to the Oconee Nuclear Station ISAT{trademark} Demonstrator project are discussed: Operator Interface Development; Equipment Qualification; Validation and Verification of Software; Factory Testing; Field Changes and Verification Testing; Utility Operational, Engineering and Maintenance; Experiences with Demonstration System; and Ability to operate in parallel with the existing Analog RPS.

  5. Engineering development of a digital replacement protection system at an operating US PWR nuclear power plant: Installation and operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    The existing Reactor Protection Systems (RPSs) at most US PWRs are systems which reflect 25 to 30 year-old designs, components and manufacturing techniques. Technological improvements, especially in relation to modern digital systems, offer improvements in functionality, performance, and reliability, as well as reductions in maintenance and operational burden. The Nuclear power industry and the US nuclear regulators are poised to move forward with the issues that have slowed the transition to modern digital replacements for nuclear power plant safety systems. The electric utility industry is now more than ever being driven by cost versus benefit decisions. Properly designed, engineered, and installed digital systems can provide adequate cost-benefit and allow continued nuclear generated electricity. This paper describes various issues and areas related to an ongoing RPS replacement demonstration project which are pertinant for a typical US nuclear plant to consider cost-effective replacement of an aging analog RPS with a modern digital RPS. The following subject areas relative to the Oconee Nuclear Station ISAT trademark Demonstrator project are discussed: Operator Interface Development; Equipment Qualification; Validation and Verification of Software; Factory Testing; Field Changes and Verification Testing; Utility Operational, Engineering and Maintenance; Experiences with Demonstration System; and Ability to operate in parallel with the existing Analog RPS

  6. Operational experience, evolution and developments in water chemistry in Indian Nuclear Power Plants - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    2000-01-01

    Lessons learnt from the experiences at nuclear power plants have enriched the understanding of corrosion behaviour in water systems. The need for proper water chemistry control not only during operation but also during fabrication and preoperational tests is clearly seen. It should not be construed that maintenance of proper water chemistry is a panacea for all corrosion and other associated problems. Unless adequate care is taken in selection of material and sound design and fabrication practices are followed, no regime of water chemistry can help in eliminating failure due to corrosion

  7. Experience in integrating the operator contributions in the PRA of actual operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potash, L.M.; Stewart, M.; Dietz, P.E.; Lewis, C.M.; Dougherty, E.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    While working on the human factors' portion of the Oconee Probabilistic Risk Assessment, we identified several major problems that inhibit any effort to handle operator error in PRAs. The approaches we developed should help to direct future efforts in dealing with these problems

  8. Operational experience of human-friendly control and instrumentation systems for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, M.; Watanabe, T.; Suto, O.; Asahi, R.

    1987-01-01

    In recent BWR nuclear power plants in Japan, an advanced centralized monitoring and control system PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information and Automation), which incorporates many operator aid functions, has been in operation since 1985. Main functions of the PODIA system as a computerized operator aid system are as follows. CRT displays for plant monitoring. Automatic controls and operation guides for plant operation. Stand-by status monitoring for engineered safety features during normal operation. Surveillance test procedure guides for engineered safety features. Integrated alarm display. The effectiveness of these functions have been proved through test and commercial operation. It has been obtained that operators have preferred PODIA much more than conventional monitoring and control systems

  9. Recent Operating Experience involving Power Electronics Failure in Korea Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaedo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, modern power electronics devices for electrical component were steadily increased in electrical systems which used for main power control and protection. To upgrade the system reliability we recommended the redundancy for electrical equipment trip system. The past several years, Korean Nuclear power plants have changed the electrical control and protection systems (Auto Voltage Regulator, Power Protection Relay) for main generator and main power protection relay systems. In this paper we deal with operating experience involving modern solid state power electronics failure in Korean nuclear power plants. One of the failures we will discuss the degraded phenomenon of power electronics device for CEDMCS(Control Element Drive Mechanism Control System). As the result of the failure we concerned about the modification for trip source of main generator excitation systems and others. We present an interesting issue for modern solid state devices (IGBT, Thyristors). (authors)

  10. Operating experience with aluminum bearings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1975-01-01

    Considerable operating experience has been gained at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant over the last 15 years in the use of aluminum bearings in process related and auxiliary equipment. All of this experience has been excellent and, in several cases, the use of this type of bearing material has solved significant operating problems. Aluminum 850-T101 alloy was first used as a bearing material in purge cascade (PC-9) centrifugal compressors where a fatigue problem was being experienced with babbitt-type bearings. Good experience in this application led to the extended use of this bearing material in other equipment including process related as well as auxiliary equipment. Since 1961 aluminum bearings have been installed in approximately 21 Type PC-9 (centrifugal), 97 Type 9 (centrifugal), 262 Type X-29 (axial), and 101 Type 31 (axial) compressors, and 3 speed increasers in the X-330 Evacuation Booster Station. Based on successful operation of these bearings, continued and expanded use of aluminum bearings is recommended as a means of obtaining a high fatigue resistant bearing at a cost lower than that for babbitt-type bearings. (U.S.)

  11. Design and operational experience with the off-gas cleaning system of the Seibersdorf incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patek, P.R.M.

    1983-01-01

    After a description of the design and the construction principles of the incinerator building, the furnace and its attached auxiliary devices are explained. The incinerator is layed out for low level wastes. It has a vertical furnace, operates with discontinuous feeding for trashes with heat-values between 600 and 10,000 kcal/kg waste. The maximum throughput amounts to 40 kg/h. The purification of the off-gas is guaranteed by a multistage filter system: 2 stages with ceramic candles, an electrostatic filter and a HEPA-filter system. The control of the off-gas cleaning is carried out by a stack instrumentation, consisting of an aerosol-, gas-, iodine- and tritium-monitor; the building is surveyed by doserate and aerosolmonitors. Finally the experiences of the first year of operation and the main problems in running the plant are described. (author)

  12. Analysis of failure and maintenance experiences of motor operated valves in a Finnish nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.; Laakso, K.

    1992-01-01

    Operating experiences from 1981 up to 1989 of totally 104 motor operated closing valves (MOV) in different safety systems at TVO I and II nuclear power units were analysed in a systematic way. The qualitative methods used were failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) and maintenance effects and criticality analysis (MECA). The failure descriptions were obtained from power plant's computerized failure reporting system. The reported 181 failure events were reanalysed and sorted according to specific classifications developed for the MOV function. Filled FMEA and MECA sheets on individual valves were stored in a microcomputer data base for further analyses. Analyses were performed for the failed mechanical and electrical valve parts, ways of detection of failure modes, failure effects, and repair and unavailability times

  13. Design and operational experience with the off-gas cleaning system of the Seibersdorf incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patek, P.

    1982-05-01

    After a description of the design and the construction principles of the incinerator building, the furnace and its attached auxilary devices are explained. The incinerator is layed out for low level wastes. It has a vertical furnace, operates with discontinuous feeding for trashes with heat-values between 600 and 10000 kcal/kg waste. The maximum throughput ammounts 40 kg/h. The purification of the off-gas is guaranteed by a multistage filter system: 2 stages with ceramic candles, an electrostatic filter and a HEPA-filter system. The control of the off-gas cleaning is carried out by a stack instrumentation, consisting of an aerosol-, gas-, iodine- and tritium-monitor; the building is surveilled by doserate- and aerosolmonitors. Finally the experiences of the first year of operation and the main problems in running the plant are described. (Author) [de

  14. Operating experiences on ammonia water exchange system at Heavy Water Plant, Talcher (paper No. 6.12)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Ram, D.; Sharma, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Water Plant at Talcher employs bithermal ammonia hydrogen exchange process for the production of heavy water. The paper describes about the existing ammonia water exchange column, its start-up, operating experience and the problems encountered in operation of the column. The operating experiences gained and the data collected over the last few years can be utilised for design and operation of new ammonia water exchange column. (V.R). 2 figs

  15. Experience teaching CD-ROM-based course on CANDU nuclear-power-plant systems and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents personal experience garnered from teaching a CD-ROM-based course on CANDU Power-Plant Systems and Operation. This course was originally developed by Prof. G.T. Bereznai as research in distance-learning techniques when he was directing the Thai-Canadian Human Resources Development Project at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. The course has been offered in a number of universities, including McMaster University and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. All the course material, including lectures, assignments, and a simulator, is provided on a CD-ROM. Lectures include a spoken soundtrack covering the material. The class often includes both undergraduate and graduate students. I found that most students appreciate having the material on electronic format, which they can view and review at will and on their own time. Students find this course quite intensive - it covers all major systems in the CANDU reactor and power plant in detail. A very important component of the course is the simulator, which teaches students how systems operate in normal operation, in power manoeuvres, and during process-system malfunctions. Effort in absorbing the material and performing assignments can often exceed 10 hours per week. Some of the simulator assignments involve tricky manoeuvres, requiring several tries to achieve the expected result. Some assignments may take several hours, especially if the manoeuvres requiring repetition take 30 minutes or more in real time. I found that some instruction in the basic theory of reactor physics and systems is appreciated by students. A few possible enhancements to the simulator model were identified. Graduate students taking the course are required to do an additional project; I assigned an investigation of the effects of xenon-concentration changes during 1 week of load cycling. In summary, this course provides to students the opportunity to learn a great deal about the workings of CANDU-plant systems. (author)

  16. Experiences from operation of Pomorzany EBFGT plant and directions of technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paweleca, A.; Chmielewskia, A.G.; Tyminskia, B.; Zimek, Z.; Licki, J.; Mazurekc, L.; Sobolewskic, R.; Kostrzewskic, J.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam flue gas treatment technology is one of the most advanced technologies among new generation air pollution control processes. It is the only one process for simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO x , applied in the industrial scale. Moreover other pollutants as acidic compounds, VOC and dioxins can be removed in one step. Among the other advantages a fully usable by-product – a fertilizer is created in the process. The industrial demonstrational plant was constructed in EPS Pomorzany in Szczecin (Poland). The facility treats the flue gases of maximum flow of 270.000 Nm 3 /h, which are irradiated by four accelerators of 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each. The removal efficiency of SO 2 in this installation may reach 95%, while removal efficiency of NO x – 70%. Apart of technical analysis also economical calculations of investment and operational costs of EBFGT installations, based on the data obtained on the Polish installation, was performed. The results show that in the case of multi-pollutant control the electron beam technology is strongly competitive to conventional technologies. Description of the experiences obtained during the operation of the plant and further possibilities of the technology development are presented in this paper. (author)

  17. Experiences from operation of Pomorzany EBFGT plant and directions of technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paweleca, A.; Chmielewskia, A. G.; Tyminskia, B.; Zimek, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, J. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Mazurekc, L.; Sobolewskic, R.; Kostrzewskic, J. [Dolna Odra Group, Pomorzany Power Plant, Szczecin (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Electron beam flue gas treatment technology is one of the most advanced technologies among new generation air pollution control processes. It is the only one process for simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, applied in the industrial scale. Moreover other pollutants as acidic compounds, VOC and dioxins can be removed in one step. Among the other advantages a fully usable by-product – a fertilizer is created in the process. The industrial demonstrational plant was constructed in EPS Pomorzany in Szczecin (Poland). The facility treats the flue gases of maximum flow of 270.000 Nm{sup 3}/h, which are irradiated by four accelerators of 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each. The removal efficiency of SO{sub 2} in this installation may reach 95%, while removal efficiency of NO{sub x} – 70%. Apart of technical analysis also economical calculations of investment and operational costs of EBFGT installations, based on the data obtained on the Polish installation, was performed. The results show that in the case of multi-pollutant control the electron beam technology is strongly competitive to conventional technologies. Description of the experiences obtained during the operation of the plant and further possibilities of the technology development are presented in this paper. (author)

  18. FFTF operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newland, D.J.; Krupar, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    In April 1982, the FFTF began its first nominally 100 day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well with steadily increasing plant capacity factors during its first four cycles. One hundred fifty fuel assemblies (eighty of which are experiments) and over 32,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 100 MWd/Kg burnup. Specialized equipment and systems unique to sodium cooled reactor plants have performed well

  19. Changing priorities of codes and standards -- quality engineering: Experiences in plant construction, maintenance, and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, D.D.; Suleski, P.F.; Meier, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Application of the ASME Code across various fossil and nuclear plants necessitates a Company approach adapted by unique status of each plant. This arises from State Statutes, Federal Regulations and consideration of each plant's as-built history over a broad time frame of design, construction and operation. Additionally, the National Board Inspection Code accompanies Minnesota Statutes for plants owned by Northern States Power Company. This paper addresses some key points on NSP's use of ASME Code as a principal mechanical standard in plant design, construction and operation. A primary resource facilitating review of Code provisions is accurate status on current plant configuration. As plant design changes arise, the Code Edition/Addenda of original construction and installed upgrades or replacements are considered against available options allowed by current standards and dialog with the Jurisdictional Authority. Consistent with the overall goal of safe and reliable plant operation, there are numerous Code details and future needs to be addressed in concert with expected plant economics and planned outages for implementation. The discussion begins in the late 60's with new construction of Monticello and Prairie Island (both nuclear), through Sherburne County Units 1 through 3 (fossil), and their changes, replacements or repairs as operating plants

  20. The Belgian experience on the backfitting and safety upgrading of old operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brognon, T.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology for backfitting and safety upgrading during the reevaluation of the Belgian NPP's: first generation (Doel-1, Doel-2, Tihange-1) and second generation plants (Doel-3, Doel-4, Tihange-2 and Tihange-3). A list of essential safety subjects and topics is given. The experience has proved the feasibility of a safety upgrading of operating NPP without injury to its availability, the benefit of a close cooperation between owner, engineering company and safety authorities throughout the project. A global approach to solving numerous specific deficiencies along with the optimization of the investments regarding the safety improvement of the NPP is suggested. Further increase of the know-how will be achieved through the present Belgian programme along with similar activities abroad. (R.I.)

  1. Experience in performing trends and patterns analysis of nuclear power plant operational data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, T.M.; Williams, M.H.; Dennig, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has conducted a formal trends and patterns program since 1982. Since that time, the methods and end products of the program have evolved through experience and changes in the environment for trends and patterns analysis, i.e., increasing regulatory emphasis on operations and balance of plant performance, emergence of performance indicators, the availability of personal computer hardware and software to perform analysis, and changes in the information reported to the USNRC. This paper discusses the technical milestones of the AEOD trends and patterns program in terms of: 1) Sources of operational data, e.g., pre- and post- 1984 Licensee Event Reports, NPRDS, 2) Data storage and retrieval, e.g., Sequence Coding and Search System (SCSS), 3) Statistical methods, e.g., contingency table analysis, 4) Types of results. The paper summarizes the major lessons learned in the process of implementing a trends and patterns program and outlines future direction

  2. Water hammer experiences in the startup and early operation of the Shearon Harris plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    During the course of preoperational testing and early operation of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, several water hammer events have occurred. A description of the events and corrective/preventive measures taken are discussed

  3. Retention of knowledge and experience from experts in near-term operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, H.

    2007-01-01

    safety and quality of nuclear power plants. For example, documentation/procedure system can have a big effect on the knowledge management. In order to keep complete information of the procedures and their change, not only should the change be documented, but also the cause and effect of the change should be formally documented. Human resource is essential support for successful knowledge management. It is well know in the industry that the implementation of SAT is very resource-consuming labour, especially for human resource. And well-kept information manage system need not just experts in archive and computer technology, but also expertise in operation, maintenance, etc. to fulfill the function in data collecting, analyzing, keeping, organizing, and utilizing. Furthermore, there should be additional personnel deployed in operating, maintenance departments to support the function of knowledge management. And to make the matter worse, strain of human resource on knowledge management is a chick and egg situation. Above all, managers' recognition of the significance and impact of knowledge management is the decisive factor and of paramount importance. Therefore, to spur the successful application of knowledge management, it is not enough to call on the training and information management experts to focus on knowledge management by TECDOC or conference. More intense measure should be taken to attract the attention of higher management, as high as possible, by items in safety standards, performance objectives and criteria, or OSART Guidelines. And the transfer of good-practice and experience should be extensive by many and various ways, e.g. workshop, document and experts exchange, so as to cover all important elements in knowledge management and narrow the gap between newly operating organizations and well-developed organizations. (author)

  4. Bituminization of radioactive wastes at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Experience from plant operation and development work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hild, W; Kluger, W; Krause, H

    1976-05-01

    A summary is given of the main operational experience gained at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe in 4 years operation of the bituminization plant for evaporator concentrates from low- and medium level wastes. At the same time some of the essential results are compiled that have been obtained in the R + D activities on bituminization.

  5. Waste Estimates for a Future Recycling Plant in the US Based Upon AREVA Operating Experience - 13206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foare, Genevieve; Meze, Florian [AREVA E and P, SGN - 1, rue des Herons, 78182 Montigny-le-Bretonneux (France); Bader, Sven; McGee, Don; Murray, Paul [AREVA Federal Services LLC, 7207 IBM Drive, Mail Code CLT- 1D, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States); Prud' homme, Pascal [AREVA NC SA - 1, place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense CEDEX (France)

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of process and secondary wastes produced by a recycling plant built in the U.S., which is composed of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility and a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility, are performed as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study [1]. In this study, a set of common inputs, assumptions, and constraints were identified to allow for comparison of these wastes between different industrial teams. AREVA produced a model of a reprocessing facility, an associated fuel fabrication facility, and waste treatment facilities to develop the results for this study. These facilities were divided into a number of discrete functional areas for which inlet and outlet flow streams were clearly identified to allow for an accurate determination of the radionuclide balance throughout the facility and the waste streams. AREVA relied primarily on its decades of experience and feedback from its La Hague (reprocessing) and MELOX (MOX fuel fabrication) commercial operating facilities in France to support this assessment. However, to perform these estimates for a U.S. facility with different regulatory requirements and to take advantage of some technological advancements, such as in the potential treatment of off-gases, some deviations from this experience were necessary. A summary of AREVA's approach and results for the recycling of 800 metric tonnes of initial heavy metal (MTIHM) of LWR UNF per year into MOX fuel under the assumptions and constraints identified for this DOE study are presented. (authors)

  6. Operating experience feedback on lose of offsite power supply for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Feng; Hou Qinmai; Che Shuwei

    2013-01-01

    The function of the service power system of a nuclear power plant is to provide safe and reliable power supply for the nuclear power plant facilities. The safety of nuclear power plant power supply is essential for nuclear safety. The serious accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred due to loss of service power and the ultimate heat sink. The service power system has two independent offsite power supplies as working power and auxiliary power. This article collected events of loss of offsite power supply in operating nuclear power plants at home and abroad, and analyzed the plant status and cause of loss of offsite power supply events, and proposed improvement measures for dealing with loss of offsite power supply. (authors)

  7. Experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GaL, P.; Adamica, T.; Marosik, V.; Rehak, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce NPP (EMO). The first year of EMO operation from the point of view of safety and reliability was successful. Evidently we were challenged with certain problems characteristic to this stage of operation which resulted in automatic reactor shutdown. There were 11 automatic shutdowns in 1998 by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1 and two manual shutdowns by the AO-1 key. In 1999, there were 6 automatic shutdowns by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1. Three of them was connected to the falsely activated binary signal of MCP switch of, in two cases the reason came out from the turbo-generator (TG) cooling water system. Very positive trend in the operation of both units shows the fact that during all commissioning period of the second unit there were only three automatic reactor shutdowns by the signal AO-1. All these actions were done in frame of commissioning tests. All causes which activated the automatic unit shutdowns were found out and rectified, the overall tuning of the cooling water system is on the process now. The solution of this problem is possible only power commissioning, and in the stage of the trial operation had no direct impacts on the nuclear, radiation, or technical safety respectively. In 1998 two events according to the INES scale after second unit commissioning because of two unit links of the cooling water system. The operational events during the commissioning tests, start-up tests, physical commissioning, were ranked the category 1 ('Action of SIS U040 p po <8,34 MPa at the system 2 and 3' and 'Breaching the L and C'). In 1999 only events occurred that were ranked in the category safety insignificant events and lower (category 0, or off the scale respectively). In the frame of the safety culture principles adopted, such as critical attitude, exact and careful approach, and communication, these problems were given the

  8. Development of a Leading Performance Indicator from Operational Experience and Resilience in a Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela F. Nelson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of operational performance indicators is of utmost importance for nuclear power plants, since they measure, track, and trend plant operation. Leading indicators are ideal for reducing the likelihood of consequential events. This paper describes the operational data analysis of the information contained in the Corrective Action Program. The methodology considers human error and organizational factors because of their large contribution to consequential events. The results include a tool developed from the data to be used for the identification, prediction, and reduction of the likelihood of significant consequential events. This tool is based on the resilience curve that was built from the plant's operational data. The stress is described by the number of unresolved condition reports. The strain is represented by the number of preventive maintenance tasks and other periodic work activities (i.e., baseline activities, as well as, closing open corrective actions assigned to different departments to resolve the condition reports (i.e., corrective action workload. Beyond the identified resilience threshold, the stress exceeds the station's ability to operate successfully and there is an increased likelihood that a consequential event will occur. A performance indicator is proposed to reduce the likelihood of consequential events at nuclear power plants.

  9. Operating experience with snubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.; Cudlin, R.

    1978-06-01

    Recent operating experience with hydraulic and mechanical snubbers has indicated that there is a need to evaluate current practice in the industry associated with snubber qualification testing programs, design and analysis procedures, selection and specification criteria, and the preservice inspection and inservice surveillance programs. The report provides a summary of operational experiences that represent problems that are generic throughout the industry. Generic Task A-13 is part of the NRC Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants described in NUREG-0410. The report is based upon a rather large amount of data that have become available in the past four years. These data have been evaluated by the Division of Operating Reactors to develop a data base for use in connection with several NRC activities including Category A, Technical Activity A-13 (Snubbers); the Standard Review Plan; future Regulatory Guides; ASME Code Provisions; and various technical specifications of operating nuclear power plants

  10. Three integrated photovoltaic/sound barrier power plants. Construction and operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordmann, T.; Froelich, A.; Clavadetscher, L.

    2002-01-01

    After an international ideas competition by TNC Switzerland and Germany in 1996, six companies where given the opportunity to construct a prototype of their newly developed integrated PV-sound barrier concepts. The main goal was to develop highly integrated concepts, allowing the reduction of PV sound barrier systems costs, as well as the demonstration of specific concepts for different noise situations. This project is strongly correlated with a German project. Three of the concepts of the competition are demonstrated along a highway near Munich, constructed in 1997. The three Swiss installations had to be constructed at different locations, reflecting three typical situations for sound barriers. The first Swiss installation was the world first Bi-facial PV-sound barrier. It was built on a highway bridge at Wallisellen-Aubrugg in 1997. The operational experience of the installation is positive. But due to the different efficiencies of the two cell sides, its specific yield lies somewhat behind a conventional PV installation. The second Swiss plant was finished in autumn 1998. The 'zig-zag' construction is situated along the railway line at Wallisellen in a densely inhabited area with some local shadowing. Its performance and its specific yield is comparatively low due to a combination of several reasons (geometry of the concept, inverter, high module temperature, local shadows). The third installation was constructed along the motor way A1 at Bruettisellen in 1999. Its vertical panels are equipped with amorphous modules. The report show, that the performance of the system is reasonable, but the mechanical construction has to be improved. A small trial field with cells directly laminated onto the steel panel, also installed at Bruettisellen, could be the key development for this concept. This final report includes the evaluation and comparison of the monitored data in the past 24 months of operation. (author)

  11. Operating boundaries of full-scale advanced water reuse treatment plants: many lessons learned from pilot plant experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, C; Kumar, Y; Walker, T; Poussade, Y; Zavlanos, V

    2010-01-01

    Three Advanced Water Treatment Plants (AWTP) have recently been built in South East Queensland as part of the Western Corridor Recycled Water Project (WCRWP) producing Purified Recycled Water from secondary treated waste water for the purpose of indirect potable reuse. At Luggage Point, a demonstration plant was primarily operated by the design team for design verification. The investigation program was then extended so that the operating team could investigate possible process optimisation, and operation flexibility. Extending the demonstration plant investigation program enabled monitoring of the long term performance of the microfiltration and reverse osmosis membranes, which did not appear to foul even after more than a year of operation. The investigation primarily identified several ways to optimise the process. It highlighted areas of risk for treated water quality, such as total nitrogen. Ample and rapid swings of salinity from 850 to 3,000 mg/l-TDS were predicted to affect the RO process day-to-day operation and monitoring. Most of the setpoints used for monitoring under HACCP were determined during the pilot plant trials.

  12. Operational experience of gaseous effluent treatment at the Eurochemic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenco, A.; Detilleux, E.

    1977-01-01

    The EUROCHEMIC fuel reprocessing plant applies the PUREX flow sheet. Two particular features of the plant influence gaseous and liquid effluents: chemical decanning and the ability to process a wide range of fuels, uranium metal or oxide, having an initial enrichment typical of power reactors (up to 5%) or material testing reactors (up to 93%). The ventilation circuits, treatment plant and monitoring equipment for gaseous releases are briefly described. No retention facilities for rare gases, tritium, or carbon-14 are provided. The releases are monitored for krypton-85, iodine-131, alpha and beta-gamma aerosols and tritium. Between 1966 and 1974 the plant processes about 200 tonnes of power reactor fuel, from which about 0.7 tonnes of plutonium and 1.5 tonnes of highly enriched uranium were separated. The most important points in the operation of the gas cleaning equipment are indicated: efficiency, operational reliability, incidents, etc.. Actual discharges as measured are compared with the limits set in the operation licence. Using the atmospheric diffusion coefficients, the dose commitment is estimated. The low level liquid effluents are passed, after neutralization, to the treatment plant of the Belgian nuclear center CEN/SCK. However, if the activity exceeds the limit set by the CEN/SCK, the effluents are concentrated by evaporation and stored on the EUROCHEMIC site. (orig.) [de

  13. Operating experience at Heavy Water Plant, Tuticorin (Paper No. 1.7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periakaruppan, M.; Arumugam, G.; Ayyanar, P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial hurdles faced in the operation of the Heavy Water Plant at Tuticorin warranted major changes in certain design concepts. This paper highlights few of the modifications carried out such as in product concentration, catalyst concentration, amide entry to extraction tower and fluid distribution in cracker tubes. (author)

  14. Shams 1 - Design and operational experiences of the 100MW - 540°C CSP plant in Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaidli, Abdulaziz; Sanz, Borja; Behnke, Klaus; Witt, Thomas; Viereck, Detlef; Schwarz, Mark André

    2017-06-01

    SHAMS 1 ("Shams" means "Sun" in Arabic) Concentrated Solar Power plant is a very successful example of a modern plant, which combines the known configuration of a parabolic trough technology with the well-established power generation technologies operated at 540°C live steam temperature while respecting the specific requirement of the daily starts and shutdowns. In addition to the high live steam temperature challenge and being located in the middle of the desert approx. 120 km south west of the city of Abu Dhabi, the plant has to face, the plant has to fact several atmospheric challenges like the high dust concentration, wind storms, and high ambient temperature. This paper, written jointly by Shams Power Company - the project and operating company and MAN Diesel & Turbo - the steam turbine original manufacturer, describes the challenges in optimizing the design of the steam turbine to fulfill the requirement of fast start up while operating the plant on daily transient pattern for minimum 30 years. It also addresses the several atmospheric challenges and how the project and operating company has overcame them. Finally, the paper gives a snap shot on the operational experience and record of the plant showing that despite the very challenging environment, the budgeted target has been exceeded in the first two years of operation.

  15. Operating power plant experience with condensate polishing units in morpholine/ammonia-OH cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhar, A.G.; Padmakumari, T.V.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Mathur, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Impurity removal efficiency of condensate polisher plant (CPP) in ammonium cycle is poor. Cost considerations demand CPP operation in amine-OH cycle. With certain precautions such as higher regeneration levels, good regenerent quality, minimized cross contamination, continuous monitoring of influent and effluent and provision for 100% standby bed, it is possible to operate CPP beyond H-OH cycle while keeping the effluent impurities within the specified limits. This paper presents problem associated with the Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) CPP operation in morpholine-OH form and Korba Super Thermal Power Station (KSTPS) CPP in ammonia-OH form and suggested remedial measures. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  16. The pilot plant in Geiselbullach for the gamma irradiation of sewage sludge - design, operation experience and cost calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessel, T.; Hennig, E.

    1976-01-01

    The pilot plant for sewage sludge irradiation in Geiselbullach near Munich has been in operation from July '73 to October '75 with a capacity of 30 m 3 per day. Successful experiences during this period resulted in an increase of the installed radiation energy and in several improvements for the technique and the efficiency. From December 1975 on the plant has been operating with a daily capacity of 120 m 3 of sludge per day. The experience with this plant brought several problems which caused interruptions of the continuous operation and that had to be solved with new measures. But although the facility at Geiselbullach is a pilot plant the availability was more than 350 days per year. Due to the simple design of the plant and of the fully automatic operation no special trained personal is necessary for the maintenance. Beside the effect of the hygienization the irradiation caused improved sedimentation properties of the sludge. Presently investigations are undertaken to prove better mechanical sludge dewatering properties. Cost calculations resulted in about DM 2.30 for operating expenses and DM 2.25 for capital costs per m 3 of sludge for the fully charged plant. The capital costs will be less in commercial plants. The conditioning effect on the sludge by the irradiation means savings of about DM 1.00 per m 3 . The irradiation of sewage sludge proved to be possible at about equal costs compared to the wellknown heat treatment (pasteurization at 70 0 C during 30 minutes.). Further investigations have to be done to overcome the contrary development of the plant capacity, limited by the decaying radiation energy and the normally rising sludge quantities of a sewage water treatment plant. (author)

  17. Six-year experiences in the operation of a low level liquid waste treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.-J.; Hwang, S.-L.; Tsai, C.-M.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a low level liquid waste treatment plant is described. The plant is designed for the disposal of liquid waste produced primarily by a 40 MW Taiwan Research Reactor as well as a fuel fabrication plant for the CANDU type reactor and a radioisotopes production laboratory. The monthly volume treated is about 600-2500 ton of low level liquid waste. The activity levels are in the range of 10 -5 -10 -3 μCi/cm 3 . The continuous treatment system of the low level liquid waste treatment plant and the treatment data collected since 1973 are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of continuous and batch processes are compared. In the continuous process, the efficiency of sludge treatment, vermiculite ion exchange and the adsorption of peat are investigated for further improvement. (H.K.)

  18. GNF2 Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, John

    2007-01-01

    GNF's latest generation fuel product, GNF2, is designed to deliver improved nuclear efficiency, higher bundle and cycle energy capability, and more operational flexibility. But along with high performance, our customers face a growing need for absolute fuel reliability. This is driven by a general sense in the industry that LWR fuel reliability has plateaued. Too many plants are operating with fuel leakers, and the impact on plant operations and operator focus is unacceptable. The industry has responded by implementing an INPO-coordinated program aimed at achieving leaker-free reliability by 2010. One focus area of the program is the relationship between fuel performance (i.e., duty) and reliability. The industry recognizes that the right balance between performance and problem-free fuel reliability is critical. In the development of GNF2, GNF understood the requirement for a balanced solution and utilized a product development and introduction strategy that specifically addressed reliability: evolutionary design features supported by an extensive experience base; thoroughly tested components; and defense-in-depth mitigation of all identified failure mechanisms. The final proof test that the balance has been achieved is the application of the design, initially through lead use assemblies (LUAs), in a variety of plants that reflect the diversity of the BWR fleet. Regular detailed surveillance of these bundles provides the verification that the proper balance between performance and reliability has been achieved. GNF currently has GNF2 lead use assemblies operating in five plants. Included are plants that have implemented extended power up-rates, plants on one and two-year operating cycles, and plants with and without NobleChem TM and zinc injection. The leading plant has undergone three pool-side inspections outages to date. This paper reviews the actions taken to insure GNF2's reliability, and the lead use assembly surveillance data accumulated to date to validate

  19. Operating experience with steam generator water chemistry in Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimura, K.; Hattori, T.

    1991-01-01

    Since the first PWR plant in Japan started its commercial operation in 1970, seventeen plants are operating as of the end of 1990. First three units initially applied phosphate treatment as secondary water chemistry control and then changed to all volatile treatment (AVT) due to phosphate induced wastage of steam generator tubing. The other fourteen units operate exclusively under AVT. In Japan, several corrosion phenomena of steam generator tubing, resulted from secondary water chemistry, have been experienced, but occurrence of those phenomena has decreased by means of improvement on impurity management, boric acid treatment and high hydrazine operation. Recently secondary water chemistry in Japanese plants are well maintained in every stage of operation. This paper introduces brief summary of the present status of steam generators and secondary water chemistry in Japan and ongoing activities of investigation for future improvement of reliability of steam generator. History and present status of secondary water chemistry in Japanese PWRs were introduced. In order to get improved water chemistry, the integrity of secondary system equipments is essential and the improvement in water chemistry has been achieved with the improvement in equipments and their usage. As a result of those efforts, present status of secondary water is excellent. However, further development for crevice chemistry monitoring technique and an advanced water chemistry data management system is desired for the purpose of future improvement of reliability of steam generator

  20. PROSPER guidelines: Guidelines for peer review and for plant self-assessment of operational experience feedback process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Effective use of operational performance information is an important element in any plant operator's arrangements for enhancing the operational safety of a nuclear power plant (NPP). This has been recognized in the IAEA Safety Fundamental, The Safety of Nuclear Installations (Safety Series No. 110). Under the technical aspects of safety, one of the principles of operation and maintenance is that the operating organization and the regulatory body shall establish complementary programmes to analyse operating experience to ensure that lessons are learned and acted upon. Such experience shall be shared with relevant national and international bodies. The Convention on Nuclear Safety, which entered into force in July 1996, also recognized the importance of operational experience feedback as a tool of high importance for the safety of nuclear plant operation and its further enhancement. It follows that the arrangements and results achieved under the operation experience feedback process in Member States will be covered by the national report under the Convention and will be subject to periodical review. These principles are further expanded in the IAEA Safety Standards Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation (Safety Standard Series No. NS-R-2, year 2000) under the Feedback of The IAEA-led Peer Review of the effectiveness of the Operational Safety Performance Experience Review process (PROSPER) and associated guidelines have been developed to provide advice and assistance to utilities or individual power plants to strengthen and enhance the effectiveness of operational experience programmes in achieving these fundamental objectives. The objectives of the former IAEA Assessment of Significant Safety Events Team (ASSET) service have been expanded to include an evaluation of the effective use of all operating performance information available to the plant (e.g. external operating experience, internal low-level and near miss event reports and other relevant operating

  1. Operating experience and development of fluidized-bed denitrators for UNH at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Nakamichi, Hideya; Takeda, Seiichiro; Kubota, Kanya; Katoh, Shuji

    1983-01-01

    The fluidized bed denitrator for uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) at Tokai reprocessing plant has been operated since 1976. About 170 tons of spent fuel have been reprocessed, and the denitrator has encountered numerous operational problems during the period. This report deals with these technical problems and the associated countermeasures taken, including the dismantling and reconstruction of equipment and the improvement of operating method. The major problems encountered were as follows: (1) the crystallization of UNH on the UNH feeding line, (2) spray nozzle clogging and candle filter clogging, (3) particle growth, (4) plugging of the drawing-out line by nozzle caking, and (5) slugging in fluidized-bed denitration. The total quantity and quality of UO 3 products obtained so far at the plant are also briefly described together with some future R and D programs such as the improvement of UO 3 reactivity and the automation of denitrators. (Aoki, K.)

  2. Operational experience in chemical control of scale in boilers at the Ostrava-Karvina power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, E; Srovnal, O

    1988-03-01

    Discusses methods for buildup removal from coal-fired boilers in power plants. Buildup types are analyzed. Standardized methods for buildup removal tested on a commercial scale in the power plants are comparatively evaluated. Scaling in the boiler heat exchange system is investigated. Using hydrofluoric acid for scale removal is discussed. Concentration of hydrofluoric acid ranges from 1.5% to 2.0%. Ryphalgan and Kaptax are used as corrosion inhibitors. Syntron B is also used for scale removal during boiler operation (at a pressure to 6.4% and temperature below 270 C). Efficiency of scale removal using various reagents is discussed. 4 refs.

  3. Industry use of operating experience to achieve improved nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A principal lesson drawn from the accident at Three Mile Island was the need for a comprehensive and rigorous system for analysis and feedback of operating experience to reactor operators. Chief executives of US utilities directed in mid-1979 that an intensive and rigorous system of analysis and feedback of operating experience be established. This system is commonly referred to as the ''Significant Events Program''. Since April 1980, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) has been joined by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in the field investigation of significant operating events. NSAC has responsibility for analysis of the design and physical events aspects, while INPO has primary responsibility for the operators' aspects, including procedures and training. The process of screening, analysis and feedback of operating experience is now functioning as a seven-step process. A variety of data sources is used, including License Event Reports and outage and major maintenance reports. These are compiled and indexed in convenient form. However, such data bases are used only as incidental tools for the basic investigations and analytical efforts. Rapid dissemination of results is provided by a computer-aided conferencing system, which links 70 operating LWR reactors in the USA, and which has now been extended to four utilities outside the USA, representing several dozen more reactors. Major safety and economic incentives are evident for the rigorous use of such operating experience and for participation in a comprehensive system. Traditional habits of secrecy are recognized as obstacles to timely communication. A principal responsibility of top management of reactor-operating organizations is to overcome such habits where they are counter to the public interest, as well as to the health and survival interest of the utility itself

  4. Experience feedback of operational events of the control rod assembly and its drive mechanism in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hong; Xiao Zhi; Tao Shusheng; Zheng Lixin; Chen Zhaolin

    2013-01-01

    Seventeen operational events of the control rod assembly and its drive mechanism are collected from 1992 to 2012 important nuclear operational events and feedback in referred nuclear power plants. After investigated and classified, several important issues, such as the impact of control rod swell and fuel assembly distortion, control rod drive mechanism leakage, and the control system reliability of control rod, are emphatically analyzed. Some suggestions of experience feedback are proposed. (authors)

  5. The licensing process of the design modifications of Cernavoda 2 NPP resulting from the operating experience of CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, L.

    2005-01-01

    The CANDU 6 plant now under construction in Cernavoda include over two hundred significant improvements made in order to comply with current codes and standards and licensing requirements relative to the operating CANDU 6 in Romania. These evolutionary improvements are incorporated in CANDU 6 design taking advance of CANDU operating experience, of the designer company research and development and technical advances worldwide in order to further enhance safety, reliability and economics. This paper gives a general idea of the evaluation of the modifications of the Cernavoda 2 nuclear power plant against the design of Cernavoda 1 and states the safety principles and requirements which are the basis for this evaluation. (author)

  6. An operational experience with cooling tower water system in chilling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, Manju B.; Roy, Ankan; Ravi, K.V.

    2015-01-01

    Cooling towers are popular in industries as a very effective evaporative cooling technology for air conditioning. Supply of chilled water to air conditioning equipments of various plant buildings and cooling tower water to important equipments for heat removal is the purpose of chilling plant at PRPD. The cooling medium used is raw water available at site. Water chemistry is maintained by make-up and blowdown. In this paper, various observations made during plant operation and equipment maintenance are discussed. The issues observed was scaling and algal growth affecting the heat transfer and availability of the equipment. Corrosion related issues were observed to be less significant. Scaling indices were calculated to predict the behavior. (author)

  7. The photovoltaic-powered water desalination plant 'SORO' design, start up, operating experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaeusser, G.; Mohn, J.; Petersen, G.

    Design features, operational parameters, and test results of a year of operation of the SORO prototype photovoltaic (PV) reverse osmosis salt water desalinization plant are described. Chemicals are added to the salt water to control the pH, prevent formation of compounds which could plug the flow system, and kill bacteria and slime which might grow in the solution. The water is pressurized and forced into contact with membranes which separate the fresh water from the brackish or sea water. The flow rate in the project was 180 l/h, with the main electrical energy load being the high pressure pump and the well pump. Batteries are charged before current is switched to power the desalinization system. The plant yielded 1.50 cu of fresh water/day and is concluded to be a viable design for scale-up to larger production figures, besides being economically competitive with solar desalinization installations where the salt content is 2000 ppm.

  8. Nuclear power plant safety and reliability improvements derived from operational experience analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.; Rosen, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    The frequency and distribution of significant events at operating nuclear power plants can be used as one of several indices to obtain a preliminary indication of unit and/or utility performance in the development and implementation of improvements aimed at reducing the probability or consequences of troublesome events. Initial data of this type are presented along with qualifications on the validity of such indicators. Planned further steps to improve this as a performance indicator are noted

  9. Operative experience in handling enriched uranium compounds in an U3O8 production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedenthal, M.; Cardenas Yucra, H.R.; Cinat, E.; Pino, H.F.; Surin, C.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a nuclear installation associated with chemical processes depends fundamentally on the risks derived from the materials and process used. The operative experience brings useful data mainly related to the ventilation and equipment design that allow to improve the handling of operational incidents and maintenance work. The paper presents the results extracted from a production campaign; ambient and personal monitoring results from monitorings performed routinely and during special interventions are commented. (Author)

  10. Operating experience in cleaning sodium-wetted components at the KNK nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stade, K.Ch.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1969, components of the KNK facility, the first sodium cooled nuclear power plant in the Federal Republic of Germany, have been cleaned both by the alcohol and the wet gas techniques. This paper outlines the experience accumulated In the application of these methods, especially in cleaning steam generators and fuel elements. Some preliminary results are indicated of the attempt to clean a cold trap from the primary circuit of the KNK facility. (author)

  11. Operating experience in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, reprocessing has accumulated 180 years of operating experience in ten plants, six of them with 41 years of operation in reprocessing oxide fuel from light water reactors. After abortive, premature attempts at what is called commercial reprocessing, which had been oriented towards the market value of recoverable uranium and plutonium, non-military reprocessing technologies have proved their technical feasibility, since 1966 on a pilot scale and since 1976 on an industrial scale. Reprocessing experience obtained on uranium metal fuel with low and medium burnups can now certainly be extrapolated to oxide fuel with high burnup and from pilot plants to industrial scale plants using the same technologies. The perspectives of waste management of the nuclear power plants operated in the Federal Republic of Germany should be viewed realistically. The technical problems still to be solved are in a balanced relationship to the benefit arising to the national economy out of nuclear power generation and can be solved in time, provided there are clearcut political boundary conditions. (orig.) [de

  12. Radiation field control at the latest BWR plants -- design principle, operational experience and future subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Energy Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie [Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Improvements of operational procedures to control water chemistry, e.g., nickel/iron control, as well as application of hardware improvements for reducing radioactive corrosion products resulted in an extremely low occupational exposure of less than 0.5 man.Sv/yr without any serious impact on the radwaste system, for BWR plants involved in the Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program. Recently, {sup 60}C radioactively in the reactor water has been increasing due to less crud fixation on the two smooth surfaces of new type high performance fuels and to the pH drop caused by chromium oxide anions released from stainless steel structures and pipings. This increase must be limited by changes in water chemistry, e.g., applications of modified nickel/iron ratio control and weak alkali control. Controlled water chemistry to optimize three points, the plant radiation level and integrities of fuel and structural materials, is the primary future subject for BWR water chemistry.

  13. Operational safety performance indicator system at the Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant - Experience with indicator aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandula, J.

    2001-01-01

    The operational safety performance indicators serve as an important tool of performance monitoring and management at the Dukovany NPP. A software-supported system has been developed, which has included: data collection, central data storage, graphic output production and periodical report generation. Analyses of performance indicator trends together with evaluation in respect of annually updated target values and acceptance criteria are used for operational safety reviews forming an integral part of continual self-assessment process. This contribution has been focused on experience obtained during development of the operational safety assessment model using indicator aggregation. It summarises problems that had to be paid specific attention in the development process. Thanks to their solution, the model has become a synoptic monitor and a useful tool for operational safety assessment. (author)

  14. Operating experience with a 250 kW el molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Manfred; Huppmann, Gerhard

    The MTU MCFC program is carried out by a European consortium comprising the German companies MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Ruhrgas AG and RWE Energie AG as well as the Danish company Energi E2 S/A. MTU acts as consortium leader. The company shares a license and technology exchange agreement with Fuel Cell Energy Inc., Danbury, CT, USA (formerly Energy Research Corp., ERC). The program was started in 1990 and covers a period of about 10 years. The highlights of this program to date are: Considerable improvements regarding component stability have been demonstrated on laboratory scale. Manufacturing technology has been developed to a point which enables the consortium to fabricate the porous components on a 250 cm 2 scale. Several large area stacks with 5000-7660 cm 2 cell area and a power range of 3-10 kW have been tested at the facilities in Munich (Germany) and Kyndby (Denmark). These stacks have been supplied by FCE. As far as the system design is concerned it was soon realized that conventional systems do not hold the promise for competitive power plants. A system analysis led to the conclusion that a new innovative design approach is required. As a result the "Hot Module" system was developed by the consortium. A Hot Module combines all the components of a MCFC system operating at the similar temperatures and pressures into a common thermally insulated vessel. In August 1997 the consortium started its first full size Hot Module MCFC test plant at the facilities of Ruhrgas AG in Dorsten, Germany. The stack was assembled in Munich using 292 cell packages purchased from FCE. The plant is based on the consortium's unique and proprietary "Hot Module" concept. It operates on pipeline natural gas and was grid connected on 16 August 1997. After a total of 1500 h of operation, the plant was intentionally shut down in a controlled manner in April 1998 for post-test analysis. The Hot Module system concept has demonstrated its functionality. The safety concept has been

  15. Operational Experience of Nuclear Fuel in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants (with Emphasis on WWER Fuel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraesvirta, R.

    2009-01-01

    The four operating nuclear reactors in Finland, Loviisa-1 and -2 and Olkiluoto-1 and -2 have now operated approximately 30 years. The overall operational experience has been excellent. Load factors of all units have been for years among the highest in the world. The development of the fuel designs during the years has enabled remarkable improvement in the fuel performance in terms of burnup. Average discharge burnup has increased more than 30 percent in all Finnish reactor units. A systematic inspection of spent fuel assemblies, and especially all failed fuel assemblies, is a good and useful practise employed in Finland. A possibility to inspect the fuel on site using a pool side inspection facility is a relatively economic way to find out root causes of fuel failures and thereby facilitate developing remedies to prevent similar failures in the future

  16. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  17. Practical experience and problems in the inspection work during test and routine operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backstroem, T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description is given of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SNPI) and its working methods in the field of licensing procedures and inspection activities. SNPI has introduced a system to be kept continuously informed about the operation of the nuclear power plants. This information is used in the preparation work preceding the inspections. Experience obtained from the inspection activities show that inspection frequency has been lower than planned. Documentation can be improved and that good relations between the authority and the utilities, including the operating personnel, is to the benefit of the nuclear safety. (author)

  18. Operating experience: safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piplani, Vivek; Krishnamurthy, P.R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Upadhyay, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Operating Experience (OE) provides valuable information for improving NPP safety. This may include events, precursors, deviations, deficiencies, problems, new insights to safety, good practices, lessons and corrective actions. As per INSAG-10, an OE program caters as a fundamental means for enhancing the defence-in-depth at NPPs and hence should be viewed as ‘Continuous Safety Performance Improvement Tool’. The ‘Convention on Nuclear Safety’ also recognizes the OE as a tool of high importance for enhancing the NPP safety and its Article 19 mandates each contracting party to establish an effective OE program at operating NPPs. The lessons drawn from major accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi NPPs had prompted nuclear stalwarts to change their safety perspective towards NPPs and to frame sound policies on issues like safety culture, severe accident prevention and mitigation. An effective OE program, besides correcting current/potential problems, help in proactively improving the NPP design, operating and maintenance procedures, practices, training, etc., and thus plays vital role in ensuring safe and efficient operation of NPPs. Further it enhances knowledge with regard to equipment operating characteristics, system performance trends and provides data for quantitative and qualitative safety analysis. Besides all above, an OE program inculcates a learning culture in the organisation and thus helps in continuously enhancing the expertise, technical competency and knowledge base of its staff. Nuclear and Radiation Facilities in India are regulated by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Operating Plants Safety Division (OPSD) of AERB is involved in managing operating experience activities. This paper provides insights about the operating experience program of OPSD, AERB (including its on-line data base namely OPSD STAR) and its utilisation in improving the regulations and safety at Indian NPPs/projects. (author)

  19. An analysis of errors of commission in the Nordic nuclear power plants based on plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyy, P.; Bento, J.P.; Flodin, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The report presents the methodology followed, the material used and conclusions drawn in a study of active human failures. First, the report discusses the concept of active human failures in the context of human errors. Then, a simplified methodology is presented applicable to analysis of operating experience and documenting all kinds of human failures. Also the material and analysis procedure used in the three parts of the study are discussed. Finally, some selected highlights of results are presented with common conclusions and recommendations. (au)

  20. Operating experience feedback in TVO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A [Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    TVO is a power company operating with two 710 MW BWR units at Olkiluoto. For operating experience feedback TVO has not established a separate organizational unit but rather relies on a group of persons representing various technical disciplines. The ``Operating Experience Group`` meets at about three-week intervals to handle the reports of events (in plant and external) which have been selected for handling by an engineer responsible for experience feedback. 7 charts.

  1. Reliability evaluation of emergency AC power systems based on operating experience at U.S. nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowsky, P. W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1986-02-15

    The reliability of emergency AC power Systems has been under study at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by its contractors for several years. This paper provides the results of work recently performed to evaluate past U.S. nuclear power plant emergency AC power System reliability performance using system level data. Operating experience involving multiple diesel generator failures, unavailabilities, and simultaneous occurrences of failures and out of service diesel generators were used to evaluate reliability performance at individual nuclear power plants covering a 9 year period from 1976 through 1984. The number and nature of failures and distributions of reliability evaluation results are provided. The results show that plant specific performance varied considerably during the period with a large number achieving high reliability performance and a smaller number accounting for lower levels of reliability performance. (author)

  2. Operational experience gained with the failed fuel rod detection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.H.; Forch, H.

    1985-01-01

    Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH together with Krautkramer Company developed such a FAILED FUEL ROD DETECTION SYSTEM (FFRDS) which allows to located defective fuel rods without dismantling the fuel assembly or pulling of individual rods. Since 1979 the FFRDS is employed successfully in various nuclear power plants in Europe, USA, Japan, and Korea. The short inspection time and the high reliability of the method make the FFRDS a true competitor to the sipping method. In this paper the authors discuss the method and the design of the system, the equipment set-up, its features and the experience gained so far. The system has been performed and automated to such an extent that within a short installation period series of fuel assemblies can be tested with relatively short intervals of time (5 minutes for BWR and 7 minutes for PWR fuel assemblies per side). The ability of the system for deployment under various conditions and the experience gained during the past six years have made this system universally applicable and highly sensitive to the requirements of NDT during outages and for transport of FAs to intermediate storage facilities. Comparison of FFRDS to conventional sipping has indicated in several instances that the FFRDS is superior to the latter technique

  3. Operational experience on reduction of feedwater iron and liquid radwaste input for Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, T.J.; Huang, Theresa Chen; Liu, Wen Tsung; Liu, T.C.; Shyur, Tzu Sheng; Shen, S.C.

    1998-01-01

    Other than cobalt alloys, or low cobalt materials, feedwater iron content plays an important role in crud activation and transport causing the growth of out-of-core radiation fields and associated with radwaste generation. Before installing prefilter in the upstream of condensate deep-bed demineralizer, increasing demand for suspended solid removal required new backwash and regeneration technique in Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant. At steady state full power operation, the average iron concentration in condensate demineralizer influent was 8-15 ppb. Considering both the necessity of backwash and reduction of liquid radwaste input, several actions had been taken to promote the crud removal capabilities without using ultrasonic resin cleaner and controlled feedwater iron content between 0.5 and 2.0 ppb. This modified resin backwash technique would also generate minimum liquid radwaste. Meanwhile, significant efforts have been made to promote the quality of waste water by carefully control input streams as well as backwash modification to reduce liquid radwaste generation. The daily quantity of liquid radwaste has decreased dramatically in the past two years and is effectively controlled under the expected average daily input of design basis. (author)

  4. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  5. Operational experiences of (in)direct co-combustion in coal and gas fired power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ree, R.; Korbee, R.; Meijer, R.; Konings, T.; Van Aart, F.

    2001-02-01

    The operational experiences of direct and indirect co-combustion of biomass/waste in European coal and natural gas fired power plants are addressed. The operational experiences of mainly Dutch direct co-combustion activities in coal fired power plants are discussed; whereas an overview of European indirect co-combustion activities is presented. The technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of different indirect co-combustion concepts (i.e. upstream gasification, pyrolysis, combustion with steam-side integration) is investigated, and the results are compared with the economic preferable concept of direct co-combustion. Main technical constraints that limit the co-combustion capacity of biomass/waste in conventional coal fired power plants are: the grindability of the biomass/coal blend, the capacity of available unit components, and the danger of severe slagging, fouling, corrosion and erosion. The main environmental constraints that have to be taken into account are the quality of produced solid waste streams (fly ash, bottom ash, gypsum) and the applicable air emission regulations. 6 refs

  6. Comparing PRAs with operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.; Martz, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment is widely used to estimate the frequencies of rare events, such as nuclear power plant accidents. An obvious question concerns the extent to which PRAs conform to operating experience--that is, do PRAs agree with reality? The authors discuss a formal methodology to address this issue and examine its performance using plant-specific data

  7. Chemical operational experiences in the Belgian nuclear power plants of Doel and Tihange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear program in Belgium started in 1962 with the commissioning of a small reactor BR3 and continued with Chooz, Doel and Tihange. This report gives a survey of the chemical experiences in Doal and Tihange. All these units are of the PWR type constructed by Westinghouse. The chemical specifications for the secondary circuit are very severe and difficult to maintain without condensate polishing system for units such as Doel 1 and 2, cooled with estuary brackish water. The condensate polishing system of Doel is described and the main results are given. The big problem of this station has been the behaviour of the condenser tubes. After 1 and 2 years of operation severe corrosion developed and a retubing became necessary. In the steam generators of Doel and Tihange deposits of a few cm are found. The denting problem has also started. Tihange has worked nearly one year with a leak in one of the steam generators. The blow down was treated on ion exchangers. The fuel elements have had a good behaviour especially in Doel 1. During shut down periods for refuelling H 2 O 2 is injected in the primary circuit. This gives a quick release of corrosion products. The activity of 58 Co increases to about 0,4 Ci/m 3 . A precoat filter with pulverised resins gives a good decontamination factor in this case. The liquid waste treatment of Doel has been modified in order to cope with the quantities of effluents. In Tihange it has been necessary to decontaminate a primary pump. This has been done with Turco products. Very good results have been obtained. (orig.) [de

  8. Evolution of Italian thermal power plants in the 2003-2008 period: evaluation of most important critical states and operative experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michi, L.; Camponeschi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian thermal power plants park is characterized by a dept transformation that is significantly changing the technological mix. The main aspects of these developments and related issues were analyzed in the last two years of operating experience [it

  9. Experience in industrial operation of the plant for immobilizing radioactive wastes in thermosetting resins at the Ardennes Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.; Romestain, P.; Bruant, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has developed, at the Grenoble Centre for Nuclear Studies, a procedure for immobilizing low- and intermediate-level wastes in thermosetting resins of the polyester or epoxy types. To demonstrate feasibility on an industrial scale, a pilot plant has been set up at the effluent treatment station of the Ardennes Franco-Belgium Nuclear Power Station (SENA), which is a 305 MW(e) PWR type. Assembly work began in January 1979. After a period devoted to final adjustments and operation with inactive products, conditioning of active products began in January 1981. In the paper, the methods of conditioning the three types of waste (evaporation concentrates, ion exchange resins and filter cartridges) are described, experience of the start-up and operation of the plant is reported and the principal results of coating characterization tests are given. The results of tests on active and inactive products show that the characteristics of the materials obtained on an industrial scale match those of laboratory products and confirm their high quality with regard to mechanical behaviour, fire resistance, homogeneity and low-leachability. Industrial experience and economic comparisons show that the process of immobilizing waste from nuclear power stations in thermosetting resins offers an extremely interesting alternative to classical methods of conditioning. (author)

  10. Operating practical experience at Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quihillalt, Oscar

    1997-01-01

    Operating experiences of Atucha-1 and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants were discussed in this work. The technical and economic aspects, such as reliability, availability, personnel training, operating costs, prices and market, which exercise influence upon Argentina nuclear energy policy, mainly on the power electric generation by nuclear power plants were considered. Finally the current status of the nucleoelectric sector in Argentina and forecasting were analysed

  11. Operating Experience at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavsek, D.; Bach, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic analysis of operational experience by assessment of internal and industry events and the feedback of lessons learned is one of the essential activities in the improvement of the operational safety and reliability of the nuclear power plant. At NPP Krsko we have developed a document called ''Operating Experience Assessment Program''. Its purpose is to establish administrative guidance for the processing of operating events including on-site and industry events. Assessment of internal events is based on the following methods: Event and Causal Factor Charting, Change Analysis, Barrier Analysis, MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree Analysis) and Human Performance Evaluation. The operating experience group has developed a sophisticated program entitled ''Operating experience tracking system'' (OETS) in response to the need for a more efficient way of processing internal and industry operating experience information. The Operating Experience Tracking System is used to initiate and track operational events including recommended actions follow up. Six screens of the system contain diverse essential information which allows tracking of operational events and enables different kinds of browsing. OETS is a part of the NPP Krsko nuclear network system and can be easily accessed by all plant personnel. (author)

  12. Experience in incorporation control of operation personnel of the Reinsberg nuclear power plant (1967 - 1973)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pul'khajm, K.F.; Klyuke, Kh.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretic estimate of fission products and corrosion nuclides in a WWR type reactor is given. The results of radiation monitoring of the personnel irradiation at the Reinsberg (DDR) nuclear power plant are presented. It is supposed that the intake of fission and corrosion products has been realized through inhalation. The equivalent doses of internal irradiation are calculated. The estimate of the results of radiation monitoring are presented [ru

  13. Operational experiences on the Borssele nuclear power plant using computer based surveillance and diagnostic system on-line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkcan, E.; Quaadvliet, W.H.J.; Peeters, T.T.J.M.; Verhoef, J.P

    1991-06-01

    The on-line monitoring and diagnostics system of Borssele nuclear power plant (NPP), designed and established by the ECN Energy Research Foundation, has been operating continuously since 1983. The system is extended in form of multiprocessing, multi-tasking structure performing real-time monitoring, on-line reactor parameters' calculation, data-base preparation for expert systems and providing early information on possible malfunctions even in the incipient stage making alert by passive alarms. The system realized has already been operating in the course of 7 fuel cycles of the reactor starting from start-up through normal power operation. An expert system operating on the VAX work station is added to the surveillance and diagnostics system for data base management of the observed physical parameters relevant to the NPP under supervision. The paper highlights the surveillance and diagnostic modules involved, in their actual hierarchical form in use, presents theoretical considerations applied to the design of the surveillance system together with the results obtained through the 12th to 17th fuel cycles of the NPP including start-ups and shut-downs and reveals the experience thus gained by both utility and ECN through the application of the system described. (author). 19 refs.; 4 figs

  14. Intelligent operation system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Toshihiko; Fukumoto, Akira; Suto, Osamu; Naito, Norio.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power plants consist of many systems and are operated by skillful operators with plenty of knowledge and experience of nuclear plants. Recently, plant automation or computerized operator support systems have come to be utilized, but the synthetic judgment of plant operation and management remains as human roles. Toshiba is of the opinion that the activities (planning, operation and maintenance) should be integrated, and man-machine interface should be human-friendly. We have begun to develop the intelligent operation system aiming at reducing the operator's role within the fundamental judgment through the use of artificial intelligence. (author)

  15. Operating experience with a near-real-time inventory balance in a nuclear fuel cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Box, W.D.; Kitts, F.G.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Morrison, G.W.; Pike, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of the ORNL Integrated Safeguards Program (ISP) is to provide enhanced material accountability, improved process control, and greater security for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With the improved instrumentation and computer interfacing currently installed, the ORNL 233 U Pilot Plant has demonstrated capability of a near-real-time liquid-volume balance in both the solvent-extraction and ion-exchange systems. Future developments should include the near-real-time mass balancing of special nuclear materials as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. In addition, the aspects of site security and physical protection can be incorporated into the computer monitoring

  16. Operating experience and data on revolving type fluidized bed incineration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, J.

    1990-01-01

    In refuse incinerators operating by revolving fluidization (Revolving Type Fluidized Bed Incinerator) a broad range of wastes, from low caloric refuse of high moisture content to high caloric value material including a wide variety of plastics, can be incinerated at high efficiency because the unit is outstanding in terms of distribution of waste in the incinerator bed and uniformity of heat. In addition, its vigorous revolving fluidization action is very effective in pulverizing refuse, so even relatively strict emission standards can be met without fine pre-shredding. Residues are discharged in a clean, dry form free of putrescible material. Data on practical operation of the revolving fluidized bed incinerator are presented in this paper

  17. Operational experiences with condensate purifiers at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doma, Arpad; Patek, Gabor

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly stricter criteria are applied to the secondary cooling circuits of nuclear power stations, due to technology development of feedwater supply systems. Demands for the minimization of ionic impurities caused by leaks and by the corrosion and erosion products from the unstable metal-water thermodynamic system are growing continuously. Therefore, a full-flow condensate purification system has been installed at the PNPP to meet increased water requirements, and its operation is described. (R.P.) 19 figs

  18. Emergency ac power systems operating experience at U.S. nuclear power plants - 1976 through 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battle, R. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

    1986-02-15

    Success and failure data of test and emergency starts of emergency ac power sources (diesel generators) at U.S. nuclear power plants were collected and evaluated to estimate diesel generator reliability parameters. A regression analysis of the estimates of the probability of failure to start based on surveillance test data from 1976 through 1983 indicates that the probability of failure to start has been decreasing. However, the reliability of diesel generator performance during losses of off-site power for 1981 through 1983 was less than expected based on the test data estimates. The failures that occurred during losses of off-site power were reviewed to determine why the calculated failure to start was greater than expected, and possible explanations for this high value are presented. The subsystems involved In diesel generator subsystem failures were categorized to determine whether there were any dominant failure modes. The results indicate that further significant Improvement in diesel generator reliability will require improvement of many subsystems. (author)

  19. Operational experience in the spent fuel receipt and storage facility at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Iimura, I.; Yamamura, O.; Ogata, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the double containment system led to the reduction of labor time for the cask decontamination to one-tenth compared to the original manner. And also it led to the great decrease of floor contamination in the receipt and storage facility. The decrease permitted as many as about 20,000 visitors to take tours in the fuel receipt and storage facility in the past three years without contamination trouble with the visitors. Different types of spent fuels can be easily handled and stored by the specially designed tools in the pool water. The exchange of the cooling water in the transport cask before unloading and the use of the storage container keep contamination of the pool water to a minimum. The pool water treatment system has been successfully operated. As result, the pool water condition has been well-controlled

  20. Operating Experience with Airborne Activity Confinement Systems at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, J. H.; Temple, J. [Savannah River Plant, E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1968-12-15

    Equipment has been installed in the ventilation exhaust system of each reactor building at the Savannah River Plant to collect and confine airborne radioactive particles and halogen vapours that might be released in a reactor accident The equipment is continuously on-line and has been in service five years. The activity collection system in each reactor building consists of four active compartments and one spare. Each compartment contains banks of 20 moisture separators, 32 filters, and 32 beds of activated carbon in series and is designed for 32 000 cfm air flow. The moisture separators, which prevent moisture damage to the filters, are woven Teflon stainless steel mats and are steam cleaned approximately every nine months to remove accumulated oily materials and particles. No moisture separators have required replacement. The filters are pleated glass-asbestos felt, protected against mechanical damage by wire mesh on both filter faces. Upon installation, each new filter is tested with a 0 6-{mu}m dioctyl phthalate aerosol. Any filter with a leak greater than 0.05% is replaced. Service life for filters is approximately 16 months The condition of the moisture separator and filter banks in each compartment is determined weekly by measuring the pressure drop across each bank and the air flow rate through the bank The activated carbon beds in each compartment are for removal of iodine-131. Carbon bed banks are leak-tested with Freon-112 annually and after replacement. After about four years of service, seventeen of the 20 banks tested in 1967 were within the maximum leakage specification of 0.09%. Three banks, with leakage up to 0.16%, were replaced in 1967. Five of the 17 with satisfactory leakage rates were replaced because of corrosion of the enameled or cadmium-plated mild steel frames. Replacement carbon beds now have stainless steel frames. (author)

  1. Study of a proposal for the insertion of operational experience as a tool for support the training plan for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Renato Alves da

    2009-05-01

    The main objectives of this work are: to determine, through the operational experience analysis of Angra 1 nuclear power plant, the plant operational vulnerabilities that affect its staff training and to propose a modeling to plan a training program to address these vulnerabilities. This analysis utilizes the Angra 1 document entitled 'Ocorrencia de Relato Obrigatorio', which reports the plant event occurrences. Through this document, as well as the opinion of specialists on the most probably root causes of the reported events, the backdrop of the operational experience analysis of internal events was built. The modeling using the SAT method and has as a guideline the internal operational experience analysis. Moreover, this modeling encompasses techniques of event and second generation human reliability analysis, both specific of the nuclear area. The development of this work shows that: the internal operational experience analysis provides a realistic view of the vulnerabilities present in the plant in all areas (technical and organizational), which must be addressed to the plan of the training program and the modeling, based on realistic view of the plant, is dynamic, not linear, and is always up to date on events in the plant, its causes and consequences. (author)

  2. The CIDEM project for integrating availability, operating experience and maintenance in the design of future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, C.; Martin-Onraet, M.

    1998-01-01

    To minimize the kWh cost of future nuclear plants EDF has decided to implement the CIDEM project (French acronym for Design Integrating Availability, Operating Experience and Maintenance), an analytic and systematic process for studying new projects. The first CIDEM application is centered on the future French nuclear unit construction program, known as the REP 2000 Program but the approach could be applied to other Reactor type. The CIDEM studies at the beginning, were oriented to the issues strongly impacting the availability. They have concerned: planned outages, forced outages and preventive maintenance. The studies were carried out by a team grouping engineers from the 3 EDF's Divisions (Engineering-Generation-Research), and working together in a Concurrent Engineering-Mode. This team works in close collaboration with the vendors and the German Utilities involved in the REP 2000 EPR program. The implementation of the CIDEM process constitutes for EDF a new approach to the study of the new Nuclear Power Plant projects. The studies conducted in the availability field have already highlighted a number of critical points and have made it possible to establish a series of specifications for the REP 2000/EPR project. The integration in the design process of Preventive Maintenance and Logistic Support studies will allow a better control of the maintenance cost. The competitiveness of nuclear energy greatly depends on the success of such an approach. (author)

  3. Fort Saint Vrain operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain (FSV), on the system of the Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) power reactor in the United States. The plant features a helium-cooled reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The paper describes the experience made during its operation. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  4. AECL's support to operating plants world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeez, S.; Kakaria, B.K.; Hinchley, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Through their operating records, CANDU reactors have established themselves as a successful and cost-effective source of electricity in Canada and abroad. They have proven to be safe, reliable and economical. A variety of factors have contributed to the enviable CANDU record, such as a sound design based on proven principles supported by effective development programs, along with dedicated plant owners committed to excellence in safely maintaining and operating their plants. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU designer, has continuously maintained a close relationship with owners/operators of the plants in Canada, Argentina, Romania and South Korea. AECL and the plant operators have all benefited from this strengthening relationship by sharing experience and information. CANDU plant operators have been required to respond decisively to the economic realities of downward cost pressures and deregulation. Operating, Maintenance and Administration (OM and A) costs are being given a new focus as plant owners review each cost element to improve the economic returns from their investments. Amongst the three main OM and A constituents, plant maintenance costs are the most variable and have the largest influence on effective plant operations. The correlation between effective plant maintenance and high capacity factors shows clearly the importance of proactive maintenance planning to reduce the frequency and duration of forced plant outages and their negative impacts on plant economics. This paper describes the management processes and organizational structures m AECL that support plant operations and maintenance in operating CANDU plants with cost effective products and services. (author)

  5. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.; Thurygill, E.W.

    1980-05-01

    The CANDU-PHW program is based upon 38 years of heavy water reactor experience with 35 years of operating experience. Canada has had 72 reactor years of nuclear-electric operations experience with 10 nuclear units in 4 generating stations during a period of 18 years. All objectives have been met with outstanding performance: worker safety, public safety, environmental emissions, reliable electricity production, and low electricity cost. The achievement has been realized through total teamwork involving all scientific disciplines and all project functions (research, design, manufacturing, construction, and operation). (auth)

  6. IAEA/NEA incident reporting system (IRS). Reporting guidelines. Feedback from safety related operating experience for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. These guidelines have been jointly developed and approved by the NEA/IAEA

  7. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations both to the workers and the public

  8. Six years of operational experience with a lead acid battery in the autonomous PV-hydrogen plant phoebus Juelich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meurer, C.; Brocke, W.A.; Emonts, B.; Heuts, G.; Mai, H.; Croe, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems IWV-3

    1999-07-01

    A set of 110 lead acid battery cells with a capacity of 1380 Ah was operated for six years in the PV-hydrogen plant PHOEBUS Juelich under realistic consumer and solar conditions. The plant is controlled by an energy management system that is specially designed for the use of a battery combined with a hydrogen long-term storage. The energy management system uses the state of charge SOC, which is determined by measurements of the battery current using validated models of the gassing current and the equilibrium voltage. It was found that after six years of operation there is hardly any fading of battery capacity. (orig.)

  9. Operating experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimesa, S.

    2007-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has developed its own system for tracking, screening and evaluating the operating experiences of the nuclear installations. The SNSA staff regularly tracks the operating experiences throughout the world and screens them on the bases of applicability for the Slovenian nuclear facilities. The operating experiences, which pass the screening, are thoroughly evaluated and also recent operational events in these facilities are taken into account. If needed, more information is gathered to evaluate the conditions of the Slovenian facilities and appropriate corrective actions are considered. The result might be the identification of the need for modification at the licensee, the need for modification of internal procedures in the SNSA or even the proposal for the modification of regulations. Information system helps everybody to track the process of evaluation and proper logging of activities. (author)

  10. The operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1992-01-01

    The duties to be performed in managing the operation of a nuclear power plant are highly diverse, as will be explained in this contribution by the examples of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Station. The excellent safety record and the high availabilities of German nuclear power plants demonstrate that their operators have adopted the right approaches. Systematic evaluation of the operating experience accumulated inhouse and in other plants is of great significance in removing weak spots and improving operation. The manifold and complex activities in the structure of organization and of activities in a nuclear power plant require a high degree of division of labor. (orig.) [de

  11. ERB-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.N.; Cissel, D.W.; Smith, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    As originally designed and operated, EBR-II successfully demonstrated the concept of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle (mini-nuclear park). Subsequent operation has been as an irradiation facility, a role which will continue into the foreseeable future. Since the beginning of operation in 1961, operating experience of EBR-II has been very satisfactory. Most of the components and systems have performed well. In particular, the mechanical performance of heat-removal systems has been excellent. A review of the operating experience reveals that all the original design objectives have been successfully demonstrated. To date, no failures or incidents resulting in serious in-core or out-of-core consequences have occurred. No water-to-sodium leaks have been detected over the life of the plant. At the present time, the facility is operating very well and continuously except for short shutdowns required by maintenance, refueling, modification, and minor repair. A plant factor of 76.9% was achieved for the calendar year 1976

  12. BoA 2 and 3 - Implementation of an innovative power plant concept and first operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, Reinhold O. [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany). Research and Development; Schoeddert, Guido [RWE Power AG, Grevenbroich (Germany). BoA Neurath; Hensel, Manfred [RWE Technology GmbH, Grevenbroich (Germany). Site Management

    2013-04-01

    Units F and G of RWE Powers Neurath power plant have been in commercial operation since the summer of 2012. After Niederaussem K, they are the second and third units equipped with BoA technology (BoA = lignite-fired power plant with optimised plant technology). The BoA approach comprises e.g. optimisation measures in connection with the steam turbine, elevated steam parameters, lean design of thick-walled parts in the steam generator, improvements to the auxiliary power consumption, and heat recovery from the flue gases. With a gross rating of 1,100 MW (1,050 MW net) each has a net design efficiency of more than 43% they are the biggest and most modern lignite-fired power plants worldwide.

  13. Experience with quality of training of personnel in start-up, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziman, V.; Alaxin, E.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical education of personnel takes place in the branch training centre in Jaslovske Bohunice and in the concern training centre of the Slovak Power Plants. Practical training takes place in the Bohunice V-1 power plant. Selected specialists are trained in the training centre of the Novo Voronezh nuclear power plant, at the Paks nuclear plant and in the training centre of the Tusimice power plant. The recruitment, selection, schooling, practical training and placement of personnel and their assignment to posts is done in such a manner as to make sure that the complexly trained personnel is available 6 months to 3 years prior to the physical start-up of the nuclear power plant. The training of university graduates for the post of reactor operator takes 18 months or more. Trained personnel attend in-service training courses in form of complementary courses whose content includes such problems as the elimination of typified possible accidents, on the basis of the analysis of all failures which occurred in the previous period. The rising quality of personnel training at the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant is reflected in the decreasing number of failures caused by the human factor and in the increased availability of the power units. (M.D.)

  14. Operational safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1987-01-01

    The operational safety of nuclear power plants has become an important safety issue since the Chernobyl accident. A description is given of the various aspects of operational safety, including the importance of human factors, responsibility, the role and training of the operator, the operator-machine interface, commissioning and operating procedures, experience feedback, and maintenance. The lessons to be learnt from Chernobyl are considered with respect to operator errors and the management of severe accidents. Training of personnel, operating experience feedback, actions to be taken in case of severe accidents, and international cooperation in the field of operational safety, are also discussed. (U.K.)

  15. Advanced plant design recommendations from Cook Nuclear Plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    A project in the American Electric Power Service Corporation to review operating and maintenance experience at Cook Nuclear Plant to identify recommendations for advanced nuclear plant design is described. Recommendations so gathered in the areas of plant fluid systems, instrument and control, testing and surveillance provisions, plant layout of equipment, provisions to enhance effective maintenance, ventilation systems, radiological protection, and construction, are presented accordingly. An example for a design review checklist for effective plant operations and maintenance is suggested

  16. Relative costs to nuclear plants: international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1992-03-01

    This work approaches the relative costs to nuclear plants in the Brazil. It also presents the calculation methods and its hypothesis to determinate the costs, and the nacional experience in costs of investment, operating and maintenance of the nuclear plants

  17. Thermal power plant design and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Power Plant: Design and Operation deals with various aspects of a thermal power plant, providing a new dimension to the subject, with focus on operating practices and troubleshooting, as well as technology and design. Its author has a 40-long association with thermal power plants in design as well as field engineering, sharing his experience with professional engineers under various training capacities, such as training programs for graduate engineers and operating personnel. Thermal Power Plant presents practical content on coal-, gas-, oil-, peat- and biomass-fueled thermal power

  18. Operational characteristics of nuclear power plants - modelling of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studovic, M.

    1984-01-01

    By operational experience of nuclear power plants and realize dlevel of availability of plant, systems and componenst reliabiliuty, operational safety and public protection, as a source on nature of distrurbances in power plant systems and lessons drawn by the TMI-2, in th epaper are discussed: examination of design safety for ultimate ensuring of safe operational conditions of the nuclear power plant; significance of the adequate action for keeping proess parameters in prescribed limits and reactor cooling rquirements; developed systems for measurements detection and monitoring all critical parameters in the nuclear steam supply system; contents of theoretical investigation and mathematical modeling of the physical phenomena and process in nuclear power plant system and components as software, supporting for ensuring of operational safety and new access in staff education process; program and progress of the investigation of some physical phenomena and mathematical modeling of nuclear plant transients, prepared at faculty of mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. (author)

  19. La Venta wind power plant, seven months operating experience and growth perspectives; Central eolica La Venta, siete meses de operacion y perspectivas de crecimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadena Tovar, Roberto; Lopez Rios, Serafin [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico)

    1995-01-01

    The capacity factor achieved for La Venta Wind Power Plant in Oaxaca State, Mexico was 63.8% during its first seven operating months. There is not similar experience around the world for a wind plant. This paper presents performance plant details and its capacity growth perspectives. [Espanol] En la central eolica La Venta, Oaxaca, Mexico se ha obtenido un factor de planta de 63.8% durante sus primeros siete meses de operacion, no existiendo precedente similar en las centrales eolicas actualmente en operacion en el mundo. En este documento se describen detalles de su comportamiento y se efectua un bosquejo general de las posibilidades de crecimiento del proyecto.

  20. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    There can be no doubt that the systematic evaluation of operating experience by the operator and the regulator is essential for continued safe operation of nuclear power plants. Recent concerns have been voiced that the operating experience information and insights are not being used effectively to promote safety. If these concerns foreshadow a real trend in OECD countries toward complacency in reporting and analysing operating events and taking corrective actions, then past experience suggests that similar or even more serious events will recur. This report discusses how the regulator can take actions to assure that operators have effective programmes to collect and analyse operating experience and, just as important, for taking steps to follow up with actions to prevent the events and conditions from recurring. These regulatory actions include special inspections of an operator operating experience programme and discussion with senior plant managers to emphasize the importance of having an effective operating experience programme. In addition to overseeing the operator programmes, the regulator has the broader responsibility for assuring that industry-wide trends, both national and international are monitored. To meet these responsibilities, the regulatory body must have its own operating experience programme, and this report discusses the important attributes of such regulatory programmes. It is especially important for the regulator to have the capability for assessing the full scope of operating experience issues, including those that may not be included in an operator operating experience programme, such as new research results, international operating experience, and broad industry trend information. (author)

  1. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  2. Operational experience of electron beam flue gases treatment pilot installation at the Maritsa East 2 Thermal Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutskinov, N. [NEK-EAD (Bulgaria)

    2011-07-01

    The electron beam flue gases treatment process is very versatile and effective technology for simultaneous removal of acidic pollutants i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) from the flue gas produced in the combustion of fossil fuel. The technology allows decomposition of VOC (volatile organic compound) such as polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) and persistent organic pollutants (POP). The electron beam flue gases treatment technology for combustion flue gases purification was applied in Maritsa-East 2 Thermal Power Plant. The decision for construction of Electron Beam Pilot Plant at Maritsa-East 2 TPP was taken at the technical meeting in IAEA Vienna, November 1998. The flue gases of 10 000 nm³/h are irradiated by three high energy electron accelerators of 800 keV and 35 kW beam power each. The plant has been operated since November 2003. The removal efficiency 90-99% for SO{sub x} and 85-90% for NO{sub x} was observed. The quality of coals are characterised with high ash content up to 45%, high moisture up to 57%, low calorific value from 1196 kcal/kg up to 1603 kcal/kg and high concentration of sulphur. The Bulgarian lignite coals are unique in their usage as fuel for the thermal power plants in Maritsa East region. (author)

  3. Operation monitor for plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tetsufumi; Kanemoto, Shigeru.

    1991-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, states of each of equipment in the plant are monitored accurately even under such a operation condition that the power is changed. That is, the fundamental idea is based on a model comparison method. A deviation between an output signal upon normal plant state obtained in a forecasting model device and that of the objective equipment in the plant are compared with a predetermined value. The result of the comparison is inputted to an alarm device to alarm the abnormality of the states of the equipment to an operator. The device of the present invention thus constituted can monitor the abnormality of the operation of equipment accurately even under such a condition that a power level fluctuates. As a result, it can remarkably contribute to mitigate operator's monitoring operation under the condition such as during load following operation. (I.S.)

  4. Qualification of nuclear power plant operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    With the ultimate aim of reducing the possibility of human error in nuclear power plant operations, the Guidebook discusses the organizational aspects, the staffing requirements, the educational systems and qualifications, the competence requirements, the ways to establish, preserve and verify competence, the specific aspects of personnel management and training for nuclear power plant operations, and finally the particular situations and difficulties to be overcome by utilities starting their first nuclear power plant. An important aspect presented in the Guidebook is the experience in training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel in various countries: Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Czechoslovakia, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States of America

  5. The production control laboratories of the plutonium extraction Plant at Marcoule. Six years operating experience: 1957 - 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, A.

    1964-01-01

    In this paper, the author attempts to sum up the conditions prevailing, after six years of operation, in the Laboratories of the Plutonium Extraction Plant. The origins and objectives are briefly reviewed, the technology and staff recruitment policy are examined, and progress made is shown. The methods used as well as the scope of application and limits imposed at the present state are considered. Past achievements and further possibilities in the next future are examined. An attempt has been made to bring out the outlooks for the more distant future and to investigate the conditions required for the successful carrying out of the program. (author) [fr

  6. Industry Operating Experience Process at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, B.; Bozin, B.; Cizmek, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experience has shown that number of minor events and near misses, usually without immediate or significant impact to plant safety and reliability, are precursors of significant or severe events due to the same or similar root or apparent cause(s). It is therefore desirable to identify and analyze weaknesses of the precursor problems (events) in order to prevent occurrence of significant events. Theoretically, significant events could be prevented from occurring if the root cause(s) of these precursor problems could be identified and eliminated. The Operating Experience Program identifies such event precursors and by reporting them to the industry, plant specific corrective actions can be taken to prevent events at other operational plants. The intent of the Operating Experience Program is therefore to improve nuclear power plant safety and reliability of the operating nuclear power plants. Each plant develops its own Operating Experience Program in order to learn from the in-house operating experience as well as from the world community of nuclear plants. The effective use of operating experience includes analyzing both plant and industry events in order to identify fundamental weaknesses and then determining appropriate plant-specific actions that will minimize the likelihood of similar events. Learning and applying the lessons from operating experience is an integral part of station safety culture and is encouraged by managers throughout the top plant administrative programs and procedures. Krsko NPP is developed it own Operating Experience Program by using the most relevant INPO/WANO/IAEA guidelines as well as its own knowledge, skills an operating practice. The Operating Experience Program is a part of the Corrective Action Program, which is among top management programs, thus program is strongly encouraged by top management. The purpose of Operating Experience Program is to provide guidance for using, sharing, and evaluating operating experience information

  7. Kvanefjeld refinery pilot plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, Damien; Furfaro, Domenic

    2016-01-01

    Greenland Minerals and Energy is a junior project development company which is listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (asx:GGG). It is developing the Kvanefjeld rare earth and uranium project located in the southern tip of Greenland. The project has completed a Feasibility Study and is currently in the permitting phase. Last year was a busy time for the company as it completed a Feasibility Study, a mining licence application (draft submitted in December 2015) and pilot plant operations. Beneficiation pilot plant operations were completed at GTK in Finland in April 2015. This pilot plant treated approximately 30 tonnes of ore to producing almost 2 tonnes of rare earth mineral concentrate. Later in the year a hydrometallurgical pilot plant was performed which mimicked the Refinery process. This pilot plant was performed at Outotec’s Pori Research laboratories in Finland from September till October 2015. The pilot plant treated approximately 200 kilograms of concentrate over 4 split operating campaigns. Each campaign was performed to focus on the performance of a specific part of the refinery flowsheet. This allowed for full operating focus on a single unit operation to ensure that it was operating correctly. The pilot plant operations were quite successful with no major issues with the flowsheet identified through continuous operation. Some fine tuning of conditions was required to ensure adequate removal of impurities was performed with recycle streams incorporated. Overall the leach extractions observed in the pilot plant exceeded the design assumptions in the Feasibility Study. These programs were partially funded by the EURARE program. The EURARE program aims to encourage the sustainable development of European based rare earth projects. This has the goal of allowing Europe to become less reliant on importation of these key raw materials. The professionalism and performance of both GTK and Outotec contributed significantly to the success of the pilot plant

  8. TVA's nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews TVA's nuclear power plant design and construction experience in terms of schedule and capital costs. The completed plant in commercial operation at Browns Ferry and six additional plants currently under construction represent the nation's largest single commitment to nuclear power and an ultimate investment of $12 billion by 1986. The presentation is made in three separate phases. Phase one will recapitulate the status of the nuclear power industry in 1966 and set forth the assumptions used for estimating capital costs and projecting project schedules for the first TVA units. Phase two describes what happened to the program in the hectic early 1979's in terms of expansion of scope (particularly for safety features), the dramatic increase in regulatory requirements, vendor problems, stretchout of project schedules, and unprecedented inflation. Phase three addresses the assumptions used today in estimating schedules and plant costs for the next ten-year period

  9. Plant operator performance evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Mitsuko; Kubota, Ryuji.

    1989-01-01

    A plant operator performance evaluation system to analyze plant operation records during accident training and to identify and classify operator errors has been developed for the purpose of supporting realization of a training and education system for plant operators. A knowledge engineering technique was applied to evaluation of operator behavior by both even-based and symptom-based procedures, in various situations including event transition due to multiple failures or operational errors. The system classifies the identified errors as to their single and double types based on Swain's error classification and the error levels reflecting Rasmussen's cognitive level, and it also evaluates the effect of errors on plant state and then classifies error influence, using 'knowledge for phenomena and operations', as represented by frames. It has additional functions for analysis of error statistics and knowledge acquisition support of 'knowledge for operations'. The system was applied to a training analysis for a scram event in a BWR plant, and its error analysis function was confirmed to be effective by operational experts. (author)

  10. Operational experience with a commercial plant for stabilisation Of radioactive sludge and other materials in the United Kingdom - 16042

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, M.; Cornell, R.M.; Riley, B.; Ware, B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2000, Nuvia Limited was contracted to design, build and commission a waste treatment plant (WETP) to stabilise the active sludge stored in the External Active Storage Tanks (EAST) at UKAEA Winfrith, UK. The sludge was generated during the operational period of the prototype Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SGHWR), which is now in the process of being decommissioned. This work supports UKAEA's mission, which is to carry out environmental restoration of its nuclear sites and to put them to alternative uses wherever possible. Recently UKAEA has been reorganised and responsibility for the site lies with Research Sites Restoration Limited (RSRL) with funding provided by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The process of stabilisation of the SGHWR sludge from the EAST tanks within 500 litre stainless steel drums in the Winfrith EAST Treatment Plant (WETP) using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and blast furnace slag (BFS) is now almost complete. At this stage it was planned to decommission and demolish the WETP facilities but RSRL have introduced a further stabilisation project involving thorium metal waste ahead of the start of the planned decommissioning. As a result, the facilities are to be revised to provide for the encapsulation of bars of thorium metal within modified 500 litre drums together with a number of necessary changes to the plant control system. The cell line used for stabilisation consists of five operational cells separated by shield doors designed to maintain strict contamination control. There is a wet cell where the drums are filled with sludge and powder, a cell with stations for curing and grouting the drums, a cell for lidding, bolting and QA inspection, a maintenance and gamma monitoring cell and a buffer store to hold the completed drums. After completion, drums are moved in a shielded overpack to the Treated Radwaste Store located on a different part of the Winfrith site. In the revised cell line configuration the wet cell will

  11. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  12. Computer aids for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    For some time, particularly since the TMI accident, nuclear power plant operators have been aware of the difficulties involved in diagnosing accidents and returning plants to their stable, safe operating mode. There are various possible solutions to these problems: improve control organization during accident situations, rewrite control procedures, integrate safety engineers in shifts, improve control rooms, and implement additional computer aids. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the efforts undertaken by EDF over the last few years in this field

  13. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear utilities operate their plants in an acceptably safe manner at all times. Learning from experience has been a key element in meeting this objective. It is therefore very important for nuclear power plant operators to have an active programme for collecting, analysing and acting on the lessons of operating experience that could affect the safety of their plants. NEA experts have noted that almost all of the recent, significant events reported at international meetings have occurred earlier in one form or another. Counteractions are usually well-known, but information does not always seem to reach end users, or corrective action programmes are not always rigorously applied. Thus, one of the challenges that needs to be met in order to maintain good operational safety performance is to ensure that operating experience is promptly reported to established reporting systems, preferably international in order to benefit from a larger base of experience, and that the lessons from operating experience are actually used to promote safety. This report focuses on how regulatory bodies can ensure that operating experience is used effectively to promote the safety of nuclear power plants. While directed at nuclear power plants, the principles in this report may apply to other nuclear facilities as well. (author)

  14. Adapting the experience of the operating authorities to the coke plant and power plant engineering markets. Adapter l'experience d'exploitants aux marches de l'ingenierie des cokeries et centrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, B [Charbonnages de France, Paris (France)

    1990-03-01

    Through its own engineering organization, created from the former engineering departments of the Houilleres de Bassins on markets abroad, Charbonnages de France (CdF) is exploiting its specific know-how in the field of extraction and use of coals. This exclusive know-how covers both coal conveying devices and the production of high quality cokes or the construction of power plants using fuels with low calorific values, all fields where CdF's techniques have acquired recognized experience both in design and in operations. This is because, during their careers, most of the engineers in CdF's engineering organization have run installations comparable to those which they are proposing to their clients. Among the recent tasks of CdF's engineering organization, those in the field of cogeneration and of circulating fluidized bed boilders should be given particular mention. In fact, CdF Engineering is the main contractor on the Carling 4 circulating fluidized bed boiler in Lorraine (electric power of 125 MW), and at Gardanne, at the Pechiney Aluminium plant, it constructed the first large industrial boiler of this type installed in France. And finally, it is now building, on the Island of La Reunion, a two-energy power plant, fed by both coal and bagasse (cane residue). 4 figs.

  15. Operating experience at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, R.

    1996-01-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, is a 5-pass, recirculating, superconducting rf linac designed to provide exceptional beam quality at 4 GeV up to 200 μA CW. It is made up of an injector, two 400-MeV linacs, and 9 recirculation arcs having a total beamline length of more than 4.5 km. On Nov. 5, 1995, CEBAF delivered a 4 GeV, 25-μA CW electron beam to the first of 3 experimental halls and the experimental physics program was started 10 days later. Accelerator availability during the first month of the experimental run exceeded 75%. Beam properties measured in the experimental hall to date are a one sigma momentum spread of 5x10 -5 and an rms emittance of 0.2 nanometer-radians, better than design specification. CW beam has been provided from all 5 passes at 800 MeV intervals. Outstanding performance of the superconducting linacs suggests a machine energy upgrade to 6 GeV in the near term with eventual machine operation at 8-10 GeV. Results from commissioning and operations experience since the last conference are presented

  16. Organizing nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, H.W.; Rekittke, K.

    1987-01-01

    With the preliminary culmination in the convoy plants of the high standard of engineered safeguards in German nuclear power plants developed over the past twenty years, the interest of operators has now increasingly turned to problems which had not been in the focus of attention before. One of these problems is the organization of nuclear power plant operation. In order to enlarge the basis of knowledge, which is documented also in the rules published by the Kerntechnischer Ausschuss (Nuclear Technology Committee), the German Federal Minister of the Interior has commissioned a study of the organizational structures of nuclear power plants. The findings of that study are covered in the article. Two representative nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany were selected for the study, one of them a single-unit plant run by an independent operating company in the form of a private company under German law (GmbH), the other a dual-unit plant operated as a dependent unit of a utility. The two enterprises have different structures of organization. (orig.) [de

  17. Unmanned operation of Hydro Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regula, E.

    2008-01-01

    Intentions to launch unmanned operation are no news, the very first occurred in Hydro Power Plants (HPP) at the time when the first computer technology was implemented into process of power generation, i.e. no later than in 1960 s . ENEL entering Slovenske elektrarne not only revived but significantly accelerated the implementation process of unmanned operation. Experience of ENEL says that unmanned operation means better reliability of the HPP and this is the priority. (author)

  18. Operating experience and TPA: the Italian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, G.

    1990-01-01

    Collection and analysis of operating experience from the Italian plants and utilization of abroad data both to plants in operation and in construction are presented. Some results are also referred, aimed to evidence the role of the international cooperation to safe operation of nuclear plants. The approach to the Trend and Pattern analyses is described as well, and the use of computerized techniques of analysis on personal computer. Finally on going activities are introduced, specifically application of operating experience of plants in operation to small sized reactors and to ones with more intrinsic safety characteristics; review of the reporting system for future application and comparative analysis of the different realization of selected safety systems

  19. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  20. Operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, P.

    1988-04-01

    The textbook for training nuclear power plant personnel is centred on the most important aspects of operating modes of WWER-440 reactors. Attention is devoted to the steady state operation of the unit, shutdown, overhaul with refuelling, physical and power start-up. Also given are the regulations of shift operation and the duties of individual categories of personnel during the shift and during the change of shifts. (Z.M.). 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Manufacturers' support to plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuschel, D.

    1996-01-01

    For more than 30 years now, safety and availablity of German nuclear power plants has been a common interest of the plant owners and the manufacturing company KWU. This longstanding collaboration for a common goal has created a safety culture unprecented in other countries, and a partnership worth to be continued. Due to the nuclear power phaseout policy, the priority today is on maintaining and safeguarding economically efficient operation of existing power plants. KWU have been adapting their business strategy to the change in the market, and are prepared to stick to this line. Thus KWU and plant operators see to it that the acquired competence in nuclear power plant technology will remain to be concentrated in the hands of the manufacturers. Continuing the partnership in this field, and encouraged by the placement of orders for the future EPR and the SWR 1000, KWU and plant operators will be in the position to offer a sound option for future decisions about construction of new nuclear power plants in Germany. (orig.) [de

  2. BWR and ABWR operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kimio; Takayama, Yoshito; Shimizu, Shunichi

    1998-01-01

    The first commercial operation of a nuclear power plant in Japan was in 1969. At present, there are 52 nuclear power plants operating in the country, accounting for about 35% of the total electricity generated and about 20 % of the total capacity of electricity generation facilities in Japan. Moreover, Japan has had the highest facility utilization rate, which is an indicator of operational safety, among the top four nuclear-generation countries (U.S.A., France, Germany, and Japan) every year since 1993, and has maintained a utilization rate of more than 80% since 1995. Toshiba has supported plant operation and maintenance in 19 nuclear power plants. The overall facility utilization rate of these plants attained a record of 86.4% in fiscal 1996. Furthermore, the averaged rates over the past three fiscal years from 1995 to 1997 have been the highest in the world among plant constructors such as GE, WH, and Siemens. (author)

  3. Operating Experience Insights into Pipe Failures for Electro-Hydraulic Control and Instrument Air Systems in Nuclear Power Plant. A Topical Report from the Component Operational Experience, Degradation and Ageing Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Structural integrity of piping systems is important for plant safety and operability. In recognition of this, information on degradation and failure of piping components and systems is collected and evaluated by regulatory agencies, international organisations (e.g. OECD/NEA and IAEA) and industry organisations worldwide to provide systematic feedback for example to reactor regulation and research and development programmes associated with non-destructive examination (NDE) technology, in-service inspection (ISI) programmes, leak-before-break evaluations, risk-informed ISI, and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) applications involving passive component reliability. Several OECD member countries have agreed to establish the OECD/NEA 'Component Operational Experience, Degradation and Ageing Programme' (CODAP) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to degradation and failure of metallic piping and non-piping metallic passive components in commercial nuclear power plants. The scope of the data collection includes service-induced wall thinning, part through-wall cracks, through-wall cracks with and without active leakage, and instances of significant degradation of metallic passive components, including piping pressure boundary integrity. The OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) acts as an umbrella committee of the Project. CODAP is the continuation of the 2002-2011 'OECD/NEA Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) and the Stress Corrosion Cracking Working Group of the 2006-2010 'OECD/NEA Stress Corrosion Cracking and Cable Ageing Project' (SCAP). OPDE was formally launched in May 2002. Upon completion of the third term (May 2011), the OPDE project was officially closed to be succeeded by CODAP. SCAP was enabled by a voluntary contribution from Japan. It was formally launched in June 2006 and officially closed with an international workshop held in Tokyo in May

  4. Operating plant safety analysis needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.Y.; Love, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective for nuclear power station owners is to operate and manage their plants safely. However, there is also a need to provide economical electric power, which requires that the unit be operated as efficiently as possible, consistent with the safety requirements. The objectives cited above can be achieved through the identification and use of available margins inherent in the plant design. As a result of conservative licensing and analytical approaches taken in the past, many of these margins may be found in the safety analysis limits within which plants currently operate. Improvements in the accuracy of the safety analysis, and a more realistic treatment of plant initial and boundary conditions, can make this margin available for a variety of uses which enhance plant performance, help to reduce O and M costs, and may help to extend licensed operation. Opportunities for improvement exist in several areas in the accident analysis normally performed for Chapter 15 of the FSAR. For example, recent modifications to the ECCS rule, 10CFR50.46 and Appendix K, allow use of margins previously unavailable in the analysis of the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). To take advantage of this regulatory change, new methods are being developed to analyze both the large and small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As this margin is used, enhancements in the analysis of other transients will become necessary. The paper discusses accident analysis methods, future development needs, and analysis margin utilization in specific accident scenarios

  5. Experience from operation of WWER-440 model 213 nuclear power plants. Reference plant: Bohunice V2 (Slovakia). Report of the IAEA technical co-operation project RER/9/004 on evaluation of safety aspects of WWER-440 model 213 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This TECDOC provides a comprehensive review of the operational experience with WWER-440/213 plants. It is hoped that it will be useful to anyone working in the field of WWER safety, and in particular to experts planning, executing or reviewing studies related to the subject. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Experience from operation of WWER-440 model 213 nuclear power plants. Reference plant: Bohunice V2 (Slovakia). Report of the IAEA technical co-operation project RER/9/004 on evaluation of safety aspects of WWER-440 model 213 nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This TECDOC provides a comprehensive review of the operational experience with WWER-440/213 plants. It is hoped that it will be useful to anyone working in the field of WWER safety, and in particular to experts planning, executing or reviewing studies related to the subject. Refs, figs and tabs.

  7. Operational experience with the first eighteen slightly enriched uranium fuel assemblies in the Atucha-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, M.; Perez, R.; Pineyro, J.; Sidelnik, J.; Fink, J.; Casario, J.A.; Alvarez, L.

    1997-01-01

    Atucha I is a 357 Mwe nuclear station, moderated and cooled with heavy water, pressure vessel type of German design, located in Argentina. Fuel assemblies (FA) are 36 active natural UO2 rod clusters, 5.3 meters long and fuel is on power. Average FA exit burnup is 6 MWd/kg U. The reactor core contains 252 FA. To reduce the fuel costs about 6 MU$S/yr a program of utilization of SEU (0.85 %w U235) fuel was started at the beginning of 1995 with the introduction of 12 FA in the first step. The exit burnup of FA is approx. 10 MWd/kgU. It is planned to increase gradually the number of them up to having a full core with SEU fuel with an expected FA average exit burnup of 11 MWd/kgU. The SEU program has also the advantage of a strong reduction of spent fuel volume, and a moderate reduction of fuelling machine use. This paper presents the satisfactory operation experience with the introduction of the first 12 SEU fuel assemblies and the planned activities for the future. The fresh SEU fuel assemblies were introduced in six fuel channels located in an intermediate zone located 136 cm from the center of the reactor and selected because they have higher margins to the channel powers limits to accommodate the initial 15 to 20 % relative channel power increase. To verify the design and fuel management calculations, comparisons have been made of the calculated and measured values of the variation of channel ΔT, regulating rods insertion and flux reading in in-core detectors near to the refueled channel. The agreement was good and in most of the cases within the measurement errors. Cell calculations were made with WIMS-D4, and reactor calculations with PUMA. a fuel management 3D diffusion program developed in Argentina. With SEU fuel with a greater burnup in the central high power core region, new operating procedures were developed to prevent PCI failures in fuel power ramps that arise during operation. Some fuel rod and structural assembly design changes were introduced on the

  8. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted on nuclear power plant (NPP) control room training simulators by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, its subcontractor, General Physics Corporation, and participating utilities. The experiments are sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Human Factors and Safeguards Branch, Division of Risk Analysis and Operations, and are a continuation of prior research using simulators, supported by field data collection, to provide a technical basis for NRC human factors regulatory issues concerned with the operational safety of nuclear power plants. During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE boiling water reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of (a) senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, (b) operating crew augmentation with an STA and (c) practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator. Methodology and results to date are reported

  9. Plant operation state monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Babuchi, Katsumi; Arato, Toshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The system of the present invention accurately monitors a plant operation state of a plant, such as a nuclear power plant and a thermal power plant by using high temperature water, based on water quality informations. That is, water quality informations for the objective portion by using an electrochemical water quality sensor disposed in the objective portion to be monitored in the plant are continuously extracted for a predetermined period of time. Water quality is evaluated based on the extracted information. Obtained results for water quality evaluation and predetermined reference values of the plant operation handling are compared. Necessary part among the results of the measurement is displayed or recorded. The predetermined period of time described above is a period that the water quality information reaches at least a predetermined value or a period that the predetermined value is estimated by the water quality information, and it is defined as a period capable of measuring the information for three months continuously. The measurement is preferably conducted continuously in a period up to each periodical inspection on about every one year. (I.S.)

  10. Tevatron operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1989-02-01

    Fermilabs superconducting accelerator, the Tevatron has been operational for nearly six years. The history of its operation is presented. Several long shutdowns for superconducting dipole repairs are discussed. The dominant factor influencing the repair was conductor motion which fatigued the cable in the magnet ends. Borescoping and x-raying techniques were used to determine which magnet ends required repair. Detailed downtime logs were kept for each of the running periods. A discussion of the sources of downtime and a comparison for different operating modes is presented

  11. Operation experience with elevated ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankova, Katerina; Kysela, Jan; Malac, Miroslav; Petrecky, Igor; Svarc, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The 10 VVER units in the Czech and Slovak Republics are all in very good water chemistry and radiation condition, yet questions have arisen regarding the optimization of cycle chemistry and improved operation in these units. To address these issues, a comprehensive experimental program for different water chemistries of the primary circuit was carried out at the Rez Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, with the goal of judging the influence of various water chemistries on radiation build-up. Four types of water chemistries were compared: standard VVER water chemistry (in common use), direct hydrogen dosing without ammonia, standard VVER water chemistry with elevated ammonia levels, and zinc dosing to standard VVER water chemistry. The test results showed that the types of water chemistry other than the common one have benefits for the operation of the nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit. Operation experience with elevated ammonia at NPP Dukovany Units 3 and 4 is presented which validates the experimental results, demonstrating improved corrosion product volume activity. (orig.)

  12. Operating experiences of Heavy Water Plant at Talcher using bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process (Paper No. 1.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldar, T.K.; Manoj Kumar; Ramamurty, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    A heavy water plant employing bithermal ammonia-hydrogen exchange process was set up at Talcher (India). The energy consumption in the process is lower as compared to monothermal process. The plant performance was affected by various problems and has resulted in low heavy water production. The problems are: (i)formation of solid deposits, (ii)inability of exchange towers to process design gas flow rates, (iii)inadequate exchange efficiency of the sieve trays provided as exchange trays, and (iv)differential amide concentration in different plant sections. These problems and their effect on the overall plant performance are discussed in detail and modifications to improve the performance are suggested. (author). 4 figs

  13. Administration in an operating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, K.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of strict administrative procedures in the daily work is being demonstrated by commenting on events that occured in the operation of German nuclear power plants. The procedure for working in an area of the plant (pressurized medium, high-radioactive level, explosive of flammable mediums), where special measures for safe working have to be taken, is discussed in detail. The administrative problems during refuelling time are further on mentioned, especially the problems connected with administering more than 1,000 people with respect to health protection and sabotage protection. Some general comments on the influences from external causes (authorities, courts, etc.) are given. (orig./ORU) [de

  14. TRIGA reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.

    1970-01-01

    The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been in operation 3 years. Last August it was upgraded from 250 kW to 1000 kW. This was accomplished with little difficulty. During the 3 years of operation no major problems have been experienced. Most of the problems have been minor in nature and easily corrected. They came from lazy susan (dry bearing), Westronics Recorder (dead spots in the range), The Reg Rod Magnet Lead-in Circuit (a new type lead-in wire that does not require the lead-in cord to coil during rod withdrawal hss been delivered, much better than the original) and other small corrections

  15. Construction of a new plant in Gabon by the Compagnie des Mines d'Uranium de Franceville: Three years' experience of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jug, V.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a programme to modernize and extend its means of production which had already commenced with the setting up of a solvent extraction unit in 1977, and a sulphuric acid production facility of increased capacity (60 t/d) in 1980, the Compagnie des Mines d'Uranium de Franceville (COMUF) started a new uranium ore treatment plant in 1982. The aim was to replace the older installation built in 1959-60, which had reached the limit of its capacity and whose largest equipment was in need of renewal. The new installations are capable of an annual uranium production of 1500 t of magnesium uranate. The techniques adopted were the most modern, those likely to simplify the process and improve operating costs, namely semi-autogenous grinding and solid-liquid separation using band filters. Three years of operating experience confirm the sound choice of the main options made when designing the installations. The treatment performances, especially those which are independent of the nature of the ore, and the reliability of operation are indeed excellent. Thanks to a training programme started in the late 1980s the staff adapted rapidly to the new technical environment and it has been possible to run the entire plant with almost exclusively Gabonese staff. (author). 1 tab

  16. Review of operating history at the Palisades Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    the Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. A portion of the SEP includes the compilation and interpretation of operational occurrences at these plants. This summary describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review of Palisades Nuclear Plant. The review includes a detailed examination of the operating experience in two segments - plant shutdowns and power reductions, and reportable events

  17. Operating experience with a near-real-time inventory balance in a nuclear-fuel-cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Box, W.D.; Kitts, F.G.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Morrison, G.W.; Pike, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of the ORNL Integrated Safeguards Program (ISP) is to provide enhanced material accountability, improved process control, and greater security for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With the improved instrumentation and computer interfacing currently installed, the ORNL 233 U Pilot Plant has demonstrated capability of a near-real-time liquid-volume balance in both the solvent-extraction and ion-exchange systems. Future developments should include the near-real-time mass balancing of special nuclear materials as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. In addition, the aspects of site security and physical protection can be incorporated into the computer monitoring

  18. Operating experience of centrifugal contactors used in a third plutonium purification cycle at the Marcoule reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, J.A.; Breschet, C.A.; Delafontaine, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Multistage centrifugal contactors of the type SGN-ROBATEL LX 208 NSC are used in a third plutonium cycle at the Marcoule Reprocessing Plant, they have been smooth-running since the commissioning in 1984. The four centrifugal contactors, totalling 32 stages, are used for Extraction. Scrub and Acidic Strip, and a bank of three flat mixer-settlers is used for plutonium blocking, and soda washing of the solvent. The plutonium product, the residual activity of which is less than one microcurie per gram, is diluent washed in a bank of three flat mixer-settlers, before been concentrated in a zirconium evaporator to 200 g. 1 -1

  19. NPD Operating Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, E. P. [Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, Rolphton, ON (Canada)

    1968-04-15

    NPD has demonstrated high-capacity factor operation and for the past three years has achieved an average net capacity factor of 98% for the ''winter-peak'' period. The net capacity factor for the year 1966 was 88% and for the period from the end of commissioning (October 1962) to the end of 1966 was 71%. The output of the station has been stretched from 22 MW(e) gross to 25 MW(e) gross. This was aided by the installation of an internal steam separator in the turbine but no basic modifications to the reactor-boiler systems were required. The turbine has also been modified by the installation of chrome steel diaphragms as a solution to an erosion problem. The station also continues as a test facility to develop new components and techniques. This includes the recent successful replacement of two reactor pressure tubes and the conversion of the reactor vault ventilation system to a ''dry'' atmosphere using a molecular sieve to collect heavy-water leakage and control the concentration of acidic oxides of nitrogen. Fuel performance has been excellent and the average burn-up in the core is now 84 MWh/kg U which is slightly above the equilibrium design value. Only three fuel bundles have been found with sheath failures and none of these was due to a deficiency in the fuel but was as a result of handling problems with the refuelling equipment. In spite of undesirably high maintenance time, the fuelling machines have now inserted over 1000 fuel bundles into the reactor ''on power''. Heavy-water loss rates have been acceptable and are improving. The average loss rate from leaks during 1966 was 210 g/h. A proposal to modify the NPD heavy-water heat transport system to allow boiling is under consideration. (author)

  20. The SM and MIR reactors operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprienko, V.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Svyatkin, M.N.; Shamardin, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The SM and MIR operation experience show that continuous work on the problem of ageing, in all its aspects, allows for prolongation of the research plant life cycle by several folds as compared to the initial project. The redesigned SM-3 reactor will operate for another 20 years. The similar result is expected from the MIR planned reconstruction which scope will be the topic of future presentations. (orig.)

  1. Proceedings of the CSNI WGOE/SEGHOF workshop on modifications at nuclear power plants - Operating experience, safety significance and the role of human factors and organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Operating experience repeatedly shows that changes and modifications at nuclear power plants (NPPs) may lead to safety significant events. At the same time, modifications are necessary to ensure a safe and economic functioning of the NPPs. To ensure the continuing safety of NPPs it is important that processes for change and modification are given proper attention both by the NPPs and the regulators. The operability, maintainability and testability of every modification should be thoroughly assessed from different points of view to ensure that no safety problems are introduced. The OECD/NEA Committee on Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) addressed the issue of modifications at a 'Workshop on Modifications at Nuclear Power Plants - Operating Experience, Safety Significance and Role of Human Factors' held at the OECD headquarters in Paris on October 6 to 8, 2003. This workshop was undertaken as a joint effort of the Working Group on Operating Experience (WGOE) and the Special Experts Group on Human and Organisational Factors (SEGHOF). During the workshop, WGOE focused on the theme of 'Minor Modifications and their Safety Significance', while SEGHOF focused on the topic 'Human and Organisational Factors in NPP Modifications'. The workshop was attended by 55 experts from the industry, regulators and technical support organizations in 15 countries. The workshop programme consisted of plenary and parallel sessions for presentations and discussions. One important part of the workshop was to discuss findings of the WGOE and SEGHOF surveys of utility and regulatory experience from modifications at the NPPs. Modifications at the NPPs are controlled by written procedures. The process varies depending on the type of the modification. Large modifications generally lead to fewer problems, because the projects are given both a great deal of attention and resources. In contrast, minor modifications seem to represent a generic challenge because they are less likely to be

  2. Load-following operation of PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jong Hwa; Oh, Soo Yul; Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-01

    The load-following operation of nuclear power plants will become inevitable due to the increased nuclear share in the total electricity generation. As a groundwork for the load-following capability of the Korean next generation PWRs, the state-of-the-art has been reviewed. The core control principles and methods are the main subject in this review as well as the impact of load-following operations on the fuel performance and on the mechanical integrity of components. To begin with, it was described what the load-following operation is and in what view point the technology should be reviewed. Afterwards the load-following method, performance and problems in domestic 900 MWe class PWRs were discussed, and domestic R and D works were summarized. Foreign technologies were also reviewed. They include Mode G and Mode X of Foratom, D and L bank method of KWU, the method using PSCEA of ABB-CE, and MSHIM of Westinghouse. The load-following related special features of Foratom`s N4 plant, KWU`s plants, ABB-CE`s Systems 80+, and Westinghouse`s AP600 were described in each technology review. The review concluded that the capability of N4 plant with Mode X is the best and the methods in System, 80+ and AP600 would require verifications for the continued and usual load-following operation. It was recommended that the load-following operation experiences in domestic PWRs under operation be required to settle down the capability for the future. In addition, a more enhanced technology is required for the Korean next generation PWR regardless what the reference plant concept is. 30 figs., 19 tabs., 75 refs. (Author).

  3. Nuclear power plant operational data compilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberberg, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electricite de France R and D Division has set up a nuclear power plant operational data compilation system. This data bank, created through American documents allows results about plant operation and operational material behaviour to be given. At present, French units at commercial operation are taken into account. Results obtained after five years of data bank operation are given. (author)

  4. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, operating crew augmentation with an STA and practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. Sixteen two-man crews of licensed operators were employed in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The SROs leading the crews were split into high and low experience groups on the basis of their years of experience as an SRO. One half of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties. A five-variable set of content-referenced performance measures was derived from task analyses of the procedurally correct responses to the four casualties. System parameters and control manipulations were recorded by the computer controlling the simulator. Data on communications and procedure use were obtained from analysis of videotapes of the exercises. Questionnaires were used to collect subject biographical information and data on subjective workload during each simulated casualty. For four of the five performance measures, no significant differences were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have significantly shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. The presence of the STA had no significant effect on overall team performance in responding to the four simulated casualties. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator

  5. Operational and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.; Gow, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In the last 15 years the CEGB has experienced progressive plant development, integration and changes in operating regime through nine nuclear (gas-cooled reactor) power stations with corresponding instrumentation advances leading towards more refined centralized control. Operation and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation is reported in this paper with reference to the progressive changes related to the early magnox, late magnox and AGR periods. Data on instrumentation reliability in terms of reactor forced outages are presented and show that the instrumentation contributions to loss of generating plant availability are small. Reactor safety circuits, neutron flux and temperature measurements, gas analysis and vibration monitoring are discussed. In reviewing the reactor instrumentation the emphasis is on reporting recent experience, particularly on AGR equipment, but overall performance and changes to magnox equipment are included so that some appreciation can be obtained of instrumentation requirements with respect to plant lifetimes. (author)

  6. Selection of operations staff, qualifications and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements and suggestions have been made by authorities and various organisations in a number of countries which define necessary experience and training for the various groups of nuclear power plant personnel. For two countries, the USA and the FRG, a comparison has been made which shows that there is only a slight deviation, taking into account the different education systems. With the example of the Biblis nuclear power plant the training on the job is described. Especially the production or operation department is looked at in more detail. The training is split up into several parts: a general part, such as nuclear physics, reactor physics and engineering, reactor safety, radiation protection and so on and a plant related part, such as arrangement and mode of operation of the plant under normal and accident conditions, license conditions and so on. (orig.) [de

  7. EBR-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-07-01

    Operation of the EBR-2 reactor is presented concerning the performance of the heat removal system; reactor materials; fuel handling system; sodium purification and sampling system; cover-gas purification; plant diagnostics and instrumentation; recent improvements in identifying fission product sources in EBR-2; and EBR-2 safety

  8. First operational experiences with the new biological waste water treatment plant at HKM; Erste Betriebserfahrungen mit der neuen biologischen Abwasserbehandlungsanlage der HKM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wendt; L. Nelles

    2002-07-01

    The common process of coke oven gas purification in by-product plant produces process water that is namely composed of excess flushing water from the crude tar decantation and waste water from NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S scrubbers. In 1959, the coke plant at HKM (formerly Mannesmann Huettenwerken Huckingen AG) was commissioned. This plant made use of the phenol removal process. Utilizing the phenolsolvan method the phenols toxic to microbes were removed from ammonia waste water and crude phenol recovered. The process water was subsequently steam stripped in strippers and deacidifiers. After more than 40 years of operation the need for modernization of the phenol removal plant arose. As a consequence of more stringent limits on coke plant effluents that have already been in place for several years the HKM came to a resolution to construct a new biological waste water treatment plant instead of renewing the phenol removal plant.

  9. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1984-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  10. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.W.; Woodhead, L.W.; Horton, E.P.; Nichols, M.J.; Daly, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  11. Mechanical and Instrumental Experiences from the Erection, Commissioning, and Operation of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, K.

    1965-05-01

    A radio chemical pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels has been built by AB Atomenergi at Kjeller in Norway. In the report a short description of the main equipment is given as well as of the procedure during the erection of the plant. Finally the results and experiences from the cold tests, tracer tests and active runs are indicated

  12. Mechanical and Instrumental Experiences from the Erection, Commissioning, and Operation of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, K

    1965-05-15

    A radio chemical pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels has been built by AB Atomenergi at Kjeller in Norway. In the report a short description of the main equipment is given as well as of the procedure during the erection of the plant. Finally the results and experiences from the cold tests, tracer tests and active runs are indicated.

  13. Designing nuclear power plants for improved operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this publication is to compile demonstrated, experience based design guidelines for improving the operability and maintainability of nuclear power plants. The guidelines are for use principally in the design of new nuclear power plants, but should also be useful in upgrading existing designs. The guidelines derive from the experience of operating and maintaining existing nuclear power plants as well as from the design of recent plants. In particular these guidelines are based on and consistent with both the EPRI advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 1, and the European Utility Requirements for LWR Nuclear Power Plants. 6 refs, 1 fig

  14. Designing nuclear power plants for improved operation and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this publication is to compile demonstrated, experience based design guidelines for improving the operability and maintainability of nuclear power plants. The guidelines are for use principally in the design of new nuclear power plants, but should also be useful in upgrading existing designs. The guidelines derive from the experience of operating and maintaining existing nuclear power plants as well as from the design of recent plants. In particular these guidelines are based on and consistent with both the EPRI advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 1, and the European Utility Requirements for LWR Nuclear Power Plants. 6 refs, 1 fig.

  15. Review of operational aids for nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many approaches are being explored to improve the safety of nuclear plant operations. One approach is to supply high-quality, relevant information by means of computer-based diagnostic systems to assist plant operators in performing their operational and safety-related roles. The evaluation of operational aids to ensure safe plant operations is a necessary function of NRC. This work has two purposes: to collect limited data on a diversity of operational aids, and to provide a method for evaluating the safety implications of the functions of proposed operational aids. After a discussion of the method evaluation now under study, this paper outlines this data collection to date

  16. Combining risk analysis and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the systematic utilization of operating experience in the decision making process concerning large industrial facilities. Even before the advent of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), operating experience had always played an important role in such decisions. Of course, operating experience has always been an input to PSA also; however, as PSA becomes more mature and the quality and quantity of operating experience improve, greater emphasis is now being placed on the use of operating experience to update and validate PSA and thereby provide a more rational basis for decision making. This report outlines the ways in which data are collected, processed using mathematical techniques and utilized in decision making. It is not intended to provide details of the methods and procedures to be used in these areas, but is rather intended as an introduction to these topics and some of the relevant literature. The meeting presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: evaluation of nuclear power plants operational experience (5 papers); uncertainties (2 papers); probabilistic safety assessment studies in Member States (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  17. Simulators predict power plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, R.

    2002-07-01

    Mix the complexity of a new construction or major retrofit project with today's 'do more with less', a pinch of 'personnel inexperience,' and a dash of 'unintended consequences', and you have got a recipe for insomnia. Advanced simulation tools, however, can help you wring out your design train your operators before the first wire is terminated and just may be get a good night's rest. The article describes several examples of uses of simulation tools. Esscor recently completed a simulation project for a major US utility exploring the potential for furnace/duct implosion that could result from adding higher volumetric flow induced-draft fans and selective catalytic reduction to a 650-MW coal-fired plant. CAF Electronics Inc. provided a full-scope simulator for Alstom's KA24-1 combined-cycle power plant in Paris, France. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are being used by the Gas Technology Institute to simulate the performance of the next generation of pulverized coal combustors. 5 figs.

  18. Modeling Operating Modes during Plant Life Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Lind, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Modelling process plants during normal operation requires a set a basic assumptions to define the desired functionalities which lead to fullfillment of the operational goal(-s) for the plant. However during during start-up and shut down as well as during batch operation an ensemble of interrelated...... modes are required to cover the whole operational window of a processs plant including intermediary operating modes. Development of such an model ensemble for a plant would constitute a systematic way of defining the possible plant operating modes and thus provide a platform for also defining a set...... of candidate control structures. The present contribution focuses on development of a model ensemble for a plant with an illustartive example for a bioreactor. Starting from a functional model a process plant may be conceptually designed and qualitative operating models may be developed to cover the different...

  19. 20 years' operation of the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Quasniczka, H.; Fiss, W.; Hentschel, G.; Schulz, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    After a 20 years' operation of the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant a review of the operating results achieved, performance of the main equipment, research and development works performed, and experience gained with education and training of plant staff is given. (author)

  20. Plant designer's view of the operator's role in nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Church, J.F.; Cross, M.T.; Porter, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear plant operator's role supports the design assumptions and equipment with four functional tasks. He must set up th plant for predictable response to disturbances, operate the plant so as to minimize the likelihood and severity of event initiators, assist in accomplishing the safety functions, and feed back operating experiences to reinforce or redefine the safety analyses' assumptions. The latter role enhances the operator effectiveness in the former three roles. The Safety Level Concept offers a different perspective that enables the operator to view his roles in nuclear plant safety. This paper outlines the operator's role in nuclear safety and classifies his tasks using the Safety Level Concept

  1. Plant operational states analysis in low power and shutdown PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jiandong; Qiu Yongping; Zhang Qinfang; An Hongzhen; Li Maolin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of Plant Operational States (POS) analysis is to disperse the continuous and dynamic process of low power and shutdown operation, which is the basis of developing event tree models for accident sequence analysis. According to the design of a 300 MW Nuclear Power Plant Project, operating experience and procedures of the reference plant, a detailed POS analysis is carried out based on relative criteria. Then, several kinds of POS are obtained, and the duration of each POS is calculated according to the operation records of the reference plant. The POS analysis is an important element in low power and shutdown PSA. The methodology and contents provide reference for POS analysis. (authors)

  2. Operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook gives a systematic introduction into the operational and maintenance activities in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Subjects: (1) Setup and operational behaviour of power reactors, (2) setup of nuclear power plants, (3) radiation protection and nuclear safety, (4) nuclear fuel, (5) constructional layout of nuclear power plants, (6) management, and (7) maintenance. 158 figs., 56 tabs

  3. Operating experiences with heat-exchanging components of a semi-technical pilot plant for steam gasification of coal using heat from HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, R.; Heek, K.H. van

    1984-01-01

    within the framework of the PNP- Project, a semi-technical plant for the development of a process of coal gasification by means of nuclear heat was operated. Here gasification is for the first time implemented in a fluidized bed using heat of an electrically heated helium cycle at pressure up to 40 bar and temperatures normal for HTR. The plant serves for testing and developing various components as immersion heater, insulations, dosing devices, and for compiling sound data for further planning

  4. Operating experience insights supporting ageing assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Be effective in ageing management means looking at the right aspects, with the right techniques, and one of the most effective tool which could be used for that purpose is the analysis of operating experience. The paper has as objective to perform a review of available operating experience, with the aim to provide a better picture about the impact of ageing effects. The IAEA International Reporting System and NRC Licensee Event Reports were chosen as reference databases, both databases being internationally recognized as important sources of information about events occurrences in the nuclear power plants. The ageing related events identified in the selected time window were analyzed in detail, and the contributions of each major degradation mechanisms that have induced the ageing related events (specific to each defined group of components) was represented and discussed. The paper demonstrates the possibility to use operating experience insights in highlighting the ageing effects. (authors)

  5. Human factors in nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, Z.A.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive effort is being devoted to developing a comprehensive human factor program that encompasses establishment of a data base for human error prediction using past operation experience in commercial nuclear power plants. Some of the main results of such an effort are reported including data retrieval and classification systems which have been developed to assist in estimation of operator error rates. Also, statistical methods are developed to relate operator error data to reactor type, age, and specific technical design features. Results reported in this paper are based on an analysis of LER's covering a six-year period for LWR's. Developments presently include a computer data management program, statistical model, and detailed error taxonomy

  6. Italian experience with pilot reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, S.; Dworschak, H.; Rolandi, G.; Simonetta, R.

    1977-01-01

    Problems and difficulties recently experienced in the reprocessing technology of high burnup power reactor fuel elements have shown the importance of pilot plant experiments to optimize the separation processes and to test advanced equipment on a representative scale. The CNEN Eurex plant, in Saluggia (Vercelli), with a 50 kg/d thruput, in operation since '71, has completed several reprocessing campaigns on MTR type fuel elements. Two different chemical flowsheets based respectively on TBP and tertiary amines were thoroughly tested and compared: a concise comparative evaluation of the results obtained with the two schemes is given. Extensive modifications have then been introduced (namely a new headend cell equipped with a shear) to make the plant suitable to reprocess power reactor fuels. The experimental program of the plant includes a joint CNEN-AECL reprocessing experiment on CANDU (Pickering) type fuel elements to demonstrate a two cycle, amine based recovery of the plutonium. Later, a stock of high burnup fuel elements from the PWR Trino power station will be reprocessed to recover Pu and U with a Purex type flowsheet. ITREC, the second CNEN experimental reprocessing plant located at Trisaia Nuclear Center (Matera), started active operation two years ago. In the first campaign Th-U mixed oxide fuel elements irradiated in the Elk River reactor were processed. Results of this experiment are reported. ITREC special design features confer a high degree of versability to the plant allowing for substantial equipment modification under remote control conditions. For this reason the plant will be principally devoted in the near future to advanced equipment testing. Along this line high speed centrifugal contactor of a new type developed in Poland will be tested in the plant in the frame of a joint experiment between CNEN and the Polish AEC. Later on the plant program will include experimental campaign on fast reactor fuels; a detailed study on this program is in

  7. Computerization of operation and maintenance for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a resource for computerization of activities in plant operation and maintenance. Experience gained from design and implementation of various computer systems around the world is described. The material may be useful as a guide to modification and upgrading of existing plants as well as design and engineering of new plants. It should be particularly of interest to managers and engineers who are engaged in planning, bidding, specifying or designing computer systems for operation and maintenance applications. Refs, figs and tabs.

  8. Computerization of operation and maintenance for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a resource for computerization of activities in plant operation and maintenance. Experience gained from design and implementation of various computer systems around the world is described. The material may be useful as a guide to modification and upgrading of existing plants as well as design and engineering of new plants. It should be particularly of interest to managers and engineers who are engaged in planning, bidding, specifying or designing computer systems for operation and maintenance applications. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Three integrated photovoltaic/sound barrier power plants. Construction and operational experience; Drei integrierte PV-Schallschutz Versuchsfelder. Bau und Erprobung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordmann, T.; Froelich, A.; Clavadetscher, L.

    2002-07-01

    After an international ideas competition by TNC Switzerland and Germany in 1996, six companies where given the opportunity to construct a prototype of their newly developed integrated PV-sound barrier concepts. The main goal was to develop highly integrated concepts, allowing the reduction of PV sound barrier systems costs, as well as the demonstration of specific concepts for different noise situations. This project is strongly correlated with a German project. Three of the concepts of the competition are demonstrated along a highway near Munich, constructed in 1997. The three Swiss installations had to be constructed at different locations, reflecting three typical situations for sound barriers. The first Swiss installation was the world first Bi-facial PV-sound barrier. It was built on a highway bridge at Wallisellen-Aubrugg in 1997. The operational experience of the installation is positive. But due to the different efficiencies of the two cell sides, its specific yield lies somewhat behind a conventional PV installation. The second Swiss plant was finished in autumn 1998. The 'zig-zag' construction is situated along the railway line at Wallisellen in a densely inhabited area with some local shadowing. Its performance and its specific yield is comparatively low due to a combination of several reasons (geometry of the concept, inverter, high module temperature, local shadows). The third installation was constructed along the motor way A1 at Bruettisellen in 1999. Its vertical panels are equipped with amorphous modules. The report show, that the performance of the system is reasonable, but the mechanical construction has to be improved. A small trial field with cells directly laminated onto the steel panel, also installed at Bruettisellen, could be the key development for this concept. This final report includes the evaluation and comparison of the monitored data in the past 24 months of operation. (author)

  10. Emergency planning and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, O.; Breniere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive lessons from operating experience for the planning of emergency measures. This operating experience has two facets: it is obtained not only from the various incidents and accidents which have occurred in countries with nuclear power programmes and from the resulting application of emergency plans but also from the different exercises and simulations carried out in France and in other countries. Experience generally confirms the main approaches selected for emergency plans. The lessons to be derived are of three types: first, it appears necessary to set forth precisely the responsibilities of each person involved in order to prevent a watering-down of decisions in the event of an accident; secondly, considerable improvements need to be made in the different communication networks to be used; and thirdly, small accidents with minor radiological consequences deserve as systematic and thorough an approach as large and more improbable accidents. (author)

  11. The use of plant experience for maintaining and improving competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics to be covered in this report are: documentation of plant experience (esp. operational events), derivation of training subjects and training goals, implementation of subjects and goals into retraining, effects of plant experience on tuning and refitting of nuclear power plant simulators and other training equipment. (orig.)

  12. An analyser for power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, A.E.; Wulff, W.

    1990-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of power plants is essential. Power plant operators need a forecast of what the plant will do when its current state is disturbed. The in-line plant analyser provides precisely this information at relatively low cost. The plant analyser scheme uses a mathematical model of the dynamic behaviour of the plant to establish a numerical simulation. Over a period of time, the simulation is calibrated with measurements from the particular plant in which it is used. The analyser then provides a reference against which to evaluate the plant's current behaviour. It can be used to alert the operator to any atypical excursions or combinations of readings that indicate malfunction or off-normal conditions that, as the Three Mile Island event suggests, are not easily recognised by operators. In a look-ahead mode, it can forecast the behaviour resulting from an intended change in settings or operating conditions. Then, when such changes are made, the plant's behaviour can be tracked against the forecast in order to assure that the plant is behaving as expected. It can be used to investigate malfunctions that have occurred and test possible adjustments in operating procedures. Finally, it can be used to consider how far from the limits of performance the elements of the plant are operating. Then by adjusting settings, the required power can be generated with as little stress as possible on the equipment. (6 figures) (Author)

  13. Technology of turbine plant operating with wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The technology of turbine plant operating with wet steam is a subject of continuing interest and importance, notably in view of the widespread use of wet steam cycles in nuclear power plants and the recent developments of advanced low pressure blading for both conventional and wet steam turbines. The nature of water formation in expanding steam has an important influence on the efficiency of turbine blading and on the integrity and safe operating life of blading and associated turbine and plant components. The subjects covered in this book include research, flow analysis and measurement, development and design of turbines and ancillary plant, selection of materials of construction, manufacturing methods and operating experience. (author)

  14. Fatigue assessments in operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosselin, S.R.; Deardorff, A.F.; Peltola, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    In November 1991, the ASME Section XI Task Group on Operating Plant Fatigue Assessment was formed to develop criteria and evaluation methodology for evaluating the effects of cyclic operation in operating nuclear power plants. The objective was to develop guidelines for inclusion in Section XI that could be used by plant operators in evaluating fatigue concerns and their impact on serviceability. This paper discusses the work performed by the Task Group. It explores the concept of ''Fatigue Design Basis'' versus ''Fatigue Operating Basis'' by examining the roles of ASME Section III and ASME Section XI in the design and operation of the nuclear power plants. Guidelines are summarized that may help plant operators perform effective design transient cycle evaluations and optimize cycle counting and fatigue usage tracking. The alternative fatigue evaluation approach using flaw tolerance is also introduced

  15. Small-scale CHP Plant based on a 35 kWel Hermetic Four Cylinder Stirling Engine for Biomass Fuels- Development, Technology and Operating Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obernberger, I.; Carlsen, Henrik; Biedermann, F.

    2003-01-01

    ) process and the Stirling engine process. The ORC process represents an economically interesting technology for small-scale biomass-fired combined heat and power plants in a power range between 400 and 1,500 kWel. A newly developed ORC technology with a nominal electric capacity of 1,000 kW was implemented...... in the biomass CHP plant Lienz (A) in the framework of an EU demonstration project. This plant was put in operation in February 2002. Stirling engines are a promising solution for installations with nominal electric capacities between 10 and 150 kW. A biomass CHP pilot plant based on a 35 kWel-Stirling engine...

  16. Training and qualification of nuclear power plant operators (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Training center using the simulators, instructor training, training upgrade, deployment of digital control panel and review of training were described with overseas practice. Recently, nuclear power plant on-site simulators were also used for respective operator training. Operator teamwork training, training team performance upgrade, reflection of operating experiences in nuclear power plant accidents, development of training support equipments and management of training records were needed to review and upgrade training and qualification programs. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Experiences of an operating association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zefferer, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Austrian Draukraftwerke operate a coal power station with a capacity 110 MW el at St. Andraein Kaernten. In 1989, the first stage of a scheme for supplying the town St. Andraewith long-distance energy was started from this power station. To provide for the intermittent downtimes between the plant's operating times, which total an annual 2000 hours, a substitute aggregate was designed consisting of two biomass (chiefly bark)-fueled grate-firing boilers (4 MW th and 2.5 MW th ). The problems that arose during the first years in the areas of biomass storage, conveyor systems, slagging, emission values, and ash removal have meanwhile been solved satisfactorily. Moreover, the Draukraftwerke intend to use biomass for electricity generation in their coal power stations. (orig.) [de

  18. Qinshan plant display system: experience to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin, L.; Jiangdong, Y.; Weili, C.; Haidong, W.; Wangtian, L.; Lockwood, R.; Doucet, R.; Trask, D.; Judd, R.

    2004-01-01

    The two CANDU 6 units operated by the Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Corporation (TQNPC) include, as part of a control centre upgrade, a new plant display system (PDS). The PDS provides plant operators with new display and monitoring functionality designed to compliment the DCC capability. It includes new overview and trend displays (e.g., critical safety parameter monitor and user-defined trends), and enhanced annunciation based on AECL's Computerized Alarm Message List System (CAMLS) including an alarm interrogation capability. This paper presents a review of operating experience gained since the PDS was commissioned more than three years ago. It includes feedback provided by control room operators and trainers, PDS maintainers, and AECL development and support staff. It also includes an overview of improvements implemented since the PDS and suggestions for the future enhancements. (author)

  19. In-depth evaluations of operating experiences in nuclear power plants. Annual report 2015/2016 (June 2015 - May 2016); Vertiefte Untersuchungen von Betriebserfahrungen aus Kernreaktoren. Jahresbericht 2015/2016 (Juni 2015 - Mai 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mildenberger, Oliver

    2017-05-15

    A central task of GRS is the continuous evaluation of events in nuclear power plants in Germany and abroad on behalf of BMUB. GRS evaluates all reportable events from German plants as well as safety-relevant events in foreign nuclear power plants. It aims for the extraction of scientific insights and information to extend the knowledge base of GRS. Learning from operating experience is an important element for preserving and improving the safety level of nuclear power plants. Insights obtained from these in-depth evaluations form the scientific bas is for expert statements, information notices or generic reports on behalf of BMUB. This report presents major results of generic in-depth investigations on safety-relevant aspects detected during the screening of operating experience from all available sources in the reporting period. Moreover, the results of additional further works to determine and advance the state of the art in science and technology related to the evaluation of operating experience are summarized: Pilot study on evaluation of U.S. NRC Licensee Event Reports (LER); Update of knowledge base on transients; Extension of CCF checklist with CCF phenomena in valves and big machine components (pumps, emergency diesels, ventilations, heat exchangers and chillers); Generic analysis of events with errors during periodic inspections; Experiences with errors during construction and operation of nuclear concrete buildings; Assessment of results from precursor analyses.

  20. Taxonomy of the nuclear plant operator's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Fullerton, A.M.; Frey, P.R.; Dougherty, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    A program is presently under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define the functional design requirements of operational aids for nuclear power plant operators. A first and important step in defining these requirements is to develop an understanding of the operator's role or function. This paper describes a taxonomy of operator functions that applies during all operational modes and conditions of the plant. Other topics such as the influence of automation, role acceptance, and the operator's role during emergencies are also discussed. This systematic approach has revealed several areas which have potential for improving the operator's ability to perform his role

  1. Reliability analysis of safety systems of nuclear power plant and utility experience with reliability safeguarding of systems during specified normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfanz, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The paper gives an outline of the methods applied for reliability analysis of safety systems in nuclear power plant. The main tasks are to check the system design for detection of weak points, and to find possibilities of optimizing the strategies for inspection, inspection intervals, maintenance periods. Reliability safeguarding measures include the determination and verification of the broundary conditions of the analysis with regard to the reliability parameters and maintenance parameters used in the analysis, and the analysis of data feedback reflecting the plant response during operation. (orig.) [de

  2. Nuclear power plant operation 2016. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2017-05-15

    A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2016, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from nuclear power plants in Germany. Reports about nuclear power plants in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain will be published in a further issue.

  3. Operations quality assurance for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This standard covers the quality assurance of all activities concerned with the operation and maintenance of plant equipment and systems in CANDU-based nuclear power plants during the operations phase, the period between the completion of commissioning and the start of decommissioning

  4. Regulatory framework for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Alcaniz, T.; Esteban Barriendos, M.

    1995-01-01

    As the framework of standards and requirements covering each phase of nuclear power plant project and operation developed, plant owners defined their licensing commitments (codes, rules and design requirements) during the project and construction phase before start-up and incorporated regulatory requirements imposed by the regulatory Body during the licensing process prior to operation. This produces a regulatory framework for operating a plant. It includes the Licensing Basis, which is the starting point for analyzing and incorporating new requirements, and for re-evaluation of existing ones. This presentation focuses on the problems of applying this regulatory framework to new operating activities, in particular to new projects, analyzing new requirements, and reconsidering existing ones. Clearly establishing a plant's licensing basis allows all organizations involved in plant operation to apply the requirements in a more rational way. (Author)

  5. Portland General Electric Company report on the operating and startup experience with control and instrumentation and electrical systems at the Trojan Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Trojan Nuclear Plant is an 1178 MWe nuclear plant located on the Columbia River 40 miles northwest of Portland, Oregon. The Nuclear Stream Supply System vendor is Westinghouse with a General Electric turbine generator. The reactor is rated and licensed for 3423 MWt (1178 MWe) and the turbine generator is designed for 3570 MWt(1219 MWe). The startup phase testing of Trojan commenced on November 21, 1975, upon receipt of our NRC Operating License. The startup testing program was completed on May 22, 1976, following 100 hours of full-power operation, at which time a scheduled summer maintenance outage began. Some of the highlights and milestones of the startup testing program are described

  6. Plant Operation: Work Week, Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A four-day work week for maintenance workers in the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado, reduces absenteeism and increases productivity; a basic manual for physical plant directors is reviewed. (Author/MLF)

  7. Licensing operators for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    The human element in the operation of commercial nuclear power plants is of utmost importance. Not only must the operators be technically competent in the execution of numerous complicated tasks, they must be capable of working together as a team to diagnose dynamic plant conditions to ensure that their plants are operated safely. The significance of human interaction skills and crew communications has been demonstrated most vividly in TMI and Chernobyl. It follows that the NRC must retain its high standards for licensing operators. This paper discusses activities and initiatives being employed by the NRC to enhance the reliability of its licensing examinations, and to build a highly qualified examiner work force

  8. Operation experience at the UWTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Kazuhiro; Inada, Kameji; Ohmori, Kouji; Usui, Kazuya; Irinouchi, Sigenori; Asami, Makoto; Tohchi, Katsunori

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the operation experience on the volume reduction of metal wastes and used air filters contaminated with uranium at the Uranium contaminated Waste Treatment Facility (UWTF) in JNC Tokai Works. The UWTF consists of the metal waste treatment system and the filter-waste treatment system. The former treats metal wastes, the latter treats used air filters. Metal wastes are unpacked from drums, cut, and then compacted. Used air filters are separated into filter media and frames. Then the filter media are compacted and the frames are crushed. The operation of the UWTF was started in June 1998. The following volumes of wastes had been treated at the UWTF from the beginning of the operation to March 2003 (for about 5 years). (1) 1,524 drums of the metal wastes had been reduced to 410 drums. The volume reduction factor was 3.7. (2) 372 drums of the used air filters had been reduced to 39 drums. The volume reduction factor was 9.5. These systems have been operated without trouble for 5 years and have demonstrated to be able to reduce the volumes of the wastes to designed values. The volume reduction technologies for metal wastes and used air filters contaminated with uranium were successfully demonstrated at the UWTF. (author)

  9. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  10. Analysis of human factor in operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.

    1980-01-01

    A taxonomy of operator errors is developed here to provide a scheme for compiling data from field experience according to their significance to the operation and their influence on the plant performance. The reversibility of operator actions is taken as the basis of detection of the relevances of errors to the overall operation. In addition, distinction is made between system errors, such as inadequate instrumentation or logistics, and 'operator errors', which indicate that the operator is involved in inducing an operational error rather than being uniquely responsible for an incident. The developed taxonomy can be used for evaluation of the performance of operators during scheduled training programs. Identification of each class of errors would assist in upgrading performance of operators in a given plant and in filing occurrence reports that help in revising safety provisions or operation procedures. The scheme is suitable for sorting and storing failure information in a data library for ease of retrieval by reliability analysis codes. (orig.) [de

  11. Safety and operation of the Stade nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salcher, H.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of PreussenElektra is to continuously increase the existing safety standard of the Stade nuclear power station using experience gained from faults and operation in nuclear power stations and the progressive state of the art. Modifications to achieve the most gentle operation of the plant have been completed and other are on-going. To do so instruments were attached to those components which are susceptible to fatigue to record the transients and extensive calculatory records were kept. Although the plant has almost 20 years successful operation behind it, it can still stand up well to comparisons with more recent plants as far as safety aspects are concerned. 6 figs

  12. Training of power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftwerksschule, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    In Germany, professional training of power plant operating personnel became an important issue in the fifties, when power plant parameters as well as complexity of instrumentation and control increased considerably. Working Groups of VGB Technische Vereiningung der Grosskraftwerketreiber e.v. (Association of Large Power Plant Operators) developed a professional career for power plant operating personnel and defined pre-requisites, scope and objectives of training. In 1957 the German utilities founded KRAFTWERKSSCHULE E.V. (kws) as a school for theoretical training and for guidance of practical training in the power plants. KWS is a non-profit organisation and independent of authorities. Today KWS has 127 members in Germany and in 6 other countries. The objectives of KWS include the training of: -Kraftwerker (control room operators; - Kraftwerksmesiter (shift supervisors); and - shift engineers; according the guidelines of the VGB

  13. The critical safety functions and plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Church, J.F.; Cross, M.T.; Guinn, W.M.; Porter, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    The operator's role in nuclear safety is outlined and the concept of ''safety functions'' introduced. Safety functions are a group of actions that prevent core melt or minimize radiation releases to the general public. They can be used to provide a hierarchy of practical plant protection that an operator should use. The plant safety evaluation uses four inputs in predicting the results of an event: the event initiator, the plant design, the initial plant conditions and setup, and the operator actions. If any of these inputs are not as assumed in the evaluation, confidence that the consequences will be as predicted is reduced. Based on the safety evaluation, the operator has three roles in assuring that the consequences of an event will be no worse than the predicted acceptable results: Maintain plant setup in readiness to properly respond. Operate the plant in a manner such that fewer, milder events minimize the frequency and the severity of adverse events. Monitor the plant to verify that the safety functions are accomplished. The operator needs a systematic approach to mitigating the consequences of an event. The concept of safety functions introduces this systematic approach and presents a hierarchy of protection. If the operator has difficulty identifying an event for any reason, the systematic safety function approach allows accomplishing the overall path of mitigating consequences. Ten functions designed to protect against core melt, preserve containment integrity, prevent indirect release of radioactivity, and maintain vital auxiliaries needed to support the other safety functions are identified

  14. Operating experience on radiation reduction in the latest BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, K.; Uchida, S.; Aizawa, M.; Takagi, K.; Amano, O.; Yamashita, K.

    1988-01-01

    In Japan, BWR plants have been operated commercially since 1970, and the reduction of radiation exposure has been an important concern. The application of the procedure for reducing occupational exposure is incorporated in Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program for LWRs. No.2 and No.4 plants in Fukushima No.2 Nuclear Power Station were designed and constructed as the latest 1,100 MWe BWRs in conformity with the Improvement and Standardization Program. No.2 plant began the commercial operation in February, 1984, and experienced three times of the scheduled annual maintenance outage. No.4 plant began the commercial operation in September, 1987, and the first annual maintenance is scheduled from September, 1988. In this paper, discussion is focused on recent radiation reduction measures, that is the control of iron and nickel in primary coolant for reducing the radiation dose rate in primary systems, based on the experience with No.2 and No.4 plants. The design concept of a low radiation dose rate nuclear power plant, the experience on water chemistry in No.2 plant, the control of iron and nickel in No.4 plant operation and so on are reported. It is believed that these operation experiences contribute to the reduction of occupational exposure in BWR plants currently in operation and in future. (Kako, I.)

  15. Inspection during operation of a nuclear power plant in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Bernal, R.

    1977-01-01

    The control and surveillance activities, as well as the operating data and results of the three nuclear power plants presently in operation: Jose Cabrera, Santa Maria de Garona and Vandellos, are summarized. The first two are light-water type, with different pressure and boiling characteristics and the third is of the gas-graphite type. The main aspects, from an inspection point of view, of the experience obtained in these three plants are analyzed. (author) [es

  16. Evaluation of nuclear power plant operator's ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Li; He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the quantitative research on nuclear power plant (NPP) operator's psychological characteristics and performance, the Borda's method of fuzzy mathematics combined with the character of operator's task is used to evaluate their abilities. The result provides the reference for operator's reliability research and psychological evaluation. (author)

  17. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative 'all modes' failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  18. Operational experience feedback with precursor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, M.; Ferjancic, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Vojnovic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experience of practical operation is a valuable source of information for improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Operational experience feedback (Olef) system manages this aspect of NPP operation. The traditional ways of investigating operational events, such as the root cause analysis (RCA), are predominantly qualitative. RCA as a part of the Olef system provides technical guidance and management expectations in the conduct of assessing the root cause to prevent recurrence, covering the following areas: conditions preceding the event, sequence of events, equipment performance and system response, human performance considerations, equipment failures, precursors to the event, plant response and follow-up, radiological considerations, regulatory process considerations and safety significance. The root cause of event is recognized when there is no known answer on question 'why has it happened?' regarding relevant condition that may have affected the event. At that point the Olef is proceeding by actions taken in response to events, utilization, dissemination and exchange of operating experience information and at the end reviewing the effectiveness of the Olef. Analysis of the event and the selection of recommended corrective/preventive actions for implementation and prioritization can be enhanced by taking into account the information and insights derived from Pasa-based analysis. A Pasa based method, called probabilistic precursor event analysis (PPE A) provides a complement to the RCA approach by focusing on how an event might have developed adversely, and implies the mapping of an operational event on a probabilistic risk model of the plant in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event PSA based event analysis provides, due to its quantitative nature, appropriate prioritization of corrective actions. PPEA defines requirements for PSA model and code, identifies input requirements and elaborates following

  19. Contribution of quality assurance to effective nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.

    1984-01-01

    The regulatory requirements related to quality assurance (QA) serve as an effective mechanism in establishing and implementing the QA programme during the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. However, these requirements only relate to the equipment and activities concerning the safety of nuclear power plants; the decision as to their implementation on other non-safety-related equipment is left to the plant management. As a result, operation statistics show that the safety-related systems are performing satisfactorily and that they are not of serious concern to plant unavailability. On the other hand, non-safety-related equipment which is still vital to plant performances is more frequently responsible for plant outages and losses in electricity production. QA programmes implemented on such equipment are in principle less strict, unsystematic and, in a number of cases, non-existent. An attempt has been made to analyse the existing operating experience data in order to identify the correlation of outage statistics with QA programmes required by existing standards and their implementation practices, both in respect of programme coverage and intensity. Unfortunately, existing operating experience data cannot directly correlate plant performance with the QA programmes implemented in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of QA techniques to plant safety, reliability of plant equipment and plant availability. For these reasons an analysis is made of outage statistics to identify the modes and causes of outages and to relate them to existing QA requirements and practices. Some conclusions are deduced that relate to a possible improvement of plant performance by consequent implementation of QA requirements to the equipment and activities responsible for both plant safety and efficient electricity production, and by adequate grading of QA activities to obtain a cost-effective QA programme in plant operation. (author)

  20. Operating experience with BWR nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonsdorf, Magnus von.

    1986-01-01

    The two-unit nuclear power station in Olkiluoto on the western coast of Finland produces about 20 per cent of the electricity consumption of the country. The first unit, TVO-I was first connected to the national grid in September 1978 and TVO-II in February 1980. The original rated power output of each unit was 660 MWe, corresponding to the thermal power of 2000 MW from the reactor. Technical modifications allowed the power to be uprated by 8%. The operating statistics (load factors etc.) are given and the outage experience discussed. The radiological history shows very low radioactivity and dose levels have been maintained at the plant. (UK)

  1. Common Cause Failure Analysis of Control Rods and Drives in the Swedish and Finnish BWR Plants. Operating Experiences in 1983 - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankamo, Tuomas [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    substantial time difference and/or spatial distance within the core. The exploration of CCF cases showed that the most prevalent factor in the CCF mechanisms was the time coupling by sequencing maintenance into refueling outages. Essential contributing factors were design changes, deviations or errors in maintenance or new types of replacement parts, accompanied by unexpected influences. An evident positive trend could be observed both for single failures and CCFs . Impact Vectors were used to expresses the conditional failure probability for the various multiplicity in CCF events, linking event analysis to the estimation of CCF model parameters. A reference application was made for the Forsmark 1 and 2 plant. The Common Load Model was used as parametric CCF model, which proved to be a practicable approach. This method provides a consistent handling of failure combinations and workable extension to evaluate localized dependence between adjacent control rod and drives. Also international experience and reference information were surveyed. The developed methods and collected data are utilized in the ongoing PSA updates for the Swedish BWRs and Olkiluoto 1 and 2. Review - within the project a detailed and project extern review has been performed, covering also the older CCF events. This do now guarantee that the CCF data for the control rods and drives in Swedish and Finnish BWR:s during the observation period 1983 - 2003, now can be judged as quality assured. The scope of this project was limited to collection, analysis and classification of CCF data, and reference application using the industry average of pooled data. It has not been the scope of this project to perform more comprehensive probabilistic studies on e.g., positive learning trends, impact of plant specific design details or different amount of failing control rods at different operational conditions in the reactor vessel and with different safety and support systems in operation. It has either been the scope to

  2. IAEA activity on operator support systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dounaev, V.; Fujita, Y.; Juslin, K.; Haugset, K.; Lux, I.; Naser, J.

    1994-01-01

    Various operator support systems for nuclear power plants are already operational or under development in the IAEA Member States. Operator support systems are based on intelligent data processing and, in addition to plant operation, they are also becoming more important for safety. A key feature of operator support systems is their availability to restructure data to increase its relevance for a given situation. This can improve the user's ability to identify plant mode, system state, and component state and to identify and diagnose faults. Operator support systems can also assist the user in planning and implementing corrective actions to improve the nuclear power plant's availability and safety. In September 1991, the IAEA Committee for Contractual Scientific Services approved the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Operator Support Systems in Nuclear Power Plants'' in the framework of the Project ''Man-Machine Interface Studies''. The main objective of this programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer for the development and implementation of operator support systems. This includes the experience with human-machine interfaces and closely related issues such as instrumentation and control, the use of computers in nuclear power plants, and operator qualification. (author)

  3. ALARA for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is outlined in connection with nuclear power plant operations. The basis of the concept is reviewed and a specific example of ALARA action is presented. (author)

  4. Development of nuclear plant Operation Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koide, I.; Okada, T.; Ishida, K. [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Recently it has become more important to detect a change in operational characteristics and to take appropriate corrective actions before it deteriorates to an incident in nuclear power plants. Therefore, aiming at earlier detection of a tendency change, swifter corrective actions and more effective application of operational data, we have developed Operation Management System which automatically acquires, accumulates and observes operational data of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station through cycles. (author)

  5. Development of nuclear plant Operation Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, I.; Okada, T.; Ishida, K.

    1998-01-01

    Recently it has become more important to detect a change in operational characteristics and to take appropriate corrective actions before it deteriorates to an incident in nuclear power plants. Therefore, aiming at earlier detection of a tendency change, swifter corrective actions and more effective application of operational data, we have developed Operation Management System which automatically acquires, accumulates and observes operational data of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station through cycles. (author)

  6. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  7. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-03-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  8. Safe operation of power plants. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freymeyer, P.

    1977-01-01

    Electrotechniques were given a dominating role in the construction of nuclear power plants. The operation of power plants - particularly nuclear power plants - is impossible without the use of electrotechnical and control means. Despite of all reserve in the development and despite of the conservative attitude it is necessary to use the newest results of development and to incite the development ot new electronic systems for the solution of these tasks. (orig.) [de

  9. Experiment research on cognition reliability model of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bingquan; Fang Xiang

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to improve the reliability of operation on real nuclear power plant of operators through the simulation research to the cognition reliability of nuclear power plant operators. The research method of the paper is to make use of simulator of nuclear power plant as research platform, to take present international research model of reliability of human cognition based on three-parameter Weibull distribution for reference, to develop and get the research model of Chinese nuclear power plant operators based on two-parameter Weibull distribution. By making use of two-parameter Weibull distribution research model of cognition reliability, the experiments about the cognition reliability of nuclear power plant operators have been done. Compared with the results of other countries such USA and Hungary, the same results can be obtained, which can do good to the safety operation of nuclear power plant

  10. Increase of hydroelectric power plant operation reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshumbaev, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    The new design of the turbine of hydroelectric power plant (HPP) is executed in the form of a pipe with plates. Proposed solution allows increasing the hydroelectric power plant capacity at existing head and water flow. At that time the HPP turbine reliability is increase, its operation performances are improving. Design efficiency is effective mostly for small-scale and micro-HPP due to reliable operation, low-end technology, and harmless ecological application. (author)

  11. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1994-03-01

    In the third quarter of 1993, all of Finland's four nuclear power plant units were in power operation, with the exception of the annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa units. The load factor average of the plant units was 83.6 %. None of the events which occurred during this annual quarter had any bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  12. Operation and maintenance in Genkai PWR Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shojiro

    1984-01-01

    The No.1 PWR plant with 559 MW capacity in the Genkai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., required about 115 days for the regular inspection in fiscal 1982 and thereafter, although more maintenance work was done. But No.2 plant of the same type required not more than 80 days. In most cases, the period of one operation cycle was from 10 to 12 months, but in the third operation cycle of No.2 plant, it is expected to be 13 months. The capacity ratio of the whole power station was 75.2% at the end of fiscal 1983. These operational records all exceeded the Japanese average. The plants are two-loop Westinghouse type PWRs, and No.1 plant started the commercial operation of anti h and the increment of P 0 + . (author) apacity ratio of No.1 plant was 71.6%, and that of No.2 plant was 85.5%. The intergranular attack on steam generator tubes was found first in the fifth regular inspection, and also in the sixth and seventh inspections, and the faulty tubes were plugged. The prevention of its spread is the largest problem. The in-service quality assurance activity, the personnel training program and the effort of upgrading the plant availability are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Plant operation monitoring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Tsugio; Matsuki, Tsutomu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for monitoring the operation of a nuclear power plant during operation, which improves the safety and reliability of operation without increasing an operator's burden. Namely, a chief in charge orally instruct an operation to an operator upon the operation of a plant constituent equipment. The operator points the equipment and calls the name. Actual operation instruction for the equipment is inputted after confirmation by oral response. The voices of theses series of operation instruction/point-calling/response confirmation are taken into a voice recognition processing device. The processing device discriminates each of the person who calls, and discriminates the content of the calls and objective equipments to be operated. Then, the series of procedures and contents of the operation for the equipments previously disposed in the data base are compared with the order of inputted calls, discriminated contents and the objective equipments to be operated. If they are not agreed with each other, the operation instruction is blocked even if actual operation instructions are inputted. (I.S.)

  14. Italian experience in gasification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, N.U.

    1991-01-01

    After tracing the historical highlights representing the development of the Fauser (Montecatini) technology based gasification processes for the production of ammonia and methanol, this paper outlines the key design, operation and performance characteristics of the Montecatini (Italy) process plant for heavy liquid hydrocarbons gasification by means of partial auto-thermal combustion with oxygen. The outline makes evident the technical-economical validity of the Montecatini design solutions which include energy recovery (even the heat dispersed through the gasifier walls is recovered and utilized to produce low pressure steam to preheat the fuel oil); reduced oxygen consumption by the high temperature preheating of all reagents; the ecologically compatible elimination of gas black; as well as, desulfurization with materials recovery. The plant process descriptions come complete with flowsheets. While demonstrating that the Italian developed technology is historically well rooted, the Author stresses that the current design versions of Montecatini gasification plants are up to date with innovative solutions, especially, with regard to pollution abatement, and cites the need for a more concerted marketing effort on the part of local industry to help improve the competitiveness of the Italian made product

  15. On the plant operators performance during earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Abe, M.; Niwa, H.; Yoneda, T.; Matsunaga, M.; Suzuki, T.

    1994-01-01

    There is little data on which to judge the performance of plant operators during and after strong earthquakes. In order to obtain such data to enhance the reliability on the plant operation, a Japanese utility and a power plant manufacturer carried out a vibration test using a shaking table. The purpose of the test was to investigate operator performance, i.e., the quickness and correctness in switch handling and panel meter read-out. The movement of chairs during earthquake as also of interest, because if the chairs moved significantly or turned over during a strong earthquake, some arresting mechanism would be required for the chair. Although there were differences between the simulated earthquake motions used and actual earthquakes mainly due to the specifications of the shaking table, the earthquake motions had almost no influence on the operators of their capability (performance) for operating the simulated console and the personal computers

  16. Visualization study of operators' plant knowledge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Tarou; Furuta, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Shinji

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear plants are typically very complicated systems and are required extremely high level safety on the operations. Since it is never possible to include all the possible anomaly scenarios in education/training curriculum, plant knowledge formation is desired for operators to enable thein to act against unexpected anomalies based on knowledge base decision making. The authors have been conducted a study on operators' plant knowledge model for the purpose of supporting operators' effort in forming this kind of plant knowledge. In this report, an integrated plant knowledge model consisting of configuration space, causality space, goal space and status space is proposed. The authors examined appropriateness of this model and developed a prototype system to support knowledge formation by visualizing the operators' knowledge model and decision making process in knowledge-based actions with this model on a software system. Finally the feasibility of this prototype as a supportive method in operator education/training to enhance operators' ability in knowledge-based performance has been evaluated. (author)

  17. Incorporating operational experience and design changes in availability forecasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.

    1988-01-01

    Reliability or availability forecasts which are based solely on past operating experience will be precise if the sample is large enough, and unbiased if nothing in the future design, environment, operating region or anything else changes. Unfortunately, life is never like that. This paper considers the methodology and philosophy of modifying forecasts based on past experience to take account also of changes in design, construction methods, operating philosophy, environments, operator training and so on, between the plants which provided the operating experience and the plant for which the forecast is being made. This emphasises the importance of collecting, assessing, and learning from past data and of a thorough knowledge of future designs, and procurement, operation, and maintenance policies. The difference between targets and central estimates is also discussed. The paper concludes that improvements in future availability can be made by learning from past experience, but that certain conditions must be fulfilled in order to do so. (author)

  18. Research of the Power Plant Operational Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koismynina Nina M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the algorithm of the power plant operational modes research is offered. According to this algorithm the program for the modes analysis and connection power transformers choice is developed. The program can be used as educational means for studying of the power plant electric part, at the same time basic data are provided. Also the program can be used for the analysis of the working power plants modes. Checks of the entered data completeness and a choice correctness of the operational modes are provided in the program; in all cases of a deviation from the correct decisions to the user the relevant information is given.

  19. Steam generator operating experience update, 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.

    1984-06-01

    This report is a continuation of earlier reports by the staff addressing pressurized water reactor steam generator operating experience. NUREG-0886, Steam Generator Tube Experience, published in February 1982 summarized experience in domestic and foreign plants through December 1981. This report summarizes steam generator operating experience in domestic plants for the years 1982 and 1983. Included are new problems encountered with secondary-side loose parts, sulfur-induced stress-assisted corrosion cracking, and flow-induced vibrational wear in the new preheater design steam generators. The status of Unresolved Safety Issues A3, A4, and A5 is also discussed

  20. Experience in startup and operation of fast flux facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The testing program was structured to perform all testing under formal testing procedures with a test engineer as the test director and the plant operators operating the systems and equipment. This provided excellent training and experience for the operators in preparation for eventual reactor operation. Operations preparations for the testing and operation activities has consisted of academic training, formal on-the-job training including systems operation and examinations by persons with an expert knowledge on that portion of the plant, training at EBR-II and the High Temperature Sodium Facility for selected senior operators, operating procedure preparation, training on an FFTF Control Room operator training simulator, and formal written, oral and operating examinations

  1. Operating experience with gamma ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.; Ouwerkerk, T.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) with radioisotopes dates back to the mid-1940s when radium was marketed for medical purposes. Cobalt-60 came on the scene in 1949 and within a few years a thriving business in cancer teletherapy machines and research irradiators was developed. AECL's first full-scale cobalt-60 gamma ray sterilizer for medical products was installed in 1964. AECL now has over 50 plants and 30 million curies in service around the world. Sixteen years of design experience in cobalt-60 sources, radiation shielding, safety interlock systems, and source pass mechanisms have made gamma irradiators safe, reliable, and easy to operate. This proven technology is being applied in promising new fields such as sludge treatment and food preservation. Cesium-137 is expected to be extensively utilized as the gamma radiation source for these applications

  2. How to define, plan and implant infrastructure for operation and maintenance of large power plants. Salto Caxias - the Parana Electricity Company, Brazil - experience; Como definir, planejar e implantar infraestrutura para operacao e manutencao de grandes usinas. Experiencia de Salto Caxias (COPEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, Faisal Ali; Potenza, Luiz Frederico [Usina Hidreletrica de Salto Caxias, Capitao Leonidas Marques, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: faisal@copel.br; potenza@mail.copel.br

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the evolutional process which has been adopted by COPEL along the hydroelectric undertaking, focusing the Salto Caxias operation staff experience, during the pre-commissioning, commissioning and beginning of the plant commercial operation.

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-02-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa plant units were held during the report period. All events during this quarter are classified as Level hero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below authorised limits. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  4. Modifications at operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, T.J.; Gazda, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications at operating nuclear power plants offer the structural engineer many challenges in the areas of scheduling of work, field adjustments, and engineering staff planning. The scheduling of structural modification work for operating nuclear power plants is normally closely tied to planned or unplanned outages of the plant. Coordination between the structural engineering effort, the operating plant staff, and the contractor who will be performing the modifications is essential to ensure that all work can be completed within the allotted time. Due to the inaccessibility of some areas in operating nuclear power plants or the short time available to perform the structural engineering in the case of an unscheduled outrage, field verification of a design is not always possible prior to initiating the construction of the modification. This requires the structural engineer to work closely with the contractor to promptly resolve problems due to unanticipated interferences or material procurement problems that may arise during the course of construction. The engineering staff planning for structural modifications at an operating nuclear power plant must be flexible enough to permit rapid response to the common ''fire drills,'' but controlled enough to ensure technically correct designs and to minimize the expenditure of man-hours and the resulting engineering cost

  5. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Pekka

    1987-07-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. No event in the report period, or in the whole year of 1986, essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. For remedying certain defects found in the adminstrative procedures concerning plant operation and maintenance, the Loviisa power plant was shut down for several days in September

  6. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, Pekka

    1987-05-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the perssonnel or the environment. For remedying certain defects found in the administrative procedures concerning plant operation and maintenance, the Loviisa power plant was shut down for several days

  7. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage.

  8. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage

  9. Operator support system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Nobuyuki; Tai, Ichiro; Sudo, Osamu; Naito, Norio.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear power generation in Japan maintains the high capacity factor, and its proportion taken in the total generated electric power exceeded 1/4, thus it has become the indispensable energy source. Recently moreover, the nuclear power plants which are harmonious with operators and easy to operate are demanded. For realizing this, the technical development such as the heightening of operation watching performance, the adoption of automation, and the improvement of various man-machine systems for reducing the burden of operators has been advanced by utilizing electronic techniques. In this paper, the trend of the man-machine systems in nuclear power plants, the positioning of operation support system, the support in the aspects of information, action and knowledge, the example of a new central control board, the operation support system using a computer, an operation support expert system and the problems hereafter are described. As the development of the man-machine system in nuclear power plants, the upgrading from a present new central control board system PODIA through A-PODIA, in which the operational function to deal with various phenomena arising in plants and safety control function are added, to 1-PODIA, in which knowledge engineering technology is adopted, is expected. (Kako, I.)

  10. Operation reports of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The requirements aiming to standardize the program of nuclear power plant operation report, required by Brazilian Energy Commission - CNEN - to evaluate the activities related to the nuclear technical safety and to the radiation protection during the units operational phase, are showed. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Professional adaptability of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xuhong; Huang Xiangrui

    2006-01-01

    The paper concerns in the results of analysis for nuclear power plant (NPP) operator job and analysis for human errors related NPP accidents. Based on the principle of ergonomics a full psychological selection system of the professional adaptability of NPP operators including cognitive ability, personality and psychological health was established. The application way and importance of the professional adaptability research are discussed. (authors)

  12. Operation control device for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Osamu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To render the controlling functions of a central control console more centralized by constituting the operation controls for a nuclear power plant with computer systems having substantially independent functions such as those of plant monitor controls, reactor monitor management and CRT display and decreasing interactions between each of the systems. Constitution: An input/output device for the input of process data for a nuclear power plant and indication data for a plant control console is connected to a plant supervisory and control computer system and a display computer system, the plant supervisory control computer system and a reactor and management computer system are connected with a CRT display control device, a printer and a CRT display input/output device, and the display computer system is connected with the CRT display control device and the CRT display unit on the central control console, whereby process input can be processed and displayed at high speed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Development of JOYO Plant Operation Management Expert Tool (JOYPET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michino, Masanobu; Terano, Toshihiro; Hanawa, Mikio; Aoki, Hiroshi; Okubo, Toshiyuki

    2000-03-01

    The Operation and Maintenance Support Systems for JOYO are being developed, with the aim of ensuring the stable and safe operation of JOYO and improving operational reliability of future FBR plants. Plant Operation Management Expert Tool named JOYPET had been developed as one of the Operation and Maintenance Support Systems, which helps plant operation management. The following functions were developed and applied. (1) Papers management (Plant status management) function for maintenance activities, (2) Isolation management support function for plant operation, (3) Automatically drawing function of plant operation schedule, (4) Isolation judgment function for plant operation. By use this system, the plant management of JOYO was able to improved reliability and reduced manpower. (author)

  14. Operating Experience in Nuclear Power Plants with Boiling-Water Reactors; Experience acquise dans l'exploitation des reacteurs a eau bouillante; Opyt ehkspluatatsii kipyashchago reaktora; Experiencia adquirida con la explotacion de reactores de agua hirviente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascherl, R. J. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1963-10-15

    Asignificant amount of operating experience has now been accumulated by boiling-water-reactor power plants. By the end of 1962, over 2200 million kWh of electricity have been generated by three plants operating on utility.system - Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Commonwealth Edison Company, Morris, Illinois; Vallecitos Atomic Power Plant, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and General Electric Company, Pleasanton, California; and Kahl Nuclear Power Station, Rheinisch Westfaelisches Elektrizitaetswerk and Bayernwerk, Kahl-am-Main, West Germany. Boiling-water-reactor power-plant performance, under routine electric-utility operating conditions, has been excellent. Reactor and plant availability and capacity factor provide a sound basis for anticipation of continuing reliable performance from boiling-water-reactor power stations. During 1963, four additional boiling-water-reactor plants will begin power operation: Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant, Consumers Power Company, Charlevoix, Michigan; Humboldt Bay Plant Nuclear Unit, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Eureka, California; Garigliano Nuclear Power Station, Societa Elettronucleare Nazionale, Scauri, Italy; and Japan Power Demonstration Reactor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai Mura, Japan. The start-up and initial operation of these plants confirms the expectation of reliable performance established by Dresden, Kahl, and Vallecitos. Performance records of Dresden, Kahl and Vallecitos have clearly proved the stability and safety of boiling-water reactors. Additionally, radiation levels within the plant and in the environs have been significantly below limits established by operating licences. Simplicity and ease of operation of boiling-water reactors has been confirmed. Load following characteristics of the Dresden dual-cycle boiling-water reactor have been excellent. Major and minor maintenance and repair work can be accomplished by ordinary craft unions, and without undue hardship or time limits caused by

  15. Operating experience with PWR in the FRG (Federal Republic of Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, H.

    1980-01-01

    Operating experiences with PWR's in the Federal Republic of Germany has been exclusively with KWU turnkey power plants with U tube steam generators. Such experience started with the 345 MW Obrigheim plant in 1968 and includes the 670 MW Stade plant, the 1200/1300 MW Biblis plants, The 900 MW Neckarwestheim and the 1300 MW Unterweser plants. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Artificial intelligence aid to efficient plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildberger, A.M.; Pack, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    As the nuclear power industry matures, it is becoming more and more important that plants be operated in an efficient, cost-effective manner, without, of course, any decrease in the essential margins of safety. Indeed, most opportunities for improved efficiency have little or no relation to nuclear safety, but are based on trade-offs among operator controllable parameters both within and external to the reactor itself. While these trade-offs are describable in terms of basic physical theory, thermodynamics, and the mathematics of control systems, their actual application is highly plant specific and influenced even by the day-to-day condition of the various plant components. This paper proposes the use of artificial intelligence techniques to construct a computer-based expert assistant to the plant operator for the purpose of aiding him in improving the efficiency of plant operation on a routine basis. The proposed system, which only advises the human operator, seems more amenable to the current regulatory approach than a truly automated control system even if the latter provides for manual override

  17. Operator training simulator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozuka, Hiromi

    1977-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, training of the operators is important. In Japan, presently there are two training centers, one is BWR operation training center at Okuma-cho, Fukushima Prefecture, and another the nuclear power generation training center in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture, where the operators of PWR nuclear power plants are trained. This report describes the BWR operation training center briefly. Operation of a nuclear power plant is divided into three stages of start-up, steady state operation, and shut down. Start-up is divided into the cold-state start-up after the shut down for prolonged period due to periodical inspection or others and the hot-state start-up from stand-by condition after the shut down for a short time. In the cold-state start-up, the correction of reactivity change and the heating-up control to avoid excessive thermal stress to the primary system components are important. The BWR operation training center offers the next three courses, namely beginner's course, retraining course and specific training course. The training period is 12 weeks and the number of trainees is eight/course in the beginner's course. The simulator was manufactured by modeling No. 3 plant of Fukushima First Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co. The simulator is composed of the mimic central control panel and the digital computer. The software system comprises the monitor to supervise the whole program execution, the logic model simulating the plant interlock system and the dynamic model simulating the plant physical phenomena. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Permanent cessation of Tokai power plant's operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.

    1998-01-01

    Tokai power plant (166MWe, Magnox type: GCR) is the first commercial reactor in Japan and has been kept operating stable since its commissioning in July 1996. During this period it has produced electricity of approximately 27.7 billion KWh (as of March 1997) and its stable operation has contributed greatly to the stable supply of electricity in Japan. Furthermore, technologies in various fields have been developed, demonstrated and accumulated through the construction and operation of Tokai power plant. It also contributes to training for many nuclear engineers, and constructions and operations of nuclear power stations by other Japanese power companies. As a pioneer, it has been achieved to develop and popularize Japanese nuclear power generation. On the other hand, Tokai power plant has small capacity in its electric power output, even though the size of the reactor and heat exchangers are rather bigger than those of LWR due to the characteristics of GCR. Therefore, the generation cost is higher than the LWR. Since there is no plant whose reactor type is the same as that of Tokai power plant, the costs for maintenance and fuel cycle are relatively higher than that of LWR. Finally we concluded that the longer we operate it, the less we can take advantage of it economically. As a result of the evaluation for the future operation of Tokai power plant including the current status for supply of electricity by the Japanese utilities and study of decommissioning by Japanese government, we decided to have a plan of stopping its commercial operation of Tokai power plant in the end of March, 1998, when we completely consume its fuel that we possess. From now on, we set about performing necessary studies and researches on the field of plant characterization, remote-cutting, waste disposal for carrying out the decommissioning of Tokai power plant safely and economically. We are going to prepare the decommissioning planning for Tokai power plant in a few years based on the

  19. Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgunduz, N.; Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Pierce, V.H.

    1997-01-01

    A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented

  20. CANDU 9 operator plant display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueman, R.; Webster, A.; MacBeth, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    To meet evolving client and regulatory needs, AECL has adopted an evolutionary approach to the design of the CANDU 9 control centre. That is, the design incorporates feedback from existing stations, reflects the growing diversity in the roles and responsibilities of the operating staff, and reduces costs associated with plant capital and operations, maintenance and administration (OM and A), through the appropriate introduction of new technologies. Underlying this approach is a refined engineering design process that cost-effectively integrates operational feedback and human factors engineering to define the operating staff information and information presentation requirements. Based on this approach, the CANDU 9 control centre will provide utility operating staff with the means to achieve improved operations and reduced OM and A costs. One of the design features that will contribute to the improved operational capabilities of the control centre is a new Plant Display System (PDS) that is separate from the digital control system. The PDS will be used to implement non-safety panel, and console video display systems within the CANDU 9 main control room (MCR). This paper presents a detailed description of the CANDU 9 Plant Display System and features that provide increased operational capabilities. (author)

  1. Evaluation of German and international operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueck, Reinhard; Verstegen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The systematic analysis of safety-relevant events in nuclear power plants and their causes is a key driver for the further development of nuclear safety. The findings obtained from the evaluation of operating experience in this respect form the basis for both technical and organisational improvements in the plants as well as for adaptations of technical rules and standards. In its role as Technical Safety Organisation advising the German federal government, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) has been concerned with the detection and analysis of failure mechanisms that underlie events in nuclear power plants at home and abroad since its foundation in 1977. This article provides an overview of the different objectives which are pursued in this context by order of or funded by the Federal Environment Ministry. Here, the focus is on the evaluation of reportable events for the preparation of so-called Information Notices and generic reports as well as for the acquisition of data that can be used for in-depth probabilistic analyses.

  2. Comparison of Plant Life Management Approaches for Long Term Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kisig

    2012-01-01

    Plant life management can be defined as the integration of ageing and economic planning to maintain a high level of safety and optimize operations. Many Member States have given high priority to long term operation of nuclear power plants beyond the time frame originally anticipated (e. g. 30 or 40 years). Out of a total of 445 (369 GWe) operating nuclear power plants, 349 units (297 GWe) have been in operation for more than 20 years (as of November 2011). The need for engineering support to operation, maintenance, safety review and life management for long term operation as well as education and training in the field is increasingly evident. In addition the Fukushima accident has rendered all stake holders even more attentive to safety concerns and to the provision of beyond safety measures in the preparation and scrutiny of applications for operational design life extensions. In many countries, the safety performance of NPPs is periodically followed and characterized via the periodic safety review (PSR) approach. The regulatory The regulatory review and acceptance of the PSR gives the licensee the permission to operate the plant for up to the end of the next PSR cycle (usually 10 years). In the USA and other countries operating US designed plants, the license renewal application is based on the five pre-requisite requirements and ageing management programme for passive long life system structure and components(SSCs) and active systems is adequately addressed by the maintenance rule (MR) requirements and other established regulatory processes. Other Member States have adopted a combined approach that incorporates elements of both PSR and additional LRA specific requirements primarily focused on time limited ageing analysis. Taking into account this variety of approaches, the international atomic energy agency (IAEA) initiated work for collecting and sharing information among Member States about good practices on plant life management for long term operation in

  3. The critical safety functions and plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Church, J.F.; Porter, N.J.; Cross, M.T.; Guinn, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    The paper outlines the operator's role in nuclear safety and introduces the concept of ''safety functions''. Safety functions are a group of actions that prevent core melt or minimize radiation releases to the general public. They can be used to provide a hierarchy of practical plant protection that an operator should use. ''An accident identical to that at Three Mile Island is not going to happen again'', said the Rogovin investigators. The concepts put forward in this paper are intended to help the operator avoid serious consequence from the next unexpected threat. On the basis of the safety evaluation, the operator has three roles in assuring that the consequences of an event will be no worse than the predicted acceptable results. These three operator roles are: first, maintain plant setup in readiness to properly respond; second, operate the plant in a manner such that fewer, milder events minimize the frequency and the severity of adverse events; third, the operator needs to monitor the plant to verify that the safety functions are accomplished. The operator needs a systematic approach to mitigating the consequences of an event. The concept of ''safety function'' introduces that systematic approach and prevents a hierarchy of protection. If the operator has difficulty in identifying an event for any reason, the systematic safety function approach allows ones to accomplish the overall path of mitigating consequences. There are ten identified functions designed to protect against core melt, preserve containment integrity, prevent indirect release of radioactivity, and maintain vital auxiliaries needed to support the other safety functions. The paper describes in detail the operator's role and the safety functions, and provides many examples of the use of alternative success paths to accomplish the safety function

  4. Training and qualification of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Based on training experiences of the nuclear power plant operators of pressurized water reactors (PWR) at the Nuclear Power Training Center Ltd. (NTC) in Japan, training programs were reviewed referring to US training programs. A systematic approach is deployed to them, which mainly consist of on-the-job training and the NTC training courses to meet the needs of all operators from beginners to experienced veterans according to their experiences and objectives. The NTC training is conducted using the simulators that simulate the nuclear power plant dynamics through the use of computers. The operators trained at the NTC work in the central control room of every PWR power plant. The NTC also carries out the qualification examinations for the shift managers. (T. Tanaka)

  5. An intelligent tool for the training of nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, B.

    1990-01-01

    A new type of pedagogical tool has been developped for the training of nuclear power plant operation. This tool combines simulation and expert system. The first process developped is about Steam Generator Tube Rupture (S.G.T.R.). All nuclear power plants will be equiped with this system in 1989 and 1990. After this first experiment, others processes will be developped for this tool

  6. Method of operating a nuclear turbine plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiraku; Ootawara, Yasuhiko; Imai, Tetsu

    1985-04-25

    A method is presented to prevent the lowering in the reactor feedwater temperature thereby secure necessary amount of steams even in a plant operation under low load. The feedwater temperature of a nuclear reactor is detected at the low load region of the plant and high enthalpy steams are supplied to a high pressure feedwater heater by opening a supply stream extract switching valve. This enables to maintain the feedwater temperature in the nuclear reactor at a constant level.

  7. Ensuring safe operation at the Loviisa nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnell, B.

    1985-01-01

    Safe operation of a nuclear plant can be achieved only if the plant is designed according to stringent safety principles, if the construction and commissioning work meets high standards and finally if proper attention is paid to the safety aspects in all operational activities. Clearly formulated safety principles and standards are required for all these steps. In the early phases of the Loviisa project only a few IAEA codes of practice and safety guides were available. Their usefulness was, however, felt early, and valuable guidance was offered by them in formulating the quality assurance programme, for example. The paper describes the approach taken in order to achieve high operational safety at the first nuclear power station in Finland, the Loviisa plant. The involvement in the project of the plant owner, Imatran Voima Oy (IVO), was very large, the company serving as its own architect-engineer. Experience has shown that the thorough knowledge of the plant, down to the finest details, obtained by extensive participation in design, erection and commissioning of the plant, is invaluable in the actual operation of the plant. This manifests itself most clearly in the event of malfunctions and incidents or if modifications have to be undertaken. Many different activities affecting the operational safety can be identified: actual operation of the plant, including the creation and maintaining of technical specifications, procedures, instructions, documentation systems, etc.; maintenance, repair and modification work; in-service inspection and testing practices; component failure data collection and analysis; incident reporting, collection and evaluation systems; operator training; quality assurance programme; procedures and implementation; reviews of operational safety by an independent safety committee; and supervision by the safety authorities. In the paper, all these activities are described in some detail. (author)

  8. Use of computer codes to improve nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.; Polak, V.; Filo, J.; Gatas, J.

    1985-01-01

    For safety and economic reasons, the scope for carrying out experiments on operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) is very limited and any changes in technical equipment and operating parameters or conditions have to be supported by theoretical calculations. In the Nuclear Power Plant Scientific Research Institute (NIIAEhS), computer codes are systematically used to analyse actual operating events, assess safety aspects of changes in equipment and operating conditions, optimize the conditions, preparation and analysis of NPP startup trials and review and amend operating instructions. In addition, calculation codes are gradually being introduced into power plant computer systems to perform real time processing of the parameters being measured. The paper describes a number of specific examples of the use of calculation codes for the thermohydraulic analysis of operating and accident conditions aimed at improving the operation of WWER-440 units at the Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 and V-2 nuclear power plants. These examples confirm that computer calculations are an effective way of solving operating problems and of further increasing the level of safety and economic efficiency of NPP operation. (author)

  9. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, P.

    1986-08-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. (author)

  10. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosson, C.

    1989-05-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  11. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.; Koponen, H.; Nevander, O.; Paltemaa, R.; Poellaenen, I.; Rannila, P.; Valtonen, K.; Vilkamo, O.

    1988-02-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  12. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimburger, H.

    1988-08-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  13. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.

    1985-09-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and capacity factors of the plants. (author)

  14. Wind power plant in grid operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heier, S.

    1993-01-01

    There are new prospects for electrical energy supply in coastal regions and on islands if one succeeds in integrating the available wind energy, dependent on the weather, into existing and to be developed supply structures. Apart from the supply of energy, effects on the grid and on the electrical consumer are gaining in importance. For wind power plants, the operating behaviour is appreciably determined by the electro-technical concept. The mechanical/electrical energy conversion with the corresponding grid connection and plant control play an important part here. Results of measurements and computer simulation make the differences in the behaviour of wind power plants clear. (orig.) [de

  15. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.; Lehtinen, P.

    1985-11-01

    These general reviews of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrate on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. (author)

  16. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.

    1988-09-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hzard to the personnel or the environment

  17. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tubulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  18. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.

    1985-01-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants in the second quarter of the year 1984 concentrates on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and availability of the plants. (author)

  19. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost all the time in the first quarter of 1992. The load factor average was 99.8%. All events which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale were level 0/below scale on the Scale. Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site remained well below authorised limits. Only quantities of radioactive material insignificant to radiation exposure, originating from the nuclear power plants, were detected in samples collected in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants

  20. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.; Viitasaari, O.

    1985-05-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants in the third quarter of the year 1984 concentrates on such events and discoveries related to reactor and radiation safety that the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as significant. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the production and capacity factors of the plants. (author)

  1. Computer simulation of thermal plant operations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Kelly, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book describes thermal plant simulation, that is, dynamic simulation of plants which produce, exchange and otherwise utilize heat as their working medium. Directed at chemical, mechanical and control engineers involved with operations, control and optimization and operator training, the book gives the mathematical formulation and use of simulation models of the equipment and systems typically found in these industries. The author has adopted a fundamental approach to the subject. The initial chapters provide an overview of simulation concepts and describe a suitable computer environment.

  2. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-08-01

    In the Quarterly Reports on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants such events and observations are described relating to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the plants' workers and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in commercial operation during the whole first quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 99.1 %. Failures have been detected in the uppermost spacing lattices of nuclear fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors. Further investigations into the significance of the failures have been initiated. In this quarter, renewed cooling systems for the instrumentation area were introduced at Loviisa 1. The modifications made in the systems serve to ensure reliable cooling of the area even during the hottest summer months when the possibility exists that the temperature of the automation equipment could rise too high causing malfunctions which could endanger plant safety. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below prescribed limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  3. Academic training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increasing emphasis being placed upon academic training of nuclear power plant operators, it is important that institutions of higher education develop and implement programs which will meet the educational needs of operational personnel in the nuclear industry. Two primary objectives must be satisfied by these programs if they are to be effective in meeting the needs of the industry. One objective is for academic quality. The other primary objective is for programs to address the specialized needs of the nuclear plant operator and to be relevant to the operator's job. The Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University, therefore, has developed a total program for these objectives, which delivers the programs, and/or appropriate parts thereto, at ten nuclear plant sites and with other plants in the planning stage. The Center for Nuclear Studies program leads to a Bachelor of Professional Studies degree in nuclear industrial operations, which is offered through the university college of Memphis State University

  4. Radiological operating experience at FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, W.L.; Prevo, P.R.

    1986-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility has been in operation for approximately five years, including about one thousand days of full power operation of the Fast Test Reactor. During that time the collective dose equivalents received by operating personnel have been about two orders of magnitude lower than those typically received at commercial light water reactors. No major contamination problems have been encountered in operating and maintaining the plant, and release of radioactive gas to the environment has been minimal and well below acceptable limits. All shields have performed satisfactorily. Experience to date indicates an apparent radiological superiority of liquid metal reactor systems over current light water plants

  5. Operating and maintenance experience with computer-based systems in nuclear power plants - A report by the PWG-1 Task Group on Computer-based Systems Important to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report was prepared by the Task Group on Computer-based Systems Important to Safety of the Principal Working Group No. 1. Canada had a leading role in this study. Operating and Maintenance Experience with Computer-based Systems in nuclear power plants is essential for improving and upgrading against potential failures. The present report summarises the observations and findings related to the use of digital technology in nuclear power plants. It also makes recommendations for future activities in Member Countries. Continued expansion of digital technology in nuclear power reactor has resulted in new safety and licensing issues, since the existing licensing review criteria were mainly based on the analogue devices used when the plants were designed. On the industry side, a consensus approach is needed to help stabilise and standardise the treatment of digital installations and upgrades while ensuring safety and reliability. On the regulatory side, new guidelines and regulatory requirements are needed to assess digital upgrades. Upgrades or new installation issues always involve potential for system failures. They are addressed specifically in the 'hazard' or 'failure' analysis, and it is in this context that they ultimately are resolved in the design and addressed in licensing. Failure Analysis is normally performed in parallel with the design, verification and validation (V and V), and implementation activities of the upgrades. Current standards and guidelines in France, U.S. and Canada recognise the importance of failure analysis in computer-based system design. Thus failure analysis is an integral part of the design and implementation process and is aimed at evaluating potential failure modes and cause of system failures. In this context, it is essential to define 'System' as the plant system affected by the upgrade, not the 'Computer' system. The identified failures would provide input to the design process in the form of design requirements or design

  6. Experiences in the construction and operation of a biodiesel pilot plant in Tabasco; Experiencias en la construccion y operacion de una planta piloto de biodiesel en Tabasco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custodio Garcia, E; Cordova Gomez, Jose F; Irineo Mijangos, Jose A; Montiel Reyes, W; Gutierrez Leon, Gustavo M [Universidad Tecnologica de Tabasco, Tecnologia Ambiental (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Initiating the development of a project that has as final goal the construction of a plant at pilot level to produce bio combustible, represent always a challenge. First, for the little experience that we could have in the construction, and another one, related to the selection of the equipment or materials for its construction, since one must have quality standards in the materials and it tends to happen that in occasions they are not in the market because of its specialization. In this work the authors present their experiences in the design and construction of the first pilot plant for production of biodiesel in the state of Tabasco, as well as in the use of the bio-fuel in the buses and emergency generating units where the biodiesel has tried on. The pilot plant for biodiesel is designed to produce 400 liters per hour, each batch, has a storage capacity of 2400 liters and counts with a system of filters and washing tank with water to eliminate water and solid matters that are contaminating the process. For the biodiesel production the methoxide is used, that is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and methanol alcohol so that it reacts with the oil and forms the biodiesel. The plant is working with used vegetal oil as raw material, same that is collected from the hotels and restaurants of the zone. The critics have served to improve the process, because sometimes not everything has been written on the biodiesel. This work is a joint project between the union of the private initiative (DG Group) and the Universidad Tecnologica de Tabasco. [Spanish] El iniciarse en el desarrollo de un proyecto que tenga como final la construccion de una planta a nivel piloto para fabricar biocombustible, siempre representa un reto. Primero, por la poca experiencia que pudieramos tener en la construccion, y otra, en lo que es la seleccion del equipo o material para su construccion, ya que se debe contar con estandares de calidad en los materiales y suele suceder que en ocasiones no se

  7. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGough, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    The United States Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program (LMFBR) includes an extensive program devoted to the development of small sodium valves. This program is now focused on the development and production of valves for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) now under construction near Richland, Washington. Other AEC support facilities, such as various test loops located at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC), Los Angeles, California, and at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), Richland, Washington, also have significant requirements for small sodium valves, and valves similar in design to the FFTF valves are being supplied to these AEC laboratories for use in their critical test installations. A principal motivation for these valve programs, beyond the immediate need to provide high-reliability valves for FFTF and the support facilities, is the necessity to develop small valve technology for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). FFTF small sodium valve design and development experience will be directly applied to the CRBRP program. Various test programs have been, and are being, conducted to verify the performance and integrity of the FFTF valves, and to uncover any potential problems so that they can be corrected before the valves are placed in service in FFTF. The principal small sodium valve designs being utilized in current U.S. programs, the test and operational experience obtained to date on them, problems uncovered, and future development and testing efforts being planned are reviewed. The standards and requirements to which the valves are being designed and fabricated, the valve designs in current use, valve operators, test and operating experience, and future valve development plans are summarized. (U.S.)

  8. Experience gained from fires in nuclear power plants: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    In 1993, the IAEA launched a programme to assist Member States in improving fire safety in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The review of fire safety assessment in many plants has shown that fire is one of the most important risk contributors for NPPs. Moreover, operational experience has confirmed that many events have a similar root cause, initiation and development mechanism. Therefore, many States have improved the analysis of their operational experience and its feedback. States that operate NPPs play an important role in the effort to improve fire safety by circulating their experience internationally - this exchange of information can effectively prevent potential events. When operating experience is well organized and made accessible, it can feed an improved fire hazard assessment on a probabilistic basis. The practice of exchanging operational experience seems to be bearing fruit: serious events initiated by fire are on the decline at plants in operating States. However, to maximize this effort, means for communicating operational experience need to be continuously improved and the pool of recipients of operational experience data enlarged. The present publication is the third in a series started in 1998 on fire events, the first two were: Root Cause Analysis for Fire Events (IAEA-TECDOC-1112) and Use of Operational Experience in Fire Safety Assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA-TECDOC-1134). This TECDOC summarizes the experience gained and lessons learned from fire events at operating plants, supplemented by specific Member State experiences. In addition, it provides a possible structure of an international fire and explosion event database aimed at the analysis of experience from fire events and the evaluation of fire hazard. The intended readership of this is operators of plants and regulators. The present report includes a detailed analysis of the most recent events compiled with the IAEA databases and other bibliographic sources. It represents a

  9. Operating experience feedback program at Olkiluoto NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosonen, Mikko

    2002-01-01

    Recent review and development of the operating experience feedback program will be described. The development of the program has been based on several reviews by outside organizations. Main conclusions from these review reports and from the self assessment of safety performance, safety problems and safety culture on the basis of the operational events made by ASSET-method will be described. An approach to gather and analyze small events - so-called near misses - will be described. The operating experience program has been divided into internal and external operating experience. ASSET-methodology and a computer program assisting the analysis are used for the internal operating experience events. Noteworthy incidents occurred during outage are analyzed also by ASSET-method. Screening and pre analysis of the external operating experience relies on co-operation with ERFATOM, an organization of Nordic utilities for the exchange of nuclear industry experience. A short presentation on the performance of the Olkiluoto units will conclude the presentation. (author)

  10. Trojan Nuclear Plant. Annual operating report: January--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojan generated 28,791,044 MW hours of electricity, an output greater than any other commercial U.S. plant. Availability factor was 92.6 percent and the capacity factor was 68.6 percent. Data are presented concerning operations, maintenance, changes, tests, experiments, specifications, and modifications. Also reported are effluents, waste disposal, meteorology data, radiation doses, chemical uses, and environmental surveillance

  11. Operational safety experience feedback by means of unusual event reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Operational experience of nuclear power plants can be used to great advantage to enhance safety performance provided adequate measures are in place to collect and analyse it and to ensure that the conclusions drawn are acted upon. Feedback of operating experience is thus an extremely important tool to ensure high standards of safety in operational nuclear power plants and to improve the capability to prevent serious accidents and to learn from minor deviations and equipment failures - which can serve as early warnings -to prevent even minor events from occurring. Mechanisms also need to be developed to ensure that operating experience is shared both nationally as well as internationally. The operating experience feedback process needs to be fully and effectively established within the nuclear power plant, the utility, the regulatory organization as well as in other institutions such as technical support organizations and designers. The main purpose of this publication is to reflect the international consensus as to the general principles and practices in the operational safety experience feedback process. The examples of national practices for the whole or for particular parts of the process are given in annexes. The publication complements the IAEA Safety Series No.93 ''Systems for Reporting Unusual Events in Nuclear Power Plants'' (1989) and may also give a general guidance for Member States in fulfilling their obligations stipulated in the Nuclear Safety Convention. Figs, tabs

  12. Operational safety experience feedback by means of unusual event reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Operational experience of nuclear power plants can be used to great advantage to enhance safety performance provided adequate measures are in place to collect and analyse it and to ensure that the conclusions drawn are acted upon. Feedback of operating experience is thus an extremely important tool to ensure high standards of safety in operational nuclear power plants and to improve the capability to prevent serious accidents and to learn from minor deviations and equipment failures - which can serve as early warnings -to prevent even minor events from occurring. Mechanisms also need to be developed to ensure that operating experience is shared both nationally as well as internationally. The operating experience feedback process needs to be fully and effectively established within the nuclear power plant, the utility, the regulatory organization as well as in other institutions such as technical support organizations and designers. The main purpose of this publication is to reflect the international consensus as to the general principles and practices in the operational safety experience feedback process. The examples of national practices for the whole or for particular parts of the process are given in annexes. The publication complements the IAEA Safety Series No.93 ``Systems for Reporting Unusual Events in Nuclear Power Plants`` (1989) and may also give a general guidance for Member States in fulfilling their obligations stipulated in the Nuclear Safety Convention. Figs, tabs.

  13. Operating experience of steam generator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureshkumar, V.A.; Madhusoodhanan, G.; Noushad, I.B.; Ellappan, T.R.; Nashine, B.K.; Sylvia, J.I.; Rajan, K.K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2006-01-01

    Steam Generator (SG) is the vital component of a Fast Reactor. It houses both water at high pressure and sodium at low pressure separated by a tube wall. Any damage to this barrier initiates sodium water reaction that could badly affect the plant availability. Steam Generator Test Facility (SGTF) has been set up in Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) to test sodium heated once through steam generator of 19 tubes similar to the PFBR SG dimension and operating conditions. The facility is also planned as a test bed to assess improved designs of the auxiliary equipments used in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR). The maximum power of the facility is 5.7 MWt. This rating is arrived at based on techno economic consideration. This paper covers the performance of various equipments in the system such as Electro magnetic pumps, Centrifugal sodium pump, in-sodium hydrogen meters, immersion heaters, and instrumentation and control systems. Experience in the system operation, minor modifications, overall safety performance, and highlights of the experiments carried out etc. are also brought out. (author)

  14. Recent U.S. reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative assessment of U.S. and foreign reactor operating experience is provided. Recent operating occurrences having potentially significant safety impacts on power operation are described. An evaluation of the seriousness of each of these issues and the plans for resolution is discussed. A quantitative report on U.S. reactor operational experience is included. The details of the NRC program for evaluating and applying operating reactor experience in the regulatory process is discussed. A review is made of the adequacy of operating reactor safety and environmental margins based on actual operating experience. The Regulatory response philosophy to operating reactor experiences is detailed. This discussion indicates the NRC emphasis on the importance of a balanced action plan to provide for the protection of public safety in the national interest

  15. Process plant equipment operation, control, and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Holloway, Michael D; Onyewuenyi, Oliver A

    2012-01-01

    "Process Plant Equipment Book is another great publication from Wiley as a reference book for final year students as well as those who will work or are working in chemical production plants and refinery…" -Associate Prof. Dr. Ramli Mat, Deputy Dean (Academic), Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia "…give[s] readers access to both fundamental information on process plant equipment and to practical ideas, best practices and experiences of highly successful engineers from around the world… The book is illustrated throughout with numerous black & white p

  16. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. To be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. And to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  17. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. To be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. And to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  18. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations; to be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources; and to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  19. Haddam Neck Plant. Annual operating report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Gross electrical power generated was 2,464,308 MWh(e) with the reactor on line 4,417 hrs. Information is presented concerning operations, power generation, shutdowns, corrective maintenance, primary coolant chemistry, occupational radiation exposure, release of radioactive materials, reportable occurrences, changes in plant, technical specifications, core vi start-up, containment leak testing, and core v and vi refueling

  20. A diagnosis system for plant operation support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundheimer, S.; Lorenzetti, J.; Lamana, C.

    1990-01-01

    The present article describes a diagnosis system for abnormal power plant events. The design is modular and uses a shell written in C languaje and a knowledge basis that can be changed easily. At present the system works with a reduced knowledge for primary and secondery leacks. The mitigation procedure is being written with the help of operation staff

  1. Improved core monitoring for improved plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.P.

    1987-01-01

    Westinghouse has recently installed a core on-line surveillance, monitoring and operations systems (COSMOS), which uses only currently available core and plant data to accurately reconstruct the core average axial and radial power distributions. This information is provided to the operator in an immediately usable, human-engineered format and is accumulated for use in application programs that provide improved core performance predictive tools and a data base for improved fuel management. Dynamic on-line real-time axial and radial core monitoring supports a variety of plant operations to provide a favorable cost/benefit ratio for such a system. Benefits include: (1) relaxation or elimination of certain technical specifications to reduce surveillance and reporting requirements and allow higher availability factors, (2) improved information displays, predictive tools, and control strategies to support more efficient core control and reduce effluent production, and (3) expanded burnup data base for improved fuel management. Such systems can be backfit into operating plants without changing the existing instrumentation and control system and can frequently be implemented on existing plant computer capacity

  2. Duke staff tap into a fund of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The benefits of the Operating Experience Database (OEDB) allows employees of the nuclear industry to access a fund of operating experience data on-line in order to help them make appropriate management decisions concerning problem solving for various plant-based problems. Recent successful uses include fire protection system design, improving compliance with technical specifications, and reducing unnecessary trips in turbines. It is anticipated that OEDB may well be used in the Ukraine and Russia in the future. (UK)

  3. Experience in operation and maintenance of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broecker, H.; Schomer, E.

    1987-01-01

    At present there are 10 PWRs in operation, most of them built on turnkey basis by KWU. The availability of West German PWRs amounted to 84.7% on average for the period from 1982-86. The good operating results are attributable to the following: 1. Sophiticated design and layout of the plant with good accessibility to the primary system even during operation. 2. Reliable performance of plant and components as result of extensive quality assurance. 3. Well-organized and highly qualified operating personnel. 4. Inservice inspection and preventive maintenance. 5. Good information feedback system. (Liu)

  4. Modeling Operating Modes for the Monju Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2012-01-01

    The specification of supervision and control tasks in complex processes requires definition of plant states on various levels of abstraction related to plant operation in start-up, normal operation and shut-down. Modes of plant operation are often specified in relation to a plant decomposition in...... for the Japanese fast breeder reactor plant MONJU....

  5. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-09-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear safety and radiation protection which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing modifications at the nuclear power plants and issues relating to the use of nuclear energy which are of general interest are also reported. The reports include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the first quarter of 1993, a primary feedwater system pipe break occurred at Loviisa 2, in a section of piping after a feedwater pump. The break was erosion-corrosion induced. Repairs and inspections interrupted power generation for seven days. On the International Nuclear Event Scale the event is classified as a level 2 incident. Other events in the first quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear safety and radiation protection

  6. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring

  7. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comparisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for the conventional Main Ring

  8. Job training planning and design for process plant operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirstad, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented by which process plant operators for nuclear power plants are trained in Sweden. It works by a top-down method of systems analysis which can be integrated into the analysis, specification, and design of the process automation system. The training methods can also be adapted to existing automation systems and operating schedules. The author's method is based on the principle that training programs should be based on job requirements, e.g. operator tasks in common, less frequent, and rare operating conditions. Procedures have been tested for the following steps: Job analysis, analysis of knowledge and experience required, analysis of operator training requirements, set-up and organisation of the training programme, achievement control, evaluation of the training programme.

  9. Job training planning and design for process plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirstad, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented by which process plant operators for nuclear power plants are trained in Sweden. It works by a top-down method of systems analysis which can be integrated into the analysis, specification, and design of the process automation system. The training methods can also be adapted to existing automation systems and operating schedules. The author's method is based on the principle that training programs should be based on job requirements, e.g. operator tasks in common, less frequent, and rare operating conditions. Procedures have been tested for the following steps: Job analysis, analysis of knowledge and experience required, analysis of operator training requirements, set-up and organisation of the training programme, achievement control, evaluation of the training programme. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries

  11. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of proper site selection, design, construction and commissioning, and the evaluation of these, followed by proper management, operation and maintenance of the plant. In a later phase, a proper transition to decommissioning is required. The organization and management of plant operations ensures that a high level of safety is achieved through the effective management and control of operational activities. This publication is a revision of the Safety Requirements publication Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 2000 as IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-2. The purpose of this revision was to restructure Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-2 in the light of new operating experience and new trends in the nuclear industry; to introduce new requirements that were not included in Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-2 on the operation of nuclear power plants; and to reflect current practices, new concepts and technical developments. This update also reflects feedback on the use of the standards, both from Member States and from the IAEA's safety related activities. The publication is presented in the new format for Safety Requirements publications. The present publication reflects the safety principles of the Fundamental Safety Principles. It has been harmonized with IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 on The Management System for Facilities and Activities. Guidance on the fulfilment of the safety requirements is provided in supporting Safety Guides. The terminology used in this publication is defined and explained in the IAEA Safety Glossary. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the Fundamental Safety Principles. This

  12. Proceedings of the Topical Session on Applying Decommissioning Experience to the Design and Operation of New Nuclear Power Plants. Topical Session of the 9. Meeting of the WPDD Held in Senec, Slovak Republic 12-13 November 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, Luigi; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Laurent, Gerard; Tuomisto, Harri; Metcalfe, Doug; Duncan, Allan

    2009-01-01

    At its ninth meeting, the WPDD held a topical session on Applying Decommissioning Experience to the Design and Operation of New Plants. In preparation for this, a survey was issued to reactor design organisations, electricity producers and safety authorities and responses were compiled into a summary report that provided a basis for discussion at the topical session. This report is in two parts: Part A documents the topical session, summarising the main points from the presentations and discussions and including the rapporteurs' reports. Part B provides a summary compilation of the responses received to the survey undertaken prior to the topical session. The topical session facilitated an exchange of information and experience between policy makers, regulators, electricity producers, design organisations and decommissioners on approaches and experiences to taking account of decommissioning considerations in the design of third generation reactor systems

  13. Operating the plant, quality assurance, and the job of the operating staff, Volume Twelve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes operating the plant (the role of the operator, the control room, plant technical specifications, plant operating procedures, initial startup program, BWR/PWR plant startup, BWR/PWR steady state power operation, BWR/PWR transient operation, emergency operation), quality assurance (what is quality, what is quality control, quality assurance includes quality control, government regulation and quality assurance, administrative controls for nuclear power plants, the necessity of reviews and audits, practical quality assurance), and the job of the operating staff (the plant operating staff, plant safety, first aid and resuscitation, general plant hazards, personnel protective equipment, handling chemicals, handling compressed gas, equipment repair and maintenance, communicating with others

  14. Operating experience feedback report - Solenoid-operated valve problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1991-02-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential common-mode failures of solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) in US plants. These events resulted in degradation or malfunction of multiple trains of safety systems as well as of multiple safety systems. On the basis of the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concludes that the problems with solenoid-operated valves are an important issue that needs additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for actions to reduce the occurrence of SOV common-mode failures. 115 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Reactor operator screening test experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, W.J.; Penkala, J.L.; Witzig, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    When it became apparent to Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that the throughput of their candidate selection-Phase I training-reactor operator certification sequence was something short of acceptable, the utility decided to ask consultants to make recommendations with respect to candidate selection procedures. The recommendation implemented was to create a Nuclear Training Test that would predict the success of a candidate in completing Phase I training and subsequently qualify for reactor operator certification. The mechanics involved in developing and calibrating the Nuclear Training Test are described. An arbitration decision that resulted when a number of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union employees filed a grievance alleging that the selection examination was unfair, invalid, not job related, inappropriate, and discriminatorily evaluated is also discussed. The arbitration decision favored the use of the Nuclear Training Test

  16. Outline and operations of benzene plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, S; Hirooka, N; Nakamura, M; Goto, T

    1983-01-01

    An account is given of plant which can process 130,000 tonnes of by-product coke oven gas light oil (GLO) per year (via hydrodesulfurization, extraction and distillation) to produce benzene, toluene and xylene. The flowsheets and component equipment of the various production processes are explained, together with special features such as the production of hydrogen from coke oven gas by the PSA process and the processing of GLO by the ARCO process. Plant operation is outlined and the results of performance tests are noted.

  17. Operational safety experience reporting in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Licensees of nuclear power plants in the United States have many reporting requirements included in their technical specifications and the code of federal regulations, title 10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commisson receives these reports and utilizes them in its regulatory program. Part of this usage includes collecting and publishing this operating experience data in various reports and storing information in various data systems. This paper will discuss the data systems and reports on operating experience published and used by the NRC. In addition, some observations on operating experience will be made. Subjects included will be the Licensee Event Report (LER) Data File, the Operating Unit Status Report (Gray Book), Radiation Exposure Reports, Effluents Reports, the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, Current Events, Bulletin Wrapups and Annual Summaries. Some of the uses of the reports and systems will be discussed. The Abnormal Occurence Report to the US Congress will also be described and discussed. (author)

  18. Quality management for nuclear power plant operation: A manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The experience from well operated nuclear power plants shows that achievement of safe, reliable and economic performance is closely related to a strong commitment and involvement by the management personnel. A system of controls is necessary to ensure that satisfactory quality in operation is achieved and maintained over the long term. The key to achieving and assuring quality lies in the ability of management to define performance objectives and to ensure that significant safety and reliability problems are prevented or detected early and resolved. This Manual has been developed by the IAEA to assist plant managers in fulfilling their responsibility with regard to the control and direction of quality and of quality assurance activities in nuclear power plant operation. It emphasizes quality objectives for nuclear power plant operation and indicates the way in which a quality system based on quality assurance principles as established in the IAEA NUSS documents can be used by managers to accomplish these objectives. Since the Manual is mainly directed at management personnel, it is presented in the form of short highlighted practices complemented by typical examples of forms and procedures. Since not all the activities under the heading of quality in operation could be covered in a single document, the activities selected for this Manual comprise those where it was felt that practical advice is generally needed. A pragmatic document useful for direct application by plant managers was the envisaged objective

  19. Kursk ASSET brings praise for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    An Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) visited Kursk on 19-31 July 1992 - the first time such a group had been to a RBMK reactor site. Kursk is a four unit station and the IAEA Team was able to consider safety significant events over its 45 reactor-year history. all four units have good operating records, with lifetime load factors of 70-80%. The ASSET's aim was to consider the plants current safety provisions for prevention of accidents and incidents. ASSET recommendations may cover the design and operability of the plant, personnel or operating procedures. At Kursk the Team found that ''highly qualified plant management and a very dedicated and knowledgeable operating staff'' was a major asset. They found a sound maintenance programme although some aspects of the facility appeared neglected. This was attributed to Russian industrial priorities that focused on functionality rather than appearance. it was in the test and maintenance personnel that the ASSET mission found the safety culture weakest. Some of their recommendations are reported in this article. (Author)

  20. Decontamination of operational nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    In order to reduce the radiation fields around nuclear power plants, and, consequently, to limit the radiation exposure of and dose commitments to the operating and maintenance personnel, the contamination build-up should be kept to a minimum. The most fruitful approach, from the point of view of economics and efficiency, is to tackle the problems of contamination and decontamination in the design and construction phases of the reactor. To do this, knowledge gained from the operation of existing power reactors should be used to make improvements in new designs. New structural materials with low corrosion rates or whose constituents are not activated by neutrons should also be used. For older reactors, in most cases it is already too late to incorporate design changes without extensive and expensive modifications. For these plants, decontamination remains the most efficient way to reduce radiation fields. The aim of this report is to deal with the different decontamination methods that may be applied to nuclear power plant circuits and equipment during operation. The factors that have to be considered in determining the type and the extent of the methods used are the engineering and the planning of the decontamination operation and the treatment of the resulting waste generated during the process are also discussed

  1. Higher operational safety of nuclear power plants by evaluating the behaviour of operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertins, M.; Glasner, P.

    1990-01-01

    In the GDR power reactors have been operated since 1966. Since that time operational experiences of 73 cumulative reactor years have been collected. The behaviour of operating personnel is an essential factor to guarantee the safety of operation of the nuclear power plant. Therefore a continuous analysis of the behaviour of operating personnel has been introduced at the GDR nuclear power plants. In the paper the overall system of the selection, preparation and control of the behaviour of nuclear power plant operating personnel is presented. The methods concerned are based on recording all errors of operating personnel and on analyzing them in order to find out the reasons. The aim of the analysis of reasons is to reduce the number of errors. By a feedback of experiences the nuclear safety of the nuclear power plant can be increased. All data necessary for the evaluation of errors are recorded and evaluated by a computer program. This method is explained thoroughly in the paper. Selected results of error analysis are presented. It is explained how the activities of the personnel are made safer by means of this analysis. Comparisons with other methods are made. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs

  2. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-12-01

    During the second quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1 and the resulting inspections and repairs at both Loviisa plant units brought about an outage the overall duration of which was 32 days. The annual maintenance outages of the TVO plant units were arranged during the report period and their combined duration was 31.5 days. Nuclear electricity accounted for 35.3% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 83.0%. Three events occurred during the report period which are classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale: feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1, control rod withdrawal at TVO I in a test during an outage when the hydraulic scram system was rendered inoperable and erroneous fuel bundle transfers during control rod drives maintenance at TVO II. Other events during this quarter are classified as Level Zero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. Only small amounts of nuclides originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-12-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations related to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing plant modifications and general matters relating to the use of nuclear energy are also reported. A summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, and tabulated data on the plants' production and their load factors are also given. At the Loviisa 1 plant unit one of two specially-backed AC busbars was lost during the second quarter of 1993. A ca. 30 minute voltage break caused malfunctions in the plant unit's electrical equipment and rendered inoperable certain components important to safety. The event is rated on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) at level 1. In inspections carried out at TVO II during the annual maintenance outage, the number of cracks detected in control rod structural material was higher than usual. When cracks occur, part of boron carbide, the power regulating medium in control rods, may wash into the reactor water and control rod shutdown capability may be impaired. The event is rated on the INES at level 1. Other events in the second quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  4. The Wonderland of Operating the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Augustinus, A; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L; Chochula, P

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 datataking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the HEP experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. Thi...

  5. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.; Buschman, H.W.; Smith, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Team performance measures for abnormal plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Seaver, D.A.; Holmes, C.W.; Gaddy, C.D.; Toquam, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    In order to work effectively, control room crews need to possess well-developed team skills. Extensive research supports the notion that improved quality and effectiveness are possible when a group works together, rather than as individuals. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recognized the role of team performance in plant safety and has attempted to evaluate licensee performance as part of audits, inspections, and reviews. However, reliable and valid criteria for team performance have not yet been adequately developed. The purpose of the present research was to develop such reliable and valid measures of team skills. Seven dimensions of team skill performance were developed on the basis of input from NRC operator licensing examiners and from the results of previous research and experience in the area. These dimensions included two-way communications, resource management, inquiry, advocacy, conflict resolution/decision-making, stress management, and team spirit. Several different types of rating formats were developed for use with these dimensions, including a modified Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) format and a Behavioral Frequency format. Following pilot-testing and revision, observer and control room crew ratings of team performance were obtained using 14 control room crews responding to simulator scenarios at a BWR and a PWR reactor. It is concluded, overall, that the Behavioral Frequency ratings appeared quite promising as a measure of team skills but that additional statistical analyses and other follow-up research are needed to refine several of the team skills dimensions and to make the scales fully functional in an applied setting

  7. Operational experience in underwater photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherdale, John D.; John Turner, D.

    Underwater photogrammetry has become established as a cost-effective technique for inspection and maintenance of platforms and pipelines for the offshore oil industry. A commercial service based in Scotland operates in the North Sea, USA, Brazil, West Africa and Australia. 70 mm cameras and flash units are built for the purpose and analytical plotters and computer graphics systems are used for photogrammetric measurement and analysis of damage, corrosion, weld failures and redesign of underwater structures. Users are seeking simple, low-cost systems for photogrammetric analysis which their engineers can use themselves.

  8. Management of nuclear power plants for safe operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture covers management aspects which have an immediate bearing on safety and identifies the objectives and tasks of management which are required for safe operation of a nuclear power plant and is based on the Codes of Practice and Safety Guides of the IAEA as well as arrangements in use at the Swiss Nuclear Power Station Beznau. This lecture - discusses the factors to be considered in structuring the operating organization, the support to be provided to plant management, the services and facilities needed and the management system for assuring the safety tasks are performed - describes the responsibilities of plant management and operating organization - outlines the requirements for recruitment, training and retraining as well as qualification and authorization of personnel - describes the programmes for maintenance, testing, examination, inspection, radiological protection, quality assurance, waste management, fuel management, emergency arrangement and security - describes the development of plant operating procedures including procedures to protect the personnel - outlines the requirements for initial and subsequent operation - describes the importance for evaluation and feedback of operating experience - describes the procedures for changes in hardware, procedures and set points - outlines the information flow and the requirements in reference to records and reports. (orig./RW)

  9. US remote monitoring operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Under international partnerships and bilateral agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, other national laboratories, and international partner organizations have emplaced remote monitoring systems in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world for the purpose of conducting field trials of remote monitoring. The purpose of the present report is to review the results from these field trials and draw general conclusions regarding the trials. Many thousands of hours of sensor and system operation have been logged, and data have been retrieved from many locations. In virtually all cases the system components have functioned as intended and data have been successfully collected and transmitted for review. Comparisons between front-end-triggered video and time-lapse video have shown that the triggered record has captured all relevant monitored operations at the various nuclear facilities included in the field trials. We believe the utility and functional reliability of remote monitoring for international safeguards has been shown. However, it should be kept in mind that openness and transparency, including some form of short-notice inspections, are likely to be prerequisites to the safeguards implementation of remote monitoring in any State

  10. Plant status control - with an operational focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    In the Nuclear industry, we have done a very good job of designing, developing, constructing, and improving our nuclear facilities. We have, however, often been inconsistent in documenting the details of our facilities, clearly addressing the rules around facility operation, and controlling and tracking the temporary, or permanent changes to our facilities. The reality is, that once we build a facility, we then must operate the facility, for it to be viable. Further we must operate it safely and efficiently for the facility to produce its product, and be acceptable to the public. Unfortunately, when we design and build these large, complicated facilities, we cannot project all the nuances of facility operation, although we can recognize this potential gap, and prepare for it. In order to allow for the complexities of the real world, we must provide the individuals who are tasked with operating our nuclear facilities, with the tools and processes to deal with 'all the nuances' of facility operation. This discussion will focus on the concepts behind a key process for ensuring that we meet our design and operating needs for our facilities, as well as recognizing and dealing with the potential gaps. The key process is 'Plant Status Control', and the discussion will have a primary focus on the needs of the end users, that being the individuals that have the immediate and current accountability for control and safety of the facility, the equipment, the staff, and ultimately the public, that being our Operations staff, and the Shift Manager. (author)

  11. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-05-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole fourth quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 94.7 % (the whole year 90.9 %). All the events in the last annual quarter, which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale, were below scale/level 0. Also the events which occurred in the other quarters of the year 1991 were rated at the scale's lowest levels. Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site remained well below authorised limits. Only quantities of radioactive material insignificant to radiation exposure originating in nuclear power plants were detected in the samples collected in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants

  12. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1994-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of the Finnish NPPs describe nuclear and radiation safety related events and observations which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Safety improvements at the plants and general matters relating to the use of nuclear energy are also reported. A summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, and tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors are also given. One event during the last quarter of 1993 was rated on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) as level 1. During this event at Loviisa 2, the secondary circuit emergency feedwater system was erroneously isolated from automatic start-up readiness. The error went unnoticed for 4.5 hours. During 1993 one level 2 incident and three level 1 incidents occurred at the Finnish NPPs. (8 figs., 4 tabs.)

  13. Training of nuclear power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-04-01

    A collection is presented containing 11 papers submitted at a conference on the selection and education of specialists for operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The conference was attended by specialists from universities and colleges, research institutes and production plants. It debated the methods and aims of both general and specialized theoretical and practical personnel education, the proposals for teaching centre equipment, the use of simulators, computers and other aids in the teaching process; training on school reactors was included. A proposal was put forward of the system of education, the teaching process itself, the content of the basic theoretical subjects, and the method of testing pupils' knowledge. The importance was stressed of establishing a national coordination centre to safeguard the syllabus, methodology, teaching aids, and also the training proper. The system of personnel education in the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary, is presented as an example. (M.S.)

  14. Operating experience and systems analysis at Trillo NPP: A program intended for systematic review of plant safety systems to assess design basis requirements compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, R. de la

    1996-01-01

    The program was defined to apply to all plant safety systems and/or systems included in plant Technical Specifications. The goal of the program was to ensure, by systematic design, construction, and commissioning review, the adequacy of safety systems, structures and components to fulfill their safety functions. Also, as a result of the program, it was established that a complete, unambiguous, systematic, design basis definition shall take place. And finally, a complete documental review of the plant design shall result from the program execution

  15. Training for operators and plant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverge, J.; Moroni, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    For many years, EDF has been making a lot of efforts to develop and to provide appropriate training to each of the different categories of personnel who participate in nuclear power plants operation and maintenance. With regard to training related to incidents and accidents management, if is important, among others, to make the difference between training of personnel on shift (plant operating teams and safety engineers) and training of personnel who makes up the emergency response teams that would be called upon in the event of a nuclear accident. Because of different origins, different backgrounds and especially different functions if an accident occurs on a unit, these two populations need completely different trainings. The training that EDF provides to these two categories of personnel is presented separately in the following pages. In both cases, links between functions to be sustained and characteristics of the training are tried to be shown. In conclusion, general perspectives on training evolution in EDF are given. 8 refs

  16. Training device for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A simulated nuclear energy power plant system with visible internal working components comprising a reactor adapted to contain a liquid with heating elements submerged in the liquid and capable of heating the liquid to an elevated temperature, a steam generator containing water and a heat exchanger means to receive the liquid at an elevated temperature, transform the water to steam, and return the spent liquid to the reactor; a steam turbine receiving high energy steam to drive the turbine and discharging low energy steam to a condenser where the low energy steam is condensed to water which is returned to the steam generator; an electric generator driven by the turbine; indicating means to identify the physical status of the reactor and its contents; and manual and automatic controls to selectively establish normal or abnormal operating conditions in the reactor, steam generator, pressurizer, turbine, electric generator, condenser, and pumps; and to be selectively adjusted to bring the reactor to acceptable operating condition after being placed in an abnormal operation. This device is particularly useful as an education device in demonstrating nuclear reactor operations and in training operating personnel for nuclear reactor systems and also as a device for conducting research on various safety systems to improve the safety of nuclear power plants

  17. IAEA Leads Operational Safety Mission to Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency today concluded a review of the safety practices at the Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) near Bern in Switzerland. The team noted a series of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled the Operational Safety Review Team at the request of the Swiss government. The team, led by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, performed an in-depth operational safety review from 8 to 25 October 2012. The team comprised experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States as well as experts from the IAEA. The team conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the Muehleberg NPP. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, Severe Accident Management and Long-Term Operation. The OSART team made 10 recommendations and 11 suggestions related to areas where operations of Muehleberg NPP could be further improved, for example: - Plant management could improve the operating experience program and methods throughout the plant to ensure corrective actions are taken in a timely manner; - In the area of Long-Term Operation, the ageing management review for some systems and components is not complete and the environmental qualification of originally installed safety cables has not yet been revalidated for long-term operation; and - The plant provisions for the protection of persons on the site during an emergency with radioactive release can be improved to minimize health risks to plant personnel. The team also identified 10 good

  18. Expert systems to assist plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Mori, Nobuyuki; Wada, Norio

    1985-01-01

    Large-scale real-time process control systems, such as those for electric power dispatching, large thermal and nuclear power stations, steel mill plants and manufacturing automation systems, need expert systems to assist operator's decision. The expert systems newly developed to fulfill the requirement are founded on OKBS (object oriented knowledge based system). OKBS provides various object types: fuzzy logic type, production rule type, frame type, state transition type, abstract data type and input/output transformation type. (author)

  19. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-03-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole third quarter of 1991. Longer interruptions in electricity generation were caused by the annual maintenances of the Loviisa plant units. The load factor average was 81.7 %. In a test conducted during the annual maintenance outage of Loviisa 1 it was detected that the check valve of the discharge line of one pressurized emergency make-up tank did not open sufficiently at the tank's hydrostatic pressure. In connection with a 1988 modification, a too tightly dimensioned bearing had been mounted on the valve's axle rod and the valve had not been duly tested after the operation. The event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale). Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site were below authorised limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive materials originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  20. Operating Experiences with a Small-scale CHP Pilot Plant based on a 35 kWel Hermetic Four Cylinder Stirling Engine for Biomass Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, F.; Carlsen, Henrik; Schoech, M.

    2003-01-01

    Within the scope of the RD&D project presented a small-scale CHP plant with a hermetic four cylinder Stirling engine for biomass fuels was developed and optimised in cooperation with the Technical University of Denmark, MAWERA Holzfeuerungsanlagen GesmbH, an Austrian biomass furnace and boiler...... exchanger of the Stirling engine, of the air preheater and of the entire combustion system. Furthermore, the optimisation of the pneumatic cleaning system to reduce ash deposition in the hot heat exchanger is of great relevance....... manufacturer, and BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, an Austrian development and engineering company. Based on the technology developed, a pilot plant was designed and erected in Austria. The nominal electric power output of the plant is 35 kWel and the nominal thermal output amounts to approx. 220 kWth. The plant...

  1. Safety goals for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This report presents and discusses the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's, Policy Statement on Safety Goals for the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants. The safety goals have been formulated in terms of qualitative goals and quantitative design objectives. The qualitative goals state that the risk to any individual member of the public from nuclear power plant operation should not be a significant contributor to that individual's risk of accidental death or injury and that the societal risks should be comparable to or less than those of viable competing technologies. The quantitative design objectives state that the average risks to individual and the societal risks of nuclear power plant operation should not exceed 0.1% of certain other risks to which members of the US population are exposed. A subsidiary quantitative design objective is established for the frequency of large-scale core melt. The significance of the goals and objectives, their bases and rationale, and the plan to evaluate the goals are provided. In addition, public comments on the 1982 proposed policy statement and responses to a series of questions that accompanied the 1982 statement are summarized

  2. Advanced maintenance strategies for power plant operators--introducing inter-plant life cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeber, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important goals of competing power plant operators is to ensure safe operation of their plants, characterized by maximum availability throughout the entire life cycle and minimized specific generating costs. One parameter crucial to the total price of electricity--and one that can be actively influenced by the power plant operators--is maintenance. Up to 30% of all electricity generating costs accrue from maintenance. In the past years maintenance measures have been optimized particularly by the application and continuing development of testing and diagnostic techniques, by the increased level of system and component automation as well as more efficient organization structures. Despite the considerable success of these efforts, the potential for further cost reductions is still far from exhausted. But the risks connected to reliability, availability and safety need to be analyzed in greater detail in order to ensure the sustainability of the savings already achieved as well as those yet to be realized. The systematic application of condition-based maintenance and the implementation of structured life cycle management are essential requirements. An inter-plant approach is recommended to make a quick implementation of maintenance optimization potentials possible. Plant-specific improvement potentials can be established with the help of a best-practice comparison, and measures and priorities can be defined for realizing them. Creating an inter-plant database will allow experience and findings to be analyzed quickly and efficiently by experts and made available to all participants on a neutral platform. Despite--or maybe owing to--the increasingly competitive marketplace, a sustained reduction in the maintenance costs of power plant operators can only be achieved through a structured, inter-plant exchange of experience. The ZES offers the industry a suitable platform for cooperation with its 'Condition-Based Maintenance' research focus. The introduction

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-08-01

    During the first quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. Nuclear electricity accounted for 32.5% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 99.0%. An international nuclear event scale has been introduced for the classification of nuclear power plant events according to their nuclear and radiation safety significance. The scale first undergoes about a year long trial period in several countries. on the scale, events are divided into levels from 1 to 7 of which events at Level 7 are the most serious. Furthermore, Level 0 (Below Scale) is used for events with no safety significance. All events which occurred at the Finnish nuclear power plants this quarter are classified as Level 0. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. At the Loviisa plant, a back-up emergency feedwater system independent of the plant's other systems has been introduced which offers a new, alternative means of removing residual heat from the reactor. Owing to this system, the risk of a severe accident has been further reduced. At the TVO plants, systems have been introduced by which accident sequences which lead to containment failure could be eliminated and the consequences of a potential severe accident could be mitigated. In this report, also the release of short-lived radioactive materials along the transfer route of an irradiated sample is described which occured at the FiR 1 research reactor. The amounts of radioactive materials individuals received in their bodies in connection with this event were very low

  4. The Clearing House on Operating Experience Feedback (CH-OEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro Colodron, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Clearing House on Operating Experience Feedback (CH-OEF) is an online information system that contains three technical databases available only to registered users: 1) Operating Experience Feedback (OEF) records, containing information about events occurred at Nuclear Power Plants; 2) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) records, containing technical details about NPPs; 3) Documents about operating experience, such as the Topical Operating Experience Reports (TOERs) and the quarterly reports on nuclear power plant events. The main objective of the information system is to develop communication, cooperation and sharing of operating experience amongst the national nuclear regulatory authorities participating in EU Clearinghouse network. The CH-OEF is essential for the preparation and dissemination of the quarterly reports on NPP events. These reports are published every three months and are intended to be complementary to other international reporting systems, containing mainly recent information publicly available. Only events that are considered to be likely to have lessons applicable to EU NPPs or with a real or potential impact on nuclear safety are addressed in the reports. The CH-OEF is a fundamental tool for their preparation, providing specific features for a more efficient sharing of information as well as for facilitating the related discussion and decision making. (author

  5. Recent operating experience and improvement of commercial IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    IGCC has today reached a status where experience is available from first and second generation plants, built in the 1970s/1980s and in the 1990s respectively, as commercial-scale demonstration plants for coal-based applications. These plants feature variations on gasification technology and subsequent environmental controls and in operating them a number of technical and commercial lessons have been learned that will help to improve the next generation of IGCC projects. The report reviews and summarises the state-of-the-art and operating experience of several commercial IGCC plants worldwide, setting out the lessons learned and plans for future development embracing such issues as the changes or modifications to plant made to overcome the operational problems and to improve the reliability and availability of the plant. Since IGCC is considered a 'capture ready' technology for CO2 abatement, the current status with regard to the incorporation of carbon capture and storage systems (CCS) has been reviewed. Finally, the report outlines the issues associated with assessing the risks in commercialising IGCC plant.

  6. Designing for nuclear power plant maintainability and operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Experience has shown that maintenance and operability aspects must be addressed in the design work. ABB Atom has since long an ambition of achieving optimised, overall plant designs, and efficient feedback of growing operating experience has stepwise eliminated shortcomings, and yielded better and better plant operating performances. The records of the plants of the latest design versions are very good; four units in Sweden have operated at an energy availability of 90.1%, and the two Olkiluoto units in Finland at a load factor of 92.7%, over the last decade. The occupational radiation exposures have also been at a low level. The possibilities for implementing 'lessons learned' in existing plants are obviously limited by practical constraints. In Finland and Sweden, significant modernisations are still underway, however, involving replacement of mechanical equipment, and upgrading and backfitting of I and C systems on a large scale, in most of the plants. The BWR 90 design focuses on meeting requirements from utilities as well as new regulatory requirements, with a particular emphasis on the consequences of severe accidents; there shall be no large releases to the environment. Other design improvements involve: all-digital I and C systems and enhanced human factors engineering to improve work environment for operators, optimisation of buildings and containment to decrease construction time and costs, and selection of materials as well as maintenance of operating procedures to reduce radiation exposures even further. The BWR 90 design was offered to Finland in the early 1990s, but development work continues. It has been selected by a number of European utilities for assessing its conformance with the European Utility Requirements (EUR), aiming at a specific EUR Volume 3 for the BWR 90. Some characteristics of the ABB BWRs, with emphasis on features of importance for achieving improved economy and enhanced safety, are described below. (author)

  7. Method of operating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Tasuku.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of operating a plant in which the inside of a reactor container is filled with inert gases. That is, the pressure at the inside of the pressure vessel is controlled based on the values sent from an absolute pressure gage and a pressure low gage during usual operation. A pressure high alarm and a pressure high scram signal are generated from a pressure high detector and a scram pressure detector. With such a constitution, since the pressure at the inside of the reactor is always kept at a slightly positive level relative to the surrounding atmospheric pressure even when high atmospheric pressure approaches to the plant site, air does not flow into the reactor container. Accordingly, the oxygen concentration is not increased. When a low atmospheric pressure approaches, the control operation for the pressure at the inside of the container is not necessary. The amount of the inert gases consumed and the amount of radioactive materials released to the atmosphere are decreased. The method of the present invention improves the safety and the reliability of the reactor operation. (N.H.)

  8. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  9. The experience gained at various stages of the Atucha nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosentino, J.O.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the experience gained in Argentina at the successive stages of planning, feasibility study, decision-making, awarding of contracts, construction and operation of the first nuclear power plant in Latin America. In particular, the operating experience accumulated so far is summarized together with the requirements for preparing operating tables for the plant. The role of the Atucha plant is also described in connection with the second plant under construction and the third in the planning stage [es

  10. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-12-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO 1 and II were in operation for almost the whole second quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 87.4 %. In consequence of a fire, which broke out in the switchgear building, connections to both external grids were lost and TVO II relied on power supplied by four back-up diesels for 7.5 hrs. The event is classified as Level 2 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The process of examining the non-leaking fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors has continued. The examinations have revealed, so far, that the uppermost spacing lattices of the bundles exhibit deformations similar to those detected in the leaking fuel bundles removed from the reactors. This event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale) on the Scale. The Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety has assessed the safety of the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants based on the new regulations issued on 14.2.1991 by the Council of State. The safety regulations are much more stringent than those in force when the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants were built. The assessment indicated that the TVO nuclear power plant meets these safety regulations. The Loviisa nuclear power plant meets the requirements with the exception of certain requirements related to the ensuring of safety functions and provision for accidents. At the Loviisa nuclear power plant there are several projects under consideration to enhance safety

  11. Recent operating experiences with steam generators in Japanese NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Seiji

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, the Genkai-3 of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. and the Ikata-3 of Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. started commercial operation, and now 22 PWR plants are being operated in Japan. Since the first PWR plant now 22 PWR plants are being operated in was started to operate, Japanese PWR plants have had an operating experience of approx. 280 reactor-years. During that period, many tube degradations have been experienced in steam generators (SGs). And, in 1991, the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) occurred in the Mihama-2 of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. However, the occurrence of tube degradation of SGs has been decreased by the instructions of the MITI as regulatory authorities, efforts of Electric Utilities, and technical support from the SG manufacturers. Here the author describes the recent SGs in Japan about the following points. (1) Recent Operating Experiences (2) Lessons learned from Mihama-2 SGTR (3) SG replacement (4) Safety Regulations on SG (5) Research and development on SG

  12. Nuclear plant operation: achieving excellence through quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstrom, L [Barseback Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden); Bergeron, J P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Coakley, W [and others

    1992-07-01

    Nuclear power operation is characterised by a very high level of safety and availability resulting in economically competitive electricity production. This achievement must not only be maintained but must be further developed if nuclear power is to regain momentum in the light of its widely recognized environmental advantages. Therefore this meeting bring together all those, managers and technical staff, responsible for the operation of the nuclear in order to allow them to exchange views, experience and knowledge on fundamental aspects such as: management philosophy, quality assurance, human resources and international co-operation; focusing on training (incident analysis and management), human factors and experience feedback; maintenance philosophy, life extension and upgrading, organisation and administration. (A.L.B.)

  13. Nuclear plant operation: achieving excellence through quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrom, L.; Bergeron, J.P.; Coakley, W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power operation is characterised by a very high level of safety and availability resulting in economically competitive electricity production. This achievement must not only be maintained but must be further developed if nuclear power is to regain momentum in the light of its widely recognized environmental advantages. Therefore this meeting bring together all those, managers and technical staff, responsible for the operation of the nuclear in order to allow them to exchange views, experience and knowledge on fundamental aspects such as: management philosophy, quality assurance, human resources and international co-operation; focusing on training (incident analysis and management), human factors and experience feedback; maintenance philosophy, life extension and upgrading, organisation and administration. (A.L.B.)

  14. Elimination and utilization of ammonium nitrogen from sewage treatment plants. Operating experience at the Goettingen and Cuxhaven sewage treatment plants; Entfernung und Verwertung von Ammonium-Stickstoff aus Klaeranlagen. Betriebserfahrungen auf den Klaeranlagen Goettingen und Cuxhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, S.; Sackewitz, M.; Spindler, T. [Rauschert Verfahrenstechnik GmbH, Steinwiesen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Stripping is a physical-chemical technique for reliable and easy removal of ammonium-nitrogen from waste water. Especially for treating small and heavily loaded partial streams, stripping represents an efficient complement to biological process stages. An energy-optimized concept evolved by the process engineering firm Rauschert manages to combine proved technology and the utilization of all process products in the long term into an economical process solution. This is reflected in the operating results of reference plants at Goettingen and Cuxhaven. (orig.) [German] Das Strippen ist ein physikalisch-chemisches Verfahren zur sicheren und einfachen Entfernung von Ammonium-Stickstoff aus Abwasser. Vor allem bei der Behandlung kleiner und hochbeladener Teilstroeme ist die Strippung eine effiziente Ergaenzung zu biologischen Verfahrensstufen. Ein energieoptimiertes Konzept der Firma Rauschert Verfahrenstechnik verbindet die bewaehrte Technik und die langfristige Verwertung saemtlicher Prozessprodukte zu einer wirtschaftlichen Problemloesung. Dies spiegelt sich in den Betriebsergebnissen der Referenzanlagen in Goettingen und Cuxhaven wider. (orig.)

  15. The training of operating personnel at Spanish nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Antonio Burgos

    2011-01-01

    An essential condition in order to ensure that nuclear power plants are operated reliably and safely is the availability in the Control Room of duly qualified persons capable both of preventing accidents and of responding to them should they occur. Training of the Control Room operating crews is accomplished in two major stages: a lengthy process of initial training in which the knowledge acquired at high school and university is built upon, leading to the specialisation required to appropriately carry out the tasks to be performed in the Control Room, and a continuous training program aimed at maintaining and improving the knowledge and skills required to operate the plant, with feedback of the lessons learned from the industry's operating experience. The use of full-scope simulators replicating the physical conditions and environment of the Control Room allows the period of initial training to be reduced and is the most appropriate method for the continuous training program of the control room personnel, since these simulators increase the realism of the training scenarios, help to better understand the response of the plant and provide an accurate idea of transient response times. Tecnatom is the Training Centre for Spanish Operators; it is the 'Operator Training Factory' and its mission is to train the nuclear power plant operating personnel in both technological fundamentals and the development of diagnostic skills through practical scenarios on the simulator and on-the-job training. Our training programmes are based on a SAT (Systematic Approach to Training) methodology that has been implemented at both Spanish and overseas plants. (author)

  16. Design of the low-temperature rectification plant KRETA including the pre-purification units ADAMO and REDUKTION and first operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammon, R. v.; Hutter, E.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Weinlaender, W.

    1977-01-01

    In the off-gas treatment system developed by the GfK Karlsruhe the noble gases Kr and Xe are removed by means of a low-temperature rectification process, in which the Kr-85 is largely separated from the inactive Xe. The Xe can then be released to the environment, while the radioactive Kr must be stored in steel cylinders. Prior to the above treatment the oxygen is removed to minimize ozone formation. This is effected, together with the removal of residual oxides of nitrogen, by catalytic reduction with hydrogen. At a subsequent stage of the pre-purification process all the gaseous components which could freeze out in the cryogenic section, i.e. H 2 O, CO 2 and NH 3 , and are removed by adsorption. These stages of the process are being investigated in the reduced-scale KRETA, REDUKTION and ADAMO pilot plants, which have a gas through-put of 50 m 3 /h (at N.T.P.), using simulated inactive gas mixtures. The design of the three plants is described. The initial tests on the KRETA plant showed that an experimental decontamination factor of >= 10 3 could be achieved for the first column for rectification of the N 2 -Kr-Xe system. Instances of xenon freezing out were also observed, these being accompanied by a drop in the decontamination factor. Separation of Kr from Xe in the second column proceeded smoothly with high enrichment of both components. Both the capacity and the efficiency of the ADAMO plant are very high for the separat ion of H 2 O and CO 2 . Coadsorbed Kr can be fully desorbed under normal conditions by flushing with N 2 . Following preliminary laboratory tests for the REDUKTION plant a ruthenium catalyst has been selected, which is particularly insensitive to poisoning, e.g. by iodine. (orig./ORU) [de

  17. LMFBR operational safety: the EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Allen, N.L.; Dean, E.M.; Fryer, R.M.; Larson, H.A.; Lehto, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has evolved from that of a small LMFBR demonstration plant to a major irradiation-test facility. Because of that evolution, many operational-safety issues have been encountered. The paper describes the EBR-II operational-safety experience in four areas: protection-system design, safety-document preparation, tests of off-normal reactor conditions, and tests of elements with breached cladding

  18. Human factors in the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaton, E.; Neboyan, V.; Lederman, L.

    1987-01-01

    In large and complex interactive systems, human error can contribute substantially to system failures. At nuclear power plants, operational experience demonstrates that human error accounts for a considerable proportion of safety-related incidents. However, experience also shows that human intervention can be very effective if there is a thorough understanding of the situation in the plant. Thus, an efficient interface of man and machine is important not only to prevent human errors but also to assist the operator in coping with unforeseen events. Human reliability can be understood as a qualitative as well as a quantitative term. Qualitatively it can be described as the aim for successful human performance of activities necessary for system reliability and availability. Quantitatively, it refers to data on failure rates or error probabilities that can be used, for example, for probabilistic safety assessments

  19. Experience and trends at the Belgonucleaire plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deramaix, P.; Eeckhout, F.; Pay, A.; Pelckmans, E.

    2000-01-01

    The BN Dessel plant started operation in 1973. During the initial period (up to 1984), the plant was equipped to fabricate FBR as well as LWR fuel (5 tHM/year) within the framework of LWR demonstration and FBR programmes. The first ten years of operation have laid down the basis for all modifications or improvements in the fields of fuel fabrication and control processes, waste management, safety and safeguards, which were implemented in the 1984-1985 refurbishment. On this occasion, the MIMAS fabrication process has been introduced to make MOX fuel reprocessable in the operating conditions of the modern reprocessing plants (COGEMA in La Hague and BNFL in Sellafield) and the capacity of the plant has been upgraded to the current nominal capacity of 35 tHM per year (with a maximum licensed of 40 tHM per year). The nominal fabrication capacity was achieved in 1989, maintained consistently since then at least at that level, approaching even the license limit. The process has proved its high flexibility, in particular in terms of the large variety of MOX manufactured for both PWRs (14 x 14, 15 x 15, 16 x 16, 17 x 17, types) and BWRs (8 x 8, 9 x 9, 10 x 10 types), of the size of the campaign (from less than 4 tHM to 28 tHM), of the origin of the PuO 2 (from COGEMA and BNFL reprocessing plants, Pu from second generation), of the Pu content (up to 8.6 w/o in HM). From 1986 up to the end of March 1999, more than 21 t Pu as PuO 2 have been processed into more than 388 tHM of MIMAS fuel, delivered or to be delivered for use in 796 PWR assemblies and 184 BWR assemblies for 21 large power reactors (17 PWRs and 4 BWRs) in 5 countries (France, Germany, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium). The MOX fuel produced has been demonstrated to reach at least the same performance as the UO 2 fuel used simultaneously in the same reactors. An increasing number of the MOX assemblies are discharged at a burnup of at least 45 GWd/tHM assembly average. One assembly reached 51 GWd/tHM assembly average

  20. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  1. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  2. Proposed Reactor Operating Experience Feedback System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Lee, Durk Hun; Bae, Koo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Most events occurring in nuclear power plants are not individually significant, and prevented from progressing to accident conditions by a series of barriers against core damage and radioactive releases. Significant events, if occur, are almost always a breach of these multiple barriers. As illustrated in the 'Swiss cheese' model, the individual layers of defense or 'cheese slices' have weakness or 'holes.' These weaknesses are inconstant, i.e., the holes are open or close at random. When by chance all the holes are aligned, a hazard causes the significant event of concern. Elements of low significant events, inattention to detail, time or economic pressure, uncorrected poor practices/habits, marginal maintenance and equipment care, etc., make holes in the layers of defense; some elements may make more holes in different layers, incurring more chances to be aligned. An effective reduction of the holes, therefore, is gained through better knowledge or awareness of increasing trends of the event elements, followed by appropriate actions. According to the Swiss cheese metaphor, attention to the Operating Experience (OE) feedback system, as opposed to the individual and to randomness, is drawn from a viewpoint of reactor safety

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-03-01

    In the Quarterly Reports on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants such incidents and observations are described relating to nuclear and radiation safety which the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, considers safety-related. During the third quarter of 1989 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. Nuclear electricity accounted for 39.0% of the total Finnish electricity production in this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 78.9%. At Loviisa 1, two holes were found in the feedwater distributor of one steam generator. Corresponding wall thinning corrosion was also detected in the walls of two other distributors. The holes were found on the feedwater distributor upper surface in the joint of the secondary circuit feedwater pipe. One hole was about 20 mm x 50 mm in size and the other was a pit hole ca 5 mm in diameter. Metal power had entered the primary circuit at TVO I. This was observed during a post-scram plant start-up. Several control rod drive units had become jammed so tight that control rod withdrawal failed. Metal powder did not hamper reactor scram under the prevailing circumstances because the drive units are prone to jamming only after a control rod is almost fully inserted and because the forces which insert a control rod by various means (electrical, hydraulic) are 6-8 fold compared with the withdrawing force

  4. Yak experience at Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, D.

    2000-01-01

    In Sept. 1998, Nuclear Power Plant Krsko started Y2K (Year 2000) Readiness Assessment Program and implementation of the Y2K-NEK Project (NEK Nuklearna Elektrana Kriko). Y2K-NEK Project and the term N EK Year 2000 Readiness Assessment Program'' applies to software, or software based system or interface, whose failure due to the Y2K problem would prevent the performance of the safety function of a structure, system, or component. This project also applies to any software, or software based system or interface, whose failure due to the Y2K problem would degrade, impair, or prevent operability of the nuclear facility. It is intended to supplement and use existing NEK procedures used for software quality control, configuration management and problem reporting. The main guideline and method definition documents for Y2K-NEK Project were: NEI/NUSMG 97-07: Nuclear Utility Year 2000 Readiness (October 1997), and NEI/NUSMG 98-07; Nuclear Utility Year 2000 Readiness Contingency Planning (Aug. 1998). This paper presents project Y2K implementation experience and post Y2K transition analysis of the plant hardware/software systems behavior compared to the expected systems behavior and expected-planned scenarios based on the results of the Y2K Readiness Assessment, implemented remediations and Y2K Contingency Planning. (author)

  5. Experience with the export of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettl, A.

    1991-01-01

    Licensing and regulatory aspects represent an important issue during the definition and implementation phase of a nuclear power project. Strict adherence to the principles 'licensability in country of origin' and 'reference plant as built' may prove to be counterproductive on account of the differences in licensing infrastructure in vendor's and buyer's countries and of the difficulty in striking a balance between proven and up-to-date designs. In order to repeat good experience in safety, consistency of the applicable rules and regulations is important when performing the necessary adaptations to local requirements. The use of an internationally accepted body of rules such as NUSS as a yardstick for safety evaluation helps to identify special requirements in vendor's country, thus minimizing distortions in evaluation of competing bids. Benefitting from ongoing efforts to improve transparency and mutual understanding of the national safety approaches through bodies and missions like INSAG, WANO, OSART, a graded approach for implementing safety review during construction and operation is suggested, matching it to the scope of a national program of NPP construction. Together with efficient project control this will minimize the demands on resources - both human and financial - required for a successful launch of a nuclear power plant. (orig.)

  6. Operational experience with the Daresbury accelerator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, T.W.; Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.; Leese, J.M.; Tait, N.R.S.; Thorn, R.

    1986-01-01

    Operational experience with the Daresbury MKI accelerator tube is reviewed with particular attention to conditioning and high voltage performance. The effects of surges and transients on the tube are described and lines of future development are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Biogas plants: Design, construction and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At the big readiness of waste coming from the agricultural activities are looked for the production of Energy and Payments, the biogas like product of the organic decomposition under anaerobic conditions, their composition and characteristic. The elements that conform the design as the digester, the storage, the load tanks and it discharges and the conduction is described and analyzed. They are given a series of elements to obtain the characteristics of the system possible to place as: planning, calculations, evaluation, execution and operation. Lastly the steps are indicated that should be continued in the construction of the plant including planning for the work

  8. Operational experience with Seibersdorf low-level incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupa, G.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains information about an excess air incinerator which burned low level β and γ wastes (also α up to determined limits). The incinerator was started up in 1980 and it is clear that in a technical plant of such magnitude, some changes and alterations will be needed to be overcome according to the experiences of operation. This paper - after a short description of the incinerator plant itself - gives a summary of some of the operation and the changes which are made in the plant according to these facts. A partial redesign of the incinerator plant in the first half of 1985 resulted in a very satisfying new design, which proved its superiority during the runs in 1985 and 1986

  9. FFTF operating experience, 1982-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, J.B.; Franz, G.R.; Loika, E.F.; Krupar, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mwt sodium-cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Startup and initial power testing included a comprehensive series of nonnuclear and nuclear tests to verify the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic characteristics of the plant. A specially designed series of natural circulation tests were then performed to demonstrate the inherent safety features of the plant. Early in 1982, the FFTF began its first 100-day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well, achieving a cycle capacity factor of 94% in the most recent irradiation cycle. Seventy-five specific test assemblies and 25,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 80 MWd/Kg

  10. Performance management for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    Fuel was loaded to Unit 3 of the second power plant in May 2010. The Second Operation Division stepped in the operation stage from production preparation and commissioning and exploration of performance management was started. By means of performance evaluation, a closed loop of performance management was formed, staff enthusiasm improved, and potential capability inspired through evaluation, analysis and improvement. The performance evaluation covers attitude, skill, efficiency, performance, teamwork sense, cooperation, etc. Quantitative appraisal was carried out through 31 objective indicators of the working process and results. According to the evaluation results and personal interviews, indicators were modified. Through the performance evaluation, positive guidance is provided to the employees to promote the development of employees, departments and the enterprise. (authors)

  11. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1963-01-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [fr

  12. MIT January Operational Internship Experience 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLatte, Danielle; Furhmann, Adam; Habib, Manal; Joujon-Roche, Cecily; Opara, Nnaemeka; Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez; Powell, Christina; Wimmer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the 2011 January Operational Internship experience (JOIE) program which allows students to study operational aspects of spaceflight, how design affects operations and systems engineering in practice for 3 weeks. Topics include: (1) Systems Engineering (2) NASA Organization (3) Workforce Core Values (4) Human Factors (5) Safety (6) Lean Engineering (7) NASA Now (8) Press, Media, and Outreach and (9) Future of Spaceflight.

  13. Implementation of Industry Experience at Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heruc, Z.; Kavsek, D.

    2002-01-01

    Being a standalone comparatively small unit NPP Krsko has adopted a business philosophy to incorporate industry experience into its daily operations. The continuos and safe operation of the unit is supported through feedback from other utilities (lessons learned) and equipment vendors and manufacturers. A permanent proactive approach in monitoring the international nuclear technology practices, standards changes and improvements, and upon feasibility review, introducing them into processes and equipment upgrades, is applied. As a member of the most important international integrations, NPP Krsko has benefited from the opportunity of sharing its experience with others (World Association of Nuclear Operators -WANO, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations - INPO, International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Nuclear Operations Maintenance Information Service - NOMIS, Nuclear Maintenance Experience Exchange - NUMEX, Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, Westinghouse Owners Group - WOG, etc.). Voluntary activities and good practices related to safety are achieved by international missions (IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team - ASSET, IAEA Operational Safety Review Team - OSART, WANO Peer Review, International Commission for Independent Safety Analysis - ICISA) and operating experience exchange programs through international organizations. These missions are promoting the highest levels of excellence in nuclear power plant operation, maintenance and support. With time, the practices described in this paper presented themselves as most contributing to safe and reliable operation of our power plant and at the same time supporting cost optimization making it a viable and reliable source of electrical energy in the more and more deregulated market. (author)

  14. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written

  15. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written.

  16. Five years of operating experience with Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of Phenix began at the end of 1968; the unit first went critical on August 31 st, 1973, and it was first connected to the grid of Electricite de France on 31st December 1973. It started operating industrially on July 14th, 1974. The balance sheet after five years of operations is as follows: Gross thermal capacity: 590 MW; Grosss electric capacity: 264 MW; Gross capacity factor of the power station: 45%; Gross electrical power produced by 30th september 1979: more than six billion kWh. In 1976 and 1977 the operation of the plant was affected by modifications made to the intermediate heat exchangers following leaks discovered in October 1976. Since 1976 the plants has been working at full capacity and the availability rate during the period July 1978 - July 1979 was more than 80% [fr

  17. China’s Nuclear Power Plants in Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Qinshan Plant Phase I Located in Haiyan,Zhejiang Province,Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Phase I is t he first 300-megawatt pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant independently designed,constructed,operated and managed by China.The plant came into commercial operation in April 1994.

  18. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-12-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole second quarter of 1992. Longer breaks in production were caused by the annual maintenance of the TVO plant units. The load factor was 87.4 %. At TVO I it was detected during the annual maintenance outage when removing nuclear fuel assemblies from the reactor that one assembly had been loaded into the reactor in an incorrect manner during the previous year's annual maintenance: the assembly was slightly higher than the other assemblies. The water cooling the nuclear fuel partly by-passed the fuel assembly and the coolant flow proper passing through the assembly was below design. The fuel assembly's cooling had been sufficient during the whole operating cycle but could have essentially deteriorated during certain transients with the danger of consequent damage to some fuel rods. On the International Nuclear Event Scale the event is classified as level 1. Other events in this quarter which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale were level 0/below scale on the scale

  19. Kayenta advanced series compensation operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The world's first three-phase, thyristor-controlled series compensation scheme with continuously variable impedance has been introduced into a transmission system. Energized and dedicated in September 1992, the installation was placed into commercial operation in January 1993 and has provided over one year of operating experience. This paper describes the 230 kV, 330 MVAr (60 Hz) advanced series compensation (ASC) project, located in north-eastern Arizona at Kayenta Substation on the 320 km Glen Canyon-Shiprock transmission line. The paper describes operating experiences, coordination with phase shifting transformer, phase shifter failure, platform power, system disturbances, and future plans.

  20. A methodology for nuclear power plant operational events evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jeferson, E-mail: jeferson@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CGRC/CNEN), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e do Ciclo de Combustivel; Costa, Sergio Dias, E-mail: sergiodiascosta@hotmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Operational events are normal occurrences in industrial plants and in nuclear power plants. The evaluation of operational events gains importance when it comes specifically to nuclear power plants due to the proportions that the impact and the consequences of these events may cause to the installation itself, their workers, the external area of the nuclear installation, the environment and to the public in general. These consequences, for the operation of these facilities can range from very little, until the consequences that lead to accidents and can cause significant impacts. Operational events may be associated or have influence in many fields of knowledge, such as operation, maintenance, engineering, Radiological Protection, physical protection, chemistry, Human or Organizational Factors and external events, among others. The accident at the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant, shows the importance of exhausting all the studies concerning operational events in order to improve the operational safety of nuclear plants, considering all the causes and possible consequences. In this context, the evaluation of operational events discipline emerges as an important and relevant tool to contribute to the maintenance and/or improvement of the operational safety of nuclear installations. Not without reason the nuclear industry actively participates in programs of exchange of operational experience, where relevant events are thoroughly evaluated and discussed in specific forums, such as power plant operators, regulators and/or joint technical meetings, always with the purpose to prevent, minimize or mitigate its consequences. Any evaluation of operational events passes necessarily by an in-depth study of the circumstances of the event, culminating with the identification of your cause and proposition of corrective actions to prevent recurrence of similar events. Additionally, the events should not be studied individually, but evaluated within a temporal context in order

  1. A methodology for nuclear power plant operational events evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jeferson

    2015-01-01

    Operational events are normal occurrences in industrial plants and in nuclear power plants. The evaluation of operational events gains importance when it comes specifically to nuclear power plants due to the proportions that the impact and the consequences of these events may cause to the installation itself, their workers, the external area of the nuclear installation, the environment and to the public in general. These consequences, for the operation of these facilities can range from very little, until the consequences that lead to accidents and can cause significant impacts. Operational events may be associated or have influence in many fields of knowledge, such as operation, maintenance, engineering, Radiological Protection, physical protection, chemistry, Human or Organizational Factors and external events, among others. The accident at the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant, shows the importance of exhausting all the studies concerning operational events in order to improve the operational safety of nuclear plants, considering all the causes and possible consequences. In this context, the evaluation of operational events discipline emerges as an important and relevant tool to contribute to the maintenance and/or improvement of the operational safety of nuclear installations. Not without reason the nuclear industry actively participates in programs of exchange of operational experience, where relevant events are thoroughly evaluated and discussed in specific forums, such as power plant operators, regulators and/or joint technical meetings, always with the purpose to prevent, minimize or mitigate its consequences. Any evaluation of operational events passes necessarily by an in-depth study of the circumstances of the event, culminating with the identification of your cause and proposition of corrective actions to prevent recurrence of similar events. Additionally, the events should not be studied individually, but evaluated within a temporal context in order

  2. Computing and cognition in future power-plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Sheridan, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to speculate on the nature of future interactions between people and computers in the operation of power plants. In particular, the authors offer a taxonomy for examining the differing functions of operators in interacting with the plant and its computers, and the differing functions of the computers in interacting with the plant and its operators

  3. Computing and cognition in future power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Sheridan, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to speculate on the nature of future interactions between people and computers in the operation of power plants. In particular, the authors offer a taxonomy for examining the differing functions of operators in interacting with the plant and its computers, and the differing functions of the computers in interacting with the plant and its operators

  4. Injection of zinc in plants of ANAV. Impact on fuel and operation experience; Inyeccion de cinc en las plantas de ANAV. Impacto sobre el combustible y experiencia de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncell, N.; Gago, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Zinc injection performed in the three ANAV (Asociacion Nuclear Asco-Vandellos) plants is part of an overall primary water chemistry program, material management and dose reduction program. The application of zinc shown significant benefits in radiation field reduction as well as in mitigation of PWSCC initiation. Although zinc injection also reduces general corrosion rates and consequently reduces corrosion product transport to the fuel, and evaluation of the risks with respect to fuel performance should be done. ANAV and ENUSA, following industry recommendations, have coordinated the task related to the viability of the program in Asco and Vandellos including monitoring, inspections and control parameters. finally, this article includes a comprehensive review of operating experience and an assessment of fuel performance effects. (Author)

  5. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  6. Operational experiences of INES in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Japan has introduced IAEA's INES in August, 1992. As of September, 1997, the total number of domestic nuclear events which have evaluated by using the INES system has amounted 119. In Japan, when a nuclear event occurs at a nuclear power plant, a provisional evaluation is performed immediately by Nuclear Power Operation Administration Office, MITI. The final evaluation of events is implemented a few months after event occurrence by the Evaluation Committee on Incidents and Failures of Nuclear Power Plant which holds a neutral position. The results of the evaluation are transmitted to IAEA according to the INES reporting criteria

  7. Dismantling without contaminating: The EUREX plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    constrains of the dismantling programme do not permit a characterization of metallic waste produced in real time and a special traceability system has been then put in place. Every single piece produced is numbered, associated with the original pipe line record (process stream data): it will be then easier, in the future characterization step, to post the liquid stream data of past process samplings to the contamination spectrum awaited for each piece. Another minimization of contamination spread risk during operations has been the accurate drying of components: after the emptying to dead volume of tanks, their upper pipes have been cut and a thin plastic hose has been introduced to evacuate the remaining bottom liquid. Where the pipelines bending may retain a residual liquid if present, the pipe is deformed in straight and draining shape before cutting. If this operation cannot be performed, a small drain drilling is made. According to the actual experience, it is possible to reduce, with direct human operation, special training and tailored techniques and tools, the spread of contamination during dismantling to very low levels, even in a tight schedule

  8. Experience in operation of heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ion; Bilegan, Iosif; Ghitescu, Petre

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the main topics of the CANDU owners group (COG) meeting held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. These meetings are part of the IAEA program for exchange of information related mainly to CANDU reactor operation safety. The first meeting for PHWR reactors took place in Vienna in 1989, followed by those in Argentina (1991), India (1994) and Korea (1996). The topics discussed at the meeting in Romania were: operation experience and recent major events, performances of CANDU reactors and safe operation, nuclear safety and operation procedures of PHWR, programs and strategies of lifetime management of installations and components of NPPs, developments and updates

  9. Improving operator quality at Genkai Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Takeshi.

    1989-01-01

    Improvement in operator quality, or improvement in an operator's skill and professional knowledge, is of prime importance because of its great influence on safe and steady plant operation. This paper describes the education and training of reactor operators at the Genkai pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant with respect to the following topics: organization of Genkai power plant; education and training program management; training at the Nuclear Training Center; training and education on-site including emergency procedures training, normal operating procedures training, informational study of emergency conditions in existing plants, and all-around training of operators; qualifying tests for supervisors; and operator motivation

  10. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, F.

    1991-01-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology

  11. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, F [Reactor Regulation Division, Nuclear Safety Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-04-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology.

  12. Use of plant operating history to define transient loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedy, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fatigue and crack growth analyses of components subjected to transient loads have been under continuous development during the recent past to include effects of environment on the components. The accuracy of the evaluation method on the predicted reliability of the components in the operating environment has become a focus of attention. Methods have integrated available material/component test data to improve evaluation techniques. However, in the area of definition of thermal transient loads the analyst still has to remain conservative, because no realistic guidelines have been developed to define thermal transients and their sequences. Fatigue re-evaluations of components are becoming increasingly necessary in operating plants as they age due to two reasons: (1) Components show age related degradation and cannot be repaired/replaced due to economic/logistic reasons. (2) Components experience transient conditions which were not considered in the original design. In either case, the evaluation of remaining life of components involves definition of transients and their sequence from the time the component was put in service until the end of life. As a common practice, initial plant design transients are used in a conservative definition of sequences to obtain results unrealistic for the situation, which sometimes leads to inaccurate estimate of the remaining life of components. The objective of this paper is to use plant operating history and plant monitoring data to provide procedures and techniques to define realistic transients for evaluation

  13. An overview of KANUPP operating experience in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, T.

    2010-01-01

    KANUPP is a small CANDU® type PHWR (137MWe), commissioned in 1972 and now operating after life extension (PLEX) since 2004. This paper contains an overview of the plant operating experience in chemistry control over the past year including life extension period. Emphasis is on: Success story; Practices; Future improvements in chemistry programs. Considerable efforts are underway to maintain plant equipment and systems to mitigate the effect of plant ageing. The improvements that have been made at the station are as under: Heat transport system (HTS) chemistry, its effects on construction material; Feed water chemistry on secondary side (considering the condenser leaks). Strict chemistry control is being exercised for the heat transport system (HTS) for its better chemistry control. For short term, the changes are limited to pH adjustments of HTS. This change decreases the rate of thinning of outlet feeders as noted in some CANDUs® due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). Water Treatment Plant has been refurbished to get very low total dissolved solids (TDS) de-mineralized water for secondary side systems of the plant. Experience of steam generators flushing before startup, sludge pile analyses mapping, verification of pH from different sampling points of SGs, are the short term mitigating actions to address sludge pile problem in steam generators (SGs). The R and D on HTS and SGs is multifaceted and is aimed at achieving optimum chemistry control. Study is being conducted for improving chemistry control for the material, equipment and systems of the plant. (author)

  14. Method of operating BWR type power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation efficiency of BWR type reactors by reducing the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start-up of the turbine and electrical generator, as well as decrease the pressure difference in each of the sections of the pressure vessel to thereby extend its life span. Method: The operation comprises switching the nuclear reactor from the shutdown mode to the start-up mode, increasing the reactor power to a predetermined level lower than a rated power while maintaining the reactor pressure to a predetermined level lower than a rated pressure, starting up a turbine and an electrical generator in the state of the predetermined reactor pressure and the reactor power to connect the electrical generator to the power transmission system and, thereafter, increasing the reactor pressure and the reactor power to the predetermined rated pressure and rated power respectively. This can shorten the time from the start-up of the reactor to the start of the power transmission system, whereby the operation efficiency of the power plant can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. Operational characteristics of nuclear power plants - modelling of operational safety; Pogonske karakteristike nuklearnih elektrana - modelsko izucavanje pogonske sigurnosti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studovic, M [Masinski fakultet, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1984-07-01

    By operational experience of nuclear power plants and realize dlevel of availability of plant, systems and componenst reliabiliuty, operational safety and public protection, as a source on nature of distrurbances in power plant systems and lessons drawn by the TMI-2, in th epaper are discussed: examination of design safety for ultimate ensuring of safe operational conditions of the nuclear power plant; significance of the adequate action for keeping proess parameters in prescribed limits and reactor cooling rquirements; developed systems for measurements detection and monitoring all critical parameters in the nuclear steam supply system; contents of theoretical investigation and mathematical modeling of the physical phenomena and process in nuclear power plant system and components as software, supporting for ensuring of operational safety and new access in staff education process; program and progress of the investigation of some physical phenomena and mathematical modeling of nuclear plant transients, prepared at faculty of mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. (author)

  16. Experience feedback of computerized controlled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poizat, F.

    2004-01-01

    The N4 step of French PWR-type nuclear power plants is characterized by an instrumentation and control system entirely computerized (operation procedures including normal and accidental operation). Four power plants of this type (Chooz and Civaux sites) of 1450 MWe each were connected to the power grid between August 1996 and December 1999. The achievement of this program make it possible and necessary to carry out an experience feedback about the development, successes and difficulties encountered in order to draw out some lessons for future realizations. This is the aim of this article: 1 - usefulness and difficulties of such an experience feedback: evolution of instrumentation and control systems, necessary cautions; 2 - a successful computerized control: checking of systems operation, advantages, expectations; 3 - efficiency of computerized systems: demonstration of operation safety, profitability; 4 - conclusions and interrogations: system approach instead of 'micro-software' approach, commercial or 'made to measure' products, contract agreement with a supplier, when and how upgrading. (J.S.)

  17. Safety review of experiments at Albuquerque Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, K.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office is responsible for the safety overview of nuclear reactor and critical assembly facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Rocky Flats Plant. The important safety concerns with these facilities involve the complex experiments that are performed, and that is the area emphasized. A determination is made by the Albuquerque Office (AL) with assistance from DOE/OMA whether or not a proposed experiment is an unreviewed safety question. Meetings are held with the contractor to resolve and clarify questions that are generated during the review of the proposed experiment. The AL safety evaluation report is completed and any recommendations are discussed. Prior to the experiment a preoperational appraisal is performed to assure that personnel, procedures, and equipment are in readiness for operations. During the experiment, any abnormal condition is reviewed in detail to determine any safety concerns

  18. The function of people in a nuclear power plant in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, E.

    1986-01-01

    Based mainly on the operating experience of Obrigheim nuclear power plant - a two-loop pressurized water reactor with about 120,000 operating hours - the function of people in the very complex technical field of operation including supervision, maintenance and repair of a nuclear power plant is presented with special attention to safety related activities. The boundaries are indicated where automatic actions for safety and economic reasons are necessary and where manually operated systems are possible or even desirable. Typical examples and figures will show, how the operating people influenced the operation and availability of Obrigheim nuclear power plant. (orig./GL)

  19. Application of digital solutions to help the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega P, F.; Fernandez F, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the search for excellence, the emergence of solutions to digitize nuclear power plants is an opportunity to optimize the operation and safety of them. The new technologies available today in the market, applied under a global vision of the operation, can contribute to the excellent operation of nuclear power plants in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. Tecnatom has a long experience in various areas related to the operation of the plants, giving the aforementioned global vision, essential to develop global solutions that pursue the safe and efficient operation of the operation. (Author)

  20. Supporting plant operation through computer-based procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Victor; Medrano, Javier; Mendez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Digital Systems are becoming more important in controlling and monitoring nuclear power plant operations. The capabilities of these systems provide additional functions as well as support operators in making decisions and avoiding errors. Regarding Operation Support Systems, an important way of taking advantage of these features is using computer-based procedures (CBPs) tools that enhance the plant operation. Integrating digital systems in analogue controls at nuclear power plants in operation becomes an extra challenge, in contrast to the integration of Digital Control Systems in new nuclear power plants. Considering the potential advantages of using this technology, Tecnatom has designed and developed a CBP platform taking currently operating nuclear power plants as its design basis. The result is a powerful tool which combines the advantages of CBPs and the conventional analogue control systems minimizing negative effects during plant operation and integrating operation aid-systems to support operators. (authors)

  1. Recent experience of Almaraz NPP in operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Cabanero, J.G.; Gomez de la Torre, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the nuclear industry has been paying special attention to boosting nuclear power plant operation. To this end, it has optimized its maintenance, engineering, safety, management and other systems, using the appropriate resources to achieve its target. Optimization of these systems required the allocation of new resources for training plant personnel. The activity of training, which hitherto dedicated most of its attention and resources to the operating area, now extends them to schooling required in other areas of the plant, with the aim of updating the skills and knowledge of personnel to deal with new needs which have arisen. Regulations at present cover the training and qualification of only personnel responsible for handling reactor or for directing plant operation activities and capable of evaluating the nature and magnitude of possible incidents, especially those causing radioactive emissions, and of personnel requiring knowledge and experience to guarantee effective protection of individuals, ie, operators, supervisors, and qualified radiological protection experts. However, it should be borne in mind that, in the future, the training of other plant personnel could also be subject to regulations. (Author)

  2. Operational experience in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1977-01-01

    In the UK there are 26 Magnox reactors and 4 AGRs operating on 11 licensed sites; a further 6 AGRs are under construction on 2 additional and one of the existing sites. The arrangements by which the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive, carries out its regulatory functions at operating nuclear power plants are described. The range of activities undertaken is described with special reference being made to the biennial shutdowns for approved maintenance and inspections which are required by conditions attached to the site licence. The other means by which the continuing safety of these power reactors is assured are explained and include the relationship with the licensee's own Nuclear Safety Committee, approved arrangements for modifications to plant systems or components which have importance for safety and long term reviews of safety aspects. (author)

  3. Operating experience feedback report - Air systems problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1987-12-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential failures of safety-related systems in U.S. plants that resulted from degraded or malfunctioning non-safety grade air systems. Based upon the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) concludes that the issue of air systems problems is an important one which requires additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for corrective actions to deal with the issue. (author)

  4. Operating experience with KRAFTWERK UNION cementation line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podmaka, L.; Tomik, L.

    1988-01-01

    A facility is described designed for fixation in a cement matrix of the radioactive concentrate produced by thickening waste water from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. The cementation line output is 0.6 m 3 concentrate/h. The concentrate is put in 200 l drums. The individual operating units, cement management, air conditioning, dosimetric monitoring and the building part are described. The requirements for the operators and the assessment of the quality of raw materials and the product are discussed. (M.D.). 3 figs., 4 refs

  5. Management quality in spanish nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez de Zabalza Ramos, F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reasons that lead nuclear power plants to require engineering support that is not usual in other types of industrial installations, namely the complexity of the plant and the economic consequences of a possible shutdown. At the time of unit startup, the need to use the services of experienced engineers for the technical support of nuclear power plants induced plant owners to turn to the engineering companies which had participated in the design of the plants. The paper lists the wide range of plant support services which these engineering companies can provide, both from their central offices and on site, especially in the field of change orders and documentation update. The paper also describes the satisfactory development of management parameters in Spanish nuclear power plants both in terms of load factor and comparison of operating and maintenance costs, and how engineering companies have contributed to this achievement, by reducing costs with no loss in the technical quality of their services. Finally, the paper describes how the engineering companies have had to adapt to a shrinking market without losing quality and how they achieved this by diversifying their services. In this context there are two areas of concern. the first area of concern is the competition from certain companies with oversized staff, who attempt to employ them in operation support for nuclear power stations, a field which does not correspond to the training and background of said staff. This could lead to a loss of quality or economic efficiency of nuclear power plants, whose operation up to now has proven satisfactory. The second area of concern is the operator's tendency to use their own resources for engineering support, making more difficult the renewal of human resources and thus leading to a decrease in productivity, and in the transfer of practical and theoretical experience from one plant to another, as well as in the transmission of the latest know

  6. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brey, H. L.

    1988-08-15

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs.

  7. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Interactive videodisc training for power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, R.; Nolan, J.; Campos, M.; Haukom, R.; Quentin, G.

    1990-01-01

    During the last several years, professionals in the personal computer and video fields have seen their two technologies coming together. This merging has created a new medium called multimedia. Multimedia provides the user with the interactivity of the personal computer and the realism of live-action television. It appears to be a perfect marriage for education, training and selling applications. As multimedia productions continue to be produced and tested with high marks, business and industry are becoming interested. The Interactive Videodisc Trainer (IVT) is a demonstration of how multimedia technology can be used by the electric power industry for operator training. Although the subject for this pilot program is the Claus sulfur recovery unit at the Cool Water Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant, similar courseware can be put to use for training at any type of power plant. The goal is to show many of the features and capabilities inherent in this powerful new training tool, so that utilities can begin to see how it could work for them

  9. Data analysis method for plant experience feedback data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ployart, R.; Lannoy, A.

    1988-01-01

    French pressurized water reactors (PWRs) represent at the moment about fifty units, among which the oldest have been in operation for ten years. Furthermore, these PWRs developed according to a growth strategy of standardized plants and with a single plant operator are quite homogeneous in their design as well as in their operating and maintenance procedures. Lastly, the improvements brought about are usually passed on to the whole of the concerned standardized plant. In this context, the operating plant experience feedback data banks hold valuable information that starts being statistically significant. The reliability oriented methods are rather well known; the ones that enable to read out some information on performance and availability, susceptible to guide the plant operator in the decision making are less tested. It concerns changes of operating or maintenance procedure, or technical changes which could be decided from an assessment of the effects of previous changes, or by observing and explaining a posteriori natural evolutions in the behaviour of components. The method used within the framework of this report leads to reveal and explain singularities, correlations, regroupings and trends in the behaviour of the french PWRs

  10. Operating nuclear plant feedback to ASME and French codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journet, J.; O'Donnell, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    The French have an advantage in nuclear plant operating experience feedback due to the highly centralized nature of their nuclear industry. There is only one utility in charge of design as well as operations (EDF) and only one reactor vendor (Framatome). The ASME Code has played a key role in resolving technical issues in the design and operation of nuclear plants since the inception of nuclear power. The committee structure of the Code brings an ideal combination of senior technical people with both broad and specialized experience to bear on complex how safe is safe enough technical issues. The authors now see an even greater role for the ASME Code in a proposed new regulatory era for the US nuclear industry. The current legalistic confrontational regulatory era has been quite destructive. There now appears to be a real opportunity to begin a new era of technical consensus as the primary means for resolving safety issues. This change can quickly be brought about by having the industry take operating plant problems and regulatory technical issues directly to the ASME Code for timely resolution. Surprisingly, there is no institution in the US nuclear industry with such a mandate. In fact, the industry is organized to feedback through the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues which could be far better resolved through the ASME Code. Major regulatory benefits can be achieved by closing this loop and providing systematic interaction with the ASME Code. The essential elements of a new regulatory era and ideas for organizing US institutional industry responsibilities, taken from the French experience, are described in this paper

  11. The N4 plant: culmination of French PWR experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellet, J.; Houyez, A.; Journet, J.; Pierrard, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The model N4 series of 1400MWe class PWR plants has been developed in France from a unique base of technical and operating experience. It meets the French government's requirement for a reactor free of constraints due to licensing agreements with overseas companies, with enhanced safety features and incorporating the lessons of Three Mile Island. In particular, improvements have been made to the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the primary pumps and control systems. The units are capable of daily load following and extended operation between refuelling. The N4 plant includes a new design of turbine-generator. (author)

  12. Steam generator assessment for sustainable power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, Andreas; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Montaner-Garcia, Violeta

    2012-09-01

    Water and steam serve in the water-steam cycle as the energy transport and work media. These fluids shall not affect, through corrosion processes on the construction materials and their consequences, undisturbed plant operation. The main objectives of the steam water cycle chemistry consequently are: - The metal release rates of the structural materials shall be minimal - The probability of selective / localized forms of corrosion shall be minimal. - The deposition of corrosion products on heat transfer surfaces shall be minimized. - The formation of aggressive media, particularly local aggressive environments under deposits, shall be avoided. These objectives are especially important for the steam generators (SGs) because their condition is a key factor for plant performance, high plant availability, life time extension and is important to NPP safety. The major opponent to that is corrosion and fouling of the heating tubes. Effective ways of counteracting all degradation problems and thus of improving the SG performance are to keep SGs in clean conditions or if necessary to plan cleaning measures such as mechanical tube sheet lancing or chemical cleaning. Based on more than 40 years of experience in steam-water cycle water chemistry treatment AREVA developed an overall methodology assessing the steam generator cleanliness condition by evaluating all available operational and inspection data together. In order to gain a complete picture all relevant water chemistry data (e.g. corrosion product mass balances, impurity ingress), inspection data (e.g. visual inspections and tube sheet lancing results) and thermal performance data (e.g. heat transfer calculations) are evaluated, structured and indexed using the AREVA Fouling Index Tool Box. This Fouling Index Tool Box is more than a database or statistical approach for assessment of plant chemistry data. Furthermore the AREVA's approach combines manufacturer's experience with plant data and operates with an

  13. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  14. LOFT instrumented fuel design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A summary description of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) system instrumented core construction details and operating experience through reactor startup and loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) operations performed to date are discussed. The discussion includes details of the test instrumentation attachment to the fuel assembly, the structural response of the fuel modules to the forces generated by a double-ended break of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant pipe at the inlet to the reactor vessel, the durability of the LOFT fuel and test instrumentation, and the plans for incorporation of improved fuel assembly test instrumentation features in the LOFT core

  15. Experience on operational safety improvement of control and operation support systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, N.; Nakagawa, T.; Mano, K.

    1988-01-01

    Japanese nuclear industry started in 1956 and about 30 years have passed since that time. Through these years, we have made a lot of efforts and developments in the field of Control and Instrumentation (C and I) system. The above 30 years and following years can be divided into four major periods. The first one is the period of research, the second of domestic production, the third of improvement, and the fourth of advancement. Improvements of C and I system, which we have made in those periods have made a great contribution to enhancement of reliability, availability and operability of nuclear power plants. Fig. 1 shows TEPCO's nuclear power plant (BWR) construction experience and technical trend of C and I system in Japan. This paper is to introduce the efforts and operational experience on control and operation support systems

  16. STMI: several years of experience in nuclear plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1977, when STMI performed its first dismantling operation, the Company appreciably improved in that field through important operations: the dismantling of the calciothermy and fluoration metal Pu preparation facility, in La Hague reprocessing plant; the dismantling of the slag treatment chain, associated to calciothermy and fluoration processes, in La Hague reprocessing plant; and the cleaning of EL4 cell in Marcoule. To perform these operations, STMI's operating teams, on top of decontamination and dismantling technologies, strived to improve handling and transportation technologies, and to nuclearize many equipments. In order to increase its technical efficiency, STMI signed a cooperation agreement with FRAMATOME company. Therefore, the union between the operational know-hows of STMI and the design experience of TECHNICATOME allow the needs of any customs facing a dismantling case to be satisfied [fr

  17. Review and updates of the risk assessment for advanced test reactor operations for operating events and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Annual or biannual reviews of the operating history of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been conducted for the purpose of reviewing and updating the ATR probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for operating events and operating experience since the first compilation of plant- specific experience data for the ATR PSA which included data for operation from initial power operation in 1969 through 1988. This technical paper briefly discusses the means and some results of these periodic reviews of operating experience and their influence on the ATR PSA

  18. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  19. Operator training for the Yacyreta binational hydroelectric power plant; Formacion de operadores para la Central Hidroelectrica de Yacireta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dure, Francisco; Tachella, Heriberto [Entidad Binacional Yacyreta, Isla Yacireta (Paraguay). Central Hidroelectrica Yacyreta]. E-mail: yacyreta@internet.siscotel.com

    1998-07-01

    This work is oriented to the power plant operators, by exposing the criteria and methods adopted for operators selection, training and incorporation to the Yacyreta Hydroelectric Power Plant. The used criteria considered some aspects, as follows: the operation staff should be consisted of equal numbers of Argentine and Paraguayan nationalities, viewing the both systems operation; experience of the shift supervisors in operating a plant for a minimum of 10 years; the supervisors should participate training the auxiliary operators.

  20. Operating Experiences of a Loss of Voltage Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Loss of voltage (LOV) events continue to occur due to inadequate work management and random human errors. On February 26, 2015, regulators analyzed the root causes of LOV events and presented the results for the nuclear industry. Currently, KHNP uses a risk monitoring program, which is named 'LOV Monitor', for LOV prevention during pilot plant outages. This review introduces the operation experiences of LOV Monitor based on the evaluation results of a real event. The operation experiences of LOV Monitor in the pilot plants confirmed that this program could detect and reduce LOV possibilities from scheduling errors such as the simultaneous maintenance of energized trains and de-energized trains considering the physical conditions of the power circuit breakers. However, a maintenance culture that heeds the risk monitoring result must be strengthened in order to obtain substantial effects through applying LOV Monitor to the outage.