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Sample records for plant nitrogen concentration

  1. Cross-site comparison of herbivore impact on nitrogen availability in grasslands: the role of plant nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.S.; Knops, J.M.H.; Milchunas, D.G.; Ritchie, M.E.; Olff, H.

    2009-01-01

    Herbivores may influence the nitrogen (N) recycling rates and consequently increase or decrease the productivity of grasslands. Plant N concentration emerged as a critical parameter to explain herbivore effects from several conceptual models, which predict that herbivores decrease soil N availabilit

  2. Nitrogen concentration in dry matter of the fifth leaf during growth of greenhouse tomato plants

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    Rattin Jorge E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen concentration in dry matter of the fifth leaf during growth of a greenhouse tomato crop was determined. Plants of hybrid Monte Carlo were grown in 4.5 L bags, using a commercial substrate, in a plant density of 3.3 plants m-2. A nutrient solution containing, in mmol L-1: KNO3, 4.0; K2SO4, 0.9; Ca(NO32, 3.75; KH2PO4, 1.5; MgSO4, 1.0; iron chelate 19. 10³, was used as reference. Microelements were added by a commercial mixture. The T3 treatment was equal to the reference nutrient solution, whereas in treatments T1, T2, T4 and T5 quantities of all nutrients from T3 were multiplied by 0.25, 0.50, 1.25 and 1.50, respectively. In each treatment, the volume of 1 L of nutrient solution was supplied to each plant once a week by fertigation. Periodically destructive measurements were made from anthesis to ripening of the first truss, to determine dry matter and N concentration in shoot and in fifth leaf tissues, counted from the apex to the bottom of the plant. Five dilution curves were fitted from data of N concentration in the fifth leaf and shoot dry matter accumulation during growth of plants. A general relationship was adjusted between actual N concentration in shoot (Nt and in the fifth leaf (Nf: Nt = 1.287 Nf (R² = 0.80. This relationship could be used to estimate the N status of plants by means of a nitrogen nutrition index (NNI, from analysis of the fifth leaf sap.

  3. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

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    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  4. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  5. Carbohydrates Concentration in leaves of potato plants affected by nitrogen fertilization rates

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    Heder Braun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT At poor conditions of nitrogen (N in the soil, potato plants may accumulate starch in leaves and be indicative of N nutritional stress. The objective of this work was to determine the effects of N rates (0, 50, 100, 200 and 300 kg ha-1 of N on the concentrations of carbohydrates (total soluble sugars-TSS, reducing sugars-RS, non-reducing sugars-NRS and starch in the fourth leaf (FL of two potato cultivars (Asterix and Atlantic and their critical levels (CL associated to the N fertilization rate necessary to obtain the maximum physical (MPE and economic (MEE efficiency of tubers. A randomized block design with four replications was used in both experiments. On day 21 after plant emergence, four FL were collected from four plants. Potatoes plants fertilized with low rates of N accumulated less TSS in leaves than those properly fertilized. The opposite occurred with content of starch. The cultivars showed similar responses to five doses of N in relation to contents of starch and TSS. However, the response to the increase in doses of N for RS, NRS and Starch/NRS is cultivar-specific. The correlations between contents of RS, NRS and Starch/NRS with the starch and TSS were dependent on the potato cultivar.

  6. Assessing plant nitrogen concentration in winter oilseed rape using hyperspectral measurements

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    Li, Lu; Liu, Shishi; Wang, Shanqing; Lu, Jianwei; Li, Lantao; Ma, Yi; Ming, Jin

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to find the optimal vegetation indices (VIs) to remotely estimate plant nitrogen concentration (PNC) in winter oilseed rape across different growth stages. Since remote sensing cannot "sense" N in live leaves, remote estimation of PNC should be based on understanding the relationships between PNC and chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid concentration (Car), Car/Chl, dry mass (DM), and leaf area index (LAI). The experiments with eight nitrogen fertilization treatments were conducted in 2014 to 2015 and 2015 to 2016, and measurements were acquired at six-leaf, eight-leaf, and ten-leaf stages. We found that at each stage, Chl, Car, DM, and LAI were all strongly related to PNC. However, across different growth stages, semipartial correlation and linear regression analysis showed that Chl and Car had consistently significant relationships with PNC, whereas LAI and DM were either weakly or barely correlated with PNC. Therefore, the most suitable VIs should be sensitive to the change in Chl and Car while insensitive to the change in DM. We found that anthocyanin reflectance index and the simple ratio of the red band to blue band fit the requirements. The validation with the 2015 to 2016 dataset showed that the selected VIs could provide accurate estimates of PNC in winter oilseed rape.

  7. Needle longevity, photosynthetic rate and nitrogen concentration of eight spruce taxa planted in northern Japan.

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    Kayama, Masazumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Wang, Wenjie; Choi, Dongsu; Koike, Takayoshi

    2007-11-01

    Growth characteristics of Picea glehnii Masters, P. jezoensis (Sieb. et Zucc) Carr., P. jezoensis var. hondoensis (Mayr) Rehder and P. shirasawae Hayashi from Japan, P. abies (L.) Karst. from Europe and P. glauca Voss, P. mariana Britt., Sterns and Pogg. and P. rubens Sarg. from North America were compared. The trees were grown in similar conditions at the Tomakomai Experimental Forest of Hokkaido University in northern Japan. Tree growth, needle biomass, longevity, photosynthetic rate, nitrogen concentration and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured, and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency was calculated. Picea jezoensis, P. jezoensis var. hondoensis, P. abies and P. glauca had high growth rates, high photosynthetic rates in young needles, high needle nitrogen concentrations and short needle life spans. In contrast, P. glehnii, P. shirasawae, P. mariana and P. rubens had low growth and photosynthetic rates, low needle nitrogen concentrations, long needle life spans and maintained a high photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency in older needles. Examination of relationships between several growth parameters of the eight taxa revealed positive correlations between SLA and mass-based photosynthetic rate and between SLA and mass-based nitrogen concentration, whereas mass-based photosynthetic rate and mass-based nitrogen concentration were negatively correlated with needle longevity. The species differed greatly in growth characteristics despite being grown in similar conditions.

  8. LEAF TOTAL NITROGEN CONCENTRATION AS AN INDICATOR OF NITROGEN STATUS FOR PLANTLETS AND YOUNG PLANTS OF EUCALYPTUS CLONES

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    Eric Victor de Oliveira Ferreira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of leaf total nitrogen concentration as an indicator for nutritional diagnosis has some limitations. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability of total N concentration as an indicator of N status for eucalyptus clones, and to compare it with alternative indicators. A greenhouse experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design in a 2 × 6 factorial arrangement with plantlets of two eucalyptus clones (140 days old and six levels of N in the nutrient solution. In addition, a field experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design in a 2 × 2 × 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, consisting of two seasons, two regions, two young clones (approximately two years old, and three positions of crown leaf sampling. The field areas (regions had contrasting soil physical and chemical properties, and their soil contents for total N, NH+4-N, and NO−3-N were determined in five soil layers, up to a depth of 1.0 m. We evaluated the following indicators of plant N status in roots and leaves: contents of total N, NH+4-N, NO−3-N, and chlorophyll; N/P ratio; and chlorophyll meter readings on the leaves. Ammonium (root and NO−3-N (root and leaf efficiently predicted N requirements for eucalyptus plantlets in the greenhouse. Similarly, leaf N/P, chlorophyll values, and chlorophyll meter readings provided good results in the greenhouse. However, leaf N/P did not reflect the soil N status, and the use of the chlorophyll meter could not be generalized for different genotypes. Leaf total N concentration is not an ideal indicator, but it and the chlorophyll levels best represent the soil N status for young eucalyptus clones under field conditions.

  9. Enhanced Removal of Biogenic Hydrocarbons in Power Plant Plumes Constrains the Dependence of Atmospheric Hydroxyl Concentrations on Nitrogen Oxides

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    De Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S. W.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Wolfe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the atmosphere provide one of the main chemical mechanisms for the removal of trace gases. OH plays a central role in determining the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing of greenhouse gases like methane. OH also plays a major role in the oxidation of organic trace gases, which can lead to formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and PM2.5. Due to its very short atmospheric lifetime of seconds or less, OH concentrations are extremely variable in space and time, which makes measurements and their interpretation very challenging. Several recent measurements have yielded higher than expected OH concentrations. To explain these would require the existence of unidentified, radical recycling processes, but issues with the measurements themselves are also still being discussed. During the NOAA airborne SENEX study in the Southeast U.S., the biogenic hydrocarbons isoprene and monoterpenes were consistently found to have lower mixing ratios in air masses with enhanced nitrogen oxides from power plants. We attribute this to faster oxidation rates of biogenic hydrocarbons due to increased concentrations of OH in the power plant plumes. Measurements at different downwind distances from the Scherer and Harllee Branch coal-fired power plants near Atlanta are used to constrain the dependence of OH on nitrogen oxides. It is found that OH concentrations were highest at nitrogen dioxide concentrations of 1-2 ppbv and decreased at higher and at lower concentrations. These findings agree with the expected dependence of OH on nitrogen oxide concentrations, but do not appear to be consistent with the reports in the literature that have shown high OH concentrations in regions of the atmosphere with high biogenic emissions and low NOx concentrations that would require unidentified radical recycling processes to be explained.

  10. Cross-site comparison of herbivore impact on nitrogen availability in grasslands : the role of plant nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E. S.; Knops, J. M. H.; Milchunas, D. G.; Ritchie, M. E.; Olff, H.; Boutin, Stan

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether there is a relationship between plant N concentration and herbivore impact on soil N availability (measured with resin bags) with a study of replicate 6-8 year old exclosures (with an unfenced control) of vertebrate herbivores (> 1 kg) established at each of seven grassland sites i

  11. Plant nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in residential lawns across seven US cities.

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    Trammell, T L E; Pataki, D E; Cavender-Bares, J; Groffman, P M; Hall, S J; Heffernan, J B; Hobbie, S E; Morse, J L; Neill, C; Nelson, K C

    2016-05-01

    Human drivers are often proposed to be stronger than biophysical drivers in influencing ecosystem structure and function in highly urbanized areas. In residential land cover, private yards are influenced by individual homeowner preferences and actions while also experiencing large-scale human and biophysical drivers. We studied plant nitrogen (%N) and N stable isotopic composition (δ(15)N) in residential yards and paired native ecosystems in seven cities across the US that span major ecological biomes and climatic regions: Baltimore, Boston, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, and Salt Lake City. We found that residential lawns in three cities had enriched plant δ(15)N (P < 0.03) and in six cities higher plant N (%) relative to the associated native ecosystems (P < 0.05). Plant δ(15)N was progressively depleted across a gradient of urban density classes in Baltimore and Boston (P < 0.05). Lawn fertilization was associated with depleted plant δ(15)N in Boston and Los Angeles (P < 0.05), and organic fertilizer additions were associated with enriched plant δ(15)N in Los Angeles and Salt Lake City (P < 0.04). Plant δ(15)N was significantly enriched as a function of housing age in Baltimore (r (2) = 0.27, P < 0.02), Boston (r (2) = 0.27, P < 0.01), and Los Angeles (r (2) = 0.34, P < 0.01). These patterns in plant δ(15)N and plant N (%) across these cities suggests that N sources to lawns, as well as greater rates of N cycling combined with subsequent N losses, may be important drivers of plant N dynamics in lawn ecosystems at the national scale.

  12. Growth responses of plants to various concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. [Helianthus annuus L. ; Zea mays L

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    Okano, K.; Totsuka, T.; Fukuzawa, T.; Tazaki, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sunflower Helianthus annuus L. and maize Zea mays L. plants in the vegetative phase were exposed to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at 0.0 (control), 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 ppm ( l liter ) for 2 weeks. The growth responses of the plants to NO2 were examined by the techniques of growth analysis. The sunflower plant was more susceptible to NO2 than the maize plant. Exposure to NO2 at 0.2 ppm slightly stimulated the growth of the sunflower plants. The net assimilation rate (NAR) was also significantly increased when the plants were exposed to 0.2 ppm NO2. Exposures to NO2 at 0.5 or more significantly reduced the dry weight of the sunflower plant. Of the component parts, the roots and stems were severely affected, while the leaves were less affected. This resulted in an elevated shoot/root ratio. The net assimilation rate of both species was reduced by the exposures to NO2 at 0.5 ppm or more, while, in contrast, the leaf area ratio (LAR) was increased. The relative growth rate (RGR), the product of the NAR and the LAR, was therefore less affected by NO2. The increase in the LAR was overwhelmingly the result of an increase in the leaf weight ratio (LWR). These results imply that a reduction in photosynthetic efficiency induced by NO2 could be, in part, compensated for by an increase in assimilatory area, suggesting an adaptive growth response of the plants to air pollutant stresses.

  13. Influence of Cropping System Intensity on Dry Matter Yield and Nitrogen Concentration in Different Parts of Soybean Plant

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    Klaudija Carović

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-year investigations were conducted within the three-year maize-soybean-wheat crop rotation with the aim to assess the influence of two cropping systems, conditionally marked as high-input and reduced-input systems, on soybean dry matter yield and nitrogen concentration in its different plant parts. The high-input system was characterized by: ploughing at 30-32 cm, fertilization with 80 kg N and 130 P2O5 and K2O kg ha-1, weed control based on oxasulfuron and, if required, a corrective treatment with propachizafop and bentazone. The reduced-input system involved: ploughing at 20-22 cm, fertilization with a total of 40 kg N and 130 kg P2O5 and K2O kg ha-1, and only oxasulfuron-based weed control. Investigations involved two soybean genotypes: L 940596 and L 910631, vegetation group I. An identical monofactorial trial with four replications was set up in each cropping system. Cropping system intensity had a positive effect on leaf and stem dry matter mass in 2002, and on leaf and stem nitrogen concentration, whereas it had no effect on pod dry matter, seed yield and seed nitrogen concentrations in either year. The highest leaf dry matter was recorded in R4 development stage and that of stem and pod without seeds in R7 development stage. In both trial years, the highest nitrogen concentrations in leaf and stem were recorded in R1 development stage. In both trial years, higher pod nitrogen concentration was achieved in R4 development stage than in the R7 stage.

  14. Changes in the salinity tolerance of sweet pepper plants as affected by nitrogen form and high CO2 concentration.

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    Piñero, María C; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    The assimilation and availability of nitrogen in its different forms can significantly affect the response of primary productivity under the current atmospheric alteration and soil degradation. An elevated CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) triggers changes in the efficiency and efficacy of photosynthetic processes, water use and product yield, the plant response to stress being altered with respect to ambient CO2 conditions (a[CO2]). Additionally, NH4(+) has been related to improved plant responses to stress, considering both energy efficiency in N-assimilation and the overcoming of the inhibition of photorespiration at e[CO2]. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the response of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) receiving an additional supply of NH4(+) (90/10 NO3(-)/NH4(+)) to salinity stress (60mM NaCl) under a[CO2] (400μmolmol(-1)) or e[CO2] (800μmolmol(-1)). Salt-stressed plants grown at e[CO2] showed DW accumulation similar to that of the non-stressed plants at a[CO2]. The supply of NH4(+) reduced growth at e[CO2] when salinity was imposed. Moreover, NH4(+) differentially affected the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency and the leaf Cl(-), K(+), and Na(+) concentrations, but the extent of the effects was influenced by the [CO2]. An antioxidant-related response was prompted by salinity, the total phenolics and proline concentrations being reduced by NH4(+) at e[CO2]. Our results show that the effect of NH4(+) on plant salinity tolerance should be globally re-evaluated as e[CO2] can significantly alter the response, when compared with previous studies at a[CO2].

  15. Interactions between elevated CO2 concentration, nitrogen and water : effects on growth and water use of six perennial plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arp, W.J.; Mierlo, J.E.M.; Berendse, F.; Snijders, W.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments are described in which plants of six species were grown for one full season in greenhouse compartments with 350 or 560 mol mol1 CO2. In the first experiment two levels of nitrogen supply were applied to study the interaction between CO2 and nitrogen. In the second experiment two leve

  16. THE NITROGEN OXIDE CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE ON HEAT LOSSES WITH EXIT SMOKE GASES OF HEAT-GENERATING PLANTS

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    A. A. Sedaev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. The most significant heat losses are losses associated with exit gases. It is these losses that determine the scale of heat emissions into the plant air with fuel combustion products and reduce the environmental safety of the plant. Many of the derived methods for reducing the nitrogen oxide emission associated with gas purification systems provide a high degree of smoke gas purification, but these methods are based on the use of various chemicals, which sharply reduces their environmental and operational characteristics.Results. The suggested method of simultaneous purification and recycling of gaseous emissions of heat-generating plants differs profitably from the existing ones. Its application will improve tech-nical and economic and also environmental characteristics of heat-generating plants and will make the characteristics of the energy enterprise a closer match to those of waste-free, environmentally-friendly and profitable enterprises.Conclusions. The obtained results confirm the fact that reduction of heat losses with exit gases re-sults in a reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions. Therefore, an increase in environmental safety of a boiler unit can be achieved in tandem with one in heat efficiency.

  17. Influence of atmospheric [CO2] on growth, carbon allocation and cost of plant tissues on leaf nitrogen concentration maintenance in nodulated Medicago sativa

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    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Plant carbon (C) allocation and plant metabolic processes (i.e. photosynthesis and respiration) can be affected by changes in C availability, for example from changing atmospheric [CO2]. In nodulated plants, C availability may also influence nitrogen (N) fixation by bacteriods. But C allocation and N fixation are often studied independently and hence do not allow elucidating interactive effects. We investigated how different atmospheric [CO2] (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence plant growth, allocation to nodules, and the ratio of photosynthesis-to-respiration (R:A) as an indicator of C cost in Medicago sativa inoculated with Ensifer meliloti. M. sativa grew c. 38% more nodules at 400 ppm and 700 ppm than at 170 ppm. However, ratios of above- and belowground plant biomass to nodule biomass were constant over time and independent of atmospheric [CO2]. Total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations were not significantly different between plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, but were four to five-fold higher than in 170 ppm plants. Leaf level N concentration was similar across treatments, but N-based photosynthetic rates were 82% and 93% higher in leaves of plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, respectively, than plants grown at 170 ppm. In addition, leaf R:A was greater (48% or 55%) in plants grown at 170 ppm than plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm. Similarly, the greatest proportion of assimilated CO2 released by root respiration occurred in rhizobial plants growing at 170 ppm. Our results suggest that C limitation in nodulated Medicago sativa plants did not influence C allocation to nodule biomass but caused a proportionally greater allocation of C to belowground respiration, most likely to bacteriods. This suggests that N tissue concentration was maintained at low [CO2] by revving up bacteriod metabolism and at the expense of non-structural carbohydrate reserves.

  18. Seeds with high molybdenum concentration improved growth and nitrogen acquisition of rhizobium-inoculated and nitrogen-fertilized common bean plants

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    Fernanda Fátima Delgado Almeida

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris with high molybdenum (Mo concentration can supply Mo plant demands, but to date no studies have concomitantly evaluated the effects of Mo-enriched seeds on plants inoculated with rhizobia or treated with N fertilizer. This work evaluated the effects of seed Mo on growth and N acquisition of bean plants fertilized either by symbiotic N or mineral N, by measuring the activities of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase and the contribution of biological N2 fixation at different growth stages. Seeds enriched or not with Mo were sown with two N sources (inoculated with rhizobia or fertilized with N, in pots with 10 kg of soil. In experiment 1, an additional treatment consisted of Mo-enriched seeds with Mo applied to the soil. In experiment 2, the contribution of N2 fixation was estimated by 15N isotope dilution. Common bean plants grown from seeds with high Mo concentration flowered one day earlier. Seeds with high Mo concentration increased the leaf area, shoot mass and N accumulation, with both N sources. The absence of effects of Mo application to the soil indicated that Mo contents of Mo-enriched seeds were sufficient for plant growth. Seeds enriched with Mo increased nitrogenase activity at the vegetative stage of inoculated plants, and nitrate reductase activity at late growth stages with both N sources. The contribution of N2 fixation was 17 and 61 % in plants originating from low- or high-Mo seeds, respectively. The results demonstrate the benefits of sowing Mo-enriched seeds on growth and N nutrition of bean plants inoculated with rhizobia or fertilized with mineral N fertilizer.

  19. Why are Nitrogen Concentrations in Plant Tissues Lower under Elevated CO2? A Critical Examination of the Hypotheses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel R. Taub; Xianzhong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Plants grown under elevated atmospheric [CO2] typically have decreased tissue concentrations of N compared with plants grown under current ambient [CO2]. The physiological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon have not been definitely established, although a considerable number of hypotheses have been advanced to account for it. In this review we discuss and critically evaluate these hypotheses. One contributing factor to the decreases in tissue N concentrations clearly is dilution of N by increased photosynthetic assimilation of C. In addition, studies on intact plants show strong evidence for a general decrease in the specific uptake rates (uptake per unit mass or length of root) of N by roots under elevated CO2. This decreased root uptake appears likely to be the result both of decreased N demand by shoots and of decreased ability of the soil-root system to supply N. The best-supported mechanism for decreased N supply is a decrease in transpiration-driven mass flow of N in soils due to decreased stomatal conductance at elevated CO2, although some evidence suggests that altered root system architecture may also play a role. There is also limited evidence suggesting that under elevated CO2, plants may exhibit increased rates of N loss through volatilization and/or root exudation, further contributing to lowering tissue N concentrations.

  20. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

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    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-07-31

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  1. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants

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    Michael J. Bidochka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  2. Increasing CO[sub 2] from glacial to present concentrations alters nitrogen and water requirements of C[sub 3] plants

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    Wayne, P.H.; Johnson, H.B.; Mayeux, H.S. (USDA-ARS, Temple, TX (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Nitrogen and water use efficiencies were measured for three C[sub 3] species, annual grasses Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and Triticum aestivum (wheat; two cultivars) and a woody perennial Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite), grown at daytime CO[sub 2] concentrations that spanned glacial to present atmospheric levels. Changes in nitrogen and water use efficiencies were used to investigate effects of increasing [CO[sub 2

  3. The inhibition and adaptability of four wetland plant species to high concentration of ammonia wastewater and nitrogen removal efficiency in constructed wetlands.

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    Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Junfeng; Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Song, Xinshan; Gong, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Four plant species, Typha orientalis, Scirpus validus, Canna indica and Iris tectorum were selected to assess their physiological response and effects on nitrogen and COD removal to high total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) in constructed wetlands. Results showed that high TAN caused decreased relative growth rate, net photosynthetic rate, and leaf transpiration. C. indica and T. orientalis showed higher TAN adaptability than S. validus and I. tectorum. Below TAN of 200 mg L(-1), growth of C. indica and T. orientalis was less affected or even stimulated at TAN range 100-200 mg L(-1). However, S. validus and I. tectorum was obviously suppressed when TAN was above 100 mg L(-1). High TAN generated obvious oxidative stress showing increased proline and malondialdehyde contents, and superoxide dismutase was inhibited. It indicated that the threshold for plant self-bioremediation against high TAN was 200 mg L(-1). What's more, planted CWs showed higher nitrogen and COD removal. Removal rate of C. indica and T. orientalis was higher than S. validus and I. tectorum.

  4. Can the foliar nitrogen concentration of upland vegetation be used for predicting atmospheric nitrogen deposition? Evidence from field surveys.

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    Hicks, W K; Leith, I D; Woodin, S J; Fowler, D

    2000-03-01

    The deposition of atmospheric nitrogen can be enhanced at high altitude sites as a consequence of cloud droplet deposition and orographic enhancement of wet deposition on hills. The degree to which the increased deposition of nitrogen influences foliar nitrogen concentration in a range of upland plant species was studied in a series of field surveys in northern Britain. A range of upland plant species sampled along altitudinal transects at sites of known atmospheric nitrogen deposition showed marked increases in foliar nitrogen concentration with increasing nitrogen deposition and altitude (and hence with decreasing temperature). For Nardus stricta L., Deschampsia flexuosa (L.) Trin., Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull, Erica cinerea L. and Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) Br. Eur. on an unpolluted hill, foliar nitrogen increased by 0.07, 0.12, 0.15, 0.08 and 0.04% dry weight respectively for each 1 kg ha(-1) year(-1) increase in nitrogen deposition. Most species showed an approximately linear relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration and altitude but no trend with altitude for foliar phosphorus concentration. This provided evidence that the tissue nutrient status of upland plants reflects nutrient availability rather than the direct effects of climate on growth. However, differences in the relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration and atmospheric nitrogen deposition for N. stricta sampled on hills in contrasting pollution climates show that the possibility of temperature-mediated growth effects on foliar nitrogen concentration should not be ignored. Thus, there is potential to use upland plant species as biomonitors of nitrogen deposition, but the response of different species to nitrogen addition, in combination with climatic effects on growth, must be well characterised.

  5. Concentration of nitrogen molecules needed by nitrogen nanobubbles existing in bulk water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萌; 涂育松; 方海平

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the stability of nitrogen nanobubbles under dif-ferent concentrations of nitrogen molecules by molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the stability of nanobubbles is very sensitive to the concentration of nitrogen molecules in water. A sharp transition between disperse states and assemble states of nitrogen molecules is observed when the concentration of nitrogen molecules is changed. The relevant critical concentration of nitrogen molecules needed by the existing nitrogen nanobubbles is analyzed.

  6. Study of Nitrogen Concentration in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Kong, Hai-Kuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Xin, Jun; Shi, Er-Wei; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-01

    This work focused on studying the nitrogen concentration ( C N) in SiC. The variations of C N in the synthesis of SiC powder as well as the transport during SiC crystal growth have been investigated for broad ranges of temperature and Ar pressure. Before SiC crystal growth, SiC powders were synthesized from high-purity silicon and carbon powders. The concentrations of nitrogen, free C, and free Si in the as-prepared powders were all measured. C N in the SiC source powder decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing Ar pressure, whereas it did not show a remarkable trend with the molar ratio of free Si to free C. SiC crystal was then grown by the physical vapor transport (PVT) technique using the as-prepared powder. The distribution of C N in the remaining material indirectly indicated the temperature field of crystal growth. In addition, compared with introducing N2 during SiC crystal growth, doping with nitrogen during synthesis of the SiC source powder might be a better method to control C N in SiC crystals.

  7. Nitrogen fertilization affects silicon concentration, cell wall composition and biofuel potential of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murozuka, Emiko; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Lindedam, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential input factor required for plant growth and biomass production. However, very limited information is available on how nitrogen fertilization affects the quality of crop residues to be used as lignocellulosic feedstock. In the present study, straw of winter wheat plants grown...... linearly from 0.32% to 0.71% over the range of nitrogen treatments. Cellulose and hemicellulose were not affected by the nitrogen supply while lignin peaked at medium rates of nitrogen application. The nitrogen treatments had a distinct influence on the silicon concentration, which decreased from 2.5% to 1...... saccharification efficiency was negatively correlated with the rate of nitrogen supply. We conclude that the level of nitrogen supply to wheat plants alters the composition of cell wall components in the straw and that this may result in reduced saccharification efficiency....

  8. Uptake of organic nitrogen by plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgny Nasholm; Knut Kielland; Ulrika. Ganeteg

    2009-01-01

    Languishing for many years in the shadow of plant inorganic nitrogen (N) nutrition research, studies of organic N uptake have attracted increased attention during the last decade. The capacity of plants to acquire organic N, demonstrated in laboratory and field settings, has thereby been well established. Even so, the ecological significance of organic N uptake for...

  9. Nitrogen isotopes link mycorrhizal fungi and plants to nitrogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, Erik A; Högberg, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In this review, we synthesize field and culture studies of the 15N/14N (expressed as δ15N) of autotrophic plants, mycoheterotrophic plants, parasitic plants, soil, and mycorrhizal fungi to assess the major controls of isotopic patterns. One major control for plants and fungi is the partitioning of nitrogen (N) into either 15N-depleted chitin, ammonia, or transfer compounds or 15N-enriched proteinaceous N. For example, parasitic plants and autotrophic hosts are similar in δ15N (with no partitioning between chitin and protein), mycoheterotrophic plants are higher in δ15 N than their fungal hosts, presumably with preferential assimilation of fungal protein, and autotrophic, mycorrhizal plants are lower in 15N than their fungal symbionts, with saprotrophic fungi intermediate, because mycorrhizal fungi transfer 15N-depleted ammonia or amino acids to plants. Similarly, nodules of N2-fixing bacteria transferring ammonia are often higher in δ15N than their plant hosts. N losses via denitrification greatly influence bulk soil δ15N, whereas δ15N patterns within soil profiles are influenced both by vertical patterns of N losses and by N transfers within the soil-plant system. Climate correlates poorly with soil δ15N; climate may primarily influence δ15N patterns in soils and plants by determining the primary loss mechanisms and which types of mycorrhizal fungi and associated vegetation dominate across climatic gradients.

  10. Quality Protein Maize Response to Nitrogen Rate and Plant Density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality Protein Maize Response to Nitrogen Rate and Plant Density in the Guinea Savanna Zone of Ghana. ... protein maize (Zea mays L.) hybrid to plant density and nitrogen (N) fertilizer. ... Optimal N rate was not affected by plant density.

  11. TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL NITROGEN CONCENTRATION IN ROOT ZONE OF MAIZE ( Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mthandi J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N plays an important role in the production of maize. In the absence of N in soils plants shows stunted growth and yellowish leaves and result into reduced crop yield. The study was conducted during two irrigation seasons of 2012 at Nkango Irrigation Scheme, Malawi in a Randomised Complete Block Design (RCBD. The factors were water and nitrogen and both were at four levels . The study inferred that movement, direction and distribution patterns of nitrogen concentration is influenced by evaporation of water from the soil surfaces, pulling effects by plant roots, deep percolation through gravitational force, and ability of plant roots to create environment that is conducive to diffusion of nitrogen. To minimize losses of nitrogen through leachi ng and ensure that nitrogen is deposited within active root zone, plant should not receive water after physiological maturity.

  12. Nitrogen Fixing Legumes in the Plant Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.A. Al-Fredan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems statement: Numerous authors have used energetic to explain the ecological success of N-fixing plants. Legume biodiversity assessment, species dynamics, nitrogen fixation monitoring and environment impact assessment of these ecological events in Al-Hassa Oasis, Saudi Arabia are rare and need to be continuous and more frequent. Approach: Thus the objectives of this study were to analyze legume abundance within and outside Al-Hassa Oasis and relate it to the distribution of the different genera. Results: Thirty two legume plant species from 20 genera have been recorded within and outside the Oasis. The largest genera were Cassia (4 species, Indigofera (4 and Acacia (3. Annual herbs were the dominant growth form (34% of species recorded, followed by shrubs (28%, perennial herbs (19% and trees (19%. Eighteen alien plant species were recorded (maybe an underestimated number. The nitrogen fixation of the legume plant species in Al-Hassa Oasis was estimated/analyzing the fixing potentiality of these species and nonfixing reference species (Panicum turgidum using the 15N natural abundance method. Species with great nitrogen fixing capacity in Al-Hassa include: Medicago sativa, Vicia faba, Vicia sativa, Melitotus indicus, Dolicus lablab, Melitotus alba and Cliforia ternate. The mean biological fixation contribution of most of the recorded legume plants were high, varying from 3.9% (Indigofera argentea to 64.6% (Medicago sativa. Conclusion: Al-Hassa Oasis is richer than expected based on its location within the desert zone. This study confirms the importance of the Oasis for national flora conservation in the Kingdom. results showed a good potential for use of the 15N natural abundance methodology for evaluating the nitrogen fixation ability of the legume plants under field conditions as well as for the estimation of %Ndfa.

  13. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmens, H., E-mail: hh@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Norris, D.A., E-mail: danor@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cooper, D.M., E-mail: cooper@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Mills, G., E-mail: gmi@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Steinnes, E., E-mail: Eiliv.Steinnes@chem.ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kubin, E., E-mail: Eero.Kubin@metla.fi [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kirkkosaarentie 7, 91500 Muhos (Finland); Thoeni, L., E-mail: lotti.thoeni@fub-ag.ch [FUB-Research Group for Environmental Monitoring, Alte Jonastrasse 83, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland); Aboal, J.R., E-mail: jesusramon.aboal@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alber, R., E-mail: Renate.Alber@provinz.bz.it [Environmental Agency of Bolzano, 39055 Laives (Italy); Carballeira, A., E-mail: alejo.carballeira@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Coskun, M., E-mail: coskunafm@yahoo.com [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, 17100 Canakkale (Turkey); De Temmerman, L., E-mail: ludet@var.fgov.be [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Tervuren (Belgium); Frolova, M., E-mail: marina.frolova@lvgma.gov.lv [Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Agency, Riga (Latvia); Gonzalez-Miqueo, L., E-mail: lgonzale2@alumni.unav.es [Univ. of Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations ({>=}1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km x 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r{sup 2} = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. - Highlights: > Nitrogen concentrations in mosses were determined at ca. 3000 sites across Europe. > Moss concentrations were compared with EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition. > The asymptotic relationship for Europe showed saturation at ca. 15 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. > Linear relationships were found with measured nitrogen deposition in some countries. > Moss concentrations complement deposition measurements at high spatial resolution. - Mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

  14. Putative Nitrogen Sensing Systems in Higher Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hon-Ming Lam; Ying Ann Chiao; Man-Wah Li; Yuk-Kwong Yung; Sang Ji

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) metabolism is essential for the biosynthesis of vital biomolecules. N status thus exerts profound effects on plant growth and development, and must be closely monitored. In bacteria and fungi, a few sophisticated N sensing systems have been extensively studied. In animals, the ability to receive amino acid signals has evolved to become an integral part of the nervous coordination system. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in the search for putative N sensing systems in higher plants based on homologous systems in bacteria, fungi, and animals. Apparently, although plants have separated and diversified from other organisms during the evolution process, striking similarities can be found in their N sensing systems compared with those of their counterparts; however, our understanding of these systems is still incomplete. Significant modifications of the N sensing systems (including cross-talk with other signal transduction pathways) in higher plants may be a strategy of adaptation to their unique mode of life.

  15. Global patterns of foliar nitrogen isotopes and their relationships with climate, mycorrhizal fungi, foliar nutrient concentrations, and nitrogen availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craine, J M; Elmore, A J; Aidar, M P M;

    2009-01-01

    Ratios of nitrogen (N) isotopes in leaves could elucidate underlying patterns of N cycling across ecological gradients. To better understand global-scale patterns of N cycling, we compiled data on foliar N isotope ratios (d15N), foliar N concentrations, mycorrhizal type and climate for over 11...... foliar phosphorus (P) concentrations. Together, these results suggest that warm, dry ecosystems have the highest N availability, while plants with high N concentrations, on average, occupy sites with higher N availability than plants with low N concentrations. Global-scale comparisons of other components...

  16. Global patterns of foliar nitrogen isotopes and their relationships with climate, mycorrhizal fungi, foliar nutrient concentrations, and nitrogen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph M. Craine; Andrew J. Elmore; Marcos P. M. Aidar; Mercedes Bustamante; Todd E. Dawson; Erik A. Hobbie; Ansgar Kahmen; Michelle C. Mack; Kendra K. McLauchlan; Anders Michelsen; Gabriela . Nardoto; Linda H. Pardo; Josep Penuelas; Peter B. Reich; Edward A.G. Schuur; William D. Stock; Pamela H. Templer; Ross A. Virginia; Jeffrey M. Welker; Ian J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    Ratios of nitrogen (N) isotopes in leaves could elucidate underlying patterns of N cycling across ecological gradients. To better understand global-scale patterns of N cycling, we compiled data on foliar N isotope ratios, foliar N concentrations, mycorrhizal type and climate for over 11 000 plants worldwide. Global-scale comparisons of other components of the N cycle...

  17. Plant health sensing system for determining nitrogen status in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, J. A.; Sui, Ruixiu; Read, John J.; Reddy, K. R.

    2004-03-01

    A plant health sensing system was developed for determining nitrogen status in plants. The system consists of a multi-spectral optical sensor and a data-acquisition and processing unit. The optical sensor"s light source provides modulated panchromatic illumination of a plant canopy with light-emitting diodes, and the sensor measures spectral reflectance through optical filters that partition the energy into blue, green, red, and near-infrared wavebands. Spectral reflectance of plants is detected in situ, at the four wavebands, in real time. The data-acquisition and processing unit is based on a single board computer that collects data from the multi-spectral sensor and spatial information from a global positioning system receiver. Spectral reflectance at the selected wavebands is analyzed, with algorithms developed during preliminary work, to determine nitrogen status in plants. The plant health sensing system has been tested primarily in the laboratory and field so far, and promising results have been obtained. This article describes the development, theory of operation, and test results of the plant health sensing system.

  18. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  19. Nitrogen Fractions in Arable Soils in Relation to Nitrogen Mineralization and Plant Uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregliani, M.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Hagg, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) as a major constituent of all plants is one of the most important nutrients. Minimizing input of mineral nitrogen fertilizer is needed to avoid harm to the environment. Optimal input of mineral nitrogen should take the nitrogen supply of the soil into account. Many different soil tests

  20. Decade-long soil nitrogen constraint on the CO2 fertilization of plant biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter B.; Hobbie, Sarah E.

    2013-03-01

    The stimulation of plant growth by elevated CO2 concentration has been widely observed. Such fertilization, and associated carbon storage, could dampen future increases in atmospheric CO2 levels and associated climate warming. However, the CO2 fertilization of plant biomass may be sensitive to nitrogen supply. Herein we show that in the latest decade of a long-term perennial grassland experiment, low ambient soil nitrogen availability constrained the positive response of plant biomass to elevated CO2, a result not seen in the first years (1998-2000) of the study. From 2001 to 2010, elevated CO2 stimulated plant biomass half as much under ambient as under enriched nitrogen supply, an effect mirrored over this period by more positive effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen supply (net nitrogen mineralization) and plant nitrogen status under enriched than ambient nitrogen supply. The results did not strongly support either the progressive nitrogen limitation hypothesis, or the alternative hypothesis of priming of soil nitrogen release by elevated CO2. As nitrogen limitation to productivity is widespread, persistent nitrogen constraints on terrestrial responses to rising CO2 are probably pervasive. Further incorporation of such interactions into Earth system models is recommended to better predict future CO2 fertilization effects and impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  1. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydro...

  2. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein conten...

  3. Analysis of hyperspectral field radiometric data for monitoring nitrogen concentration in rice crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroppiana, D.; Boschetti, M.; Confalonieri, R.; Bocchi, S.; Brivio, P. A.

    2005-10-01

    Monitoring crop conditions and assessing nutrition requirements is fundamental for implementing sustainable agriculture. Rational nitrogen fertilization is of particular importance in rice crops in order to guarantee high production levels while minimising the impact on the environment. In fact, the typical flooded condition of rice fields can be a significant source of greenhouse gasses. Information on plant nitrogen concentration can be used, coupled with information about the phenological stage, to plan strategies for a rational and spatially differentiated fertilization schedule. A field experiment was carried out in a rice field Northern Italy, in order to evaluate the potential of field radiometric measurements for the prediction of rice nitrogen concentration. The results indicate that rice reflectance is influenced by nitrogen supply at certain wavelengths although N concentration cannot be accurately predicted based on the reflectance measured at a given wavelength. Regression analysis highlighted that the visible region of the spectrum is most sensitive to plant nitrogen concentration when reflectance measures are combined into a spectral index. An automated procedure allowed the analysis of all the possible combinations into a Normalized Difference Index (NDI) of the narrow spectral bands derived by spectral resampling of field measurements. The derived index appeared to be least influenced by plant biomass and Leaf Area Index (LAI) providing a useful approach to detect rice nutritional status. The validation of the regressive model showed that the model is able to predict rice N concentration (R2=0.55 [p<0.01] RRMSE=29.4; modelling efficiency close to the optimum value).

  4. Formation of unidentified nitrogen in plants: an implication for a novel nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Misa; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Matsubara, Toshiyuki; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Fukunaga, Kazunari; Fujita, Kounosuke; Sakurai, Naoki; Hirata, Toshifumi; Ide, Hiroshi; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Hitomi

    2004-05-01

    Plants take up inorganic nitrogen and store it unchanged or convert it to organic forms. The nitrogen in such organic compounds is stoichiometrically recoverable by the Kjeldahl method. The sum of inorganic nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen has long been known to equal the total nitrogen in plants. However, in our attempt to study the mechanism of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) metabolism, we unexpectedly discovered that about one-third of the total nitrogen derived from (15)N-labeled NO(2) taken up by Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants was converted to neither inorganic nor Kjeldahl nitrogen, but instead to an as yet unknown nitrogen compound(s). We here refer to this nitrogen as unidentified nitrogen ( UN). The generality of the formation of UN across species, nitrogen sources and cultivation environments for plants has been shown as follows. Firstly, all of the other 11 plant species studied were found to form the UN in response to fumigation with (15)NO(2). Secondly, tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants fed with (15)N-nitrate appeared to form the UN. And lastly, the leaves of naturally fed vegetables, grass and roadside trees were found to possess the UN. In addition, the UN appeared to comprise a substantial proportion of total nitrogen in these plant species. Collectively, all of our present findings imply that there is a novel nitrogen mechanism for the formation of UN in plants. Based on the analyses of the exhaust gas and residue fractions of the Kjeldahl digestion of a plant sample containing the UN, probable candidates for compounds that bear the UN were deduced to be those containing the heat-labile nitrogen-oxygen functions and those recalcitrant to Kjeldahl digestion, including organic nitro and nitroso compounds. We propose UN-bearing compounds may provide a chemical basis for the mechanism of the reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and thus that cross-talk may occur between UN and RNS metabolisms in plants. A mechanism for the formation of UN

  5. Interrelated responses of tomato plants and the leaf miner Tuta absoluta to nitrogen supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbat, R; Adamowicz, S; Robin, C; Han, P; Desneux, N; Le Bot, J

    2016-05-01

    Plant-insect interactions are strongly modified by environmental factors. This study evaluates the influence of nitrogen fertilisation on the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cv. Santa clara and the leafminer (Tuta absoluta (Meyrick), Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Greenhouse-grown tomato plants were fed hydroponically on a complete nutrient solution containing either a high nitrogen concentration (HN) sustaining maximum growth or a low nitrogen concentration (LN) limiting plant growth. Insect-free plants were compared with plants attacked by T. absoluta. Seven and 14 days after artificial oviposition leading to efficacious hatching and larvae development, we measured total carbon, nitrogen and soluble protein as well as defence compounds (phenolics, glycoalkaloids, polyphenol oxidase activity) in the HN versus LN plants. Only in the HN treatment did T. absoluta infestation slightly impair leaf growth and induce polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in the foliage. Neither the concentration of phenolic compounds and proteins nor the distribution of nitrogen within the plant was affected by T. absoluta infestation. In contrast, LN nutrition impaired T. absoluta-induced PPO activity. It decreased protein and total nitrogen concentration of plant organs and enhanced the accumulation of constitutive phenolics and tomatine. Moreover, LN nutrition impaired T. absoluta development by notably decreasing pupal weight and lengthening the development period from egg to adult. Adjusting the level of nitrogen nutrition may thus be a means of altering the life cycle of T. absoluta. This study provides a comprehensive dataset concerning interrelated responses of tomato plants and T. absoluta to nitrogen nutrition.

  6. Increasing nitrogen rates in rice and its effect on plant nutrient composition and nitrogen apparent recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Hirzel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is one of the essential foods of the human diet; advances in agronomic crop management can improve productivity and profitability as well as reduce adverse environmental impacts. Nitrogen rates in Chile are generally based on crop yield without considering other agronomic factors. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of increasing N rates on plant nutrient composition and N apparent recovery in rice cultivated in five different locations in Chile. The five sites located in central Chile belong to one of the following soil orders: Inceptisol, Alfisol, and Vertisol; they were cropped in field conditions with 'Zafiro-INIA' rice fertilized with 0, 80, and 160 kg N ha-1. Whole-plant total DM, macronutrient composition, and N apparent recovery efficiency (NARE were determined at grain harvest. Results indicate that all evaluated parameters, with the exception of K concentration, were affected by the soil used. Nitrogen rates only affected total DM production and P, K, and Mg concentrations in plants. Phosphorus and K response decreased when N was added to some soils, which is associated with its chemical properties. Magnesium concentration exhibited an erratic effect, but it was not affected by the N rate in most soils. Nitrogen apparent recovery efficiency was not affected by the N rate and accounted for approximately 49% and 41% for 80 and 160 kg N ha-1, respectively. Macronutrient composition was 5.1-7.7 g N, 1.3-1.8 g P, 5.4-10.8 g K, 1.68-2.57 g Ca, and 0.81-1.45 g Mg kg-1 of total DM.

  7. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein content in the plants under examination constitutes 18 to 25%o of dry matter. Albumins and glutelins are the most abundant protein fractions.

  8. Effect of Alnus glutinosa on hybrid populus growth and soil nitrogen concentration in a mixed plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey O. Dawson; Edward A. Hansen

    1983-01-01

    Height growth of hybrid Populusand soil nitrogen concentration around Alnus glutinosa stems differed significantly both spatially and with the Alnus/Populus mixture in a short-rotation intensively cultured mixed planting. Populus height growth comparable to that obtained from optimal rates of...

  9. Using plant traits to explain plant-microbe relationships involved in nitrogen acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarel, Amélie A M; Pommier, Thomas; Desclos-Theveniau, Marie; Diquélou, Sylvain; Dumont, Maxime; Grassein, Fabrice; Kastl, Eva-Maria; Grigulis, Karl; Laîné, Philippe; Lavorel, Sandra; Lemauviel-Lavenant, Servane; Personeni, Emmanuelle; Schloter, Michael; Poly, Franck

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that plant species and soil microorganisms. are tightly linked, but understanding how different species vary in their effects on soil is currently limited. In this study, we identified those. plant characteristics (identity, specific functional traits, or resource acquisition strategy) that were the best predictors of nitrification and denitrification processes. Ten plant populations representing eight species collected from three European grassland sites were chosen for their contrasting plant trait values and resource acquisition strategies. For each individual plant, leaf and root traits and the associated potential microbial activities (i.e., potential denitrification rate [DEA], maximal nitrification rate [NEA], and NH4+ affinity of the microbial community [NHScom]) were measured at two fertilization levels under controlled growth conditions. Plant traits were powerful predictors of plant-microbe interactions, but relevant plant traits differed in relation to the microbial function studied. Whereas denitrification was linked to the relative growth rate of plants, nitrification was strongly correlated to root trait characteristics (specific root length, root nitrogen concentration, and plant affinity for NH4+) linked to plant N cycling. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) that commonly serves as an indicator of resource acquisition strategies was not correlated to microbial activity. These results suggest that the LES alone is not a good predictor of microbial activity, whereas root traits appeared critical in understanding plant-microbe interactions.

  10. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH2), and decreases in levels of NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH1), as well as decreases in the levels of mRNA for the amino acid permease-encoding genes GAP1 and PUT4. The governing factor of nitrogen metabolism might be the concentration of ammonia rather than its flux.

  11. Maize plant nitrogen uptake dynamics at limited irrigation water and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Hafiz Mohkum; Farhad, Wajid; Abbas, Farhat; Fahad, Shah; Saeed, Shafqat; Nasim, Wajid; Bakhat, Hafiz Faiq

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the dynamics of plant nitrogen (N) uptake at varying irrigation water levels is critical for strategizing increased N recovery efficiency (NRE), water use efficiency (WUE), and maize yield. The N dynamics were studied under various irrigation regimes to evaluate NRE, WUE, and maize yield. A pot experiment was conducted using three irrigation water regimes (50, 75, and 100% field capacity (FC)) and four N fertilizer rates (0, 1.6, 3.2, and 4.8 g pot(-1)) applied with two fertilizer application methods including foliar and soil applications. The highest plant growth and grain yields were achieved by application of 4.8 g N pot(-1) with 100% FC. Contrarily, the maximum WUE (7.0 g L(-1)) was observed by the lowest irrigation water (50% FC) with the highest N fertilizer rates (4.8 g pot(-1)). Nitrogen concentration in the stem and grain was linearly increased by increasing N fertilizer rates with irrigation water. However, in the root, N concentration was decreased when the crop was supplied with 100% FC. In plant, maximum N uptake (6.5 mg g(-1)) was observed when 4.8 g N pot(-1) was applied with 100% FC. Nitrogen recovery efficiency was increased by increasing N rate up to 3.2 g pot(-1) with 100% FC. Therefore, for achieving maximum WUE and NRE, the highest water and N applications, respectively, are not necessary.

  12. Plant traits related to nitrogen uptake influence plant-microbe competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Delphine; Pivato, Barbara; Bru, David; Busset, Hugues; Deau, Florence; Faivre, Céline; Matejicek, Annick; Strbik, Florence; Philippot, Laurent; Mougel, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Plant species are important drivers of soil microbial communities. However, how plant functional traits are shaping these communities has received less attention though linking plant and microbial traits is crucial for better understanding plant-microbe interactions. Our objective was to determine how plant-microbe interactions were affected by plant traits. Specifically we analyzed how interactions between plant species and microbes involved in nitrogen cycling were affected by plant traits related to 'nitrogen nutrition in interaction with soil nitrogen availability. Eleven plant species, selected along an oligotrophic-nitrophilic gradient, were grown individually in a nitrogen-poor soil with two levels of nitrate availability. Plant traits for both carbon and nitrogen nutrition were measured and the genetic structure and abundance of rhizosphere. microbial communities, in particular the ammonia oxidizer and nitrate reducer guilds, were analyzed. The structure of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere differed significantly between plant species and these differences depended on nitrogen availability. The results suggest that the rate of nitrogen uptake per unit of root biomass and per day is a key plant trait, explaining why the effect of nitrogen availability on the structure of the bacterial community depends on the plant species. We also showed that the abundance of nitrate reducing bacteria always decreased with increasing nitrogen uptake per unit of root biomass per day, indicating that there was competition for nitrate between plants and nitrate reducing bacteria. This study demonstrates that nitrate-reducing microorganisms may be adversely affected by plants with a high nitrogen uptake rate. Our work puts forward the role of traits related to nitrogen in plant-microbe interactions, whereas carbon is commonly considered as the main driver. It also suggests that plant traits related to ecophysiological processes, such as nitrogen uptake rates, are more

  13. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS (SIGMODON HISPIDUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  14. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS (SIGMODON HISPIDUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  15. Modeling grain protein formation in relation to nitrogen uptake and remobilization in rice plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yan; LI Weiguo; JING Qi; CAO Weixing; Takeshi Horie

    2007-01-01

    Protein concentration of grain is an important quality index of rice,and formation of grain protein largely depends on pre-anthesis nitrogen assimilation and postanthesis nitrogen remobilization in the rice plant.The primary objective of this study was to develop a simplified process model for simulating nitrogen accumulation and remobilization in plant and protein formation in rice grains on the basis of an established rice growth model.Six field experiments,involving different years,eco-sites,varieties,nitrogen rates,and irrigation regimes,were conducted to obtain the necessary data for model building,genotypic parameter determination,and model validation.Using physiological development time(PDT)as general time scale of development progress and cultivar-specific grain protein concentration as genotypic parameter,the dynamic relationships of plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation to environmental and genetic factors were quantified and synthesized in the present model.The pre-anthesis nitrogen uptake rate by plant changed with the PDT in a negative exponential pattern,and post-anthesis nitrogen uptake rate changed with leaf area index(LA1)in an exponential equation.Post-antbesis nitrogen translocation rate depended on the plant nitrogen concentration and dry weight at anthesis as well as residue nitrogen concentration of plant at maturity.The nitrogen for protein synthesis in grains came from two sources:the nitrogen pre-stored in leaves,stem and sheath before anthesis and then remobilized after anthesis,and the nitrogen absorbed directly by plant after anthesis.Finally,the model was tested by using the data sets of different years,eco-sites,varieties,and N fertilization and irrigation conditions with the root mean square errors(RMSE)0.22%-0.26%,indicating the general and reliable features of the model.It is hoped that by properly integrating with the existing rice growth models,the present model can be used for predicting grain protein concentration and

  16. Distribution of Leaf Color and Nitrogen Nutrition Diagnosis in Rice Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-hua; CAO Wei-xing; WANG Qiang-sheng; DING Yan-feng; HUANG Pi-sheng; LING Qi-hong

    2002-01-01

    Greenness and nitrogen content of each leaf on main stem of different japonica and indica ricevarieties under different nitrogen levels were investigated. Results showed that the fourth leaf from the top ex-hibited active changes with the change of plant nitrogen status. When the plant nitrogen content was low, itscolor and nitrogen content were obviously lower than those of the three top leaves. With the increase of plantnitrogen content, the color and nitrogen content of the fourth leaf increased quickly, and the differences ofcolor and nitrogen content between the fourth leaf and the three top leaves decreased. So, the fourth leaf wasan ideal indication of plant nutrition status. In addition, color difference between the fourth and the third leaffrom the top was highly related to the plant nitrogen content regardless of the variety and development stage.Therefore, color difference between the fourth and the third leaf could be widely used for diagnosis of plantnutrition. Results also indicated that the minimized color difference between the fourth and the third leaf at the criticaleffective tillering, the emergence of the second leaf from the top, and the heading was the symbol of high yield. Plantnitrogen content of 27 g kg-1 DW for japonica rice and 25 g kg-1 DW for indica were the critical nitrogen concentrations.

  17. The Influence of salinity and nitrogen on tomato fruit quality and micronutrients concentration in hydroponic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Safarzadeh Shirazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinity plays an important role in the reduction of tomato growth, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. Nitrogen (N may increase tomato tolerance to salt stress by increasing plant growth. In order to investigate the interaction effect of salinity and nitrogen on tomato growth, fruit quality, and micronutrient concentration in tomato plants, a hydroponic experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with three replications. Treatments included 3 salinity levels (0, 30 and 60 mM, and 3 nitrogen rates (0, 1.5, and 3 mM. Results indicated that salinity decreased tomato height, shoot and fruit fresh weight, and increased citric acid in tomato fruit and consequently caused blossom-end rot in tomato fruit. However, salinity improved fruit quality (flavor. The use of N increased plant height, shoot, and fruit fresh weight compared to control. By application of N to saline nutrient solution, plant height increased. Salinity increased concentration of iron (Fe, manganese (Mn, zinc (Zn, and copper (Cu in roots, as`well as Fe and Cu in fruit. Increasing N rates in nutrient solution increased micronutrients concentration in tomato roots. Interaction of 60 mM salinity and N decreased micronutrients concentration in root, compared to control. Our tentative conclusion shows that the addition of N to the nutrient solution may decrease detrimental effect of salinity on the growth of tomato plants.

  18. Plant growth enhancement by elevated CO2 eliminated by joint water and nitrogen limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter B.; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Lee, Tali D.

    2014-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations can fertilize plant growth. The resulting increased plant uptake of CO2 could, in turn, slow increases in atmospheric CO2 levels and associated climate warming. CO2 fertilization effects may be enhanced when water availability is low, because elevated CO2 also leads to improved plant water-use efficiency. However, CO2 fertilization effects may be weaker when plant growth is limited by nutrient availability. How variation in soil nutrients and water may act together to influence CO2 fertilization is unresolved. Here we report plant biomass levels from a five-year, open-air experiment in a perennial grassland under two contrasting levels of atmospheric CO2, soil nitrogen and summer rainfall, respectively. We find that the presence of a CO2 fertilization effect depends on the amount of available nitrogen and water. Specifically, elevated CO2 levels led to an increase in plant biomass of more than 33% when summer rainfall, nitrogen supply, or both were at the higher levels (ambient for rainfall and elevated for soil nitrogen). But elevated CO2 concentrations did not increase plant biomass when both rainfall and nitrogen were at their lower level. We conclude that given widespread, simultaneous limitation by water and nutrients, large stimulation of biomass by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not be ubiquitous.

  19. Influence of nitrogen loading and plant nitrogen assimilation on nitrogen leaching and N₂O emission in forage rice paddy fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riya, Shohei; Zhou, Sheng; Kobara, Yuso; Sagehashi, Masaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Livestock wastewater disposal onto rice paddy fields is a cost- and labor-effective way to treat wastewater and cultivate rice crops. We evaluated the influence of nitrogen loading rates on nitrogen assimilation by rice plants and on nitrogen losses (leaching and N2O emission) in forage rice fields receiving liquid cattle waste (LCW). Four forage rice fields were subjected to nitrogen loads of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1) (N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively) using basal fertilizer (chemical fertilizer) (50 kg N ha(-1)) and three LCW topdressings (each 57-284 kg N ha(-1)). Nitrogen assimilated by rice plants increased over time. However, after the third topdressing, the nitrogen content of the biomass did not increase in any treatment. Harvested aboveground biomass contained 93, 60, 33, and 31 % of applied nitrogen in N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. The NH4 (+) concentration in the pore water at a depth of 20 cm was less than 1 mg N L(-1) in N100, N250, and N500 throughout the cultivation period, while the NH4 (+) concentration in N750 increased to 3 mg N L(-1) after the third topdressing. Cumulative N2O emissions ranged from -0.042 to 2.39 kg N ha(-1); the highest value was observed in N750, followed by N500. In N750, N2O emitted during the final drainage accounted for 80 % of cumulative N2O emissions. This study suggested that 100-258 kg N ha(-1) is a recommended nitrogen loading rate for nitrogen recovery by rice plants without negative environmental impacts such as groundwater pollution and N2O emission.

  20. Estimating Canopy Nitrogen Concentration in Sugarcane Using Field Imaging Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Souris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The retrieval of nutrient concentration in sugarcane through hyperspectral remote sensing is widely known to be affected by canopy architecture. The goal of this research was to develop an estimation model that could explain the nitrogen variations in sugarcane with combined cultivars. Reflectance spectra were measured over the sugarcane canopy using a field spectroradiometer. The models were calibrated by a vegetation index and multiple linear regression. The original reflectance was transformed into a First-Derivative Spectrum (FDS and two absorption features. The results indicated that the sensitive spectral wavelengths for quantifying nitrogen content existed mainly in the visible, red edge and far near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Normalized Differential Index (NDI based on FDS(750/700 and Ratio Spectral Index (RVI based on FDS(724/700 are best suited for characterizing the nitrogen concentration. The modified estimation model, generated by the Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR technique from FDS centered at 410, 426, 720, 754, and 1,216 nm, yielded the highest correlation coefficient value of 0.86 and Root Mean Square Error of the Estimate (RMSE value of 0.033%N (n = 90 with nitrogen concentration in sugarcane. The results of this research demonstrated that the estimation model developed by SMLR yielded a higher correlation coefficient with nitrogen content than the model computed by narrow vegetation indices. The strong correlation between measured and estimated nitrogen concentration indicated that the methods proposed in this study could be used for the reliable diagnosis of nitrogen quantity in sugarcane. Finally, the success of the field spectroscopy used for estimating the nutrient quality of sugarcane allowed an additional experiment using the polar orbiting hyperspectral data for the timely determination of crop nutrient status in rangelands without any requirement of prior

  1. Advances in Nitrogen Loss Leached by Precipitation from Plant Canopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shi-qing; JI Chun-rong; FANG Ya-ning; CHEN Xiao-li; LI Sheng-xiu

    2008-01-01

    Function of canopy in changing nutrient cycle and flux is one of the focuses in recent years. On the basis of comprehensively appraising published research, we analyzed the nitrogen loss leaching from plant canopy and several factors which affected it. We pointed out the disadvantages of the published researches and the key issues that ought to be solved: (1) The menstruation need to be advanced, and the research should be carried out on nitrogen loss leaching from the canopy of the field plant. (2) If the nitrogen is leached from the plant canopy, the research on the type of nitrogen loss should be carried out, and the nitrogen use efficiency of different varieties should be dealt on a research perspective with regard to the nitrogen leaching. (3) The research should be conducted on the mechanism and pathway, and the progress of nitrogen leaching; and the factors affecting nitrogen leaching should be included in the research, such as the leaf area of different growth stages, stomata densities, stomata conductance, and the apparent free space, which are beneficial to explain the mechanism of nitrogen leaching from the plant canopy.

  2. Optimality of nitrogen distribution among leaves in plant canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Kouki

    2016-05-01

    The vertical gradient of the leaf nitrogen content in a plant canopy is one of the determinants of vegetation productivity. The ecological significance of the nitrogen distribution in plant canopies has been discussed in relation to its optimality; nitrogen distribution in actual plant canopies is close to but always less steep than the optimal distribution that maximizes canopy photosynthesis. In this paper, I review the optimality of nitrogen distribution within canopies focusing on recent advancements. Although the optimal nitrogen distribution has been believed to be proportional to the light gradient in the canopy, this rule holds only when diffuse light is considered; the optimal distribution is steeper when the direct light is considered. A recent meta-analysis has shown that the nitrogen gradient is similar between herbaceous and tree canopies when it is expressed as the function of the light gradient. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain why nitrogen distribution is suboptimal. However, hypotheses explain patterns observed in some specific stands but not in others; there seems to be no general hypothesis that can explain the nitrogen distributions under different conditions. Therefore, how the nitrogen distribution in canopies is determined remains open for future studies; its understanding should contribute to the correct prediction and improvement of plant productivity under changing environments.

  3. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for Nitrogen Fixation and its Application to Improve Plant Growth under Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops. PMID:23675499

  4. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for nitrogen fixation and its application to improve plant growth under nitrogen-deficient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops.

  5. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for nitrogen fixation and its application to improve plant growth under nitrogen-deficient conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Setten

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops.

  6. The effect of nitrogen source on photosynthesis of carob at high CO[sub 2] concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, C.; Martins-Loucao, M.A. (Depto. de Biologia Vegetal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)); Lips, S.H. (Desert Agrobiology Center, J. Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research, Gen-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer (Israel))

    1993-01-01

    Carob seedlings (Ceratonia siliqua L. cv. Mulata), fed with nitrate or ammonium, were grown in growth chambers containing two levels of CO[sub 2] (360 or 800 [mu]l l[sup -1]), three root temperatures (15, 20 or 25 deg. C), and the same shoot temperature (20/24 deg. C, night/day temperature). The response of the plants to CO[sub 2] enrichment was affected by environmental factors such as the type of inorganic nitrogen in the medium and root temperature. Increasing root temperature enhanced photosynthesis rate more in the presence of nitrate than in the presence of ammonium. Differences in photosynthetic products were also observed between nitrate- and ammonium-fed carob seedlings. Nitrate-grown plants showed an enhanced content of sucrose, while ammonium led to enhanced storage of starch. Increase in root temperature caused an increase in dry mass of the plants of similar proportions in both nitrogen sources. The enhancement of the rates of photosynthesis by CO[sub 2] enrichment was proportionally much larger than the resulting increases in dry mass production when nitrate was the nitrogen source. Ammonium was the preferred nitrogen source for carob at both ambient and high CO[sub 2] concentrations. The level of photosynthesis of a plant is limited not only by atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration but also by the nutritional and environmental conditions of the root. (au) (17 refs.)

  7. Impact of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium on Brown Planthopper and Tolerance of Its Host Rice Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Mamunur RASHID; Mahbuba JAHAN; Khandakar Shariful ISLAM

    2016-01-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH),Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), appeared as a devastating pest of rice in Asia. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of three nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), on BPH and its host rice plants. Biochemical constituents of BPH and rice plants with varying nutrient levels at different growth stages, and changes in relative water content (RWC) of rice plants were determined in the laboratory. Feeding of BPH and the tolerance of rice plants to BPH with different nutrient levels were determined in the nethouse. Concentrations of N and P were found much higher in the BPH body than in its host rice plants, and this elemental mismatch is an inherent constraint on meeting nutritional requirements of BPH. Nitrogen was found as a more limiting element for BPH than other nutrients in rice plants. Application of N fertilizers to the rice plants increased the N concentrations both in rice plants and BPH while application of P and K fertilizers increased their concentrations in plant tissues only but not in BPH. Nitrogen application also increased the level of soluble proteins and decreased silicon content in rice plants, which resulted in increased feeding of BPH with sharp reduction of RWC in rice plants ultimately caused susceptible to the pest. P fertilization increased the concentration of P in rice plant tissues but not changed N, K, Si, free sugar and soluble protein contents, which indicated little importance of P to the feeding of BPH and tolerance of plant against BPH. K fertilization increased K content but reduced N, Si, free sugar and soluble protein contents in the plant tissues which resulted in the minimum reduction of RWC in rice plants after BPH feeding, thereby contributed to higher tolerance of rice plants to brown planthopper.

  8. Impact of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium on Brown Planthopper and Tolerance of Its Host Rice Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mamunur Rashid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål, appeared as a devastating pest of rice in Asia. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of three nutrients, nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K, on BPH and its host rice plants. Biochemical constituents of BPH and rice plants with varying nutrient levels at different growth stages, and changes in relative water content (RWC of rice plants were determined in the laboratory. Feeding of BPH and the tolerance of rice plants to BPH with different nutrient levels were determined in the nethouse. Concentrations of N and P were found much higher in the BPH body than in its host rice plants, and this elemental mismatch is an inherent constraint on meeting nutritional requirements of BPH. Nitrogen was found as a more limiting element for BPH than other nutrients in rice plants. Application of N fertilizers to the rice plants increased the N concentrations both in rice plants and BPH while application of P and K fertilizers increased their concentrations in plant tissues only but not in BPH. Nitrogen application also increased the level of soluble proteins and decreased silicon content in rice plants, which resulted in increased feeding of BPH with sharp reduction of RWC in rice plants ultimately caused susceptible to the pest. P fertilization increased the concentration of P in rice plant tissues but not changed N, K, Si, free sugar and soluble protein contents, which indicated little importance of P to the feeding of BPH and tolerance of plant against BPH. K fertilization increased K content but reduced N, Si, free sugar and soluble protein contents in the plant tissues which resulted in the minimum reduction of RWC in rice plants after BPH feeding, thereby contributed to higher tolerance of rice plants to brown planthopper.

  9. Potato crop growth as affected by nitrogen and plant density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA CARLOS ALBERTO DA SILVA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and development variables and dry matter characteristics were studied for cultivar Snowden of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. to evaluate nitrogen and plant density influence. Disregarding ending of season plant stress, the average number of actives haulms per plant was five and it was not affected by plant spacing. However, seasonal and final number of active haulms per plant were increased at 200 kg/ha of nitrogen. Maximum stem elongation was reached quickly with double density and had the tendency to keep constant at the highest and lowest nitrogen levels after 70 days after planting. Specific stem mass defined as mass per unit stem length was established as an indirect measure of stem thickness and load capacity. Specific leaf mass position in plant was higher at upper stem leaves, increased as plant density increased and did not vary markedly over time throughout the season. The rate of leaf appearance increased drastically due to more branching caused by high nitrogen level, and increased above ground dry matter per plant. Canopy growth and development influenced main tuber yield components. The number of active tubers per haulm decreased after 60 days after planting showing that tuberization is reversible. Tuber growth functions were established allowing the estimate of dry biomass partitioning coefficients for each plant organ.

  10. Distribution of Nitrogen Dioxide Concentration in Kaunas 2003–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovilė LAURINAVIČIENĖ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The aim of the present study was to assess distribution of nitrogen dioxide concentration in Kaunas. A passive sampling method was used. Sampling was carried out in 62 measurements points of Kaunas city during four different seasons in 2003-2007. According to the measured concentration average seasonal and annual concentration of nitrogen dioxide was calculated. The study results showed that mean nitrogen dioxide concentration in Kaunas was 18.1 µgm-3. The highest mean seasonal concentration was found during spring (20.1 µgm-3, the lowest - during winter (16.5 µgm-3. The highest nitrogen dioxide concentration was in Centras district (26.3 µgm-3, the lowest in Rokai - 11.4 µgm-3. Using Arc GIS program, maps of nitrogen dioxide concentration distribution were plotted. Nitrogen dioxide concentration interpoliation results revealed that the highest pollution was in Centras, Žaliakalnis, Dainava districts, the lowest was found in the areas with lower traffic flows and more green places.

  11. Nitrogen deposition and prey nitrogen uptake control the nutrition of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millett, J., E-mail: j.millett@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Hydrological and Ecosystem Science, Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Foot, G.W. [Centre for Hydrological and Ecosystem Science, Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Svensson, B.M. [Department of Plant Ecology and Evolution, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18 D, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has important negative impacts on natural and semi-natural ecosystems, impacting on biotic interactions across trophic levels. Low-nutrient systems are particularly sensitive to changes in N inputs and are therefore more vulnerable to N deposition. Carnivorous plants are often part of these ecosystems partly because of the additional nutrients obtained from prey. We studied the impact of N deposition on the nutrition of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia growing on 16 ombrotrophic bogs across Europe. We measured tissue N, phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) concentrations and prey and root N uptake using a natural abundance stable isotope approach. Our aim was to test the impact of N deposition on D. rotundifolia prey and root N uptake, and nutrient stoichiometry. D. rotundifolia root N uptake was strongly affected by N deposition, possibly resulting in reduced N limitation. The contribution of prey N to the N contained in D. rotundifolia ranged from 20 to 60%. N deposition reduced the maximum amount of N derived from prey, but this varied below this maximum. D. rotundifolia tissue N concentrations were a product of both root N availability and prey N uptake. Increased prey N uptake was correlated with increased tissue P concentrations indicating uptake of P from prey. N deposition therefore reduced the strength of a carnivorous plant–prey interaction, resulting in a reduction in nutrient transfer between trophic levels. We suggest that N deposition has a negative impact on D. rotundifolia and that responses to N deposition might be strongly site specific. - Highlights: • We measured nutrition of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia across Europe. • We measured tissue nutrient concentrations and prey and root N uptake at 16 sites. • Tissue N concentrations were a product of root N availability and prey N uptake. • N deposition reduced the maximum amount of N derived from prey. • N deposition reduced the strength of a

  12. Effect of combined nitrogen on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in pea plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwaard, F.

    1979-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing activity of the symbiotic system of Pisum sativum with Rhizobium leguminosarum is adversely affected by combined nitrogen. Both ammonium chloride and potassium nitrate, when added to the roots, lower the nitrogenase activity (acetylene-reduction) of intact pea plants. During a 3-

  13. Plant traits related to nitrogen uptake influence plant-microbe competition

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Delphine; Pivato, Barbara; Bru, David; Busset, Hugues; Deau, Florence; Faivre, Céline; Matejicek, Annick; Strbik, Florence; Mougel, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Plant species are important drivers of soil microbial communities. However, how plant functional traits are shaping these communities has received less attention though linking plant and microbial traits is crucial for better understanding plant-microbe interactions. Our objective was to determine how plant-microbe interactions were affected by plant traits. Specifically we analyzed how interactions between plant species and microbes involved in nitrogen cycling were affected by plant traits ...

  14. Biological nitrogen fixation in non-legume plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Carole; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine

    2013-05-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in plant growth. The ability of a plant to supply all or part of its requirements from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) thanks to interactions with endosymbiotic, associative and endophytic symbionts, confers a great competitive advantage over non-nitrogen-fixing plants. Because BNF in legumes is well documented, this review focuses on BNF in non-legume plants. Despite the phylogenic and ecological diversity among diazotrophic bacteria and their hosts, tightly regulated communication is always necessary between the microorganisms and the host plant to achieve a successful interaction. Ongoing research efforts to improve knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these original relationships and some common strategies leading to a successful relationship between the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and their hosts are presented. Understanding the molecular mechanism of BNF outside the legume-rhizobium symbiosis could have important agronomic implications and enable the use of N-fertilizers to be reduced or even avoided. Indeed, in the short term, improved understanding could lead to more sustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms and, in the longer term, to the transfer of endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixation capacities to major non-legume crops.

  15. Biological nitrogen fixation in non-legume plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Carole; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential nutrient in plant growth. The ability of a plant to supply all or part of its requirements from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) thanks to interactions with endosymbiotic, associative and endophytic symbionts, confers a great competitive advantage over non-nitrogen-fixing plants. Scope Because BNF in legumes is well documented, this review focuses on BNF in non-legume plants. Despite the phylogenic and ecological diversity among diazotrophic bacteria and their hosts, tightly regulated communication is always necessary between the microorganisms and the host plant to achieve a successful interaction. Ongoing research efforts to improve knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these original relationships and some common strategies leading to a successful relationship between the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and their hosts are presented. Conclusions Understanding the molecular mechanism of BNF outside the legume–rhizobium symbiosis could have important agronomic implications and enable the use of N-fertilizers to be reduced or even avoided. Indeed, in the short term, improved understanding could lead to more sustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms and, in the longer term, to the transfer of endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixation capacities to major non-legume crops. PMID:23478942

  16. The effects of inorganic nitrogen form and CO2 concentration on wheat yield and nutrient accumulation and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli eCarlisle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and primary productivity. Inorganic N is available to plants from the soil as ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3–. We studied how wheat grown hydroponically to senescence in controlled environmental chambers is affected by N form (NH4+ vs. NO3– and CO2 concentration (‘subambient’, ‘ambient’, and ‘elevated’ in terms of biomass, yield, and nutrient accumulation and partitioning. NH4+-grown wheat had the strongest response to CO2 concentration. Plants exposed to subambient and ambient CO2 concentrations typically had the greatest biomass and nutrient accumulation under both N forms. In general NH4+ plants had higher concentrations of total N, P, K, S, Ca, Zn, Fe, and Cu, while NO3– plants had higher concentrations of Mg, B, Mn, and NO3–-N. NH4+ plants contained amounts of phytate similar to NO3– plants but had higher bioavailable Zn, which could have ramifications for human health. NH4+ plants allocated more nutrients and biomass to aboveground tissues whereas NO3– plants allocated more nutrients to the roots. The two inorganic nitrogen forms influenced plant growth and nutrient status so distinctly that they should be treated separately. Moreover, plant growth and nutrient status varied in a non-linear manner with atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  17. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  18. Variations in dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in biofilters with different media during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huining; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Gu, Li; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is potential precursor of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilters on DON concentration changes in a drinking water plant. A small pilot plant was constructed next to a sedimentation tank in a drinking water plant and included activated carbon, quartz sand, anthracite, and ceramsite biofilters. As the biofilter layer depth increased, the DON concentration first decreased and then increased, and the variation in DON concentration differed among the biofilters. In the activated carbon biofilter, the DON concentration was reduced by the largest amount in the first part of the column and increased by the largest amount in the second part of the column. The biomass in the activated carbon filter was less than that in the quartz sand filter in the upper column. The heterotrophic bacterial proportion among bacterial flora in the activated carbon biofilter was the largest, which might be due to the significant reduction in DON in the first part of the column. Overall, the results indicate that the DON concentration in biofiltered water can be controlled via the selection of appropriate biofilter media. We propose that a two-layer biofilter with activated carbon in the upper layer and another media type in the lower layer could best reduce the DON concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal concentration for sugar transport in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Kaare H; Savage, Jessica A; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Vascular plants transport energy in the form of sugars from the leaves where they are produced to sites of active growth. The mass flow of sugars through the phloem vascular system is determined by the sap flow rate and the sugar concentration. If the concentration is low, little energy is transferred from source to sink. If it is too high, sap viscosity impedes flow. An interesting question is therefore at which concentration is the sugar flow optimal. Optimization of sugar flow and transpor...

  20. Methods of affecting nitrogen assimilation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A.; Nero, Damion C.

    2016-10-11

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  1. Effects of watershed land use on nitrogen concentrations and δ15 nitrogen in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Marci L.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; McClelland, J.W.; Valiela, I.

    2006-01-01

    Eutrophication is a major agent of change affecting freshwater, estuarine, and marine systems. It is largely driven by transportation of nitrogen from natural and anthropogenic sources. Research is needed to quantify this nitrogen delivery and to link the delivery to specific land-derived sources. In this study we measured nitrogen concentrations and δ 15N values in seepage water entering three freshwater ponds and six estuaries on Cape Cod, Massachusetts and assessed how they varied with different types of land use. Nitrate concentrations and δ 15N values in groundwater reflected land use in developed and pristine watersheds. In particular, watersheds with larger populations delivered larger nitrate loads with higher δ 15N values to receiving waters. The enriched δ 15N values confirmed nitrogen loading model results identifying wastewater contributions from septic tanks as the major N source. Furthermore, it was apparent that N coastal sources had a relatively larger impact on the N loads and isotopic signatures than did inland N sources further upstream in the watersheds. This finding suggests that management priorities could focus on coastal sources as a first course of action. This would require management constraints on a much smaller population.

  2. Black Nitrogen or Plant-Derived Organic Nitrogen - which Form is More Efficiently Sequestered in Soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, María; Velasco-Molina, Marta; Knicker, Heike

    2014-05-01

    Input of charcoal after forest fires can lead to considerable changes of the quality and quantity of organic matter in soils (SOM). This affects not only its organic C pool but also shifts its organic N composition from peptideous to N-heterocyclic structures (Knicker et al., 1996). In the present study we sought to understand how this alteration is affecting the N availability in fire affected soils. Therefore, we performed a medium-term pot experiment in which grass material (Lolium perenne) was grown on soil material (Cambisols) of a fire-affected and a fire-unaffected forest. The soils were topped with mixtures of ground fresh grass residues and KNO3 or charred grass material (pyrogenic organic matter; PyOM) with KNO3. Here, either the organic N or the inorganic N was isotopically enriched with 15N. Following the 15N concentration in the soil matrix and the growing plants as a function of incubation time (up to 16 months) by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry allowed us to indentify which N-source is most efficiently stabilized and how PyOM is affecting this process. Preliminary data indicated that only after the germination of the seeds, the concentration of the added inorganic 15N in the soil decreased considerably most likely due to its uptake by the growing plants but also due to N-losses by leaching and volatilization. Additional addition of plant residues or PyOM had no major effect on this behavior. Covering the soil with 15N-grass residues which simulates a litter layer led to a slow increase of the 15N concentration in the mineral soil during the first month. This is best explained by the ongoing incorporation of the litter into the soil matrix. After that a small decrease was observed, showing that the organic N was only slowly mobilized. Addition of 15N-PyOM showed a comparable behavior but with 15N concentration in the soil corresponding to twice of those of the pots amended with 15N-grass residues. After that the 15N concentrations decrease quickly

  3. Understanding Plant Nitrogen Metabolism through Metabolomics and Computational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin H. Beatty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of plant metabolism could provide a direct mechanism for improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE in crops. One of the major barriers to achieving this outcome is our poor understanding of the complex metabolic networks, physiological factors, and signaling mechanisms that affect NUE in agricultural settings. However, an exciting collection of computational and experimental approaches has begun to elucidate whole-plant nitrogen usage and provides an avenue for connecting nitrogen-related phenotypes to genes. Herein, we describe how metabolomics, computational models of metabolism, and flux balance analysis have been harnessed to advance our understanding of plant nitrogen metabolism. We introduce a model describing the complex flow of nitrogen through crops in a real-world agricultural setting and describe how experimental metabolomics data, such as isotope labeling rates and analyses of nutrient uptake, can be used to refine these models. In summary, the metabolomics/computational approach offers an exciting mechanism for understanding NUE that may ultimately lead to more effective crop management and engineered plants with higher yields.

  4. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen form and concentration on growth and photosynthesis of a fast- and slow-growing grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, J M; Press, M C

    1996-03-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of Agrostis capillaris L. and Nardus stricta L. were measured for plants grown under ambient and elevated concentrations of CO2 (340 and 550 μl CO2 l(-1) respectively) and a range of nitrogen concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg N l(-1) ) supplied as either ammonium sulphate or sodium nitrate. After 42 d of growth for A. capillaris and 49 d of growth for N. stricta, the higher nitrogen concentrations resulted in stimulation of growth. The form of nitrogen did not affect the total dry weight attained by A. capillaris. However, ammonium-grown N. stricta attained a greater total dry weight than did nitrate-grown plants. Nitrogen form influenced leaf area ratio, which was greater in nitrate-grown A. capillaris and in ammonium-grown N. stricta. At the two lowest nitrogen concentrations there was no effect of elevated CO2 on total dry weight in either species, whilst at the two highest nitrogen concentrations positive growth responses to elevated C02 were observed. Photosynthetic capacity and carboxylation efficiency were lower in plants grown in elevated CO2 at the two lowest nitrogen concentrations, and were associated with greater leaf soluble carbohydrate content and lower foliar nitrogen concentrations. By contrast, the CO2 treatment did not affect these parameters at the two highest nitrogen concentrations employed.

  5. Orthogonal fitness benefits of nitrogen and ants for nitrogen-limited plants in the presence of herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G; Ableson, Ian; Kerber, Jennifer; Vannette, Rachel L; Tao, Leiling

    2017-09-09

    Predictable effects of resource availability on plant growth-defense strategies provide a unifying theme in theories of direct anti-herbivore defense, but it is less clear how resource availability modulates plant indirect defense. Ant-plant-hemipteran interactions produce mutualistic trophic cascades when hemipteran-tending ants reduce total herbivory, and these interactions are a key component of plant indirect defense in most terrestrial ecosystems. Here we conducted an experiment to test how ant-plant-hemipteran interactions depend on nitrogen (N) availability by manipulating the presence of ants and aphids under different N fertilization treatments. Ants increased plant flowering success by decreasing the densities of herbivores, and the effects of ants on folivores were positively related to the density of aphids. Unexpectedly, N fertilization produced no changes in plant N concentrations. Plants grown in higher N grew and flowered more, but aphid honeydew chemistry stayed the same, and neither the density of aphids nor the rate of ant attraction per aphid changed with N addition. The positive effects of ants and N addition on plant fitness were thus independent of one another. We conclude that N was the plant's limiting nutrient and propose that addition of the limiting nutrient is unlikely to alter the strength of mutualistic trophic cascades. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitrogen Concentration Estimation in Tomato Leaves by VIS-NIR Non-Destructive Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Menesatti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen concentration in plants is normally determined by expensive and time consuming chemical analyses. As an alternative, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO3 concentration determination in petiole sap were proposed, but these assays are not always satisfactory. Spectral reflectance values of tomato leaves obtained by visible-near infrared spectrophotometry are reported to be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plant nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility and the accuracy of the estimation of tomato leaf nitrogen concentration performed through a rapid, portable and non-destructive system, in comparison with chemical standard analyses, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO3 concentration in petiole sap. Mean reflectance leaf values were compared to each reference chemical value by partial least squares chemometric multivariate methods. The correlation between predicted values from spectral reflectance analysis and the observed chemical values showed in the independent test highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.94. The utilization of the proposed system, increasing efficiency, allows better knowledge of nutritional status of tomato plants, with more detailed and sharp information and on wider areas. More detailed information both in space and time is an essential tool to increase and stabilize crop quality levels and to optimize the nutrient use efficiency.

  7. Nitrogen concentration estimation in tomato leaves by VIS-NIR non-destructive spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulissi, Valentina; Antonucci, Francesca; Benincasa, Paolo; Farneselli, Michela; Tosti, Giacomo; Guiducci, Marcello; Tei, Francesco; Costa, Corrado; Pallottino, Federico; Pari, Luigi; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen concentration in plants is normally determined by expensive and time consuming chemical analyses. As an alternative, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO(3) concentration determination in petiole sap were proposed, but these assays are not always satisfactory. Spectral reflectance values of tomato leaves obtained by visible-near infrared spectrophotometry are reported to be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plant nutritional status. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility and the accuracy of the estimation of tomato leaf nitrogen concentration performed through a rapid, portable and non-destructive system, in comparison with chemical standard analyses, chlorophyll meter readings and N-NO(3) concentration in petiole sap. Mean reflectance leaf values were compared to each reference chemical value by partial least squares chemometric multivariate methods. The correlation between predicted values from spectral reflectance analysis and the observed chemical values showed in the independent test highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.94). The utilization of the proposed system, increasing efficiency, allows better knowledge of nutritional status of tomato plants, with more detailed and sharp information and on wider areas. More detailed information both in space and time is an essential tool to increase and stabilize crop quality levels and to optimize the nutrient use efficiency.

  8. Biohydrogen production from lactose: influence of substrate and nitrogen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Fierro, J; Fernández, C; Cuetos, M J; Gómez, X

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from renewable sources may be considered the energy vector of the future. However, reducing process costs is imperative in order to achieve this goal. In the present research, the effect of nitrogen (N), initial pH and substrate content for starting up the dark fermentative process was studied using the response surface methodology. Anaerobic digested dried sludge (biosolid pellets) was used as the inoculum. Synthetic wastewater was used as the substrate in batch reactors. A decrease in H2 production was observed with the increase in N and lactose concentrations. This drop was considerably greater when the concentration of lactose was at its lower level. Although the increase in lactose concentration results in a lower H2 production, the effect of N on the response is attenuated at higher levels of lactose. On the other hand, the effect of initial pH on the fermentation system was not significant. The evaluation on the process under semi-continuous conditions was performed using anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs). The process was evaluated at different C/N ratios using synthetic wastewater. Results showed higher hydrogen yields with the gradual decrease in nitrogen content. The addition of cheese whey to the ASBR resulted in a H2 production rate of 0.18 L H2 L(-1) d(-1).

  9. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the perched ground water under seepage-irrigated potato cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Arboleda, F; Mylavarapu, R; Hutchinson, C; Portier, K

    2008-01-01

    Excessive nitrogen rates for potato production in northeast Florida have been declared as a potential source of nitrate pollution in the St. Johns River watershed. This 3-yr study examined the effect of N rates (0, 168, and 280 kg ha(-1)) split between planting and 40 d after planting on the NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Atlantic) in rotation with sorghum sudan grass hybrid (Sorghum vulgare x Sorghum vulgare var. sudanese, cv. SX17), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata cv. Iron Clay), and greenbean (Phaseolus vulgare cv. Espada). Soil solution from the root zone and water from the perched ground water under potato were sampled periodically using lysimeters and wells, respectively. Fertilization at planting increased the NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water, but no effect of the legumes in rotation with potatoes on nitrate leaching was detected. Fertilization of green bean increased NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under potato planted in the following season. The NO(3)-N concentration in the soil solution within the potato root zone followed a similar pattern to that of the perched ground water but with higher initial values. The NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water was proportional to the rainfall magnitude after potato planting. A significant increase in NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under cowpea planted in summer after potato was detected for the side-dressing of 168 kg ha(-1) N applied to potato 40 d after planting but not at the 56 kg ha(-1) N side-dress. Elevation in NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under sorghum was not significant, supporting its use as an effective N catch crop.

  10. Dissolved organic nitrogen transformation in river water: Effects of suspended sediment and organic nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinghui; Liu, Ting; Yang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xueqing; Yu, Zhongbo

    2013-03-01

    SummaryHigh suspended sediment (SPS) concentration exists in many Asian rivers. In addition, human activities and climate change can change river runoff, leading to the variation of SPS and pollutant concentrations. In this research, the effects of SPS and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentration on DON transformation in river systems were studied through simulation experiments with samples collected from the Yellow River which is famous for its high SPS concentration. The results indicated that high DON concentration resulted in a longer retention time of NH4+-N and NO2--N in the system due to the inhibition effect of ammonia on nitrification. The re-suspension of sediment accelerated DON transformation, and both the ammonification and nitrification rates increased with SPS concentration. The ammonification rate constants obtained from the first-order kinetics were 0.286, 0.332, 0.538 day-1; the nitrification rate constants obtained from the Logistic model were 0.0018, 0.0038, 0.005 day-1 μmol-1 L-1 for the systems with SPS concentration of 0, 5, 10 g L-1, respectively. Bacteria tended to attach onto SPS, and the specific growth rate in the systems with SPS was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that without SPS in the first 3 days of cultivation, which resulted in an increase of DON transformation rate with SPS concentration. This study implied that DON transformation rate may be lower in the dry season than that in the wet season, and nitrogen transformation will be affected by the variation of river runoff and SPS concentration.

  11. Effects of simultaneous ozone exposure and nitrogen loads on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, growth, and nutrient concentrations of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.F.D. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland)]. E-mail: vera.thomas@iap.ch; Braun, S. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland); Flueckiger, W. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    Beech seedlings were grown under different nitrogen fertilisation regimes (0, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) for three years and were fumigated with either charcoal-filtered (F) or ambient air (O{sub 3}). Nitrogen fertilisation increased leaf necroses, aphid infestations, and nutrient ratios in the leaves (N:P and N:K), as a result of decreased phosphorus and potassium concentrations. For plant growth, biomass accumulation, and starch concentrations, a positive nitrogen effect was found, but only for fertilisations of up to 40 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The highest nitrogen load, however, reduced leaf area, leaf water content, growth, biomass accumulation, and starch concentrations, whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations were enhanced. The ozone fumigation resulted in reduced leaf area, leaf water content, shoot growth, root biomass accumulation, and decreased starch, phosphorus, and potassium concentrations, increasing the N:P and N:K ratios. A combined effect of the two pollutants was detected for the leaf area and the shoot elongation, where ozone fumigation amplified the nitrogen effects. - The effects of nitrogen and ozone on growth, carbohydrate concentrations, and nutrients are mainly additive.

  12. VERTICAL LEAF SPECTRAL VARIATION AS AN INDICATOR OF NITROGEN NUTRITION STATUS IN RICE PLANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the response of individual leaf spectral reflectance to five levels of nitrogen fertilizer treatments in rice(Oriza sativa L.) plants. Sampling was combined through a rice canopy at upper, medium and low levels for biomass, nitrogen and water content measurements with spectral signals from the leaves. The vertical gradients of leaf biomass ,nitrogen and water contents were associated with the nitrogen availability during tillering, panicle formation, initial heading and heading. Rice plants treated with the lowest rate of N could be characterized with the lowest value of gradient in leaf biomass and leaf water content and the highest value of gradient in leaf N concentration. A spectral gradient of single reflectance(R),ratio(RVI) and normalized difference(ND) of two individual reflectances was defined as this yielded a better relationship between the spectral data and leaf nitrogen concentration. The results suggested the spectral gradients may be used as an improved diagnostic tool for nitrogen status.

  13. Sewage sludge composting simulation as carbon/nitrogen concentration change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nassereldeen Kabbashi

    2011-01-01

    Available composting models do not describe accurately the dynamics of composting processes.Difficulty in modeling composting processes is attributed mainly to the unpredicted change in process rate caused by change in activation energy value (E).This article presented the results of an attempt made to utilize patterns of change in carbon,nitrogen and temperature profiles to model sewage sludge composting process as a multi-stage process.Results of controlled sewage sludge composting experiments were used in th estudy.All the experiments were carried out as batch experiments in a 300-liter Horizontal Drum Bioreactor (HDB).Analysis of the profiles of carbon,nitrogen and temperature has indicated that there were clear patterns that could be used to develop simple models of the process,the initial C/N ratio was between 7-8 and the final C/N ratio of the compost in most experiments were found to be around 15.0,indicating the compost was fully matured and could be used safely for agricultural purpose.Electrical conductivity of composting material decreased from 1.83 to 1.67 dS/m,after a period,it increased gradually from 2.01 to 2.23 dS/m and remained at around 2.33 dS/m till the end of composting.It is found that change in the concentration of total carbon can reasonably be described by three constant process rate coefficients (k1,k2,k3).It is found that the process starts with a certain process rate coefficient (k1) and continues until peak temperature is reached,then it reaches lower process (k2) in the declining phase of the thermophilic stage,and finally it proceeds with a faster process rate (k3) when maturation is reached.Change in the concentration of total nitrogen has shown to have the same patterns of change as carbon.

  14. Diverse Plant-Associated Pleosporalean Fungi from Saline Areas: Ecological Tolerance and Nitrogen-Status Dependent Effects on Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Pan, Xueyu; Kubicek, Christian; Druzhinina, Irina; Chenthamara, Komal; Labbé, Jessy; Yuan, Zhilin

    2017-01-01

    Similar to mycorrhizal mutualists, the rhizospheric and endophytic fungi are also considered to act as active regulators of host fitness (e.g., nutrition and stress tolerance). Despite considerable work in selected model systems, it is generally poorly understood how plant-associated fungi are structured in habitats with extreme conditions and to what extent they contribute to improved plant performance. Here, we investigate the community composition of root and seed-associated fungi from six halophytes growing in saline areas of China, and found that the pleosporalean taxa (Ascomycota) were most frequently isolated across samples. A total of twenty-seven representative isolates were selected for construction of the phylogeny based on the multi-locus data (partial 18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, and transcription elongation factor 1-α), which classified them into seven families, one clade potentially representing a novel lineage. Fungal isolates were subjected to growth response assays by imposing temperature, pH, ionic and osmotic conditions. The fungi had a wide pH tolerance, while most isolates showed a variable degree of sensitivity to increasing concentration of either salt or sorbitol. Subsequent plant-fungal co-culture assays indicated that most isolates had only neutral or even adverse effects on plant growth in the presence of inorganic nitrogen. Interestingly, when provided with organic nitrogen sources the majority of the isolates enhanced plant growth especially aboveground biomass. Most of the fungi preferred organic nitrogen over its inorganic counterpart, suggesting that these fungi can readily mineralize organic nitrogen into inorganic nitrogen. Microscopy revealed that several isolates can successfully colonize roots and form melanized hyphae and/or microsclerotia-like structures within cortical cells suggesting a phylogenetic assignment as dark septate endophytes. This work provides a better understanding of the symbiotic relationship between plants and

  15. The effect of plant species on soil nitrogen mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krift, van der A.J.; Berendse, F.

    2001-01-01

    1. To ascertain the influence of different plant species on nitrogen (N) cycling, we performed a long-term garden experiment with six grasses and five dicots with different potential growth rates, that are adapted to habitats with different nutrient supplies. We measured in situ N mineralization and

  16. Plant species richness enhances nitrogen retention in green roof plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine; Schweinhart, Shelbye; Buffam, Ishi

    2016-10-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs have become common in many cities and are projected to continue to increase in coverage, but little is known about the ecological properties of these engineered ecosystems. In this study, we tested the biodiversity-ecosystem function hypothesis using commercially available green roof trays as replicated plots with varying levels of plant species richness (0, 1, 3, or 6 common green roof species per plot, using plants with different functional characteristics). We estimated accumulated plant biomass near the peak of the first full growing season (July 2013) and measured runoff volume after nearly every rain event from September 2012 to September 2013 (33 events) and runoff fluxes of inorganic nutrients ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate from a subset of 10 events. We found that (1) total plant biomass increased with increasing species richness, (2) green roof plots were effective at reducing storm runoff, with vegetation increasing water retention more than soil-like substrate alone, but there was no significant effect of plant species identity or richness on runoff volume, (3) green roof substrate was a significant source of phosphate, regardless of presence/absence of plants, and (4) dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = nitrate + ammonium) runoff fluxes were different among plant species and decreased significantly with increasing plant species richness. The variation in N retention was positively related to variation in plant biomass. Notably, the increased biomass and N retention with species richness in this engineered ecosystem are similar to patterns observed in published studies from grasslands and other well-studied ecosystems. We suggest that more diverse plantings on vegetated roofs may enhance the retention capacity for reactive nitrogen. This is of importance for the sustained health of vegetated roof ecosystems, which over time often experience nitrogen limitation, and is also relevant for water quality in receiving waters

  17. Induction of leaf senescence by low nitrogen nutrition in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Eloísa; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación

    2010-03-01

    Different parameters which vary during the leaf development in sunflower plants grown with nitrate (2 or 20 mM) for a 42-day period have been determined. The plants grown with 20 mM nitrate (N+) showed greater leaf area and specific leaf mass than the plants grown with 2 mM nitrate (N-). The total chlorophyll content decreased with leaf senescence, like the photosynthetic rate. This decline of photosynthetic activity was greater in plants grown with low nitrogen level (N-), showing more pronounced senescence symptoms than with high nitrogen (N+). In both treatments, soluble sugars increased with aging, while starch content decreased. A significant increase of hexose to sucrose ratio was observed at the beginning of senescence, and this raise was higher in N- plants than in N+ plants. These results show that sugar senescence regulation is dependent on nitrogen, supporting the hypothesis that leaf senescence is regulated by the C/N balance. In N+ and N- plants, ammonium and free amino acid concentrations were high in young leaves and decreased progressively in the senescent leaves. In both treatments, asparagine, and in a lower extent glutamine, increased after senescence start. The drop in the (Glu+Asp)/(Gln+Asn) ratio associated with the leaf development level suggests a greater nitrogen mobilization. Besides, the decline in this ratio occurred earlier and more rapidly in N- plants than in N+ plants, suggesting that the N- remobilization rate correlates with leaf senescence severity. In both N+ and N- plants, an important oxidative stress was generated in vivo during sunflower leaf senescence, as revealed by lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. In senescent leaves, the increase in hydrogen peroxide levels occurred in parallel with a decline in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In N+ plants, the activities of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increased to reach their highest values at 28 days, and later decreased during senescence, whereas

  18. Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration on the Biomasses and Nitrogen Concentrations in the Organs of Sainfoin(Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zheng-chao; SHANGGUAN Zhou-ping

    2009-01-01

    In forage grasses,the nitrogen concentration is directly related to the nutritional value.The studies examined the hypothesis that global elevation of CO2 concentration probably affects the biomass,nitrogen(N)concentration,and allocation and distribution patterns in the organs of forage grasses.While sainfoin(Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop.)seedlings grew on a low nutrient soil in closed chambers for 90 days,they were exposed to two CO2 concentrations(ambient or ambient+350μmol mol-1 CO2)without adding nutrients to them.After 90 days exposure to CO2,the biomasses of leaves,stems,and roots,and N concentrations and contents of different parts were measured.Compared with the ambient CO2 concentration,the elevated CO2 concentration increased the total dry matter by 25.07%,mainly due to the root and leaf having positive response to the elevated CO2 concentration.However,the elevated CO2 concentration did not change the proportions of the dry matters in different parts and the total plants compared with the ambient CO2 concentration.The elevated CO2 concentration lowered the N concentrations of the plant parts.Because the dry matter was higher,the elevated CO2 concentration had no effect on the N content in the plants compared to the ambient CO2 concentration.The elevated CO2 concentration promoted N allocations of the different parts significantly and increased N allocation of the underground part.The results have confirmed the previous suggestions that the elevated CO2 concentration stimulates plant biomass production and decreases the N concentrations of the plant parts.

  19. Crescimento e acumulação de nitrogênio de plantas de feijoeiro originadas de sementes com alto teor de molibdênio Growth and nitrogen accumulation by common bean plants originating from seeds with high molybdenum concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Yuudi Kubota

    2008-08-01

    ção foliar, podem estimular a atividade da nitrogenase e aumentar a acumulação de biomassa e N do feijoeiro.Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris seeds with high molybdenum concentration can adequately supply the crop demand of this nutrient. Two experiments were conducted in a greenhouse to evaluate the effect of Mo-enriched seeds, obtained from plants treated with foliar fertilization, on growth and N accumulation by common bean plants. The soil substrate was the A horizon of a Haplustult (3.5 kg pots, which were limed and fully fertilized with exception of Mo. The first experiment had a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial design with five replications: three bean cultivars, two seed Mo concentrations, and two harvest dates. In plants of the three cultivars originating from seeds with high Mo concentration, the shoot biomass and N accumulation were higher at both harvests. Seeds with high Mo concentration increased the nodule mass of cultivars Manteigão and Rio Tibagi 30 days after emergence (DAE but reduced biomass and number of nodules in the cultivars Carioca and Manteigão 45 DAE. High seed Mo concentration increased the nitrogenase activity 30 DAE and the specific nitrogenase activity 45 DAE. The second experiment had a 2 x 2 x 4 factorial design with five replications: two bean cultivars, two seed Mo concentrations, and four harvest dates. The shoot mass in plants originating from seeds with high Mo concentration was higher 47 and 59 DAE, and shoot N accumulation was higher 59 DAT. High seed Mo concentration did not affect nodulation until 45 DAE, but reduced nodule number 59 DAE. The reduced nodulation at the pod filling stage observed in both experiments, in plants grown from seeds with high Mo concentration, can be due to the improved growth of these plants, which may have anticipated the translocation of assimilates to pods. It can be concluded that Mo-enriched seeds, harvested from plants treated with foliar fertilizer, can stimulate nitrogenase activity and increase biomass and N

  20. In-vehicle nitrogen dioxide concentrations in road tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ashley N.; Boulter, Paul G.; Roddis, Damon; McDonough, Liza; Patterson, Michael; Rodriguez del Barco, Marina; Mattes, Andrew; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding in-vehicle concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during transit through road tunnels in urban environments. Furthermore, previous studies have tended to involve a single vehicle and the range of in-vehicle NO2 concentrations that vehicle occupants may be exposed to is not well defined. This study describes simultaneous measurements of in-vehicle and outside-vehicle NO2 concentrations on a route through Sydney, Australia that included several major tunnels, minor tunnels and busy surface roads. Tests were conducted on nine passenger vehicles to assess how vehicle characteristics and ventilation settings affected in-vehicle NO2 concentrations and the in-vehicle-to-outside vehicle (I/O) concentration ratio. NO2 was measured directly using a cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique that gave a high temporal and spatial resolution. In the major tunnels, transit-average in-vehicle NO2 concentrations were lower than outside-vehicle concentrations for all vehicles with cabin air recirculation either on or off. However, markedly lower I/O ratios were obtained with recirculation on (0.08-0.36), suggesting that vehicle occupants can significantly lower their exposure to NO2 in tunnels by switching recirculation on. The highest mean I/O ratios for NO2 were measured in older vehicles (0.35-0.36), which is attributed to older vehicles having higher air exchange rates. The results from this study can be used to inform the design and operation of future road tunnels and modelling of personal exposure to NO2.

  1. Plant community controls on short-term ecosystem nitrogen retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    Retention of nitrogen (N) is a critical ecosystem function, especially in the face of widespread anthropogenic N enrichment; however, our understanding of the mechanisms involved is limited. Here, we tested under glasshouse conditions how plant community attributes, including variations in the dominance, diversity and range of plant functional traits, influence N uptake and retention in temperate grassland. We added a pulse of (15) N to grassland plant communities assembled to represent a range of community-weighted mean plant traits, trait functional diversity and divergence, and species richness, and measured plant and microbial uptake of (15) N, and leaching losses of (15) N, as a short-term test of N retention in the plant-soil system. Root biomass, herb abundance and dominant plant traits were the main determinants of N retention in the plant-soil system: greater root biomass and herb abundance, and lower root tissue density, increased plant (15) N uptake, while higher specific leaf area and root tissue density increased microbial (15) N uptake. Our results provide novel, mechanistic insight into the short-term fate of N in the plant-soil system, and show that dominant plant traits, rather than trait functional diversity, control the fate of added N in the plant-soil system.

  2. Effects of plant diversity on microbial nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Braun, Judith; Daly, Amanda; Gorka, Stefan; Hu, Yuntao; Kaiser, Christina; Martin, Victoria; Meyerhofer, Werner; Walker, Tom W. N.; Wanek, Wolfgang; Wasner, Daniel; Wiesenbauer, Julia; Zezula, David; Zheng, Qing; Richter, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    There is a general consensus that plant diversity affects many ecosystem functions. One example of such an effect is the enhanced aboveground and belowground plant biomass production with increasing species richness, with implications for carbon and nutrient distribution in soil. The Jena Experiment (http://www.the-jena-experiment.de/), a grassland biodiversity experiment established in 2002 in Germany, comprises different levels of plant species richness and different numbers of plant functional groups. It provides the opportunity to examine how changes in biodiversity impact on microbially-mediated nutrient cycling processes. We here report on plant diversity and plant functional composition effects on growth and nitrogen and phosphorus transformation rates, including nitrogen use efficiency, of microbial communities. Microbial growth rates and microbial biomass were positively affected by increasing plant species richness. Amino acid and ammonium concentrations in soil were also positively affected by plant species richness, while phosphate concentrations in contrast were negatively affected. The cycling of organic N in soils (estimated as gross protein depolymerization rates) increased about threefold with plant diversity, while gross N and P mineralization were not significantly affected by either species or functional richness. Microbial nitrogen use efficiency did not respond to different levels of plant diversity but was very high (0.96 and 0.98) across all levels of plant species richness, demonstrating a low N availability for microbes. Taken together this indicates that soil microbial communities were able to meet the well-documented increase in plant N content with species richness, and also the higher N demand of the microbial community by increasing the recycling of organic N such as proteins. In fact, the microbial community even overcompensated the increased plant and microbial N demand, as evidenced by increased levels of free amino acids and

  3. Expansion and photosynthetic rate of leaves of soybean plants during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley-Henry, L.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of nitrogen stress and restoration of nitrogen availability after a period of stress on expansion and photosynthetic rate of soybean leaves of differing maturity. We hypothesized that nitrogen resupply would lead to additional accumulation of reduced nitrogen in the leaves and, ultimately, resumption of leaf initiation and expansion and photosynthetic activity. In continuously nitrogen-stressed plants, expansion of middle trifoliolates of main-stem trifoliates and leaf area at full expansion were severely restricted. Leaves showing the greatest effects were initiated after removal of nitrogen. When the reduced nitrogen concentration in mature leaves of continuously stressed plants fell below 9 mg dm-2, the photosynthetic rate per unit leaf decreased rapidly, reaching a minimum of ca. 6-8 mg dm-2 h-1. The older mature leaves tended to abscise at this point, while the youngest leaves remained on the plant and continued to photosynthesize slowly. When nitrogen was resupplied, leaf expansion and final leaf area increased. Leaf initiation was also stimulated as reduced nitrogen levels rose in the leaves. Photosynthetic rates of the oldest and youngest pair of mature leaves returned to values comparable to those of similar-aged leaves of nonstressed soybean plants.

  4. Soil nitrogen availability and plant genotype modify the nutrition strategies of M. truncatula and the associated rhizosphere microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Zancarini

    Full Text Available Plant and soil types are usually considered as the two main drivers of the rhizosphere microbial communities. The aim of this work was to study the effect of both N availability and plant genotype on the plant associated rhizosphere microbial communities, in relation to the nutritional strategies of the plant-microbe interactions, for six contrasted Medicago truncatula genotypes. The plants were provided with two different nutrient solutions varying in their nitrate concentrations (0 mM and 10 mM. First, the influence of both nitrogen availability and Medicago truncatula genotype on the genetic structure of the soil bacterial and fungal communities was determined by DNA fingerprint using Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA. Secondly, the different nutritional strategies of the plant-microbe interactions were evaluated using an ecophysiological framework. We observed that nitrogen availability affected rhizosphere bacterial communities only in presence of the plant. Furthermore, we showed that the influence of nitrogen availability on rhizosphere bacterial communities was dependent on the different genotypes of Medicago truncatula. Finally, the nutritional strategies of the plant varied greatly in response to a modification of nitrogen availability. A new conceptual framework was thus developed to study plant-microbe interactions. This framework led to the identification of three contrasted structural and functional adaptive responses of plant-microbe interactions to nitrogen availability.

  5. Soil nitrogen availability and plant genotype modify the nutrition strategies of M. truncatula and the associated rhizosphere microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zancarini, Anouk; Mougel, Christophe; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Prudent, Marion; Salon, Christophe; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Plant and soil types are usually considered as the two main drivers of the rhizosphere microbial communities. The aim of this work was to study the effect of both N availability and plant genotype on the plant associated rhizosphere microbial communities, in relation to the nutritional strategies of the plant-microbe interactions, for six contrasted Medicago truncatula genotypes. The plants were provided with two different nutrient solutions varying in their nitrate concentrations (0 mM and 10 mM). First, the influence of both nitrogen availability and Medicago truncatula genotype on the genetic structure of the soil bacterial and fungal communities was determined by DNA fingerprint using Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA). Secondly, the different nutritional strategies of the plant-microbe interactions were evaluated using an ecophysiological framework. We observed that nitrogen availability affected rhizosphere bacterial communities only in presence of the plant. Furthermore, we showed that the influence of nitrogen availability on rhizosphere bacterial communities was dependent on the different genotypes of Medicago truncatula. Finally, the nutritional strategies of the plant varied greatly in response to a modification of nitrogen availability. A new conceptual framework was thus developed to study plant-microbe interactions. This framework led to the identification of three contrasted structural and functional adaptive responses of plant-microbe interactions to nitrogen availability.

  6. Optimal concentration for sugar transport in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kaare H; Savage, Jessica A; Holbrook, N Michele

    2013-06-06

    Vascular plants transport energy in the form of sugars from the leaves where they are produced to sites of active growth. The mass flow of sugars through the phloem vascular system is determined by the sap flow rate and the sugar concentration. If the concentration is low, little energy is transferred from source to sink. If it is too high, sap viscosity impedes flow. An interesting question is therefore at which concentration is the sugar flow optimal. Optimization of sugar flow and transport efficiency predicts optimal concentrations of 23.5 per cent (if the pressure differential driving the flow is independent of concentration) and 34.5 per cent (if the pressure is proportional to concentration). Data from more than 50 experiments (41 species) collected from the literature show an average concentration in the range from 18.2 per cent (all species) to 21.1 per cent (active loaders), suggesting that the phloem vasculature is optimized for efficient transport at constant pressure and that active phloem loading may have developed to increase transport efficiency.

  7. Temporal variation of the total nitrogen concentration in aereal organs of nitrogen fixing and non fixing riparian species

    OpenAIRE

    Llinares, F.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in nitrogen concentration was determinated in samples of Alnus glutinosa, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Populus x canadiensis and Ailanthus altissima leaves, petioles and branches periodically during a year. Maximum nitrogen percentage was found in diazotrophic species (Alnus and Elaeagnus) and the nitrogen retranslocation form branches was higher (2.5 times) in no fixing species. Se estudian 10s cambios en la concentración de nitrógeno en Alnus glutinosa, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Populus...

  8. Particulates, not plants, dominate nitrogen processing in a septage-treating aerated pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamersley, M Robert; Howes, Brian L; White, David S

    2003-01-01

    In pond and wetland systems for wastewater treatment, plants are often thought to enhance the removal of ammonium and nitrogen through the activities of root-associated bacteria. In this study, we examined the role of plant roots in an aerated pond system with floating plants designed to treat high-strength septage wastewater. We performed both laboratory and full-scale experiments to test the effect of different plant root to septage ratios on nitrification and denitrification, and measured the abundances of nitrifying bacteria associated with roots and septage particulates. Root-associated nitrifying bacteria did not play a significant role in ammonium and total nitrogen removal. Investigations of nitrifier populations showed that only 10% were associated with water hyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] roots (at standard facility plant densities equivalent to 2.2 wet g roots L(-1) septage); instead, nitrifiers were found almost entirely (90%) associated with suspended septage particulates. The role of root-associated nitrifiers in nitrification was examined in laboratory batch experiments where high plant root concentrations (7.4 wet g L(-1), representing a 38% net increase in total nitrifier populations over plant-free controls) yielded a corresponding increase (55%) in the non-substrate-limited nitrification rate (V(max)). However, within the full-scale septage-treating pond system, nitrification and denitrification rates remained unchanged when plant root concentrations were increased to 7.1 g roots L(-1) (achieved by increasing the surface area available for plants while maintaining the same tank volume). Under normal facility operating conditions, nitrification was limited by ammonium concentration, not nitrifier availability. Maximizing plant root concentrations was found to be an inefficient mechanism for increasing nitrification in organic particulate-rich wastewaters such as septage.

  9. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aliasgharzad N. Aliasgharzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA. In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari were inoculated with these bacterial strains and three ranges of soil water potential (W1: -10 to -20, W2: -40 to -50 and W3: -65 to -75 kPa were applied to the pots. All strains were positive in NRA test and the highest (7.63mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was recorded for AC49-VII and the least (0.23mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was belong to AC51-VI. Leaf and root NRA, root and shoot nitrogen concentrations, and dry weights of root and shoot decreased by increasing water deficit stress. All four bacterial strains caused a significant enhancement in root NRA and in each water deficit level, the higher root NRA was recorded in AC46-I and AC49-VII inoculated plants. The highest leaf NRA was achieved by AC49-VII. The mean increment of root NRA by bacterial strains was 171% compared to the non-bacterial plants. Moreover, at the highest level of water deficit stress, the highest dry weight and nitrogen concentration in root and shoot were obtained by AC46-I and AC49-VII treatments.

  10. Nitrogen for growth of stock plants and production of strawberry runner tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeimi Isabel Janisch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine growth and dry matter partitioning among organs of strawberry stock plants under five Nitrogen concentrations in the nutrient solution and its effects on emission and growth of runner tips. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions, from September 2010 to March 2011, in a soilless system with Oso Grande and Camino Real cultivars. Nitrogen concentrations of 5.12, 7.6, 10.12 (control, 12.62 and 15.12 mmol L-1 in the nutrient solution were studied in a 5x2 factorial randomised experimental design. All runner tips bearing at least one expanded leaf (patent requested were collected weekly and counted during the growth period. The number of leaves, dry matter (DM of leaves, crown and root, specific leaf area and leaf area index (LAI was determined at the final harvest. Increasing N concentration in the nutrient solution from 5.12 to 15.12 mmol L-1 reduces growth of crown, roots and LAI of strawberry stock plants but did not affect emission and growth of runner tips. It was concluded that for the commercial production of plug plants the optimal nitrogen concentration in the nutrient solution should be 5.12 mmol L-1.

  11. Biophysical controls over concentration and depth distribution of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in desert playas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Owen P.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2016-12-01

    Playa wetlands are important areas of soil organic carbon and nutrient storage in drylands. We conducted this study to assess how catchment biophysical variables control soil organic carbon and nitrogen in playas and how playas function differently than upland ecosystems. We found that playa organic carbon and nitrogen corresponded primarily with catchment vegetation cover and secondarily with catchment area, slope, and soil texture. The effect of increased organic matter production associated with high catchment vegetation cover overshadowed the potential effect of reduced run-on. We also found soil carbon and nitrogen profiles to be significantly shallower in playas than uplands. This trend is correlated with evidence of sedimentation and shallow-rooted plants in playas. Upland soils had a deeper carbon and nitrogen profile, which correlated with organic matter being generated by deeply rooted vegetation. In playas, C:N ratios remained constant through depth but in uplands, C:N ratios increased through depth. We found evidence that differences in rooting depth distributions and soil texture may explain these C:N variations between uplands and playas. In uplands, clay concentration increased with depth, whereas in playas, clay concentration did not change with depth, which highlighted the important role of sedimentation in these ecosystems. Our results suggest that small changes in playa catchment vegetation cover in response to climate change or grazing intensity would greatly impact playa soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. This effect would be due to the playa soils dependence on allochthonous organic matter and the large upland area that drains into playas.

  12. The plant nitrogen mobilization promoted by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus leaves depends on fungus pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, Virginie; Cadiou, Sandrine; Pageau, Karine; Laugé, Richard; Reisdorf-Cren, Michèle; Langin, Thierry; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen plays an essential role in the nutrient relationship between plants and pathogens. Some studies report that the nitrogen-mobilizing plant metabolism that occurs during abiotic and biotic stress could be a 'slash-and-burn' defence strategy. In order to study nitrogen recycling and mobilization in host plants during pathogen attack and invasion, the Colletotrichum lindemuthianum/Phaseolus vulgaris interaction was used as a model. C. lindemuthianum is a hemibiotroph that causes anthracnose disease on P. vulgaris. Non-pathogenic mutants and the pathogenic wild-type strain were used to compare their effects on plant metabolism. The deleterious effects of infection were monitored by measuring changes in chlorophyll, protein, and amino acid concentrations. It was shown that amino acid composition changed depending on the plant-fungus interaction and that glutamine accumulated mainly in the leaves infected by the pathogenic strain. Glutamine accumulation correlated with the accumulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1 alpha) mRNA. The most striking result was that the GS1 alpha gene was induced in all the fungus-infected leaves, independent of the strain used for inoculation, and that GS1 alpha expression paralleled the PAL3 and CHS defence gene expression. It is concluded that a role of GS1 alpha in plant defence has to be considered.

  13. Effects of Plant Density and Nitrogen Application Rate on Grain Yield and Nitrogen Uptake of Super Hybrid Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xian-qing; ZHU De-feng; CHEN Hui-zhe; ZHANG Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    The nitrogen uptake, yield and its components for two super-high-yielding hybrid rice combinations, Guodao 6 and Eryou 7954 were investigated under different plant densities (15, 18, and 21 plants/m2) and different nitrogen application rates (120, 150, 180, and 210 kg/hm2). The experiment was conducted on loam soil during 2004-2006 at the experimental farm of the China National Rice Research Institute in Hangzhou, China. In these years, the two hybrid rice clearly showed higher yield at a plant density of 15 plants/m2 with a nitrogen application rate of 180 kg/hm2. Guodao 6 produced an average grain yield of 10 215.6 kg/hm2 across the three years, while the yield of Eryou 7954 was 9 633.0 kg/hm2. With fewer plants per unit-area and larger plants in the plots, the two hybrid rice produced more panicles per plant in three years. The highest nitrogen uptake of the two hybrid rice was at a plant density of 15 plants/m2 with a nitrogen application rate of 180 kg/hm2. Further increasing nitrogen application rate was not advantageous for nitrogen uptake in super-high-yielding rice under the same plant density.

  14. ROLE OF ETHYLENE IN RESPONSES OF PLANTS TO NITROGEN AVAILABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Iqbal R Khan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene is a plant hormone involved in several physiological processes and regulates the plant development during the whole life. Stressful conditions usually activate ethylene biosynthesis and signalling in plants. The availability of nutrients, shortage or excess, influences plant metabolism and ethylene plays an important role in plant adaptation under suboptimal conditions. Among the plant nutrients, the nitrogen (N is one the most important mineral element required for plant growth and development. The availability of N significantly influences plant metabolism, including ethylene biology. The interaction between ethylene and N affects several physiological process such as leaf gas exchanges, roots architecture, leaf, fruits and flowers development. Low plant N use efficiency leads to N loss and N deprivation, which affect ethylene biosynthesis and tissues sensitivity, inducing cell damage and ultimately lysis. Plants may respond differently to N availability balancing ethylene production through its signalling network. This review discusses the recent advances in the interaction between N availability and ethylene at whole plant and different organ levels, and explores how N availability induces ethylene biology and plant responses. Exogenously applied ethylene seems to cope the stress conditions and improves plant physiological performance. This can be explained considering the expression of ethylene biosynthesis and signalling genes under different N availability. A greater understanding of the regulation of N by means of ethylene modulation may help to increase N use efficiency and directly influence crop productivity under conditions of limited N availability, leading to positive effects on the environment. Moreover, efforts should be focused on the effect of N deficiency or excess in fruit trees, where ethylene can have detrimental effects especially during postharvest.

  15. Effects of nitrogen and plant density on dwarf sunflower hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Süzer S.

    2010-01-01

    This research was carried out to determine the seed yield and some yield components of two dwarf hybrids as compared to one standard-height sunflower hybrid (Helianthus annuus L.) at different nitrogen rates and planting densities. The study was carried out under natural rainfed conditions at the Thrace Agricultural Research Institute in Edirne-Turkey between 1999 and 2001. The experiments were set up in split-split plots in a randomized complete block desi...

  16. Effects of high nitrogen concentrations on the growth of submersed macrophytes at moderate phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan; Shao, Jian-Chun; Liang, Xiao-Min; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-10-15

    Eutrophication of lakes leading to loss of submersed macrophytes and higher turbidity is a worldwide phenomenon, attributed to excessive loading of phosphorus (P). However, recently, the role of nitrogen (N) for macrophyte recession has received increasing attention. Due to the close relationship between N and P loading, disentanglement of the specific effects of these two nutrients is often difficult, and some controversy still exists as to the effects of N. We studied the effects of N on submersed macrophytes represented by Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara in pots positioned at three depths (0.4 m, 0.8 m, and 1.2 m to form a gradient of underwater light conditions) in 10 large ponds having moderate concentrations of P (TP 0.03 ± 0.04 mg L(-1)) and five targeted concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) (0.5, 2, 10, 20, and 100 mg L(-1)), there were two ponds for each treatment. To study the potential shading effects of other primary producers, we also measured the biomass of phytoplankton (ChlaPhyt) and periphyton (ChlaPeri) expressed as chlorophyll a. We found that leaf length, leaf mass, and root length of macrophytes declined with increasing concentrations of TN and ammonium, while shoot number and root mass did not. All the measured growth indices of macrophytes declined significantly with ChlaPhyt, while none were significantly related to ChlaPeri. Neither ChlaPhyt nor ChlaPeri were, however, significantly negatively related to the various N concentrations. Our results indicate that shading by phytoplankton unrelated to the variation in N loading and perhaps toxic stress exerted by high nitrogen were responsible for the decline in macrophyte growth.

  17. Estimating the Total Nitrogen Concentration of Reed Canopy with Hyperspectral Measurements Considering a Non-Uniform Vertical Nitrogen Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhua Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The total nitrogen concentration (NC, g/100 g of wetland plants is an important parameter to estimate the wetland health status and to calculate the nitrogen storage of wetland plants. Remote sensing has been widely used to estimate biophysical, physiological, and biochemical parameters of plants. However, current studies place little emphasis on NC estimations by only taking nitrogen’s vertical distribution into consideration, resulting in limited accuracy and decreased practical value of the results. The main goal of this study is to develop a model, considering a non-uniform vertical nitrogen distribution to estimate the total NC of the reed canopy, which is one of the wetland’s dominant species, using hyperspectral data. Sixty quadrats were selected and measured based on an experimental design that considered vertical layer divisions within the reed canopy. Using the measured NCs of different leaf layers and corresponding spectra from the quadrats, the results indicated that the vertical distribution law of the NC was distinct, presenting an initial increase and subsequent decrease from the top layer to the bottom layer. The spectral indices MCARI/MTVI2, TCARI/OSAVI, MMTCI, DCNI, and PPR/NDVI had high R2 values when related to NC (R2 > 0.5 and low R2 when related to LAI (R2 < 0.2 and could minimize the influence of LAI and increase the sensitivity to changes in NC of the reed canopy. The relative variation rates (Rv, % of these spectral indices, calculated from each quadrat, also indicated that the top three layers of the reed canopy were an effective depth to estimate NCs using hyperspectral data. A model was developed to estimate the total NC of the whole reed canopy based on PPR/DNVI with R2 = 0.88 and RMSE = 0.37%. The model, which considered the vertical distribution patterns of the NC and the effective canopy layers, has demonstrated great potential to estimate the total NC of the whole reed canopy.

  18. CHROMIUM CONCENTRATION IN TEHRAN ELECTROPLATING PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasseddin

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazards of soluable hexa and trivalent chromium have been documented by many investigators. But there was no information regarding safety of about 5000 workers at exposure risk to chromium in 600 primitive electroplating work shops of Tehran. During this study more than 70% of work shops were inactive due to some of their own problems. Out of active plants those that were relatively more cooperative 43 manual and 3 semi automatic were investigated for chromium concentration both by personal and environmental Sampling. The Samples were analyzed by AAS and cholormetry. In 30% of personal and 40% of environmental samples both total and Cr+6 were higher than ACGIH’S TLV. In one of semiautomatic plant Cr=6 was as high as 0.71 mg/m.3.Regarding injuries, following observations were made: Nasal wound 85%, skin irritation 73% , Dermatitis 35% and some other chromium related injuries including 2 cases of Septum perforations.

  19. [Variation of nitrogen during the high suspended sediments concentration water supply in an artificial shallow lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-yuan; Shen, Yu; Yang, Shi-ying

    2013-09-01

    The effect of water quality and suspended sediments in the process of water supply is of an increasing concern recently in an artificial shallow lake. The water supply from the Yellow River to Dongchang Lake happened on April 23rd to 25th, 2012. The synchronous monitoring of flow velocity, suspended sediment concentration, dissolved nitrogen and particulate nitrogen concentration was conducted during the three days in five monitoring sites of the longitudinal profile from inlet to outlet. The spatio-temporal variation of nitrogen and the relationship between nitrogen concentration and suspended sediment concentration was analyzed. Moreover, the analysis of different nitrogen forms in surface water and bottom sediment was also made in the whole lake before and after the water supply. Results showed that the process of water supplement had an obvious effect on flow velocities and suspended sediment concentrations around the inlet area. The influence area was a limited scope. The spatial distribution of nitrogen presented a certain concentration gradient along the flow direction. Around the water inlet, concentrations of all nitrogen forms in water and bottom sediment was higher than those in other lake zones. The amplitude of variation of all nitrogen concentrations in surface water, suspended sediments showed a decreasing trend from water inlet to outlet. And concentrations of total dissolved and particulate nitrogen increased at different ratios after water supply in the lake. Total particulate nitrogen concentration increase was higher. It revealed the water supply of the Yellow River had a great influence on lake water. The dissolved nitrogen was the main nitrogen form in water supply. The ratio of total dissolved nitrogen to particulate nitrogen was 7.3 : 1. Nitrate was the primary form in dissolved nitrogen, and ammonium was the primary form in particulate nitrogen, respectively. The correlation between concentration of suspended sediments and ammonium, total

  20. Foliage plants for indoor removal of the primary combustion gases carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.; Mesick, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Foliage plants were evaluated for their ability to sorb carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, the two primary gases produced during the combustion of fossil fuels and tobacco. The spider plant (Chlorophytum elatum var. vittatum) could sorb 2.86 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in a 6 h photoperiod. The golden pothos (Scindapsus aureus) sorbed 0.98 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in the same time period. In a system with the spider plant, greater than or equal to 99 percent of an initial concentration of 47 ppm NO2 could be removed in 6 h from a void volume of approximately 0.35 cu m. One spider plant potted in a 3.8 liter container can sorb 3300 micrograms CO and effect the removal of 8500 micrograms NO2/hour, recognizing the fact that a significant fraction of NO2 at high concentrations will be lost by surface sorption, dissolving in moisture, etc.

  1. Impact of cotton planting date and nitrogen fertilization on Bemisia argentifolii populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONGBI; DONG-MEILIN; KEH-SHENLII; NICKC.TOSCANO

    2005-01-01

    The silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring) is a widely distributed pest of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and the population levels may be affected by rates of nitrogen fertilization and planting date. Field experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of cotton planting date and nitrogen fertilization on silverleaf whitefly population dynamics. Cotton was planted on 26 April and 8 June, for the early and late plantings, respectively. Nitrogen treatments consisted of soil applications of 0, 112, 168 and 224 kg of nitrogen per hectare. The population levels of adult whiteflies were much higher on early-planted cotton than on late planting. Also, increased numbers of adult whiteflies on both early and late plantings occurred with increasing amounts of applied nitrogen.Applied nitrogen increased seed cotton yields of early plantings but had no effect on the yields of late plantings.

  2. Effect of pre-planting irrigation, maize planting pattern and nitrogen on weed seed bank population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, E; Vazan, S; Oveisi, M

    2011-01-01

    Pre-planting irrigation and planting patterns are important factors in weed management that effect on seed bank. Additionally, the nitrogen is the most important factor in plant growth that affects weed-crop competition and ultimately, seed rain into the soil. A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of nitrogen application rates, pre-planting irrigation and maize planting patterns on weed seed bank population. Experimental factors were nitrogen rates at 4 levels (200, 300, 400 and 500 kg per hectare) as main plot; and pre-planting irrigation at 2 levels (irrigation before planting plus weeding emerged seedlings and, irrigation after sowing), and maize planting patterns (one-row and two-row planting of maize with same density per square of row length) that were assigned in a factorial arrangement to the sub plots. Soil samples were taken at the beginning of the season (before planting of maize) and at the end of the season (after harvest) at depth of 0-5 cm in the fixed quadrates (60 cm x 60 cm). The weed seeds were extracted from the soil samples and were identified using standard methods. The majority of weed seed bank populations included 6 weed species: Portulaca oleracea, Chenopodium album, Amaranthus retroflexus, Sorghum halepense, Daturea stramonium, Xanthium strumarium. Results showed that population of weed seed bank increased significantly with increasing nitrogen rate. The increasing rate was different between one-row and two-row planting patterns. The parameters indicated that seed bank population was much higher in a one row planting pattern of maize. With two-row planting, seed bank was decreased by 34, 26, 20 and 5% at 200, 300, 400 and 500 kg N/ha, respectively. Pre-planting irrigation was also found an effective implement to reduce the weed seed bank. When pre-planting irrigation was applied, seed bank was decreased by 57, 43, 34 and 9% at 200, 300, 400 and 500 kg N/ha. Increasing nitrogen because of weed's better growth and higher seed

  3. Effect of urea and nickel on growth, physiological traits and total nitrogen concentration of lettuce in hydroponic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nazari Mamaqani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate fertilizers are common source of nitrogen (N in nutrient solutions. Substitution of urea with nitrate could reduce this dependence. Also, nickel (Ni is essential for activation of urease in plants fed with urea. For this aim, a factorial experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with four replicates. Urea in five levels (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/L and Ni in two levels (0 and 2 mg/L were used for lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Siyahoo in hydroponics. The results showed that the highest fresh and dry weight of leaves and stem were obtained in 50 mg/L urea treatment. Leaf area was reduced in treatments having more than 25 mg/L urea concentration. The highest chlorophyll index and maximal quantum yield of PS II photochemistry efficiency (Fv/Fm were obtained in 100 and 75 mg/L urea, respectively. Total nitrogen concentration of leaves was increased significantly with increasing urea concentration; plants treated with 100 mg/L urea had the highest total nitrogen concentration. Nickel application reduced yield and physiological traits of lettuce; while it had no significant effect on total nitrogen concentration.

  4. Plant Nitrogen Acquisition Under Low Availability: Regulation of Uptake and Root Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Takatoshi; Krapp, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire nitrogen nutrients from the soil through their roots mostly in the form of ammonium and nitrate. Since these nutrients are scarce in natural soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses to cope with the environment. One of the most important responses is the regulation of nitrogen acquisition efficiency. This review provides an update on the molecular determinants of two major drivers of the nitrogen acquisition efficiency: (i) uptake activity (e.g. high-affinity nitrogen transporters) and (ii) root architecture (e.g. low-nitrogen-availability-specific regulators of primary and lateral root growth). Major emphasis is laid on the regulation of these determinants by nitrogen supply at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which enables plants to optimize nitrogen acquisition efficiency under low nitrogen availability.

  5. Plant nitrogen-use strategy as a driver of rhizosphere archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidiser abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thion, Cécile E; Poirel, Jessica D; Cornulier, Thomas; De Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D; Prosser, James I

    2016-07-01

    The influence of plants on archaeal (AOA) and bacterial (AOB) ammonia oxidisers (AO) is poorly understood. Higher microbial activity in the rhizosphere, including organic nitrogen (N) mineralisation, may stimulate both groups, while ammonia uptake by plants may favour AOA, considered to prefer lower ammonia concentration. We therefore hypothesised (i) higher AOA and AOB abundances in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and (ii) that AOA are favoured over AOB in the rhizosphere of plants with an exploitative strategy and high N demand, especially (iii) during early growth, when plant N uptake is higher. These hypotheses were tested by growing 20 grassland plants, covering a spectrum of resource-use strategies, and determining AOA and AOB amoA gene abundances, rhizosphere and bulk soil characteristics and plant functional traits. Joint Bayesian mixed models indicated no increase in AO in the rhizosphere, but revealed that AOA were more abundant in the rhizosphere of exploitative plants, mostly grasses, and less abundant under conservative plants. In contrast, AOB abundance in the rhizosphere and bulk soil depended on pH, rather than plant traits. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for plant-ammonia oxidiser interactions and for links between plant functional traits and ammonia oxidiser ecology. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Determination of the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was determined from of the rate of retracting nitrogen from thin initially N-saturated coupons. Nitrogen saturated homogeneous foils of expanded austenite were obtained by nitriding AISI 304 and AISI 316 in pure...... ammonia at 693 K and 718 K. Denitriding experiments were performed by equilibrating the foils with a successively lower nitrogen activity, as imposed by a gas mixture of ammonia and hydrogen. The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was approximated...... in the composition range where nitrogen can be extracted by hydrogen gas at the diffusion temperature. Numerical simulation of the denitriding experiments shows that the thus determined concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are an accurate approximation of the actual diffusivity of nitrogen in expanded...

  7. Scaling of nitrogen and phosphorus across plant organs in shrubland biomes across Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xian; Tang, Zhiyao; Ji, Chengjun; Liu, Hongyan; Ma, Wenhong; Mohhamot, Anwar; Shi, Zhaoyong; Sun, Wei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiangping; Wu, Xian; Yu, Shunli; Yue, Ming; Zheng, Chengyang

    2014-06-26

    Allocation of limiting resources, such as nutrients, is an important adaptation strategy for plants. Plants may allocate different nutrients within a specific organ or the same nutrient among different organs. In this study, we investigated the allocation strategies of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in leaves, stems and roots of 126 shrub species from 172 shrubland communities in Northern China using scaling analyses. Results showed that N and P have different scaling relationships among plant organs. The scaling relationships of N concentration across different plant organs tended to be allometric between leaves and non-leaf organs, and isometric between non-leaf organs. Whilst the scaling relationships of P concentration tended to be allometric between roots and non-root organs, and isometric between non-root organs. In arid environments, plant tend to have higher nutrient concentration in leaves at given root or stem nutrient concentration. Evolutionary history affected the scaling relationships of N concentration slightly, but not affected those of P concentration. Despite fairly consistent nutrients allocation strategies existed in independently evolving lineages, evolutionary history and environments still led to variations on these strategies.

  8. Estimation of leaf nitrogen concentration on winter wheat by multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, Vincent; Marlier, Guillaume; Destain, Marie-France; Dumont, Benjamin; Mercatoris, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Precision agriculture can be considered as one of the solutions to optimize agricultural practice such as nitrogen fertilization. Nitrogen deficiency is a major limitation to crop production worldwide whereas excess leads to environmental pollution. In this context, some devices were developed as reflectance spot sensors for on-the-go applications to detect leaves nitrogen concentration deduced from chlorophyll concentration. However, such measurements suffer from interferences with the crop growth stage and the water content of plants. The aim of this contribution is to evaluate the nitrogen status in winter wheat by using multispectral imaging. The proposed system is composed of a CMOS camera and a set of filters ranged from 450 nm to 950 nm and mounted on a wheel which moves due to a stepper motor. To avoid the natural irradiance variability, a white reference is used to adjust the integration time. The segmentation of Photosynthetically Active Leaves is performed by using Bayes theorem to extract their mean reflectance. In order to introduce information related to the canopy architecture, i.e. the crop growth stage, textural attributes are also extracted from raw images at different wavelength ranges. Nc was estimated by partial least squares regression (R² = 0.94). The best attribute was homogeneity extracted from the gray level co-occurrence matrix (R² = 0.91). In order to select in limited number of filters, best subset selection was performed. Nc could be estimated by four filters (450 +/- 40 nm, 500 +/- 20 nm, 650 +/- 40 nm, 800 +/- 50 nm) (R² = 0.91).

  9. Effect of plant species on nitrogen recovery in aquaponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Brotto, Ariane Coelho; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen transformations in aquaponics with different edible plant species, i.e., tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and pak choi (Brassica campestris L. subsp. chinensis) were systematically examined and compared. Results showed that nitrogen utilization efficiencies (NUE) of tomato- and pak choi-based aquaponic systems were 41.3% and 34.4%, respectively. The abundance of nitrifying bacteria in tomato-based aquaponics was 4.2-folds higher than that in pak choi-based aquaponics, primarily due to its higher root surface area. In addition, tomato-based aquaponics had better water quality than that of pak choi-based aquaponics. About 1.5-1.9% of nitrogen input were emitted to atmosphere as nitrous oxide (N2O) in tomato- and pak choi-based aquaponic systems, respectively, suggesting that aquaponics is a potential anthropogenic source of N2O emission. Overall, this is the first intensive study that examined the role plant species played in aquaponics, which could provide new strategy in designing and operating an aquaponic system.

  10. Membrane Transporters for Nitrogen, Phosphate and Potassium Uptake in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Fang Chen; Yi Wang; Wei-Hua Wu

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium are essential nutrients for plant growth and development. However, their contents in soils are limited so that crop production needs to invest a lot for fertilizer supply. To explore the genetic potentialities of crops (or plants) for their nutrient utilization efficiency has been an important research task for many years. In fact, a number of evidences have revealed that plants, during their evolution, have developed many morphological, physiological,biochemical and molecular adaptation mechanisms for acquiring nitrate, phosphate and potassium under stress conditions.Recent discoveries of many transporters and channels for nitrate, phosphate and potassium up take have opened upopportunities to study the molecular regulatory mechanisms for acquisition of these nutrients. This review aims to briefly discuss the genes and gene families for these transporters and channels. In addition, the functions and regulation of some important transporters and channels are particularly emphasized.

  11. Plant Growth-Promoting Nitrogen-Fixing Enterobacteria Are in Association with Sugarcane Plants Growing in Guangxi, China

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The current nitrogen fertilization for sugarcane production in Guangxi, the major sugarcane-producing area in China, is very high. We aim to reduce nitrogen fertilization and improve sugarcane production in Guangxi with the help of indigenous sugarcane-associated nitrogen-fixing bacteria. We initially obtained 196 fast-growing bacterial isolates associated with the main sugarcane cultivar ROC22 plants in fields using a nitrogen-deficient minimal medium and screened out 43 nitrogen-fixing isol...

  12. Efeito da concentração de nitrogênio na solução nutritiva e do número de frutos por planta sobre a produção do meloeiro Effect of nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution and number of fruits per plant on yield of melon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe V. Purquerio

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, na UNESP em Jaboticabal (SP, de junho a novembro de 2001, com o objetivo de avaliar a produção do melão (Cucumis melo var. reticulatus, híbrido Bônus nº2, cultivado em sistema hidropônico NFT, em função da concentração de nitrogênio na solução nutritiva (80, 140, 200 e 300 mg L-1 e número de frutos por planta (2, 3, 4 e livre. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso, em parcelas subdivididas, com seis repetições. Aos 80 dias após o transplantio, foram observados 2, 3, 4 e 5,1 frutos por planta e, posteriormente na colheita, 2, 2,9, 3,0 e 3,4 frutos por planta, respectivamente para os tratamentos com 2, 3, 4 e fixação livre, sendo esta redução atribuída ao abortamento de frutos. Houve redução no peso médio do 1º, 2º e 3º fruto colhido, com o aumento da concentração de nitrogênio. Plantas com o menor número de frutos, apresentaram maior peso médio dos mesmos, porém com menor produção por planta. A maior produção (2.474 g/planta foi obtida com 80 mg L-1 de nitrogênio na solução nutritiva.The effects of different nitrogen concentrations (80; 140; 200 and 300 mg L-1 and fruit number per plant (2; 3; 4 and free setting, were investigated on net melon production (Cucumis melo var. reticulatus, Bonus nº 2 hybrid. The experiment was carried out in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil, in NFT hydroponic system, from June to November, 2001. The experimental design was of randomized split plots, replicated six times. At 80 days after seedling transplant 2; 3; 4 and 5.1 fruits per plant were found. However, at harvest there were 2; 2.9; 3.0 and 3.4 fruits per plant, relative to 2; 3; 4 and free setting per plant treatment. This observed fruit reduction was attributed to fruit abortion. With the increase of nitrogen concentrations a reduction in first, second and third fruit weight was found. Plants with fewer fruits, produced higher average

  13. Nitrogen Uptake Preferences by Plants in Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S.; Wang, L.; D'Odorico, P.

    2005-12-01

    In arid and semiarid ecosystems like African savannas, nutrient availability varies spatially and temporally and nutrients are considered to be a major limiting factor for growth in addition to water availability. Preference for different nitrogen forms presumably enhances the survivorship and fitness of plants since the relative abundances of nitrate and ammonium varies between drier and wetter areas. To test the hypothesis that species developing in dry areas will prefer nitrate whereas species growing in wet areas will prefer ammonium, a controlled experiment using a greenhouse was undertaken. Six native African grass species from different precipitation regimes were used in this study. Two species were from relatively wet areas (Pandamatenga, Botswana, precipitation = 698 mm/year), two were from relatively dry areas (Tshane, Botswana, precipitation = 232 mm/year) and other two were from intermediate environments (Ghanzi, Botswana, precipitation = 400 mm/year). The grass seeds were collected in the field during the dry season of 2004 and using germination pans, were grown in a greenhouse. When individuals were mature, they were transferred into plastic pots (one individual per pot) containing commercial sand. After one week period of adjustment, a 15N labeled fertilizer (NH4NO3) was applied. The total N applied as fertilizer was comparable to the mineralized field N based on a calculated rate for the top 15 cm of soil. A pair of individual plants was treated as an experimental unit. Each plant received the same amount of total N fertilizer, but one was 15NO3 labeled and another was 15NH4 labeled. Nutrient uptake preference was determined by the 15N difference between pairs. The preliminary results with three species shows that, the individuals from dry area ( Enneapogon cenchroides from Tshane) has significantly higher foliar 15N signatures in the 15NO3 labeling treatment (p = 0.0103) and no difference in root 15N signatures. Whereas individuals from the wet

  14. Agronomic Efficiency of Biosolid as Source of Nitrogen to Banana Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Junqueira Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge (SS or biosolid has been studied as source of nutrient for several different plant species. It also contributes to soil fertility recycling organic matter and plant nutrients. This followup work examines a three-year (2001–2004 field experiment designed to evaluate the response of banana plants (Cavendish subgroup to the application of biosolid as source of nitrogen. The treatments consisted of control (mineral PK, no N, three rates of sludge, and two rates of mineral NPK fertilizer. Plant and soil N concentration, fruit yield, plant height, stem diameter, and foliar endurance index were measured. Fruit yield with mineral fertilization or sludge applications did not differ statistically (P>0.05. Application of biosolid resulted in statistically significant higher agronomic efficiency (P<0.05 in comparison to mineral fertilizers. The concentration of soil mineral nitrogen increased using mineral fertilizer or sludge until 0.80 m after three years of application. The effect of the source of N was smaller than the effect of the rate. Biosolid can be used as source of N for banana growers.

  15. Relationship between atmospheric ammonia concentration and nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Erik; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Strandberg, Morten Tune

    2014-01-01

    From April 2006 to April 2007, the geographical and seasonal variation in nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa) and atmospheric ammonia concentrations were measured at five heathland sites. The seasonal variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was small, even though...... there was a large seasonal variation in the air concentration of ammonia. A sizable local variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was found even at the scale of a few kilometres. The nitrogen content in the lichen showed a high correlation to the yearly mean value of the measured ammonia concentration...

  16. The importance of nitrogen and carbohydrate storage for plant growth of the alpine herb Veratrum album

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleijn, David; Treier, Urs; Müller-Schärer, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether nitrogen (N) and carbohydrates reserves allow Veratrum album, an alpine forb, to start spring growth earlier than the neighbouring vegetation and to survive unpredictable disturbances resulting in loss of above-ground biomass.Seasonal dynamics of plant reserves, soil N...... availability and vegetation growth were monitored. Veratrum album shoots were experimentally removed when carbohydrate reserves were at a seasonal minimum and the subsequent changes in biomass and reserves were compared with those in control plants.  Reserves did not give V. album a competitive advantage...... in spring; however, they did function as a buffer against the impact of calamities. Shoot removal resulted in significantly lower root dry weight, higher N concentration in rhizome and roots and lower starch concentrations in rhizome and roots but no plant mortality was observed.Veratrum album used stored N...

  17. Simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles in low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model is presented, which simulates nitrogen concentration-depth profiles as obtained with low temperature gaseous nitriding of stainless steel. The evolution of the calculated nitrogen concentration-depth profiles is compared with experimental nitriding kinetics. It is shown that the...

  18. 40 CFR 52.277 - Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. 52.277 Section 52.277 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. (a) The following rules are being retained...

  19. Plants' use of different nitrogen forms in response to crude oil contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Ming [Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of the Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Centre for Watershed Ecology, Institute of Life Science, Key Laboratory of Poyang Lake Environment and Resource Utilization, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Lu Meng; Yang Qiang; Zhang Xiaodong [Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of the Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiao Ming [College of Life and Environment Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Jiang Lifen; Yang Ji; Fang Changming [Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of the Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen Jiakuan [Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of the Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Centre for Watershed Ecology, Institute of Life Science, Key Laboratory of Poyang Lake Environment and Resource Utilization, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Li Bo, E-mail: bool@fudan.edu.c [Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of the Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Centre for Watershed Ecology, Institute of Life Science, Key Laboratory of Poyang Lake Environment and Resource Utilization, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we investigated Phragmites australis' use of different forms of nitrogen (N) and associated soil N transformations in response to petroleum contamination. {sup 15}N tracer studies indicated that the total amount of inorganic and organic N assimilated by P. australis was low in petroleum-contaminated soil, while the rates of inorganic and organic N uptake on a per-unit-biomass basis were higher in petroleum-contaminated soil than those in un-contaminated soil. The percentage of organic N in total plant-assimilated N increased with petroleum concentration. In addition, high gross N immobilization and nitrification rates relative to gross N mineralization rate might reduce inorganic-N availability to the plants. Therefore, the enhanced rate of N uptake and increased importance of organic N in plant N assimilation might be of great significance to plants growing in petroleum-contaminated soils. Our results suggest that plants might regulate N capture under petroleum contamination. - Plant strategies of utilizing nitrogen in crude oil-contaminated soils.

  20. Plant growth-promoting nitrogen-fixing enterobacteria are in association with sugarcane plants growing in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Li, Zhengyi; Hu, Chunjin; Zhang, Xincheng; Chang, Siping; Yang, Litao; Li, Yangrui; An, Qianli

    2012-01-01

    The current nitrogen fertilization for sugarcane production in Guangxi, the major sugarcane-producing area in China, is very high. We aim to reduce nitrogen fertilization and improve sugarcane production in Guangxi with the help of indigenous sugarcane-associated nitrogen-fixing bacteria. We initially obtained 196 fast-growing bacterial isolates associated with the main sugarcane cultivar ROC22 plants in fields using a nitrogen-deficient minimal medium and screened out 43 nitrogen-fixing isolates. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that 42 of the 43 nitrogen-fixing isolates were affiliated with the genera Enterobacter and Klebsiella. Most of the nitrogen-fixing enterobacteria possessed two other plant growth-promoting activities of IAA production, siderophore production and phosphate solubilization. Two Enterobacter spp. strains of NN145S and NN143E isolated from rhizosphere soil and surface-sterilized roots, respectively, of the same ROC22 plant were used to inoculate micropropagated sugarcane plantlets. Both strains increased the biomass and nitrogen content of the sugarcane seedlings grown with nitrogen fertilization equivalent to 180 kg urea ha(-1), the recommended nitrogen fertilization for ROC22 cane crops at the seedling stage. (15)N isotope dilution assays demonstrated that biological nitrogen fixation contributed to plant growth promotion. These results suggested that indigenous nitrogen-fixing enterobacteria have the potential to fix N(2) associated with sugarcane plants grown in fields in Guangxi and to improve sugarcane production.

  1. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet-Massin, Claire; Giuliano, Simon; Alletto, Lionel; Daydé, Jean; Berger, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys). The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N) supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions), in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions) and in field conditions (FC) on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC) and location (FC) had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC) N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization.

  2. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet-Massin, Claire; Giuliano, Simon; Alletto, Lionel; Daydé, Jean; Berger, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys). The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N) supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions), in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions) and in field conditions (FC) on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC) and location (FC) had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC) N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization. PMID:26192921

  3. Nitrogen Limitation Alters Biomass Production but Enhances Steviol Glycoside Concentration in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Barbet-Massin

    Full Text Available The need for medicinal and aromatic plants for industrial uses creates an opportunity for farmers to produce alternative crops. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a perennial shrub originating from Paraguay, is of increasing interest as a source of zero-calorie natural sweeteners: the steviol glycosides (SVglys. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance of nitrogen (N supply for leaf yield and for SVgly concentrations in leaves, which are the two major components of S. rebaudiana productivity. In this regard, the relationship between leaf N concentration, CO2 assimilation, leaf production and SVgly accumulation was investigated. The experiments were conducted consecutively in growth-chamber (CC: controlled conditions, in greenhouse (SCC: semi-controlled conditions and in field conditions (FC on two genotypes. In CC and SCC, three levels of N fertilization were applied. Plants were grown on four locations in the FC experiment. Both N supply (CC and SCC and location (FC had a significant effect on N content in leaves. When light was not limiting (SCC and FC N content in leaves was positively correlated with CO2 assimilation rate and biomass accumulation. Irrespective of the growth conditions, N content in leaves was negatively correlated with SVgly content. However, increased SVgly content was correlated with a decreased ratio of rebaudioside A over stevioside. The evidence that the increased SVgly accumulation compensates for the negative effect on biomass production suggests that adequate SVgly productivity per plant may be achieved with relatively low fertilization.

  4. Iron deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlotti Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen is a principal limiting nutrient in plant growth and development. Among factors that may limit NO3- assimilation, Fe potentially plays a crucial role being a metal cofactor of enzymes of the reductive assimilatory pathway. Very few information is available about the changes of nitrogen metabolism occurring under Fe deficiency in Strategy I plants. The aim of this work was to study how cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants modify their nitrogen metabolism when grown under iron deficiency. Results The activity of enzymes involved in the reductive assimilation of nitrate and the reactions that produce the substrates for the ammonium assimilation both at root and at leaf levels in Fe-deficient cucumber plants were investigated. Under Fe deficiency, only nitrate reductase (EC 1.7.1.1 activity decreased both at the root and leaf level, whilst for glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2 and glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.1.14 an increase was found. Accordingly, the transcript analysis for these enzymes showed the same behaviour except for root nitrate reductase which increased. Furthermore, it was found that amino acid concentration greatly decreased in Fe-deficient roots, whilst it increased in the corresponding leaves. Moreover, amino acids increased in the xylem sap of Fe-deficient plants. Conclusions The data obtained in this work provided new insights on the responses of plants to Fe deficiency, suggesting that this nutritional disorder differentially affected N metabolism in root and in leaf. Indeed under Fe deficiency, roots respond more efficiently, sustaining the whole plant by furnishing metabolites (i.e. aa, organic acids to the leaves.

  5. Iron deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlotti, Andrea; Vigani, Gianpiero; Zocchi, Graziano

    2012-10-11

    Nitrogen is a principal limiting nutrient in plant growth and development. Among factors that may limit NO3- assimilation, Fe potentially plays a crucial role being a metal cofactor of enzymes of the reductive assimilatory pathway. Very few information is available about the changes of nitrogen metabolism occurring under Fe deficiency in Strategy I plants. The aim of this work was to study how cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants modify their nitrogen metabolism when grown under iron deficiency. The activity of enzymes involved in the reductive assimilation of nitrate and the reactions that produce the substrates for the ammonium assimilation both at root and at leaf levels in Fe-deficient cucumber plants were investigated. Under Fe deficiency, only nitrate reductase (EC 1.7.1.1) activity decreased both at the root and leaf level, whilst for glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) and glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.1.14) an increase was found. Accordingly, the transcript analysis for these enzymes showed the same behaviour except for root nitrate reductase which increased. Furthermore, it was found that amino acid concentration greatly decreased in Fe-deficient roots, whilst it increased in the corresponding leaves. Moreover, amino acids increased in the xylem sap of Fe-deficient plants. The data obtained in this work provided new insights on the responses of plants to Fe deficiency, suggesting that this nutritional disorder differentially affected N metabolism in root and in leaf. Indeed under Fe deficiency, roots respond more efficiently, sustaining the whole plant by furnishing metabolites (i.e. aa, organic acids) to the leaves.

  6. Simultaneous nitrogen, phosphorous, and hardness removal from reverse osmosis concentrate by microalgae cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Wu, Yin-Hu; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Xu, Xue-Qiao; Dao, Guo-Hua; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-05-01

    While reverse osmosis (RO) is a promising technology for wastewater reclamation, RO concentrate (ROC) treatment and disposal are important issues to consider. Conventional chemical and physical treatment methods for ROC present certain limitations, such as relatively low nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies as well as the requirement of an extra process for hardness removal. This study proposes a novel biological approach for simultaneous removal of nitrogen, phosphorus, and calcium (Ca(2+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)) ions from the ROC of municipal wastewater treatment plants by microalgal cultivation and algal biomass production. Two microalgae strains, Chlorella sp. ZTY4 and Scenedesmus sp. LX1, were used for batch cultivation of 14-16 days. Both strains grew well in ROC with average biomass production of 318.7 mg/L and lipid contents up to 30.6%, and nitrogen and phosphorus could be effectively removed with efficiencies of up to 89.8% and 92.7%, respectively. Approximately 55.9%-83.7% Ca(2+) could be removed from the system using the cultured strains. Mg(2+) removal began when Ca(2+) precipitation ceased, and the removal efficiency of the ion could reach up to 56.0%. The most decisive factor influencing Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) removal was chemical precipitation with increases in pH caused by algal growth. The results of this study provide a new biological approach for removing nitrogen, phosphorous, and hardness from ROC. The results suggest that microalgal cultivation presents new opportunities for applying an algal process to ROC treatment. The proposed approach serves dual purposes of nutrient and hardness reduction and production of lipid rich micro-algal biomass.

  7. [Progress in inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Wen; Wei, Ya-Xing

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen is the necessary element in life activity of vegetation, which takes important function in biosynthesis of protein, nucleic acid, chlorophyll, and enzyme etc, and plays a key role in vegetation photosynthesis. The technology about inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing has been the research hotspot since the 70s of last century. With the development of hyperspectral remote sensing technology in recent years, the advantage of spectral bands subdivision in a certain spectral region provides the powerful technology measure for correlative spectral characteristic research on vegetation nitrogen. In the present paper, combined with the newest research production about monitoring vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing published in main geography science literature in recent several years, the principle and correlated problem about monitoring vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing were introduced. From four aspects including vegetation nitrogen spectral index, vegetation nitrogen content inversion based on chlorophyll index, regression model, and eliminating influence factors to inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration, main technology methods about inversion of vegetation nitrogen concentration by hyperspectral remote sensing were detailedly introduced. Correlative research conclusions were summarized and analyzed, and research development trend was discussed.

  8. Experimental analysis of a nitrogen removal process simulation of wastewater land treatment under three different wheat planting densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen contaminant transport,transformation and uptake simulation experiments were conducted in green house under three different planting density of winter wheat.They were Group A,planting density of 0.0208 plants/cm2,Group B,0.1042 plants/cm2,and Group C,0.1415 plants/cm2 .The capacity and ratio of nitrogen removal were different on three kinds of conditions of wastewater land treatment.From analysis of wastewater treatment capacity,wastewater concentration and irrigation intensity for Group C were suitable and nitrogen quantity added was 2 times of that for Group B,2.6 times for Group A while nitrogen residue was only 7.06%.Hence,wastewater irrigation and treatment design with purpose of waste water treatment should select the design with maximum capacity,optimal removal ratio and least residue in soil,which was closely related to crop planting density,crop growth status and also background nitrogen quantity in soil.

  9. Nitrogen and dry-matter partitioning in soybean plants during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley-Henry, L.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The study tested the hypothesis that resupplying nitrogen after a period of nitrogen stress leads to restoration of the balance between root and shoot growth and normal functional activity. Nonnodulated soybean plants were grown hydroponically for 14 days with 1.0 mM NO3- in a complete nutrient solution. One set of plants was continued on the complete nutrient solution for 25 days; a second set was given 0.0 mM NO3- for 25 days; and the third set was given 0.0 mM NO3- for 10 days followed by transfer to the complete solution with 1.0 mM NO3- for 15 days. In continuously nitrogen-stressed plants, emergence and expansion of main-stem and branch leaves were severely inhibited as low nitrogen content limited further growth. This was followed by a shift in partitioning of dry matter from the leaves to the roots, resulting in an initial stimulation of root growth and a decreased shoot:root ratio. Reduced nitrogen also was redistributed from the leaves into the stem and roots. When nitrogen stress was relieved, leaf initiation and expansion were renewed. With the restoration of the balance between root and shoot function, the shoot:root ratio and distribution of reduced nitrogen within the plant organs returned to levels similar to those of nonstressed plants.

  10. Algal uptake of dissolved organic nitrogen in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingtian; Su, Mingzhou; Xi, Beidou; Qian, Guangren; Liu, Jianyong; Hua, Fei; Huo, Shouliang

    2016-12-01

    The algal uptake of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A2O) process was investigated in this study. Anaerobic, aerobic and effluent DON samples from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were separated into hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions using a DAX-8 resin coupled with an anion exchange resin and a nanofiltration (NF) pretreatment. Hydrophilic DON accounted for 66.66%-88.74% of the entire DON for the two plants evaluated. After a 15-day incubation, 16.95%-91.75% DON was bioavailable for algal growth, and untreated samples exhibited higher DON bioavailability, with 52.83% DON average uptake rates, compared with the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions (45.53% and 44.40%, respectively) because the pretreatment caused the inorganic salt to be resistant to algae. Anaerobic untreated samples, hydrophilic fractions and hydrophobic fractions showed higher DON reduction rates and higher biomass accumulation compared with the other DON fractions due to the decomposition of resistant organics by anaerobic and anoxic bacteria. DON in aerobic and effluent samples of plant A was more bioavailable than that of plant B with usages of 27.49%-55.26% DON. DON bioavailability in the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic process decreased in the following order: anaerobic>effluent>aerobic. The DON contents were reduced after anaerobic treatment in the two plants. The EEM-PARAFAC model identified three DON components, including two humic acid-like substances and one protein-like substance in plant A and two protein-like substances and one humic acid-like substance in plant B. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effect of foliar feeding on nitrogen assimilation in alfalfa plants at insufficient molybdenum supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristozkova, Marieta; Geneva, Maria; Stancheva, Ira

    2009-06-01

    The influence of foliar feeding on the nitrogen assimilation in alfalfa plants under conditions of Mo shortage was studied. It was established that foliar fertilization with 0.3% solution of Agroleaf® resulted in increase of nitrogen fixation and nitrogen assimilation in the absence of Mo. Insufficient molybdenum supply leads to significant reduction of plant Mo content and nitrogen-fixing activity, while stress induced amino acids as alanine, GABA, threonine, proline and serine increased repeatedly. The negative effect of Mo deficiency on the enzyme activities related to the primary nitrogen assimilation (NR, GS, GOGAT) and plant growth diminished due to the foliar absorbed nutrients.

  12. Plant-ants feed their host plant, but above all a fungal symbiont to recycle nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Emmanuel; Djiéto-Lordon, Champlain; McKey, Doyle; Selosse, Marc-André; Blatrix, Rumsaïs

    2011-05-07

    In ant-plant symbioses, plants provide symbiotic ants with food and specialized nesting cavities (called domatia). In many ant-plant symbioses, a fungal patch grows within each domatium. The symbiotic nature of the fungal association has been shown in the ant-plant Leonardoxa africana and its protective mutualist ant Petalomyrmex phylax. To decipher trophic fluxes among the three partners, food enriched in (13)C and (15)N was given to the ants and tracked in the different parts of the symbiosis up to 660 days later. The plant received a small, but significant, amount of nitrogen from the ants. However, the ants fed more intensively the fungus. The pattern of isotope enrichment in the system indicated an ant behaviour that functions specifically to feed the fungus. After 660 days, the introduced nitrogen was still present in the system and homogeneously distributed among ant, plant and fungal compartments, indicating efficient recycling within the symbiosis. Another experiment showed that the plant surface absorbed nutrients (in the form of simple molecules) whether or not it is coated by fungus. Our study provides arguments for a mutualistic status of the fungal associate and a framework for investigating the previously unsuspected complexity of food webs in ant-plant mutualisms.

  13. Plant and Endophyte Effect on Fiber, N, and P Concentrations in Tall Fescue

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, James K.; Ben C. Morton; Jagadeesh Mosali

    2011-01-01

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) infected with an endophyte (Neotyphodium spp.) generally has agronomic advantages over endophyte-free tall fescue. The objective of this study was to determine if endophyte presence (E+) or absence (E−) in three tall fescue genotypes affects concentrations of acid detergent fiber (ADF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) in field and greenhouse studies. E+ plants had higher concentrations of ADF and NDF (nonsignificant in one ge...

  14. Responses of leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf area of Populus sibirica seedlings to nitrogen fertilization in a semi-arid area, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.; Han, S. H.; Son, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effects of three rates of nitrogen fertilization on Populus sibirica seedlings in a semi-arid area, Elsentasarkhai, Mongolia. In May 2015, 2-year-old P. sibirica seedlings were planted in the control and three fertilized plots. Urea was applied to each seedling with 5 g (N1), 15 g (N2) and 30 g (N3) in May 2015 and 2016. Leaf nitrogen concentration, total chlorophyll content, leaf area and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured in July 2016 and the differences were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (PSLA, however, leaf area in the N2 plot (3109.9 cm2) was significantly higher than that in the control (494.0 cm2). The N3 treatment significantly increased leaf nitrogen concentration and total chlorophyll content, however, it did not change leaf area. The N2 treatment seems to be suitable for leaf growth of P. sibirica seedlings in the study site. To determine the optimal rate of nitrogen fertilization, the growth and biomass of seedlings after treatments also need to be examined. * This study was supported by Korea Forest Service (S211216L030120).

  15. Bed planting of wheat(Triticum aestivum L.)improves nitrogen use efficiency and grain yield compared to flat planting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul; Majeed; Atif; Muhmood; Abid; Niaz; Shahid; Javid; Zahid; Ashfaq; Ahmad; Syed; Shahid; Hussain; Shah; Asrar; Hussain; Shah

    2015-01-01

    Conventional flat planting is commonly used for growing wheat in Pakistan and the crop is irrigated by flood irrigation, but it leads to ineffective use of applied nitrogen owing to poor aeration and leaching and volatilization losses. The practice also results in greater crop lodging, lower water use efficiency, and crusting of the soil surface. In contrast, bed planting of wheat not only saves water but improves fertilizer use efficiency and grain yield. Three years of pooled data from the present study showed that wheat planting on beds and nitrogen application at 120 kg ha-1produced 15.06% higher grain yield than flat planting at the same nitrogen rate. Similarly, 25.04%, 15.02%, 14.59%, and 29.83% higher nitrogen uptake, nitrogen use, and agronomic and recovery efficiencies, respectively, were recorded for bed compared to flat planting. Wheat planting on beds with a nitrogen application of80 kg ha-1gave a yield similar to that of flat planting with 120 kg ha-1nitrogen. However,the economic return was 29% higher in bed planting as compared to flat planting, when nitrogen was applied at 120 kg ha-1.

  16. Bed planting of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. improves nitrogen use efficiency and grain yield compared to flat planting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Majeed 

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional flat planting is commonly used for growing wheat in Pakistan and the crop is irrigated by flood irrigation, but it leads to ineffective use of applied nitrogen owing to poor aeration and leaching and volatilization losses. The practice also results in greater crop lodging, lower water use efficiency, and crusting of the soil surface. In contrast, bed planting of wheat not only saves water but improves fertilizer use efficiency and grain yield. Three years of pooled data from the present study showed that wheat planting on beds and nitrogen application at 120 kg ha− 1 produced 15.06% higher grain yield than flat planting at the same nitrogen rate. Similarly, 25.04%, 15.02%, 14.59%, and 29.83% higher nitrogen uptake, nitrogen use, and agronomic and recovery efficiencies, respectively, were recorded for bed compared to flat planting. Wheat planting on beds with a nitrogen application of 80 kg ha− 1 gave a yield similar to that of flat planting with 120 kg ha− 1 nitrogen. However, the economic return was 29% higher in bed planting as compared to flat planting, when nitrogen was applied at 120 kg ha− 1.

  17. Exchange of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuninger, C.; Meixner, F. X.; Thielmann, A.; Kuhn, U.; Dindorf, T.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), often denoted as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and ozone (O3) are considered as most important compounds in atmospheric chemistry. In remote areas NOx concentration is related to biological activities of soils and vegetation. The emitted NOx will not entirely be subject of long range transport through the atmosphere. Aside oxidation of NO2 by the OH radical (forming HNO3), a considerable part of it is removed from the atmosphere through the uptake of NO2 by plants. The exchange depends on stomatal activity and on NO2 concentrations in ambient air. It is known that NO2 uptake by plants represents a large NO2 sink, but the magnitude and the NO2 compensation point concentration are still under discussion. Our dynamic chamber system allows exchange measurements of NO2 under field conditions (uncontrolled) as well as studies under controlled laboratory conditions including fumigation experiments. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter (photolytic converter) with subsequent chemiluminescence analysis of the generated NO. Furthermore, as the exchange of NO2 is a complex interaction of transport, chemistry and plant physiology, in our field experiments we determined fluxes of NO, NO2, O3, CO2 and H2O. For a better knowledge of compensation point values for the bi-directional NO2 exchange we investigated a primary representative of conifers, Picea abies, under field and laboratory conditions, and re-analyzed older field data of the deciduous tree Quercus robur.

  18. Divergent selection for amino-nitrogen concentration in sugarbeet roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvements in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing quality, and therefore the cost-effectiveness of processing, will enhance beet sugar’s competitiveness with cane sugar and alternative sweeteners. Amino-nitrogen is one of the naturally occurring constituents of sugarbeet, referred to as impuri...

  19. Soil nitrogen dynamics and Capsicum Annuum sp. plant response to biochar amendment in silt loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Gelybo, Gyorgyi; Dencso, Marton; Toth, Eszter; Farkas, Csilla; Kasa, Ilona; Pokovai, Klara

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the growth of Capsicum Annuum sp. (pepper) in small-scale experiment to observe changes in plant growth and health as reflected by leaf area, plant height, yield, root density, and nitrogen usage. Based on field conditions, part of the study aimed to examine the photosynthetic and photochemical responses of plants to treatments resulting from different plant growth rates. During the 12.5 week long study, four treatments were investigated with biochar amount of 0, 0.5%, 2.5%, and 5.0% (by weight) added to silt loam soil. The plants were placed under natural environmental conditions, such that photosynthetic activities from photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the plants photochemical reflectance index (PRI) could be continuously measured after exposure to sunlight. In this study we found that benefits from biochar addition to silt loam soil most distinguishable occurred in the BC2.5 treatments, where the highest plant yield, highest root density, and highest leaf areas were observed compared to other treatments. Furthermore, data showed that too low (0.5%) or too high (5.0%) biochar addition to the soil had diminishing effects on Capsicum Annuum sp. growth and yield over time. At the end of the 12th week, BC2.5 had 22.2%, while BC0.5 and BC5.0 showed 17.4% and 15.7% increase in yield dry weight respectively compared to controls. The collected data also showed that the PRI values of plants growing on biochar treated soils were generally lower compared to control treatments, which could relate to leaf nitrogen levels. Total nitrogen amount showed marginal changes over time in all treatments. The total nitrogen concentration showed 28.6% and 17.7% increase after the 6th week of the experiment for BC2.5 and BC5.0, respectively, while inorganic nutrients of NO3-N and NH4+-N showed a continuous decrease during the course of the study, with a substantial drop during the first few weeks. The present study provides evidence for impact

  20. Enhanced concentrations of reactive nitrogen species in wildfire smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Katherine B.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Carrico, Christian M.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    During the summer of 2012 the Hewlett Gulch and High Park wildfires burned an area of 400 km2 northwest of Fort Collins, Colorado. These fires both came within 20 km of the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University, allowing for extensive measurements of smoke-impacted air masses over the course of several weeks. In total, smoke plumes were observed at the measurement site for approximately 125 h. During this time, measurements were made of multiple reactive nitrogen compounds, including gas phase species NH3, NOx, and HNO3, and particle phase species NO3- and NH4+, plus an additional, unspeciated reactive nitrogen component that is measured by high temperature conversion over a catalyst to NO. Concurrent measurements of CO, levoglucosan and PM2.5 served to confirm the presence of smoke at the monitoring site. Significant enhancements were observed for all of the reactive nitrogen species measured in the plumes, except for NH4+ which did not show enhancements, likely due to the fresh nature of the plume, the presence of sufficient regional ammonia to have already neutralized upwind sulfate, and the warm conditions of the summer measurement period which tend to limit ammonium nitrate formation. Excess mixing ratios for NH3 and NOx relative to excess mixing ratios of CO in the smoke plumes, ΔNH3/ΔCO (ppb/ppb) and ΔNOx/ΔCO (ppb/ppb), were determined to be 0.027 ± 0.002 and 0.0057 ± 0.0007, respectively. These ratios suggest that smoldering combustion was the dominant source of smoke during our plume interceptions. Observations from prior relevant laboratory and field measurements of reactive nitrogen species are also briefly summarized to help create a more comprehensive picture of reactive nitrogen and fire.

  1. Relationships among Mercury Concentration, and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Scalp Hair of Residents from Seven Countries: Effects of Marine Fish and C4 Plants Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Endo

    Full Text Available We analyzed the Hg concentration, and δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values in the scalp hair of residents from seven countries; Vietnam, New Zealand, Spain, the USA, South Korea, Brazil and Japan. Relationships among the data in each country and among the seven countries were then examined. The highest Hg concentration as well as the highest or higher δ¹⁵N value in each country was found in the hair of a heavy marine fish-eater, whereas the lowest Hg concentration and δ¹⁵N value were found in the hair of a vegetarian or non (marginal-fish eater. Hg concentrations were positively correlated with the δ¹⁵N values in each country, and increased markedly in samples with δ¹⁵N values exceeding 9.0 ‰, probably due to fish consumption. The highest Hg concentration could be found in sample, with a δ¹³C value between -19 and -18‰, probably reflecting the δ¹³C value of the marine food web.

  2. Autotrophic denitrification for treatment of wastewater with high concentration of sulphur and nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Fajardo Ortiz, María del Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have contributed to the imbalance of nitrogen and sulphur natural cycles which causes many negative effects in nature due to the emissions of sulphur and nitrogen compounds and their transformations, e.g. rain acid, eutrophication, bad odours etc. To avoid such negative effects on environment, effluents containing high concentrations of both nitrogen and sulphur compounds must be treated previously to their discharge. Nitrification/denitrification is the conventio...

  3. Nutrient allocation strategies of woody plants: an approach from the scaling of nitrogen and phosphorus between twig stems and leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengbing Yan; Peng Li; Yahan Chen; Wenxuan Han; Jingyun Fang

    2016-01-01

    Allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), among plant organs reflects the influences of evolutionary and ecological processes on functional traits of plants, and thus is related to functional groups and environmental conditions. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by exploring the stoichiometric scaling of N and P concentrations between twig stems and leaves of 335 woody species from 12 forest sites across eastern China. Scaling exponents of twig stem N (o...

  4. High nitrogen supply and carbohydrate content reduce fungal endophyte and alkaloid concentration in Lolium perenne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Parsons, Anthony J; Bassett, Shalome; Christensen, Michael J; Hume, David E; Johnson, Linda J; Johnson, Richard D; Simpson, Wayne R; Stacke, Christina; Voisey, Christine R; Xue, Hong; Newman, Jonathan A

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between cool-season grasses and fungal endophytes is widely regarded as mutualistic, but there is growing uncertainty about whether changes in resource supply and environment benefit both organisms to a similar extent. Here, we infected two perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) cultivars (AberDove, Fennema) that differ in carbohydrate content with three strains of Neotyphodium lolii (AR1, AR37, common strain) that differ intrinsically in alkaloid profile. We grew endophyte-free and infected plants under high and low nitrogen (N) supply and used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to estimate endophyte concentrations in harvested leaf tissues. Endophyte concentration was reduced by 40% under high N supply, and by 50% in the higher sugar cultivar. These two effects were additive (together resulting in 75% reduction). Alkaloid production was also reduced under both increased N supply and high sugar cultivar, and for three of the four alkaloids quantified, concentrations were linearly related to endophyte concentration. The results stress the need for wider quantification of fungal endophytes in the grassland-foliar endophyte context, and have implications for how introducing new cultivars, novel endophytes or increasing N inputs affect the role of endophytes in grassland ecosystems.

  5. Growth but not photosynthesis response of a host plant to infection by a holoparasitic plant depends on nitrogen supply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Shen

    Full Text Available Parasitic plants can adversely influence the growth of their hosts by removing resources and by affecting photosynthesis. Such negative effects depend on resource availability. However, at varied resource levels, to what extent the negative effects on growth are attributed to the effects on photosynthesis has not been well elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis responses of the host plant Mikania micrantha to infection by the holoparasite Cuscuta campestris by focusing on the interaction of nitrogen and infection. Mikania micrantha plants fertilized at 0.2, 1 and 5 mM nitrate were grown with and without C. campestris infection. We observed that the infection significantly reduced M. micrantha growth at each nitrate fertilization and more severely at low than at high nitrate. Such alleviation at high nitrate was largely attributed to a stronger influence of infection on root biomass at low than at high nitrate fertilization. However, although C. campestris altered allometry and inhibited host photosynthesis, the magnitude of the effects was independent of nitrate fertilizations. The infection reduced light saturation point, net photosynthesis at saturating irradiances, apparent quantum yield, CO2 saturated rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco, and maximum light-saturated rate of electron transport, and increased light compensation point in host leaves similarly across nitrate levels, corresponding to a similar magnitude of negative effects of the parasite on host leaf soluble protein and Rubisco concentrations, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency and stomatal conductance across nitrate concentrations. Thus, the more severe inhibition in host growth at low than at high nitrate supplies cannot be attributed to a greater parasite-induced reduction in host photosynthesis, but the result of a higher proportion of host resources

  6. Growth but not photosynthesis response of a host plant to infection by a holoparasitic plant depends on nitrogen supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Xu, Shu-Jun; Hong, Lan; Wang, Zhang-Ming; Ye, Wan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic plants can adversely influence the growth of their hosts by removing resources and by affecting photosynthesis. Such negative effects depend on resource availability. However, at varied resource levels, to what extent the negative effects on growth are attributed to the effects on photosynthesis has not been well elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis responses of the host plant Mikania micrantha to infection by the holoparasite Cuscuta campestris by focusing on the interaction of nitrogen and infection. Mikania micrantha plants fertilized at 0.2, 1 and 5 mM nitrate were grown with and without C. campestris infection. We observed that the infection significantly reduced M. micrantha growth at each nitrate fertilization and more severely at low than at high nitrate. Such alleviation at high nitrate was largely attributed to a stronger influence of infection on root biomass at low than at high nitrate fertilization. However, although C. campestris altered allometry and inhibited host photosynthesis, the magnitude of the effects was independent of nitrate fertilizations. The infection reduced light saturation point, net photosynthesis at saturating irradiances, apparent quantum yield, CO2 saturated rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco, and maximum light-saturated rate of electron transport, and increased light compensation point in host leaves similarly across nitrate levels, corresponding to a similar magnitude of negative effects of the parasite on host leaf soluble protein and Rubisco concentrations, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency and stomatal conductance across nitrate concentrations. Thus, the more severe inhibition in host growth at low than at high nitrate supplies cannot be attributed to a greater parasite-induced reduction in host photosynthesis, but the result of a higher proportion of host resources transferred to the parasite at

  7. Nitrogen and COD Removal from Septic Tank Wastewater in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands: Plants Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, R S; Grismer, M E

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated subsurface flow (SSF) constructed wetland treatment performance with respect to organics (COD) and nitrogen (ammonium and nitrate) removal from domestic (septic tank) wastewater as affected by the presence of plants, substrate "rock" cation exchange capacity (CEC), laboratory versus field conditions and use of synthetic as compared to actual domestic wastewater. This article considers the effects of plants on constructed wetland treatment in the field. Each constructed wetland system was comprised of two beds (2.6 m long by 0.28 m wide and deep filled with ~18 mm crushed lava rock) separated by an aeration tank connected in series. The lava rock had a porosity of ~47% and a CEC of 4 meq/100 gm. One pair of constructed wetland systems was planted with cattails in May 2008, while an adjacent pair of systems remained un-planted. Collected septic tank or synthesized wastewater was allowed to gravity feed each constructed wetland system and effluent samples were regularly collected and tested for COD and nitrogen species during four time periods spanning November 2008 through June 2009. These effluent concentrations were tested for statistical differences at the 95% level for individual time periods as well as the overall 6-month period. Organics removal from domestic wastewater was 78.8% and 76.1% in the planted and un-planted constructed wetland systems, respectively, while ammonium removal was 94.5% and 90.2%, respectively. Similarly, organics removal from the synthetic wastewater of equivalent strength was 88.8% and 90.1% for planted and un-planted constructed wetland systems, respectively, while ammonium removal was 96.9% and 97.3%, respectively.

  8. Photorespiration and nitrate assimilation: a major intersection between plant carbon and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-02-01

    C3 carbon fixation has a bad reputation, primarily because it is associated with photorespiration, a biochemical pathway thought to waste a substantial amount of the carbohydrate produced in a plant. This review presents evidence collected over nearly a century that (1) Rubisco when associated with Mn(2+) generates additional reductant during photorespiration, (2) this reductant participates in the assimilation of nitrate into protein, and (3) this nitrate assimilation facilitates the use of a nitrogen source that other organisms tend to avoid. This phenomenon explains the continued dominance of C3 plants during the past 23 million years of low CO2 atmospheres as well as the decline in plant protein concentrations as atmospheric CO2 rises.

  9. Application technique affects the potential of mineral concentrates from livestock manure to replace inorganic nitrogen fertilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, G.; Velthof, G.L.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that mineral concentrates (MCs) produced from livestock manure might partly replace inorganic N fertilizers, thereby further closing the nitrogen (N) cycle. Here, we quantified nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and N loss pathways associated with MCs, compared with inorganic fertil

  10. Plant litter chemistry and mycorrhizal roots promote a nitrogen feedback in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina Wurzburger; Ronald L. Hendrick

    2009-01-01

    1. Relationships between mycorrhizal plants and soil nitrogen (N) have led to the speculation that the chemistry of plant litter and the saprotrophy of mycorrhizal symbionts can function together to...

  11. Litter quality mediated nitrogen effect on plant litter decomposition regardless of soil fauna presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Chao, Lin; Yang, Qingpeng; Wang, Qingkui; Fang, Yunting; Wang, Silong

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen addition has been shown to affect plant litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. The way that nitrogen deposition impacts the relationship between plant litter decomposition and altered soil nitrogen availability is unclear, however. This study examined 18 co-occurring litter types in a subtropical forest in China in terms of their decomposition (1 yr of exposure in the field) with nitrogen addition treatment (0, 0.4, 1.6, and 4.0 mol·N·m(-2) ·yr(-1) ) and soil fauna exclusion (litter bags with 0.1 and 2 cm mesh size). Results showed that the plant litter decomposition rate is significantly reduced because of nitrogen addition; the strength of the nitrogen addition effect is closely related to the nitrogen addition levels. Plant litters with diverse quality responded to nitrogen addition differently. When soil fauna was present, the nitrogen addition effect on medium-quality or high-quality plant litter decomposition rate was -26% ± 5% and -29% ± 4%, respectively; these values are significantly higher than that of low-quality plant litter decomposition. The pattern is similar when soil fauna is absent. In general, the plant litter decomposition rate is decreased by soil fauna exclusion; an average inhibition of -17% ± 1.5% was exhibited across nitrogen addition treatment and litter quality groups. However, this effect is weakly related to nitrogen addition treatment and plant litter quality. We conclude that the variations in plant litter quality, nitrogen deposition, and soil fauna are important factors of decomposition and nutrient cycling in a subtropical forest ecosystem.

  12. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuang Cao

    Full Text Available Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N, which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N. On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10. The compositional

  13. High host-plant nitrogen content: a prerequisite for the evolution of ant-caterpillar mutualism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, L; Rasmann, S; Litsios, G; Fiedler, K; Dubuis, A; Pottier, J; Guisan, A

    2012-08-01

    The amount of nitrogen required to complete an insect's life cycle may vary greatly among species that have evolved distinct life history traits. Myrmecophilous caterpillars in the Lycaenidae family produce nitrogen-rich exudates from their dorsal glands to attract ants for protection, and this phenomenon has been postulated to shape the caterpillar's host-plant choice. Accordingly, it was postulated that evolution towards myrmecophily in Lycaenidae is correlated with the utilization of nitrogen-rich host plants. Although our results were consistent with the evolutionary shifts towards high-nutrient host plants serving as exaptation for the evolution of myrmecophily in lycaenids, the selection of nitrogen-rich host plants was not confined to lycaenids. Butterfly species in the nonmyrmecophilous family Pieridae also preferred nitrogen-rich host plants. Thus, we conclude that nitrogen is an overall important component in the caterpillar diet, independent of the level of myrmecophily, as nitrogen can enhance the overall insect fitness and survival. However, when nitrogen can be obtained through alternative means, as in socially parasitic lycaenid species feeding on ant brood, the selective pressure for maintaining the use of nutrient-rich host plants is relaxed, enabling the colonization of nitrogen-poor host plants.

  14. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of pollen cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of lily (lilium davidii Duch) pollen cell have been studied. The results showed that the Ca2+ concentration was increased when pollen grain was implanted by nitrogen ion with energy 100keV and dose 1013 ions/cra2. However, the increase of Ca2+ concentration was partly inhibited by the addition of Ca2+channel inhibitor depending on dose. And nitrogen ion implantation caused depolarization of pollen cell membrane potential. In other words, membrane potential was increased,but the effect decreased by adding Ca2+ channel inhibitor.However, it was still significantly higher than the membrane potential of control cells. It was indicated that the depolarization of cell membrane potential opened the calcium channel on the membrane that caused the increasing of intraceilular calcium concentration. This might be an earlier step of the effect of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on pollen germination.

  15. Plant Species Richness and Nitrogen Deposition can Alter Microbial Assimilation of New Photosynthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H.; Zak, D.; Reich, P.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial assimilation of recent photosynthate was analyzed in a 6-year-long field experiment to determine how plant species richness impacts microbial metabolism of new photosynthate, and how this may be modified by atmospheric N deposition. Our study was conducted at the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) FACE (Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment) experiment located at the Cedar Creek Natural History area in Minnesota, USA. In this experiment, plant species richness, atmospheric N deposition, and atmospheric CO2 concentration were manipulated in concert. The depleted δ13C of fumigation CO2 enabled us to investigate the effect of plant species richness and atmospheric N deposition on the metabolism of soil microbial communities in the elevated CO2 treatment. We determined the δ13C of bacterial, actinobacterial, and fungal phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). In the elevated CO2 conditions of this study, the δ13C of bacterial PLFAs (i15:0, i16:0, 16:1ω7c, 16:1ω9c, 10Me16:0, and 10Me18:0) and the fungal PLFA 18:1ω9c was significantly lower in species-rich plant communities than in species-poor plant communities, indicating that microbial incorporation of new C increased with plant species richness. Despite an increase in plant production, total PLFA decreased under N deposition by 27%. Moreover, N deposition also decreased fungal relative abundance in species-rich plant communities. In our study, plant species richness directly increased microbial incorporation of new photosynthate, providing a mechanistic link between greater plant detritus production in species-rich plant communities and larger and more active soil microbial community.

  16. Effects of Gibberellic Acid and Nitrogen on Some Physiology Parameters and Micronutrients Concentration in Pistachio under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid mozafari

    2017-02-01

    /63, Tissue (Sandy loam, electrical conductivity (ECe (1 dS m-1, Silt (23.1%, Clay (5.5%, Organic matter (0.5%, Olsen phosphorus (P (5.35 mg kg-1, Ammonium acetate-extractable K (100 mg kg-1 were determined. Nitrogen treatments 3 weeks after planting, dissolved in irrigation water was added to pots. Salinity, after the establishment of the plant (5 weeks after planting, divided into two equal parts and one-week interval dissolved with irrigation water was added to the pot. as well acid gibberellic treatments, as spray after salt treatment was applied at three times and at intervals of one week. Results and discussion: The results showed that the salinity content of carotenoid and Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters significantly reduced but with increasing acid gibberellic and nitrogen application, mentioned parameters were significantly increased, compared to controls. The ability of photosynthesis improved and increased productivity. Mozafari et al studied the pistachio, reported that with increasing salinity from zero to 150 and 300 mM NaCl, carotenoids decreased more than 16% and 22% compared to control respectively. Carotenoids play a most important role in light, protecting plants against stress condition. Salinity application increased leaf proline, but with application of 150 mg nitrogen and 500 mg per liter foliar application of acid gibberellics, this parameter increased by 55 and 26 percent, respectively. Also, combined use of these two treatments increased proline content by 79 percent compared to control. The researchers stated that the increasing gibberellin concentration caused leaf proline increased, so spraying 100 and 200 mg per liter gibberellin significantly increased leaf proline compared with the non-application of gibberellin. The results also showed with increasing salinity increased iron, manganese and zinc concentrations shoots and roots and decreased copper concentrations, but using 150 mg of nitrogen and acid gibberellic consumption concentrations

  17. Finding a nitrogen niche: a systems integration of local and systemic nitrogen signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Krouk, Gabriel; Coruzzi, Gloria M; Ruffel, Sandrine

    2014-10-01

    The ability of plants to sense their nitrogen (N) microenvironment in the soil and deploy strategic root growth in N-rich patches requires exquisite systems integration. Remarkably, this new paradigm for systems biology research has intrigued plant biologists for more than a century, when a split-root framework was first used to study how plants sense and respond to heterogeneous soil nutrient environments. This systemic N-signalling mechanism, allowing plants to sense and forage for mineral nutrients in resource-rich patches, has important implications for agriculture. In this review, we will focus on how advances in the post-genomic era have uncovered the gene regulatory networks underlying systemic N-signalling. After defining how local and systemic N-signalling can be experimentally distinguished for molecular study using a split-root system, the genetic factors that have been shown to mediate local and/or systemic N-signalling are reviewed. Second, the genetic mechanism of this regulatory system is broadened to the whole genome level. To do this, publicly available N-related transcriptomic datasets are compared with genes that have previously been identified as local and systemic N responders in a split-root transcriptome dataset. Specifically, (i) it was found that transcriptional reprogramming triggered by homogeneous N-treatments is composed of both local and systemic responses, (ii) the spatio-temporal signature of local versus systemic responsive genes is defined, and (iii) the conservation of systemic N-signalling between Arabidopsis and Medicago is assessed. Finally, the potential mediators, i.e. metabolites and phytohormones, of the N-related long-distance signals, are discussed.

  18. Nitrogen forms influence microcystin concentration and composition via changes in cyanobacterial community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Eve Monchamp

    Full Text Available The eutrophication of freshwaters is a global health concern as lakes with excess nutrients are often subject to toxic cyanobacterial blooms. Although phosphorus is considered the main element regulating cyanobacterial biomass, nitrogen (N concentration and more specifically the availability of different N forms may influence the overall toxicity of blooms. In this study of three eutrophic lakes prone to cyanobacterial blooms, we examined the effects of nitrogen species and concentrations and other environmental factors in influencing cyanobacterial community structure, microcystin (MC concentrations and MC congener composition. The identification of specific MC congeners was of particular interest as they vary widely in toxicity. Different nitrogen forms appeared to influence cyanobacterial community structure leading to corresponding effects on MC concentrations and composition. Total MC concentrations across the lakes were largely explained by a combination of abiotic factors: dissolved organic nitrogen, water temperature and ammonium, but Microcystis spp. biomass was overall the best predictor of MC concentrations. Environmental factors did not appear to affect MC congener composition directly but there were significant associations between specific MC congeners and particular species. Based on redundancy analyses (RDA, the relative biomass of Microcystis aeruginosa was associated with MC-RR, M. wesenbergii with MC-LA and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae with MC-YR. The latter two species are not generally considered capable of MC production. Total nitrogen, water temperature, ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen influenced the cyanobacterial community structure, which in turn resulted in differences in the dominant MC congener and the overall toxicity.

  19. Nitrogen forms influence microcystin concentration and composition via changes in cyanobacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchamp, Marie-Eve; Pick, Frances R; Beisner, Beatrix E; Maranger, Roxane

    2014-01-01

    The eutrophication of freshwaters is a global health concern as lakes with excess nutrients are often subject to toxic cyanobacterial blooms. Although phosphorus is considered the main element regulating cyanobacterial biomass, nitrogen (N) concentration and more specifically the availability of different N forms may influence the overall toxicity of blooms. In this study of three eutrophic lakes prone to cyanobacterial blooms, we examined the effects of nitrogen species and concentrations and other environmental factors in influencing cyanobacterial community structure, microcystin (MC) concentrations and MC congener composition. The identification of specific MC congeners was of particular interest as they vary widely in toxicity. Different nitrogen forms appeared to influence cyanobacterial community structure leading to corresponding effects on MC concentrations and composition. Total MC concentrations across the lakes were largely explained by a combination of abiotic factors: dissolved organic nitrogen, water temperature and ammonium, but Microcystis spp. biomass was overall the best predictor of MC concentrations. Environmental factors did not appear to affect MC congener composition directly but there were significant associations between specific MC congeners and particular species. Based on redundancy analyses (RDA), the relative biomass of Microcystis aeruginosa was associated with MC-RR, M. wesenbergii with MC-LA and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae with MC-YR. The latter two species are not generally considered capable of MC production. Total nitrogen, water temperature, ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen influenced the cyanobacterial community structure, which in turn resulted in differences in the dominant MC congener and the overall toxicity.

  20. Monitoring plant tissue nitrogen isotopes to assess nearshore inputs of nitrogen to Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Stephen E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Fradkin, Steven C.

    2016-05-31

    Mats of filamentous-periphytic algae present in some nearshore areas of Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, may indicate early stages of eutrophication from nutrient enrichment of an otherwise highly oligotrophic lake. Natural abundance ratios of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) measured in plant tissue growing in nearshore areas of the lake indicate that the major source of nitrogen used by these primary producing plants is derived mainly from atmospherically fixed nitrogen in an undeveloped forested ecosystem. Exceptions to this pattern occurred in the Barnes Point area where elevated δ15N ratios indicate that effluent from septic systems also contribute nitrogen to filamentous-periphytic algae growing in the littoral zone of that area. Near the Lyre River outlet of Lake Crescent, the δ15N of filamentous-periphytic algae growing in close proximity to the spawning areas of a unique species of trout show little evidence of elevated δ15N indicating that nitrogen from on-site septic systems is not a substantial source of nitrogen for these plants. The δ15N data corroborate estimates that nitrogen input to Lake Crescent from septic sources is comparatively small relative to input from motor vehicle exhaust and vegetative sources in undeveloped forests, including litterfall, pollen, and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The seasonal timing of blooms of filamentous-periphytic algal near the lake shoreline is also consistent with nitrogen exported from stands of red alder trees (Alnus rubra). Isotope biomonitoring of filamentous-periphytic algae may be an effective approach to monitoring the littoral zone for nutrient input to Lake Crescent from septic sources.

  1. Nitrogen uptake during one year in subarctic plant functional groups and in microbes after long-term warming and fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in an arctic long-term warming and fertilization experiment, the short-term (days) and longer-term (month and year) nitrogen (N) uptake and allocation in plants, microbes, and soil pools were studied, with 15N-labeling of an organic nitrogen form, glycine. The long-term warming...... and fertilization had no marked effect on soil inorganic N content, but both dissolved organic N (DON) and plant biomass did increase after fertilization. Soil microbes initially immobilized most of the added 15N, but in the following months, they lost two-thirds, while label concentration in plants increased....... After a year, however, the 15N recovered in microbes was still 10-fold higher than that in the plant biomass, showing the high importance of soil microbes in nutrient retention in arctic ecosystems, irrespective of the impact of long-term warming or fertilization. The effects of the treatments...

  2. Organic Nitrogen Concentrations and Trends in Urban Stormwater: Implications for Stormwater Monitoring and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, M. G.; Toor, G.

    2014-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) can be a significant contributor of bioavailable N to the phytoplankton and bacteria that cause eutrophication and harmful algal blooms. In urban systems, urban stormwater runoff containing ON compounds is one source of potentially bioavailable N in water bodies. However, ON characterization and concentrations in urban stormwater are rarely reported or considered for urban stormwater management. We instrumented a 13-hectare residential catchment in Florida's Tampa Bay area with an ISCO autosampler and collected storm event runoff samples at 15-minute intervals during the 2013 wet season (June to September, n =236). Our objectives were to determine the (1) relative importance of ON compared to inorganic N forms (i.e., NO3- and NH4+) in the runoff, (2) investigate temporal trends in the ON concentrations in runoff, and (3) assess how rainfall depth and intensity affect any temporal trends. Mean concentration of total N in stormwater runoff for the wet season was 1.86 mg/l, of which dissolved and particulate ON were 63%. The dominance of ON in urban stormwater runoff suggests that the ON fraction should also be targeted when stormwater control measures call for N reductions. Particulate ON (PON) displayed a strong seasonal first flush trend as season progressed from June (1.45 mg/l; n =75) to September (0.20 mg/l; n = 28), while dissolved ON (DON) did not display any seasonal trend, with mean monthly concentrations ranging from 0.36 to 0.80 mg/l. A principal component analysis using storm event N concentrations, rainfall depth, and rainfall intensity as variables showed no significant correlation, suggesting that storms of various sizes and intensities can mobilize ON. The seasonal first flush observed for PON in the wet season can provide a window of time for optimal N removal and implies that stormwater best management practices should focus on capturing plant materials earlier in the season.

  3. Investigation of Sulfate concentration influence on Anaerobic Lagoon performance: Birjand Wastewater Treatment plant: A Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In the present study the influence of the different sulfate concentration on the anaerobic lagoon stabilization was investigated. Materials and Methods: The present study is an experimental research carried out on anaerobic stabilization pond pilot for 7 months in Birjand wastewater treatment plant. After making sure of a steady state sulfate with different concentrations of 200, 300 and 400 mg/L were injected into the pilot. Then parameters including pH, organic nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, BOD5, COD and nitrate were measured. All of the experiments were carried out according to the methods presented in the book "Standard Method" for the examination of water and wastewater (2005. Results: It was found that by increasing sulfate concentration from 200 to 300 mg/L all of parameters  except BOD5 (10% reduction had no significant changes., but by increasing the sulfate concentration from 200 to 400 mg/L the removal efficiency of the parameters such as BOD5, COD, Organic nitrogen, total kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrate and sulfate reduced to 11, 8, 12, 26, 6 and 10 percent, respectively. PH in the first stage was alkaline and then changed to acidic. Conclusion: Anaerobic stabilization ponds have different capacities for removal of organic compounds at different sulfate concentrations; so that; in sulfate concentration of 200 mg/L, the proper operation was seen and in concentration of 300 mg/L, sulfate-reducing bacteria get dominant and therefore odor is produced..  Alternatively, by increasing the concentration of sulphate to 400 mg/L, ammonia nitrogen increased 2.5 times (150% in the effluent.

  4. Is wood pre-treatment essential for tree-ring nitrogen concentration and isotope analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Annick; Savard, Martine M; Bégin, Christian; Smirnoff, Anna

    2011-02-28

    Tree-ring nitrogen concentrations and isotope ratios (δ(15)N) are gaining in popularity for environmental research although their use is still debated because of nitrogen mobility in tree stems. Modern studies generally present results on wood that is pre-treated to remove soluble nitrogen compounds and to minimize the impact of radial translocation on tree-ring nitrogen environmental records. However, the necessity to use such pre-treatment has never been fully assessed. Here we compare the nitrogen concentrations and δ(15)N values of two wood preparation protocols applied to beech and red spruce tree rings for the removal of soluble compounds from ring pairs with non pre-treated tree rings. For both tree species, pre-treatment did not minimize the radial patterns of tree-ring nitrogen concentrations and the increasing concentration trends that are coincident with the heartwood-sapwood boundary. Therefore, even if the tree-ring nitrogen concentrations are slightly modified by pre-treatment, these concentrations are considered to reflect internal stem processes rather than environmental conditions in both species. The δ(15)N values were similar for untreated and pre-treated ring pairs, suggesting that wood pre-treatment did not substantially change the δ(15)N values and temporal trends in ring series. In addition, tree-ring δ(15)N series of untreated and pre-treated wood did not show any sign of influence of the heartwood-sapwood boundary in either tree species, indicating that nitrogen translocation did not generate significant isotopic fractionation. We therefore suggest that untreated ring δ(15)N values of beech and red spruce trees can be used for environmental research.

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-06-13

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7-overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement.

  6. Nitrogen dose and plant density effects on popcorn grain yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... randomized complete block design with a split-plot arrangement with three replications. Nitrogen ... also cultural practices such as nitrogen fertilizer rates and .... procedures using the Statistical Software Package (MSTAT-C).

  7. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    -freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC...... concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at −18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax...... component 4 (EXmax: 280 nm, EXmax: 328 nm) to total fluorescence was not affected by freezing. We recommend fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen for preservation of bulk DOC concentrations of samples from terrestrial sources, whereas immediate measuring is preferable to preserve spectroscopic properties...

  8. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at −18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax......-freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC...... component 4 (EXmax: 280 nm, EXmax: 328 nm) to total fluorescence was not affected by freezing. We recommend fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen for preservation of bulk DOC concentrations of samples from terrestrial sources, whereas immediate measuring is preferable to preserve spectroscopic properties...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a single diamond crystal with a high nitrogen concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhuang-Fei; Jia Xiao-Peng; Liu Xiao-Bing; Hu Mei-Hua; Li Yong; Yan Bing-Min; Ma Hong-An

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we explore diamond synthesis with a series of experiments using an Fe-Ni catalyst and a P3N5 additive in the temperature range of 1250-1550 ℃ and the pressure range of 5.0-6.3 GPa.We also investigate the influence of nitrogen on diamond crystallization. Our results show that the synthesis conditions (temperature and pressure) increase with the amount of P3N5 additive increasing.The nitrogen impurity can significantly influence the diamond morphology.The diamonds stably grow into strip and lamellar shapes in the nitrogen-rich environment.The Fourier-transform infrared spectrum shows that the nitrogen concentration increases rapidly with the content of P3N5 additive increasing.By spectrum analysis,we find that with the increase of the nitrogen concentration,the Ib-type nitrogen atoms can aggregate in the A-centre form. The highest A-centre nitrogen concentration is approximately 840 ppm.

  10. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  11. Characterisation and removal of recalcitrants in reverse osmosis concentrates from water reclamation plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagastyo, Arseto Y; Keller, Jurg; Poussade, Yvan; Batstone, Damien J

    2011-03-01

    Water reclamation plants frequently utilise reverse osmosis (RO), generating a concentrated reject stream as a by-product. The concentrate stream contains salts, and dissolved organic compounds, which are recalcitrant to biological treatment, and may have an environmental impact due to colour and embedded nitrogen. In this study, we characterise organic compounds in RO concentrates (ROC) and treated ROC (by coagulation, adsorption, and advanced oxidation) from two full-scale plants, assessing the diversity and treatability of colour and organic compounds containing nitrogen. One of the plants was from a coastal catchment, while the other was inland. Stirred cell membrane fractionation was applied to fractionate the treated ROC, and untreated ROC along with chemical analysis (DOC, DON, COD), colour, and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) scans to characterise changes within each fraction. In both streams, the largest fraction contained 10 kDa molecules, with 17-34% of organic compounds as COD. Iron coagulation affected a wider size range, with better removal of organics (41-49% as COD) at the same molar dosage. As with iron, adsorption reduced organics of a broader size range, including organic nitrogen (26-47%). Advanced oxidation (UV/H2O2) was superior for complete decolourisation and provided superior organics removal (50-55% as COD).

  12. Effect of Water-logging Stress and Nitrogen Forms on Amount and Solutes Concentration of Bleeding Sap in Maize Plants at Seeding Stage%淹涝和氮形态对苗期玉米伤流液流量及组分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘盼盼; 伍大利; 刘畅; 周毅; 汪建飞

    2013-01-01

      Effect of water conditions(water-logging stress and non-water-logging stress)and nitrogen forms(am-monium,nitrate and the mixture of nitrate and ammonium )on concentration and transport of components in bleeding in the amount of free amino acid in bleeding sap at night and the increase in root activity of nitrate -fed plants disap-peared at the same time.Therefore,it revealed that nitrogen form is a major factor affecting maize plants to adapt to water-logging stress,with the periodic difference existed in the responses of different nitrogen form -fed maize plants to the stress condition.%  采用砂培培养方法,比较研究淹涝与否和不同氮形态(铵态氮、硝态氮以及铵硝态氮以1∶1混合)对苗期玉米伤流液流量及组分的影响。结果表明,与非淹涝胁迫条件相比,在淹涝胁迫处理的第3天,铵态氮处理玉米的根、茎鞘和整株的生物量干物质量显著增加,当胁迫延长至7 d 时,其叶的生物量干质量的增加幅度也达差异显著性水平。此时,其根、茎鞘和叶的生物量干物质量明显高于硝态氮处理,且其中茎鞘的生物量干物质量也明显高于铵、硝混合处理。尽管在遭受淹涝胁迫3 d 时,铵态氮处理的伤流液流量及其中的可溶性糖的量均明显降低,但当胁迫时间延长至7 d 时,其根系活力明显增高,伤流液的流量及其中的可溶性糖的量也均恢复至非淹涝胁迫条件下的水平。相对而言,与非淹涝胁迫条件相比,为期3 d 的淹涝胁迫显著提高硝态氮处理的玉米植株的根系活力,但降低其伤流液流量及其中的硝态氮的量;且随着胁迫时间的延长,其伤流液中的可溶性糖的量也由遭受淹涝胁迫3 d 时的无明显变化的趋势,发展为呈明显的降低趋势;而其夜间伤流液中的氨基酸的量则由明显降低转变为与对照无明显差异;其根系活力也恢复至与对照无显著

  13. Modeling the effects of organic nitrogen uptake by plants on the carbon cycling of boreal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Zhu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forest and tundra are the major ecosystems in the northern high latitudes in which a large amount of carbon is stored. These ecosystems are nitrogen-limited due to slow mineralization rate of the soil organic nitrogen. Recently, abundant field studies have found that organic nitrogen is another important nitrogen supply for boreal ecosystems. In this study, we incorporated a mechanism that allowed boreal plants to uptake small molecular amino acids into a process-based biogeochemical model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, to evaluate the impact of organic nitrogen uptake on ecosystem carbon cycling. The new version of the model was evaluated at both boreal forest and tundra sites. We found that the modeled organic nitrogen uptake accounted for 36–87% of total nitrogen uptake by plants in tundra ecosystems and 26–50% for boreal forests, suggesting that tundra ecosystem might have more relied on the organic form of nitrogen than boreal forests. The simulated monthly gross ecosystem production (GPP and net ecosystem production (NEP tended to be larger with the new version of the model since the plant uptake of organic nitrogen alleviated the soil nitrogen limitation especially during the growing season. The sensitivity study indicated that the most important factors controlling the plant uptake of organic nitrogen were the maximum root uptake rate (Imax and the radius of the root (r0 in our model. The model uncertainty due to uncertain parameters associated with organic nitrogen uptake at tundra ecosystem was larger than at boreal forest ecosystems. This study suggests that considering the organic nitrogen uptake by plants is important to boreal ecosystem carbon modeling.

  14. Preferential uptake of soil nitrogen forms by grassland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Alexandra; Bol, Roland; Bardgett, Richard D

    2005-02-01

    In this study, we assessed whether a range of temperate grassland species showed preferential uptake for different chemical forms of N, including inorganic N and a range of amino acids that commonly occur in temperate grassland soil. Preferential uptake of dual-labelled (13C and 15N) glycine, serine, arginine and phenylalanine, as compared to inorganic N, was tested using plants growing in pots with natural field soil. We selected five grass species representing a gradient from fertilised, productive pastures to extensive, low productivity pastures (Lolium perenne, Holcus lanatus, Anthoxanthum odoratum, Deschampsia flexuosa, and Nardus stricta). Our data show that all grass species were able to take up directly a diversity of soil amino acids of varying complexity. Moreover, we present evidence of marked inter-species differences in preferential use of chemical forms of N of varying complexity. L. perenne was relatively more effective at using inorganic N and glycine compared to the most complex amino acid phenylalanine, whereas N. stricta showed a significant preference for serine over inorganic N. Total plant N acquisition, measured as root and shoot concentration of labelled compounds, also revealed pronounced inter-species differences which were related to plant growth rate: plants with higher biomass production were found to take up more inorganic N. Our findings indicate that species-specific differences in direct uptake of different N forms combined with total N acquisition could explain changes in competitive dominance of grass species in grasslands of differing fertility.

  15. Gravitational effects on plant growth hormone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, Robert S.; Schulze, Aga

    Numerous studies, particularly those of H. Dolk in the 1930's, established by means of bio-assay, that more growth hormone diffused from the lower, than from the upper side of a gravity-stimulated plant shoot. Now, using an isotope dilution assay, with 4,5,6,7 tetradeutero indole-3-acetic acid as internal standard, and selected ion monitoring-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as the method of determination, we have confirmed Dolk's finding and established that the asymmetrically distributed hormone is, in fact, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). This is the first physico-chemical demonstration that there is more free IAA on the lower sides of a geo-stimulated plant shoot. We have also shown that free IAA occurs primarily in the conductive vascular tissues of the shoot, whereas IAA esters predominate in the growing cortical cells. Now, using an especially sensitive gas chromatographic isotope dilution assay we have found that the hormone asymmetry also occurs in the non-vascular tissue. Currently, efforts are directed to developing isotope dilution assays, with picogram sensitivity, to determine how this asymmetry of IAA distribution is attained so as to better understand how the plant perceives the geo-stimulus.

  16. Influence of nitrogen deficiency on photosynthesis and chloroplast ultrastructure of pepper plants (Research Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. DONCHEVA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Zlaten Medal were grown on nutrient solution without nitrogen, and photosynthetic response of plants was examined by determination of leaf CO2 fixation and chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. The absence of nitrogen in the medium resulted in a decrease of the leaf area and of plant biomass accumulation, and in an increase of the root-shoot dry weight ratio. The photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll and carotenoid contents decreased significantly under nitrogen deprivation. Examination of nitrogen deficient leaves by transmission electron microscopy showed dramatic changes in chloroplast ultrastructure. The proportion of starch granules and plastoglobules in the stroma matrix was increased and internal membrane system was greatly reduced. It seems that nitrogen plays an important role in the formation of chloroplast structure and hence to the photosynthetic intensity and productivity of pepper plants.

  17. The plant growth-promoting effect of the nitrogen-fixing endophyte Pseudomonas stutzeri A15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van T K; Rediers, Hans; Ghequire, Maarten G K; Nguyen, Hiep H; De Mot, René; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2017-04-01

    The use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria as a sustainable alternative for chemical nitrogen fertilizers has been explored for many economically important crops. For one such strain isolated from rice rhizosphere and endosphere, nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A15, unequivocal evidence of the plant growth-promoting effect and the potential contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is still lacking. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. stutzeri A15 inoculation on the growth of rice seedlings in greenhouse conditions. P. stutzeri A15 induced significant growth promotion compared to uninoculated rice seedlings. Furthermore, inoculation with strain A15 performed significantly better than chemical nitrogen fertilization, clearly pointing to the potential of this bacterium as biofertilizer. To assess the contribution of BNF to the plant growth-promoting effect, rice seedlings were also inoculated with a nitrogen fixation-deficient mutant. Our results suggest that BNF (at best) only partially contributes to the stimulation of plant growth.

  18. Effect of Phosphorus Fertilizer on Nitrogen Fixation by Some Grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: Nitrogen fixation by grain legumes contributes N to tropical soils. But in Sudano –. Sahelian .... at 650C, weighed and analyzed for the N concentrations (Marr ... The increase of whole plant growth and plant nitrogen concentration ...

  19. Nutrient removal of a floating plant system receiving low- pollution wastewater: Effects of plant species and influent concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, J. J.; Zhao, J. N.; Xue, L. H.; Yang, L. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Plant floating bed was adopted in this study to compare the purification effect of four plant species (Oenanthe javanica, Ipomoea aquatica, Hydrocotyle vulgaris, and Iris sibirica) receiving high and low treated domestic sewage. The experiment was conducted for eight months during the low temperature season. The results indicated that the average removal rates of TN and NH4+-N in I. aquatica floating bed were relatively high both under high and low influent concentration during the first stage of the experiment. During the second stage, H. vulgaris showed the best performance for nitrogen treatment, and the average removal rates of TN were 70.7% and 87.7% under high and low influent concentration, while the average removal rates of NH4 +-N were as high as 98.9% and 98.9%, accordingly. Moreover, H. vulgaris contributed most for plant assimilation to nitrogen removal among different plant floating systems. It was also found that the existence of hydrophytes effectively controlled the rise of water pH value and algae growth and reproduction, which helped to improve the aquatic environment. The results provide engineering parameters for the future design of an ecological remediation technology for low-pollution wastewater purification.

  20. Plant dependence on rhizobia for nitrogen influences induced plant defenses and herbivore performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Jennifer M; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2014-01-21

    Symbiotic rhizobia induce many changes in legumes that could affect aboveground interactions with herbivores. We explored how changing the intensity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, as modulated by soil nitrogen (N) levels, influenced the interaction between soybean (Glycine max) and herbivores of different feeding guilds. When we employed a range of fertilizer applications to manipulate soil N, plants primarily dependent on rhizobia for N exhibited increased root nodulation and higher levels of foliar ureides than plants given N fertilizer; yet all treatments maintained similar total N levels. Soybean podworm (Helicoverpa zea) larvae grew best on plants with the highest levels of rhizobia but, somewhat surprisingly, preferred to feed on high-N-fertilized plants when given a choice. Induction of the defense signaling compound jasmonic acid (JA) by H. zea feeding damage was highest in plants primarily dependent on rhizobia. Differences in rhizobial dependency on soybean did not appear to affect interactions with the phloem-feeding soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). Overall, our results suggest that rhizobia association can affect plant nutritional quality and the induction of defense signaling pathways and that these effects may influence herbivore feeding preferences and performance-though such effects may vary considerably for different classes of herbivores.

  1. Modelling the concentrations of nitrogen and water-soluble carbohydrates in grass herbage ingested by cattle under strip-grazing management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, N.J.; Schulte, R.P.O.

    2008-01-01

    There is scope of increasing the nitrogen (N) efficiency of grazing cattle through manipulation of the energy and N concentrations in the herbage ingested. Because of asymmetric grazing by cattle between individual plant parts, it has not yet been established how this translates into the

  2. Phytoremediation Investigating Herbaceous Plants and Their Rhizosphere Microorganisms in the Mixture of Wood Sawdust of Used Sleepers and Soil Fertilised with Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Maruska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies were carried out in the period of 2013–2014 in experiment developed during plant vegetation, cultivating five plant species in the vegetative pots with the substrate contaminated with used sleepers (US and uncontaminated substrate fertilised with nitrogenous fertilisers. The objective of the research is to analyse the morphological features of aboveground and underground parts of herbaceous plants and determine the dependence of the number of fungi and bacteria colonies in the rhizosphere of these plants and the substrate contaminants and the impact of nitrogenous fertiliser concentration; with reference to that, determine the feasibility of these plants for phytoremediation. A tolerant plant was found, i.e. Tagetes patula L. as a phytoremediator, which adapted to grow in the condition of contaminated and fertilised substrate with nitrogen, and suitable for cultivating it in similar edaphic conditions. An intolerant plant, i.e. Trifolium repens L. as a phytoindicator, is a perennial, herbaceous plant of Fabaceae Lindl. Family, the rhizosphere of which contains the maximum number of fungi and bacteria colonies in the occurrence of the maximum concentration of nitrogenous fertilisers and contaminants. These bacteriological and mycological processes, as well as the excess of nitrogen, have negative impact on the growth of aboveground and underground parts of Trifolium repens.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.72.4.17493

  3. Concentrations, loads, and yields of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment and bacteria concentrations in the Wister Lake Basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas, 2011-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Stephanie D.

    2014-01-01

    The Poteau Valley Improvement Authority uses Wister Lake in southeastern Oklahoma as a public water supply. Total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediments from agricultural runoff and discharges from wastewater treatment plants and other sources have degraded water quality in the lake. As lake-water quality has degraded, water-treatment cost, chemical usage, and sludge production have increased for the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority, investigated and summarized concentrations of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, suspended sediment, and bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus sp.) in surface water flowing to Wister Lake. Estimates of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment loads, yields, and flow-weighted mean concentrations of total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations were made for the Wister Lake Basin for a 3-year period from October 2010 through September 2013. Data from water samples collected at fixed time increments during base-flow conditions and during runoff conditions at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla. (USGS station 07247015), the Poteau River near Heavener, Okla. (USGS station 07247350), and the Fourche Maline near Leflore, Okla. (USGS station 07247650), water-quality stations were used to evaluate water quality over the range of streamflows in the basin. These data also were collected to estimate annual constituent loads and yields by using regression models. At the Poteau River stations, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment concentrations in surface-water samples were significantly larger in samples collected during runoff conditions than in samples collected during base-flow conditions. At the Fourche Maline station, in contrast, concentrations of these constituents in water samples collected during runoff conditions were not significantly larger than concentrations during base

  4. Optimal Plant Carbon Allocation Implies a Biological Control on Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, I. C.; Stocker, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    The degree to which nitrogen availability limits the terrestrial C sink under rising CO2 is a key uncertainty in carbon cycle and climate change projections. Results from ecosystem manipulation studies and meta-analyses suggest that plant C allocation to roots adjusts dynamically under varying degrees of nitrogen availability and other soil fertility parameters. In addition, the ratio of biomass production to GPP appears to decline under nutrient scarcity. This reflects increasing plant C exudation into the soil (Cex) with decreasing nutrient availability. Cex is consumed by an array of soil organisms and may imply an improvement of nutrient availability to the plant. Thus, N availability is under biological control, but incurs a C cost. In spite of clear observational support, this concept is left unaccounted for in Earth system models. We develop a model for the coupled cycles of C and N in terrestrial ecosystems to explore optimal plant C allocation under rising CO2 and its implications for the ecosystem C balance. The model follows a balanced growth approach, accounting for the trade-offs between leaf versus root growth and Cex in balancing C fixation and N uptake. We assume that Cex is proportional to root mass, and that the ratio of N uptake (Nup) to Cex is proportional to inorganic N concentration in the soil solution. We further assume that Cex is consumed by N2-fixing processes if the ratio of Nup:Cex falls below the inverse of the C cost of N2-fixation. Our analysis thereby accounts for the feedbacks between ecosystem C and N cycling and stoichiometry. We address the question of how the plant C economy will adjust under rising atmospheric CO2 and what this implies for the ecosystem C balance and the degree of N limitation.

  5. Achieving nitrogen removal via nitrite in a pilot-scale continuous pre-denitrification plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Yuan, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaolian

    2009-02-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite (the nitrite pathway) is beneficial for carbon-limited biological wastewater treatment plants. However, partial nitrification to nitrite has proven difficult in continuous processes treating domestic wastewater. The nitrite pathway is achieved in this study in a pilot-scale continuous pre-denitrification plant (V=300 L) treating domestic wastewater by controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration at 0.4-0.7 mg/L. It is demonstrated that the nitrite pathway could be repeatedly and reliably achieved, with over 95% of the oxidized nitrogen compounds at the end of the aerobic zone being nitrite. The nitrite pathway improved the total nitrogen (TN) removal by about 20% in comparison to the nitrate pathway, and also reduced aeration costs by 24%. FISH analysis showed that the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population gradually reduced at low DO levels, and reached negligible levels when stable nitrite pathway was established. It is hypothesized that NOB was washed out due to its relatively lower affinity with oxygen. A lag phase was observed in the establishment of the nitrite pathway. Several sludge ages were required for the onset of the nitrite pathway after the application of low DO levels. However, nitrite accumulation increased rapidly after that. A similar lag phase was observed for the upset of the nitrite pathway when a DO concentration of 2-3 mg/L was applied. The nitrite pathway negatively impacted on the sludge settleability. A strong correlation between the sludge volume index and the degree of nitrite accumulation was observed.

  6. Effects of Source and Concentrations of Nitrogen and Carbohydrate on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss microbial protein synthesis and the effects of sources and concentrations of nitrogen and carbohydrate on microbial protein synthesis. Even though ammonia-N is a satisfactory source of nitrogen for the growth of the majority of rumen microbes, substitution of intact protein for urea usually stimulates ruminal microbial protein synthesis. While protein sources high in degradable intake protein (DIP), such as soybean meal, appear to have properties ...

  7. Ammonia nitrogen removal from acetylene purification wastewater from a PVC plant by struvite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Dong, DeMing; Hua, XiuYi; Guo, ZhiYong; Liang, DaPeng

    Acetylene purification wastewater (APW) usually contains high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N), which is generated during the production of acetylene in a polyvinylchloride manufacturing plant. In this study, a struvite precipitation method was selected to remove NH4-N from the APW. Laboratory-scale batch experiments were performed to investigate the effects of the initial APW pH, phosphate (PO4(3-)) concentration, magnesium (Mg(2+)) concentration, and sources of PO4(3-) and Mg(2+) on NH4-N removal. The results indicated that the initial APW pH had a significant effect on the removal of NH4-N, while the other factors had relatively minor effect. The NH4-N could be effectively removed at an optimum initial APW pH of 9.5, when Na2HPO4·12H2O and MgSO4·7H2O were both applied to NH4-N at a ratio of 1.2. Under these conditions, the efficiency of removal of NH4-N, total nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand were 85%, 84% and 18%, respectively. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the precipitates were dominated by struvite. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the precipitates showed a typical morphology of stick-like and prismatic crystals with coarse surface. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis indicated that the precipitates contained P, O, Mg and Ca.

  8. Dynamics of nitrogen concentration on intercropped ryegrass - 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i1.12661

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mossate Gabbi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nitrogen (N in ryegrass intercropped with different forage species with regard to dry matter (DM accumulation within an agroecological transition system was evaluated. Annual ryegrass was intercropped with black oats (RY + BO, white clover (RY + WC and forage peanut (RY + FP. The experimental design was completely randomized, with three replications. The study applied the N dilution model for plant tissue which comparatively uses modifiable factors of the environment at optimal levels. The model shows decline in N concentration due to the DM accumulation of temperate grass pastures. Data were compared to model by the root mean square deviation analysis. Dilution coefficient (β, used in all pasture samples, was lower than -0.60. Highest N concentration decline in plant tissues, due to DM accumulation, occurred in RY + WC pastures (β = -0.94, followed by RY + FP (β = - 0.86 and RY + BO (β = - 0.67, respectively. Ryegrass intercropped with white clover showed the highest N content in plant tissue, with a nitrogen nutrition index close to the proposed model.

  9. Impact of lime, nitrogen and plant species on bacterial community structure in grassland microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nabla; Brodie, Eoin; Connolly, John; Clipson, Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    A microcosm-based approach was used to study impacts of plant and chemical factors on the bacterial community structure of an upland acidic grassland soil. Seven perennial plant species typical of both natural, unimproved (Nardus stricta, Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina and F. rubra) and fertilized, improved (Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) grasslands were either left unamended or treated with lime, nitrogen, or lime plus nitrogen in a 75-day glasshouse experiment. Lime and nitrogen amendment were shown to have a greater effect on microbial activity, biomass and bacterial ribotype number than plant species. Liming increased soil pH, microbial activity and biomass, while decreasing ribotype number. Nitrogen addition decreased soil pH, microbial activity and ribotype number. Addition of lime plus nitrogen had intermediate effects, which appeared to be driven more by lime than nitrogen. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that lime and nitrogen addition altered soil bacterial community structure, while plant species had little effect. These results were further confirmed by multivariate redundancy analysis, and suggest that soil lime and nitrogen status are more important controllers of bacterial community structure than plant rhizosphere effects.

  10. The influence of emission changes on ozone concentrations and nitrogen deposition into the southern North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke M.I. Meyer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of changes in amount of emission for NOx (Nitrogen monoxide NO + Nitrogen dioxide NO2 and NMVOC (Non Methane Volatile Organic Compounds on concentrations of ozone (O3, NOx, nitric acid (HNO3 and on nitrogen deposition in the area of the southern North Sea are investigated. One reference case for the period 16 June till 20 June, 1998 and six emission scenarios are calculated. Spatial and temporal emission patterns are kept and overall emission factors are used that correspond to years 1998 (reference, 1970 and 2010. Some more artificial emission scenarios are constructed to investigate the effect of a changed ratio of NOx to NMVOC emissions. The meteorology is unchanged for all scenarios. The studies are performed with the meteorology/chemistry model M-SYS (METRAS/MECTM including a simple aerosol chemistry and using a horizontal resolution of 8 km. Changes in emissions of NMVOC and NOx cause nonlinear changes in O3, NOx and HNO3 concentrations. The concentration changes depend on emission changes and on changes in the ratio of NMVOC to NOx emissions. The whole area, over land and water, turns out to be in the NMVOC limited regime. Ozone scenario concentrations linearly depend on the ratio of NMVOC to NOx emissions. NOx concentrations linearly depend on changes in the total emissions of NOx and NMVOC. They are inversely related to changes in the ratio of NMVOC to NOx emissions. HNO3 concentrations mainly depend on the total emission changes with NOx emission changes being of doubled relevance compared to NMVOC emission changes. The same relation is found for nitrogen deposition. Compared to mean ozone concentrations from the reference case, higher (lower NOx emissions reduce (increase ozone concentrations, while HNO3 concentrations are increased (reduced. In contrast, reduced (increased NMVOC emissions reduce (increase both, ozone and HNO3 concentrations and, in addition, the nitrogen deposition.

  11. Stable isotopes of nitrogen in plants of contaminated soils and sediments by an abandoned gold mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, O. F.; Sanchez, A.; Marmolejo, A. J.; Magallanes, V. R.

    2013-05-01

    Mining industry is an economic activity which generates high ecological impact. In the mining district "El Triunfo", the concentration of potential toxic elements (PTE: As, Cd, Hg, Sb) have exceeded 50 times allowable limits. Nowadays, environmental pollution levels can be evaluated through the use of stable isotopes of N. For this, isotopic analysis of nitrogen and concentrations of metals and metalloids were considered in the area where plants are exposed (Prosopis spp., Parkinsonia spp. and Salicornia spp.) Polluted sediments were collected over 48 km of the Las Gallinas-El Hondo-El Carrizal arroyo. PTE concentrations, with a previous acidic digestion (HF, HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4) were determined by ICP-MS. As and Sb were determined by NAA. For N isotopes, obtained samples were grounded to fine powder in an agate mortar with an acetone rinse between samples then analyzed by an EA-IRMS. Results showed that plants growing on the tailings decreased their δ15N proportionally to the metal concentration in the area.

  12. Atmospheric carbon dioxide, irrigation, and fertilization effects on phenolic and nitrogen concentrations in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, F L; Maier, C A

    2001-06-01

    Concentrations of total soluble phenolics, catechin, proanthocyanidins (PA), lignin and nitrogen (N) were measured in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) needles exposed to either ambient CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]), ambient plus 175 or ambient plus 350 micromol CO(2) mol(-1) in branch chambers for 2 years. The CO(2) treatments were superimposed on a 2 x 2 factorial combination of irrigation and fertilization treatments. In addition, we compared the effects of branch chambers and open-top chambers on needle chemistry. Proanthocyanidin and N concentrations were measured in needles from branch chambers and from trees in open-top chambers exposed concurrently for two years to either ambient [CO(2)] or ambient plus 200 micromol CO(2) mol(-1) in combination with a fertilization treatment. In the branch chambers, concentrations of total soluble phenolics in needles generally increased with needle age. Concentrations of total soluble phenolics, catechin and PA in needle extracts increased about 11% in response to the elevated [CO(2)] treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on foliar lignin concentrations. Nitrogen concentrations were about 10% lower in needles from the elevated [CO(2)] treatments than in needles from the ambient [CO(2)] treatments. Soluble phenolic and PA concentrations were higher in the control and irrigated soil treatments in about half of the comparisons; otherwise, differences were not statistically significant. Needle N concentrations increased 23% in response to fertilization. Treatment effects on PA and N concentrations were similar between branch and open-top chambers, although in this part of the study N concentrations were not significantly affected by the CO(2) treatments in either the branch or open-top chambers. We conclude that elevated [CO(2)] and low N availability affected foliar chemical composition, which could in turn affect plant-pathogen interactions, decomposition rates and mineral nutrient cycling.

  13. Nutrient Allocation Strategies of Woody Plants: An Approach From the Scaling of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Between Twigs and Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z.; Li, P.; Chen, Y.; Han, W.; Fang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), among plant organs reflects the influences of evolutionary and ecological processes on functional traits of plants, and thus is related to functional groups and environmental conditions. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by exploring the stoichiometric scaling of N and P concentrations between twigs and leaves of 335 woody species from 12 forest sites across eastern China. There were significant scaling relationships between twig N (or P) and leaf N (or P) using reduced major axis (RMA) regression analysis; yet their scaling exponents varied among functional groups and changed with environmental factors. Evergreen broad-leaved plants had a higher exponent (αP) of twig P to leaf P than that of deciduous broad-leaved plants (1.26 vs. 0.96, p 1 at low latitude (23.2°N) to nutrient concentration increased, plants at low latitudes showed a faster increase in twig nutrient concentration, whereas plants at high latitudes presented a faster increase in leaf nutrient concentration. Such shifts in nutrient allocation strategy from low to high latitudes may be controlled by temperature. Overall, our findings provide a new approach to explore plant nutrient allocation strategies by analysing the stoichiometric scaling of nutrients among organs, which could broaden our understanding of the interactions between plants and their environments.

  14. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Foliar nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry of three wetland plants distributed along an elevation gradient in Dongting Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Gao, Han; Zhu, Lianlian; Xie, Yonghong; Yang, Guishan; Hu, Cong; Chen, Xinsheng; Deng, Zhengmiao

    2017-06-06

    We examined foliar nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) stoichiometry of 3 wetland plants (Phalaris arundinacea, Miscanthus sacchariflorus, and Carex brevicuspis) distributed along an elevation gradient in the Dongting Lake, China, and how this stoichiometry is related to soil physico-chemical characteristics, elevation, and flooding days. Plant and soil samples were collected from 3 lakeshore sites. Total N and P concentrations of plants and six physico-chemical characteristics of the soil were measured, in addition to the elevation and flooding days. P. arundinacea and M. sacchariflorus had higher total N and P concentrations than C. brevicuspis. The foliar N:P ratio decreased with increasing elevation, and only increased with increasing foliar total N concentration. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the foliar stoichiometry was primarily regulated by soil water content, followed by soil nutrient concentration. The foliar N and P stoichiometry of the 3 wetland plants was insignificantly correlated with soil total P concentration. However, foliar stoichiometric characteristics and soil total N concentration significantly differed among the 3 species. These results demonstrate that spatial variation of foliar stoichiometry in wetland plants exists along an elevation gradient, with this information being useful for the conservation and management of wetland plants in this lake.

  16. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization rate and planting density on cotton biomass and nitrogen accumulation in extremely early mature cotton region of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Sheng; Xu, Min; Zhang, Guo-Wei; Jin, Lu-Lu; Shan, Ying; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Zhi-Guo

    2011-12-01

    Taking two cotton cultivars Liaomian 19 and NuCOTN 33B with different growth periods as test materials, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen fertilization rates (0, 240 and 480 kg N x hm(-2)) and different planting densities (75000, 97500 and 120000 plants x hm(-2)) on the cotton biomass, nitrogen accumulation, and accumulative nitrogen utilization in the planting region of extremely early mature cotton in Northeast China. The dynamics of cotton biomass and nitrogen accumulation of the two cultivars with their growth process followed Logistic model. Both nitrogen fertilization rate and planting density had significant effects on the cotton nitrogen accumulation dynamics and the cotton yield and quality. In all treatments, the beginning time of rapid accumulation of nitrogen was about 13 d earlier than that of biomass. In treatment plant density 97500 plants x hm(-2) and nitrogen fertilization rate 240 kg x hm(-2), the eigenvalues of the dynamic accumulation models of nitrogen and biomass for the two cultivars were most harmonious, lint yield was the highest, fiber quality was the best, and accumulative nitrogen utilization efficiency was the highest. In the study region, the earlier beginning time of rapid accumulation of nitrogen and biomass and their higher accumulation rates were benefit to the formation of higher cotton yield.

  17. Impact of glycerol and nitrogen concentration on Enterobacter A47 growth and exopolysaccharide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Cristiana A V; Marques, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Ana R V; Antunes, Sílvia; Grandfils, Christian; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-11-01

    Enterobacter A47 produces a fucose-containing exopolysaccharide (EPS) by cultivation in mineral medium supplemented with glycerol. EPS synthesis by Enterobacter A47 was shown to be influenced by both the initial glycerol and nitrogen concentrations and by the nutrients' feeding rate during the fed-batch phase. Initial nitrogen concentrations above 1.05g/L were detrimental for EPS synthesis: the productivity was reduced to 0.35-0.62g/Ld (compared to 1.89-2.04g/Ld under lower nitrogen concentrations) and the polymer had lower fucose content (14-17%mol, compared to 36-38%mol under lower nitrogen concentrations). On the other hand, EPS productivity was improved to 5.66g/Ld by increasing the glycerol and nitrogen feeding rates during the fed-batch phase. However, the EPS thus obtained had lower fucose (26%mol) and higher galactose (34%mol) contents, as well as lower average molecular weight (7.2×10(5)). The ability of Enterobacter A47 to synthesize EPS with different physico-chemical characteristics may be useful for the generation of biopolymers with distinct functional properties suitable for different applications.

  18. Planting Date and Seeding Rate Effects on Sunn Hemp Biomass and Nitrogen Production for a Winter Cover Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipling S. Balkcom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L. is a tropical legume that produces plant biomass and nitrogen (N quickly. Our objectives were to assess the growth of a new sunn hemp cultivar breed to produce seed in a temperate climate and determine the residual N effect on a rye (Secale cereale L. cover crop in east-central Alabama from 2007 to 2009. Plant populations, plant height, stem diameter, biomass production, and N content were determined for two sunn hemp planting dates, following corn (Zea mays L. and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. harvest, across different seeding rates (17, 34, 50, and 67 kg/ha. Rye biomass was measured the following spring. Sunn hemp biomass production was inconsistent across planting dates, but did relate to growing degree accumulation. Nitrogen concentrations were inversely related to biomass production, and subsequent N contents corresponded to biomass levels. Neither planting date nor seeding rate affected rye biomass production, but rye biomass averaged over both planting dates following wheat/sunn hemp averaged 43% and 33% greater than rye following fallow. Rye biomass following corn/sunn hemp was equivalent to fallow plots. Early planting dates are recommended for sunn hemp with seeding rates between 17 and 34 kg/ha to maximize biomass and N production.

  19. A New Dopant of NaN3 for High-Concentration-Nitrogen Diamond Synthesized by HPHT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhong-Zhu; JIA Xiao-Peng; Hisao Kan-da; MA Hong-An; WANG Dong-Mei; LIU Wan-Qiang; YU Run-Ze

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen is successfully doped in diamond by adding sodium azide (NaN3) as the source of nitrogen to the graphite and iron powders. The diamond crystals with high nitrogen concentration, 1000-2200 ppm, which contain the same concentrations of nitrogen with natural diamond, have been synthesized by using the system of iron-carbonadditive NaN3. The nitrogen concentrations in diamond increase with the increasing content of NaN3. When the content of NaN3 is increased to 0.7-1.3 wt.%, the nitrogen concentration in the diamond almost remains in a nitrogen concentration range from 1250 ppm to 2200 ppm, which is the highest value and several times higher than that in the diamond synthesized by a conventional method without additive NaN3 under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions.

  20. Heavy metal concentrations in soils and accumulation in plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... An auto battery manufacturing company dumped slag containing proportion of heavy metals in ... their shoot over a wide range of soil concentrations. They ... capacity of plants that grew naturally on metalliferous wastes and ...

  1. NITROGEN UTILIZATION BY DAIRY GOATS OFFERED DIFFERENT NITROGEN SOURCES AS SUPPLEMENTS IN HIGH ISOCALORIC ENERGY CONCENTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R.S. Asih

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Twelve growing female goats (Anglo-Nubian were assigned to a multiple latin square designexperiment to evaluate the effectiveness of additions of nitrogen (N supplements to a high isocaloricenergy ration on N utilization. In this experiment, microbial synthesis and N balance were assessed. Thedaily rations were either unsupplemented barley meal (BM, or BM supplemented with one of threenitrogen sources. All rations were isocaloric (3.0 Mcal ME/kg DM and the N supplements weresoybean meal (BSBM, cottonseed meal (BCSM or urea (BU to provide 2.9% N in the concentratecomponent. The unsupplemented BM contained 1.7% N. The addition of N supplements to the rationenhanced N utilization in dairy goats. The organic matter (OM intake, N intake, N balance, andmicrobial N synthesis for BM, BSBM, BCSM and BU were 660.5 g, 721.9 g, 728.1g and 703.5 g; 13.5g, 21.5 g, 20.9 g and 20.7 g; 2.7 g; 7.1 g, 5.4 g, and 5.7 g; and 14.1 g 19.1 g, 19.1 g, and 20.0 g,respectively. It can be concluded that when sufficient dietary energy was available for ruminal microbialactivities, the source of N did not affect N balance, and microbial N synthesis.

  2. Allocation of nitrogen to chemical defence and plant functional traits is constrained by soil N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Judy; Gleadow, Roslyn M; Woodrow, Ian E

    2010-09-01

    Plants have evolved a vast array of defence mechanisms to avoid or minimize damage caused by herbivores and pathogens. The costs and benefits of defences are thought to vary with the availability of resources, herbivore pressure and plant functional traits. We investigated the resource (nitrogen) and growth cost of deploying cyanogenic glycosides in seedlings of Eucalyptus cladocalyx (Myrtaceae). To do this, we grew the plants under a range of soil N conditions, from levels that were limiting for growth to those that were saturating for growth, and we measured correlations between foliar chemical and performance attributes. Within each N treatment, we found evidence that, for every N invested in cyanogenic glycosides, additional N is added to the leaf. For the lowest N treatment, the additional N was less than one per cyanogenic glycoside, rising to some two Ns for the other treatments. The interaction between cyanogenic glycosides and both condensed tannins and total phenolic compounds was also examined, but we did not detect correlations between these compounds under constant leaf N concentrations. Finally, we did not detect a correlation between net assimilation rate, relative growth rate and cyanogenic glycoside concentrations under any soil N treatment. We conclude that the growth cost of cyanogenic glycosides was likely too low to detect and that it was offset to some degree by additional N that was allocated alongside the cyanogenic glycosides.

  3. Control of Seed Germination and Plant Development by Carbon and Nitrogen Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Daniel; Prieto, Pilar; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular basis of the influence of external carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and other abiotic factors on phytohormones regulation during seed germination and plant developmental processes, and the identification of elements that participate in this response is essential to understand plant nutrient perception and signaling. Sugars (sucrose, glucose) and nitrate not only act as nutrients but also as signaling molecules in plant development. A connection between changes in auxin transport and nitrate signal transduction has been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana through the NRT1.1, a nitrate sensor and transporter that also functions as a repressor of lateral root growth under low concentrations of nitrate by promoting auxin transport. Nitrate inhibits the elongation of lateral roots, but this effect is significantly reduced in abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive mutants, what suggests that ABA might mediate the inhibition of lateral root elongation by nitrate. Gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis has been also related to nitrate level in seed germination and its requirement is determined by embryonic ABA. These mechanisms connect nutrients and hormones signaling during seed germination and plant development. Thus, the genetic identification of the molecular components involved in nutrients-dependent pathways would help to elucidate the potential crosstalk between nutrients, nitric oxide (NO) and phytohormones (ABA, auxins and GAs) in seed germination and plant development. In this review we focus on changes in C and N levels and how they control seed germination and plant developmental processes through the interaction with other plant growth regulators, such as phytohormones. PMID:26635847

  4. Determination of the Fate of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in the Three Wastewater Treatment Plants, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedyan, Mohammed; Al Harahsheh, Ahmed; Qnaisb, Esam

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the composition of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) species, particularly dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), over the traditional wastewater treatment operations in three biological nutrient removal (BNR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Jordan. It had been found that the DON percentage was up to 30% of TDN within…

  5. Carbon Allocation in Mojave Desert Plant-Soil Systems as Affected by Nitrogen and Water Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, P. S.; Kapitzke, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Changes in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition due to increased urbanization and precipitation due to climate change are likely to affect carbon (C) allocation in plants and soils in arid ecosystems in the Southwestern United States where net primary production is often limited by N and water availability. We conducted a greenhouse study to determine the effects of N and water availability on one year old creosote (Larrea tridentata) plants, the dominant shrub in the Mojave Desert. In our greenhouse study we employed two N levels (0 and 40 kg ha-1) and two soil moisture levels (7% and 15%). We grew creosote seedlings in PVC columns filled with topsoil from the Mojave Global Change Facility at the Nevada Test Site. The columns were covered and sealed at the base of the plant to separate the above- from belowground plant compartment. Plants were distributed over two growth chambers receiving ambient light while day/night temperatures were set at 25° C/15° C. In one chamber plants were labeled once a week with 13C-enriched CO2 while a second chamber acted as an unlabeled control. Throughout the six month study we measured soil CO2 concentrations, respired CO2 as well as their isotopic signatures. At the end of the study plants were harvested and we measured plant above- and belowground biomass and isotopic composition of the vegetation. In addition, we measured isotopic composition of soil organic and inorganic C. Increased N availability stimulated stem weight and decreased total C losses through soil respiration. Other plant and soil parameters including isotopic composition were not affected by changes in N availability. Increased soil moisture stimulated plant biomass mainly due to an increase in leaf weight while root biomass tended to decrease. Soil CO2 concentrations increased with increasing water availability despite a reduction in root biomass. The isotopic data showed that net new C uptake increased mostly in leaves, soil organic matter and soil

  6. Planting densities and Nitrogen level impact on yield and yield component of maize

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kashif Akhtar; Muhammad Zahir Afridi; Mansoor Akbar; Sajjad Zaheer; Shah Faisal

    2015-01-01

      An experiment was conducted to find out effect of planting densities and nitrogen levels on yield and yield components of maize at Toru Mardan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, during Kharif season 2014...

  7. The plant nitrogen mobilization promoted by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus leaves depends on fungus pathogenicity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Virginie Tavernier; Sandrine Cadiou; Karine Pageau; Richard Laugé; Michèle Reisdorf-Cren; Thierry Langin; Céline Masclaux-Daubresse

    2007-01-01

    .... In order to study nitrogen recycling and mobilization in host plants during pathogen attack and invasion, the Colletotrichum lindemuthianum/Phaseolus vulgaris interaction was used as a model. C...

  8. Decoupling of nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial plants associated with global changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Z. Y.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2015-05-01

    Living organisms maintain a balance of chemical elements for optimal growth and reproduction, which plays an important role in global biogeochemical cycles. Human domination of Earth's ecosystems has led to drastic global changes, but it is unclear how these affect the stoichiometric coupling of nutrients in terrestrial plants, the most important food source on Earth. Here we use meta-analyses of 1,418 published studies to show that the ratio of terrestrial plant nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) decreases with elevated concentrations of CO2, increasing rainfall, and P fertilization, but increases with warming, drought, and N fertilization. Our analyses also reveal that multiple global change treatments generally result in overall additive effects of single-factor treatments and that the responses of plant nutrients and their stoichiometry are similar in direction, but often greater in controlled than in natural environments. Our results suggest a decoupling of the P biogeochemical cycle from N in terrestrial plants under global changes, which in turn may diminish the provision of ecosystem services.

  9. Biofilter design for effective nitrogen removal from stormwater - influence of plant species, inflow hydrology and use of a saturated zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Emily G I; Pham, Tracey; Cook, Perran L M; Fletcher, Tim D; Hatt, Belinda E; Deletic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The use of biofilters to remove nitrogen and other pollutants from urban stormwater runoff has demonstrated varied success across laboratory and field studies. Design variables including plant species and use of a saturated zone have large impacts upon performance. A laboratory column study of 22 plant species and designs with varied outlet configuration was conducted across a 1.5-year period to further investigate the mechanisms and influences driving biofilter nitrogen processing. This paper presents outflow concentrations of total nitrogen from two sampling events across both 'wet' and 'dry' frequency dosing, and from sampling across two points in the outflow hydrograph. All plant species were effective under conditions of frequent dosing, but extended drying increased variation between species and highlighted the importance of a saturated zone in maintaining biofilter function. The saturated zone also effectively treated the volume of stormwater stored between inflow events, but this extended detention provided no additional benefit alongside the rapid processing of the highest performing species. Hence, the saturated zone reduced performance differences between plant species, and potentially acts as an 'insurance policy' against poor sub-optimal plant selection. The study shows the importance of biodiversity and inclusion of a saturated zone in protecting against climate variability.

  10. Artificial intelligence models for predicting the performance of biological wastewater treatment plant in the removal of Kjeldahl Nitrogen from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manu, D. S.; Thalla, Arun Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The current work demonstrates the support vector machine (SVM) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) modeling to assess the removal efficiency of Kjeldahl Nitrogen of a full-scale aerobic biological wastewater treatment plant. The influent variables such as pH, chemical oxygen demand, total solids (TS), free ammonia, ammonia nitrogen and Kjeldahl Nitrogen are used as input variables during modeling. Model development focused on postulating an adaptive, functional, real-time and alternative approach for modeling the removal efficiency of Kjeldahl Nitrogen. The input variables used for modeling were daily time series data recorded at wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) located in Mangalore during the period June 2014-September 2014. The performance of ANFIS model developed using Gbell and trapezoidal membership functions (MFs) and SVM are assessed using different statistical indices like root mean square error, correlation coefficients (CC) and Nash Sutcliff error (NSE). The errors related to the prediction of effluent Kjeldahl Nitrogen concentration by the SVM modeling appeared to be reasonable when compared to that of ANFIS models with Gbell and trapezoidal MF. From the performance evaluation of the developed SVM model, it is observed that the approach is capable to define the inter-relationship between various wastewater quality variables and thus SVM can be potentially applied for evaluating the efficiency of aerobic biological processes in WWTP.

  11. Effects of total ammonia nitrogen concentration on solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongjiang; Xu, Fuqing; Li, Yebo

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitive effect of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) (including NH3 and NH4(+)) on solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover was investigated in batch reactors at 37°C. The highest methane yield of 107.0 L/kg VS(feed) was obtained at a TAN concentration of 2.5 g/kg (based on total weight). TAN concentrations greater than 2.5 g/kg resulted in decreased methane yields, with a 50% reduction observed at a concentration of 6.0 g/kg. Reduced reaction rates and microbial activities for hydrolysis of cellulose and methanogenesis from acetate were observed at TAN concentrations higher than 4.3 g/kg. Strong ammonia stress was indicated at butyrate concentrations higher than 300 mg/kg. Result showed that the effluent of liquid anaerobic digestion can provide enough nitrogen for solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover.

  12. An improved biofilter to control the dissolved organic nitrogen concentration during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huining; Gu, Li; Liu, Bing; Gan, Huihui; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Yu, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a key precursor of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) formed during disinfection in drinking water treatment. To effectively control DBPs, reduction of the DON concentration before the disinfection process is critical. Traditional biofilters can increase the DON concentration in the effluent, so an improved biofilter is needed. In this study, an improved biofilter was set up with two-layer columns using activated carbon and quartz sand under different influent patterns. Compared with the single-layer filter, the two-layer biofilter controlled the DON concentration more efficiently. The two-point influent biofilter controlled the DON concentration more effectively than the single-point influent biofilter. The improved biofilter resulted in an environment (including matrix, DO, and pH) suitable for microbial growth. Along the depth of the biofilter column, the environment affected the microbial biomass and microbial activity and thus affected the DON concentration.

  13. Effects of calcium at toxic concentrations of cadmium in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danlian; Gong, Xiaomin; Liu, Yunguo; Zeng, Guangming; Lai, Cui; Bashir, Hassan; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Dafei; Xu, Piao; Cheng, Min; Wan, Jia

    2017-05-01

    This review provides new insight that calcium plays important roles in plant growth, heavy metal accumulation and translocation, photosynthesis, oxidative damage and signal transduction under cadmium stress. Increasing heavy metal pollution problems have raised word-wide concerns. Cadmium (Cd), being a highly toxic metal, poses potential risks both to ecosystems and human health. Compared with conventional technologies, phytoremediation, being cost-efficient, highly stable and environment-friendly, is believed to be a promising green technology for Cd decontamination. However, Cd can be easily taken up by plants and may cause severe phytotoxicity to plants, thus limiting the efficiency of phytoremediation. Various researches are being done to investigate the effects of exogenous substances on the mitigation of Cd toxicity to plants. Calcium (Ca) is an essential plant macronutrient that involved in various plant physiological processes, such as plant growth and development, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming, photosynthesis and intracellular signaling transduction. Due to the chemical similarity between Ca and Cd, Ca may mediate Cd-induced physiological or metabolic changes in plants. Recent studies have shown that Ca could be used as an exogenous substance to protect plants against Cd stress by the alleviation of growth inhibition, regulation of metal uptake and translocation, improvement of photosynthesis, mitigation of oxidative damages and the control of signal transduction in the plants. The effects of Ca on toxic concentrations of Cd in plants are reviewed. This review also provides new insight that plants with enhanced Ca level have improved resistance to Cd stress.

  14. Effects of Nitrogen source, empty bed residence time and inlet concentration on biofilter removal of chlorobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Can; Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2009-04-15

    A new biofilter with bamboo carriers was used to remove gaseous chlorobenzene. Operating parameters such as the nitrogen source, the empty bed residence time (EBRT) and the inlet concentration of chlorobenzene were varied. The ability of the biofilter to remove chlorobenzene was evaluated under each set of conditions. The experimental results indicated that better biofilter performance was achieved using ammonium instead of nitrate nitrogen as the nitrogen source. However, an addition of excess ammonium did not further increase the removal efficiency. The optimal ratio of carbon to nitrogen supply (C/N) was 7:1-14:1. Increasing EBRT increased the biofilter efficiency from 0-20% (EBRT=24 s) to 30-50% (EBRT=41 s) and to 50-70% (EBRT=122 s). The relationship between removal efficiency and EBRT indicated that the removal of chlorobenzene is a pseudo first order kinetic process below the concentration of 400 mg/m{sup 3}. A substrate inhibition model, the Haldane equation, successfully described the removal rate of the biofilter at various inlet concentrations. With increasing inlet concentration, the removal rate initially rose and then declined. The highest removal rate of 18 g/m{sup 3} x h was achieved at an inlet concentration of 1440 mg/m{sup 3}. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Effect of nitrogen concentration in culture mediums on growth and enzyme production of Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Da-wen; WEN Xiang-hua; QIAN Yi

    2005-01-01

    Effect of different nitrogen concentration in the mediums on growth and enzyme production of Phanerochaete chrysosporium was studied when glucose concentration was 10 g/L. The results showed that the medium contained 0.8 g/L ammonium tartrate is the best. It not only supply abundant nutrients for the growth of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, which make mycelia the best grow compared with the other medium, but also produce higher manganese-dependent peroxidase(Mnp) and laccase(Lac) activity. In addition, it is observed that the variation of mycelia surface is related to ligninolytic enzyme secreted by Phanerochaete chrysosporium. When the surface of mycelium pellets appeared burs, it predicts secondary metabolism begin. This experimentation demonstrated that when the ratio of carbon and nitrogen in nitrogen limited medium is equal to 100:8, growth and enzyme production of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is the best, it could achieve the maximum Mnp and Lac activity.

  16. Effect of nitrogen concentration in culture mediums on growth and enzyme production of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Da-wen; Wen, Xiang-hua; Qian, Yi

    2005-01-01

    Effect of different nitrogen concentration in the mediums on growth and enzyme production of Phanerochaete chrysosporium was studied when glucose concentration was 10 g/L. The results showed that the medium contained 0.8 g/L ammonium tartrate is the best. It not only supply abundant nutrients for the growth of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, which make mycelia the best grow compared with the other medium, but also produce higher manganese-dependent peroxidase (Mnp) and laccase (Lac) activity. In addition, it is observed that the variation of mycelia surface is related to ligninolytic enzyme secreted by Phanerochaete chrysosporium. When the surface of mycelium pellets appeared burs, it predicts secondary metabolism begin. This experimentation demonstrated that when the ratio of carbon and nitrogen in nitrogen limited medium is equal to 100:8, growth and enzyme production of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is the best, it could achieve the maximum Mnp and Lac activity.

  17. Effect of Nitrogen on Water Content, Sap Flow, and Tolerance of Rice Plants to Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhong-xian; S. VILLAREAL; YU Xiao-ping; K. L. HEONG; HU Cui

    2004-01-01

    Water content (WC) and sap flow from leaf sheath of rice plants with varying nitrogen levels at different growth stages,and fluctuations in relative water content (RWC) of rice plants being damaged by brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens were determined in the laboratory, and the tolerance of rice plants to BPH at different nitrogen regimes was evaluated in the greenhouse at International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), the Philippines. The results indicated that both WC and RWC were increased significantly, as the amount of sap flow from rice plants was reduced statistically, with the increase of nitrogen content in rice plants. RWC in rice plants applied with high nitrogen fertilizer decreased drastically by the injury of BPH nymphs, while the reduced survival duration of rice plants with the increase of nitrogen content was recorded. These may be considered to be one of the important factors in increasing the susceptibility to BPH damage on rice plants applied with nitrogen fertilizer.

  18. Effect of Nitrogen on Water Content, Sap Flow, and Tolerance of Rice Plants to Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuZhong-xian; S.VILLAREAL; YuXiao-ping; K.L.HEONG; HuCui

    2004-01-01

    Water content (WC) and sap flow from leaf sheath of rice plants with varying nitrogen levels at different growth stages and fluctuations in relative water content (RWC) of rice plants being damaged by brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens were determincd in the laboratory, and the tolerance of rice plants to BPH at different nitrogen regimes was evaluated in the greenhouse at International Rice Research institute (1RRI), the Philippines. The results indicated that both WC and RWC were increased significantly, as the amount of sap flow from rice plants was reduced statistically, with the in crease of nitrogen content inrice plants. RWC in rice plants applied with high nitrogen fertilizer decreased drastically by the injury, of BPH nymphs, while the reduced survival duration of rice plants with the increase of nitrogen content was recorded. These may be considered to be one of the important factors in increasing the susceptibility' to BPH damage on rice plants applied with nitrogen fertilizer

  19. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations from agricultural catchments—influence of spatial and temporal variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheimer, B.; Lidén, R.

    2000-01-01

    The eutrophication problem has drawn attention to nutrient leaching from arable land in southern Sweden, and further understanding of spatial and temporal variability is needed in order to develop decision-making tools. Thus, the influence of spatial and temporal variables was analysed statistically using empirical time series of different nutrient species from 35 well-documented catchments (2-35 km 2), which have been monitored for an average of 5 years. In the spatial analysis several significant correlations between winter median concentrations and catchment characteristics were found. The strongest correlation was found between inorganic nitrogen and land use, while concentrations of different phosphorus species were highly correlated to soil texture. Multiple linear regression models gave satisfactory results for prediction of median winter concentrations in unmeasured catchments, especially for inorganic nitrogen and phosphate. In the analysis of temporal variability within catchments, internal variables from a dynamic hydrological model (HBV) were linked to concentration fluxes. It was found that phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen concentrations were elevated during flow increase at low-flow conditions, while they were diluted as the wetness in the catchment increased. During unmonitored periods regression models were successful in predicting temporal variability of total phosphorus, phosphate and inorganic nitrogen, while organic nitrogen and particulate phosphorus could not be predicted with this approach. Dividing the data into different flow categories did not improve the prediction of nutrient concentration dynamics. The results and literature review presented, confirm parts of the present HBV-N model approach and will be useful for further development of nutrient routines linked to dynamic hydrological models.

  20. Nitrogen fertilization and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria treatments affected amino acid content of cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Atilla; Yildirim, Ertan; Ekinci, Melek; Turan, Metin; Kul, Raziye; Karagöz, Fazilet P.

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the influence of a nitrogen fixing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation (seed coating and seedling dipping) and 6 doses of nitrogen (0, 40, 80, 120, 160, 200 kg ha-1) application on amino acid contents of cabbage. Coating and seedling dipping applications caused a significant increase in values histidine, glycine, thionin, arginine and alanine of cabbage. Highest glutamate, serine, asparagines and glutamine contents were obtained from 160-200 kg ha-1 nitrogen dose applied plants. As a result, the use of bacteria treatments provides means of improving amino acid contents in cabbage.

  1. Importance of Foliar Nitrogen Concentration to Predict Forest Productivity in the Mid-Atlantic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yude Pan; John Hom; Jennifer Jenkins; Richard Birdsey

    2004-01-01

    To assess what difference it might make to include spatially defined estimates of foliar nitrogen in the regional application of a forest ecosystem model (PnET-II), we composed model predictions of wood production from extensive ground-based forest inventory analysis data across the Mid-Atlantic region. Spatial variation in foliar N concentration was assigned based on...

  2. Genome-wide patterns of carbon and nitrogen regulation of gene expression validate the combined carbon and nitrogen (CN)-signaling hypothesis in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Palenchar, Peter M; Kouranov, Andrei; Lejay, Laurence V; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    2004-01-01

    Background Carbon and nitrogen are two signals that influence plant growth and development. It is known that carbon- and nitrogen-signaling pathways influence one another to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interactions between carbon and nitrogen signaling or the mechanisms by which the different pathways interact. Results Microarray analysis was used to study global changes in mRNA levels due to carbon and nitrogen in Arabidopsis thaliana. An in...

  3. Effect of mass concentration of immobilized Spirulina platensis on nitrogen removal from simulated shrimp pond water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patama Lerksasen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina platensis strain BP immobilized on fibrous polyester mat was applied for nitrogen removal from simulated shrimp pond water. Different S. platensis mass on mat was built up during immobilizing process by varying the amount of batch fed suspended S. platensis cells. During immobilization, 0.2 OD560 S. platensis was replenished to reactor and chlorophyll-a in the solution was monitored. The immobilized S. platensis mass was 63, 49 and 19 g dw-S. platensis/m2 for Sp V-1, Sp IV-1 and Sp II-1 mat reactors adding five, four and two times of 0.2 OD560 S. platensis respectively. In accordance with statistic, the results of nitrogen removal tests by applying those immobilized mats in circulated batch system reactors loaded with 1.94 gN/m2-d showed that there were significant differences on ammonia removal among the different initial S. platensis mass on mats (ANOVA; P<0.05. The Sp V-1, Sp IV-1 and Sp II-1 mats could reduce the ammonia nitrogen concentration from 1 mg-N/L to the level as low as 0.18 mg-N/L within 2 weeks. Transformation of 75-81% ammonia nitrogen to organic nitrogen in microalgal cells, of which 27-43% were detached to solution, resulted to 44-58% total nitrogen removed from the system.

  4. Nitrogen Fertilization of Corn: Plant Biochemistry Effects and Carbon Cycle Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.; McSwiney, C. P.; Robertson, G. P.; Baldock, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are rising due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions (Alley et al. 2007; Prentice et al. 2001). About half of the anthropogenic CO2 emitted during the 1990s was absorbed by the terrestrial biosphere and ocean (Prentice et al. 2001). It is possible to estimate the size of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks individually using atmospheric CO2 and O2 measurements (Keeling et al. 1996). To best estimate the sizes of these carbon sinks, we need to accurately know the oxidative ratio (OR) of the terrestrial biosphere (Randerson et al. 2006). OR is the ratio of the moles of O2 released per moles of CO2 consumed in gas fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. Though it is likely that the net OR of the biosphere varies with ecosystem type and nutrient status, OR is assumed constant in carbon sink apportionment calculations (e.g. Prentice et al. 2001). Small shifts in OR can lead to large variations in the calculated sizes of the terrestrial biosphere and ocean carbon sinks (Randerson et al. 2006). OR likely shifts with changes in climate, nutrient status, and land use. These shifts are due, in part, to shifts in plant biochemistry. We are measuring ecosystem OR in corn agricultural ecosystems under a range of nitrogen fertilization treatments at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. We measure OR indirectly, through its relationship with organic carbon oxidation state (Cox) (Masiello et al. in press 2008). Cox can be measured through elemental analysis and, with basic knowledge of plant nitrogen use patterns, Cox values can be converted to OR values. Cox can also be measured through 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can be combined with a molecular mixing model to determine Cox, OR, and plant biochemical composition (i.e. percentage carbohydrates, lignin, lipids, and proteins) (Baldock et al. 2004). Here we present data showing the effects of

  5. Use of Potato Nitrogen Concentrate in the Production of α-Amylase by Aspergillus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Thaller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of various nitrogen sources and media supplements on α-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1 formation by Aspergillus oryzae ATCC 1011 was investigated in shake flask experiments and batch fermentations. Both inorganic and organic nitrogen-containing supplements have been applied, while corn starch and ammonium sulphate were used as the major source of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. Shake flask experiments revealed that potato nitrogen concentrate (PNC is almost equivalent to corn steep liquor (CSL in supporting amylase formation. A pretreatment step consisting of clarification of the turbid material did not show any significant effect. The replacement of the inorganic nitrogen source by sodium nitrate led to lower enzyme yields. Other complex supplements may reduce the enzyme level formed, e.g. casein hydrolysate, or increase the amylase titre slightly, e.g. yeast extract or malt extract. Cultivations in instrumented bench top reactors on media supplemented with PNC led to higher cell growth rates and yields of α-amylase in comparison with the medium without any supplement. Replacement of PNC by CSL revealed a slightly increased enzyme level, which is in the range of 9–17 % after 100 h of cultivation. Only minor differences were revealed in the growth kinetics and enzyme formation when PNC was used as the sole nitrogen source, replacing a mixture of soybean meal, yeast extract, malt extract and casein hydrolysate in bioreactor cultivations with lactose as the carbon source. However, metabolic differences as seen from the course of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT, α-amino nitrogen concentration and the amount of acid needed to maintain a constant pH were observed.

  6. Using Plant Phylogenetic Relatedness as a Predictor for Plants' Control on Soil Microbial Communities and Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, T.; Bowman, W. D.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the known importance of soil microbes and their influence on soil processes, a mechanistic understanding is still needed to predict how plants and soil microbes interact at scales that are relevant to community and ecosystem-scale processes. Closely related plant species have similar traits aboveground, but we don't know whether this is also true for belowground traits that affect soil microbial community structure and function. Determining how tightly plant phylogeny and plant functional traits are linked to soil microbial communities is a useful approach for discovering plant-microbe associations that are generalizable across plant species (a limitation of studies that employ a single or few plant species). Using this approach, we conducted a greenhouse study with seven congeneric grasses (genus Poa) and their native soils to examine whether plants' influences on microbial community structure were consistent with plant phylogenetic relatedness and/or plant functional traits. Seeds of each Poa species were planted in native soil (from the seed source population) as well as a homogenized soil from all seven populations. Additionally, a nitrogen treatment was added to address how an environmental change (such as nitrogen deposition) alters plant-microbe associations. Rhizosphere community composition of bacteria and fungi was obtained via marker gene sequencing to compare community composition across plant species. Patterns in plant-microbe associations across plant species reveal plant control on nutrient cycling via plant species' influence on microbial community structure. These results determine if we are ready to generalize about plant-microbe interactions at the genus level, an important stepping-stone to applying knowledge of plant-microbe interactions to larger ecological scales.

  7. Microbial biomass in red soils and its significance in plant availability of nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚槐应; 何振立; 黄昌勇

    2002-01-01

    A series of laboratory and pot experiments carried out to examine the role of soil microbial biomass in red soils' nitrogen availability and productivity showed that soil available N (NA), dry matter yield (DMY) of ryegrass, and plant uptake of nitrogen were each closely correlated with microbial biomass-C (Cmic) or -N (Nmic), suggesting that soil microbial biomass is a very important nitrogen pool available to plants in red soils. After correction for the substrate effect, the computed turnover of the Nmic in three tested soils ranged from 63 to 250 days. Soils with low Nmic or light texture generally had higher Nmic turnover rate than those with high Nmic or heavy texture. These results showed that soils with low Nmic, microbial biomass could also play an important role in the availability of nitrogen to plants due to these soils' high turnover rate.

  8. Nutrient allocation strategies of woody plants: an approach from the scaling of nitrogen and phosphorus between twig stems and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengbing; Li, Peng; Chen, Yahan; Han, Wenxuan; Fang, Jingyun

    2016-02-05

    Allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), among plant organs reflects the influences of evolutionary and ecological processes on functional traits of plants, and thus is related to functional groups and environmental conditions. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by exploring the stoichiometric scaling of N and P concentrations between twig stems and leaves of 335 woody species from 12 forest sites across eastern China. Scaling exponents of twig stem N (or P) to leaf N (or P) varied among functional groups. With increasing latitude, these scaling exponents significantly decreased from >1 at low latitude to nutrient concentration increased, plants at low latitudes showed a faster increase in twig stem nutrient concentration, whereas plants at high latitudes presented a faster increase in leaf nutrient concentration. Such shifts in nutrient allocation strategy from low to high latitudes may be controlled by temperature. Overall, our findings provide a new approach to explore plant nutrient allocation strategies by analysing the stoichiometric scaling of nutrients among organs, which could broaden our understanding of the interactions between plants and their environments.

  9. Plant maturity and nitrogen fertilization affected fructan metabolism in harvestable tissues of timothy (Phleum pratense L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould-Ahmed, Marouf; Decau, Marie-Laure; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Lafrenière, Carole; Drouin, Pascal

    2014-10-15

    Timothy (Phleum pratense L.) is an important grass forage used for pasture, hay, and silage in regions with cool and humid growth seasons. One of the factors affecting the nutritive value of this grass is the concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), mainly represented by fructans. NSC concentration depends on multiple factors, making it hardly predictable. To provide a better understanding of NSC metabolism in timothy, the effects of maturity stage and nitrogen (N) fertilization level on biomass, NSC and N-compound concentrations were investigated in the tissues used for forage (leaf blades and stems surrounded by leaf sheaths) of hydroponically grown plants. Moreover, activities and relative expression level of enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were measured in the same tissues. Forage biomass was not altered by the fertilization level but was strongly modified by the stage of development. It increased from vegetative to heading stages while leaf-to-stem biomass ratio decreased. Total NSC concentration, which was not altered by N fertilization level, increased between heading and anthesis due to an accumulation of fructans in leaf blades. Fructan metabolizing enzyme activities (fructosyltransferase-FT and fructan exohydrolase-FEH) were not or only slightly altered by both maturity stage and N fertilization level. Conversely, the relative transcript levels of genes coding for enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were modified by N supply (PpFT1 and Pp6-FEH1) or maturity stage (PpFT2). The relative transcript level of PpFT1 was the highest in low N plants while that of Pp6-FEH1 was the highest in high N plants. Morevoer, transcript level of PpFT1 was negatively correlated with nitrate concentration while that of PpFT2 was positively correlated with sucrose concentration. This distinct regulation of the two genes coding for 6-sucrose:fructan fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) may allow a fine adequation of C allocation towards fructan synthesis in

  10. Past and future trends in concentrations of sulphur and nitrogen compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hole, Lars R.; Christensen, Jesper H.; Ruoho-Airola, Tuija

    2009-01-01

    Recent trends in nitrogen and sulphur compounds in air and precipitation from a range of Arctic monitoring stations are presented, with seasonal data from the late 70s to 2004 or 2005. Earlier findings of declining sulphur concentrations are confirmed for most stations, while the pattern is less......-2000 is reasonably well reproduced at most stations using an Eulerian, hemispherical model. Results for nitrogen compounds are weaker. Scenario studies show that even if large sulphur emission reductions take place in important source regions in South-East Asia in the coming decades, only small changes in Arctic...

  11. Agaricus subrufescens: substratum nitrogen concentration and mycelial extraction method on antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÍRIA B.D. BERTÉLI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antitumor activity of Agaricus subrufescens has been shown on vegetative mycelium and basidiocarp. However, few studies have assessed the effect of A. subrufescens cultivation conditions and extraction methods on antitumor activity. This study evaluated the effect of nitrogen concentration on the cultivation medium of A. subrufescens and the extraction method of mycelial antineoplastic actives against sarcoma 180 cells implanted in mice. Two nitrogen sources (isolated soybean protein and NaNO3 and 10 nitrogen concentrations (0.25 to 8.0 g/L were used. Dried mycelium extract was obtained by hot water infusion (1:10 mass:volume; 90 °C or by aqueous mixture (1:10 mass:volume, ambient temperature in ultrapure water. The doses were administered daily by gavage to mice implanted with sarcoma 180 cells. Isolated soy protein is more efficient to mycelial biomass production than NaNO3. The mycelial biomass production increases when the cultivation medium is added with high nitrogen concentrations as well as the splenic index and the antitumor activity of the moistened mycelial powder. Hot water extract is more effective than the moistened mycelial powder to reduce tumor. The antitumor activity of hot water mycelial extract is similar to the one of basidiocarps, presenting lower metabolic demand on the spleen, keeping blood parameters normal and promoting animal wellness.

  12. Starting points in plant-bacteria nitrogen-fixing symbioses: intercellular invasion of the roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Fernando; Wall, Luis; Fabra, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural practices contribute to climate change by releasing greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide that are mainly derived from nitrogen fertilizers. Therefore, understanding biological nitrogen fixation in farming systems is beneficial to agriculture and environmental preservation. In this context, a better grasp of nitrogen-fixing systems and nitrogen-fixing bacteria-plant associations will contribute to the optimization of these biological processes. Legumes and actinorhizal plants can engage in a symbiotic interaction with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia or actinomycetes, resulting in the formation of specialized root nodules. The legume-rhizobia interaction is mediated by a complex molecular signal exchange, where recognition of different bacterial determinants activates the nodulation program in the plant. To invade plants roots, bacteria follow different routes, which are determined by the host plant. Entrance via root hairs is probably the best understood. Alternatively, entry via intercellular invasion has been observed in many legumes. Although there are common features shared by intercellular infection mechanisms, differences are observed in the site of root invasion and bacterial spread on the cortex reaching and infecting a susceptible cell to form a nodule. This review focuses on intercellular bacterial invasion of roots observed in the Fabaceae and considers, within an evolutionary context, the different variants, distribution and molecular determinants involved. Intercellular invasion of actinorhizal plants and Parasponia is also discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Global assessment of nitrogen deposition effects on terrestrial plant diversity: a synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbink, R.; Hicks, K.; Galloway, J.; Spranger, T.; Alkemade, R.; Ashmore, M.R.; Bustamante, M.; Cinderby, S.; Davidson, E.; Dentener, F.; Emmett, B.; Erisman, J.W.; Fenn, M.; Gilliam, F.; Nordin, A.; Pardo, L.; Vries, de W.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is a recognized threat to plant diversity in temperate and northern parts of Europe and North America. This paper assesses evidence from field experiments for N deposition effects and thresholds for terrestrial plant diversity protection across a latitudinal range

  14. Optimum sizing of steam turbines for concentrated solar power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Poullikkas, Constantinos Rouvas, Ioannis Hadjipaschalis, George Kourtis

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a selection of the optimum steam turbine type and size for integration in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants is carried out. In particular, the optimum steam turbine input and output interfaces for a range of CSP plant capacity sizes are identified. Also, efficiency and electricity unit cost curves for various steam turbine capacities are estimated by using a combination of the Steam Pro software module of the Thermoflow Suite 18 package and the IPP v2.1 optimization software...

  15. Improved plant nitrogen nutrition contributes to higher water use efficiency in tomatoes under alternate partial root-zone irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaosheng; Liu, Fulai; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2010-01-01

    Comparative effects of partial root-zone irrigation (PRI) and deficit irrigation (DI) on stomatal conductance (gs), nitrogen accumulation and distribution in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) plants were investigated in a split-root pot experiment. Results showed that both PRI and DI saved 25......% water and led to 10.0% and 17.5% decreases in dry biomass, respectively, compared with the fully irrigated (FI) controls. Consequently, water use efficiency (WUE) was increased by 18.6% and 10.8% in the PRI and DI plants, respectively. The highest WUE in the PRI plants was associated with the highest...... carbon isotope composition (δ13C), indicating that the improvement of WUE might have been a result of long-term optimisation of stomatal control over gas exchange. The constantly higher xylem sap ABA concentration in PRI compared with DI plants was seemingly responsible for the greater control over...

  16. Impact of gaseous nitrogen deposition on plant functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulen, I.; Perez-Soba, M; De Kok, LJ; Van der Eerden, L

    1998-01-01

    Dry deposition of NH3 and NOx (NO and NO2) can affect plant metabolism at the cellular and whole-plant level. Gaseous pollutants enter the plant mainly through the stomata, and once in the apoplast NH3 dissolves to form NH4+, whereas NO2 dissolves to form NO3- and NO2-. The latter compound can also

  17. Plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations and follicular dynamics in ewes fed proteins of different degradability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bianchi Lazarin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of overfeeding with protein of different degradability on body condition, plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations, ovulation number and follicular dynamics were assessed in Santa Ines ewes. Twelve ewes were assigned to a randomized block design according to body weight and received overfeeding with soybean meal or with corn gluten meal or maintenance diet for 28 days before ovulation and during the next estrous cycle. Blood samples were taken on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the beginning of treatments for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and on days 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 into the estrous cycle for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone. Follicular dynamics was monitored daily by ultrasound during one estrous cycle. Dry matter and crude protein intake, weight gain, plasma urea nitrogen concentration before ovulation, number of ovulations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 1st and of the 2nd waves and the growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave were higher in the ewes that received overfeeding. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave was higher in the ewes fed maintenance diet. The back fat thickness, plasma urea nitrogen before ovulation and progesterone concentrations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 2nd wave and growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave were higher in ewes that received overfeeding with soybean meal. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave was higher in ewes that received overfeeding with corn gluten meal. Overfeeding with protein-rich feeds may increase the ovulation number and with soybean meal, it may be effective in increasing plasma progesterone concentration in ewes.

  18. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  19. Understanding nitrate uptake, signaling and remobilisation for improving plant nitrogen use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Surya

    2017-08-28

    The majority of terrestrial plants use nitrate as their main source of nitrogen. Nitrate also acts as an important signalling molecule in vital physiological processes required for optimum plant growth and development. Improving nitrate uptake and transport, through activation by nitrate sensing, signalling and regulatory processes, would enhance plant growth, resulting in improved crop yields. The increased remobilisation of nitrate, and assimilated nitrogenous compounds, from source to sink tissues further ensures higher yields and quality. An updated knowledge of various transporters, genes, activators, and microRNAs, involved in nitrate uptake, transport, remobilisation, and nitrate-mediated root growth, is presented. An enhanced understanding of these components will allow for their orchestrated fine tuning in efforts to improving nitrogen use efficiency in plants. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Review of avian mortality studies at concentrating solar power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews past and current avian mortality studies at concentrating solar power (CSP) plants and facilities including Solar One in California, the Solar Energy Development Center in Israel, Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California, Crescent Dunes in Nevada, and Gemasolar in Spain. Findings indicate that the leading causes of bird deaths at CSP plants are from collisions (primarily with reflective surfaces; i.e., heliostats) and singeing caused by concentrated solar flux. Safe irradiance levels for birds have been reported to range between 4 and 50 kW/m2. Above these levels, singeing and irreversible damage to the feathers can occur. Despite observations of large numbers of "streamers" in concentrated flux regions and reports that suggest these streamers indicate complete vaporization of birds, analyses in this paper show that complete vaporization of birds is highly improbable, and the observed streamers are likely due to insects flying into the concentrated flux. The levelized avian mortality rate during the first year of operation at Ivanpah was estimated to be 0.7 - 3.5 fatalities per GWh, which is less than the levelized avian mortality reported for fossil fuel plants but greater than that for nuclear and wind power plants. Mitigation measures include acoustic, visual, tactile, and chemosensory deterrents to keep birds away from the plant, and heliostat aiming strategies that reduce the solar flux during standby.

  1. The Form in Which Nitrogen Is Supplied Affects the Polyamines, Amino Acids, and Mineral Composition of Sweet Pepper Fruit under an Elevated CO2 Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, Maria C; Otálora, Ginés; Porras, Manuel E; Sánchez-Guerrero, Mari C; Lorenzo, Pilar; Medrano, Evangelina; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effect of supplying nitrogen, as NO3(-) or as NO3(-)/NH4(+), on the composition of fruits of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Melchor) plants grown with different CO2 concentrations ([CO2]): ambient or elevated (800 μmol mol(-1)). The results show that the application of NH4(+) and high [CO2] affected the chroma related to the concentrations of chlorophylls. The concentrations of Ca, Cu, Mg, P, and Zn were significantly reduced in the fruits of plants nourished with NH4(+), the loss of Fe being more dramatic at increased [CO2], which was also the case with the protein concentration. The concentration of total phenolics was increased by NH4(+), being unaffected by [CO2]. Globally, the NH4(+) was the main factor that affected fruit free amino acid concentrations. Polyamines were affected differently: putrescine was increased by elevated [CO2], while the response of cadaverine depended on the form of N supplied.

  2. Temperature, plant species and residence time effects on nitrogen removal in model treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C R; Stein, O R; Hook, P B; Burr, M D; Parker, A E; Hafla, E C

    2013-01-01

    Total nitrogen (TN) removal in treatment wetlands (TWs) is challenging due to nitrogen cycle complexity and the variation of influent nitrogen species. Plant species, season, temperature and hydraulic loading most likely influence root zone oxygenation and appurtenant nitrogen removal, especially for ammonium-rich wastewater. Nitrogen data were collected from two experiments utilizing batch-loaded (3-, 6-, 9- and 20-day residence times), sub-surface TWs monitored for at least one year during which temperature was varied between 4 and 24 °C. Synthetic wastewater containing 17 mg/l N as NH4 and 27 mg/l amino-N, 450 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD), and 13 mg/l SO4-S was applied to four replicates of Carex utriculata, Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha latifolia and unplanted controls. Plant presence and species had a greater effect on TN removal than temperature or residence time. Planted columns achieved approximately twice the nitrogen removal of unplanted controls (40-95% versus 20-50% removal) regardless of season and temperature. TWs planted with Carex outperformed both Typha and Schoenoplectus and demonstrated less temperature dependency. TN removal with Carex was excellent at all temperatures and residence times; Schoenoplectus and Typha TN removal improved at longer residence times. Reductions in TN were not accompanied by increases in NO3, which was consistently below 1 mg/l N.

  3. Chemistry of fog waters in California's Central Valley - Pt. 3: concentrations and speciation of organic and inorganic nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Zhang; Anastasio, C. [University of California, Davis, CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Program, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources

    2001-07-01

    Although organic nitrogen (ON) has been found to be a ubiquitous and significant component in wet and dry deposition, almost nothing is known about its concentration or composition in fog waters. To address this gap, we have investigated the concentration and composition of ON in fog waters collected in Davis, in California's Central Valley. Significant quantities of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) were found in these samples, with a median concentration of 303{mu}M N (range=120-1630{mu}M N). DON typically represented approximately 16% of the total dissolved nitrogen (inorganic+organic) in Davis fog waters. The median concentration of nitrogen in free amino acids and alkyl amines was 16{mu}M N (range=3.8-120{mu}M N), which accounted for 3.4% of the DON in Davis fogs. Thus, although the absolute concentrations of free amino compounds were significant, they were only a minor component of the DON pool. Combined amino nitrogen (e.g., proteins and peptides) was present at higher concentrations and accounted for 6.1-29 per cent (median=16%) of DON. Overall, free and combined amino compounds typically accounted for a median value of 22% of DON in the fog waters. The high concentrations of DON found, and the fact that amino and other N-containing organic compounds can serve as nitrogen sources for microorganisms and plants, indicate that atmospheric ON compounds likely play an important role in nitrogen cycling in the Central Valley. In addition, due to the basicity of some N functional groups, ON compounds likely contribute to the previously observed acid buffering capacity of Central Valley fog waters. Finally, a comparison of fog waters with fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) collected from the same site during the same period of time indicated that the median concentrations (mol Nm{sup -3}-air) of total water-soluble ON, free amino nitrogen and total amino nitrogen were very similar in the fog water and PM{sub 2.5}. Given the high water solubility of many organic N

  4. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part IV: Effects of housing and meteorologic factors on indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, J D; Schwab, M; McDermott, A; Lambert, W E; Samet, J M

    1996-12-01

    In a prospective study of infants' exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2)* and respiratory illness, NO2 concentrations were measured in more than 1,400 homes in Albequerque, NM, From January 1988 through June 1991 (Health Effects Institute Research Report Number 58, Parts I, II and III). This report characterizes the variability in indoor NO2 concentrations across seasons and years, and identifies factors associated with variation in concentrations between homes and across seasons. In regression analyses of winter data, NO2 levels in the infants' bedrooms were predominately determined by the presence of gas cooking ranges with continuously burning pilot lights, the presence of wall or floor furnaces, the use of the stove for space heating, and the square footage of the living space. These findings are consistent with previously published analysis of data from homes in other U.S. cities. Relatively small differences in seasonal NO2 levels were observed across years. The correlation coefficient (r) of bedroom NO2 levels obtained in the same homes was 0.66 over two winters and 0.48 over two summers. For homes that had gas cooking ranges with continuously burning pilot lights, the NO2 bedroom concentrations differed, on average, less than 5 parts per billion (ppb) across winters. These differences were hypothesized to be caused by differences in the use of indoor NO2 sources, ventilation, and ambient (outdoor) NO2 levels. We were, however, unable to demonstrate an association between year-to-year differences in seasonal indoor NO2 concentrations and reported use of cooking range, furnace, or heater, or ambient NO2 levels, or temperature.

  5. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Bridgham, Scott D; Kellogg, Laurie E

    2010-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (A(N), plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRT(N)). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g N x m(-2) x yr(-1), 2 g P x m(-2) x yr(-1), or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic-minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either A(N) or MRT(N), but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important

  6. Selenium concentrations of selected medicinal and aromatic plants in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkutlu, Faruk; Sekeroglu, Nazim; Koca, Ufuk; Yazici, Gizem

    2011-10-01

    Recent scientific studies have proven the importance of trace elements on human health. The main food supplies are plants and animals, which are significant sources of these minerals. Studies on determining mineral compositions of herbs, spices and some other crops have increased all over the world. Published works revealed that spices, herbs and medicinal plants should be consumed to obtain beneficial trace elements. Selenium (Se), one of the most vital trace elements, has a significant role in human diet acting as a preventative agent against some serious illnesses. Despite numerous scientific works on mineral compositions of medicinal and aromatic plants, investigations of selenium content in these foods could not be successfully studied until recently due to the lack of suitable analytical methods for selenium analysis. Thus, publications on selenium concentrations of foods are recent. In this regard, selenium contents of some medicinal and aromatic plants commonly used as spices, herbal teas and traditional medicines in Turkey were studied in the present research. Selenium contents of the most used parts of these plants were analyzed by ICP-OES (Varian Vista-Pro, Australia). Of the analyzed 26 medicinal and aromatic plants, the highest Se concentration (1133 microg kg-1) was found in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and the lowest in sumac (Rhus coriaria L.) fruits (11 microg kg(-1)).

  7. Nitrogen, Phosphor, and Potassium Level in Soil and Oil Palm Tree at various Composition of plant species mixtures grown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, C.; Rauf, A.; Fazrin, D. A.; Habibi, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    In productive oil palm plantation areas, poor vegetation is generally caused by low light intensity. This condition causes excessive erosion and decreases soil fertility. One of the efforts for soil and water conservation at oil palm plantations is through increased vegetation diversity. The changes of soil and plant nitrogen, phosporus, and potassium content, observed by planting two types of herbs under oil palm tree, with different compositions. Vegetation composition was set as: Arachis glabrata 100%; Stenotaprum secundatum 100%; Arachis glabrata 50% + Stenotaprum secundatum 50%; Arachis glabrata 75% + Stenotaprum secundatum 25%; Arachis glabrata 25% + Stenotaprum secundatum 75%. The shoot and root fresh/dry weight, nutrient content (nitrogen, phosphor, and potassium) of each cutting were measured at the end of the experiment. Ten of treatment plant were harvested and divided shoots and roots after washing out of soil. Biomass samples were dried at 70 °C for 48 h and weighed. The total N and its proportional concentration (N%) were analyzed with the micro- Kjeldahl method. Potasium analyzing with flamephotometry, and phosphor and from samples was determined by analyzing with spectrophotometry method. The results showed the highest shoot growth of A.glabarata if planting was mixed with S. secundatum, but the result was different with S.secundatum being superior if planted with monoculture system. Combination of interrow cultivation is more recommended for soil conservation and nutrient maintenance in palm oil trees were A. Glabarata 75% + S.secundatum 25%.

  8. Characterization of salt tolerance in ectoine-transformed tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabaccum): photosynthesis, osmotic adjustment, and nitrogen partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaieb, R E A; Tanaka, N; Saneoka, H; Murooka, Y; Ono, H; Morikawa, H; Nakamura, A; Nguyen, N T; Suwa, R; Fujita, K

    2006-02-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) biosynthetic genes (ect. ABC) from Halomonas elongata were introduced to tobacco plants using an Agrobacterium-mediated gene delivery system. The genes for ectoine biosynthesis were integrated in a stable manner into the tobacco genome and the corresponding transcripts were expressed. The concentration of ectoine under salt-stress conditions was higher in the roots than in leaves. A close relationship was found between stomatal conductance and the amount of transported nitrogen, suggesting that water transport through the xylem in the stem and transpiration may be involved in nitrogen transport to leaves. The data indicate that the turgor values of the ectoine transgenic lines increased with increasing salt concentration. The data revealed two ways in which ectoine enhanced salinity tolerance of tobacco plants. First, ectoine improved the maintenance of root function so that water is taken up consistently and supplied to shoots under saline conditions. Second, ectoine enhanced the nitrogen supply to leaves by increasing transpiration and by protecting Rubisco proteins from deleterious effects of salt, thereby improving the rate of photosynthesis.

  9. Effect of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration on their removal kinetic in treated urban wastewater by Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J; Alvarez, P; Arbib, Z; Garrido, C; Barragán, J; Perales, J A

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of removing nutrients by the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, using urban wastewater as culture medium, namely the effluent subjected to secondary biological treatment in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). For this, laboratory experiments were performed in batch cultures to study the effect of initial nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on growth and reduction of nutrient performance of C. vulgaris. The microalga was cultivated in enriched wastewater containing different phosphorus (1.3-143.5 mg x L(-1) P.PO4(3-)), ammonium (5.8-226.8 mg x L(-1) N-NH4+) and nitrate (1.5-198.3 mg x L(-1) N-NO3-) concentrations. The nutrient removal and growth kinetics have been studied: maximum productivity of 0.95 g SS x L(-1) x day(-1), minimum yield factor for cells on substrate (Y) of 11.51 g cells x g nitrogen(-1) and 0.04 g cells x g phosphorus(-1) were observed. The results suggested that C. vulgaris has a high potential to reduce nutrients in secondary WWTP effluents.

  10. Tightly-Coupled Plant-Soil Nitrogen Cycling: Comparison of Organic Farms across an Agricultural Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Timothy M; Hollander, Allan D; Steenwerth, Kerri; Jackson, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    How farming systems supply sufficient nitrogen (N) for high yields but with reduced N losses is a central challenge for reducing the tradeoffs often associated with N cycling in agriculture. Variability in soil organic matter and management of organic farms across an agricultural landscape may yield insights for improving N cycling and for evaluating novel indicators of N availability. We assessed yields, plant-soil N cycling, and root expression of N metabolism genes across a representative set of organic fields growing Roma-type tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in an intensively-managed agricultural landscape in California, USA. The fields spanned a three-fold range of soil carbon (C) and N but had similar soil types, texture, and pH. Organic tomato yields ranged from 22.9 to 120.1 Mg ha-1 with a mean similar to the county average (86.1 Mg ha-1), which included mostly conventionally-grown tomatoes. Substantial variability in soil inorganic N concentrations, tomato N, and root gene expression indicated a range of possible tradeoffs between yields and potential for N losses across the fields. Fields showing evidence of tightly-coupled plant-soil N cycling, a desirable scenario in which high crop yields are supported by adequate N availability but low potential for N loss, had the highest total and labile soil C and N and received organic matter inputs with a range of N availability. In these fields, elevated expression of a key gene involved in root N assimilation, cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1, confirmed that plant N assimilation was high even when inorganic N pools were low. Thus tightly-coupled N cycling occurred on several working organic farms. Novel combinations of N cycling indicators (i.e. inorganic N along with soil microbial activity and root gene expression for N assimilation) would support adaptive management for improved N cycling on organic as well as conventional farms, especially when plant-soil N cycling is rapid.

  11. Growth reduction of Sphagnum magellanicum subjected to high nitrogen deposition: the role of amino acid nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, J.; Berendse, F.

    2003-01-01

    We tested the relationship between Sphagnum growth and the amount of nitrogen stored in free amino acids in a fertilisation experiment with intact peat monoliths in an open greenhouse in The Netherlands. Three nitrogen deposition scenarios were used: no nitrogen deposition, field conditions and a do

  12. Responses of hydraulics at the whole-plant level to simulated nitrogen deposition of different levels in Fraxinus mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Ying; Wang, Miao; Yang, Da; Song, Jia; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Han, Shi-Jie; Hao, Guang-You

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is expected to have great impact on forest ecosystems by affecting many aspects of plant-environmental interactions, one of which involves its influences on plant water relations through modifications of plant hydraulic architecture. However, there is a surprising lack of integrative study on tree hydraulic architecture responses to N deposition, especially at the whole-plant level. In the present study, we used a 5-year N addition experiment to simulate the effects of six different levels of N deposition (20-120 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) on growth and whole-plant hydraulic conductance of a dominant tree species (Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr.) from the typical temperate forest of NE China. The results showed that alleviation of N limitation by moderate concentrations of fertilization (20-80 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) promoted plant growth, but further N additions on top of the threshold level showed negative effects on plant growth. Growth responses of F. mandshurica seedlings to N addition of different concentrations were accompanied by corresponding changes in whole-plant hydraulic conductance; higher growth rate was accompanied by reduced whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and higher leaf water-use efficiency. A detailed analysis on hydraulic conductance of different components of the whole-plant water transport pathway revealed that changes in root and leaf hydraulic conductance, rather than that of the stem, were responsible for Kplant responses to N fertilization. Both plant growth and hydraulic architecture responses to increasing levels of N addition were not linear, i.e., the correlation between measured parameters and N availability exhibited bell-shaped curves with peak values observed at medium levels of N fertilization. Changes in hydraulic architecture in response to fertilization found in the present study may represent an important underlying mechanism for the commonly observed changes in water-related tree performances

  13. Transformation of nitrogen dioxide into ozone and prediction of ozone concentrations using multiple linear regression techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Nurul Adyani; Ramli, Nor Azam; Yahaya, Ahmad Shukri; Yusof, Noor Faizah Fitri M D; Sansuddin, Nurulilyana; Al Madhoun, Wesam Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Analysis and forecasting of air quality parameters are important topics of atmospheric and environmental research today due to the health impact caused by air pollution. This study examines transformation of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) into ozone (O(3)) at urban environment using time series plot. Data on the concentration of environmental pollutants and meteorological variables were employed to predict the concentration of O(3) in the atmosphere. Possibility of employing multiple linear regression models as a tool for prediction of O(3) concentration was tested. Results indicated that the presence of NO(2) and sunshine influence the concentration of O(3) in Malaysia. The influence of the previous hour ozone on the next hour concentrations was also demonstrated.

  14. Ubiquity of insect-derived nitrogen transfer to plants by endophytic insect-pathogenic fungi: an additional branch of the soil nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    The study of symbiotic nitrogen transfer in soil has largely focused on nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Vascular plants can lose a substantial amount of their nitrogen through insect herbivory. Previously, we showed that plants were able to reacquire nitrogen from insects through a partnership with the endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. That is, the endophytic capability and insect pathogenicity of M. robertsii are coupled so that the fungus acts as a conduit to provide insect-derived nitrogen to plant hosts. Here, we assess the ubiquity of this nitrogen transfer in five Metarhizium species representing those with broad (M. robertsii, M. brunneum, and M. guizhouense) and narrower insect host ranges (M. acridum and M. flavoviride), as well as the insect-pathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Lecanicillium lecanii. Insects were injected with (15)N-labeled nitrogen, and we tracked the incorporation of (15)N into two dicots, haricot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and soybean (Glycine max), and two monocots, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and wheat (Triticum aestivum), in the presence of these fungi in soil microcosms. All Metarhizium species and B. bassiana but not L. lecanii showed the capacity to transfer nitrogen to plants, although to various degrees. Endophytic association by these fungi increased overall plant productivity. We also showed that in the field, where microbial competition is potentially high, M. robertsii was able to transfer insect-derived nitrogen to plants. Metarhizium spp. and B. bassiana have a worldwide distribution with high soil abundance and may play an important role in the ecological cycling of insect nitrogen back to plant communities.

  15. Round Robin test for the determination of nitrogen concentration in solid Lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favuzza, P., E-mail: paolo.favuzza@enea.it [ENEA Center, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Antonelli, A. [ENEA Research Center, Brasimone, 40035, Camugnano (Italy); Furukawa, T. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Groeschel, F. [KIT Research Center, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1,76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hedinger, R. [F4E Research Center, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Higashi, T. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Hirakawa, Y.; Iijima, M.; Ito, Y.; Kanemura, T. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Knaster, J. [IFMIF-EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho (Japan); Kondo, H. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Miccichè, G.; Nitti, F.S. [ENEA Research Center, Brasimone, 40035, Camugnano (Italy); Ohira, S. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Severi, M. [University of Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sugimoto, M. [JAEA Research Center, Rokkasho (Japan); Suzuki, A. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Traversi, R. [University of Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Wakai, E. [JAEA Research Center, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen contained in solid Lithium is converted into Ammonium ion. • Ammonium ion is suitably quantified by ionic chromatograph or by Ammonia sensor. • Good agreement of the partner’s results has been achieved. • Maximum operative reproducibility and blank subtraction are necessary. - Abstract: Three different partners, ENEA, JAEA ed University of Tokyo, have been involved during 2014–2015 in the Round Robin experimentation for the assessment of the soundness of the analitycal procedure for the determination of the Nitrogen impurities contained inside a solid Lithium sample. Two different kinds of Lithium samples, differing by about an order of magnitude in Nitrogen concentration (∼230 wppm; ∼20–30 wppm), have been selected for this cross analysis. The agreement of the achieved results appears very good for what concerns the most concentrated Lithium and indicates each partner’s procedure is appropriate and intrinsecally able to lead to meaningful values, characterized by a relative uncertainty of just few %. The smaller agreement in the case of the less concentrated Lithium anyway points out that particular attention must be paid to reduce as much as possible any source of external contamination and highlights the importance of the proper blank subtraction.

  16. Uptake and incorporation of {sup 15}N marked nitrogen oxides by seasonal and woddy plants; Aufnahme und Einbau {sup 15}N-markierter Stickoxide durch krautige und holzige Pflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickriede, A.

    1998-07-01

    It the Research Centre Juelich a special system was developed to expose plants under defined climatic conditions to a nitrogen oxide enriched atmosphere. In completition and extension to former studies sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.), mays (Zea mays L.) and poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) were exposed to nitrogen oxides. By using {sup 15}N enriched nitrogen oxides ({sup 15}NO{sub 2}, and {sup 15}NO, summarised as {sup 15}NO{sub x}) the uptake and incorporation of {sup 15}NOx in dependance of the exposition concentration (30 to 100 ppb {sup 15}NO, 20 ppb {sup 15}NO{sub 2}), nitrogen nutrition (nitrate or ammonium), and harvesting time were examined. Moreover, the influence of nitrogen oxide exposition on the distribution pattern of {sup 15}NO{sub x} nitrogen within the plants and on the amino acid content of plant leaves was investigated. (orig.)

  17. A review of methods for sensing the nitrogen status in plants: advantages, disadvantages and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Huerta, Rafael F; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G; Contreras-Medina, Luis M; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Prado-Olivarez, Juan; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V

    2013-08-16

    Nitrogen (N) plays a key role in the plant life cycle. It is the main plant mineral nutrient needed for chlorophyll production and other plant cell components (proteins, nucleic acids, amino acids). Crop yield is affected by plant N status. Thus, the optimization of nitrogen fertilization has become the object of intense research due to its environmental and economic impact. This article focuses on reviewing current methods and techniques used to determine plant N status. Kjeldahl digestion and Dumas combustion have been used as reference methods for N determination in plants, but they are destructive and time consuming. By using spectroradiometers, reflectometers, imagery from satellite sensors and digital cameras, optical properties have been measured to estimate N in plants, such as crop canopy reflectance, leaf transmittance, chlorophyll and polyphenol fluorescence. High correlation has been found between optical parameters and plant N status, and those techniques are not destructive. However, some drawbacks include chlorophyll saturation, atmospheric and soil interference, and the high cost of instruments. Electrical properties of plant tissue have been used to estimate quality in fruits, and water content in plants, as well as nutrient deficiency, which suggests that they have potential for use in plant N determination.

  18. Properties of nitrogen fertilization are decisive in determining the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the activity of nitrate reductase in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Du, Shaoting

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 is predicted to double by the end of this century. The response of higher plants to an increase in atmospheric CO2 often includes a change in nitrate reductase (NR) activity. In a recent study, we showed that, under elevated CO2 levels, NR induction in low-nitrate plants and NR inhibition in high-nitrate plants are regulated by nitric oxide (NO) generated via nitric oxide synthases. This finding provides an explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 levels, and suggests that the use of nitrogen fertilizers on soil will have a major influence on the nitrogen assimilation capacity of plants in response to CO2 elevation.

  19. Interactions between plants, litter and microbes in cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in the arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Sven Evert; Castro, Jorge; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    that had been pre-treated by 12 year of warming and fertilizer addition, we incubated soils together with litter and plants added and examined whether the absence of plants and litter in ‘traditional' incubations could explain the discrepancy. The pre-treatment had no effect on nitrogen (N) mineralization...... mineralization in soils without plants. Hence, the presence of plants stimulated mobilization of the growth-limiting N. The growth-sufficient P was not affected by the presence of plants, however. Furthermore, increased plant and microbial N uptake correlated positively, which speaks against competition......Estimated nutrient mineralization in northern nutrient-poor ecosystems, measured as differences in soil inorganic nutrients before and after a period of soil incubation in the absence of plants and litter, usually shows a discrepancy of much lower rates than plant nutrient uptake rates. In plots...

  20. Influence of the concentration ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus on the growth and interspecies competition of two red tide algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The growth and interspecies competition of two red tide algal species Thalassiosira pseudonana Hasle et Heimdal and Gymnodinium sp. were studied under different concentration ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus, and the algal batch culture experiments were conducted. The physiological and biochemical indexes were measured periodically, including the maximum comparing growth rate, relative growth rate, average double time and chlorophyll a concentration. The results showed that when the concentration ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus was 16∶ 1, the maximum comparing growth rate,relative growth rate and chlorophyll a concentration of Thalassiosira pseudonana all reached the highest,and average double time was the shortest. This implied that the optimal concentration ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus of Thalassiosira pseudonana is 16∶ 1. When the concentration ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus was 6∶ 1, the maximum comparing growth rate, relative growth rate and the chlorophyll a concentration of Gymnodinium sp. reached the highest,and average double time was the shortest, so the optimal concentration ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus of Gymnodinium sp. is 6∶ 1. From the growth curves as indicated both in the cell density and the chlorophyll a concentration, it is suggested that the influence of concentration ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus on the chlorophyll a concentration and the cell density are almost the same. Different concentration ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus had weak influence on community succession and the competition between the two algae. Gymnodinium sp. may use the phosphorus in vivo for growth, so it is important to pay attention to the concealment of phosphorus, in order to avoid the outbreak of red tide. On the basis of the importance of nitrogen and phosphorus and the ratio of their concentration, the possible outbreak mechanism of red tide of the two algae was also discussed.

  1. Concentration-dependent RDX uptake and remediation by crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Diejun; Liu, Z Lewis; Banwart, Wanye

    2011-07-01

    The potential RDX contamination of food chain from polluted soil is a significant concern in regards to both human health and environment. Using a hydroponic system and selected soils spiked with RDX, this study disclosed that four crop plant species maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum sudanese), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and soybean (Glycine max) were capable of RDX uptake with more in aerial parts than roots. The accumulation of RDX in the plant tissue is concentration-dependent up to 21 mg RDX/L solution or 100 mg RDX/kg soil but not proportionally at higher RDX levels from 220 to 903 mg/kg soil. While wheat plant tissue harbored the highest RDX concentration of 2,800 μg per gram dry biomass, maize was able to remove a maximum of 3,267 μg RDX from soil per pot by five 4-week plants at 100 mg/kg of soil. Although RDX is toxic to plants, maize, sorghum, and wheat showed reasonable growth in the presence of the chemical, whereas soybeans were more sensitive to RDX. Results of this study facilitate assessment of the potential invasion of food chain by RDX-contaminated soils.

  2. 27 CFR 18.39 - Qualification to alternate a volatile fruit-flavor concentrate plant and a distilled spirits plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a volatile fruit-flavor concentrate plant and a distilled spirits plant. 18.39 Section 18.39 Alcohol... PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Qualification Changes After Original Establishment § 18.39 Qualification to alternate a volatile fruit-flavor concentrate plant and a distilled spirits plant. A proprietor...

  3. Reduction in nitrogen oxides emission on TGME-464 boiler of IRU power plant (Estonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility for realization of measures on a reduction in nitrogen oxides emission on a TGME-464 (plant no. 2) boiler of the IRU power plant (Tallinn, Estonia) is investigated. Low-cost techno-logical measures, namely, nonstoichiometric burning and burning with the moderate controlled chemical underburning, are proposed and experimentally tested. Recommendations on the implementation of low-emission modes of burning natural gas into mode diagrams of the boiler are given. Nitrogen oxides emissions are reduced to the required level as a result of the implementation of the proposed measures.

  4. Carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: global carbon cycle impact from an improved plant nitrogen cycle in the Community Land Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mingjie; Fisher, Joshua B; Brzostek, Edward R; Phillips, Richard P

    2016-03-01

    Plants typically expend a significant portion of their available carbon (C) on nutrient acquisition - C that could otherwise support growth. However, given that most global terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) do not include the C cost of nutrient acquisition, these models fail to represent current and future constraints to the land C sink. Here, we integrated a plant productivity-optimized nutrient acquisition model - the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen Model - into one of the most widely used TBMs, the Community Land Model. Global plant nitrogen (N) uptake is dynamically simulated in the coupled model based on the C costs of N acquisition from mycorrhizal roots, nonmycorrhizal roots, N-fixing microbes, and retranslocation (from senescing leaves). We find that at the global scale, plants spend 2.4 Pg C yr(-1) to acquire 1.0 Pg N yr(-1) , and that the C cost of N acquisition leads to a downregulation of global net primary production (NPP) by 13%. Mycorrhizal uptake represented the dominant pathway by which N is acquired, accounting for ~66% of the N uptake by plants. Notably, roots associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi - generally considered for their role in phosphorus (P) acquisition - are estimated to be the primary source of global plant N uptake owing to the dominance of AM-associated plants in mid- and low-latitude biomes. Overall, our coupled model improves the representations of NPP downregulation globally and generates spatially explicit patterns of belowground C allocation, soil N uptake, and N retranslocation at the global scale. Such model improvements are critical for predicting how plant responses to altered N availability (owing to N deposition, rising atmospheric CO2 , and warming temperatures) may impact the land C sink.

  5. Is nitrogen transfer among plants enhanced by contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, François P; Veneklaas, Erik J; Dixon, Kingsley W; Lambers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) transfer among plants has been found where at least one plant can fix N2 . In nutrient-poor soils, where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies (without N2 fixation) co-occur, it is unclear if N transfer exists and what promotes it. A novel multi-species microcosm pot experiment was conducted to quantify N transfer between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM), ectomycorrhizal (EM), dual AM/EM, and non-mycorrhizal cluster-rooted plants in nutrient-poor soils with mycorrhizal mesh barriers. We foliar-fed plants with a K(15) NO3 solution to quantify one-way N transfer from 'donor' to 'receiver' plants. We also quantified mycorrhizal colonization and root intermingling. Transfer of N between plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies occurred at both low and high soil nutrient levels with or without root intermingling. The magnitude of N transfer was relatively high (representing 4% of donor plant N) given the lack of N2 fixation. Receiver plants forming ectomycorrhizas or cluster roots were more enriched compared with AM-only plants. We demonstrate N transfer between plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, and a preferential enrichment of cluster-rooted and EM plants compared with AM plants. Nutrient exchanges among plants are potentially important in promoting plant coexistence in nutrient-poor soils.

  6. Nitrogen transformations and retention in planted and artificially aerated constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais-Landry, Gabriel; Maranger, Roxane; Brisson, Jacques; Chazarenc, Florent

    2009-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) processing in constructed wetlands (CWs) is often variable, and the contribution to N loss and retention by various pathways (nitrification/denitrification, plant uptake and sediment storage) remains unclear. We studied the seasonal variation of the effects of artificial aeration and three different macrophyte species (Phragmites australis, Typha angustifolia and Phalaris arundinacea) on N processing (removal rates, transformations and export) using experimental CW mesocosms. Removal of total nitrogen (TN) was higher in summer and in planted and aerated units, with the highest mean removal in units planted with T. angustifolia. Export of ammonium (NH(4)(+)), a proxy for nitrification limitation, was higher in winter, and in unplanted and non-aerated units. Planted and aerated units had the highest export of oxidized nitrogen (NO(y)), a proxy for reduced denitrification. Redox potential, evapotranspiration (ETP) rates and hydraulic retention times (HRT) were all predictors of TN, NH(4)(+) and NO(y) export, and significantly affected by plants. Denitrification was the main N sink in most treatments accounting for 47-62% of TN removal, while sediment storage was dominant in unplanted non-aerated units and units planted with P. arundinacea. Plant uptake accounted for less than 20% of the removal. Uncertainties about the long-term fate of the N stored in sediments suggest that the fraction attributed to denitrification losses could be underestimated in this study.

  7. Leaf litter nitrogen concentration as related to climatic factors in Eurasian forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chunjiang; Berg, Bjørn; Kutsch, Werner

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the patterns of nitrogen (N) concentrations in leaf litter of forest trees as functions of climatic factors, annual average temperature (Temp, °C) and annual precipitation (Precip, dm) and of forest type (coniferous vs. broadleaf, deciduous vs. evergreen, Pinus......, etc.). Location: The review was conducted using data from studies across the Eurasian continent. Methods: Leaf litter N concentration was compiled from 204 sets of published data (81 sets from coniferous and 123 from broadleaf forests in Eurasia). We explored the relationships between leaf litter N...... concentration and Temp and Precip by means of regression analysis. Leaf litter data from N2-fixing species were excluded from the analysis. Results: Over the Eurasian continent, leaf litter N concentration increased with increasing Temp and Precip within functional groups such as conifers, broadleaf, deciduous...

  8. [FTIR spectra of endangered plants Ulmus elongata and its correlation to soil nitrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-xiang; Liu, Peng; Kang, Hua-jing; Liao, Cheng-chuan; Pan, Cheng-chun; Li, Cheng-hui

    2008-06-01

    Ulmus elongata, an endemic species in China, is one of the grade II national key conservation rare and endangered plants. The spectra of root, stem, skin and leaf of Ulmus elongata sampled from eight different sites were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry with OMNI-sampler directly, fast and accurately. A positioning technology of OMNIC E.S.P. 5.1 intelligent software and ATR correction was used. The background was scanned before the determination of every example. The peak value and absorbance were ascertained using a method of baseline correction in infrared spectra, and then the relativity between absorption peaks of the spectra and the soil nitrogen was analyzed. Results from the comparison of the spectra showed some differences in their FTIR spectra among root, stem, skin and leaf of Ulmus elongata from the same plant. The coefficients of correlation between chemical composition of this four different organs of Ulmus elongata and soil nitrogen were positive in different degrees. There was the significantly positive correlation between chemical composition of stem and total nitrogen (p 0.05). It was showed that the change in soil total nitrogen has some influence on chemical composition of different organs of Ulmus elongata, but the degree of available nitrogen was very smaller. The linear correlation between soil total nitrogen and organs chemical composition of Ulmus elongate, not only provided the theoretic basis for plant nutriology and nutrient ecology of Ulmus elongate, but also proved that the plants and soil were inseparable. The results also showed that FTIR can be used widely for analysis of the correlation between chemical composition of endangered plants and soil physical and chemical properties in the future, and indicated that the new method has practicability and reliability to a certain degree.

  9. Effects of hand weeding strip and nitrogen fertilizer on corn plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Renato Vaz; Martins, Dagoberto; Cardoso, Leonildo A; Carbonari, Caio Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to evaluate effects of different strip weed control associated with nitrogen fertilizer on corn applied after planting. The experiment was set and conducted in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil, and the hybrid planted was Dekalb 333-B. A completely randomized block design with four replications was used. Experimental plots were disposed as a factorial scheme 2 x 2 x 4, constituted by two types of weeding on row (with or without manual hoeing), two types of weeding on inter-row (with or without manual hoeing), and four nitrogen levels applied after planting (00, 60, 90, and 120 kg ha(-1)). Plots were composed by six rows with 5 m length. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied at 35 days after emergence (d.a.e). For weed community it was evaluated: weed density, dominancy, frequency, and relative importance. The main weed species were: Brachiaria plantiginea, Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa, Cyperus rotunds, Brachiaria decumbens, Euphorbia heterofila, Oxalis latifolia, Acanthospermum hispidum, Commelina benghalensis. It was evaluated corn height at 40 and 100 d.a.e., first ear insertion height at 100 d.a.e., and final grain yield at harvesting. Plants and first ear insertion height were affected when nitrogen fertilizer was not applied. Treatments without weed control showed that weed interfered negatively with plants height. There were no correlation between weeds and nitrogen fertilizer for all parameters evaluated. Parcels without weed showed the highest ear weights and final grain production. Treatments that received nitrogen fertilizer, independently of studied arrangement, provided higher yields.

  10. Effect of Residue Nitrogen Concentration and Time Duration on Carbon Mineralization Rate of Alfalfa Residues in Regions with Different Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeid shafiei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Various factors like climatic conditions, vegetation, soil properties, topography, time, plant residue quality and crop management strategies affect the decomposition rate of organic carbon (OC and its residence time in soil. Plant residue management concerns nutrients recycling, carbon recycling in ecosystems and the increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Plant residue decomposition is a fundamental process in recycling of organic matter and elements in most ecosystems. Soil management, particularly plant residue management, changes soil organic matter both qualitatively and quantitatively. Soil respiration and carbon loss are affected by soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, solar radiation and precipitation. In natural agro-ecosystems, residue contains different concentrations of nitrogen. It is important to understand the rate and processes involved in plant residue decomposition, as these residues continue to be added to the soil under different weather conditions, especially in arid and semi-arid climates. Material and methods Organic carbon mineralization of alfalfa residue with different nitrogen concentrations was assessed in different climatic conditions using split-plot experiments over time and the effects of climate was determined using composite analysis. The climatic conditions were classified as warm-arid (Jiroft, temperate arid (Narab and cold semi-arid (Sardouiyeh using cluster analysis and the nitrogen (N concentrations of alfalfa residue were low, medium and high. The alfalfa residue incubated for four different time periods (2, 4, 6 and 8 months. The dynamics of organic carbon in different regions measured using litter bags (20×10 cm containing 20 g alfalfa residue of 2-10 mm length which were placed on the soil surface. Results and discussion The results of this study showed that in a warm-arid (Jiroft, carbon loss and the carbon decomposition rate constant were low in a cold semi

  11. Mobilization of interactions between functional diversity of plant and soil organisms on nitrogen availability and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drut, Baptiste; Cassagne, Nathalie; Cannavacciuolo, Mario; Brauman, Alain; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Cobo, Jose; Fustec, Joëlle

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: legumes, earthworms, microorganisms, nitrogen, interactions Both aboveground and belowground biodiversity and their interactions can play an important role in crop productivity. Plant functional diversity, such as legume based intercrops have been shown to improve yields through plant complementarity for nitrogen use (Corre-Hellou et al., 2006). Moreover, plant species or plant genotype may influence the structure of soil microorganism communities through the composition of rhizodeposits in the rhizosphere (Dennis et al., 2010). Belowground diversity can also positively influence plant performance especially related to functional dissimilarity between soil organisms (Eisenhauer, 2012). Earthworms through their burrowing activity influence soil microbial decomposers and nutrient availability and have thus been reported to increase plant growth (Brown, 1995; Brown et al., 2004). We hypothesize that i) plant functional (genetic and/or specific) diversity associated to functional earthworms diversity are key drivers of interactions balance to improve crop performances and ii) the improvement of plant performances can be related to change in the structure of soil microorganism communities due to the diversity of rhizodeposits and the burrowing activity of earthworms. In a first mesocosm experiment, we investigated the effect of a gradient of plant diversity - one cultivar of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), 3 different wheat cultivars, and 3 different cultivars intercropped with clover (Trifolium hybridum L.) - and the presence of one (endogeic) or two (endogeic and anecic) categories of earthworms on biomass and nitrogen accumulation of wheat. In a second mesocosm experiment, we investigated the influence of three species with different rhizodeposition - wheat, rapeseed (Brassica napus L. ) and faba bean (Vicia faba L.) in pure stand or intercropped - and the presence of endogeic earthworms on microbial activity and nitrogen availability. In the first experiment

  12. Influence of Nitrogen Sources and Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation on Growth, Crude Fiber and Nutrient Uptake in Squash (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne ex Poir. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice I. TCHIAZE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR, B have immense potential application in sustainable agriculture as ecofriendly biofertilizers and biopesticides. In this study, the effects of three nitrogen (N sources (NO3-, NH4+ and NO3NH4 and PGPR on growth, crude fiber and nutrient uptake were investigated in squash plants. Some growth parameters [root dry weight (RDW, shoot dry weight (SDW, total plant dry weight (PDW, number of leaves (NL, shoot length (SL, stem diameter (SD and number of ramifications (NR], crude fiber (cellulose content and nutrient uptake (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn were determined. Application of NO3-,NH4+ or NO3NH4 singly or in combination with PGPR inoculation led to a significant increase in RDW, SDW, PDW, NL, SL, SD and NR. Na, Cu and Zn contents, on the contrary, decreased in inoculated treated plants while no significant differences were recorded in cellulose contents (CE of leaves except in plants fed with NO3-. The leaf CE content ranged from 12.58 to 13.67%. The plants supplied with NO3+B, NH4+B and NO3NH4+B showed significantly higher plant biomass and accumulation of N, P, K and Mn concentrations in leaves compared to all other treatments. These results suggest that specific combinations of PGPR with NO3-, NH4+ or NO3NH4 fertilizers can be considered as efficient alternative biofertilizers to improve significantly the squash growth and nutrient uptake.

  13. Defect concentration in nitrogen-doped graphene grown on Cu substrate: A thickness effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Dhananjay K., E-mail: dhananjay@ua.pt [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Fateixa, Sara [Department of Chemistry & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Hortigüela, María J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vidyasagar, Reddithota [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Otero-Irurueta, Gonzalo [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Nogueira, Helena I.S. [Department of Chemistry & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Singh, Manoj Kumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering & Centre for Mechanical Technology & Automation, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kholkin, Andrei, E-mail: kholkin@ua.pt [Department of Physics & CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Tuning the band-gap of graphene is a current need for real device applications. Copper (Cu) as a substrate plays a crucial role in graphene deposition. Here we report the fabrication of in-situ nitrogen (N) doped graphene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and the effect of Cu substrate thickness on the growth mechanism. The ratio of intensities of G and D peaks was used to evaluate the defect concentration based on local activation model associated with the distortion of the crystal lattice due to incorporation of nitrogen atoms into graphene lattice. The results suggest that Cu substrate of 20 µm in thickness exhibits higher defect density (1.86×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) as compared to both 10 and 25 µm thick substrates (1.23×10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} and 3.09×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively). Furthermore, High Resolution -X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS) precisely affirms ~0.4 at% of nitrogen intercalations in graphene. Our results show that the substitutional type of nitrogen doping dominates over the pyridinic configuration. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows all the XRD peaks associated with carbon. However, the peak at ~24° is suppressed by the substrate peaks (Cu). These results suggest that nitrogen atoms can be efficiently incorporated into the graphene using thinner copper substrates, rather than the standard 25 µm ones. This is important for tailoring the properties by graphene required for microelectronic applications.

  14. Uptake of munitions materiels (TNT, RDX) by crop plants and potential interactions of nitrogen nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Mitchell, W. [USABRDL, Ft. Detrick, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Munitions materiel such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and their combustion/decomposition products can accumulate/cycle in terrestrial environs. High soil organic matter and fertility have been previously shown to negatively correlate with both TNT or RDX uptake in plants such as grass, wheat, and bean. The present study was therefore conducted using low fertility soil to assess uptake and distribution patterns of C-radiolabelled TNT and RDX (15 and 30 {micro}g/g) within corn (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), carrot (Daucus carota), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown to maturity in growth chambers. Uptake by the plants at maturity (90- to 120-days) ranged from 1.8 to 2.7% of total amended {sup 14}C-TNT for carrots and corn respectively and 17 to 33% of total amended {sup 14}C-RDX for corn and carrots respectively. Distribution patterns of total radiolabel indicate that the TNT-derived label was primarily retained within the roots (60 to 85%) while the RDX-derived label was distributed to the shoots (85 to 97%). Less than 0.01 {micro}g/g dry wt. TNT was found in all analyzed shoot tissues with > 90% of the TNT-derived radiolabel in the form of polar metabolites. Concentrations of RDX in shoot tissues of corn exceeded 180 {micro}g/g dry wt. Alfalfa grown in unfertilized, fertilized (NO{sub 3}), or unfertilized-inoculated (Rhizobia) soil exhibited a 70 to 100% increase in dry wt. after 45 days in the TNT-amended (15 {micro}g/g) fertilized and unfertilized-inoculated plants versus the controls. A potential TNT/nitrogen interaction will be discussed.

  15. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Photosynthetic Determinants of Growth in Maize Plants: Effects of Nitrogen Nutrition on Growth, Carbon Fixation and Photochemical Features

    OpenAIRE

    S. C., Huber; Tatsuo, SUGIYAMA; R.S, Alberte; Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Tohoku University; Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago

    1989-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) plants were grown in a greenhouse with different levels of nitrate-N (2 to 20 millimolar). Nitrogen nutrition had dramatic effects on plant growth and photosynthetic characteristics of mature leaves. Increasing nitrogen resulted in greater biomass production, shoot/root ratios, and rates of leaf expansion during the day. The elongating zone of high-N plants had higher activities (per gram fresh weight) of sucrose synthase and neutral invertase than low-N plants, suggesting...

  17. Effects of sampling interval on spatial patterns and statistics of watershed nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.-S.D.; Usery, E.L.; Finn, M.P.; Bosch, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how spatial patterns and statistics of a 30 m resolution, model-simulated, watershed nitrogen concentration surface change with sampling intervals from 30 m to 600 m for every 30 m increase for the Little River Watershed (Georgia, USA). The results indicate that the mean, standard deviation, and variogram sills do not have consistent trends with increasing sampling intervals, whereas the variogram ranges remain constant. A sampling interval smaller than or equal to 90 m is necessary to build a representative variogram. The interpolation accuracy, clustering level, and total hot spot areas show decreasing trends approximating a logarithmic function. The trends correspond to the nitrogen variogram and start to level at a sampling interval of 360 m, which is therefore regarded as a critical spatial scale of the Little River Watershed. Copyright ?? 2009 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All right reserved.

  18. Plant water use affects competition for nitrogen: why drought favors invasive species in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Katherine; Seabloom, Eric W; Harpole, W Stanley; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Classic resource competition theory typically treats resource supply rates as independent; however, nutrient supplies can be affected by plants indirectly, with important consequences for model predictions. We demonstrate this general phenomenon by using a model in which competition for nitrogen is mediated by soil moisture, with competitive outcomes including coexistence and multiple stable states as well as competitive exclusion. In the model, soil moisture regulates nitrogen availability through soil moisture dependence of microbial processes, leaching, and plant uptake. By affecting water availability, plants also indirectly affect nitrogen availability and may therefore alter the competitive outcome. Exotic annual species from the Mediterranean have displaced much of the native perennial grasses in California. Nitrogen and water have been shown to be potentially limiting in this system. We parameterize the model for a Californian grassland and show that soil moisture-mediated competition for nitrogen can explain the annual species' dominance in drier areas, with coexistence expected in wetter regions. These results are concordant with larger biogeographic patterns of grassland invasion in the Pacific states of the United States, in which annual grasses have invaded most of the hot, dry grasslands in California but perennial grasses dominate the moister prairies of northern California, Oregon, and Washington.

  19. Ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia, nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid in an intensive agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbieranowski, Antoni L.; Aherne, Julian

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of ambient atmospheric gaseous reactive nitrogen (Nr) species concentrations (ammonia [NH3], nitrogen dioxide [NO2] and nitric acid [HNO3]) were measured at the field scale in an intensive agricultural region in southern Ontario, Canada. Atmospheric concentrations were measured with the Willems badge diffusive passive sampler (18 sites for NH3, 9 sites for NO2 and HNO3) for one year (April 2010-March 2011; under a two week measurement frequency) within a 15 km × 15 km area. Dry deposition was calculated using the inferential method and estimated across the entire study area. The spatial distribution of emission sources associated with agricultural activity resulted in high spatial variability in annual average ambient NH3 concentrations (8 μg m-3 within a 2 km distance, coefficient of variation ˜50%) and estimated dry deposition (4-13 kg N ha-1 yr-1) between sample sites. In contrast, ambient concentrations and deposition of both NO2 (˜5.2->6.5 μg m-3; 1.0-1.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and HNO3 (0.6-0.7 μg m-3; 0.5-1 kg N ha-1 yr-1) had low variability (coefficient of variation mycorrhiza and ground vegetation within adjacent semi-natural ecosystems (estimated at ˜10% of the study area).

  20. Optimal concentration and temperatures of solar thermal power plants

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Using simple, finite-time, thermodynamic models of solar thermal power plants, the existence of an optimal solar receiver temperature has previously been demonstrated in literature. Scant attention has been paid, however, to the presence of an optimal level of solar concentration at which the conversion of incident sunlight to electricity (solar-to-electric efficiency) is maximized. This paper addresses that gap. The paper evaluates the impact, on the design of Rankine-cycle solar-trough and ...

  1. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l. ) walp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos)

    1982-05-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation.

  2. Achieving low effluent NO3-N and TN concentrations in low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio without using external carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiashun; Oleyiblo, Oloche James; Xue, Zhaoxia; Otache, Y. Martins; Feng, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Two mathematical models were used to optimize the performance of a full-scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated treatment plant, a plug-flow bioreactors operated in a 3-stage phoredox process configuration, anaerobic anoxic oxic (A2/O). The ASM2d implemented on the platform of WEST2011 software and the BioWin activated sludge/anaerobic digestion (AS/AD) models were used in this study with the aim of consistently achieving the designed effluent criteria at a low operational cost. Four ASM2d parameters (the reduction factor for denitrification , the maximum growth rate of heterotrophs (µH), the rate constant for stored polyphosphates in PAOs ( q pp), and the hydrolysis rate constant ( k h)) were adjusted. Whereas three BioWin parameters (aerobic decay rate ( b H), heterotrophic dissolved oxygen (DO) half saturation ( K OA), and Y P/acetic) were adjusted. Calibration of the two models was successful; both models have average relative deviations (ARD) less than 10% for all the output variables. Low effluent concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) were achieved in a full-scale BNR treatment plant having low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio (COD/TKN). The effluent total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen concentrations were improved by 50% and energy consumption was reduced by approximately 25%, which was accomplished by converting the two-pass aerobic compartment of the plug-flow bioreactor to anoxic reactors and being operated in an alternating mode. Findings in this work are helpful in improving the operation of wastewater treatment plant while eliminating the cost of external carbon source and reducing energy consumption.

  3. Effects of Different Concentrations of Ammonia Nitrogen on N2O Emission in the Process of Partial Nitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Lin; KONG; Qiang; ZHANG; Jian; MIAO; Ming-sheng

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to discuss the effects of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification. [Method] By using a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) under intermittent aeration, the influences of various concentrations of influent ammonia nitrogen on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from partial nitrification were analyzed. [Result] When the concentration of influent ammonia nitrogen varied from 200 to 400 mg/L, the changing trends of DO and ORP value were consistent during the process of partial nitrification, and the concentration ratio of NO-2-N to NH+4-N in effluent water reached 1∶1, with lower NO-3-N level. In addition, ammonia nitrogen concentration in the influent had significant effects on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification, that is, the higher the ammonia nitrogen concentration, the more the N2O emission. When ammonia nitrogen concentration was 400 mg/L, N2O emission was up to about 37 mg. [Conclusion] N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification might be related to the concentrations of NH+4 and NO-2.

  4. Effects of Different Concentrations of Ammonia Nitrogen on N_2O Emission in the Process of Partial Nitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Lin; KONG; Qiang; ZHANG; Jian; MIAO; Ming-sheng

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to discuss the effects of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification. [Method] By using a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) under intermittent aeration, the influences of various concentrations of influent ammonia nitrogen on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from partial nitrification were analyzed. [Result] When the concentration of influent ammonia nitrogen varied from 200 to 400 mg/L, the changing trends of DO and ORP value were consistent during the process of partial nitrification, and the concentration ratio of NO-2-N to NH+4-N in effluent water reached 1∶1, with lower NO-3-N level. In addition, ammonia nitrogen concentration in the influent had significant effects on N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification, that is, the higher the ammonia nitrogen concentration, the more the N2O emission. When ammonia nitrogen concentration was 400 mg/L, N2O emission was up to about 37 mg. [Conclusion] N2O emission in the process of partial nitrification might be related to the concentrations of NH+4 and NO-2.

  5. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H; Salgado, Ione

    2014-11-11

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to the generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, that is, covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity.

  6. Digital imaging approaches for phenotyping whole plant nitrogen and phosphorus response in Brachypodium distachyon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Poir; Vincent Chochois; Xavier R.R.Sirault; John P.Vogel; Michelle Watt; Robert T.Furbank

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluates the phenotypic response of the model grass (Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.) to nitrogen and phosphorus nutrition using a combination of imaging techniques and destructive harvest of shoots and roots. Reference line Bd21-3 was grown in pots using 11 phosphorus and 11 nitrogen concentrations to establish a dose-response curve. Shoot biovolume and biomass, root length and biomass, and tissue phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations increased with nutrient concentration. Shoot biovolume, estimated by imaging, was highly correlated with dry weight (R2>0.92) and both biovolume and growth rate responded strongly to nutrient availability. Higher nutrient supply increased nodal root length more than other root types. Photochemical efficiency was strongly reduced by low phosphorus concentrations as early as 1 week after germination, suggesting that this measurement may be suitable for high throughput screening of phosphorus response. In contrast, nitrogen concentration had little effect on photochemical efficiency. Changes in biovolume over time were used to compare growth rates of four accessions in response to nitrogen and phosphorus supply. We demonstrate that a time series image-based approach coupled with mathematical modeling provides higher resolution of genotypic response to nutrient supply than traditional destructive techniques and shows promise for high throughput screening and determina-tion of genomic regions associated with superior nutrient use efficiency.

  7. Molecular characterization of nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from brazilian agricultural plants at São Paulo state

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhardt,Érica. L.; Ramos,Patrícia L.; Manfio, Gilson P; Barbosa,Heloiza R.; Pavan, Crodowaldo; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    Fourteen strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from different agricultural plant species, including cassava, maize and sugarcane, using nitrogen-deprived selective isolation conditions. Ability to fix nitrogen was verified by the acetylene reduction assay. All potentially nitrogen-fixing strains tested showed positive hybridization signals with a nifH probe derived from Azospirillum brasilense. The strains were characterized by RAPD, ARDRA and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. RAPD anal...

  8. Leaf protein concentrate as food supplement from arid zone plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mala

    2010-06-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas where prevalence of droughts and famines is a recurring feature, forest cover can in general make valuable contributions to food security and provide income to the rural poor. Protein and calorie malnutrition is widespread in these areas leading to high child mortality rate. Plant species can play an important role in overcoming this by being used as a source of leaf protein concentrate (LPC), a highly nutritious food. LPC should be considered seriously as it can serve as an additional protein source in the case of non-ruminants and man, especially in drought prone areas. The use of LPC in developing countries as an alternative protein source to fishmeal in broiler diet holds tremendous promise as it can substantially lower high cost of fishmeal and eventually the acute shortage of animal protein supply. Potential tropical plants for LPC production have been evaluated and selected for further research by United States Department of Agriculture. The present study was aimed to determine the potential of arid zone plants for preparation of LPC. Extraction characteristics of the several plant species have been studied and the quality of LPC prepared from them was investigated. Different fractions, chloroplastic and cytoplasmic proteins, were analyzed for their crude protein contents. Analysis of LPC shows considerable differences in their protein contents, which was found to range from 13.7 to 88.9%. Based on this, Achyranthes aspera and Tephrosia purpurea were found to be the best suited plants for LPC preparation.

  9. Nitrate dynamics in natural plants: Insights based on the concentration and natural isotope abundances of tissue nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yan Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nitrate (NO3-, a major nitrogen (N source for natural plants, has been studied mostly through experimental N addition, enzymatic assay, isotope labeling, and genetic expression. However, artificial N supply may not reasonably reflect the N strategies in natural plants because NO3- uptake and reduction may vary with external N availability. Abrupt application and short operation times, field N addition, and isotopic labeling hinder the elucidation of in situ NO3--use mechanisms. The concentration and natural isotopes of tissue NO3- can offer insights into the plant NO3- sources and dynamics in a natural context. Furthermore, they facilitate the exploration of plant NO3- utilization and its interaction with N pollution and ecosystem N cycles without disturbing the N pools. The present study was conducted to review the application of the denitrifier method for concentration and isotope analyses of NO3- in plants. Moreover, this study highlights the utility and benefits of these parameters in interpreting NO3- sources and dynamics in natural plants. We summarize the major sources and reduction processes of NO3- in plants, and discuss the implications of NO3- concentration in plant tissues based on existing data. Particular emphasis was laid on the regulation of soil NO3 - and plant ecophysiological functions in interspecific and intra-plant NO3- variations. We introduce N and O isotope systematics of NO3- in plants and discusse the principles and feasibilities of using isotopic enrichment and fractionation factors; the correlation between concentration and isotopes (N and O isotopes: δ18O and ∆17O; and isotope mass-balance calculations to constrain sources and reduction of NO3- in possible scenarios for natural plants are deliberated. Finally, we construct a preliminary framework of intraplant δ18O-NO3- variation, and summarize the uncertainties in using tissue NO3- parameters to interpret plant NO3- utilization.

  10. Nitrogen and Phosphorous Uptake in Plant Biomass of Experimental Bioretention Systems in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, P.

    2016-12-01

    There is keen interest in implementing bioretention systems for stormwater management in an arid climate as they have proven to reduce toxicity from stormwater. Nitrogen is prevalent in urban stormwater, and plants and soil in bioretention treat stormwater before they enter natural waterways. A limited number of studies have focused on quantifying nutrient accumulation in plants. We quantified Total Nitrogen (TN), Total carbon (TC), and Total Phosphorous (TP) uptake in plants biomass of bioretention systems of semi-arid climate. The designed bioretention units housed at the University of Utah have three different vegetation types: Utah native plants (upland), no plants (control) and wetland plants (wetland grasses and reeds). The bioretention units are designed to capture 95% of the runoff from an impervious area of 220 m2. The soil is composed of 63% sand, 23% silt, and 14% clay. We compared TN, TC, and TP accumulation in plant biomass of upland and wetland systems. Two set of samples were taken for this study. For the first set, plants were completely destroyed in several upland and wetland bioretention units and TN and TP was quantified in their overall biomass. For the second set, TN and TP uptake were quantified in non-destructed samples on a monthly basis. To determine biomass of non-destructed samples, and TN, TP uptake, allometric equations were developed using plant height, crown diameter, and stem diameter measured each month from May 2015 to Dec 2015. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to quantify TN and lachat colorimetry was used to quantify TP in all plant samples. TN, TC, and TP results for the destructed showed similar trends in three upland and wetland systems .i.e. when one increased other also increased. TN, TC analysis on plant samples over a seven months period showed that TN and TC decreased in summer, but it was significantly higher during winter. TN and TC on non-destructed samples spiked towards late spring, and woody plants

  11. Earthworm functional traits and interspecific interactions affect plant nitrogen acquisition and primary production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriuzzi, Walter; Schmidt, Olaf; Brussaard, L.; Faber, J.H.; Bolger, T.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a greenhouse experiment to test how the functional diversity of earthworms, the dominant group of soil macro-invertebrates in many terrestrial ecosystems, affects nitrogen cycling and plant growth. Three species were chosen to represent a range of functional traits: Lumbricus terrestris

  12. The importance of nitrogen and carbohydrate storage for plant growth of the alpine herb Veratrum album

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, D.; Treier, U.A.; Müller-Schärer, H.

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether nitrogen (N) and carbohydrates reserves allow Veratrum album, an alpine forb, to start spring growth earlier than the neighbouring vegetation and to survive unpredictable disturbances resulting in loss of above-ground biomass. Seasonal dynamics of plant reserves, soil N availabil

  13. Nutritional constraints in ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants under increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Kutnar, L.; Rydin, H.; Limpens, J.; Hajek, M.; Grosvernier, P.; Hansen, I.; Lacumin, P.; Gerdol, R.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effects of increasing levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on nutrient limitation of ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants. • Fifteen mires in 11 European countries were selected across a natural gradient of bulk atmospheric N deposition from 0.1 to 2 g/m2 year-1. Nutritional constrai

  14. Combined effects of nitrogen to phosphorus ratios and nitrogen speciation on cyanobacterial metabolite concentrations in eutrophic Midwestern USA reservoirs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, T.D.; Smith, V.H.; Graham, J.L.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Tedesco, L.P.; Clercin, N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the total nitrogen to total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratio and nitrogen oxidation state may have substantial effects on secondary metabolite (e.g., microcystins) production in cyanobacteria. We investigated the relationship between the water column TN:TP ratio and the cyanob

  15. Stormwater Bioretention: Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Metal Removal by Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Rycewicz-Borecki, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Stormwater runoff may contain high levels of pollutants and is regulated by the Federal National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Stormwater bioretention (BR) systems are often used to satisfy these regulations. BR systems collect accumulated runoff that leaches into groundwater. A greenhouse study evaluated nutrient and metal removal among plant species that are typically found growing in BR systems. A field demonstration study assessed citric acid enhanced metal bioaccumulati...

  16. Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre C. Rooney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural improvement of seminatural grasslands has been shown to result in changes to plant and microbial diversity, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. A microcosm approach was used to elucidate the effects of two key components of agricultural improvement (nitrogen addition and liming on ammonia-oxidising bacterial (AOB communities in an upland grassland soil. Plant species characteristic of unimproved and improved pastures (A. capillaris and L. perenne were planted in microcosms, and lime, nitrogen (NH4NO3, or lime plus nitrogen added. The AOB community was profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP of the amoA gene. AOB community structure was largely altered by NH4NO3 addition, rather than liming, although interactions between nitrogen addition and plant species were also evident. Results indicate that nitrogen addition drives shifts in the structure of key microbial communities in upland grassland soils, and that plant species may play a significant role in determining AOB community structure.

  17. Increase of Fungal Pathogenicity and Role of Plant Glutamine in Nitrogen-Induced Susceptibility (NIS) To Rice Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huichuan; Nguyen Thi Thu, Thuy; He, Xiahong; Gravot, Antoine; Bernillon, Stéphane; Ballini, Elsa; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Highlight  Modifications in glutamine synthetase OsGS1-2 expression and fungal pathogenicity underlie nitrogen-induced susceptibility to rice blast. Understanding why nitrogen fertilization increase the impact of many plant diseases is of major importance. The interaction between Magnaporthe oryzae and rice was used as a model for analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying Nitrogen-Induced Susceptibility (NIS). We show that our experimental system in which nitrogen supply strongly affects rice blast susceptibility only slightly affects plant growth. In order to get insights into the mechanisms of NIS, we conducted a dual RNA-seq experiment on rice infected tissues under two nitrogen fertilization regimes. On the one hand, we show that enhanced susceptibility was visible despite an over-induction of defense gene expression by infection under high nitrogen regime. On the other hand, the fungus expressed to high levels effectors and pathogenicity-related genes in plants under high nitrogen regime. We propose that in plants supplied with elevated nitrogen fertilization, the observed enhanced induction of plant defense is over-passed by an increase in the expression of the fungal pathogenicity program, thus leading to enhanced susceptibility. Moreover, some rice genes implicated in nitrogen recycling were highly induced during NIS. We further demonstrate that the OsGS1-2 glutamine synthetase gene enhances plant resistance to M. oryzae and abolishes NIS and pinpoint glutamine as a potential key nutrient during NIS. PMID:28293247

  18. Trends in concentrations and export of nitrogen in boreal forest streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkkola, S.; Nieminen, M. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland); Koivusalo, H. [Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Espoo (Finland), Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [and others

    2012-11-01

    Temporal trends in inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) export in the stream water between 1979 and 2006 were studied in eight forested headwater catchments in eastern Finland, where an increasing air-temperature trend and a decreasing N-deposition trend has been observed since the 1980s. The Seasonal Kendall test was conducted to study if the stream water N concentrations have changed concurrently and a mixed model regression analysis was used to study which catchment characteristics and hydrometeorological variables were related to the variation in stream water N. The annual concentrations of total organic N (TON) increased at two catchments and the concentrations of nitrate (NO{sub 3}-N) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}-N) decreased at three and four catchments, respectively. The main factor explaining variation in concentrations and export of N was percentage of peatlands in a catchment. The NH{sub 4}-N concentrations were also related to the N deposition, and the exports of NO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}, and TON to precipitation. Quantitative changes in both the N concentrations and exports were small. The results suggested relatively small changes in the N concentrations and exports between 1979 and 2006, most probably because the effects of increased air and stream water temperatures largely have been concealed behind the concurrent decrease in N deposition. (orig.)

  19. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization rate and planting density on cotton boll biomass and nitrogen accumulation in extremely early maturing cotton region of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Xiang-Bin; Xu, Min; Shen, Dan; Jin, Lu-Lu; Zhou, Zhi-Guo

    2012-02-01

    Taking cotton cultivars Liaomian 19 and NuCoTN 33B as test materials, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of nitrogen fertilization rate (0, 240 and 480 kg x hm(-2)) and planting density (75000, 97500 and 120000 plants x hm(-2)) on the boll biomass and nitrogen accumulation in the extremely early maturing cotton region of Northeast China. With the growth and development of cotton, the biomass and nitrogen accumulation of cotton boll, cotton seed, and cotton fiber varied in 'S' shape. Both nitrogen fertilization rate and planting density had significant effects on the dynamic characteristics of boll biomass and nitrogen accumulation, and on the fiber yield and quality. In treatment 240 kg x hm(-2) and 97500 plants x hm(-2), the biomass of single boll, cotton seed and cotton fiber was the maximum, the starting time and ending time of the rapid accumulation period of the biomass and nitrogen were earlier but the duration of the accumulation was shorter, the rapid accumulation speed of the biomass was the maximum, and the distribution indices of the biomass and nitrogen were the lowest in boll shell but the highest in cotton seed and cotton fiber.

  20. Seasonal variation in nitrogen pools and 15N/13C natural abundances in different tissues of grassland plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Schjoerring

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal changes in nitrogen (N pools, carbon (C content and natural abundance of 13C and 15N in different tissues of ryegrass plants were investigated in two intensively managed grassland fields in order to address their ammonia (NH3 exchange potential. Green leaves generally had the largest total N concentration followed by stems and inflorescences. Senescent leaves had the lowest N concentration, indicating N re-allocation. The seasonal pattern of the Γ value, i.e. the ratio between NH4+ and H+ concentrations, was similar for the various tissues of the ryegrass plants but the magnitude of Γ differed considerably among the different tissues. Green leaves and stems generally had substantially lower Γ values than senescent leaves and litter. Substantial peaks in Γ were observed during spring and summer in response to fertilization and grazing. These peaks were associated with high NH4+ rather than with low H+ concentrations. Peaks in Γ also appeared during the winter, coinciding with increasing δ15N values, indicating absorption of N derived from mineralization of soil organic matter. At the same time, δ13C values were declining, suggesting reduced photosynthesis and capacity for N assimilation. δ15N and δ13C values were more influenced by mean monthly temperature than by the accumulated monthly precipitation. In conclusion, ryegrass plants showed a clear seasonal pattern in N pools. Green leaves and stems of ryegrass plants generally seem to constitute a sink for NH3, while senescent leaves have a large potential for NH3 emission. However, management events such as fertilisation and grazing may create a high NH3 emission potential even in green plant parts. The obtained results provide input for future modelling of plant-atmosphere NH3 exchange.

  1. Research on the Concentration Prediction of Nitrogen in Red Tide Based on an Optimal Grey Verhulst Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the harm of red tide to marine ecological balance, marine fisheries, aquatic resources, and human health, an optimal Grey Verhulst model is proposed to predict the concentration of nitrogen in seawater, which is the key factor in red tide. The Grey Verhulst model is established according to the existing concentration data series of nitrogen in seawater, which is then optimized based on background value and time response formula to predict the future changes in the nitrogen concentration in seawater. Finally, the accuracy of the model is tested by the posterior test. The results show that the prediction value based on the optimal Grey Verhulst model is in good agreement with the measured nitrogen concentration in seawater, which proves the effectiveness of the optimal Grey Verhulst model in the forecast of red tide.

  2. Modeling of the Flow, Temperature and Concentration Fields in an Arc Plasma Reactor with Argon-Nitrogen Atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fudolig, Agustin M; Nogami, Hiroshi; Yagi, Jun-ichiro

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical formulation was developed for describing the flow behavior, temperature profile and concentration fields in pure or mixed argon and nitrogen arc plasmas impinging on a metal target inside a reactor...

  3. Chemical signals and their regulations on the plant growth and water use efficiency of cotton seedlings under partial root-zone drying and different nitrogen applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrao Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial root-zone drying during irrigation (PRD has been shown effective in enhancing plant water use efficiency (WUE, however, the roles of chemical signals from root and shoot that are involved and the possible interactions affected by nitrogen nutrition are not clear. Pot-grown cotton (Gossypium spp. seedlings were treated with three levels of N fertilization and PRD. The concentrations of nitrate (NO3−, abscisic acid (ABA and the pH value of leaf and root xylem saps, biomass and WUE were measured. Results showed that PRD plants produced larger biomass and higher WUE than non-PRD plants, with significant changes in leaf xylem ABA, leaf and root xylem NO3− concentrations and pH values, under heterogeneous soil moisture conditions. Simultaneously, high-N treated plants displayed larger changes in leaf xylem ABA and higher root xylem NO3− concentrations, than in the medium- or low-N treated plants. However, the WUE of plants in the low-N treatment was higher than that of those in the high- and medium-N treatments. PRD and nitrogen levels respectively induced signaling responses of ABA/NO3− and pH in leaf or root xylem to affect WUE and biomass under different watering levels, although significant interactions of PRD and nitrogen levels were found when these signal molecules responded to soil drying. We conclude that these signaling chemicals are regulated by interaction of PRD and nitrogen status to regulate stomatal behavior, either directly or indirectly, and thus increase PRD plant WUE under less irrigation.

  4. Dependence of nitrogen concentration in type Ib diamonds on synthesis temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yu; JIA XiaoPeng; ZANG ChuanYi; LI ShangSheng; XIAO HongYu; ZHANG YaFei; HUANG GuoFeng; LI Rui; HAN QiGang; MA LiQiu; LI Yong; CHEN XiaoZhou; ZHANG Chong; MA HongAn

    2009-01-01

    Type Ib diamonds were grown by the temperature gradient method (TGM) at 5.5 GPa and 1500-1560 K in a china-type cubic anvil high pressure apparatus using Ni70Mn25Co5 alloy as solvent/catalyst. The concentration of nitrogen (CN) in type Ib diamonds synthesized at different synthesis temperatures was measured by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The dependence of CN in diamond on synthesis temperature was studied. For the type Ib diamonds synthesized using Ni70Mn25Co5 as catalyst, its CN decreases along with the increase of synthesis temperature.

  5. Effect of CO2 Concentration on Nitrogen Metabolism of Winter Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEN Zhong-hua; LI Sheng-xiu

    2005-01-01

    Hoagland's solution was used as water culture medium to study the effect of CO2 concentration on nitrate metabolism of wheat under natural light and light-shaded conditions. NO3-N, NH4+-N, nitrate reductase activity, total uptake N by wheat plants during solution cultural period and total N in plants were determined for comprehensive evaluation of the effect.Results showed that under both natural light and light-shaded conditions, addition of CO2 increased NO3-N uptake and its assimilative capabilities by plants. However, there were some difference between shoots and roots. With increase of CO2concentration, the concentration of NO3-N and NH4+-N as well as nitrate reductase activity were all decreased for shoots while the difference was not so distinct in roots, and the nitrate reductase activity was not decreased, but increased. Since NO3-N uptake by plants from the solution and the total N in plants were much higher by CO2 addition, it may be concluded that addition of CO2 has resulted in rise of nitrate absorption, assimilation and metabolism of wheat.

  6. Modification of primary and secondary metabolism of potato plants by nitrogen application differentially affects resistance to Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstrass, K; Treutter, D; Plessl, M; Heller, W; Elstner, E F; Heiser, I

    2006-09-01

    Potato plants ( SOLANUM TUBEROSUM L. cv. Indira) were grown at two levels of N supply in the greenhouse. Plants supplied with 0.8 g N per plant (high N variant) showed significantly increased biomass as compared to plants without additional N fertilisation (low N variant). C/N ratio was lower and protein content was higher in leaves of the high N variant. The concentration of chlorogenic acids and flavonols was significantly lower in leaves from the high N variant. Whereas resistance to ALTERNARIA SOLANI increased when plants were supplied with additional nitrogen, these plants were more susceptible to PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS. After infection with both pathogens, we found a strong induction of p-coumaroylnoradrenaline and p-coumaroyloctopamine, which are identified for the first time in potato leaves and are discussed as resistance factors of other solanaceous plants.

  7. Changes in swainsonine, calystegine, and nitrogen concentrations on an annual basis in Ipomoea carnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel; Oliveira, Carlos A; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Riet-Correa, Gabriela; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2015-03-01

    Ipomoea carnea, a swainsonine containing plant, is known to cause a neurologic disease in grazing livestock in Brazil and other parts of the world. To better understand the relative toxicity and nutritional content of I. carnea we investigated swainsonine, calystegine, and crude protein concentrations in leaves of I. carnea on a monthly basis for one year in northern and northeastern Brazil. Swainsonine concentrations were detected at concentrations that could potentially poison an animal throughout the year although there was some variation between months. At one location swainsonine concentrations were generally the highest during the rainy season or the months immediately following the rainy season. Total calystegine concentrations were similar to those reported previously while crude protein concentrations were similar to those found in other Ipomoea species and are such that they may explain why I. carnea becomes desirable to grazing livestock as forage becomes limited during the dry season.

  8. Identification of Soil Organic Nitrogen Substance Acting as Indicator of Response of Cocoa Plants to Nitrogen Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bako Baon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An indicator needed for estimating the presence of response of cocoa (Theobroma cacao trees to nitrogen (N fertilizer has been well understood, however there is still little progress on the work on identification of organic N fraction which regulates the response of cocoa to N fertilizer. The objective of this study is to identify a fraction of soil organic N which is very closely related with degree of cocoa response to N fertilizer. Hydrolyses were performed on soil samples derived from 23 sites of cocoa plantations distributed both in Banyuwangi district (12 sites and in Jember district (11 sites. Analysis of organic N fractions consisted of total hydrolysable N, ammonium N, amino sugar N, amino acid N and combinations of those fractions. To investigate the level of cocoa plants response to N fertilizer, seedlings of cocoa were planted in plastic pots treated with and without urea as source of N. Degree of response of cocoa plants to N fertilizer was measured based on growth parameters, such as plant height, leaf number, stem girth, fresh weight of stem, leaf and shoot; and dry weight of stem, leaf and shoot. Results of this study showed that biggest response of cocoa was shown by dry weight of leaf at the level of 29,22% (in the range of -17,43% – 95,98%, whereas the smallest response was shown by stem dry weight at the level of -1,04 (in the range of -26,16 – 47,54. From those of organic N fractions analyzed, only N ammonium did not show any significant correlations with all the growth parameters observed. Leaf dry weight was the most closely related parameter with nearly all organic N fractions followed by shoot dry weight and stem girth. The soil organic N fraction which had very significant relation with cocoa plant response was total hydrolysable N. Using the method of Cate-Nelson, it was revealed that cocoa gardens contain total hydrolysable N less than 1273 mg/kg were classified as responsive to N fertilizer.Key words: plant

  9. The impact of influent total ammonium nitrogen concentration on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria inhibition in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Vojtech; Catrysse, Michael; Stryjova, Hana; Jonatova, Ivana; Volcke, Eveline I P; Svehla, Pavel; Bartacek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The application of nitrification-denitrification over nitrite (nitritation-denitritation) with municipal (i.e. diluted and cold (or low-temperature)) wastewater can substantially improve the energy balance of municipal wastewater treatment plants. For the accumulation of nitrite, it is crucial to inhibit nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) with simultaneous proliferation of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The present study describes the effect of the influent total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration on AOB and NOB activity in two moving bed biofilm reactors operated as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) at 15 °C (SBR I) and 21 °C (SBR II). The reactors were fed with diluted reject water containing 600, 300, 150 and 75 mg TAN L(-1). The only factor limiting NOB activity in these reactors was the high concentrations of free ammonia and/or free nitrous acid (FNA) during the SBR cycles. Nitrite accumulation was observed with influents containing 600, 300 and 150 mg TAN L(-1) in SBR I and 600 and 300 in SBR II. Once nitrate production established in the reactors, the increase of influent TAN concentration up to the original 600 mg TAN L(-1) did not limit NOB activity. This was due to the massive development of NOB clusters throughout the biofilm that were able to cope with faster formation of FNA. The results of the fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis preliminarily showed the stratification of bacteria in the biofilm.

  10. Influence of phosphorus application and arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation on growth, foliar nitrogen mobilization, and phosphorus partitioning in cowpea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffouo, Victor Désiré; Ngwene, Benard; Akoa, Amougou; Franken, Philipp

    2014-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of phosphorus (P) application and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Funneliformis mosseae) on growth, foliar nitrogen mobilization, and phosphorus partitioning in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita-5) plants. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in pots containing a mixture of vermiculite and sterilized quartz sand. Mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal cowpea plants were supplied with three levels of soluble P (0.1 (low P), 0.5 (medium P), or 1.0 mM (high P)).Cowpea plants supplied with low P fertilization showed significantly (p fertilization at both the vegetative and pod-filling stages. P uptake and growth parameters of cowpea plants were positively influenced by mycorrhizal inoculation only in the medium P fertilization treatment at the vegetative stage. Lack of these effects in the other treatments may be linked to either a very low P supply (in the low P treatment at the vegetative stage) or the availability of optimal levels of freely diffusible P in the substrate towards the pod-filling stage due to accumulation with time. The N concentration in leaves of all cowpea plants were lower at the pod-filling stage than at the vegetative stage, presumably as a result of N mobilization from vegetative organs to the developing pods. This was however not influenced by AM fungal inoculation and may be a consequence of the lack of an improved plant P acquisition by the fungus at the pod-filling stage.

  11. Decreasing Fertilizer use by Optimizing Plant-microbe Interactions for Sustainable Supply of Nitrogen for Bioenergy Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicklberger, M. F.; Huang, J.; Felix, P.; Pettenato, A.; Chakraborty, R.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential component of DNA and proteins and consequently a key element of life. N often is limited in plants, affecting plant growth and productivity. To alleviate this problem, tremendous amounts of N-fertilizer is used, which comes at a high economic price and heavy energy demand. In addition, N-fertilizer also significantly contributes to rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Therefore, the addition of fertilizer to overcome N limitation is highly undesirable. To explore reduction in fertilizer use our research focuses on optimizing the interaction between plants and diazotrophic bacteria, which could provide adequate amounts of N to the host-plant. Therefore we investigated the diversity of microbes associated with Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), considered as potential energy crop for bioenergy production. Several bacterial isolates with representatives from Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Bacilli were obtained from the roots, leaves, rhizoplane and rhizosphere of these plants. Majority of these isolates grew best with simple sugars and small organic acids. As shown by PCR amplification of nifH, several of these isolates are potential N2-fixing bacteria. We investigated diazotrophs for their response to elevated temperature and salinity (two common climate change induced stresses found on marginal lands), their N2-fixing ability, and their response to root exudates (which drive microbial colonization of the plant). Together this understanding is necessary for the development of eco-friendly, economically sustainable energy crops by decreasing their dependency on fertilizer.

  12. Nitrogen signalling in plant interactions with associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, T L G; Balsemão-Pires, E; Saraiva, R M; Ferreira, P C G; Hemerly, A S

    2014-10-01

    Some beneficial plant-interacting bacteria can biologically fix N2 to plant-available ammonium. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is an important source of nitrogen (N) input in agriculture and represents a promising substitute for chemical N fertilizers. Diazotrophic bacteria have the ability to develop different types of root associations with different plant species. Among the highest rates of BNF are those measured in legumes nodulated by endosymbionts, an already very well documented model of plant-diazotrophic bacterial association. However, it has also been shown that economically important crops, especially monocots, can obtain a substantial part of their N needs from BNF by interacting with associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria, that either live near the root surface or endophytically colonize intercellular spaces and vascular tissues of host plants. One of the best reported outcomes of this association is the promotion of plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Besides fixing N, these bacteria can also produce plant growth hormones, and some species are reported to improve nutrient uptake and increase plant tolerance against biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, this particular type of plant-bacteria association consists of a natural beneficial system to be explored; however, the regulatory mechanisms involved are still not clear. Plant N status might act as a key signal, regulating and integrating various metabolic processes that occur during association with diazotrophic bacteria. This review will focus on the recent progress in understanding plant association with associative and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria, particularly on the knowledge of the N networks involved in BNF and in the promotion of plant growth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Concentrations and nitrogen isotope compositions of free amino acids in Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles of different ages as indicators of atmospheric nitrogen pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Xiao, Huayun

    2017-09-01

    Free amino acid δ15N values and concentrations of current-year new (new), current-year mature (middle-age) and previous-year (old) Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles were determined for five sites with different distances from a highway in a forest in Guiyang (SW China). Needle free amino acid concentrations decreased with increasing distance from the highway, and only the free amino acid concentrations (total free amino acid, arginine, γ-aminobutyric acid, valine, alanine and proline) in the middle-aged needles demonstrated a strong correlation with distance from the highway, indicating that free amino acid concentrations in middle-aged needles may be a more suitable indicator of nitrogen (N) deposition compared to new and old needles. Needle free amino acid δ15N values were more positive near the highway compared to the more distant sites and increased with increasing needle age, indicating that N deposition in this site may be dominated by isotopically heavy NOx-N from traffic emissions. In sites beyond 400 m from the highway, the δ15N values of total free amino acids, histidine, glutamine, proline, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine, lysine, arginine and serine in each age of needle were noticeably negative compared to their respective δ15N values near the highway. This suggested that needle free amino acid δ15N values from these sites were more affected by 15N-depleted atmospheric NHx-N from soil emissions. This result was further supported by the similarity in the negative moss δ15N values at these sites to the δ15N values of soil-derived NHx-N. Needle free amino acid δ15N values therefore have the potential to provide information about atmospheric N sources. We conclude that needle free amino acid concentrations are sensitive indicators of N deposition and that the age-related free amino acid δ15N values in needles can efficiently reflect atmospheric N sources. This would probably promote the application of the combined plant tissue amino acid

  14. Low Nitrogen Retention in Soil and Litter under Conditions without Plants in a Subtropical Pine Plantation

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    Yanmei Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil acts as a major sink for added nitrogen (N in forests, but it remains unclear about the capacity of soil to immobilize N under conditions without plant roots and whether added N interacts with ecosystem N to affect N retention. We added 15NH415NO3 to in situ soil columns (with leaching and leaf litter (without leaching of two tree species in a subtropical Pinus elliottii plantation. Soil and litter were collected three or eight months after N addition to measure concentrations of indigenous and exogenous N. About 70% of exogenous N was retained in soil three months after N addition, of which 65.9% were in inorganic forms. Eight months after N addition, 16.0% of exogenous N was retained in soil and 9.8%–13.6% was immobilized in litter. N addition increased the mineral release and nitrification of soil indigenous N. Loss of litter indigenous N was also increased by N addition. Our results suggest that N deposition on lands with low root activities or low soil carbon (C contents may lead to increased N output due to low N immobilization. Moreover, the effects of added N on ecosystem indigenous N may decrease the capacity of soil and litter in N retention.

  15. Modelling Plant and Soil Nitrogen Feedbacks Affecting Forest Carbon Gain at High CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, R. E.; Norby, R. J.; Franklin, O.; Pepper, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Short-term, direct effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant carbon gain are relatively well understood. There is considerable uncertainty, however, about longer-term effects, which are influenced by various plant and ecosystem feedbacks. A key feedback in terrestrial ecosystems occurs through changes in plant carbon (C) allocation patterns. For instance, if high CO2 were to increase C allocation to roots, then plants may experience positive feedback through improved plant nutrition. A second type of feedback, associated with decomposition of soil-organic matter, may reduce soil-nutrient availability at high CO2. This paper will consider mechanistic models of both feedbacks. Effects of high CO2 on plant C allocation will be investigated using a simple model of forest net primary production (NPP) that incorporates the primary mechanisms of plant carbon and nitrogen (N) balance. The model called MATE (Model Any Terrestrial Ecosystem) includes an equation for annual C balance that depends on light- saturated photosynthetic rate and therefore on [CO2], and an equation for N balance incorporating an expression for N uptake as a function of root mass. The C-N model is applied to a Free Air CO2 Exchange (FACE) experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee, USA, where closed-canopy, monoculture stands of the deciduous hardwood sweetgum ( Liquidambar styraciflua) have been growing at [CO2] of 375 and 550 ppm for ten years. Features of this experiment are that the annual NPP response to elevated CO2 has averaged approximately 25% over seven years, but that annual fine-root production has almost doubled on average, with especially large increases in later years of the experiment (Norby et al. 2006). The model provides a simple graphical approach for analysing effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on leaf/root/wood C allocation and productivity. It simulates increases in NPP and fine-root production at the ORNL FACE site that are consistent

  16. Nitrogen transfer from forage legumes to nine neighbouring plants in a multi-species grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirhofer-Walzl, Karin; Høgh Jensen, Henning; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Legumes play a crucial role in nitrogen supply to grass-legume mixtures for ruminant fodder. To quantify N transfer from legumes to neighbouring plants in multi-species grasslands we established a grass-legume-herb mixture on a loamy-sandy site in Denmark. White clover (Trifolium repens L.), red...... amounts of N from legumes than dicotyledonous plants which generally have taproots. Slurry application mainly increased N transfer from legumes to grasses. During the growing season the three legumes transferred approximately 40 kg N ha-1 to neighbouring plants. Below-ground N transfer from legumes...

  17. The effect of carbohydrate accumulation and nitrogen deficiency on feedback regulation of photosynthesis in beech (Fagus sylvatica) under elevated CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, K.; Urban, O.; Holub, P.; Rajsnerova, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main manifestations of global change is an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Elevated concentration of CO2 has stimulating effect on plant photosynthesis and consequently also on the productivity. Long-term studies, however, show that this effect is progressively reduced due to feedback regulation of photosynthesis. The main causes of this phenomenon are considered as two factors: i) increased biomass production consumes a larger amount of nitrogen from the soil and this leads to progressive nitrogen limitation of photosynthesis, particularly at the level of the enzyme Rubisco, ii) the sink capacity is genetically limited and elevated CO2 concentration leads to increased accumulation of carbohydtrates (mainly sucrose, which is the main transport form of assimilates) in leaves. Increased concentrations of carbohydrates leads to a feedback regulation of photosynthesis by both, long-term feedback regulation of synthesis of the enzyme Rubisco, and also due to reduced capacity to produce ATP in the chloroplasts. However, mechanisms for interactive effects of nitrogen and accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates are still not well understood. Using 3-year-old Fagus sylvatica seedlings we have explored the interactive effects of nitrogen nutrition and sink capacity manipulation (sucrose feeding) on the dynamics of accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates and changes in photosynthetic parameters under ambient (385 μmol (CO2) mol-1) and elevated (700 μmol(CO2) mol-1) CO2 concentration. Sink manipulation by sucrose feeding led to a continuous increase of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, which was higher in nitrogen fertilized seedlings. The accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates was also slightly stimulated by elevated CO2 concentration. Exponential decay (p structural carbohydrates increased. However, this relationship was modified by the nitrogen content. Accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates had relatively smaller effect

  18. THE EFFECT OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION OF MAIZE ON PROTEIN CONCENTRATION AND IN VITRO FEMENTABILITY OF GRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D BABNIK

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrogen fertilization of maize on fermentability of maize grain in the rumen was studied by means of in vitro method based on the measurement of gas produced during the incubation of samples with rumen liquor. Gas production was recorded continuously up to 72 h incubation time and cumulative gas production was described by the Gompertz equation Y=A*exp(-exp(-d*(t-tm. Seven treatments, one of them unfertilized and others fertilized with 100 to 250 kg N ha–1, were compared. Grain yield and concentration of crude protein (CP in grain increased linearly with nitrogen fertilization. Grain yield increased for 25 kg dry matter (DM ha–1 and CP concentration for 0.13 g kg–1 DM per each additional kg of N. Concentration of CP in grain, which varied from 83 to 115 g kg–1 DM, was closely related to the dynamics of gas production. The maximal gas production rate (MPR was negatively related to CP concentration in the grain (R2 = 0.53; p < 0.10 and the time of MPR (tm was positively related to the amount of added N (R2 = 0.74; p < 0.05 and concentration of CP in the grain (R2 = 0.88; p < 0.01. It is likely that intensive N fertilization of maize limits ruminal digestion of maize starch. Due to the shift of starch digestion from the rumen to lower gastrointestinal tract better utilization of energy can be expected in maize grain of extensively fertilized maize than in the grain of maize, in which supply of N is sub-optimal.

  19. Optimum sizing of steam turbines for concentrated solar power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Poullikkas, Constantinos Rouvas, Ioannis Hadjipaschalis, George Kourtis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a selection of the optimum steam turbine type and size for integration in concentrated solar power (CSP plants is carried out. In particular, the optimum steam turbine input and output interfaces for a range of CSP plant capacity sizes are identified. Also, efficiency and electricity unit cost curves for various steam turbine capacities are estimated by using a combination of the Steam Pro software module of the Thermoflow Suite 18 package and the IPP v2.1 optimization software tool. The results indicate that the estimated efficiency and the expected specific capital cost of the power block are very important criteria in choosing the best steam turbine size of a CSP plant. For capacity sizes of 10kWe up to 50MWe, the steam turbine efficiency increases and the steam turbine expected specific capital cost of the power block decreases at a high rate, whereas for larger sizes they remain almost constant. Thus, there is significant efficiency gains to be realized and large cost savings in increasing the turbine size up to 50MWe. Finally, although the cost of electricity of a CSP plant with capacities greater than 1MWe is significantly reduced to less than 1US$/kWh, currently such technology can only become economically viable through supporting schemes.

  20. Optimum sizing of steam turbines for concentrated solar power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas; Rouvas, Constantinos; Hadjipaschalis, Ioannis; Kourtis, Gorge [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2012-07-01

    In this work, a selection of the optimum steam turbine type and size for integration in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants is carried out. In particular, the optimum steam turbine input and output interfaces for a range of CSP plant capacity sizes are identified. Also, efficiency and electricity unit cost curves for various steam turbine capacities are estimated by using a combination of the Steam Pro software module of the Thermoflow Suite 18 package and the IPP v2.1 optimization software tool. The results indicate that the estimated efficiency and the expected specific capital cost of the power block are very important criteria in choosing the best steam turbine size of a CSP plant. For capacity sizes of 10kWe up to 50MWe, the steam turbine efficiency increases and the steam turbine expected specific capital cost of the power block decreases at a high rate, whereas for larger sizes they remain almost constant. Thus, there is significant efficiency gains to be realized and large cost savings in increasing the turbine size up to 50MWe. Finally, although the cost of electricity of a CSP plant with capacities greater than 1MWe is significantly reduced to less than 1US$/kWh, currently such technology can only become economically viable through supporting schemes.

  1. Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Nitrogen Uptake of Plants: Current Knowledge and Research Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Bücking

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi play an essential role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many important crop species. The extraradical mycelium of the fungus takes up nutrients from the soil, transfers these nutrients to the intraradical mycelium within the host root, and exchanges the nutrients against carbon from the host across a specialized plant-fungal interface. The contribution of the AM symbiosis to the phosphate nutrition has long been known, but whether AM fungi contribute similarly to the nitrogen nutrition of their host is still controversially discussed. However, there is a growing body of evidence that demonstrates that AM fungi can actively transfer nitrogen to their host, and that the host plant with its carbon supply stimulates this transport, and that the periarbuscular membrane of the host is able to facilitate the active uptake of nitrogen from the mycorrhizal interface. In this review, our current knowledge about nitrogen transport through the fungal hyphae and across the mycorrhizal interface is summarized, and we discuss the regulation of these pathways and major research gaps.

  2. Nitrogen Removal Efficiency at Centralized Domestic Wastewater Treatment Plants in Bangkok, Thailand

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    Pongsak Noophan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, influents and effluents from centralized domestic wastewater treatment systems in Bangkok (Rattanakosin, Dindaeng, Chongnonsi, Nongkhaem, and Jatujak were randomly collected in order to measure organic nitrogen plus ammonium-nitrogen (total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and total volatile suspended solids by using Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater 1998. Characteristics of influent and effluent (primary data of the centralized domestic wastewater treatment system from the Drainage and Sewerage Department of Bangkok Metropolitan Administration were used to analyze efficiency of systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was used to identify specific nitrifying bacteria (ammonium oxidizing bacteria specific for Nitrosomonas spp. and nitrite oxidizing bacteria specific for Nitrobacter spp. and Nitrospira spp.. Although Nitrosomonas spp. and Nitrobacter spp. were found, Nitrospira spp. was most prevalent in the aeration tank of centralized wastewater treatment systems. Almost all of the centralized domestic wastewater treatment plants in Bangkok are designed for activated sludge type biological nutrient removal (BNR. However, low efficiency nitrogen removal was found at centralized wastewater treatment plants in Bangkok. Influent ratio of TOC:N at centralized treatment plant is less than 2.5. Centralized wastewater treatment systems have not always been used suitability and used successfully in some areas of Bangkok Thailand.

  3. Nitrogen impacts on vascular plants in Britain: an analysis of two national observation networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Henrys

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Large areas of the United Kingdom currently have nitrogen (N deposition at rates which exceed the thresholds above which there is risk of damage to sensitive components of the ecosystem (critical loads, and are predicted to continue to do so. Previous studies have shown that this excess N can be very damaging to semi-natural ecosystems. However, such studies have focussed primarily on the relationship of species richness to nitrogen, possibly missing the risk that increased deposition can have on individual plant species. To address this gap in knowledge, we used data from two national observation networks over Great Britain: the vascular plant database and the Botanical Society of the British Isles local change network to examine the response of individual vascular plant species to nitrogen in acid grasslands, calcareous grasslands and heathlands. Presence absence records of individual species, along with mean Ellenberg scores, within 10 km hectads were modelled against N deposition whilst at the same time controlling for the effects of climate, land use and sulphur deposition using generalised additive models. Ellenberg N showed a significant increase with increasing N deposition in almost all habitats across both surveys. Many individual species showed strong relationships with N deposition and clear negative trends in species prevalence to increasing nitrogen were found in all habitats. Species that showed negative relationships to N showed signs of decline at low levels, far below the current critical load levels.

  4. Effects of planting Phragmites australis on nitrogen removal, microbial nitrogen cycling, and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Yuka; Sei, Kazunari; Mori, Kazuhiro; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-10-21

    We examined the effect of planting an emergent aquatic plant (Phragmites australis) on nitrogen removal from sediments using a 42-d pot experiment. The experimental pot systems comprised two types of sediments planted with and without young P. australis. Total nitrogen (total N), total dissolved N, and NH4-N in the sediments decreased markedly after planting. In contrast, those levels decreased only slightly in the unplanted sediments. The decrease in total N in the P. australis-planted sediments was 7-20 times those in the unplanted sediments. Abundances of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA, ammonia-oxidizing bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA), ammonia-oxidizing archaeal amoA, and denitrifying bacterial nitrite reductase (nirK) genes increased significantly in sediments after planting. Phragmites australis appears to have released oxygen and created a repeating cycle of oxidizing and reducing conditions in the sediments. These conditions should promote mineralization of organic N, nitrification, and denitrification in the sediments. Phragmites australis absorbed bioavailable nitrogen generated by microbial nitrogen metabolism. During the 42-d period after planting, 31-44% of total N was removed by microbial nitrogen cycling, and 56-69% was removed via absorption by P. australis. These results suggest that planting P. australis can increase microbial populations and their activities, and that nitrogen removal can be accelerated by the combined functions of P. australis and microorganisms in the sediment. Thus, planting P. australis has considerable potential as an effective remediation technology for eutrophic sediments.

  5. Do foliar, litter, and root nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations reflect nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical wet forest?

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    Silvia Alvarez-Clare

    Full Text Available Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P] and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation--as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization--based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba had 9% higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community.

  6. Do foliar, litter, and root nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations reflect nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical wet forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Mack, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP) is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation--as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization--based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root) [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba) had 9% higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza) had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community.

  7. Effect of planting dates and nitrogen rates on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella Sativa L.

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    hamed javadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of planting dates and nitrogen rates on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L. a field experiment was conducted in spring 2006 in the Azad University of Birjand. The experiment was done as split plot based on compeletely randomized block design with 3 replications. Four planting dates (21 March, 4, 21 April, 5 May were used as main plot and 3 levels of nitrogen (40, 80 and 120 kg/ha were as sub plot. The results showed that the planting dates effect was significant on traits such as plant height, number of main branches, number of follicles per plant, biological yield and grain yield. As, maximum plant height, number of follicles per plant and biological yield were observed in first planting date and maximum number of main branches and grain yield were observed in first and second planting dates. Planting dates had no significant effects on number of follicles in main branches, number of seed per follicles, weight of 1000 seeds and harvest index. Nitrogen rates and interaction between planting dates and nitrogen rates had no significant effect on the traits. According to the results of this experiment 40 kg/ha nitrogen is enough for black cumin. Also, planting dates in 21 March and 4 April were recognised better because of high yield production.

  8. Increasing in-stream nitrogen concentrations under different bioenergy crop management practices in central Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Thraen, Daniela; Rode, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how nitrogen fluxes respond to changes in land use and agriculture practices is crucial for improving instream water quality prediction. In central Germany, expansion of bioenergy crops such as maize and rape for ethanol production during the last decade led to increasing of fertilizer application rates. To examine the effect of these changes, surface water quality of a drinking water reservoir catchment was investigated for more than 30 years. The Weida catchment (99.5 km2) is part of the Elbe river basin and has a share of 67% agricultural land use with significant changes in agricultural practices within the investigation period. For the period 2004-2012, the share of maize and rape has been increased by 52% and 20%, respectively, for enhancing bioenergy production. To achieve our gaols, the semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was calibrated for discharge and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (IN) during the period 1997-2000.The model was validated successfully (with lowest performance of NSE = 0.78 and PBIAS = 3.74% for discharge) for three different periods 1983-1987, 1989-1996 and 2000-2003, which are charaterized by different fertilizer application rates. Results showed that the HYPE model reproduced reasonably well discharge and IN daily loads (with lowest NSE = 0.64 for IN-load). In addition, the HYPE model was evaluated successfully to predict the discharge and IN concentrations for the period 2004-2012, where detailed input data in terms of crops management (field-specific survey) have been considered. Land use and crop rotations scenarios, with high hypothetical percentage of acceptance by the farmers, revealed that continuous conversion of agricultural land into bioenergy crops, will most likely, lead to an enrichment of in-stream nitrogen, especially after spring storms.

  9. IR spectroscopy of ethanol in nitrogen cryomatrices with different concentration ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldiyarov, A.; Aryutkina, M.; Drobyshev, A.; Kurnosov, V.

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of cryovacuum condensates of ethanol-nitrogen mixtures formed by co-condensation of gas mixtures with different concentrations on a cooled metal substrate are studied by IR spectrometry. The condensation temperature was Tc = 16 K and the pressure of the gaseous phase during cryodeposition was P = 10-5 Torr. The ethanol concentration in nitrogen was varied from 0.5 to 10% and the film thickness, from 1 to 30 μm. Measurements were made in the range from 400 to 4200 cm-1. An analysis of the IR spectra and a comparison with published data shows that ethanol monomers and dimers are present in the nitrogen matrix. This is indicated by an absorption band at a frequency of 3658 cm-1 owing to vibrations of O-H bonds of ethanol monomers and dimers. The local minima of this band at 3645 and 3658 cm-1 are related to the existence of two conformational states of the ethanol molecule: anti (3658 cm-1) and gauche (3645 cm-1). In addition, the presence of ethanol dimers and monomers in the matrix leads to the appearance of absorption bands at 1259 and 1276 cm-1 attributable to deformation vibrations δ(COH) of the anti- and gauche-isomers, respectively, as well as bands corresponding to a combination of ν(CCO) valence vibrations and rotational oscillations of the methyl group r(CH3) attributable to anti-dimers (ν = 1090 cm-1) and anti-monomers (ν = 1095 cm-1). Local minima within 3000-3600 cm-1 also indicate the presence of cyclical dimers, trimers, and tetramers, as well as hexamers in the matrix. A broad band over 3250-3330 cm-1 indicates that large polyaggregates, with ethanol molecules in a hydrogen-bond state (multimer), exist in the matrix.

  10. Effects of Invasive-Plant Management on Nitrogen-Removal Services in Freshwater Tidal Marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldred, Mary; Baines, Stephen B; Findlay, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Establishing relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem function is an ongoing endeavor in contemporary ecosystem and community ecology, with important practical implications for conservation and the maintenance of ecosystem services. Removal of invasive plant species to conserve native diversity is a common management objective in many ecosystems, including wetlands. However, substantial changes in plant community composition have the potential to alter sediment characteristics and ecosystem services, including permanent removal of nitrogen from these systems via microbial denitrification. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping and removing invasive plants is needed to manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets. We monitored small-scale removals of Phragmites australis over four years to determine their effects on potential denitrification rates relative to three untreated Phragmites sites and adjacent sites dominated by native Typha angustifolia. Sediment ammonium increased following the removal of vegetation from treated sites, likely as a result of decreases in both plant uptake and nitrification. Denitrification potentials were lower in removal sites relative to untreated Phragmites sites, a pattern that persisted at least two years following removal as native plant species began to re-colonize treated sites. These results suggest the potential for a trade-off between invasive-plant management and nitrogen-removal services. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping versus removing invasive plants is needed to adequately manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets.

  11. Effects of Invasive-Plant Management on Nitrogen-Removal Services in Freshwater Tidal Marshes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Alldred

    Full Text Available Establishing relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem function is an ongoing endeavor in contemporary ecosystem and community ecology, with important practical implications for conservation and the maintenance of ecosystem services. Removal of invasive plant species to conserve native diversity is a common management objective in many ecosystems, including wetlands. However, substantial changes in plant community composition have the potential to alter sediment characteristics and ecosystem services, including permanent removal of nitrogen from these systems via microbial denitrification. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping and removing invasive plants is needed to manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets. We monitored small-scale removals of Phragmites australis over four years to determine their effects on potential denitrification rates relative to three untreated Phragmites sites and adjacent sites dominated by native Typha angustifolia. Sediment ammonium increased following the removal of vegetation from treated sites, likely as a result of decreases in both plant uptake and nitrification. Denitrification potentials were lower in removal sites relative to untreated Phragmites sites, a pattern that persisted at least two years following removal as native plant species began to re-colonize treated sites. These results suggest the potential for a trade-off between invasive-plant management and nitrogen-removal services. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping versus removing invasive plants is needed to adequately manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets.

  12. Amino Acid Export in Plants: A Missing Link in Nitrogen Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sakiko Okumoto; Guillaume Pilot

    2011-01-01

    T The export of nutrients from source organs to parts of the body where they are required (e.g. sink organs) is a fundamental biological process. Export of amino acids, one of the most abundant nitrogen species in plant long-distance transport tissues (i.e. xylem and phloem), is an essential process for the proper distribution of nitrogen in the plant. Physiological studies have detected the presence of multiple amino acid export systems in plant cell membranes. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the molecular identity of amino acid exporters, partially due to the technical difficulties hampering the identification of exporter proteins. In this short review, we will summarize our current knowledge about amino acid export systems in plants. Several studies have described plant amino acid transporters capable of bi-directional, facilitative transport, reminiscent of activities identified by earlier physiological studies. Moreover, recent expansion in the number of available amino acid transporter sequences have revealed evolutionary relationships between amino acid exporters from other organisms with a number of uncharacterized plant proteins, some of which might also function as amino acid exporters. In addition, genes that may regulate export of amino acids have been discovered. Studies of these putative transporter and regulator proteins may help in understanding the elusive molecular mechanisms of amino acid export in plants.

  13. History on the biological nitrogen fixation research in graminaceous plants: special emphasis on the Brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldani, José I; Baldani, Vera L D

    2005-09-01

    This review covers the history on Biological Nitrogen Fixation (BNF) in Graminaceous plants grown in Brazil, and describes research progress made over the last 40 years, most of which was coordinated by Johanna Döbereiner. One notable accomplishment during this period was the discovery of several nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as the rhizospheric (Beijerinckia fluminensis and Azotobacter paspali), associative (Azospirillum lipoferum, A. brasilense, A. amazonense) and the endophytic (Herbaspirillum seropedicae, H. rubrisubalbicans, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, Burkholderia brasilensis and B. tropica). The role of these diazotrophs in association with grasses, mainly with cereal plants, has been studied and a lot of progress has been achieved in the ecological, physiological, biochemical, and genetic aspects. The mechanisms of colonization and infection of the plant tissues are better understood, and the BNF contribution to the soil/plant system has been determined. Inoculation studies with diazotrophs showed that endophytic bacteria have a much higher BNF contribution potential than associative diazotrophs. In addition, it was found that the plant genotype influences the plant/bacteria association. Recent data suggest that more studies should be conducted on the endophytic association to strengthen the BNF potential. The ongoing genome sequencing programs: RIOGENE (Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus) and GENOPAR (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) reflect the commitment to the BNF study in Brazil and should allow the country to continue in the forefront of research related to the BNF process in Graminaceous plants.

  14. Recently fixed carbon allocation in strawberry plants and concurrent inorganic nitrogen uptake through arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomè, Elisabetta; Tagliavini, Massimo; Scandellari, Francesca

    2015-05-01

    Most crop species form a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, receiving plant photosynthate and exchanging nutrients from the soil. The plant carbon (C) allocation to AM fungi and the nitrogen feedback are rarely studied together. In this study, a dual (13)CO2 and (15)NH4(15)NO3 pulse labeling experiment was carried out to determine the allocation of recent photosynthates to mycorrhizal hyphae and the translocation of N absorbed by hyphae to strawberry plants. Plants were grown in pots in which a 50 μm mesh net allowed the physical separation of the mycorrhizal hyphae from the roots in one portion of the pot. An inorganic source of (15)N was added to the hyphal compartment at the same time of the (13)CO2 pulse labeling. One and seven days after pulse labeling, the plants were destructively harvested and the amount of the recently fixed carbon (C) and of the absorbed N was determined. (13)C allocated to belowground organs such as roots and mycorrhizal hyphae accounted for an average of 10%, with 4.3% allocated to mycorrhizal hyphae within the first 24h after the pulse labeling. Mycorrhizae absorbed labeled inorganic nitrogen, of which almost 23% was retained in the fungal mycelium. The N uptake was linearly correlated with the (13)C fixed by the plants suggesting a positive correlation between a plant photosynthetic rate and the hyphal absorption capacity.

  15. Tightly-Coupled Plant-Soil Nitrogen Cycling: Comparison of Organic Farms across an Agricultural Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M Bowles

    Full Text Available How farming systems supply sufficient nitrogen (N for high yields but with reduced N losses is a central challenge for reducing the tradeoffs often associated with N cycling in agriculture. Variability in soil organic matter and management of organic farms across an agricultural landscape may yield insights for improving N cycling and for evaluating novel indicators of N availability. We assessed yields, plant-soil N cycling, and root expression of N metabolism genes across a representative set of organic fields growing Roma-type tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L. in an intensively-managed agricultural landscape in California, USA. The fields spanned a three-fold range of soil carbon (C and N but had similar soil types, texture, and pH. Organic tomato yields ranged from 22.9 to 120.1 Mg ha-1 with a mean similar to the county average (86.1 Mg ha-1, which included mostly conventionally-grown tomatoes. Substantial variability in soil inorganic N concentrations, tomato N, and root gene expression indicated a range of possible tradeoffs between yields and potential for N losses across the fields. Fields showing evidence of tightly-coupled plant-soil N cycling, a desirable scenario in which high crop yields are supported by adequate N availability but low potential for N loss, had the highest total and labile soil C and N and received organic matter inputs with a range of N availability. In these fields, elevated expression of a key gene involved in root N assimilation, cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1, confirmed that plant N assimilation was high even when inorganic N pools were low. Thus tightly-coupled N cycling occurred on several working organic farms. Novel combinations of N cycling indicators (i.e. inorganic N along with soil microbial activity and root gene expression for N assimilation would support adaptive management for improved N cycling on organic as well as conventional farms, especially when plant-soil N cycling is rapid.

  16. Removal of high concentrated ammonia nitrogen from landfill leachate by landfilled waste layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hui-dong; HE Pin-jing; SHAO Li-ming; LI Guo-jian

    2004-01-01

    The landfill of municipal solid waste(MSW) could be regarded as denitrification reactor and used in ammonia nitrogen biological removal process. In this research, the process was applied to municipal solid waste(MSW) collected in Shanghai, China, which was characterized with high food waste content. The NH4+ removal efficiency in the system of SBR nitrifying reactor followed by fresh and matured landfilled waste layer in series was studied. In the nitrifying reactor, above 90% of NH4+ in leachate was oxidized to NO2- and NO3-. Then high concentrated NO2- and NO3- was removed in the way of denitrification process in fresh landfilled waste layer. At the same time, degradation of fresh landfilled waste was accelerated. Up to the day 120, 136.5 gC/(kg dry waste) and 17.9 gN/(kg dry waste) were produced from waste layer. It accounted for 50.15% and 86.89% of the total carbon and nitrogen content of preliminary fresh waste, which was 4.42 times and 5.17 times higher than that of reference column respectively. After filtering through matured landfilled waste, BOD5 concentration in leachate dropped to below 100 mg/L, which would not affect following nitrification adversely. Because the matured landfilled waste acted as a well methanogenic reactor, 23% of carbon produced accumulatively from fresh landfilled waste degradation was converted into CH4.

  17. Determination of type and concentration of DNA nitrogenous bases by Raman spectroscopy using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptinskiy, Kirill A.; Burikov, Sergey A.; Sarmanova, Olga E.; Dolenko, Sergey A.; Dolenko, Tatiana A.

    2016-04-01

    In this article the results of solution of two-parametrical inverse problems of laser Raman spectroscopy of identification and determination of concentration of DNA nitrogenous bases in two-component solutions are presented. Elaboration of methods of control of reactions with DNA strands in remote real-time mode is necessary for solution of one of the basic problems of creation of biocomputers - increase of reliability of molecular DNA-computations. The comparative analysis of two used methods of solution of stated problems has demonstrated convincing advantages of technique of artificial neural networks. Use of artificial neural networks allowed to reach the accuracy of determination of concentration of each base in two-component solutions 0.2-0.3 g/l.

  18. Trends of nitrogen and phosphorus input into Lake Neusiedl from wastewater treatment plants and non-point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Paul; Heiss, Gerhard; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Lake Neusiedl (Austria) is a mesotrophic to eutrophic shallow steppe lake. Due to its low water volume and the lack of a natural outflow, excessive nutrient input is a special risk for this lake. In recent years, improved waste water treatment technologies have reduced the N and P loads of the inflows although all municipalities surrounding Lake Neusiedl (with one exception) and the cities and municipalities within the catchment area of the river Wulka discharge their (treated) wastewater into Lake Neusiedl. The amount of wastewater in 2010 was more than 22 x 106 m3. Although the amount of wastewater increased by more than 70 % in the last 30 years, it was possible to reduce the ammonium load from 38 t/a to 8 t/a (as NH4-N), the nitrate load from 83 t/a to 34 t/a (as NO3-N), the phosphate load from 8 t/a to 3 t/a (as PO4-P) and the total phosphorus load from 11 t/a to 6 t/a (comparison of the average annual loads of 1982 and 2010). Another environmental risk for Lake Neusiedl is the nitrogen input due to agricultural activities. Therefore a pilot action within the EULAKES-project focused on the nitrate levels during annual cycles (2011-2012) in groundwater as well as in selected rivers, channels and ditches discharging into Lake Neusiedl. The monitoring programme demonstrated clearly that the major contribution of the total nitrogen load discharged by surface water into Lake Neusiedl originated from River Wulka. For a general assessment of the influence of surface water discharge into Lake Neusiedl it is necessary to investigate the data of River Wulka for a longer period. Therefore data at the monitoring station Schützen were analysed for the period 1992-2010. Evaluation of the monitoring data showed that due to the higher nitrogen concentrations at higher average annual discharges the inorganic nitrogen load was about 6.5 times higher in 2010 (average discharge of Wulka 2.1 m3/s) than in the year 2001 (average discharge of Wulka 0.56 m3/s). The total inorganic

  19. Influence of light and nitrogen on the photosynthetic efficiency in the C4 plant Miscanthus × giganteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Ying; Sun, Wei; Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena; Stutz, Samantha S; Gandin, Anthony; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Cousins, Asaph B

    2017-01-01

    There are numerous studies describing how growth conditions influence the efficiency of C4 photosynthesis. However, it remains unclear how changes in the biochemical capacity versus leaf anatomy drives this acclimation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine how growth light and nitrogen availability influence leaf anatomy, biochemistry and the efficiency of the CO2 concentrating mechanism in Miscanthus × giganteus. There was an increase in the mesophyll cell wall surface area but not cell well thickness in the high-light (HL) compared to the low-light (LL) grown plants suggesting a higher mesophyll conductance in the HL plants, which also had greater photosynthetic capacity. Additionally, the HL plants had greater surface area and thickness of bundle-sheath cell walls compared to LL plants, suggesting limited differences in bundle-sheath CO2 conductance because the increased area was offset by thicker cell walls. The gas exchange estimates of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activity were significantly less than the in vitro PEPc activity, suggesting limited substrate availability in the leaf due to low mesophyll CO2 conductance. Finally, leakiness was similar across all growth conditions and generally did not change under the different measurement light conditions. However, differences in the stable isotope composition of leaf material did not correlate with leakiness indicating that dry matter isotope measurements are not a good proxy for leakiness. Taken together, these data suggest that the CO2 concentrating mechanism in Miscanthus is robust under low-light and limited nitrogen growth conditions, and that the observed changes in leaf anatomy and biochemistry likely help to maintain this efficiency.

  20. [Effects of applying nitrogen fertilizer and fertilizer additive on rice yield and rice plant nitrogen uptake, translocation, and utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-jun; Xia, Yong-qiu; Yang, Xiao-yun; Guo, Miao; Yan, Xiao-yuan

    2011-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted in the Taihu Lake region of southern Jiangsu to study the effects of applying nitrogen (N) fertilizer and fertilizer additive on the rice yield and the rice plant N uptake, translocation, and utilization. Applying N fertilizer had significant positive effects on the rice yield, accumulative absorbed N at all growth stages and at each growth stage, and N translocation rate after anthesis (P 0.05). The N translocation rate after anthesis and the N fertilizer use efficiency decreased with increasing N application rate. Applying fertilizer additive further improved the rice yield, accumulative absorbed N, N translocation rate after anthesis, and N fertilizer use efficiency, and this effect was more evident when the N application rate was equal to or greater than 200 kg x hm(-2). Relatively high rice yield and N use efficiency were achieved when applying 150 kg x hm(-2) of N fertilizer without the application of fertilizer additive.

  1. Altitudinal patterns and controls of plant and soil nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry in subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianjin; Hou, Enqing; Liu, Yang; Wen, Dazhi

    2016-04-01

    Altitude is a determining factor of ecosystem properties and processes in mountains. This study investigated the changes in the concentrations of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) and their ratios in four key ecosystem components (forest floor litter, fine roots, soil, and soil microorganisms) along an altitudinal gradient (from 50 m to 950 m a.s.l.) in subtropical China. The results showed that soil organic C and microbial biomass C concentrations increased linearly with increasing altitude. Similar trends were observed for concentrations of total soil N and microbial biomass N. In contrast, the N concentration of litter and fine roots decreased linearly with altitude. With increasing altitude, litter, fine roots, and soil C:N ratios increased linearly, while the C:N ratio of soil microbial biomass did not change significantly. Phosphorus concentration and C:P and N:P ratios of all ecosystem components generally had nonlinear relationships with altitude. Our results indicate that the altitudinal pattern of plant and soil nutrient status differs among ecosystem components and that the relative importance of P vs. N limitation for ecosystem functions and processes shifts along altitudinal gradients.

  2. Concentration is not enough to evaluate accumulation of heavy metals and nutrients in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymazal, Jan

    2016-02-15

    Wetland plants produce high aboveground biomass and possess the ability to accumulate heavy metals and nutrients. This ability is used for phytoremediation purposes including removal of nutrients and heavy metals from polluted waters. The concentrations of heavy metals are usually much higher in the belowground then in aboveground biomass, especially in roots which are primary sites of uptake. This may lead to the conclusion that accumulation of heavy metals is higher in the belowground biomass. However, in case the aboveground is much higher than belowground biomass the accumulation could be higher in the aboveground biomass. Concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus is always higher in leaves than in stems. However, the stem biomass is often much higher in robust emergent species such as Phragmites australis and therefore, more nutrients can be stored in stems. The examples shown in this communication clearly reveal that to evaluate properly the accumulation of heavy metals and nutrients in particular plant compartment biomass amount must be taken into consideration. In the first study, concentrations of Cd, Cr and Hg in Phalaris arundinacea belowground/aboveground biomass were 150/80 μg/kg, 5420/228 μg/kg and 38/18 μg/kg. The high aboveground biomass (1196 g/m(2)) and low belowground biomass (244 g/(2)) resulted in much higher accumulation of Cd and Hg in aboveground biomass (96 μg/m(2) and 21.2 μg/m(2), respectively) than in belowground biomass (36 μg/m(2) and 9.3 μg/m(2), respectively). Only for chromium, belowground accumulation (1312 μg/m(2)) was higher than aboveground accumulation (272 μg/m(2)). In the second study, both nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were higher (26.7 mg/g and 749 mg/kg, respectively) in leaves than in stems (8.2mg/g and 534 mg/kg, respectively) of P. australis. The higher biomass of stems (1835 g/m(2)) than leaves (967 g/m(2)) resulted in higher accumulation of nitrogen but lower accumulation of phosphorus in leaves as

  3. Plant community responses to simultaneous changes in temperature, nitrogen availability, and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Gornish

    Full Text Available Increasing rates of change in climate have been observed across the planet and have contributed to the ongoing range shifts observed for many species. Although ecologists are now using a variety of approaches to study how much and through what mechanisms increasing temperature and nutrient pollution may influence the invasions inherent in range shifts, accurate predictions are still lacking.In this study, we conducted a factorial experiment, simultaneously manipulating warming, nitrogen addition and introduction of Pityopsis aspera, to determine how range-shifting species affect a plant community. We quantified the resident community using ordination scores, then used structural equation modeling to examine hypotheses related to how plants respond to a network of experimental treatments and environmental variables. Variation in soil pH explained plant community response to nitrogen addition in the absence of invasion. However, in the presence of invasion, the direct effect of nitrogen on the community was negligible and soil moisture was important for explaining nitrogen effects. We did not find effects of warming on the native plant community in the absence of invasion. In the presence of invasion, however, warming had negative effects on functional richness directly and invasion and herbivory explained the overall positive effect of warming on the plant community.This work highlights the variation in the biotic and abiotic factors responsible for explaining independent and collective climate change effects over a short time scale. Future work should consider the complex and non-additive relationships among factors of climate change and invasion in order to capture more ecologically relevant features of our changing environment.

  4. Nitrogen fertilizer improves boron phytoextraction by Brassica juncea grown in contaminated sediments and alleviates plant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansoldati, Virginia; Tassi, Eliana; Morelli, Elisabetta; Gabellieri, Edi; Pedron, Francesca; Barbafieri, Meri

    2012-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of different fertilizer treatments on Brassica plants grown on boron-contaminated sediments. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and on the lysimeter scale. At laboratory scale (microcosm), five different fertilizers were tested for a 35-d period. On the lysimeter scale, nitrogen fertilization was tested at three different doses and plants were allowed to grow until the end of the vegetative phase (70 d). Results showed that nitrogen application had effectively increased plant biomass production, while B uptake was not affected. Total B phytoextracted increased three-fold when the highest nitrogen dose was applied. Phytotoxicity on Brassica was evaluated by biochemical parameters. In plants grown in unfertilized B-contaminated sediments, the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and pyrogallol peroxidase (PPX) increased, whereas catalase (CAT) decreased with respect to control plants. Addition of N progressively mitigated the alteration of enzymatic activity, thus suggesting that N can aid in alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. SOD activity was restored to control levels just at the lowest N treatment, whereas the CAT inhibition was partially restored only at the highest one. N application also lowered the B-induced increase in APX and PPX activities. Increased glutathione reductase activity indicated the need to restore the oxidative balance of glutathione. Data also suggest a role of glutathione and phytochelatins in B defense mechanisms. Results suggest that the nitrogen fertilizer was effective in improving B phytoextraction by increasing Brassica biomass and by alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal trends of dry and bulk concentration of nitrogen compounds over a rain forest in Ghana

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    F. Fattore

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available African tropical forests of the equatorial belt might receive significant input of extra nitrogen derived from biomass burning occurring in the north savanna belt and transported equator wards by NE winds. In order to test this hypothesis an experiment was set up in a tropical rain forest in the National park of Ankasa (Ghana aiming at: quantifying magnitude and seasonal variability of concentrations of N compounds, present as gas and aerosol (dry nitrogen or in the rainfall (bulk nitrogen, over the studied forest; relating their seasonal variability to trends of local and regional winds and rainfall and to variations of fire events in the region. Three Delta systems, implemented for monthly measurements of NO2, were mounted over a tower at 45 m height, 20 m above forest canopy to sample gas (NH3, NO2, HNO3, HCl, SO2 and aerosol (NH4+, NO3−, and several ions, together with three tanks for bulk rainfall collection (to analyze NH4+, NO3− and ion concentration. The tower was provided with a sonic anemometer to estimate local wind data. The experiment started in October 2011 and data up to October 2012 are presented. To interpret the observed seasonal trends of measured compounds, local and regional meteo data and regional satellite fire data were analyzed. The concentration of N compounds significantly increased from December to April, during the drier period, peaking in December-February when North Eastern winds (Harmattan were moving dry air masses over the West central African region and the inter tropical convergence zone (ITCZ was at its minimum latitude over the equator. This period also coincided with peaks of fire in the whole region. On the contrary, N concentration in gas, aerosol and rain decreased from May to October when prevalent winds arrived from the sea (South-East, during the Monsoon period. Both ionic compositions of rain and analysis of local wind direction showed a significant and continuous presence of see-breeze at site

  6. Effects of small hydropower plants on mercury concentrations in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebalho, Elaine C; Díez, Sergi; Dos Santos Filho, Manoel; Muniz, Claumir Cesar; Lázaro, Wilkinson; Malm, Olaf; Ignácio, Aurea R A

    2017-08-16

    Although the impacts of large dams on freshwater biota are relatively well known, the effects of small hydropower plants (SHP) are not well investigated. In this work, we studied if mercury (Hg) concentrations in fish rise in two tropical SHP reservoirs, and whether similar effects take place during impoundment. Total Hg concentrations in several fish species were determined at two SHP in the Upper Guaporé River basin floodplain, Brazil. In total, 185 specimens were analysed for Hg content in dorsal muscle and none of them reported levels above the safety limit (500 μg kg(-1)) for fish consumption recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO). The highest levels of Hg (231 and 447 μg kg(-1)) were found in carnivorous species in both reservoirs. Mercury increased as a function of standard length in most of the fish populations in the reservoirs, and higher Hg concentrations were found in fish at the reservoir compared with fish downstream. The high dissolved oxygen concentrations and high transparency of the water column (i.e. oligotrophic reservoir) together with the absence of thermal stratification may explain low Hg methylation and low MeHg levels found in fish after flooding. Overall, according to limnological characteristics of water, we may hypothesise that reservoir conditions are not favourable to high net Hg methylation.

  7. Plant species diversity reduces N2O but not CH4 emissions from constructed wetlands under high nitrogen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenjuan; Shi, Mengmeng; Chang, Jie; Ren, Yuan; Xu, Ronghua; Zhang, Chongbang; Ge, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been widely used for treating wastewater. CWs also are the sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) due to high pollutant load. It has been reported that plant species diversity can enhance nitrogen (N) removal efficiency in CWs for treating wastewater. However, the influence of plant species diversity on GHG emissions from CWs in habitats with high N levels still lack research. This study established four species richness levels (1, 2, 3, 4) and 15 species compositions by using 75 simulated vertical flow CWs microcosms to investigate the effects of plant species diversity on the GHG emissions and N removal efficiency of CWs with a high N level. Results showed plant species richness reduced nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and N (NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N, and TIN) concentrations in wastewater, but had no effect on methane (CH4) emission. Especially, among the 15 compositions of plant species, the four-species mixture emitted the lowest N2O and had under-depletion of N (DminTIN CWs for treating wastewater with a high N level.

  8. Crescimento, desenvolvimento e produtividade do tomateiro cultivado em substrato com três concentrações de nitrogênio na solução nutritiva Growth, development and yield of tomato plants grown in substrate under three nitrogen concentrations of the nutrient solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerônimo Luiz Andriolo

    2004-10-01

    e T3, com produtividade máxima estimada de 7,8kg m-2 na dose de 9,3mmolN L-1. Concluiu-se que a concentração de N na solução nutritiva afetou o crescimento e a produtividade da cultura do tomateiro em substrato, porém não foi observada resposta similar nos dois ciclos de cultivo.The effect of three N concentrations of the nutrient solution on growth and yield of tomato plants grown in substrate was determined in autumn and spring growing periods. Two experiments were conducted inside a polyethylene tunnel, at Departamento de Fitotecnia - UFSM, using the hybrid Monte Carlo. Sowing was made on February 8 and on July 5, 2002, and planting inside the tunnel 36 and 40 days later, in autumn and spring, respectively. Plants were grown in plastic bags filled with 5.5dm³ of commercial substrate (Plantmax®, with one plant per bag and a plant density of 3.3 plants m-2. Nutrients were supplied to plants by a complete nutrient solution, with the following composition, in mmol L-1: 5.5 of KNO3; 1.3 of KH2PO4; 2.75 of Ca(NO32; 0.75 of MgSO4, with iron chelate and micronutrients. The treatment T2 was the nutrient solution described above, with 11.0mmolN L-1. For treatment T1, the N concentration of the nutrient solution was reduced to 5.5mmolN L-1, whereas for T3 it was increased to 15.16mmolN L-1. A randomised experimental design was used, with four replications and 15 plants per plot. Plants were harvested at 33, 48, 55, 62, 69, 76 and 83 days after planting (DAP in autumn, and at 55, 62, 69, 78, 85 and 92 DAP in spring, to measure plant growth and development. Crop yield was determined by fresh weight of fruits. The number of leaves was lower on T3 plants in autumn and spring, whereas the number of fruits was higher on T1 plants in spring. The dynamics of fruit dry mass accumulation did not show significant differences among treatments in autumn. In spring, the lowest value of this variable was recorded on T3 plants. Mean values of fresh fruit weight reached 5.4; 5

  9. Concentration of NOX in the vicinity of the power plants Vojany EVO 1 and EVO 2

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    Ján Brehuv

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a calculation of the maximal concentration of nitrogen oxides in the vicinity of point sources (main chimneys of power plants Vojany EVO1 and EVO2. The wind velocity u10,M (7, at which the concentration on a given place in the surrounding of the pollution source attains a maximal value, is calculated. The relation (8 for a calculation of the place with the maximal concentration for a given class of air stability (Table 1 and 2 and for a given wind velocity is derived. According to equation (3 and Table 3, a thermal capacity of EVO1 and EVO2 is calculated, considering a flat country in the vicinity of the sources (x3 = 0 in relation (1. Subsequently, it is also considered that the wind direction has the direction joining the source and the place of concentration calculation (x2 = 0. The calculations of concentration are performed for the 5th class of air stability. As to this class, favourable conditions for the pollutants dispersion are there. Thus, the maximum concentration is in a relatively small distance from the source with a sharp concentration maximum. As to other classes of the air stability (Table 1 and 2, the maximum concentration is located in larger distances from the source, i.e. about 10 km, as it is considered in Table 4 and 5. The theoretical calculation of NOX concentration in the vicinity of the sources, EVO1 and EVO2, shows (Table 4 and 5 that it does not exceed the allowable limit of 150 µg.m-3.

  10. Biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in sequencing batch reactors: effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen concentration and influent particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kayaalp, Ahmet S; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wylie, Jason; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2013-01-01

    Removal of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from municipal wastewaters is required to mitigate eutrophication of receiving water bodies. While most treatment plants achieve good N removal using influent carbon (C), the use of influent C to facilitate enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is poorly explored. A number of operational parameters can facilitate optimum use of influent C and this study investigated the effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during aerobic period and influent solids on biological P and N removal in sequencing batch reactors (SRBs) using municipal wastewaters. Increasing cycle length from 3 to 6 h increased P removal efficiency, which was attributed to larger portion of N being removed via nitrite pathway and more biodegradable organic C becoming available for EBPR. Further increasing cycle length from 6 to 8 h decreased P removal efficiencies as the demand for biodegradable organic C for denitrification increased as a result of complete nitrification. Decreasing DO concentration in the aerobic period from 2 to 0.8 mg L(-1) increased P removal efficiency but decreased nitrification rates possibly due to oxygen limitation. Further, sedimented wastewater was proved to be a better influent stream than non-sedimented wastewater possibility due to the detrimental effect of particulate matter on biological nutrient removal.

  11. The influence of leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants and the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Berry, Joseph A

    2013-10-01

    The distribution of nitrogen isotopes in the biosphere has the potential to offer insights into the past, present and future of the nitrogen cycle, but it is challenging to unravel the processes controlling patterns of mixing and fractionation. We present a mathematical model describing a previously overlooked process: nitrogen isotope fractionation during leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange. The model predicts that when leaf-atmosphere exchange of NH3(g ) occurs in a closed system, the atmospheric reservoir of NH3(g ) equilibrates at a concentration equal to the ammonia compensation point and an isotopic composition 8.1‰ lighter than nitrogen in protein. In an open system, when atmospheric concentrations of NH3(g ) fall below or rise above the compensation point, protein can be isotopically enriched by net efflux of NH3(g ) or depleted by net uptake. Comparison of model output with existing measurements in the literature suggests that this process contributes to variation in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants as well as NH3(g ) in the atmosphere, and should be considered in future analyses of nitrogen isotope circulation. The matrix-based modelling approach that is introduced may be useful for quantifying isotope dynamics in other complex systems that can be described by first-order kinetics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Novel labeling technique illustrates transfer of 15N2 from Sphagnum moss to vascular plants via diazotrophic nitrogen fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, N. R.; Vile, M. A.; Wieder, R.

    2013-12-01

    We used 15N2 gas to trace nitrogen (N) from biological N2-fixation to vascular plant uptake in an Alberta bog in order to determine if neighboring bog plants acquire recently fixed N from diazotrophs associating with Sphagnum mosses. Recent evidence indicates high rates of N2-fixation in Sphagnum mosses of Alberta bogs (Vile et al. 2013). Our previous work has shown that mosses can assimilate fixed N from associated diazotrophs as evidenced by the high N content of mosses despite minimal inputs from atmospheric deposition, retranslocation, and N mineralization. Therefore, the potential exists for vascular plants to obtain N from ';leaky' tissues of live mosses, however, this phenomenon has not been tested previously. Here we document the potential for relatively rapid transfer to vascular plants of N fixed by Sphagnum moss-associated diazotrophs. We utilized the novel approach of incubating mosses in 15N2 to allow the process of diazotrophic N2-fixation to mechanistically provide the 15N label, which is subsequently transferred to Sphagnum mosses. The potential for vascular bog natives to tap this N was assessed by planting the vascular plants in the labeled moss. Sphagnum mosses (upper 3 cm of live plants) were incubated in the presence of 98 atom % 15N2 gas for 48 hours. Two vascular plants common to Alberta bogs; Picea mariana and Vaccinium oxycoccus were then placed in the labeled mosses, where the mosses served as the substrate. Tissue samples from these plants were collected at three time points during the incubation; prior to 15N2 exposure (to determine natural abundance 15N), and at one and two months after 15N2 exposure. Roots and leaves were separated and run separately on a mass spectrometer to determine 15N concentrations. Sphagnum moss capitula obtained N from N2-fixation (δ15N of -2.43 × 0.40, 122.76 × 23.78, 224.92 × 68.37, 143.74 × 54.38 prior to, immediately after, and at 1 and 2 months after exposure to 15N2, respectively). Nitrogen was

  13. Growth Performance Characteristics of Goats Fed Varied Levels of Poultry Manure in whole Cassava Plant Based Concentrate Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf, M. B.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A 56-day feed intake, growth and digestibility trial was carried out to investigate the use of poultry manure as a fermentable nitrogen source in whole cassava plant-based concentrate fed to goats on basal Panicummaximum hay (9.18 % CP. Sixteen adult (2 years old; 12.48 – 16.72 kg initial body weights West African Dwarf goats were blocked on the basis of body weights into four similar groups that were assigned randomly to four treatments. Treatments consisted of dried poultry manure that was included in a cassava-based concentrate at 0, 14, 18 or 22 % level. Average feed intake (g/W0.725 kg was reduced (p < 0.05 in goats fed poultry manure at 22 % inclusion level when compared with the other dietary groups. Effects of poultry manure treatments on digestibility of dry matter or crude protein, nitrogen retention and body weight gain were significant (p < 0.05. It was concluded that poultry manure could be used to complement cassava leaf meal in cassava plant-based concentrates for the goats. The use of poultry manure as a source of fermentable nitrogen would promote activities of rumen microbial populations for efficient fermentation and reduce the constraints associated with collection and processing of cassava leaf in sufficient quantity for inclusion in the diet.

  14. Nitrification performance of nitrifying bacteria immobilized in waterborne polyurethane at low ammonia nitrogen concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yamei Dong; Zhenjia Zhang; Yongwei Jin; Zhirong Li; Jian Lu

    2011-01-01

    Suspended and waterborne polyurethane immobilized nitrifying bacteria have been adopted for evaluating the effects of environmental changes, such as temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and pH, on nitrification characteristics under conditions of low ammonia concentrations.The results showed that nitrification was prone to complete with increasing pH, DO and temperature.Sensitivity analysis demonstrated the effects of temperature and pH on nitrification feature of suspended bacteria were slightly greater than those of immobilized nitrifying bacteria.Immobilized cells could achieve complete nitrification at low ammonia concentrations when DO was sufficient.Continuous experiments were carried out to discuss the removal of ammonia nitrogen from synthetic micropollute source water with the ammonia concentration of about 1 mg/L using immobilized nitrifying bacteria pellets in an up-flow inner circulation reactor under different hydraulic retention times (HRT).The continuous removal rate remains above 80% even under HRT 30 min.The results verified that the waterborne polyurethane immobilized nitrifying bacteria pellets had great potential applications for micro-pollution source water treatment.

  15. Land Use and Stream Nitrogen Concentrations in Agricultural Watersheds Along the Central Coast of California

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    Marc Los Huertos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In coastal California nitrogen (N in runoff from urban and agricultural land is suspected to impair surface water quality of creeks and rivers that discharge into the Monterey Bay Sanctuary. However, quantitative data on the impacts of land use activities on water quality are largely limited to unpublished reports and do not estimate N loading. We report on spatial and temporal patterns of N concentrations for several coastal creeks and rivers in central California. During the 2001 water year, we estimated that the Pajaro River at Chittenden exported 302.4 Mg of total N. Nitrate-N concentrations were typically <1 mg N l–1 in grazing lands, oak woodlands, and forests, but increased to a range of 1 to 20 mg N l–1 as surface waters passed through agricultural lands. Very high concentrations of nitrate (in excess of 80 mg N l–1 were found in selected agricultural ditches that received drainage from tiles (buried perforated pipes. Nitrate concentrations in these ditches remained high throughout the winter and spring, indicating nitrate was not being flushed out of the soil profile. We believe unused N fertilizer has accumulated in the shallow groundwater through many cropping cycles. Results are being used to organize landowners, resource managers, and growers to develop voluntary monitoring and water quality protection plans.

  16. Land use and stream nitrogen concentrations in agricultural watersheds along the central coast of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Huertos, M; Gentry, L E; Shennan, C

    2001-11-22

    In coastal California nitrogen (N) in runoff from urban and agricultural land is suspected to impair surface water quality of creeks and rivers that discharge into the Monterey Bay Sanctuary. However, quantitative data on the impacts of land use activities on water quality are largely limited to unpublished reports and do not estimate N loading. We report on spatial and temporal patterns of N concentrations for several coastal creeks and rivers in central California. During the 2001 water year, we estimated that the Pajaro River at Chittenden exported 302.4 Mg of total N. Nitrate-N concentrations were typically <1 mg N l(-1) in grazing lands, oak woodlands, and forests, but increased to a range of 1 to 20 mg N l(-1) as surface waters passed through agricultural lands. Very high concentrations of nitrate (in excess of 80 mg N l(-1)) were found in selected agricultural ditches that received drainage from tiles (buried perforated pipes). Nitrate concentrations in these ditches remained high throughout the winter and spring, indicating nitrate was not being flushed out of the soil profile. We believe unused N fertilizer has accumulated in the shallow groundwater through many cropping cycles. Results are being used to organize landowners, resource managers, and growers to develop voluntary monitoring and water quality protection plans.

  17. Role of plants in nitrogen and sulfur transformations in floating hydroponic root mats: A comparison of two helophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Rania A B; Kuschk, Peter; Wiessner, Arndt; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Müller, Jochen A; Köser, Heinz

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge about the roles helophytes play in constructed wetlands (CWs) is limited, especially regarding their provision of organic rhizodeposits. Here, transformations of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur were monitored in a CW variety, floating hydroponic root mat (FHRM), treating synthetic wastewater containing low concentration of organic carbon. Two helophytes, Phragmites australis and Juncus effusus, were compared in duplicates. Striking differences were found between the FHRM of the two helophytes. Whereas ammonium was removed in all FHRMs to below detection level, total nitrogen of 1.15 ± 0.4 g m(-2) d(-1) was removed completely only in P. australis systems. The mats with J. effusus displayed effective nitrification but incomplete denitrification as 77% of the removed ammonium-nitrogen accumulated as nitrate. Furthermore, the P. australis treatment units showed on average 3 times higher sulfate-S removal rates (1.1 ± 0.45 g m(-2) d(-1)) than the systems planted with J. effusus (0.37 ± 0.29 g m(-2) d(-1)). Since the influent organic carbon was below the stoichiometric requirement for the observed N and S transformation processes, helophytes' organic rhizodeposits apparently contributed to these transformations, while P. australis provided about 6 times higher bioavailable organic rhizodeposits than J. effusus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Inputs from Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents Increase Responses of Planktonic Metabolic Rates to Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Conley, Daniel J; Muthusamy, Saraladevi; Lindh, Markus V; Pinhassi, Jarone; Kritzberg, Emma S

    2015-10-06

    Increased anthropogenic pressures on coastal marine ecosystems in the last century are threatening their biodiversity and functioning. Global warming and increases in nutrient loadings are two major stressors affecting these systems. Global warming is expected to increase both atmospheric and water temperatures and increase precipitation and terrestrial runoff, further increasing organic matter and nutrient inputs to coastal areas. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations frequently exceed those of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in aquatic systems. Many components of the DON pool have been shown to supply nitrogen nutrition to phytoplankton and bacteria. Predictions of how global warming and eutrophication will affect metabolic rates and dissolved oxygen dynamics in the future are needed to elucidate their impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Here, we experimentally determine the effects of simultaneous DON additions and warming on planktonic community metabolism in the Baltic Sea, the largest coastal area suffering from eutrophication-driven hypoxia. Both bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic rates changed in relation to temperature. DON additions from wastewater treatment plant effluents significantly increased the activation energies for community respiration and gross primary production. Activation energies for community respiration were higher than those for gross primary production. Results support the prediction that warming of the Baltic Sea will enhance planktonic respiration rates faster than it will for planktonic primary production. Higher increases in respiration rates than in production may lead to the depletion of the oxygen pool, further aggravating hypoxia in the Baltic Sea.

  19. BIOMETRIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CHRYSANTHEMUM (CHRYSANTHEMUM INDICUM L. PLANTS GROWN AT DIFFERENT RATES OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V IVANOVA

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A trial with large the flowered chrysanthemum cultivar Dark Westland was carried out in an unheated greenhouse. Three rates of nitrogen fertilization were studied: 0, 100 and 140 kgN/ha, as well as two modes of plant formation – single- and two-stemmed plants. Parameters of the biometric characteristics, leaf gasexchange and leaf pigment content were determined. The best results about growth and decorative behaviour were achieved at nitrogen fertilization level of 100 kgN/ha. It was established that nitrogen fertilization in rates of 100 and 140 kgN/ha enhances photosynthetic rate in both modes of plant formation.

  20. A New Curve of Critical Nitrogen Concentration Based on Spike Dry Matter for Winter Wheat in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ben; Ata-UI-Karim, Syed Tahir; Yao, Xia; Tian, YongChao; Cao, WeiXing; Zhu, Yan; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing the status of crop nitrogen (N) helps to optimize crop yield, improve N use efficiency, and reduce the risk of environmental pollution. The objectives of the present study were to develop a critical N (Nc) dilution curve for winter wheat (based on spike dry matter [SDM] during the reproductive growth period), to compare this curve with the existing Nc dilution curve (based on plant dry matter [DM] of winter wheat), and to explore its ability to reliably estimate the N status of winter wheat. Four field experiments, using varied N fertilizer rates (0–375 kg ha-1) and six cultivars (Yangmai16, Ningmai13, Ningmai9, Aikang58, Yangmai12, Huaimai 17), were conducted in the Jiangsu province of eastern China. Twenty plants from each plot were sampled to determine the SDM and spike N concentration (SNC) during the reproductive growth period. The spike Nc curve was described by Nc = 2.85×SDM-0.17, with SDM ranging from 0.752 to 7.233 t ha-1. The newly developed curve was lower than the Nc curve based on plant DM. The N nutrition index (NNI) for spike dry matter ranged from 0.62 to 1.1 during the reproductive growth period across the seasons. Relative yield (RY) increased with increasing NNI; however, when NNI was greater than 0.96, RY plateaued and remained stable. The spike Nc dilution curve can be used to correctly identify the N nutrition status of winter wheat to support N management during the reproductive growth period for winter wheat in eastern China. PMID:27732634

  1. Interactions between uptake of amino acids and inorganic nitrogen in wheat plants

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    E. Gioseffi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil-borne amino acids may constitute a source of nitrogen (N for plants in various terrestrial ecosystems but their importance for total N nutrition is unclear, particularly in nutrient-rich arable soils. One reason for this uncertainty is lack of information on how the absorption of amino acids by plant roots is affected by the simultaneous presence of inorganic N forms. The objective of the present study was to study absorption of glycine (Gly and glutamine (Gln by wheat roots and their interactions with nitrate (NO3 and ammonium (NH4+ during uptake. The underlying hypothesis was that amino acids, when present in nutrient solution together with inorganic N, may lead to down-regulation of the inorganic N uptake, thereby resulting in similar total N uptake rates. Amino acids were enriched with double-labelled 15N and 13C, while NO3 and NH4+ acquisition was determined by their rate of removal from the nutrient solution surrounding the roots. The uptake rates of NO3 and NH4+ did not differ from each other and were generally about twice as high as the uptake rate of organic N when the different N forms were supplied separately in concentrations of 2 mM. Nevertheless, replacement of 50% of the inorganic N with organic N was able to restore the N uptake to the same level as that in the presence of only inorganic N. Co-provision of NO3 did not affect glycine uptake, while the presence of glycine down-regulated NO3 uptake. The ratio between 13C and 15N were lower in shoots than in roots and also lower than the theoretical values, reflecting higher C losses via respiratory processes compared to N losses. It is concluded that organic N can constitute a significant N-source for wheat plants and that there is an interaction

  2. Physiological response of the epiphytic lichen Evernia prunastri (L.) Ach. to ecologically relevant nitrogen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzi, S; Paoli, L; Fiorini, E; Loppi, S

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the physiological response of the epiphytic lichen Evernia prunastri to ecologically relevant concentrations of nitrogen compounds. Lichen samples were sprayed for 4 weeks either with water or 50, 150 and 500 μM NH(4)Cl. The integrity of cell membranes and chlorophyll a fluorescence emission (F(V)/F(M) and PI(ABS)) were analyzed. No membrane damage occurred after the exposure period. F(V)/F(M), a classical fluorescence indicator, decreased during the second week of treatment with 500 μM NH(4)Cl and the third week with 50 and 150 μM NH(4)Cl. PI(ABS), an overall index of the photosynthetic performance, was more sensitive and decreased already during the first week with 500 μM NH(4)Cl and the second week with 150 μM NH(4)Cl. Since E. prunastri has been exposed to ammonium loads corresponding to real environmental conditions, these findings open the way to an effective use of this species as early indicators of environmental nitrogen excess. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Struvite Crystallization of Anaerobic Digestive Fluid of Swine Manure Containing Highly Concentrated Nitrogen

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    Eun Young Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the optimal operation factors for struvite crystallization for removing and recovering nitrogen and phosphorus from anaerobic digestive fluid of swine manure containing highly concentrated nitrogen was determined. Every experiment for the struvite crystallization reaction was conducted by placing 1,000 mL of digestion fluid in a 2,000 mL Erlenmeyer flask at various temperatures, pH, and mixing speed. Except for special circumstances, the digestion fluid was centrifuged (10,000 rpm, 10 min and then the supernatant was used for the experiment at room temperature and 100 rpm. The optimal mole ratio of PO43−:Mg2+ was 1:1.5, and the pH effect ranging from 9 to 11 was similar, when mixed for 1 hour. Under this condition, the removal efficiency of NH4+-N and PO43−-P was 40% and 88.6%, respectively. X-shaped crystal was observed by light and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, struvite crystal structure was confirmed through X-ray diffraction analysis.

  4. Treatment of Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater in Low Concentration by Two-Stage Ozonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xianping; Yan, Qun; Wang, Chunying; Luo, Caigui; Zhou, Nana; Jian, Chensheng

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia nitrogen wastewater (about 100 mg/L) was treated by two-stage ozone oxidation method. The effects of ozone flow rate and initial pH on ammonia removal were studied, and the mechanism of ammonia nitrogen removal by ozone oxidation was discussed. After the primary stage of ozone oxidation, the ammonia removal efficiency reached 59.32% and pH decreased to 6.63 under conditions of 1 L/min ozone flow rate and initial pH 11. Then, the removal efficiency could be over 85% (the left ammonia concentration was lower than 15 mg/L) after the second stage, which means the wastewater could have met the national discharge standards of China. Besides, the mechanism of ammonia removal by ozone oxidation was proposed by detecting the products of the oxidation: ozone oxidation directly and ·OH oxidation; ammonia was mainly transformed into NO3−-N, less into NO2−-N, not into N2. PMID:26404353

  5. Symbiosome-like intracellular colonization of cereals and other crop plants by nitrogen-fixing bacteria for reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocking, Edward C; Stone, Philip J; Davey, Michael R

    2005-12-01

    It has been forecast that the challenge of meeting increased food demand and protecting environmental quality will be won or lost in maize, rice and wheat cropping systems, and that the problem of environmental nitrogen enrichment is most likely to be solved by substituting synthetic nitrogen fertilizers by the creation of cereal crops that are able to fix nitrogen symbiotically as legumes do. In legumes, rhizobia present intracellularly in membrane-bound vesicular compartments in the cytoplasm of nodule cells fix nitrogen endosymbiotically. Within these symbiosomes, membrane-bound vesicular compartments, rhizobia are supplied with energy derived from plant photosynthates and in return supply the plant with biologically fixed nitrogen, usually as ammonia. This minimizes or eliminates the need for inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. Recently we have demonstrated, using novel inoculation conditions with very low numbers of bacteria, that cells of root meristems of maize, rice, wheat and other major non-legume crops, such as oilseed rape and tomato, can be intracellularly colonized by the non-rhizobial, non-nodulating, nitrogen fixing bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus that naturally occurs in sugarcane. G. diazotrophicus expressing nitrogen fixing (nifH) genes is present in symbiosome-like compartments in the cytoplasm of cells of the root meristems of the target cereals and non-legume crop species, somewhat similar to the intracellular symbiosome colonization of legume nodule cells by rhizobia. To obtain an indication of the likelihood of adequate growth and yield, of maize for example, with reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers, we are currently determining the extent to which nitrogen fixation, as assessed using various methods, is correlated with the extent of systemic intracellular colonization by G. diazotrophicus, with minimal or zero inputs.

  6. Symbiosome-like intracellular colonization of cereals and other crop plants by nitrogen-fixing bacteria for reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward C. Cocking; Philip J. Stone; Michael R. Davey

    2005-01-01

    It has been forecast that the challenge of meeting increased food demand and protecting environmental quality will be won or lost in maize, rice and wheat cropping systems,and that the problem of environmental nitrogen enrichment is most likely to be solved by substituting synthetic nitrogen fertilizers by the creation of cereal crops that are able to fix nitrogen symbiotically as legumes do. In legumes, rhizobia present intraceliularly in membrane-bound vesicular compartments in the cytoplasm of nodule cells fix nitrogen endosymbiotically. Within these symbiosomes, membrane-bound vesicular compartments, rhizobia are supplied with energy derived from plant photosynthates and in return supply the plant with biologically fixed nitrogen, usually as ammonia. This minimizes or eliminates the need for inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. Recently we have demonstrated, using novel inoculation conditions with very low numbers of bacteria, that cells of root meristems of maize, rice, wheat and other major non-legume crops, such as oilseed rape and tomato, can be intracellularly colonized by the non-rhizobial, non-nodulating, nitrogen fixing bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus that naturally occurs in sugarcane. G. diazotrophicus expressing nitrogen fixing (nifH) genes is present in symbiosome-like compartments in the cytoplasm of cells of the root meristems of the target cereals and non-legume crop species, somewhat similar to the intracellular symbiosome colonization of legume nodule cells by rhizobia. To obtain an indication of the likelihood of adequate growth and yield, of maize for example, with reduced inputs of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers,we are currently determining the extent to which nitrogen fixation, as assessed using various methods, is correlated with the extent of systemic intracellular colonization by G. diazotrophicus,with minimal or zero inputs.

  7. Seeds with high molybdenum concentration improved growth and nitrogen acquisition of rhizobium-inoculated and nitrogen-fertilized common bean plants Sementes com alta concentração de molibdênio aumentaram o crescimento e a aquisição de nitrogênio de plantas de feijoeiro inoculadas com rizóbio ou sob fertilização nitrogenada

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    Fernanda Fátima Delgado Almeida

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris with high molybdenum (Mo concentration can supply Mo plant demands, but to date no studies have concomitantly evaluated the effects of Mo-enriched seeds on plants inoculated with rhizobia or treated with N fertilizer. This work evaluated the effects of seed Mo on growth and N acquisition of bean plants fertilized either by symbiotic N or mineral N, by measuring the activities of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase and the contribution of biological N2 fixation at different growth stages. Seeds enriched or not with Mo were sown with two N sources (inoculated with rhizobia or fertilized with N, in pots with 10 kg of soil. In experiment 1, an additional treatment consisted of Mo-enriched seeds with Mo applied to the soil. In experiment 2, the contribution of N2 fixation was estimated by 15N isotope dilution. Common bean plants grown from seeds with high Mo concentration flowered one day earlier. Seeds with high Mo concentration increased the leaf area, shoot mass and N accumulation, with both N sources. The absence of effects of Mo application to the soil indicated that Mo contents of Mo-enriched seeds were sufficient for plant growth. Seeds enriched with Mo increased nitrogenase activity at the vegetative stage of inoculated plants, and nitrate reductase activity at late growth stages with both N sources. The contribution of N2 fixation was 17 and 61 % in plants originating from low- or high-Mo seeds, respectively. The results demonstrate the benefits of sowing Mo-enriched seeds on growth and N nutrition of bean plants inoculated with rhizobia or fertilized with mineral N fertilizer.Sementes de feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris com alto teor de molibdênio (Mo podem suprir as demandas vegetais; entretanto, estudos prévios não avaliaram concomitantemente os efeitos do Mo da semente em plantas inoculadas com rizóbio ou sob fertilização nitrogenada. Este trabalho avaliou os efeitos do Mo da semente, no

  8. Mycorrhizal fungal community relationship to root nitrogen concentration over a regional atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient in the northeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erik A. Lilleskov; Philip M. Wargo; Kristiina A. Vogt; Daniel J. Vogt

    2008-01-01

    Increased nitrogen (N) input has been found to alter ectomycorrhizal fungal communities over short deposition gradients and in fertilization experiments; however, its effects over larger spatial scales have not been determined. To address this gap, we reanalyzed data from a study originally designed to examine the effects of soil aluminum/calcium (Al/Ca) ratios on the...

  9. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... phosphate synthase and amylase activities at low temperature. Moreover, low-temperature stress increased theC :Nratio in the leaves of maize plants, and AM colonisation decreased the root C :N ratio. These results suggested a difference in the C and N metabolism of maize plants at ambient and low...... temperature regimes. AM symbiosis modulated C metabolic enzymes, thereby inducing an accumulation of soluble sugars, which may have contributed to an increased tolerance to low temperature, and therefore higher Pn in maize plants....

  10. Influence of photolysis on multispectral photoacoustic measurement of nitrogen dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guoxun; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic instruments are commonly used to measure aerosol and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) light absorption coefficients to determine the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Here a new photoacoustic system is developed to explore the effect of photolysis on the measured signal in a multispectral photoacoustic spectrometer In this system, a 405-nm laser is used primarily as light source for photolysis. Additionally, a well-overlapped 532-nm laser, modulated at the resonant frequency of the photoacoustic instrument, is used to probe the NO2 concentration. As a result, the photolysis effect at 405 nm can be observed by the photoacoustic instrument through the 532-nm laser. This work determines an 11% reduction of the photoacoustic signal caused by the photolysis effect for typical conditions, which needs to be taken into account when calibrating multispectral photoacoustic spectrometers with NO2.

  11. Fecal nitrogen concentration as a nutritional quality indicator for European rabbit ecological studies.

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    Esperanza Gil-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Measuring the quality of the nutritional resources available to wild herbivores is critical to understanding trophic regulation processes. However, the direct assessment of dietary nutritional characteristics is usually difficult, which hampers monitoring nutritional constraints in natural populations. The feeding ecology of ruminant herbivores has been often assessed by analyzing fecal nitrogen (FN concentrations, although this method has been less evaluated in other taxa. This study analyzed the suitability of FN as an indicator of ingesta quality in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus, which is a keystone lagomorph species in Mediterranean ecosystems and of great conservation interest. Firstly, domestic O. cuniculus were used to evaluate under experimental conditions the accuracy of total FN and the metabolic FN as diet quality indicators of forages with characteristics similar to those available under natural conditions. Secondly, the accuracy of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS to calculate FN was tested using partial least squares regression. Thirdly, a pilot field study was conducted to monitor FN dynamics from wild O. cuniculus in three different habitats during wet and drought periods. A strong association was found between diet type and total FN and metabolic FN (Pseudo-R(2 ≥ 0.89. It was also found that NIRS calibrations were accurate for depicting nitrogen concentrations (R(2 > 0.98 between NIRS and chemical results. Finally, the seasonal FN dynamics measured in the field were consistent with current knowledge on vegetation dynamics and forage limitations in the three habitats. The results support the use of NIRS methods and FN indices as a reliable and affordable approach to monitoring the nutritional quality of rabbit habitats. Potential applications include the assessment of the mechanistic relationships between resource limitations and population abundance, e.g., in relation to natural drought cycles and to habitat

  12. Split Nitrogen Application Improves Wheat Baking Quality by Influencing Protein Composition Rather Than Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cheng; Auf'm Erley, Gunda Schulte; Rossmann, Anne; Schuster, Ramona; Koehler, Peter; Mühling, Karl-Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The use of late nitrogen (N) fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g., booting, heading or anthesis) to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume) needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems.

  13. Split nitrogen application improves wheat baking quality by influencing protein composition rather than concentration

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    Cheng eXue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of late nitrogen (N fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g. booting, heading or anthesis to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS, which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems.

  14. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Phytic Acid Concentration in Maize Grain Under Two Nitrogen Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-chao; HUANG Ya-qun; MA Wen-qi; ZHOU Jin-feng; BIAN Fen-ru; CHEN Fan-jun; MI Guo-hua

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is the main storage form of phosphorus (P) in seeds. It can form insoluble complexes with microelements, thereby reducing their bioavailability for animals. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with grain PA concentration (PAC) is essential to improve this trait without affecting other aspects of grain nutrition such as protein content. Using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, we mapped QTL for grain PAC, as well as grain nitrogen concentration (NC) and P concentration (PC) in maize under two N conditions in 2 yr. We detected six QTLs for PAC. The QTL for PAC on chromosome 4 (phi072-umc1276) was identified under both low-N and high-N treatments, and explained 13.2 and 15.4%of the phenotypic variance, respectively. We identified three QTLs for grain NC, none of which were in the same region as the QTLs for PAC. We identified two QTLs for PC in the low-N treatment, one of which (umc1710-umc2197) was in the same interval as the QTL for PAC under high-N conditions. These results suggested that grain PAC can be improved without affecting grain NC and inorganic PC.

  15. The effect of plant density and nitrogen fertilizer on light interception and dry matter yield in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.

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    mohamad reza asghari poor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant density and nitrogen fertilizer on canopy light interception and on flowering was investigated in hemp (Cannabis sativa L. cv. ‘Kompolti’ Crop grown at initial densities of 50, 150 and 250 plants/m2 at the Mashhad and 30, 90 and 150 plants/m2 at the Shirvan. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied before and 45 days after sowing at a rates of 50 and 200 kg/ha at the Mashhad, and 50, 150 and 250 kg/ha at the Shirvan. Rate of canopy development increased with increasing plant density and nitrogen fertilizer in both sites. At the Mashhad, interception of 90% of light was attained at 380 to 665 degree days (base 2°C from emergence for the crop grown at different densities. At Shirvan, rate of canopy development was slower. Interception of 90% of light was attained at 586 degree days from emergence for the crop grown at 30 plants/m2 and at 712 degree days for the crop grown at 150 plants/m2, probably as a result of cold weather. Nitrogen fertilizer in a similar way as plant density increased light interception. Maximum light interception did not depend on plant density and nitrogen fertilizer and was about 95%. In both sites, the flowering date was later with increasing plant density. Dates of 75% flowering for the initial densities of 50, 150 and 250 plants/m2 in Mashhad and 30, 90 and 150 plants/m2 in Shirvan were, respectively 26 August, 1, 6, 6, 11 and 12 September. Independent of plant density, canopy light interception started to decline at about 150 degree days after flowering, reaching 58 to 75% at about 700 degree days post-flowering. Morphological characteristics at both sites were highly correlated with plant sexual, plant population and nitrogen fertilizer. Highest stem, leaf and inflorescence yield were obtained in Mashhad at 250 plant/m-2 and in Shirvan at 150 plant m-2 when 200 kg N ha-1 in Mashhad and 250 kg N/ha in Shirvan was used. Above ground dry matter increased at both sites with increasing plant density and

  16. Impact of available nitrogen and sugar concentration in musts on alcoholic fermentation and subsequent wine spoilage by Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Bradford C; Bohlscheid, Jeffri C; Edwards, Charles G

    2015-04-01

    The level of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) supplementation required for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to complete fermentation of high sugar musts in addition to the impact of non-metabolized nitrogen on post-alcoholic spoilage by Brettanomyces bruxellensis was studied. A 2 × 3 factorial design was employed using a synthetic grape juice medium with YAN (150 or 250 mg N/L) and equal proportions of glucose/fructose (230, 250, or 270 g/L) as variables. S. cerevisiae ECA5 (low nitrogen requirement) or Uvaferm 228 (high nitrogen requirement) were inoculated at 10(5) cfu/mL while B. bruxellensis E1 or B2 were added once alcoholic fermentation ceased. Regardless of YAN concentration, musts that contained 230 or 250 g/L glucose/fructose at either nitrogen level attained dryness (mean = 0.32 g/L fructose) while those containing 270 g/L generally did not (mean = 2.5 g/L fructose). Higher concentrations of YAN present in musts yielded wines with higher amounts of α-amino acids and ammonium but very little (≤ 6 mg N/L) was needed by B. bruxellensis to attain populations ≥ 10(7) cfu/mL. While adding nitrogen to high sugar musts does not necessarily ensure completion of alcoholic fermentation, residual YAN did not affect B. bruxellensis growth as much as ethanol concentration.

  17. Effects of experimental nitrogen additions on plant diversity in tropical forests of contrasting disturbance regimes in southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiankai [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160 (China); Mo Jiangming, E-mail: mojm@scib.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160 (China); Gilliam, Frank S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755-2510 (United States); Yu Guirui [Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhang Wei; Fang Yunting; Huang Juan [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Responses of understory plant diversity to nitrogen (N) additions were investigated in reforested forests of contrasting disturbance regimes in southern China from 2003 to 2008: disturbed forest (with harvesting of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated forest (without harvesting). Experimental additions of N were administered as the following treatments: Control, 50 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, and 100 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Nitrogen additions did not significantly affect understory plant richness, density, and cover in the disturbed forest. Similarly, no significant response was found for canopy closure in this forest. In the rehabilitated forest, species richness and density showed no significant response to N additions; however, understory cover decreased significantly in the N-treated plots, largely a function of a significant increase in canopy closure. Our results suggest that responses of plant diversity to N deposition may vary with different land-use history, and rehabilitated forests may be more sensitive to N deposition. - Highlights: > Nitrogen addition had no significant effect on understory plant diversity in the disturbed forest. > Nitrogen addition significantly decreased understory plant cover. > Nitrogen addition had no effect on richness and density in the rehabilitated forest. > The decrease is largely a function of a significant increase in canopy closure. > Land-use practices may dominate the responses of plant diversity to N addition. - Research in disturbed forests of southeastern China demonstrates that land-use history can substantially alter effects of excess nitrogen deposition on plant diversity of tropical forest ecosystems.

  18. Nitrogen split dose fertilization, plant age and frost effects on phytochemical content and sensory properties of curly kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. sabellica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenbaek, Marie; Jensen, Sidsel; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Kidmose, Ulla; Kristensen, Hanne L

    2016-04-15

    We investigated how concentrations of sensory relevant compounds: glucosinolates (GLSs), flavonoid glycosides, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and sugars in kale responded to split dose and reduced nitrogen (N) fertilization, plant age and controlled frost exposure. In addition, frost effects on sensory properties combined with N supply were assessed. Seventeen week old kale plants showed decreased aliphatic GLSs at split dose N fertilization; whereas reduced N increased aliphatic and total GLSs. Ontogenetic effects were demonstrated for all compounds: sugars, aliphatic and total GLSs increased throughout plant development, whereas kaempferol and total flavonoid glycosides showed higher concentrations in 13 week old plants. Controlled frost exposure altered sugar composition slightly, but not GLSs or flavonoid glycosides. Reduced N supply resulted in less bitterness, astringency and pungent aroma, whereas frost exposure mainly influenced aroma and texture. N treatment explained most of the sensory variation. Producers should not rely on frost only to obtain altered sensory properties.

  19. Realistic diversity loss and variation in soil depth independently affect community-level plant nitrogen use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmants, Paul C; Zavaleta, Erika S; Wolf, Amelia A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that diverse plant communities use nitrogen (N) more completely and efficiently, with implications for how species conservation efforts might influence N cycling and retention in terrestrial ecosystems. However, most such experiments have randomly manipulated species richness and minimized environmental heterogeneity, two design aspects that may reduce applicability to real ecosystems. Here we present results from an experiment directly comparing how realistic and randomized plant species losses affect plant N use across a gradient of soil depth in a native-dominated serpentine grassland in California. We found that the strength of the species richness effect on plant N use did not increase with soil depth in either the realistic or randomized species loss scenarios, indicating that the increased vertical heterogeneity conferred by deeper soils did not lead to greater complementarity among species in this ecosystem. Realistic species losses significantly reduced plant N uptake and altered N-use efficiency, while randomized species losses had no effect on plant N use. Increasing soil depth positively affected plant N uptake in both loss order scenarios but had a weaker effect on plant N use than did realistic species losses. Our results illustrate that realistic species losses can have functional consequences that differ distinctly from randomized losses, and that species diversity effects can be independent of and outweigh those of environmental heterogeneity on ecosystem functioning. Our findings also support the value of conservation efforts aimed at maintaining biodiversity to help buffer ecosystems against increasing anthropogenic N loading.

  20. Extensive turnover of plant nitrogen in peats from the West Siberian Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philben, M. J.; Kaiser, K.; Benner, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen cycling in peatlands is of great interest because N is scarce in peatlands and may limit both primary production and microbial decomposition. The amino acid hydroxyproline (Hyp) was used to determine the proportion of peat N derived from plants in two peat cores collected from the West Siberian Lowland, Russia. Hyp is an effective tracer of plant N because plants are its only significant source in peats. In addition, its reactivity is similar to that of bulk plant N, so its yield in peat can be used to quantitatively estimate plant N. The C:N ratio of the peat was very high (>70) throughout both cores. As N is assumed to be conserved while C is removed with decomposition, high C:N ratios are often interpreted as indicating relatively unaltered peat. However, Hyp yields indicate extensive turnover of plant N. Peat N was mostly plant-derived in the upper 50 cm of both cores, but declined to 30-60% in the catotelm. These results suggest that N from plant litter is rapidly utilized by microbes and incorporated into new forms. Thus despite high C:N ratios, these peats have undergone substantial alteration and decomposition. This demonstrates the organic N pool in peatlands is intensely recycled and is more dynamic than can be inferred by considering the C:N ratio alone.

  1. Plant, soil microbial and soil inorganic nitrogen responses to elevated CO 2: a study in microcosms of Holcus lanatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Romain; Leadley, Paul W.; Lensi, Robert; Barthes, Laure

    2005-05-01

    The impact of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on the nitrogen cycle was evaluated in a 2-month experiment in monospecific grassland microcosms ( Holcus lanatus L.) grown on reconstituted grassland soil. The responses of the N pools in the plants, soil, and soil microbes were studied. The impact of high CO 2 on key stages of the N cycle, especially nitrification and denitrification processes, were also measured. Our study showed a strong plant response to high CO 2: total biomass increased by 76% ( P modified by high CO 2, because the percent N in the plant decreased by 40% ( P resin bags (-8%, P = 0.019). Soil nitrifying enzyme activity (NEA) had a tendency to increase (+17%; P = 0.061) and denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) decreased (-12%; P = 0.013). We found evidence of increased microbial N sink (microbial N increased by 17%, P = 0.004). This and other studies suggest that rising CO 2 often reduces soil nitrate concentrations, which may lead to decreased nitrate leaching. Elevated CO 2 led to environmental conditions that were less favourable for denitrification in our study.

  2. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on Dry Matter and Concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium in Berseem Clover, by Cadmium stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hashem aram

    2016-02-01

    Zanjan, after the complete analysis of soil and obtaining the chemical and physical properties in the laboratory. 6 kg of soil was weighed for each pot and then the soil was contaminated. Cadmium sulfate was used in this experiment. The mycorrhizal fungi weighed 150 grams and was mixed with the soil. After mixing the soil with mycorrhizal fungi, the soil was put in pots and then it was cultivated with clover. In this study, clover seeds weighed 0/5 grams and were disinfected with 10% hydrogen peroxide solution and were added to each pot. Distilled water was used for irrigation. After the completion of growth of plants (about 70 day, plant aerial parts and roots were harvested and before measuring, they were washed with distilled water and then were dried in the oven for 72 hours. Plant aerial parts were harvested. Data were analyzed by SAS (version 9 and MSTATC (version 2.10 software, and obtained variance analysis tables. Mean comparison of different treatments was conducted by Duncan test. Charts were obtained by excel software. Results and Discussion: The results showed that the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were significant on all traits measured (P< 0.01. With increasing cadmium concentration in soil, dry matter of 37% and 39%, nitrogen concentration of 35% and 28%, Potassium 9/27% and 37%, and phosphorus concentration of 37% and 39%, reduced in root and aerial, respectively. Also the results showed that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased dry matter amount by 42% and 26%, nitrogen concentration by 40.3% and 30%, phosphorus concentration by 6% and 15.4%, potassium concentrations by 54% and 91.2% in root and aerial, respectively. Interaction between cadmium levels and mycorrhizal fungi in statistics was significant on dry matter aerial, nitrogen concentration in aerial and root, and potassium concentrations in plant root (P< 0.01. Conclusion: The results showed that mycorrhizal fungi were significant on all traits measured in one percent level. Cadmium

  3. Effect of HCO3- concentration on anammox nitrogen removal rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, Ivar; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Vabamäe, Priit; Kroon, Kristel; Loorits, Liis; Saluste, Alar; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-01-01

    Anammox biomass enriched in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) fed by actual sewage sludge reject water and synthetically added NO2- was used to study the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of the anammox process depending on bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentration. MBBR performance resulted in the maximum TN removal rate of 1100 g N m(-3) d(-1) when the optimum HCO3- concentration (910 mg L(-1)) was used. The average reaction ratio of NO2- removal, NO3- production and NH4+ removal were 1.18/0.20/1. When the HCO3- concentration was increased to 1760mg L(-1) the TN removal rate diminished to 270 g N m(-3) d(-1). The process recovered from bicarbonate inhibition within 1 week. The batch tests performed with biomass taken from the MBBR showed that for the HCO3- concentration of 615 mg L(-1) the TN removal rate was 3.3 mg N L(-1) h(-1), whereas for both lower (120 mg L(-1)) and higher (5750 mg L(-1)) HCO3- concentrations the TN removal rates were 2.3 (+/- 0.15) and 1.6 (+/- 0.12) mg N L(-1) d(-1), respectively. PCR and DGGE analyses resulted in the detection of uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 and, surprisingly, low-oxygen-tolerant aerobic ammonia oxidizers. The ability of anammox bacteria for mixotrophy was established by diminished amounts of nitrate produced when comparing the experiments with an organic carbon source and an inorganic carbon source.

  4. Effects of Salinity on Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Biochemical Parameters of Nitrogen Fixing Soybean Plants (Glycine max L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora D.; Kirova, Elisaveta B.; Yanev, Tony K.; Iliev, Ilko Ts.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of physiology and hyperspectral leaf reflectance were used to detect salinity stress in nitrogen fixing soybean plants. Seedlings were inoculated with suspension of Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 273. Salinity was performed at the stage of 2nd-4th trifoliate expanded leaves by adding of NaCl in the nutrient solution of Helrigel in concentrations 40 mM and 80 mM. A comparative analysis was performed between the changes in the biochemical parameters - stress markers (phenols, proline, malondialdehyde, thiol groups), chlorophyll a and b, hydrogen peroxide, and leaf spectral reflectance in the spectral range 450-850 nm. The spectral measurements were carried out by an USB2000 spectrometer. The reflectance data of the control and treated plants in the red, green, red-edge and the near infrared ranges of the spectrum were subjected to statistical analysis. Statistically significant differences were found through the Student's t-criterion at the two NaCl concentrations in all of the ranges examined with the exception of the near infrared range at 40 mM NaCl concentration. Similar results were obtained through linear discriminant analysis. The tents of the phenols, malondialdehyde and chlorophyll a and b were found to decrease at both salinity treatments. In the spectral data this effect is manifested by decrease of the reflectance values in the green and red ranges. The contents of proline, hydrogen peroxide and thiol groups rose with the NaCl concentration increase. At 80 mM NaCl concentration the values of these markers showed a considerable increase giving evidence that the soybean plants were stressed in comparison with the control. This finding is in agreement with the results from the spectral reflectance analysis.

  5. Use of the analysis of plant growth and nutrient uptake for nitrogen fertilizer recommendations in open air vegetable growing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titulaer, H.H.H.; Slangen, J.H.G.

    1990-01-01

    The plant growth and nitrogen uptake pattern of a crop with a short production period (iceberg lettuce) grown at two different periods in the growing season and a crop with a long growth period (gherkins) are analyzed in order to formulate an improved nitrogen fertilizer recommendation. A split

  6. Agro-Process Intensification through Synthetic Rhizosphere Media for Nitrogen Fixation and Yield Enhancement in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Akay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In order to combat global warming and the emerging Food, Energy and Water shortages (FEWs, several approaches have been adopted, including genetic engineering and farming practices. Biomass based energy technology will further stress food and water resources and hence novel holistic approaches to FEWs should be designed. Approach: A novel technique (Agro-Process Intensification, A-PI which simultaneously addresses FEWs in general and food production in particular was described. The technique was based on the enhancement of multiple interactions between plant roots, water, nutrients and bacteria using soil additives in the form of micro-bioreactors which allow plant root growth through them thus generating a micro-environment acting as a Synthetic Rhizo Sphere (SRS. The SRS-media was a nano-structured micro-porous crosslinked, elastic, ionic and highly hydrophilic polymer, facilitating the efficient use of water and nutrients as well as nitrogen fixation in legumes. Results: SRS media, with or without bacteria, was prepared, characterized and used in greenhouse experiments. Grass, for which the enhancement was well above 200% under water stress, was used to evaluate the mechanism of A-PI. The pea plant was used to demonstrate the intensification achievable by biologically active micro-bioreactors in which nitrogen fixing bacteria, Rhizobia, were supported within the SRS-media. Biologically active SRS-media enhanced the plant root infection by nitrogen fixing bacteria and increased both crop yield (ca. 70% and mineral content. Conclusion/Recommendations: A-PI is achieved principally through the elimination of the random nature of the root/water/nutrient/microorganism interactions. The association of SRS-media with plant roots provides a unique and efficient delivery technique for water and nutrients while protecting beneficial bacteria within the SRS for infection enhancement. Focus on the understanding of the molecular

  7. Endophytic Actinobacteria and the Interaction of Micromonospora and Nitrogen Fixing Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Martha E; Riesco, Raúl; Benito, Patricia; Carro, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, it was believed that a healthy plant did not harbor any microorganisms within its tissues, as these were often considered detrimental for the plant. In the last three decades, the numbers of studies on plant microbe-interactions has led to a change in our view and we now know that many of these invisible partners are essential for the overall welfare of the plant. The application of Next Generation Sequencing techniques is a powerful tool that has permitted the detection and identification of microbial communities in healthy plants. Among the new plant microbe interactions recently reported several actinobacteria such as Micromonospora are included. Micromonospora is a Gram-positive bacterium with a wide geographical distribution; it can be found in the soil, mangrove sediments, and freshwater and marine ecosistems. In the last years our group has focused on the isolation of Micromonospora strains from nitrogen fixing nodules of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants and reported for the first time its wide distribution in nitrogen fixing nodules of both types of plants. These studies have shown how this microoganism had been largely overlooked in this niche due to its slow growth. Surprisingly, the genetic diversity of Micromonospora strains isolated from nodules is very high and several new species have been described. The current data indicate that Micromonospora saelicesensis is the most frequently isolated species from the nodular tissues of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants. Further studies have also been carried out to confirm the presence of Micromonospora inside the nodule tissues, mainly by specific in situ hybridization. The information derived from the genome of the model strain, Micromonospora lupini, Lupac 08, has provided useful information as to how this bacterium may relate with its host plant. Several strategies potentially necessary for Micromonospora to thrive in the soil, a highly competitive, and rough environment, and

  8. Response of Sphagnum mosses to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J.

    1998-12-31

    The main objective of this work was to study the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentration and N deposition rates on Sphagna adapted to grow along a nutrient availability gradient (i.e. ombrotrophy-mesotrophy-eutrophy). The study investigated: (i) the effects of various longterm CO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of net photosynthesis in Sphagna, (ii) the effects of the CO{sub 2} and N treatments on the moss density, shoot dry masses, length increment and dry mass production in Sphagna, (iii) the concentrations of the major nutrients in Sphagna after prolonged exposure to the CO{sub 2} and N treatments, and (iv) species dependent differences in potential NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake rates. The internal nutrient concentration of the capitulum and the production of biomass were effected less by the elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations because the availability of N was a controlling factor. In addition responses to the N treatments were related to ecological differences between the Sphagna species. Species with a high tolerance of N availability were able to acclimatise to the increased N deposition rates. The data suggests a high nutrient status is less significant than the adaptation of the Sphagna to their ecological niche (e.g. low tolerance of meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii to high N deposition rate). At the highest N deposition rate the ombrotrophic S. fuscum had the highest increase in tissue N concentration among the Sphagna studied. S. fuscum almost died at the highest N deposition rate because of the damaging effects of N to the plant`s metabolism. Ombrotrophic hummock species such as S. fuscum, were also found to have the highest potential N uptake rate (on density of dry mass basis) compared to lawn species. The rate of net photosynthesis was initially increased with elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, but photosynthesis was down regulated with prolonged exposure to CO{sub 2}. The water use efficiency in Sphagna appeared not to be coupled

  9. Symbiotic leghemoglobins are crucial for nitrogen fixation in legume root nodules but not for general plant growth and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Thomas; van Dongen, Joost T; Günther, Catrin

    2005-01-01

    fixation (SNF). In legumes, SNF occurs in specialized organs, called nodules, which contain millions of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, called bacteroids. The induction of nodule-specific plant genes, including those encoding symbiotic leghemoglobins (Lb), accompanies nodule development. Leghemoglobins...

  10. Increased Salinity Tolerance of Cowpea Plants by Dual Inoculation of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus clarum and a Nitrogen-fixer Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, G H; Aboul-Nasr, M B; Al-Humiany, A

    2005-03-01

    Pot greenhouse experiments were carried out to attempt to increase the salinity tolerance of one of the most popular legume of the world; cowpea; by using dual inoculation of an Am fungus Glomus clarum and a nitrogen-fixer Azospirillum brasilense. The effect of these beneficial microbes, as single- or dual inoculation-treatments, was assessed in sterilized loamy sand soil at five NaCl levels (0.0~7.2 ds/m) in irrigating water. The results of this study revealed that percentage of mycorrhizal infection, plant height, dry weight, nodule number, protein content, nitrogenase and phosphatase activities, as well as nutrient elements N, P, K, Ca, Mg were significantly decreased by increasing salinity level in non-mycorrhized plants in absence of NFB. Plants inoculated with NFB showed higher nodule numbers, protein content, nitrogen concentration and nitrogenase activities than those of non-inoculated at all salinity levels. Mycorrhized plants exhibited better improvement in all measurements than that of non-mycorrhized ones at all salinity levels, especially, in the presence of NFB. The concentration of Na(+) was significantly accumulated in cowpea plants by rising salinity except in shoots of mycorrhizal plants which had K(+)/Na(+) ratios higher than other treatments. This study indicated that dual inoculation with Am fungi and N-fixer Azospirillum can support both needs for N and P, excess of NaCl and will be useful in terms of soil recovery in saline area.

  11. Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration,Nitrogen Fertilization,Planting Density and Foliar Zn Application on Rice Zn concentration and Bioavailability of Supper Rice Ⅱyou 084 under FACE Conditions%FACE 下二氧化碳、施氮量、密度和锌肥对Ⅱ优084稻米锌浓度及有效性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周三妮; 王云霞; 赖上坤; 齐义涛; 朱建国; 杨连新; 王余龙

    2014-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2 ])increases rice yield,but little is known about effects of [CO2 ]on Zn bioavailability of edible parts of rice,as well as the agricultural practices which can improve micronutrient status of rice under high CO2 environment.By using a Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE)facility installed in paddy field,super rice Ⅱ-you 084 were grown under two levels of CO2 concentration (ambient and 50% higher than ambient),N application (1 5 and 25 g/m2 ),planting density (1 6 and 24 hills/m2 )and foliar Zn application (0% and 0•2% ZnSO4 ).At maturity,in milled and brown rice Zn and phytate concentrations were analyzed,molar ratio of phytate to Zn were calculated.The results showed that compared to brown rice,milled rice had much lower Zn concentration,phytate concentration and molar ratio of phytate to Zn.Elevated [CO2 ]significantly decreased Zn concentration of milled and brown rice by 5 % and 7%,respectively;Foliar Zn application significantly increased Zn concentration of milled and brown rice by 40% and 63%,respectively.However,the changes of N application and planting density had no effects on rice Zn concentration.Phytate concentrations of milled and brown rice were not affected by either CO2 or Zn treatments,but higher levels of N application and planting density significantly decreased phytate concentration of brown rice by 8% and 6%,respectively.The molar ratios of phytate to Zn in milled and brown rice were significantly increased at elevated [CO2 ]in average of 6% and 7%,but decreased under foliar Zn application by 28% and 40%,respectively.The high levels of N application and planting density had little effects on molar ratio of phytate to Zn in milled rice,but in brown rice,it decreased by 10% and 7%.Our results indicate that the content and bioavailability of micronutrient Zn in edible part of rice Ⅱ-you 084 will be lower under future high CO2 environment, but modification of agronomic practice such as ample N

  12. Effects of VA mycorrhiza formation on plant nitrogen uptake and rhizosphere bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal sorghum plants were grown in pots at three levels of fertilizer nitrogen ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) which had been enriched with /sup 15/N. Root colonization by Glomus mosseae did not affect plant growth or total N uptake, but significant reductions in mycorrhizal plant /sup 15/N:/sup 14/N ratios and increased 'A' values were found. This suggested that mycorrhizal plants had access to an N source which was less available to nonmycorrhizal plants. In two additional experiments, mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal celery plants were grown in pots which allowed VAM fungal hyphae, but not roots, to have direct access to /sup 15/N-enriched organic or inorganic N sources. Root dry weight was significantly reduced in mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal plants had significantly greater shoot and root /sup 15/N content than nonmycorrhizal plants. Number and length of VAM fungal hyphae crossing into the area of /sup 15/N placement were positively correlated with mycorrhizal plant /sup 15/N content in the inorganic-N but not organic-N treatment. In a fourth experiment, the effect of G. mosseae on the rhizosphere populations of five bacterial isolates associated with blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) was examined. No significant differences in bacterial populations were found in nonrhizosphere soil samples from pots of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants. One bacterial isolate was significantly increased in number, while a different isolate and total bacterial populations were significantly reduced by the presence of the mycorrhizal fungus. The results suggest that root colonization by VAM fungi can alter rhizosphere bacterial populations.

  13. Effects of narrow plant spacing on root distribution and physiological nitrogen use efficiency in summer maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenshun Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to understand the effects of plant spacing on grain yield and root competition in summer maize (Zea mays L.. Maize cultivar Denghai 661 was planted in rectangular tanks (0.54 m × 0.27 m × 1.00 m under 27 cm (normal and 6 cm (narrow plant spacing and treated with zero and 7.5 g nitrogen (N per plant. Compared to normal plant spacing, narrow plant spacing generated less root biomass in the 0–20 cm zone under both N rates, slight reductions of dry root weight in the 20–40 cm and 40–70 cm zones at the mid-grain filling stage, and slight variation of dry root weights in the 70–100 cm zone during the whole growth period. Narrow plant spacing decreased root reductive activity in all root zones, especially at the grain-filling stage. Grain yield and above-ground biomass were 5.0% and 8.4% lower in the narrow plant spacing than with normal plant spacing, although narrow plant spacing significantly increased N harvest index and N use efficiency in both grain yield and biomass, and higher N translocation rates from vegetative organs. These results indicate that the reductive activity of maize roots in all soil layers and dry weights of shallow roots were significantly decreased under narrow plant spacing conditions, resulting in lower root biomass and yield reduction at maturity. Therefore, a moderately dense sowing is a basis for high yield in summer maize.

  14. Effects of narrow plant spacing on root distribution and physiological nitrogen use efficiency in summer maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenshun; Jiang; Kongjun; Wang; Qiuping; Wu; Shuting; Dong; Peng; Liu; Jiwang; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the effects of plant spacing on grain yield and root competition in summer maize(Zea mays L.). Maize cultivar Denghai 661 was planted in rectangular tanks(0.54 m × 0.27 m × 1.00 m) under 27 cm(normal) and 6 cm(narrow) plant spacing and treated with zero and 7.5 g nitrogen(N) per plant. Compared to normal plant spacing, narrow plant spacing generated less root biomass in the 0–20 cm zone under both N rates, slight reductions of dry root weight in the 20–40 cm and 40–70 cm zones at the mid-grain filling stage, and slight variation of dry root weights in the 70–100 cm zone during the whole growth period. Narrow plant spacing decreased root reductive activity in all root zones, especially at the grain-filling stage. Grain yield and above-ground biomass were 5.0% and 8.4% lower in the narrow plant spacing than with normal plant spacing, although narrow plant spacing significantly increased N harvest index and N use efficiency in both grain yield and biomass, and higher N translocation rates from vegetative organs. These results indicate that the reductive activity of maize roots in all soil layers and dry weights of shallow roots were significantly decreased under narrow plant spacing conditions, resulting in lower root biomass and yield reduction at maturity. Therefore, a moderately dense sowing is a basis for high yield in summer maize.

  15. Endophytic Actinobacteria and The Interaction of Micromonospora and Nitrogen Fixing Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha E Trujillo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, it was believed that a healthy plant did not harbor any microorganisms within its tissues, as these were often considered detrimental for the plant. In the last three decades, the numbers of studies on plant microbe-interactions has led to a change in our view and we now know that many of these invisible partners are essential for the overall welfare of the plant. The application of Next Generation Sequencing techniques is a powerful tool that has permitted the detection and identification of microbial communities in healthy plants. Among the new plant microbe interactions recently reported several actinobacteria such as Micromonospora are included.Micromonospora is a Gram-positive bacterium with a wide geographical distribution; it can be found in the soil, mangrove sediments, and freshwater and marine ecosistems. In the last years our group has focused on the isolation of Micromonospora strains from nitrogen fixing nodules of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants and reported for the first time its wide distribution in nitrogen fixing nodules of both types of plants. These studies have shown how this microoganism had been largely overlooked in this niche due to its slow growth. Surprisingly, the genetic diversity of Micromonospora strains isolated from nodules is very high and several new species have been described. The current data indicate that Micromonospora saelicesensis is the most frequently isolated species from the nodular tissues of both leguminous and actinorhizal plants. Further studies have also been carried out to confirm the presence of Micromonospora inside the nodule tissues, mainly by specific in-situ hybridization.The information derived from the genome of the model strain, Micromonospora lupini, Lupac 08, has provided useful information as to how this bacterium may relate with its host plant. Several strategies potentially necessary for Micromonospora to thrive in the soil, a highly competitive and rough

  16. Native and Alien Plant Species Richness Response to Soil Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Temperate Floodplain and Swamp Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hrivnák

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen and phosphorus are commonly limiting elements affecting plant species richness in temperate zones. Our species richness-ecological study was performed in alder-dominated forests representing temperate floodplains (streamside alder forests of Alnion incanae alliance and swamp forests (alder carrs of Alnion glutinosae alliance in the Western Carpathians. Species richness (i.e., the number of vascular plants in a vegetation plot was analyzed separately for native and alien vascular plants in 240 vegetation plots across the study area covering Slovakia, northern Hungary and southern Poland. The relationship between the species richness of each plant group and total soil nitrogen content, plant-available phosphorus and carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio was analyzed by generalized linear mixed models (GLMM with Poisson error distribution and log-link function. The number of recorded native and alien species was 17–84 (average 45.4 and 0–9 (average 1.5 species per plot, respectively. The GLMMs were statistically significant (p ˂ 0.001 for both plant groups, but the total explained variation was higher for native (14% than alien plants (9%. The richness of native species was negatively affected by the total soil nitrogen content and plant-available phosphorus, whereas the C/N ratio showed a positive impact. The alien richness was predicted only by the total soil nitrogen content showing a negative effect.

  17. Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient levels stimulates growth and development of horticultural plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, S.E.H.; Shigeto, J. [Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Mathematical and Life Sciences; Sakamoto, A.; Takahashi, M.; Morikawa, H. [Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Mathematical and Life Sciences, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology

    2008-02-15

    Studies have demonstrated that ambient levels of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) can cause Nicotiana plumbaginifolia to double its biomass as well as its cell contents. This paper examined the influence of NO{sub 2} on lettuce, sunflower, cucumber, and pumpkin plants. Plants were grown in environments supplemented with stable isotope-labelled NO{sub 2} for approximately 6 weeks and irrigated with nitrates. Measured growth parameters included leaf number, internode number, stem length, number of flower buds, and root length. Results of the study demonstrated that the addition of NO{sub 2} doubled the aboveground and belowground biomass of sunflowers, while only the aboveground biomass of pumpkin, cucumbers, and lettuces was doubled. Levels of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) were also doubled in the lettuce samples. A mass spectrometry analysis showed that only a small percentage of total plant N was derived from NO{sub 2}. It was concluded that exogenous NO{sub 2} additions function as a signal rather than as a significant nutrient source in horticultural plants. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  18. Exceptionally high organic nitrogen concentrations in a semi-arid South Texas estuary susceptible to brown tide blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetz, Michael S.; Cira, Emily K.; Sterba-Boatwright, Blair; Montagna, Paul A.; Palmer, Terence A.; Hayes, Kenneth C.

    2017-03-01

    Studies of estuarine eutrophication have tended to focus on systems with continually flowing rivers, while little is known about estuaries from semi-arid/arid regions. Here we report results from an assessment of water quality conditions in Baffin Bay, Texas, a shallow (use. Chlorophyll a averaged 28-30 μg/l in Baffin Bay from 2003 to 2013 and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) concentrations were also very high (116-120 μM), with concentrations of both variables exceeding those of most other Texas estuaries by 2-5 fold. More recent field sampling (2013-2015) showed that dissolved organic nitrogen concentrations in Baffin Bay (62 ± 14 μM) were >2 fold higher than in three other Texas estuaries. In contrast, inorganic nitrogen (ammonium, nitrate) and phosphate concentrations were relatively low. Statistically significant long-term annual increases in chlorophyll a and salinity were observed in Baffin Bay, while long-term seasonal increases were observed for water temperature and TKN. Overall, Baffin Bay is displaying multiple symptoms of eutrophication, namely very high organic carbon, organic nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations, as well as symptoms not quantified here such as fish kills and episodic hypoxia. Much of the increase in chlorophyll in Baffin Bay, at least since ∼1990, have coincided with blooms of the mixotrophic phytoplankton species, Aureoumbra lagunensis, which is thought to be favored under high proportions of organic to inorganic nitrogen. Thus the high and possibly increasing organic nitrogen concentrations, coupled with a long-term annual increase in salinity and a long-term seasonal increase in water temperature are likely to promote additional brown tide blooms in this system in the future.

  19. Ants are less attracted to the extrafloral nectar of plants with symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godschalx, Adrienne L; Schädler, Martin; Trisel, Julie A; Balkan, Mehmet A; Ballhorn, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    Plants simultaneously maintain mutualistic relationships with different partners that are connected through the same host, but do not interact directly. One or more participating mutualists may alter their host's phenotype, resulting in a shift in the host's ecological interactions with all other mutualists involved. Understanding the functional interplay of mutualists associated with the same host remains an important challenge in biology. Here, we show belowground nitrogen-fixing rhizobia on lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) alter their host plant's defensive mutualism with aboveground ants. We induced extrafloral nectar (EFN), an indirect defense acting through ant attraction. We also measured various nutritive and defensive plant traits, biomass, and counted ants on rhizobial and rhizobia-free plants. Rhizobia increased plant protein as well as cyanogenesis, a direct chemical defense against herbivores, but decreased EFN. Ants were significantly more attracted to rhizobia-free plants, and our structural equation model shows a strong link between rhizobia and reduced EFN as well as between EFN and ants: the sole path to ant recruitment. The rhizobia-mediated effects on simultaneously expressed defensive plant traits indicate rhizobia can have significant bottom-up effects on higher trophic levels. Our results show belowground symbionts play a critical and underestimated role in determining aboveground mutualistic interactions.

  20. Impact of rhizobial inoculation and nitrogen utilization in plant growth promotion of maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMESH K. SINGH

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Singh RK, Malik N, Singh S. 2013. Impact of rhizobial inoculation and nitrogen utilization in plant growth promotion of maize (Zea mays L.. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 8-14. During the course of growing population demands there has been an increasing interest in exploring the possibility of extending the beneficial interaction between cereals and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR. Endophytes are a group of microorganism that resides mostly in the intercellular space of various parts of plants including cereals. Assessment of plant growth promoting properties of the five-rhizobial strains belonging to α subclass i.e. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli RRE6 and R. undicola RRE36 and those belonging to β subclass i.e. Burkholderia cepacia (RRE3, RRE5, RRE25 was done by growing maize plants inoculated with these strains. Inoculated maize plants showed a significant increase in plant height, root length, shoot and root dry weight over uninoculated control. R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli RRE6 and B. cepacia RRE5 among the α and β-subclass representatives respectively, gave the best inoculation response. Effect of nitrate supplementation upon maize-RRE6 and RRE5 association was also studied and a significant increase in all the growth parameters and colonization ability was recorded when nitrate was present as a supplement over uninoculated control and maize-RRE6 and RRE5 in absence of external nitrate.

  1. In-situ nitrogen removal from the eutrophic water by microbial-plant integrated system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Hui-qing; YANG Xiao-e; FANG Yun-ying; PU Pei-min; LI Zheng-kui; RENGEL Zed

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was to assess the influence of interaction of combination of immobilized nitrogen cycling bacteria (INCB) with aquatic macrophytes on nitrogen removal from the eutrophic waterbody, and to get insight into different mechanisms involved in nitrogen removal. Methods: The aquatic macrophytes used include Eichhornia crassipes (summer-autumn floating macrophyte), Elodea nuttallii (winter-growing submerged macrophyte), and nitrogen cycling bacteria including ammonifying, nitrosating, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria isolated from Taihu Lake. The immobilization carriers materials were made from hydrophilic monomers 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) and hydrophobic 2-hydroxyethyl methylacrylate (HEMA). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the roles of macrophytes combined with INCB on nitrogen removal from eutrophic water during different seasons. Results: Eichhornia crassipes and Elodea nuttallii had different potentials in purification of eutrophic water. Floating macrophyte+bacteria (INCB) performed best in improving water quality (during the first experiment)and decreased total nitrogen (TN) by 70.2%, nitrite and ammonium by 92.2% and 50.9%, respectively, during the experimental period, when water transparency increased from 0.5 m to 1.8 m. When INCB was inoculated into the floating macrophyte system,the populations of nitrosating, nitrifying, and denitrifying bacteria increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude compared to the un-inoculated treatments, but ammonifying bacteria showed no obvious difference between different treatments. Lower values of chlorophyll a, CODMn, and pH were found in the microbial-plant integrated system, as compared to the control. Highest reduction in N was noted during the treatment with submerged macrophyte+INCB, being 26.1% for TN, 85.2% for nitrite, and 85.2% for ammonium at the end of 2nd experiment. And in the treatment, the populations of ammonifying, nitrosating, nitrifying, and denitrifying bacteria increased

  2. Degradation of proteins by enzymes exuded by Allium porrum roots - a potentially important strategy for acquiring organic nitrogen by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Bartosz; Godlewski, Mirosław; Smolander, Aino; Kitunen, Veikko

    2009-10-01

    Nitrogen is one of the crucial elements that regulate plant growth and development. It is well-established that plants can acquire nitrogen from soil in the form of low-molecular-mass compounds, namely nitrate and ammonium, but also as amino acids. Nevertheless, nitrogen in the soil occurs mainly as proteins or proteins complexed with other organic compounds. Proteins are believed not to be available to plants. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest that plants can actively participate in proteolysis by exudation of proteases by roots and can obtain nitrogen from digested proteins. To gain insight into the process of organic nitrogen acquisition from proteins by leek roots (Allium porrum L. cv. Bartek), casein, bovine serum albumin and oxidized B-chain of insulin were used; their degradation products, after exposure to plant culture medium, were studied using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Casein was degraded to a great extent, but the level of degradation of bovine serum albumin and the B-chain of insulin was lower. Proteases exuded by roots cleaved proteins, releasing low-molecular-mass peptides that can be taken up by roots. Various peptide fragments produced by digestion of the oxidized B-chain of insulin suggested that endopeptidase, but also exopeptidase activity was present. After identification, proteases were similar to cysteine protease from Arabidopsis thaliana. In conclusion, proteases exuded by roots may have great potential in the plant nitrogen nutrition.

  3. Nitrogen isotopic composition of plant-soil in the Loess Plateau and its responding to environmental chanse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WeiGuo; WANG Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The nitrogen isotope of soil is of emerging significance as an indicator of climatic change and bio-geochemical cycle of nitrogen in nature systems. In this paper, the nitrogen content and isotopic composition of modern ecosystems from arid and semiarid Loess Plateau in northwestern China, in-cluding plant roots and surface soil, were determined to investigate trends in δ15N variation of plant roots and soil along a precipitation and temperature gradient in northwestern China under the East Asian Monsoon climate condition. The δ15N values of surface soil from the study area vary from -1.2‰to 5.8‰, but from -5.1‰ to 1.9‰ in the plant roots. Our results indicate that (1) although the isotopic compositions of both plant roots and surface soil change with a similar trend along the climate gradient,the apparent nitrogen difference between plant roots and soil existed, with △δ15N values ranging from 0.3‰ to 7.2‰ with average of 4.1‰; and (2) mean annual precipitation (MAP) is the dominant factor for isotopic composition of plant-soil nitrogen in the Loess Plateau, and the δ15.N values are less correlated with MAT; we suggest that nitrogen isotopic composition of soil is a potential tracer for environmental changes.

  4. Climatic warming increases winter wheat yield but reduces grain nitrogen concentration in east China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlu Tian

    Full Text Available Climatic warming is often predicted to reduce wheat yield and grain quality in China. However, direct evidence is still lacking. We conducted a three-year experiment with a Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI facility to examine the responses of winter wheat growth and plant N accumulation to a moderate temperature increase of 1.5°C predicted to prevail by 2050 in East China. Three warming treatments (AW: all-day warming; DW: daytime warming; NW: nighttime warming were applied for an entire growth period. Consistent warming effects on wheat plant were recorded across the experimental years. An increase of ca. 1.5°C in daily, daytime and nighttime mean temperatures shortened the length of pre-anthesis period averagely by 12.7, 8.3 and 10.7 d (P<0.05, respectively, but had no significant impact on the length of the post-anthesis period. Warming did not significantly alter the aboveground biomass production, but the grain yield was 16.3, 18.1 and 19.6% (P<0.05 higher in the AW, DW and NW plots than the non-warmed plot, respectively. Warming also significantly increased plant N uptake and total biomass N accumulation. However, warming significantly reduced grain N concentrations while increased N concentrations in the leaves and stems. Together, our results demonstrate differential impacts of warming on the depositions of grain starch and protein, highlighting the needs to further understand the mechanisms that underlie warming impacts on plant C and N metabolism in wheat.

  5. Epstein-Plesset theory based measurements of concentration of nitrogen gases dissolved in aerated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masashi; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble aeration is used to dissolved gases into water and is an important technique in agriculture and industry. We can measure concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) in aerated water by commercial DO meters. However, there do not exist commercially available techniques to measure concentration to dissolved nitrogen (DN). In the present study, we propose the method to measure DN in aerated water with the aid of Epstein-Plesset-type analysis. Gas-supersaturated tap water is produced by applying aeration with micro-sized air bubbles and is then stored in a glass container open to the atmosphere. Diffusion-driven growth of bubbles nucleated at the container surface is recorded with a video camera. The bubble growth rate is compare to the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that models mass transfer of both DO and DN into the surface-attached bubbles base on the diffusion equation. Given the DO measurements, we can obtain the DN level by fitting in the comparison.

  6. [Seasonal dynamics of nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency of wetland plants in Minjiang River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Long; Zeng, Cong-Sheng; Zhang, Lin-Hai; Wang, Wei-Qi; Lin, Yan; Ai, Jin-Quan

    2009-06-01

    Taking the native Phragmites australis and invasive Spartina alterniflora in Minjiang River estuary as test objectives, this paper studied the seasonal dynamics of their biomass and nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency. A typical single-peak curve was presented for the seasonal dynamics of aboveground biomass and nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency of the two species. P. australis had the maximum aboveground biomass (2195.33 g X m(-2)) in summer, while S. alterniflora had it (3670.02 g X m(-2)) in autumn. The total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) contents of P. australis reached the peak (21.06 g x m(-2) of TN and 1.12 g x m(-2) of TP) in summer and in autumn, respectively, while those of S. alterniflora all reached the peak (26.76 g x m(-2) of TN and 3.23 g x m(-2) of TP) in autumn. Both of the two species had a higher absorption efficiency in TN than in TP (P absorption efficiency of TN and TP than P. australis (P nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency of the plants.

  7. Heterotrophic nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1 isolated from coke plant wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YuXiang; Hu, Tingting; Song, Yujie; Chen, Hongping; Lv, YongKang

    2015-11-01

    A strain of Acinetobacter sp. Y1, which exhibited an amazing ability to remove ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, was isolated from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The aim of this work was to study the ability, influence factors and possible pathway of nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. Y1. Results showed that maximum removal rate of NH4(+)-N by the strain was 10.28 mg-N/L/h. Carbon source had significant influence on the growth and ammonium removal efficiencies of strain Y1. Pyruvate, citrate and acetate were favourable carbon sources for the strain. Temperature, pH value and shaking speed could affect the growth and nitrogen removal ability. Nitrate or nitrite could be used as a sole nitrogen source for the growth and removed efficiently by the strain. N2 levels increased to 53.74%, 50.21% and 55.13% within 36 h when 100 mg/L NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N or NO3(-) -N was used as sole nitrogen source in the gas detection experiment. The activities of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO), nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which are key enzymes in heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification, were all detectable in the strain. Consequently, a possible pathway for ammonium removal by the strain was also suggested.

  8. Concentrations, Deposition, and Effects of Nitrogenous Pollutants in Selected California Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N in California ecosystems is ecologically significant and highly variable, ranging from about 1 to 45 kg/ha/year. The lowest ambient concentrations and deposition values are found in the eastern and northern parts of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the highest in parts of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains that are most exposed to the Los Angeles air pollution plume. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains, N is deposited mostly in precipitation, although dry deposition may also provide substantial amounts of N. On the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada, the majority of airborne N is in reduced forms as ammonia (NH3 and particulate ammonium (NH4+ from agricultural activities in the California Central Valley. In southern California, most of the N air pollution is in oxidized forms as nitrogen oxides (NOx, nitric acid (HNO3, and particulate nitrate (NO3– resulting from fossil fuel combustion and subsequent complex photochemical reactions. In southern California, dry deposition of gases and particles provides most (up to 95% of the atmospheric N to forests and other ecosystems. In the mixed-conifer forest zone, elevated deposition of N may initially benefit growth of vegetation, but chronic effects may be expressed as deterioration of forest health and sustainability. HNO3 vapor alone has a potential for toxic effects causing damage of foliar surfaces of pines and oaks. In addition, dry deposition of predominantly HNO3 has lead to changes in vegetation composition and contamination of ground- and stream water where terrestrial N loading is high. Long-term, complex interactions between N deposition and other environmental stresses such as elevated ozone (O3, drought, insect infestations, fire suppression, or intensive land management practices may affect water quality and sustainability of California forests and other ecosystems.

  9. Organic matter and concentrated nitrogen removal by shortcut nitrification and denitrification from mature municipal landfill leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-jun; PENG Yong-zhen; WANG Shu-ying; ZHENG Shu-wen; GUO Jin

    2007-01-01

    An UASB+Anoxic/Oxic (A/O) system was introduced to treat a mature landfill leachate with low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and high ammonia concentration. To make the best use of the biodegradable COD in the leachate, the denitrification of NOx-N in the recirculation effluent from the clarifier was carried out in the UASB. The results showed that most biodegradable organic matters were removed by the denitrification in the UASB. The NH4+-N loading rate (ALR) of A/O reactor and operational temperature was 0.28-0.60 kg NH4+-N/(m3·d) and 17-29℃ during experimental period, respectively. The short-cut nitrification with nitrite accumulation efficiency of 90%-99% was stabilized during the whole experiment. The NH4+-N removal efficiency varied between 90% and 100%. When ALR was less than 0.45 kg NH4+-N/(m3·d), the NH4+-N removal efficiency was more than 98%. With the influent NH4+-N of 1200-1800 mg/L, the effluent NH4+-N was less than 15 mg/L. The shortcut nitrification and denitrification can save 40% carbon source, with a highly efficient denitrification taking place in the UASB. When the ratio of the feed COD to feed NH4+-N was only 2-3, the total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal efficiency attained 67%-80%. Besides, the sludge samples from A/O reactor were analyzed using FISH. The FISH analysis revealed that ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) accounted for 4% of the total eubacterial population, whereas nitrite oxidation bacteria (NOB) accounted only for 0.2% of the total eubacterial population.

  10. Concentrations, deposition, and effects of nitrogenous pollutants in selected California ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytnerowicz, A; Padgett, P E; Parry, S D; Fenn, M E; Arbaugh, M J

    2001-11-28

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in California ecosystems is ecologically significant and highly variable, ranging from about 1 to 45 kg/ha/year. The lowest ambient concentrations and deposition values are found in the eastern and northern parts of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the highest in parts of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains that are most exposed to the Los Angeles air pollution plume. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains, N is deposited mostly in precipitation, although dry deposition may also provide substantial amounts of N. On the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada, the majority of airborne N is in reduced forms as ammonia (NH3) and particulate ammonium (NH4+) from agricultural activities in the California Central Valley. In southern California, most of the N air pollution is in oxidized forms as nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitric acid (HNO3), and particulate nitrate (NO3-) resulting from fossil fuel combustion and subsequent complex photochemical reactions. In southern California, dry deposition of gases and particles provides most (up to 95%) of the atmospheric N to forests and other ecosystems. In the mixed-conifer forest zone, elevated deposition of N may initially benefit growth of vegetation, but chronic effects may be expressed as deterioration of forest health and sustainability. HNO3 vapor alone has a potential for toxic effects causing damage of foliar surfaces of pines and oaks. In addition, dry deposition of predominantly HNO3 has lead to changes in vegetation composition and contamination of ground- and stream water where terrestrial N loading is high. Long-term, complex interactions between N deposition and other environmental stresses such as elevated ozone (O3), drought, insect infestations, fire suppression, or intensive land management practices may affect water quality and sustainability of California forests and other ecosystems.

  11. Native plant restoration combats environmental change: development of carbon and nitrogen sequestration capacity using small cordgrass in European salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Guillermo; Rubio-Casal, Alfredo E; Figueroa, Enrique; Grewell, Brenda J; Castillo, Jesús M

    2013-10-01

    Restoration of salt marshes is critical in the context of climate change and eutrophication of coastal waters because their vegetation and sediments may act as carbon and nitrogen sinks. Our primary objectives were to quantify carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks and sequestration rates in restored marshes dominated by Spartina maritima to provide support for restoration and management strategies that may offset negative aspects of eutrophication and climate change in estuarine ecosystems. Sediment C content was between ca. 13 mg C g(-1)and sediment N content was ca. 1.8 mg N g(-1). The highest C content for S. maritima was recorded in leaves and stems (ca. 420 mg C g(-1)) and the lowest in roots (361 ± 4 mg C g(-1)). S. maritima also concentrated more N in its leaves (31 ± 1 mg N g(-1)) than in other organs. C stock in the restored marshes was 29.6 t C ha(-1); ca. 16 % was stored in S. maritima tissues. N stock was 3.6 t N ha(-1), with 8.3 % stored in S. maritima. Our results showed that the S. maritima restored marshes, 2.5 years after planting, were sequestering atmospheric C and, therefore, provide some mitigation for global warming. Stands are also capturing nitrogen and reducing eutrophication. The concentrations of C and N contents in sediments, and cordgrass relative cover of 62 %, and low below-ground biomass (BGB) suggest restored marshes can sequester more C and N. S. maritima plantations in low marshes replace bare sediments and invasive populations of exotic Spartina densiflora and increase the C and N sequestration capacity of the marsh by increasing biomass production and accumulation.

  12. The dynamics of nitrogen derived from a chemical nitrogen fertilizer with treated swine slurry in paddy soil-plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonhee; Choi, Hong L

    2017-01-01

    A well-managed chemical nitrogen (N) fertilization practice combined with treated swine slurry (TSS) is necessary to improve sustainability and N use efficiency in rice farming. However, little is known about the fate of N derived from chemical N fertilizer with and without TSS in paddy soil-plant systems. The objectives of this study were (1) to estimate the contribution of applied N fertilizer to N turnover in rice paddy soil with different N fertilization practices that were manipulated by the quantity of treated swine slurry and chemical N fertilizer (i.e., HTSS+LAS, a high amount of TSS with a low amount of ammonium sulfate; LTSS+HAS, a low amount of TSS with a high amount of ammonium sulfate; AS, ammonium sulfate with phosphorus and potassium; C, the control) and (2) to compare the rice response to applied N derived from each N fertilization practice. Rice biomass yield, 15N recovery in both rice grain and stems, soil total N (TN), soil inorganic N, and soil 15N recovery were analyzed. Similar amounts of 15N uptake by rice in the TSS+AS plots were obtained, indicating that the effects of the different quantities of TSS on chemical fertilizer N recovery in rice during the experimental period were not significant. The soil 15N recoveries of HTSS+LAS, LTSS+HAS, and AS in each soil layer were not significantly different. For the HTSS+LAS, LTSS+HAS and AS applications, total 15N recoveries were 42%, 43% and 54%, respectively. Because the effects of reducing the use of chemical N fertilizer were attributed to enhancing soil quality and cost-effectiveness, HTSS+LAS could be an appropriate N fertilization practice for improving the long-term sustainability of paddy soil-plant systems. However, N losses, especially through the coupled nitrification-denitrification process, can diminish the benefits that HTSS+LAS offers.

  13. Plant inter-species effects on rhizosphere priming effect and nitrogen acquisition by plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Xu, Xingliang; Yang, Baijie; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Rhizosphere interactions play a central role linking roots-soil system and regulate various aspects of nutrient cycling. Rhizodeposition inputs are known to change soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition via rhizosphere priming effects (RPEs) through enhancing soil biological activity and altering microbial community structure. The magnitude of RPEs varies widely among plant-species and root biomass possibly due to different quality and quantity of rhizodeposits. However, it is virtually unknown whether the RPEs are influenced by plant inter-species interactions and how these processes affect N mineralization and available N for plants. Monocultures of maize (M) and soybean (S), and mixed cultures of maize/maize (MM), soybean/soybean (SS), maize/soybean (MS) were grown over a 45-day greenhouse experiment. We labeled them with plant litter that was enriched in13C and 15N. The 15N distributions in plants and microbial biomass were measured at 14, 35, and 45days after labeling. The RPEs were positive under all plants, ranging from 11.7% to 138.3% and gradually decreased with plant growth. The RPE in the SS was significantly higher than these in others treatments at 14 days, while at 45 days it was higher in the MS than these from their monocultures, suggesting that the RPE was enhanced by the inter-species effects of maize and soybean. The litter decomposition ratio and 15N recovery of plants and microorganism increased with the root growth across all plants. The 15N recovery of plants in the MS (14.2%) was higher than these in the MM (12.3%) and SS(9.7%) at 45 days. Similarly, the 15N recovery of microorganism in the corresponding treatments was 6.7%, 2.2%, and 6.8%, respectively. The MS showed higher soil organic N mineralization amount than that from all soybean and maize monocultures at 45 days. We conclude that plant inter-species interactions may have significant effect on rhizosphere priming and modify the plant N uptake from litter resource and SOM.

  14. Sulphur and nitrogen supply - soil acidification and the absorption of nutrients in plants; Svovel og nitrogentilfoersel - jordforsuring og plantenes naeringstilgang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, G.

    1996-01-01

    Ecologically, soil is of the greatest interest as a growth medium for plants, and which affects the quality of ground water and surface water. In this connection, the paper looks upon how the increased deposition of sulphur, nitrogen and hydrogen ions affect the quality of soil as a growth medium for plants. Topics cover: Interaction between soil and plants, effects of acid rain in soil, and the effects of acid rain on plants. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  16. Warming, CO2, and <