WorldWideScience

Sample records for planning by facility or land use

  1. Biological Considerations in Land Use Planning for a Federal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document presents biological considerations of land use planning for the United States Department of Agriculture Beltsville Agricultural Research Center and for...

  2. Future land use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  3. Land Use Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan discusses the main types of land use at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Information about geology and water, groundwater, climatic conditions,...

  4. Land Use Control Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Andrew Scott

    2015-01-01

    This Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of Building M7-505 of institutional controls that have been implemented at the site. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with Building M7-505, institutional land use controls (LUCs) are necessary to prohibit the use of groundwater from the site. LUCs are also necessary to prevent access to soil under electrical equipment in the northwest portion of the site. Controls necessary to prevent human exposure will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  5. Land-use planning: One geologist's viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, E.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Planning for the best use of land and its resources should take fully into consideration the long-term consequences of each type of use in order to stretch out most beneficially the well-being of society in the future, and to protect the integrity of the land and its biota. Three kinds of land-use can be distinguished for planning purposes. Reversible land-use leaves the land, after use, essentially as it was before; little or no man-induced modification remains. An example of reversible use in the United States is the designation of certain public lands as Wilderness. Terminal land-use commits the land to a chosen particular use, and any attempt at reversal requires either time-scales that are long compared with the expected lifespan of the social and political institution, or a commitment of resources that is too high for society to consider worth bearing. Examples of terminal land-use are location of metropolises and sites of toxic and/or radioactive waste disposals; by its nature the list grows monotonically. A current source of some social tension arises from the fact that Wilderness designation appears to assign a terminal-use status by legislative fiat, whereas in fact the land is being used reversibly. In between these two extremes of reversible and terminal land-use, the bulk of land-use is sequential, in which each use of land changes its potentials and configurations, and these changes are mainly irreversible. One goal of geologic input to land-use planning is to identify the various pathways along which a given land may be used, in order to extract the greatest benefit to society with the least harm to the land and its life. The proposed planning format consists of identification of (1) types of land, (2) types of use, (3) nature of consumption of resources when (2) acts upon (1), (4) identification of alternative pathways of land recovery to the original or some new state, and (5) due consideration of potentials for future use. Some consumptions are

  6. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  7. 1984 Land Use Plan - Union Slough NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Land Use Plan outlines the Refuge program for land use practices during 1984: specifically, cooperative farming, force account farming, haying, prescribed...

  8. Urban Land Use Classifcation Linked to Planning Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Dongjin; ZHOU Jianyun; SHI Ke

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the applicability of the new Code for Classification of Urban Land Use and Planning Standards of Development Land from the angle of planning management,this paper points out the conflicts between the planning and land use management institutions.Referring to the experience of land use control in the US and the UK through zoning and case law respectively,this paper puts forward that the urban land use classification should take into consideration the characteristics of the actual urban planning system and the possibility of mixed land use due to the uncertainty of urban development,and be linked to the institutions of planning and land supply management.

  9. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folta, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wisoff, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.

  10. Supplement to Land Use Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines the various land uses at Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge. The grasslands on the Tewaukon Wildlife Refuge will be used for grazing to the...

  11. LAND USE PLANNING AND URBAN PLANS: TERRITORIAL BALANCE AS ETHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Helena Sguizzardi Abascal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests a necessary link between urban planning and territorial organization, in order to, through the synergistic relationship between planning tools and their application to planning, implementing a policy of urban and regional management. By linking the development plan for territorial development plans and categories of land use, this methodology helps to streamline operations at multiple scales. The establishment of this network of instruments and shapes the actions of government action against the rapid and intense increase of only economic forces that shape the territory today, suggesting that it is possible to regulate the action of the housing market through planned interventions, valuing the regional balance, social and environmental - ethical by definition. It is suggested that the possible effects predatory natural and built environment can be reversed or prevented by an action articulating these planning instruments are linked to the development and implementation of plans (and projects at multiple scales, approaching from the regional to the local and metropolitan, from regional policies to sectors, that are incidents in the municipal territory. However, the speed and magnitude of the occupation and transformation of soil occur mainly in periods of heating housing, often jeopardize the balance and environmental quality, natural heritage, urban and landscape. It assumes the argument that the overcoming of undesirable environmental effects, triggered by occupation of the ground guided by the real estate sector fast action can be successful with the articulation of levels of planning and intervention. It is proposed that the complexity of contemporary urban and metropolitan requires the articulation of different scales through the use of innovative urban instruments. By articulating these different scales, at the municipal and other levels supra, contributes to, through a network plan to overcome the undesirable dichotomy

  12. Seismic hazards and land-use planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Donald R.; Buchanan-Banks, Jane M.

    1974-01-01

    Basic earth-science data are necessary for a realistic assessment of seismic hazards and as a basis for limiting corrective land-use controls only to those areas of greatest hazard. For example, the location, character, and amount of likely displacement and activity of surface faulting can be predicted if detailed geologic maps and seismic data are available and are augmented by field studies at critical localities. Because few structures can withstand displacement of their foundations, they should be located off active fault traces, the distance varying with the character of faulting, the certainty with which fault traces are known, and the importance of the structure. Recreational activities and other nonoccupancy land uses should be considered for fault zone areas where land is under pressure for development; elsewhere, such areas should remain as open space. Two methods of predicting ground shaking effects have applications to land-use decisions: (1) Relative earthquake effects can be related to firmness of the ground and can be used in a gross way to allocate population density in the absence of more sophisticated analyses; and (2) intensity maps, based on, (a) damage from former earthquakes, or (b) a qualitative analyses of geologic units added to a design earthquake, can be helpful both for general and specific plans. Theoretical models are used with caution to predict ground motion for critical structures to be located at specific sites with unique foundation conditions. Fully adequate methods of assessing possible shaking remain to be developed. Where land-use decisions do not reflect likely ground shaking effects, stringent building codes are needed, particularly for important structures. Ground failure (landsliding, ground cracking and lurching, differential settlement, sand boils, and subsidence) commonly results from liquefaction, loss of soil strength, or compaction. Areas suspected of being most likely to fail should not be developed unless detailed

  13. Interim Land Use Control Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This Interim Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Contractors Road Heavy Equipment (CRHE) Area (SWMU 055; "the Site") of institutional controls that have been implemented at the Site1. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with the CRHE Area, an interim institutional land use control (LUC) is necessary to prevent human health exposure to volatile organic compound (VOC)-affected groundwater at the Site. Controls will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  14. Planning for land use and conservation: Assessing GIS-based conservation software for land use planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob Baldwin; Ryan Scherzinger; Don Lipscomb; Miranda Mockrin; Susan Stein

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in planning and ecological software make it possible to conduct highly technical analyses to prioritize conservation investments and inform local land use planning. We review these tools, termed conservation planning tools, and assess the knowledge of a key set of potential users: the land use planning community. We grouped several conservation software...

  15. Land Use Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Land Use Plan for Ottawa NWR provides a description and history of the Refuge. This plan proposes a three-year rotation for the major marshes on the Refuge. The...

  16. Discussion on Evolution of Land-use Planning in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The classical definition of land-use plan was brought forward by Kent in 1964, which is"the official statement of a…legislative body which sets forth its major policies concerning desirable future physical development."Concerning current socio-economic development characteristics in China,the land-use planning is a process to evaluate

  17. Sample Federal Facility Land Use Control ROD Checklist and Suggested Language (LUC Checklist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LUC Checklist provides direction on describing and documenting land use controls (LUCs) in federal facility actrions under CERCLA in Records of Decision (RODs), remedial designs (RDs), and remedial action work plans (RAWPs).

  18. Uncorrected land-use planning highlighted by flooding: the Alba case study (Piedmont, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luino, F.; Turconi, L.; Petrea, C.; Nigrelli, G.

    2012-07-01

    Alba is a town of over 30 000 inhabitants located along the Tanaro River (Piedmont, northwestern Italy) and is famous for its wine and white truffles. Many important industries and companies are based in Alba, including the famous confectionery group Ferrero. The town suffered considerably from a flood that occurred on 5-6 November 1994. Forty-eight percent of the urban area was inundated, causing severe damage and killing nine people. After the flood, the Alba area was analysed in detail to determine the reasons for its vulnerability. Information on serious floods in this area since 1800 was gathered from official records, state technical office reports, unpublished documents in the municipal archives, and articles published in local and national newspapers. Maps, plans and aerial photographs (since 1954) were examined to reconstruct Alba's urban development over the last two centuries and the planform changes of the Tanaro River. The results were compared with the effects of the November 1994 flood, which was mapped from aerial photographs taken immediately after the flood, field surveys and eyewitness reports. The territory of Alba was subdivided into six categories: residential; public service; industrial, commercial and hotels; sports areas, utilities and standards (public gardens, parks, athletics grounds, private and public sport clubs); aggregate plants and dumps; and agriculture and riverine strip. The six categories were then grouped into three classes with different flooding-vulnerability levels according to various parameters. Using GIS, the three river corridors along the Tanaro identified by the Autorità di Bacino del Fiume Po were overlaid on the three classes to produce a final map of the risk areas. This study shows that the historic floods and their dynamics have not been duly considered in the land-use planning of Alba. The zones that were most heavily damaged in the 1994 flood were those that were frequently affected in the past and sites of

  19. Uncorrected land-use planning highlighted by flooding: the Alba case study (Piedmont, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Luino

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alba is a town of over 30 000 inhabitants located along the Tanaro River (Piedmont, northwestern Italy and is famous for its wine and white truffles. Many important industries and companies are based in Alba, including the famous confectionery group Ferrero.

    The town suffered considerably from a flood that occurred on 5–6 November 1994. Forty-eight percent of the urban area was inundated, causing severe damage and killing nine people. After the flood, the Alba area was analysed in detail to determine the reasons for its vulnerability.

    Information on serious floods in this area since 1800 was gathered from official records, state technical office reports, unpublished documents in the municipal archives, and articles published in local and national newspapers. Maps, plans and aerial photographs (since 1954 were examined to reconstruct Alba's urban development over the last two centuries and the planform changes of the Tanaro River.

    The results were compared with the effects of the November 1994 flood, which was mapped from aerial photographs taken immediately after the flood, field surveys and eyewitness reports.

    The territory of Alba was subdivided into six categories: residential; public service; industrial, commercial and hotels; sports areas, utilities and standards (public gardens, parks, athletics grounds, private and public sport clubs; aggregate plants and dumps; and agriculture and riverine strip. The six categories were then grouped into three classes with different flooding-vulnerability levels according to various parameters. Using GIS, the three river corridors along the Tanaro identified by the Autorità di Bacino del Fiume Po were overlaid on the three classes to produce a final map of the risk areas.

    This study shows that the historic floods and their dynamics have not been duly considered in the land-use planning of Alba. The zones that were most heavily damaged in the 1994 flood were

  20. Land Use and Land Cover, Current land use layer developed by Bay-Lake Regional Planning Commission as part of the County's 2009 Smart Growth Plan., Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Manitowoc County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. It is described as...

  1. Sustainable Land Use Planning and Planning of Rural Road Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, C.F.

    2000-01-01

    To provide for peoples needs in the future, further improvements of the road network are a necessity. Simultaneously, harmful effects of this network on both local inhabitants and the flora and fauna become more penetrating. So, sustainable land use planning creates a great challenge for rural road

  2. A needs analysis method for land-use planning of illegal dumping sites: a case study in Aomori-Iwate, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuei; Furuichi, Toru; Nagao, Yukari

    2013-02-01

    Land use at contaminated sites, following remediation, is often needed for regional redevelopment. However, there exist few methods of developing economically and socially feasible land-use plans based on regional needs because of the wide variety of land-use requirements. This study proposes a new needs analysis method for the conceptual land-use planning of contaminated sites and illustrates this method with a case study of an illegal dumping site for hazardous waste. In this method, planning factors consisting of the land-use attributes and related facilities are extracted from the potential needs of the residents through a preliminary questionnaire. Using the extracted attributes of land use and the related facilities, land-use cases are designed for selection-based conjoint analysis. A second questionnaire for respondents to the first one who indicated an interest in participating in the second questionnaire is conducted for the conjoint analysis to determine the utility function and marginal cost of each attribute in order to prioritize the planning factors to develop a quantitative and economically and socially feasible land-use plan. Based on the results, site-specific land-use alternatives are developed and evaluated by the utility function obtained from the conjoint analysis. In this case study of an illegal dumping site for hazardous waste, the uses preferred as part of a conceptual land-use plan following remediation of the site were (1) agricultural land and a biogas plant designed to recover energy from biomass or (2) a park with a welfare facility and an athletic field. Our needs analysis method with conjoint analysis is applicable to the development of conceptual land-use planning for similar sites following remediation, particularly when added value is considered.

  3. Comprehensive facilities plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  4. LUMIS: A Land Use Management Information System for urban planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    The Land Use Management Information System (LUMIS) consists of a methodology of compiling land use maps by means of air photo interpretation techniques, digitizing these and other maps into machine-readable form, and numerically overlaying these various maps in two computer software routines to provide land use and natural resource data files referenced to the individual census block. The two computer routines are the Polygon Intersection Overlay System (PIOS) and an interactive graphics APL program. A block referenced file of land use, natural resources, geology, elevation, slope, and fault-line items has been created and supplied to the Los Angeles Department of City Planning for the City's portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. In addition, the interactive system contains one hundred and seventy-three socio-economic data items created by merging the Third Count U.S. Census Bureau tapes and the Los Angeles County Secured Assessor File. This data can be graphically displayed for each and every block, block group, or tract for six test tracts in Woodland Hills, California. Other benefits of LUMIS are the knowledge of air photo availability, flight pattern coverage and frequencies, and private photogrammetry companies flying Southern California, as well as a formal Delphi study of relevant land use informational needs in the Santa Monicas.

  5. Using multi-disciplinary strategic master facilities planning for organizations experiencing programmatic re-direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heubach, J.G.; Weimer, W.C.; Bruce, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    Facility master planning is critical to the future productivity of a laboratory and the quality of worklife for the laboratory staff. For organizations undergoing programmatic re-direction, a master facility planning approach linked to the organization`s strategic planning process is even more important. Major changes in an organization such as programmatic re-direction can significantly impact a broad range of variables which exceed the expertise of traditional planning teams, e.g., capacity variability, work team organization, organizational culture, and work process simplification. By expanding the diversity of the participants of the planning team, there is a greater likelihood that a research organization`s scientific, organizational, economic, and employees` needs can be meshed in the strategic plan and facility plan. Recent recommendations from facility planners suggest drawing from diverse fields in building multi-disciplinary planning teams: Architecture, engineering, natural science, social psychology, and strategic planning (Gibson,1993). For organizations undergoing significant operational or culture change, the master facility planning team should also include members with expertise in organizational effectiveness, industrial engineering, human resources, and environmental psychology. A recent planning and design project provides an example which illustrates the use of an expanded multi-disciplinary team engaged in planning laboratory renovations for a research organization undergoing programmatic re-direction. The purpose of the proposed poster session is to present a multi-disciplinary master facility planning process linked to an organization`s strategic planning process or organizational strategies.

  6. Land-Use Planning in the Chaco Plain (Burruyacú, Argentina): Part 2: Generating a Consensus Plan to Mitigate Land-Use Conflicts and Minimize Land Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recatalá Boix, Luis; Zinck, Joseph Alfred

    2008-08-01

    The Burruyacú district (Tucumán province, Northwest Argentina) has been traditionally an area with rural activities based on the exploitation of the Chaco forest for timber and livestock browsing. Since the 1960s, local institutions started promoting soybean due to favorable land conditions and good market prices. Soybean extension, as from the 1970s, has resulted in important reduction of the Chaco forest and also caused physical soil degradation, especially soil compaction and erosion. A land-use-planning exercise was carried out using the Land-Use Planning and Information System (LUPIS) as a spatial decision support system. LUPIS facilitates the generation of alternative land-use plans by adjusting the relative importance attributed by multiple stakeholders to preference and avoidance policies. The system leads to the allocation of competing land uses to land map units in accordance with their preferred resource requirements, conditional upon the resource base of the area and the stakeholders’ demands. After generating a land use plan for each stakeholder category identified in the study area, including commercial farmers, conservative/conventional farmers, and conservationists, a consensus plan was established to address the land-use conflicts between mechanized agriculture, traditional agriculture and forest conservation, and to mitigate soil degradation caused by extensive dry-farming. Although the planning exercise did not directly involve the stakeholders, the results are sufficiently practical and realistic to suggest that the approach could be extended to the entire Chaco plain region.

  7. Land Use Planning in the Urban Sensitive Areas Case Study, Farahzad Valley Stream-Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Extended Abstract1-Introduction As an important fundamental Issue in urban planning, land use suitability assessment provides important reference for planning, planning management, planning implementation and planning evaluation. Whether at home or abroad, many scholars and planning workers have made in-depth study and explore at the approaches of land suitability assessment, especially in the use of GIS technology. Land use suitability assessment is an important fundamental work in urban pla...

  8. Interim Land Use Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Interim Land Use Plan for Muscatatuck NWR provides a brief history of the Refuge; summarizes present land conditions, needs, and habitat types; and provides an...

  9. PLUS: 'Planning Land Use with Students' is a Local Land Use Policy That Showcase the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Land Use decisions in the local community are well represented in geoscience topics and issues, and provide an excellent opportunity to showcase a wide range of geoscience careers to high school students. In PLUS (Planning Land Use with Students) we work with youth corps, volunteer agencies and the County Departments of Planning, Transportation, Public Health, Water Resources to run a program for high school seniors to engage the students in the complex layers of decision making connected with land use as we showcase geoscience careers (http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/edu/plus/index.html). How development occurs, what resources are in use and who makes these decisions is both interesting and relevant for students. We develop case studies around current, active, local land use issues large enough in scale to have a formal environmental review at the County and/or the State level. Sections of each case study are dedicated to addressing the range of environmental issues that are central to each land use decision. Water, its availability, planned use and treatment on the site, brings in both a review of local hydrology and a discussion of storm water management. Air quality and the impact of the proposed project's density, transportation plans, and commercial and industrial uses brings in air quality issues like air quality ratings, existing pollution, and local air monitoring. A review of the site plans brings in grading plans for the project area, which highlights issues of drainage, soil stability, and exposure to toxins or pollutants depending on the historic use of the site. Brownfield redevelopments are especially challenging with various monitoring, clean up and usage restrictions that are extremely interesting to the students. Students' work with mentors from the community who represent various roles in the planning process including a range of geosciences, community business members and other players in the planning process. This interplay of individuals provides

  10. Land cover change or land-use intensification: simulating land system change with a global-scale land change model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselen, Sanneke; Verburg, Peter H

    2013-12-01

    Land-use change is both a cause and consequence of many biophysical and socioeconomic changes. The CLUMondo model provides an innovative approach for global land-use change modeling to support integrated assessments. Demands for goods and services are, in the model, supplied by a variety of land systems that are characterized by their land cover mosaic, the agricultural management intensity, and livestock. Land system changes are simulated by the model, driven by regional demand for goods and influenced by local factors that either constrain or promote land system conversion. A characteristic of the new model is the endogenous simulation of intensification of agricultural management versus expansion of arable land, and urban versus rural settlements expansion based on land availability in the neighborhood of the location. Model results for the OECD Environmental Outlook scenario show that allocation of increased agricultural production by either management intensification or area expansion varies both among and within world regions, providing useful insight into the land sparing versus land sharing debate. The land system approach allows the inclusion of different types of demand for goods and services from the land system as a driving factor of land system change. Simulation results are compared to observed changes over the 1970-2000 period and projections of other global and regional land change models.

  11. WATERSHED RUNOFFAND RIVER FLOOD MODELING IN LAND USE PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Niedda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In land use planning along river paths it may be useful to consider the statistics of the flooding process of the river. The set of rules regulating land use planning in Italy results in the return period required being very long and, as a result, there are very high river discharge peaks which are taken into consideration and not much possibility of making experimental observations. Correct planning of land use should include some description of river flooding in these critical conditions. To do this a basin scale hydrological model and a robust numerical scheme of the 2D complete SWE have to be integrated. Knowing that experimental validation is very difficult we showed the reliability of the numerical schemes used to get consistent solutions. A watershed runoff forecast model was used to obtain the river hydrograph to apply as a boundary condition in the study of river flood inundation on the flat plain near the Olbia airport (Sardinia, Italy. A threshold of 1 cm was used as a condition to consider whether or not to include the cell in the computational field in the description of the wetting-drying process. And this seems to fit well in the model. The numerical model is conservative, ensuring preservation of water volumes with a precision of 10-4. The great surface water gradient in some sections is evident proof of the importance of the SWE inertial terms in wave front propagation. The flow peak loss during the alluvial plane flooding resulted in a reduction of about 10% of the discharge peak at the river mouth. This numerical method, which has been validated in previous similar applications, describes sufficiently well flooding in a complex area with river morphology limited by airport and road infrastructures.

  12. Information System for Land-Use Planning and Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiao; MIAO Fang

    2008-01-01

    In order to maintain the overall social interest in land use and improve the level of land administration, an information system for land-use planning and management (ISLUPM) was established, which is composed of presentation layer, business logic layer and data layer in the general structure. The application support platform of the ISLUPM, built based on COM, COM+ and .NET standard components, includes data engine, data management, assemblies, components management, operation management, and interface. Then, an elaboration was made on major functions of the ISLUPM, such as planning revision scheme, planning operation flow, digital processing, thematic analysis and inquiry, and preparation of the chart of reserved land resources. The developed system has been successfully applied to the land-use planning and management work of Longquanyi District, Chengdu, China. It may provide a reference for development of geographic information system (GIS) for land and resources.

  13. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Land Use Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Land Use Plan for Benton Lake NWR outlines policies for Refuge uses including: farming, grassland management, fur resource management, and seed harvesting. A...

  15. Tourism stakeholder perspectives on land use plan implementation

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree to which shared decision-making (SDM) processes used in the development and implementation of land use plans benefited the backcountry tourism industry in the Cariboo-Chilcotin region of British Columbia. Based on the perspectives provided by key informants from the region, the research suggests that the employment of SDM methods provided several overriding opportunities for the tourism industry. These included creating easier and more effective venues for resol...

  16. Hierarchical resource analysis for land use planning through remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, B. H.; Frazee, C. J.; Cox, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    A hierarchical resource analysis was applied to remote sensing data to provide maps at Planning Levels I and III (Anderson et al., U.S. Geological Survey Circular 671) for Meade County, S. Dak. Level I land use and general soil maps were prepared by visual interpretation of imagery from a false color composite of Landsat MSS bands 4, 5, and 7 and single bands (5 and 7). A modified Level III land use map was prepared for the Black Hills area from RB-57 photography enlarged to a scale of 1:24,000. Level III land use data were used together with computer-generated interpretive soil maps to analyze relationships between developed and developing areas and soil criteria.

  17. Land use plan : Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this land use plan for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge is to outline the principal practices and procedures necessary to establish a reasonable...

  18. Land Use Plan Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This comprehensive plan outlines the goals for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge on how the refuge lands and waters will be used in relation to the overall refuge...

  19. Impact assessment of land use planning driving forces on environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Longgao, E-mail: chenlonggao@163.com [Institute of Land Resources, Jiangsu Normal University (JSNU), Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of Land Resources, Jiangsu Normal University (JSNU), Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Li, Long [Department of Geography, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels 1050 (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Land use change may exert a negative impact on environmental quality. A state–impact–state (SIS) model describing a state transform under certain impacts has been integrated into land use planning (LUP) environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). This logical model is intuitive and easy to understand, but the exploration of impact is essential to establish the indicator system and to identify the scope of land use environmental impact when it is applied to a specific region. In this study, we investigated environmental driving forces from land use planning (LUPF), along with the conception, components, scope, and impact of LUPF. This method was illustrated by a case study in Zoucheng, China. Through the results, we concluded that (1) the LUPF on environment are impacts originated from the implementation of LUP on a regional environment, which are characterized by four aspects: magnitude, direction, action point, and its owner; (2) various scopes of LUPF on individual environmental elements based on different standards jointly define the final scope of LUPEA; (3) our case study in Zoucheng demonstrates the practicability of this proposed approach; (4) this method can be embedded into LUPEA with direction, magnitudes, and scopes of the LUPF on individual elements obtained, and the identified indicator system can be directly employed into LUPEA and (5) the assessment helps to identify key indicators and to set up a corresponding strategy to mitigate the negative impact of LUP on the environment, which are two important objectives of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in LUP. - Highlights: • Environmental driving forces from land use planning (LUPF) are investigated and categorized. • Our method can obtains the direction, magnitudes and scopes of environmental driving forces. • The LUPEA scope is determined by the combination of various scopes of LUPF on individual elements. • LUPF assessment can be embedded into LUPEA. • The method can help to

  20. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-10-01

    This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

  1. Assessment of Probable Future Land Use and Habitat Conditions in Water Resources Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Carlisle and Park (1976); wastewater treatment facility c. Fabos, Green, and Joyner (1978); responsible regional landscape planning . d. Miller, Tom, and...relationships of alternative land uses on various landscape, ecological, and public service resources of prime concern in landscape planning . METLAND...uses is within the context of landscape planning . The description of future uses then is essentially that of the most suitable and desirable usage

  2. Radon in land use planning; Radon i arealplanlegging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Radon poses a health risk. Therefore, it is important that the municipality takes into account radon, in land use planning. This Radiation Info provides an overview of what makes an additional radon prone area and what tools are available to assess this. The background is the Planning and Building Act provisions on risk analysis (ROS) and zones. (eb)

  3. Potential land use planning and assessment in the west part of the Büyük Menderes basin by ILSEN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was planned to investigate the structural properties and soil mapping capability according to rules of the 7. Approximation Soil Taxonomic System of the region western part of the Büyük Menderes Basin by using Landsat satellite images in remote sensing technique. The data gathered from field observation about some soil properties and land requirements of different land use types were correlated and as a result of that the boundaries of land use patterns were carried out. Land use patterns were detected according to suitable land use classes for soil mapping units and potential land use map were done. Land use assessment is likely to be the prediction of land potential for productive land use types. This case is great important in guiding decisions on land uses in terms of potential and conserving natural resources for future generations. The main objective of this study was to determine land resources and to assess potential land use in the west part of the Büyük Menderes Basin of Aegean region. The study area covers about 24.300 km2 and formed on alluvial material deposited by Büyük Menders River. Using Landsat 5 TM satellite images, which cover back and foot slope of mountain and alluvial plains of the western part of Menderes Basin, and taking physiographic units of the region as basis, detailed soil series and phases were determined. Soils of the region were classified as Entisol, Inceptisol as 2 orders, 4 suborders, 4 great groups and 6 sub groups, and 10 series. Twenty-five different land utilization types grouped into 4 major land use groups were evaluated for the studied area’s soils. ILSEN computer model was used to determined potential land use groups and suitable classes for agricultural uses. In addition, ArcGIS software was used to generate their maps and database. Suitability map for agricultural uses results showed that, distributions of the best, relatively good, problematic and restricted agricultural lands

  4. Integrated Application of RS and GIS to Agriculture Land Use Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper gives some guidelines of land use planning firstly.A framework of agriculture land use planning is designed based on land use suitability evaluation using integrated technologies of RS and GIS.Further work expected is also given.

  5. SMALL HYDRO PLANTS IN LAND USE SYSTEM PLANNING IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Bernatek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small hydropower plants are present in the land use system planning in Poland. At the national level the important role of spatial planning in the development of renewable energy was highlighted, included small hydroplants. However, it seems that at the regional level this demand has not been realized. The necessity of developing small hydroplants as a renewable energy was highlighted, but negative environmental impact was not indicated. At local level legal instrument of small hydropower plants is specified.

  6. The role of land use planning in sustainable rural systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van H.N.

    1998-01-01

    The creation of a more sustainable countryside has become a very important item across the world. Several methods, approaches and policies can be applied and agencies, interests groups etc. can become active in this regard. Land-use planning, as one of these activities, is challenged to play an acti

  7. Sustainable Land-use Planning of Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1.IntroductionChina is now amid rapid urbanization,which,no matter in terms of scale or speed,is unprecedented in the human history.The history of urban development shows that the sustainability of a city is actually determined in the early stage of its

  8. Facility Response Plan (FRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  9. SUSTAINABLE LAND USE PLANNING BASED ON ECOLOGICAL HEALTH --Case Study of Beiwenquan Town, Chongqing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Jin-gan; WEI Chao-fu; XIE De-ti

    2005-01-01

    This paper, taking Beiwenquan Town of Beibei, Chongqing as an example, assessed the impacts of land use on ecological health by comprehensive index method, and discussed methodological system of sustainable land use planning based on ecological health. Results indicated that: 1) From 1992 to 2002, land use changes focused on 12 patterns with the total conversion area of 92.11%, which were related to cultivated land, residential and industrial-mining area, and orchard land. Urbanization and economic reconstruction were the leading driving forces. 2) There was obvious difference of the areas ofecotypes driven by land use change in wide valley and mild slope between 1992 and 2002,while there were little or no difference in steep slope and very steep slope. 3) Both of the conditions of ecological health in 1992 and 2002 were sound, and the ecotypes focused on the types of health and sub-health. But, health ecosystem in 1992, with an area of 764.64ha, accounting for 38.51% of the total evaluation area, was better than that in 2002, with an area of 636.10ha, accounting for 34.19% of the total evaluation area. 4) The ecotypes involved into different ranges have already degenerated, due to humankind's disturbance, while the conditions of ecological health in the same ranges in 1992, regardless of stability and reconstruction, were better than that in 2002.5) The planning scenario based on ecological health was accorded with the practice condition of Beiwenquan Town: 388.29ha of cultivated land could meet the Beiwenquan demand of food and byproduct; 1045.26ha of forest land area, the Beiwenquan demand of ecological health; and 1004.73ha of the residential and industrial-mining area, the Beiwenquan building demand. 6) Sustainable land use planning based on ecological health had higher useful value, because it not only stood to ecological theory, but also satisfied the developmental demand of society and economy.

  10. Siting Urban Agriculture as a Green Infrastructure Strategy for Land Use Planning in Austin, TX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Rogers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Green infrastructure refers to a type of land use design that mimics the natural water cycle by using the infiltration capacities of vegetation, soils, and other natural processes to mitigate stormwater runoff. As a multifunctional landscape, urban agriculture should be seen as a highly beneficial tool for urban planning not only because of its ability to function as a green stormwater management strategy, but also due to the multiple social and environmental benefits it provides. In 2012, the city of Austin adopted a major planning approach titled the “Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan” (IACP outlining the city’s vision for future growth and land use up to 2039. The plan explicitly addresses the adoption of green infrastructure as a target for future land use with urban agriculture as a central component. Addressing this area of land use planning will require tools that can locate suitable areas within the city ideal for the development of green infrastructure. In this study, a process was developed to create a spatially explicit method of siting urban agriculture as a green infrastructure tool in hydrologically sensitive areas, or areas prone to runoff, in east Austin. The method uses geospatial software to spatially analyze open access datasets that include land use, a digital elevation model, and prime farmland soils. Through this method a spatial relationship can be made between areas of high surface runoff and where the priority placement of urban farms should be sited as a useful component of green infrastructure. Planners or geospatial analysts could use such information, along with other significant factors and community input, to aid decision makers in the placement of urban agriculture. This spatially explicit approach for siting potential urban farms, will support the integration of urban agriculture as part of the land use planning of Austin.

  11. Land use planning and chemical sites. Summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Carsten D.

    2000-01-01

    heritage, societal and company aspects, with focus laid on the safety related items. An approach based on efficient frontier curves has been used forcomparison of alternatives having land-use pattern as variable. Central to the application of the proposed methodology is a GIS based software platform...... enabling the users to generate alternatives, select the preferred ones and peruse efficient solutionsboth in terms of the implied land use patterns and the corresponding consequences. Study material has been gathered from planning cases in Sweden, Denmark and Greece. The work described in this report has...

  12. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Closure of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant Lagoon 3 and Land Application Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael G.

    2016-09-23

    This quality assurance project plan describes the technical requirements and quality assurance activities of the environmental data collection/analyses operations to close Central Facilities Area Sewage treatment Plant Lagoon 3 and the land application area. It describes the organization and persons involved, the data quality objectives, the analytical procedures, and the specific quality control measures to be employed. All quality assurance project plan activities are implemented to determine whether the results of the sampling and monitoring performed are of the right type, quantity, and quality to satisfy the requirements for closing Lagoon 3 and the land application area.

  13. Land Use Planning and Disaster: A European Perspective From Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juli Ponce

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the role of EU and EU Member States in relation to disasters and land use planning. It considers how land use planning can evaluate and manage risks to avoid disasters, paying special attention to the European use of precautionary principle, sometimes explained with the sentence “Better safe than Sorry”. The analysis uses especially, but not only, the example of the Spanish legal system taking into account its inclusion in the more general EU legal system. The study also considers public responsibility in preventing disasters and possible consequences of maladministration when taking planning decisions, using real Spanish cases. Finally, the article explores the possibilities of planning as a tool to prevent disasters in relation to two specific areas: location of nuclear plants and new developments regarding the prevention of crime and terrorist attacks by means of urban planning (the so called Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design. El estudio analiza el papel de la Unión Europea (UE y los Estados miembros de la UE en relación con los desastres y la planificación del uso del suelo. Se describe cómo la planificación del uso del suelo puede evaluar y gestionar los riesgos para evitar desastres, prestando especial atención al uso europeo del principio de precaución, a veces resumido en la frase “Más vale prevenir que curar”. El análisis utiliza especialmente, pero no sólo, el ejemplo del sistema jurídico español, teniendo en cuenta su inclusión en el sistema legal general de la UE. El estudio también tiene en cuenta la responsabilidad pública en la prevención de desastres y las posibles consecuencias de la mala administración cuando se toman decisiones de planificación, a través de casos reales españolas. Por último, el artículo explora las posibilidades de la planificación como una herramienta para prevenir desastres en relación a dos áreas específicas: la ubicación de centrales

  14. 76 FR 45606 - Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan and Possible Land Use Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Fish and Wildlife Service Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, Habitat... Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, for the proposed Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP... proposed Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP). The EIS will be a joint Environmental...

  15. Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) Change Detection in Islamabad and its Comparison with Capital Development Authority (CDA) 2006 Master Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaan, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing is very useful for the production of land use and land cover statistics which can be beneficial to determine the distribution of land uses. Using remote sensing techniques to develop land use classification mapping is a convenient and detailed way to improve the selection of areas designed to agricultural, urban and/or industrial areas of a region. In Islamabad city and surrounding the land use has been changing, every day new developments (urban, industrial, commercial and agricultural) are emerging leading to decrease in vegetation cover. The purpose of this work was to develop the land use of Islamabad and its surrounding area that is an important natural resource. For this work the eCognition Developer 64 computer software was used to develop a land use classification using SPOT 5 image of year 2012. For image processing object-based classification technique was used and important land use features i.e. Vegetation cover, barren land, impervious surface, built up area and water bodies were extracted on the basis of object variation and compared the results with the CDA Master Plan. The great increase was found in built-up area and impervious surface area. On the other hand vegetation cover and barren area followed a declining trend. Accuracy assessment of classification yielded 92% accuracies of the final land cover land use maps. In addition these improved land cover/land use maps which are produced by remote sensing technique of class definition, meet the growing need of legend standardization.

  16. Field Sampling Plan for Closure of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant Lagoon 3 and Land Application Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-10-01

    This field sampling plan describes sampling of the soil/liner of Lagoon 3 at the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant. The lagoon is to be closed, and samples obtained from the soil/liner will provide information to determine if Lagoon 3 and the land application area can be closed in a manner that renders it safe to human health and the environment. Samples collected under this field sampling plan will be compared to Idaho National Laboratory background soil concentrations. If the concentrations of constituents of concern exceed the background level, they will be compared to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act preliminary remediation goals and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act levels. If the concentrations of constituents of concern are lower than the background levels, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act levels, or the preliminary remediation goals, then Lagoon 3 and the land application area will be closed. If the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act levels and/or the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act preliminary remediation goals are exceeded, additional sampling and action may be required.

  17. Estimation of soil erosion for a sustainable land use planning: RUSLE model validation by remote sensing data utilization in the Kalikonto watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andriyanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS are increasingly used for planning and natural resources management. GIS and RS is based on pixels is used as a tool of spatial modeling for predicting the erosion. One of the methods developed for predicting the erosion is a Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE. RUSLE is the method used for predicting the erosion associated with runoff gained from five parameters, namely: rain erosivity (R, soil erodibility (K, length of slopes (L, slope (S, and land management (CP. The main constraint encountered in the process of operating the GIS is the calculation of the slope length factor (L.This study was designed to create a plan of sustainable land use and low erosion through the RULSE erosion modeling by utilizing the remote sensing data. With this approach, this study was divided into three activities, namely (1 the preparation and analysis of spatial data for the determination of the parameters and estimating the erosion by using RUSLE models, (2 the validation and calibration of the model of RUSLE by measuring soil erosion at the scale of plots on the field, and (3 Creating a plan of sustainable land use and low erosion with RUSLE. The validation erosion shows the value of R2 = 0.56 and r = 0.74. Results of this study showed that the RUSLE model could be used in the Kalikonto watershed. The erosions at the value of the actual estimation, spatial Plan (RTRW and land capability class in the Kalikonto watershed were 72t / ha / year, 62 t / ha / year and 58 t / ha / year, respectively.

  18. Marine Planning for Potential Wave Energy Facility Placement Amongst a Crowded Sea of Existing Resource Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, B. E.; Fuller, E.; Plummer, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Conversion to renewable energy sources is a logical response to increasing pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean wave energy is the least developed renewable energy source, despite having the highest energy per unit area. While many hurdles remain in developing wave energy, assessing potential conflicts and evaluating tradeoffs with existing uses is essential. Marine planning encompasses a broad array of activities that take place in and affect large marine ecosystems, making it an ideal tool for evaluating wave energy resource use conflicts. In this study, we focus on the potential conflicts between wave energy conversion (WEC) facilities and existing marine uses in the context of marine planning, within the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. First, we evaluated wave energy facility development using the Wave Energy Model (WEM) of the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs (InVEST) toolkit. Second, we ran spatial analyses on model output to identify conflicts with existing marine uses including AIS based vessel traffic, VMS and observer based measures of commercial fishing effort, and marine conservation areas. We found that regions with the highest wave energy potential were distant from major cities and that infrastructure limitations (cable landing sites) restrict integration with existing power grids. We identified multiple spatial conflicts with existing marine uses; especially shipping vessels and various commercial fishing fleets, and overlap with marine conservation areas varied by conservation designation. While wave energy generation facilities may be economically viable in the California Current, this viability must be considered within the context of the costs associated with conflicts that arise with existing marine uses. Our analyses can be used to better inform placement of WEC devices (as well as other types of renewable energy facilities) in the context of marine planning by accounting for economic tradeoffs

  19. Economic feasibility of CHP facilities fueled by biomass from unused agriculture land

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeifer, Antun; Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Ćosić, Boris

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the energy potential of biomass from growing short rotation coppice on unused agricultural land in the Republic of Croatia is used to investigate the feasibility of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) facilities fueled by such biomass. Large areas of agricultural land that remain unused...... for food crops, represent significant potential for growing biomass that could be used for energy. This biomass could be used to supply power plants of up to 15MWe in accordance with heat demands of the chosen locations. The methodology for regional energy potential assessment was elaborated in previous...... work and is now used to investigate the conditions in which such energy facilities could be feasible. The overall potential of biomass from short rotation coppice cultivated on unused agricultural land in the scenarios with 30% of the area is up to 10PJ/year. The added value of fruit trees pruning...

  20. How planners' use and non-use of expert knowledge in land use and transport planning affect the goal achievement potential of plans? Experiences from three Scandinavian cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennøy, Aud; Hansson, Lisa; Lissandrello, Enza;

    2016-01-01

    the plans (if implemented) contribute to achieve defined objectives, which in this paper concern transition toward more sustainable mobility patterns and reduction of traffic volumes. The expert knowledge in question concerns how land use and transport systems developments influence traffic volumes in urban......Changing urban development in more sustainable directions poses numerous challenges for planning practitioners. Expert knowledge could be helpful for planners aiming at facing up to these challenges by developing innovative ways of meeting seemingly contradictive objectives and solving planning...... their planning problems. Instead, they rely on their embedded professional knowledge, which is sometimes outdated or misleading. It is found that changing towards land use and transport systems developments contributing to more sustainable mobility patterns requires considerable efforts from planning...

  1. Study On Safeguard Measures for Implementing Overall Planning of Land Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Based on minutely analysing the main problems existing in safeguard measures for implementing a new round of overall planning of land use,this paper constructs implementation security system of overall planning of land use,and puts forward the principles and basis of formulating safeguard measures for implementing overall planning of land use.Finally,this paper establishes the content system of safeguard measures:effectively strengthen social supervision;strengthen administrative management of land use planning;strengthen economic management of land use planning;reinforce the legal status of planning;establish incentive and constraint mechanism for reinforcing implementation;improve support system of planning.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  3. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Oil Facilities § 154.1047 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or...

  4. Remote sensing in Arizona. [for land use and urban development planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winikka, C. C.; Adams, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Orthophotoquads prepared from high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery were utilized for land use mapping and urban development planning. LANDSAT imagery of rough terrains were evaluated by photographic projection on a viewer screen for enlargement of details.

  5. Remote sensing in Arizona. [for land use and urban development planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winikka, C. C.; Adams, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Orthophotoquads prepared from high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery were utilized for land use mapping and urban development planning. LANDSAT imagery of rough terrains were evaluated by photographic projection on a viewer screen for enlargement of details.

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  7. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Sand Dune Movement in Xinjiang of Northwest China and Prevention of Desertification by Windbreak Facilities in Arid Lands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. MAKI; M. DU; R. SAMESHIMA; B. PAN

    1996-01-01

    .... There are various countermeasure against desertification in arid lands of the world. In this paper, we demonstrated the situation of sand erosion and movement of sand dunes, and we propose the prevention method by using windbreak facilities, i. e...

  9. Land Use and Land Cover, Land Use Inventory for Planning, Published in 2008, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Jefferson County Land Information Office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. It is described as...

  10. Land use planning ballot initiatives in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey D. Kline; Eric M. White

    2010-01-01

    Sustaining farm and forest land has been an important goal in the United States because of the role these lands play in the livelihoods of rural residents while also providing desired open space benefits. However, land use policies to protect rural lands often involve a tension between balancing public interests regarding economic and open space goals with the private...

  11. Land Use Planning in the Urban Sensitive Areas Case Study, Farahzad Valley Stream-Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafieian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended Abstract1-Introduction As an important fundamental Issue in urban planning, land use suitability assessment provides important reference for planning, planning management, planning implementation and planning evaluation. Whether at home or abroad, many scholars and planning workers have made in-depth study and explore at the approaches of land suitability assessment, especially in the use of GIS technology. Land use suitability assessment is an important fundamental work in urban planning. Be restricted by technology and means, qualitative analysis methods are wider used in evaluating land use suitability. It is necessary to explore a quantitative evaluation method to provide a reliable basis for in-depth analysis of urban planning and improve the persuasiveness of the decision-making and objectivity and science of the urban planning. 2-Theoritical BasesUrban valley stream is one of the important factors in making structural and functional evolutions of cities. In these natural corridors, in addition to, permanent or periodic flow of water, visual and natural values, as well as different function/ action pattern -in the form of tourism- recreation, economical functions, and even human life- are existed. In theories related to urban sustainable development, optimum utilization of these areas in the framework of sensitive areas and urban vital plans is considered by urban institution. Urban Managers are using a number of programs and policies to guide and control growth in the urban valley streams. These growth management measures include such policies as:Smart growth programs - includes a range of approaches to contain development by using more efficient and compact urban development patterns that preserve open space and protect environmentally sensitive areas.Alternative zoning ordinances-These can be used to protect forests, wetlands, floodplains, or environmentally sensitive land. There are several different forms of alternative

  12. Mineral resources and land-use planning, the Watkins, Colorado case: a workshop synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J. R.; Agnew, A. B.; Hill, G.; Guernsey, J. L.

    1978-09-01

    The Reclamation and Land Use Planning Program is sponsored jointly through the U.S. Geological Survey's RALI Program and the U.S. Department of Energy's Land Reclamation Program to provide guidance materials and technical services to mining industry and public sector planners concerned with planning for effective land use in surface mine areas. The Program integrates reclamation planning with land use planning to assure maximum benefits to the public from both the reuse of mined areas and the efficient utilization of surface resources. Argonne's Land Reclamation program is a joint effort of the Laboratory's Energy and Environmental Systems Division and Environmental Impact Studies Division. The Program is conducting coordinated applied and basic research on the physical and ecological problems of land reclamation related to surface mining and is developing cost-effective techniques for reclaiming/rehabilitating mined land to productive end uses. The Program conducts integrated research and development projects focused on near- or long-term reclamation problems in major minerals resource areas throughout the U.S. and is responsible for coordinating, evaluating, and disseminating the results of coal mine reclamation studies conducted at other research institutions. This workshop addressed issues of critical importance relating to the potential development of lignite deposits in the vicinity of Denver, Colorado. This synopsis recaps the issues, discussions, and planning efforts of the workshop participants and the expert ''faculty'' who helped make the workshop a success.

  13. The development of a land use inventory for regional planning using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessling, A. H.; Mara, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    Water quality planning in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana is reviewed in terms of use of land use data and satellite imagery. A land use inventory applicable to water quality planning and developed through computer processing of LANDSAT-1 imagery is described.

  14. Land use planning of paddy field using geographic information system and land evaluation in West Lombok, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiatmaka .

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Planning analysis to increase rice production either through intensiḀcation of existing paddy Ḁeld area or ex-tensiḀcation in potential land area was conducted in West Lombok Regency, West Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia. Existing paddy Ḁeld was delineated using high-resolution data from IKONOS imagery of 2012. Land use and land cover outside existing paddy Ḁeld were interpreted using SPOT-5 imagery of 2012. ἀe Automated Land Evaluation System (ALES was used for land suitability analysis for paddy. ἀe results are interpreted in terms of the potential of paddy Ḁeld intensiḀcation in existing paddy Ḁeld area and the potential of extensiḀcation in land potentially used for paddy Ḁeld. ἀe result of analysis showed that in West Lombok Regency, there are still possible to do intensiḀcation and extensiḀca-tion of paddy Ḁeld to increase rice production in order to improve regional food security.

  15. Use of risk assessment panels during revision of the Tongass Land and Resource Management Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles G. Shaw

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the process used to conduct the 16 risk assessment panels and a subsistence working group held during revision of the Tongass land management plan. It provides an overview of how results from the panels were used by forest managers in plan-related decisionmaking, discusses some reactions to the effort, and identifies some opportunities to improve...

  16. Land Use and Natural Resources Planning for Sustainable Ecotourism Using GIS in Surat Thani, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Murayama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the land use and natural resources for future sustainable ecotourism site planning using GIS as a tool. The study is based on 2007 land use land cover data and ecotourism suitability data which are then integrated with other GIS datasets to evaluate the land use and natural resources at a district level in Surat Thani province. The final step of this study was the prioritization of the area that is best suited for ecotourism in assessing ecotourism sustainability in Surat Thani province. The result is useful for tourism facilities development and ecotourism resource utilization where ecotourism could be more developed. Additionally, the results can be used for managers and planners working in local and central governments and other non-governmental organizations. These integrated approaches cover complex and universal issues such as sustainable development of ecotourism, biodiversity conservation and protected area management in a tropical and developing country such as Thailand. Moreover, it is believed that this study can be used as a basis for evaluating the suitability of other areas for ecotourism. In addition, it may also serve as a starting point for more complex studies in the future.

  17. Incorporating land-use requirements and environmental constraints in low-carbon electricity planning for California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Grace C; Torn, Margaret S; Williams, James H

    2015-02-17

    The land-use implications of deep decarbonization of the electricity sector (e.g., 80% below 1990 emissions) have not been well-characterized quantitatively or spatially. We assessed the operational-phase land-use requirements of different low-carbon scenarios for California in 2050 and found that most scenarios have comparable direct land footprints. While the per MWh footprint of renewable energy (RE) generation is initially higher, that of fossil and nuclear generation increases over time with continued fuel use. We built a spatially explicit model to understand the interactions between resource quality and environmental constraints in a high RE scenario (>70% of total generation). We found that there is sufficient land within California to meet the solar and geothermal targets, but areas with the highest quality wind and solar resources also tend to be those with high conservation value. Development of some land with lower conservation value results in lower average capacity factors, but also provides opportunity for colocation of different generation technologies, which could significantly improve land-use efficiency and reduce permitting, leasing, and transmission infrastructure costs. Basing siting decisions on environmentally-constrained long-term RE build-out requirements produces significantly different results, including better conservation outcomes, than implied by the current piecemeal approach to planning.

  18. The land-use of Bandung, its density, overcrowded area and public facility toward a compact city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramita, B.

    2016-04-01

    The concept of a compact city has been introduced since 1973. It is a utopian vision largely driven by a desire to see more efficient uses of resources. In 1980s, the reconfiguration of the physical urban form of metropolitan areas was increasingly debated by both theorists and practitioners. Recently, the concept of a compact city has been more focused on developed countries in which the population tends to decrease. However, in Asia, except Japan which contains many dense cities, it has become a concept which promotes relatively high residential density with mixed land uses, though rather only in population and density. This paper addresses the land-use of Bandung that having the density over 14,000 people/km2, which has been so much potential toward a compact city. Somehow, unprepared ness of urban planning and regulation, the city seemed overwrought to serve its inhabitants. This condition is shown from the demographic condition, especially population density in Bandung based on its sub areas of the city (SWK). The stack of public facilities in a certain district has led the concentration of density and activity, which finally raising the slum and overcrowded settlement. Finally, this paper explores the implications of land use management and describes challenges faced and possible approaches, especially in land-use management strategies to be implemented in Bandung.

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  20. Revisiting a programmatic planning approach: managing linkages between transport and land use planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Tim; Tillema, Taede; Arts, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The body of knowledge on transport and land use planning shows considerable overlap with management theories and practices. Notable examples can be found in project management and strategic management. Recently, in the field of management theory, the idea of programme management has gained

  1. Revisiting a programmatic planning approach: managing linkages between transport and land use planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Tim; Tillema, Taede; Arts, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The body of knowledge on transport and land use planning shows considerable overlap with management theories and practices. Notable examples can be found in project management and strategic management. Recently, in the field of management theory, the idea of programme management has gained prominenc

  2. Selecting reasonable future land use scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, W.E.; Smith, R.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper examines a process to help select the most reasonable future land use scenarios for hazardous waste and/or low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. The process involves evaluating future land use scenarios by applying selected criteria currently used by commercial mortgage companies to determine the feasibility of obtaining a loan for purchasing such land. The basis for the process is that only land use activities for which a loan can be obtained will be considered. To examine the process, a low-level radioactive waste site, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is used as an example. The authors suggest that the process is a very precise, comprehensive, and systematic (common sense) approach for determining reasonable future use of land. Implementing such a process will help enhance the planning, decisionmaking, safe management, and cleanup of present and future disposal facilities.

  3. Cadastre (forest maps) and spatial land uses planning, strategic tool for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Vasileios C.

    2014-08-01

    The rise in the living standards of the Greeks created, especially since 1970, along with other needs and the need for second or holiday home since 1990 after finding the first house on the outskirts of large urban centers. Trying to find land for the creation of new resorts or new type of permanent residences (maisonettes with or without garden, depending on the financial position of each) had the painful consequence of wasteful and uncontrolled use of land, without a program, without the fundamental rules of land planning and the final creation was usually unsightly buildings. The costs were to pay as usually the forest rural lands. The national spatial planning of land use requires that we know the existing land uses in this country, and based on that we can design and decide their land uses on the future in a rational way. On final practical level, this planning leads to mark the boundaries of specific areas of land that are permitted and may change uses. For this reason, one of the most valuable "tools" of that final marking the boundaries is also the forest maps. The paper aims the investigation to determine the modern views on the issues of Cadastre and Land Management with an ulterior view to placing the bases for creating a building plan of an immediate completion of forest maps. Sustainable development as a term denoting a policy of continued economic and social development that does not involve the destruction of the environment and natural resources, but rather guarantees their rational viability.

  4. Evaluating the role of ecosystem serivces in participatory land use planning: proposing a balanced score card

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fürst, C.; Opdam, P.; Inostroza, L.; Luque, S.

    2014-01-01

    The application of the ecosystem services (ES) concept in land use planning has great potential to enhance the awareness of planning actors on their interactions. At the same time it can contribute to improve the linkage between the role of land use patterns and the understanding of land system func

  5. Land and Forest Management by Land Use/ Land Cover Analysis and Change Detection Using Remote Sensing and GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS are the most effective tools in spatial data analysis. Natural resources like land, forest and water, these techniques have proved a valuable source of information generation as well as in the management and planning purposes. This study aims to suggest possible land and forest management strategies in Chakia tahsil based on land use and land cover analysis and the changing pattern observed during the last ten years. The population of Chakia tahsil is mainly rural in nature. The study has revealed that the northern part of the region, which offers for the settlement and all the agricultural practices constitutes nearly 23.48% and is a dead level plain, whereas the southern part, which constitute nearly 76.6% of the region is characterized by plateau and is covered with forest. The southern plateau rises abruptly from the northern alluvial plain with a number of escarpments. The contour line of 100 m mainly demarcates the boundary between plateau and plain. The plateau zone is deeply dissected and highly rugged terrain. The resultant topography comprises of a number of mesas and isolated hillocks showing elevation differences from 150 m to 385 m above mean sea level. Being rugged terrain in the southern part, nowadays human encroachment are taking place for more land for the cultivation. The changes were well observed in the land use and land cover in the study region. A large part of fallow land and open forest were converted into cultivated land.

  6. Integrated mined-area reclamation and land use planning. Volume 4. A bibliography of integrated mined-area reclamation and land use planning, with annotations. [424 citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, L R; LaFevers, J R; Perry, A O; Rice, W Jr

    1976-12-01

    This bibliography has been compiled for use by planners who, within their areas of responsibility, deal with the problems presented by surface mining and reclamation. Every effort has been made to identify and to annotate those entries considered most useful in the development of plans for reclamation and after-mining land use. The coverage of varied surface mining and reclamation studies is intended to access the reader to documents and works related to legal, economic, and technological aspects: materials that treat with procedural, planning, and regulatory factors pertaining to land use and reclamation. The technical level of each annotated entry has been assessed to rank skills required for the comprehension and utilization of the work in question. This bibliography has been formulated to be used as a tool by municipal, county, and regional planners in a field of study in which guidelines are as yet few and diverse in approach.

  7. The Challenge of Developing Social Indicators for Cumulative Effects Assessment and Land Use Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Parkins

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a synopsis on social indicators as relevant to cumulative effects assessment and land use planning. Although much has been done to better understand the social dimensions of environmental assessment, empirical work has been lacking on social indicators that could be used either as measurable inputs or outputs for cumulative effects assessment and land use planning in different kinds of communities and regions. Cumulative effects models currently in practice often fail to address deeper issues of community and regional well-being. Against this gap, social scientists are being asked to make reliable generalizations about functional, measurable relationships between certain social indicators and land use change or scenarios. To address this challenge, the Alberta Research Council held a two-day workshop in 2005 with social scientists. The workshop resulted in a list of prioritized social indicators that could be included in cumulative effects modeling/assessments and land use planning. The top five social indicators included population growth rate, education attainment, self-assessed quality of life, equity, i.e., distribution of benefits, and locus of control. Although consensus on social indicators and social thresholds for cumulative effects models was not reached, the insight gained from the workshop will help inform future cumulative effects assessment and land use planning.

  8. Looking Forward: Using Scenario Modeling to Support Regional Land Use Planning in Northern Yukon, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Hamm

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Regional land use planning provides opportunities for governments, land users, and stakeholders to consider multiple land and resource interests over large geographic areas and meaningful time periods. The broad and integrative nature of regional planning is therefore well suited to assessing the potential cumulative effects of current and future land use activity. For this reason, cumulative effects assessment models and management concepts are playing an increasingly important role in regional planning. We describe how the ALCES® landscape cumulative effects simulation model was used to explore possible outcomes of an oil and gas scenario in the Eagle Plain basin of the North Yukon Planning Region of Yukon Territory, Canada. Scenario modeling was conducted to facilitate informed discussion about key land use issues and practices, potential levels of landscape change, and possible socioeconomic benefits and environmental impacts. Modeling results supported the sustainable development and cumulative effects management recommendations of the North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan. Land use scenario modeling, as applied in this project, was found to be an effective approach for establishing sustainable development guidelines through a regional planning process.

  9. IMROVING URBAN LAND USE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT IN NIGERIA: THE CASE OF AKURE

    OpenAIRE

    Afolabi ARIBIGBOLA

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines urban land use planning and management practices in Akure, Nigeria with the aim of identifying how to improve it and achieve sustainable city development in the country. It highlights land use planning and management policies and regulations in the city. It further discusses the implications of uncoordinated land use management in context of developing world cities and suggests how to improve the present inefficient practices. The paper draws on a systematic survey of land...

  10. Coastal geologic hazards and land-use planning in northwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Martin E.; Morgan, Michael

    1986-12-01

    Detailed mapping of geology-related development risks was completed for seven small, relatively remote communities along the northern Oregon coast in Clatsop and Tillamook counties. More than 45 previously unmapped, active landslides up to 20 km2 in area were mapped along one 15-km section of the 26 km of coastline studied Additional geologic constraints to land use in the study area include marine erosion, ocean and estuarine flooding, wind erosion of dune areas, soil erosion, and, in one community, soil piping Recommendations made on the basis of this mapping were incorporated into comprehensive land-use plans prepared by each community as required by the State of Oregon The principal changes in land-use regulations in the area obtained from this investigation are the rezoning of large tracts of undeveloped land to better reflect geologic limitations, the requiring of site-specific studies by licensed geotechnical experts for developments proposed in certain hazardous areas, the adoption of Chapter 70 of the Uniform Building Code by several communities, and the addition of numerous special regulations on site preparation methods This article shows that geologic data of sufficient detail can be effectively incorporated into local land-use plans when required by state law This is facillitated when state and federal agencies provide good regional geologic information and land-use planning guidelines.

  11. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  14. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    among soil 7 principal types of agroecological functions: (a) Agroclimatic ones of plant supply with photosynthetic active radiation, effective heat and available moisture; (b) Agrochemical functions of crop supply with available macro- and micro-nutrients; (c) Agrophysical ones of favorable condition support for farming effective workability and trafficability; (d) Hydrophysical functions of plant seasonal supply with available moisture and soil air exchange; (e) Phyto-sanitary functions of favorable condition support for crop minimum damage by pathogens, pests and weeds; (f) Ecogeochemical ones of soil resistance to contamination; (g) Ecopedomorphogenetic functions of plant and farming support with soil agroecological quasi-homogeneity in space and time. The IT-based soil evaluation algorithm includes 4 particular ones: (i) the principal agroecological parameters assessment by their modelling or adapted to concrete soil type logistic equation; (ii) agroecological function assessment as corrected harmonic mean from its parameters assessment values; (iii) homogeneous land unit assessment as combination of its functions values; (iv) heterogeneous land unit assessment as weighted average value corrected by soil cover patterns contrast and boundary complexity - with their results visualization. The principal limitations for sustainable land use practices are usually determined by the level of photosynthetic active radiation or soil available water deficit, soil fertility and agrotechnological parameters, risks of soil degradation processes development, crop physiological stress, production or environmental contamination. The agriculture intensification often leads to the raised issue of greenhouse gases, including CO2 (as a result of soil organic carbon mineralization), CH4 (animal production) and N2O (mineral fertilizing), to changes of the profitability and decrease in soil potential of the atmospheric carbon sequestration. The consequence of agricultural land

  15. Achieving compliance with environmental health-related land use planning conditions in Hong Kong: perspectives from traditional motivation theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Rita Li Yi

    2009-11-01

    Environmental health-related land use planning conditions can enhance the environment in Hong Kong. Previous research by others has shown, however, that a lack of compliance with planning conditions often occurs. And as no direct enforcement of planning conditions exists in Hong Kong, it is of interest to understand possible ways in which to increase the motivation of land developers and property owners to comply with planning conditions. The author looked at motivation from the perspective of three traditional motivation theories: Theory X, Theory Y, and incentive theory. While the majority of this article focuses on the enforcement and the legal tests in land use planning conditions, it also presents the results of the first study of the motivations behind Hong Kong land developers to comply with land use planning conditions.

  16. The impact of urban planning on land use and land cover in Pudong of Shanghai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Functional zones in cities constitute the most conspicuous components of newly developed urban areas, and have been a hot spot fordomestic and foreign investors in China, which not only show the expanse of urban space accompanied by the shifts both in landscape (fromrural to urban) and land use(from less extensive to extensive), but also display the transformation of regional ecological functions.By using thetheories and methods of landscape ecology, the structure of landscapes and landscape ecological planning can be analyzed and evaluated forstudying the urban functional zones' layout.In 1990, the Central Government of China declared to develop and open up Pudong New Area so as to promote economic development in Shanghai.Benefited from the advantages of Shanghai' s location and economy, the government of PudongNew Area has successively built up 7 different functional zones over the past decade according to their functions and strategic goals.Based onthe multi-spectral satellite imageries taken in 1990, 1997 and 2000, a landscape ecology analysis was carried out for Pudong New Area ofShanghai, supported by GIS technology.Green space (including croplands) and built-up areas are the major factors considered in developingurban landscape.This paper was mainly concerned with the different spatial patterns and dynamics of green space, built-up areas and newbuildings in different functional zones, as influenced by different functional layouts and development strategies.The rapid urbanization inPudoag New Area resulted in a more homogeneous landscape.Agricultural landscape and suburban landscape were gradually replaced by urbanlandscape as the degree of urbanization increased.As a consequence of urbanization in Pudong, not only built-up patches, but also newly-builtpatches and green patches merged into one large patch, which should be attributed to the construction policy of extensive green space as theurban development process in Pudong New Area.The shape of green area

  17. Land use planning and wildfire: development policies influence future probability of housing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Massada, Avi Bar; Butsic, Van; Keeley, Jon E.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of homes are being destroyed by wildfire in the wildland-urban interface. With projections of climate change and housing growth potentially exacerbating the threat of wildfire to homes and property, effective fire-risk reduction alternatives are needed as part of a comprehensive fire management plan. Land use planning represents a shift in traditional thinking from trying to eliminate wildfires, or even increasing resilience to them, toward avoiding exposure to them through the informed placement of new residential structures. For land use planning to be effective, it needs to be based on solid understanding of where and how to locate and arrange new homes. We simulated three scenarios of future residential development and projected landscape-level wildfire risk to residential structures in a rapidly urbanizing, fire-prone region in southern California. We based all future development on an econometric subdivision model, but we varied the emphasis of subdivision decision-making based on three broad and common growth types: infill, expansion, and leapfrog. Simulation results showed that decision-making based on these growth types, when applied locally for subdivision of individual parcels, produced substantial landscape-level differences in pattern, location, and extent of development. These differences in development, in turn, affected the area and proportion of structures at risk from burning in wildfires. Scenarios with lower housing density and larger numbers of small, isolated clusters of development, i.e., resulting from leapfrog development, were generally predicted to have the highest predicted fire risk to the largest proportion of structures in the study area, and infill development was predicted to have the lowest risk. These results suggest that land use planning should be considered an important component to fire risk management and that consistently applied policies based on residential pattern may provide substantial benefits for

  18. Land use planning and wildfire: development policies influence future probability of housing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra D Syphard

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of homes are being destroyed by wildfire in the wildland-urban interface. With projections of climate change and housing growth potentially exacerbating the threat of wildfire to homes and property, effective fire-risk reduction alternatives are needed as part of a comprehensive fire management plan. Land use planning represents a shift in traditional thinking from trying to eliminate wildfires, or even increasing resilience to them, toward avoiding exposure to them through the informed placement of new residential structures. For land use planning to be effective, it needs to be based on solid understanding of where and how to locate and arrange new homes. We simulated three scenarios of future residential development and projected landscape-level wildfire risk to residential structures in a rapidly urbanizing, fire-prone region in southern California. We based all future development on an econometric subdivision model, but we varied the emphasis of subdivision decision-making based on three broad and common growth types: infill, expansion, and leapfrog. Simulation results showed that decision-making based on these growth types, when applied locally for subdivision of individual parcels, produced substantial landscape-level differences in pattern, location, and extent of development. These differences in development, in turn, affected the area and proportion of structures at risk from burning in wildfires. Scenarios with lower housing density and larger numbers of small, isolated clusters of development, i.e., resulting from leapfrog development, were generally predicted to have the highest predicted fire risk to the largest proportion of structures in the study area, and infill development was predicted to have the lowest risk. These results suggest that land use planning should be considered an important component to fire risk management and that consistently applied policies based on residential pattern may provide

  19. The Student Business Plan: Useful or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Colin; Penaluna, Andy; Matlay, Harry; Penaluna, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a critical discussion of the role of the business plan in current enterprise educational practice. In addition to reviewing recent work that considers the "for" and "against" arguments about the use of business plans in higher education, the authors suggest that the context of student learning is largely…

  20. Predicting the impact of lava flows at Mount Etna by an innovative method based on Cellular Automata: Applications regarding land-use and civil defence planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisci, G. M.; Avolio, M. V.; D'Ambrosio, D.; di Gregorio, S.; Lupiano, G. V.; Rongo, R.; Spataro, W.; Benhcke, B.; Neri, M.

    2009-04-01

    Forecasting the time, character and impact of future eruptions is difficult at volcanoes with complex eruptive behaviour, such as Mount Etna, where eruptions occur from the summit and on the flanks, affecting areas distant from each other. Modern efforts for hazard evaluation and contingency planning in volcanic areas draw heavily on hazard maps and numerical simulations. The computational model here applied belongs to the SCIARA family of lava flow simulation models. In the specific case this is the SCIARA-fv release, which is considered to give the most accurate and efficient performance, given the extent (567 km2) of the study area and the great number of simulations to be carried out. The model is based on the Cellular Automata computational paradigm and, specifically, on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata approach for the modelling of spatially extended dynamic systems2. This work addresses the problem of compiling high-detailed susceptibility maps with an elaborate approach in the numerical simulation of Etnean lava flows, based on the results of 39,300 simulations of flows erupted from a grid of 393 hypothetical vents in the eastern sector of Etna. This sector was chosen because it is densely populated and frequently affected by flank eruptions. Besides the definition of general susceptibility maps, the availability of a large number of lava flows of different eruption types, magnitudes and locations simulated for this study allows the instantaneous extraction of various scenarios on demand. For instance, in a Civil Defence oriented application, it is possible to identify all source areas of lava flows capable of affecting a given area of interest, such as a town or a major infrastructure. Indeed, this application is rapidly accomplished by querying the simulation database, by selecting the lava flows that affect the area of interest and by circumscribing their sources. Eventually, a specific category of simulation is dedicated to the assessment of protective

  1. Application of Scenario Analysis and Multiagent Technique in Land-Use Planning: A Case Study on Sanjiang Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Land-use planning has triggered debates on social and environmental values, in which two key questions will be faced: one is how to see different planning simulation results instantaneously and apply the results back to interactively assist planning work; the other is how to ensure that the planning simulation result is scientific and accurate. To answer these questions, the objective of this paper is to analyze whether and how a bridge can be built between qualitative and quantitative approaches for land-use planning work and to find out a way to overcome the gap that exists between the ability to construct computer simulation models to aid integrated land-use plan making and the demand for them by planning professionals. The study presented a theoretical framework of land-use planning based on scenario analysis (SA method and multiagent system (MAS simulation integration and selected freshwater wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain of China as a case study area. Study results showed that MAS simulation technique emphasizing quantitative process effectively compensated for the SA method emphasizing qualitative process, which realized the organic combination of qualitative and quantitative land-use planning work, and then provided a new idea and method for the land-use planning and sustainable managements of land resources.

  2. Application of scenario analysis and multiagent technique in land-use planning: a case study on Sanjiang wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan; Ni, Shi-Jun; Kong, Bo; He, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Cheng-Jiang; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Pan, Xin; Xia, Chao-Xu; Li, Xuan-Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Land-use planning has triggered debates on social and environmental values, in which two key questions will be faced: one is how to see different planning simulation results instantaneously and apply the results back to interactively assist planning work; the other is how to ensure that the planning simulation result is scientific and accurate. To answer these questions, the objective of this paper is to analyze whether and how a bridge can be built between qualitative and quantitative approaches for land-use planning work and to find out a way to overcome the gap that exists between the ability to construct computer simulation models to aid integrated land-use plan making and the demand for them by planning professionals. The study presented a theoretical framework of land-use planning based on scenario analysis (SA) method and multiagent system (MAS) simulation integration and selected freshwater wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain of China as a case study area. Study results showed that MAS simulation technique emphasizing quantitative process effectively compensated for the SA method emphasizing qualitative process, which realized the organic combination of qualitative and quantitative land-use planning work, and then provided a new idea and method for the land-use planning and sustainable managements of land resources.

  3. Smart facility location planning for Smart Cities: using GIS technology and facility provision standards for pro-active planning of social facilities to support smart growth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Chéri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a rational approach to the planning of social facility provision to eradicate service backlogs of the current period as well as preparing for the future. For more than a decade a GIS based methodology has been used in South...

  4. 435 LAND USE PLANNING AND HOUSING SITUATION IN THE WA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-07-05

    Jul 5, 2013 ... Housing insufficiency is a major problem confronting most Ghanaian ... marginalize, create a sense of inadequacy and ... have inadequate access to waste collection and ..... Waste. Recycling, Urban Gardening, and Land Use.

  5. Land Use Plan Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents various pieces of information about Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge that includes climate, history of past land uses, economic outlook,...

  6. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  7. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  8. A novel trajectory planning strategy for aircraft emergency landing using Gauss pseudospectral method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohua MENG; Jinwu XIANG; Zhangping LUO; Yiru REN; Nanjian ZHUANG

    2014-01-01

    To improve the survivability during an emergency situation, an algorithm for aircraft forced landing trajectory planning is proposed. The method integrates damaged aircraft modelling and trajectory planning into an optimal control framework. In order to deal with the complex aircraft flight dynamics, a solving strategy based on Gauss pseudospetral method (GPM) is presented. A 3-DOF nonlinear mass-point model taking into account the wind is developed to approximate the aircraft flight dynamics after loss of thrust. The solution minimizes the forced landing duration, with respect to the constraints that translate the changed dynamics, flight envelope limitation and operational safety requirements. The GPM is used to convert the trajectory planning problem to a nonlinear programming problem (NLP), which is solved by sequential quadratic programming algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can generate the minimum-time forced landing trajectory in event of engine-out with high efficiency and precision.

  9. Application of a LUTI model for the assessment of land use plans and public transport investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bok, Michiel; Geurs, Karst Teunis; Zondag, Barry; Viegas, J.M.; Macario, R.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated land-use and transport interaction models (LUTI) are praised for their ability to evaluate land-use and transport planning in an integrated and consistent modeling system. However, applications of empirically estimated land use models are rare. This paper will present the application of

  10. Urban land planning in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeković Slavka L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the capitalization, urban land management and planning routine have been explored. The focus dwells on the praxis and urban planning perspectives as a link and means for realizing the public interest in space and the role of 'urban transplants' as a lever of urban development. It has also been pointed to a certain discrimination of the property status and property rights through the category of 'public interest', which is articulated by way of urban planning. The unfairness of the existing planning system towards private property and 'taxation' of entrepreneurial activities is evident, especially in urban land use i.e. installing the height of the land rent. It is expected that urban planning is competent upon the background of societal democratization, privatization and introduction of market institutions where the perspectives shift towards democratic transformation, the regulatory role and protection of property rights and different actors’ interests in using urban land. The conclusion is that changes in the management of urban land are required with recommendations to consider public-private sector partnerships.

  11. Multifunctional Urban Agriculture for Sustainable Land Use Planning in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Taylor Lovell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban agriculture offers an alternative land use for integrating multiple functions in densely populated areas. While urban agriculture has historically been an important element of cities in many developing countries, recent concerns about economic and food security have resulted in a growing movement to produce food in cities of developed countries including the United States. In these regions, urban agriculture offers a new frontier for land use planners and landscape designers to become involved in the development and transformation of cities to support community farms, allotment gardens, rooftop gardening, edible landscaping, urban forests, and other productive features of the urban environment. Despite the growing interest in urban agriculture, urban planners and landscape designers are often ill-equipped to integrate food-systems thinking into future plans for cities. The challenge (and opportunity is to design urban agriculture spaces to be multifunctional, matching the specific needs and preferences of local residents, while also protecting the environment. This paper provides a review of the literature on urban agriculture as it applies to land use planning in the United States. The background includes a brief historical perspective of urban agriculture around the world, as well as more recent examples in the United States. Land use applications are considered for multiple scales, from efforts that consider an entire city, to those that impact a single building or garden. Barriers and constraints to urban agriculture are discussed, followed by research opportunities and methodological approaches that might be used to address them. This work has implications for urban planners, landscape designers, and extension agents, as opportunities to integrate urban agriculture into the fabric of our cities expand.

  12. An interactive water indicator assessment tool to support land use planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Jansen, H.C.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive web-based rapid assessment tool that generates key water related indicators to support decision making by stakeholders in land use planning. The tool is built on a consistent science based method that combines remote sensing with hydrological and socioeconomic anal

  13. Smart facility location planning using GIS technology & facility provision standards for pro-active planning of social facilities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available and Industrial Research SOUTH AFRICA 2 © CSIR 2016 www.csir.co.za Structure of presentation • Key informants & objectives • Linking Accessibility planning; Planning Support Systems and the Smart City concept • Approach & provision... of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory governance” Caragllui 2011 Planning Support Systems (PSS) can be defined as geo-information technology...

  14. An inexact risk management model for agricultural land-use planning under water shortage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Feng, Changchun; Dai, Chao; Li, Yongping; Li, Chunhui; Liu, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Water resources availability has a significant impact on agricultural land-use planning, especially in a water shortage area such as North China. The random nature of available water resources and other uncertainties in an agricultural system present risk for land-use planning and may lead to undesirable decisions or potential economic loss. In this study, an inexact risk management model (IRM) was developed for supporting agricultural land-use planning and risk analysis under water shortage. The IRM model was formulated through incorporating a conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) constraint into an inexact two-stage stochastic programming (ITSP) framework, and could be used to control uncertainties expressed as not only probability distributions but also as discrete intervals. The measure of risk about the second-stage penalty cost was incorporated into the model so that the trade-off between system benefit and extreme expected loss could be analyzed. The developed model was applied to a case study in the Zhangweinan River Basin, a typical agricultural region facing serious water shortage in North China. Solutions of the IRM model showed that the obtained first-stage land-use target values could be used to reflect decision-makers' opinions on the long-term development plan. The confidence level α and maximum acceptable risk loss β could be used to reflect decisionmakers' preference towards system benefit and risk control. The results indicated that the IRM model was useful for reflecting the decision-makers' attitudes toward risk aversion and could help seek cost-effective agricultural land-use planning strategies under complex uncertainties.

  15. Land use planning: A potential force for retaining habitat connectivity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L. Shafer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE is perceived to have been isolated from the population in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem for a century. Better land use planning is needed to thwart progressive intra- and inter-ecosystem habitat fragmentation, especially due to private land development. The dilemma of private lands being intermixed in large landscapes is addressed. This review attempts to identify some land use planning levels and tools which might facilitate dispersal by the grizzly bear and other large mammals. The planning levels discussed include national, regional, state, county and municipal, and federal land management agency. Specific potential federal tools mentioned include zoning, Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, the Endangered Species Act, beyond boundary authority, land exchanges, less-than-fee acquisition and other incentives, the Northern Rockies Ecosystem Protection Act, and federal land annexation. Besides summarizing existing recommendations, some derived observations are offered.

  16. The risk component in Land Use Planning Programs: the case of the Regional and Marine Use Planning Program for the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Rosete Vergés

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The concern to include in the land use planning programs aspects related to risk management has about 15 years. In a few cases the presence of a specific danger has been the trigger to start a land use planning process. This is true for processes like The Regional Land Use Planning of the Popocatepetl Volcano and his Core Area, The Land Use Planning of the Monarch Butterfly Region or The Regional Land Use Planning of the Necaxa and Laxaxalpan Watersheds. On the other hand, even though the use of spatial models focused on the selection of vulnerable areas to climate change risks has been as strong research issue for the last 14 years, the last six years were determinant as in this time models have grown stronger on the methodological level. The identification of those climate change danger vulnerable areas has been only recently incorporated into the methodology. With the increase of natural danger associated to global climate change, the inclusion of guidelines focused on mitigation and adaptation in the Land Use Planning Programs is a must, especially in those areas that proof to be more vulnerable to those effects.

  17. Task of engineering geology in land-use planning on the example of four selected geofactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Juriš

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an evaluation of four selected geobarriers (flood lands, radon hazard, undermining and slope movements by means of geographic information systems that are geofactors endangering or limiting landscape and environment or make certain land use impossible. The objective is to improve the possibilities of their implementation in land use planning. The research was carried out in the area numbered 4, which is one out of five realized model areas in the future. It is located in Ostrava, the third largest agglomeration in the north-west of the Czech Republic, which has been most affected by anthropogenic industrial and mining activities among the Czech cities as well as in the European scope. The area is defined by a map sheet 15-43-09 in the town districts of Mariánské Hory a Hulváky, Nová Ves, Svinov, Třebovice, Hošťálkovice, Moravská Ostrava a Přívoz, Ostrava – Jih and Vítkovice.

  18. The South Florida Ecosystem Portfolio Model - A Map-Based Multicriteria Ecological, Economic, and Community Land-Use Planning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiosa, William B.; Bernknopf, Richard; Hearn, Paul; Hogan, Dianna; Strong, David; Pearlstine, Leonard; Mathie, Amy M.; Wein, Anne M.; Gillen, Kevin; Wachter, Susan

    2009-01-01

    issues of regional ecological sustainability can be explored with the EPM (for example, changes in biodiversity potential and regional habitat fragmentation), it does not attempt to define or evaluate long-term ecological sustainability as such. Instead, the EPM is intended to provide transparent first-order indications of the direction of ecological, economic, and community change, not to make detailed predictions of ecological, economic, and social outcomes. In short, the EPM is an attempt to widen the perspectives of its users by integrating natural and social scientific information in a framework that recognizes the diversity of values at stake in South Florida land-use planning. For terrestrial ecosystems, land-cover change is one of the most important direct drivers of changes in ecosystem services (Hassan and others, 2005). More specifically, the fragmentation of habitat from expanding low-density development across landscapes appears to be a major driver of terrestrial species decline and the impairment of terrestrial ecosystem integrity, in some cases causing irreversible impairment from a land-use planning perspective (Brody, 2008; Peck, 1998). Many resource managers and land-use planners have come to realize that evaluating land-use conversions on a parcel-by-parcel basis leads to a fragmented and narrow view of the regional effects of natural land-cover loss to development (Marsh and Lallas, 1995). The EPM is an attempt to integrate important aspects of the coupled natural-system/human-system view from a regional planning perspective. The EPM evaluates proposed land-use changes, both conversion and intensification, in terms of relevant ecological, economic, and social criteria that combine information about probable land-use outcomes, based on ecological and environmental models, as well as value judgments, as expressed in user-modifiable preference models. Based on on-going meetings and interviews with stakeholders and potential tool users we foc

  19. Interdisciplinary research on the application of ERTS-1 data to the regional land use planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, J. L.; Kiefer, R. W.; Mccarthy, M. M.; Niemann, B. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Although the degree to which ERTS-1 imagery can satisfy regional land use planning data needs is not yet known, it appears to offer means by which the data acquisition process can be immeasurably improved. This paper documents the initial experiences of an interdisciplinary group attempting to formulate ways of analyzing the effectiveness of ERTS-1 imagery as a base for environmental monitoring and the resolution of regional land allocation problems. Because of the need to describe and depict regional resource complexity in an interrelatable state, certain resources within the geographical regions have been inventoried and stored in a two-dimensional computer-based map form. Computer oriented processes were developed to provide for the economical storage, analysis and spatial display of natural and cultural data for regional land use planning purposes. Statistical programs have been developed that correlate interpreted data with stored data, both spatially and numerically.

  20. Can less sometimes be more? Integrating land use and transport planning on Merseyside (1965–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B. Fischer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of land use planning with other spatially significant policy sectors has been a longstanding aspiration and subject of debate in the planning profession and academia. The strategic planning of the 1960s and 1970s, for example, frequently aimed to promote a more ‘spatialised’ management of public policies and programmes. More recently, in the 1990s and 2000s the notion of ‘spatial planning’, popularised by international debates and new forms of governance and public management, has similarly placed an emphasis on the coherent management and coordination of policies and activities with a spatial impact. Achieving greater coordination between land use and transport policy has been a recurring theme in discussions on the integration of land use planning and other sectors. Informed by the context outlined above, this paper considers integration between land use and transport policies, plans, programmes and projects from both a conceptual and empirical perspective. It postulates the existence of a continuum model of integration between policy sectors ranging from ‘light’ to ‘deep’ integration and identifies barriers to and enablers of the achievement of effective integration. These elements are then used to frame and interpret evidence on the integration of land use and transport policies in Merseyside (UK between 1965 and 2008. The findings indicate that effective integration is more likely to happen at the centre of a continuum between light and deep integration, with the implication being that deeper integration between policy sectors does not necessarily result in more effective integration overall.

  1. Facility Response Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-06

    10,500 gallons)? Yes Are rmarn transfer No opwatbons excsively moble (O.e tank truck at dock)? Signfiant and Substanlla harm substantial harm L Submit...current technology . one or more of the following provisions will normally be found on newer tank installationst " High-liquid level alarms with an...transportation- related facilities in adverse weather. The appropriate limitations for such planning are available technology and the practical and

  2. Child- and youth-friendly land-use and transport planning guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, R.; O' Brien, C. [Centre for Sustainable Transportation, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-04-27

    Increased automobile use has been associated with rising obesity, reduced academic performance and compromised emotional development in children and youths. This paper proposed a range of guidelines focused on the needs of children and young people. It is intended for use by municipalities or other agencies in transport and land-use planning. Recommendations included the appointment of a staff or council member responsible for bringing a children's perspective to transport and land use planning issues; an identification of the travel needs of young people; an exploration of pedestrian routes used by children to ensure their safety and useability; and the arrangement of walking buses and other means of supervision for very young children. The construction of separate sidewalks for children and youth on heavy traffic roads was recommended, as well as separate bicycle paths and provisions at intersections. It was suggested that planners should ensure that destinations needed by children are within walking or cycling distance. It was also suggested that the transit system should be made safer and introduce or maintain low fares. It was observed that school funding formulas encourage the construction and use of large schools that are more likely to have traffic congestion, and that parents often pressure school boards for more buses so that children will not have to walk or cycle to school. Reductions in road traffic and the enforcement of speed limits in urban areas were recommended, as well as the use of low emission or electric vehicles. It was suggested that there is a lack of parental awareness regarding the short- and long-term health impacts of driving their children rather than supporting active transport. 90 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. Analysis of subsurface drainage for land use planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorjani, H.

    1990-01-01

    The trend of increasing agricultural output in recent decades has been noted. To some extent this increase has been due to a myopic view on growth and development that involved an unabated exploitation of land and water resources with intensive use of complex technology. In this process, for the pas

  4. Land Use and Land Cover, Land Use - created for Comp plan, Published in 2006, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Board Of Commissioners.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2006. It is described as...

  5. Chemical risk assessment for storage of hazardous materials in the context of Land Use Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Ozunu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Historical technological accidents caused in numerous occasions the major environmentalpollution and the loss of many human lives. Lessons learned from these accidents contributedsignificantly to the development of technological safety in two ways: technological and legislative. Afterthree years from the adherence of Romania to EU, a coherent legislation for land-use planning is stillmissing in the context of Article 12 of Seveso Directive. Nowadays there are more than 200 Seveso-typeeconomical operators in Romania, most of them with major risk, located close to areas highly vulnerablefor population or environment. The elaboration of risk assessment studies for the technological accidentsprevention, land-use planning and emergency planning is necessary and essential for these sites. Basedon these studies the population can be informed, instructed and prepared for accidents, thus savingmany lives. In this paper the development of a risk assessment methodology for land-use andemergency planning is proposed for Seveso-type sites, where large quantities of dangerous, explosive,flammable or toxic substances are stored, handled or processed. Three case studies were consideredwhile elaborating this methodology. These case studies include technological accident scenarios for thestorage of common hazardous substances: propane, chlorine and ammonium nitrate. Severalmethodologies applied in the EU member states were approached and the proposed methodology isbased on the results of this research.

  6. Integrating transportation and land use planning at the metropolitan level in North America: multilevel governance in Toronto and Chicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny R. Tremblay-Racicot

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article compares the policies and processes by which transportation and land use planning are integra¬ted in metropolitan Toronto, Canada, and Chicago, in the United States. Using twenty-four semi-structured interviews with key informants, it describes the array of interventions undertaken by governmental and non-governmental actors in their respective domains to shed light on how the challenge of integrating trans¬portation and land use planning is addressed on both sides of the border. Evidence concerning the political dynamics in Toronto and Chicago demonstrates that the capacity of metropolitan institutions to adopt and implement plans that integrate transportation with land use fundamentally depends on the leadership of the province or the state government. Although the federal government of each nation can bypass the sub-national level and intervene in local affairs by funding transportation projects that include land use components, its capacity to promote a coherent metropolitan vision is inherently limited. In the absence of leadership at the provincial or state level, the presence of a policy entrepreneur or a strong civic capacity at the regional level can be a key factor in the adoption and implementation of innovative reforms.

  7. Land Use Planning and the Consequences of Smart Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Jentsch

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Smart Growth is a current buzzword which implies that all growth is good if it is planned. But urban planning usually fails because it concentrates on each city as the center of its own universe, starting with a downtown and working out. This is unrealistic but common, really a misapplication of the concentric zone theory of the early industrial city to the modern world. The author began his career as a planner with the Pruitt-Igoe project in St. Lewis and uses that as one example of why planning failed then as it continues to do so today. (A video file is included.

  8. Environmental geology for land use and regional planning in the Bandung Basin, West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhari, S.; Siebenhüner, M.

    The demand on land and natural resources in the Greater Bandung area increases rapidly with increasing population and economic growth. Land use changes and over-exploitation of natural resources have significantly caused negative environmental impacts. In the period 1989-1993, an Indonesian-German technical cooperation project between the Directorate of Environmental Geology (Indonesia) and the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany) has been conducting a study to improve the conservation and management of the natural resources for regional planning in the Bandung Basin. The Bandung Basin consists of a plain which is surrounded by a mountainous chain. The mountainous area is mostly dominated by Quaternary volcanic products such as lava, breccia, agglomerate, lahar, tuff, and andesite intrusions. The plain comprises thick alluvial deposits of river and lacustrine origin. Tertiary sediments only cover the western part of the basin. The Quaternary volcanic products do not only produce fertile agricultural soils but also are the important source of various construction materials and act as groundwater recharge. From the environmental geology point of view, the physical development,of the Greater Bandung area faces various constraints. These include conflict among urban development, agricultural land, groundwater protection, extraction of mineral resources, and potential waste disposal sites. In addition, some areas are restricted for development due to: (a) their poor foundation characteristics; (b) location in flood prone areas; and (c) geological hazards such as landslides and lahar flows. Operation of many existing and abandoned waste disposal dumping facilities in geologically unfavorable areas has contaminated both the groundwater and surface water. Improper exploitation technique in many quarries and pits has also endangered the environment, such as destabilization of slope, increasing danger of landslides and erosion, and increasing

  9. Development and use of consolidated criteria for evaluation of emergency preparedness plans for DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, K.; Kier, P.H.; Baldwin, T.E.

    1995-07-01

    Emergency preparedness at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is promoted by development and quality control of response plans. To promote quality control efforts, DOE has developed a review document that consolidates requirements and guidance pertaining to emergency response planning from various DOE and regulatory sources. The Criteria for Evaluation of Operational Emergency Plans (herein referred to as the Criteria document) has been constructed and arranged to maximize ease of use in reviewing DOE response plans. Although developed as a review instrument, the document also serves as a de facto guide for plan development, and could potentially be useful outside the scope of its original intended DOE clientele. As regulatory and DOE requirements are revised and added in the future, the document will be updated to stay current.

  10. Cad Graphics in Facilities Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Linda M.

    1984-01-01

    By applying a computer-aided drafting system to a range of facilities layouts and plans, a division of Tektronix, Inc., Oregon, is maintaining staffing levels with an added workload. The tool is also being used in other areas of the company for illustration, design, and administration. (MLF)

  11. Tsunami Hazard Preventing Based Land Use Planning Model Using GIS Techniques in Muang Krabi, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Salam Soomro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The terrible tsunami disaster, on 26 December 2004 hit Krabi, one of the ecotourist and very fascinating provinces of southern Thailand including its various regions e.g. Phangna and Phuket by devastating the human lives, coastal communications and the financially viable activities. This research study has been aimed to generate the tsunami hazard preventing based lands use planning model using GIS (Geographical Information Systems based on the hazard suitability analysis approach. The different triggering factors e.g. elevation, proximity to shore line, population density, mangrove, forest, stream and road have been used based on the land use zoning criteria. Those criteria have been used by using Saaty scale of importance one, of the mathematical techniques. This model has been classified according to the land suitability classification. The various techniques of GIS, namely subsetting, spatial analysis, map difference and data conversion have been used. The model has been generated with five categories such as high, moderate, low, very low and not suitable regions illustrating with their appropriate definition for the decision makers to redevelop the region.

  12. Planning of public healthcare facility using a location allocation modelling: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, S. Sarifah Radiah; Moin, Noor Hasnah; Omar, Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Finding the correct location of any facility and determining the demands which are to be assigned to it is very crucial in public health service. This is to ensure that the public gain maximum benefits. This article analyzes the previous location decisions of public primary healthcare (PHC) facilities in the district of Kuala Langat, Malaysia. With total population of 220214 (in 2010), the PHC in the district is currently served by 28 facilities. The percentages of total population covered (in 2007) within the maximum allowable distance of 3km and 5km are 69.7 percent and 77.8 percent respectively. This is very low compared to the Malaysian National Health Policy of Health for All or 100 percent coverage. The determination of health facility location should be planned carefully to further increase effective primary health service to the nation that is required for economic sustainability.

  13. Public Participation in Land Use Planning:Values and Case Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Objective:we want to explore values and methods of public participation in land use planning through analysis on values of public participation and case of Ji’an County in Jiangxi Province.Methods:document and data method,case analysis method,qualitative and quantitative combined methods.Results:public participation in land use plays a positive role in improving science and practice of planning.Conclusions:preparation and implementation of land use planning should manifest human-oriented,public participation,wisdom of the masses,scientific demonstration,and democratic decision-making.

  14. Land Use and Land Cover, Existing land use derived from orthoimagery. Ground-truthing from discussion with local plan commission members., Published in 2000, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Portage County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Land Use and Land Cover dataset current as of 2000. Existing land use derived from orthoimagery. Ground-truthing from discussion with local plan commission members..

  15. A Land-Use-Planning Simulation Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Cirucci, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Google Earth (GE) is proving to be a valuable tool in the science classroom for understanding the environment and making responsible environmental decisions (Bodzin 2008). GE provides learners with a dynamic mapping experience using a simple interface with a limited range of functions. This interface makes geospatial analysis accessible and…

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  17. Simulation Planning for Sustainable Use of Land Resources: Case study in Diamou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diallo Yacouba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we presented the simulation planning scheme to project land and land resources use changes at a local scale for Diamou (MALI. Problem statement: All the land cover types were under the influence of human and livestock population. Diamou has undergone changes in land-cover over the last decades. The shifting cultivation system practiced was probably the main reason for this state of affairs. Moreover, the dryness and extensive character of pastoral activities had contributed to the general degradation of natural resources. The principal objective of our study was to contribute to the sustainable use of land resources from 1999-2010. Approach: Using formula the resources supply and demand had been estimated based on statistics data, derived from a comprehensive review of the literature. The resources balance (difference between supply and demand had been estimated for two years 1999 and 2010.The resources demand were measured by an average consumption needs person-1 day-1 multiplied by the population. For the livestock population the biomass demand and supply had been measured based on TLU dietary requirements and the pastureland carrying capacity. The diagram of resources balances were drawn using word Microsoft word command and the simulation land use areas schema using ArcGIS. Results: From present approach, it was found, that, in year 1999 the fuel wood and cereal balances were negative. The drink water and biomass balances were positive. The dominant land use categories were the pastureland and the cropland, occupying about 52 and 45% of total area respectively of the total area 8876 ha. Except the biomass balance in year 2010, all the resources balance were negative. The drink water and fuel wood deficits were equal to 439 and 2801 m³ respectively. The dominant land use class, a cropland covered approximately 45% of total area. Conclusion: Studies had indicated the cereal, fuel wood and drink water resources deficit in

  18. Ecological Capability of Land Use Planning for Rural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nouri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Execution of development and creation of appropriate points for rural development without considering ecological capability will result in the appearance of several environmental, economic and social problems. This research is done in an analysis approach frame of a system with the aim of choosing the most suitable location for rural development in Abadeh with an area of 22,000 km2. In 2002 by applying geographic information system (GIS precious tools. Based on the above objective, ecological resources of concerned area were recognized and surveyed. The obtained data changed into digital figures and together with the other descriptive data were shifted to Arc/Info and Arcview systems for the purpose of creation of data base. Based on specific ecological models of Iran and special conditions of the area and by using structured query language (SQL in Arcview, the ecological capability of concerned area for rural development was determined. By considering current natural limitations, such as limited severe earthquake danger in central areas, limitation of flood danger in some of the central and western areas, development of evaporating deposits and salt domes in east and precipitation under 500mm in the studied area, no suitable place for the first grade rural development was found. However, it showed capability for second-grade rural development aspect. This area includes 3.8% of total area of the studied place. For improving present management in the studied region, it is recommended that in future development of the region, offered appropriated points while emphasizing on the land having low production capability to be considered.

  19. Correspondence Concerning Land Use and Recreational Management Plans for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a compilation of various memorandums regarding land use and recreational management plans for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge. Seney Refuge is...

  20. Chemical risk assessment for storage of hazardous materials in the context of Land Use Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandru Ozunu; Zoltán Török

    2010-01-01

    ...: technological and legislative. Afterthree years from the adherence of Romania to EU, a coherent legislation for land-use planning is stillmissing in the context of Article 12 of Seveso Directive...

  1. Response of Land Use Planning in Less Developed Areas to Economic Globalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-nan

    2012-01-01

    Under the background of economic globalization, the development mechanisms of various regions face potential deep transformation, and the effective participation of less developed areas in China in economic globalization is of great significance to the sustainable development of Chinese economy and society. In this study, we summarized the characteristics and influences of economic globalization from the aspects of industrial recombination and transfer, competition, economic relevance and development modes, and analysed the opportunities and challenges of land use in less developed areas brought by economic globalization. Afterwards, based on the major problems of land use planning management in the middle of Jiangsu Province, we put forward some suggestion including management of planning process, balanced development of ecology and economy, strengtheningn planing use zoning, spatial agglomeration and protecting cultural diversity to response to economic globalization.

  2. Land Use Planning: Attitudes and Behavior of Elected Officials and Their Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Stan L.; Geertsen, H. Reed

    1978-01-01

    Examines a statewide sample of Utah residents and their elected state representatives in terms of their respective support of land use planning over several months before, during, and after the defeat of a state land use act. Finds that models developed from classic democratic theory are generally ineffective in accounting for the relationships…

  3. Application of GIS in land-use planning: a case study in the Coastal Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, N.H.; Quang Tri, Le; Mensvoort, van M.E.F.; Bregt, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the applications of Geographic Information System (GIS) in three different Land Use Planning (LUP) approaches: The participatory LUP (PLUP) which strongly considers the local people perceptions for land utilizations, the guidelines for LUP by FAO enhanced with multi-criteria eval

  4. Risk management for optimal land use planning integrating ecosystem services values: A case study in Changsha, Middle China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Zhong, Minzhou; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Gaojie; Hua, Shanshan; Li, Xiaodong; Yuan, Yujie; Wu, Haipeng; Gao, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Land-use change has direct impact on ecosystem services and alters ecosystem services values (ESVs). Ecosystem services analysis is beneficial for land management and decisions. However, the application of ESVs for decision-making in land use decisions is scarce. In this paper, a method, integrating ESVs to balance future ecosystem-service benefit and risk, is developed to optimize investment in land for ecological conservation in land use planning. Using ecological conservation in land use planning in Changsha as an example, ESVs is regarded as the expected ecosystem-service benefit. And uncertainty of land use change is regarded as risk. This method can optimize allocation of investment in land to improve ecological benefit. The result shows that investment should be partial to Liuyang City to get higher benefit. The investment should also be shifted from Liuyang City to other regions to reduce risk. In practice, lower limit and upper limit for weight distribution, which affects optimal outcome and selection of investment allocation, should be set in investment. This method can reveal the optimal spatial allocation of investment to maximize the expected ecosystem-service benefit at a given level of risk or minimize risk at a given level of expected ecosystem-service benefit. Our results of optimal analyses highlight tradeoffs between future ecosystem-service benefit and uncertainty of land use change in land use decisions.

  5. Criteria for evaluation and guidelines for land use planning in terms of sustainable urban development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ostojić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable spatial development is a generally accepted objective and principle in spatial planning. It is implemented mainly by regulations in the sectors for management of natural resources, but not comprehensively in implementing regulations for urban space management. One of the most important instruments of spatial planning at local level is land use, for which there is no comprehensive framework of implementing measures for achieving sustainable spatial objectives in urban areas. In accordance with the review and critical analysis of literature, there are four measures presented in the paper: protection of natural resources and reduction of environmental-climate risks, compact urban structure, mixed-use and accessibility of urban functions. The review and analysis have shown that the listed measures enable sustainable development of urban areas, but only if they are planned and implemented in accordance with supporting physical, social and economic elements of urban space. In the conclusion, indicators which can assess the level of sustainability in land use design are presented and guidelines for restructuring land use in existing settlement areas are described.

  6. Remote sensing for land management and planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Curtis E.; Strahler, Alan H.; Franklin, Janet

    1983-05-01

    The primary role of remote sensing in land management and planning has been to provide information concerning the physical characteristics of the land which influence the management of individual land parcels or the allocation of lands to various uses These physical characteristics have typically been assessed through aerial photography, which is used to develop resource maps and to monitor changing environmental conditions These uses are well developed and currently well integrated into the planning infrastructure at local, state, and federal levels in the United States. Many newly emerging uses of remote sensing involve digital images which are collected, stored, and processed automatically by electromechanical scanning devices and electronic computers Some scanning devices operate from aircraft or spacecraft to scan ground scenes directly; others scan conventional aerial transparencies to yield digital images. Digital imagery offers the potential for computer-based automated map production, a process that can significantly increase the amount and timeliness of information available to land managers and planners. Future uses of remote sensing in land planning and management will involve geographic information systems, which store resource information in a geocoded format. Geographic information systems allow the automated integration of disparate types of resource data through various types of spatial models so that with accompanying sample ground data, information in the form of thematic maps and/ or aerially aggregated statistics can be produced Key issues confronting the development and integration of geographic information systems into planning pathways are restoration and rectification of digital images, automated techniques for combining both quantitative and qualitative types of data in information-extracting procedures, and the compatibility of alternative data storage modes

  7. Land-use planning of Volyn region (Ukraine) using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strielko, Irina; Pereira, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Land-use development planning is carried out in order to create a favourable environment for human life, sustainable socioeconomic and spatial development. Landscape planning is an important part of land-use development that aims to meet the fundamental principles of sustainable development. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a fundamental tool to make a better landscape planning at different territorial levels, providing data and maps to support decision making. The objective of this work is to create spatio-temporal, territorial and ecological model of development of Volyn region (Ukraine). It is based on existing spatial raster and vector data and includes the analysis of territory dynamics as the aspects responsible for it. A spatial analyst tool was used to zone the areas according to their environmental components and economic activity. This analysis is fundamental to define the basic parameters of sustainability of Volyn region. To carry out this analysis, we determined the demographic capacity of districts and the analysis of spatial parameters of land use. On the basis of the existing natural resources, we observed that there is a need of landscape protection and integration of more are natural areas in the Pan-European Ecological Network. Using GIS technologies to landscape planning in Volyn region, allowed us to identify, natural areas of interest, contribute to a better resource management and conflict resolution. Geographic Information Systems will help to formulate and implement landscape policies, reform the existing administrative system of Volyn region and contribute to a better sustainable development.

  8. Planning Office and Community Influence on Land-Use Decisions Intended to Benefit the Low-Income: Welcome to Chicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Dominic Searcy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores urban planning office and community influence on land-use decision making in two poverty-stricken but redeveloping neighborhood areas in Chicago. The Department of Planning and Development in this study had marginal impact on land-use decisions due to administrative limitations. Community influence is moderated by the degree to which low-income housing advocates can act directly as developers and produce housing units. The research findings indicate that land-use decisions intended to benefit the low-income resulted not from community-based political conflict but more so from community organization cooperation with political actors.

  9. Land Use Dynamics of the Fast-Growing Shanghai Metropolis, China (1979–2008 and its Implications for Land Use and Urban Planning Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the integrated approach of remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS techniques, four Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery acquired during 1979 and 2008 were used to quantitatively characterize the patterns of land use and land cover change (LULC and urban sprawl in the fast-growing Shanghai Metropolis, China. Results showed that, the urban/built-up area grew on average by 4,242.06 ha yr−1. Bare land grew by 1,594.66 ha yr−1 on average. In contrast, cropland decreased by 3,286.26 ha yr−1 on average, followed by forest and shrub, water, and tidal land, which decreased by 1,331.33 ha yr−1, 903.43 ha yr−1, and 315.72 ha yr−1 on average, respectively. As a result, during 1979 and 2008 approximately 83.83% of the newly urban/built-up land was converted from cropland (67.35%, forest and shrub (9.12%, water (4.80%, and tidal land (2.19%. Another significant change was the continuous increase in regular residents, which played a very important role in contributing to local population growth and increase in urban/built-up land. This can be explained with this city’s huge demand for investment and qualified labor since the latest industrial transformation. Moreover, with a decrease in cropland, the proportion of population engaged in farming decreased 13.84%. Therefore, significant socio-economic transformation occurred, and this would lead to new demand for land resources. However, due to very scarce land resources and overload of population in Shanghai, the drive to achieve economic goals at the loss of cropland, water, and the other lands is not sustainable. Future urban planning policy aiming at ensuring a win-win balance between sustainable land use and economic growth is urgently needed.

  10. Assessing the shelf life of cost-efficient conservation plans for species at risk across gradients of agricultural land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Cassandra M; Kerr, Jeremy T

    2017-08-01

    High costs of land in agricultural regions warrant spatial prioritization approaches to conservation that explicitly consider land prices to produce protected-area networks that accomplish targets efficiently. However, land-use changes in such regions and delays between plan design and implementation may render optimized plans obsolete before implementation occurs. To measure the shelf life of cost-efficient conservation plans, we simulated a land-acquisition and restoration initiative aimed at conserving species at risk in Canada's farmlands. We accounted for observed changes in land-acquisition costs and in agricultural intensity based on censuses of agriculture taken from 1986 to 2011. For each year of data, we mapped costs and areas of conservation priority designated using Marxan. We compared plans to test for changes through time in the arrangement of high-priority sites and in the total cost of each plan. For acquisition costs, we measured the savings from accounting for prices during site selection. Land-acquisition costs and land-use intensity generally rose over time independent of inflation (24-78%), although rates of change were heterogeneous through space and decreased in some areas. Accounting for spatial variation in land price lowered the cost of conservation plans by 1.73-13.9%, decreased the range of costs by 19-82%, and created unique solutions from which to choose. Despite the rise in plan costs over time, the high conservation priority of particular areas remained consistent. Delaying conservation in these critical areas may compromise what optimized conservation plans can achieve. In the case of Canadian farmland, rapid conservation action is cost-effective, even with moderate levels of uncertainty in how to implement restoration goals. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Review of a land use planning programme through the soft systems methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nidumolu, U.B.; Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Keulen, van H.; Skidmore, A.K.; Harmsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional land use planning approaches relied significantly on biophysical data and followed a hierarchical top-down approach. The component of primary stakeholders as being critical to the success of implementing such plans is often ignored. In India, a large-scale geo-information project called

  12. Land Use and Land Cover, Comprehensive Planning Maps, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It is...

  13. MANAGEMENT IN LAND USE PLANNING: PROBLEMS AND KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov V. S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Russian and the world economy can be characterized as crisis ones. The economic crisis in modern society is perceived as ordinary, it is a part of its daily occurrence. The management and the organization of functioning in different spheres of economy traditionally treats management activity, at the same time the manager's profession in Russia is discredited completely. In the economy of Russia the institute of the professional managers who are ready to perform high-quality services in the land market, and at the same to meet time requirements imposed both from users of land services was not created. Recovery of trust to the leading class of the society undermined in decades of the carried-out socioeconomic transformations affecting all spheres of life of society is the basis of successful development of the country. The first step in ladder of development of national economy always was land issues and there still is. It is possible to carry out the economic transformations affecting the taxation and property without knowing how much the land costs currently. However, without the strong base it is impossible to construct high economic potential of welfare of society. Consideration of topical issues of preparation of the new and already performing the professional activity managerial personnel in the market of land resources in Russia became the purpose of this article

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  15. STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT ON LAND-USE PLANNING-A Case Study of Changchun Economic and Technological Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The study centers on the necessity, the workflow and the synthetically integrated methods (Principal Component Analysis(PCA), AndyticalHierarchyProcess(AHP) andFuzzy ComprerhensiveEvaluation(FCE)) of strategic environment assessment (SEA) on land-use planning. The whole article includes three main parts: firstly, some attributedatabase, graphic-base and the spatial transform matrix, which reflect the change of regional land-use pattern, can be obtained by GIS technique; secondly, adopting fitting method of trend-surface analysis will convert environment monitoringdata from scattered spots to regular control spots, based on which we can perform regional environment impact assessment; finally, Changchun Economic and Technological Developmen Zone is chosen as a case study on land-use planning.Through those efforts the results may be obtained as follows: 1 ) according to transform matrix, the possibility of transformation from one land-use to another can be obtained after the planning is carried out; 2) environment quality would changeas a result of the change of land-nsc pattern; 3) the SEA on land-use plan is an effective tool to make land-use patternmore reasonable.

  16. A comprehensive scoring system to measure healthy community design in land use plans and regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Kristin M; Kaplan, Marina; Walling, Lee Ann; Miller, Patricia P; Crist, Gina

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive land use plans and their corresponding regulations play a role in determining the nature of the built environment and community design, which are factors that influence population health and health disparities. To determine the level in which a plan addresses healthy living and active design, there is a need for a systematic, reliable and valid method of analyzing and scoring health-related content in plans and regulations. This paper describes the development and validation of a scoring tool designed to measure the strength and comprehensiveness of health-related content found in land use plans and the corresponding regulations. The measures are scored based on the presence of a specific item and the specificity and action-orientation of language. To establish reliability and validity, 42 land use plans and regulations from across the United States were scored January-April 2016. Results of the psychometric analysis indicate the scorecard is a reliable scoring tool for land use plans and regulations related to healthy living and active design. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) scores showed strong inter-rater reliability for total strength and comprehensiveness. ICC scores for total implementation scores showed acceptable consistency among scorers. Cronbach's alpha values for all focus areas were acceptable. Strong content validity was measured through a committee vetting process. The development of this tool has far-reaching implications, bringing standardization of measurement to the field of land use plan assessment, and paving the way for systematic inclusion of health-related design principles, policies, and requirements in land use plans and their corresponding regulations.

  17. Development of a computerized aid to integrated land use planning (CAILUP) at regional level in irrigated areas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoanh, C.T.

    1996-01-01

    The problem - Objectives of the studyLand use planning is an essential activity in any country, because the demands for different land uses usually exceed the available resources. Land use planning implies weighting of trade-offs among conflicting goals, as different interest

  18. Research on Overall Planning and Implementation Evaluation of Land Use of Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Agriculture-seven Division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru; BAO; Minhua; GAO; Xiaolong; LI

    2013-01-01

    Based on methods for evaluating the overall planning and implementation of land use of domestic scholars, a comprehensive and highly-operable index system and evaluating method for land use planning multi-type implementation has been established through selecting multi-type evaluating indicators and applied to the last-round overall planning of land use in Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps Agriculture-seven Division. The obtained comprehensive score was 86.40, indicating that land use overall planning has been excellently coordinated with land, society, economy as well as ecology and has exerted outstanding effect with the rank as "good". The evaluation results are in accordance with actual conditions, which displays that the established multi-type implementation evaluating system of land use overall planning is reasonable with scientific evaluating methods and can be the reference for evaluation of land use overall planning in other regiments and companies of Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps.

  19. Development of a Global Wetland Sustainability Index for comprehensive land use planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleupner, C.; Schneider, U. A.; Havlik, P.; Stacke, T.

    2012-04-01

    Allocation of nature reserves for conservation of ecosystem functions and services is a multi-dimensional task. Conservation programs act from local to regional or national scales, and some efforts involve entire continents. Globally, several international environmental agreements have been established which include conservation issues. Examples are the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Convention on Migratory Species of Wild Animals, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. A common aim of most initiatives is the protection and restoration of valuable natural sites by providing a functional network of sites. The planning of protected habitat networks to safeguard global biodiversity requires substantial knowledge on exposure, services, and functions of ecosystems. Further, the complex spatial relationships between humans and the environment under consideration of costs and land use competition have to be determined. Often such analyses are hindered by lack of data. We developed a global index that ranks sites for wetland protection according to its wetland quantity, wetland quality and pressure upon the wetland sites. Each of the three parts is based on several spatial-ecological datasets that contain important information for the adequate assessment of spatial economic and ecologic interdependencies. Applying cluster analyses and ecological decision trees the data are combined and results are translated to the final index and expressed per simulation unit for integration into the Global Biomass Optimization Model GLOBIOM. This global recursive dynamic partial equilibrium model integrates the agricultural, bio energy and forestry sectors with the aim to provide policy analyses on global issues concerning land use competition between the major land-based production sectors. Results not only show the most vulnerable wetland areas to nature loss and the most valuable wetland areas for biodiversity protection under

  20. Use of land facets to plan for climate change: conserving the arenas, not the actors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Paul; Brost, Brian

    2010-06-01

    Even under the most optimistic scenarios, during the next century human-caused climate change will threaten many wild populations and species. The most useful conservation response is to enlarge and link protected areas to support range shifts by plants and animals. To prioritize land for reserves and linkages, some scientists attempt to chain together four highly uncertain models (emission scenarios, global air-ocean circulation, regional circulation, and biotic response). This approach has high risk of error propagation and compounding and produces outputs at a coarser scale than conservation decisions. Instead, we advocate identifying land facets-recurring landscape units with uniform topographic and soil attributes-and designing reserves and linkages for diversity and interspersion of these units. This coarse-filter approach would conserve the arenas of biological activity, rather than the temporary occupants of those arenas. Integrative, context-sensitive variables, such as insolation and topographic wetness, are useful for defining land facets. Classification procedures such as k-means or fuzzy clustering are a good way to define land facets because they can analyze millions of pixels and are insensitive to case order. In regions lacking useful soil maps, river systems or riparian plants can indicate important facets. Conservation planners should set higher representation targets for rare and distinctive facets. High interspersion of land facets can promote ecological processes, evolutionary interaction, and range shift. Relevant studies suggest land-facet diversity is a good surrogate for today's biodiversity, but fails to conserve some species. To minimize such failures, a reserve design based on land facets should complement, rather than replace, other approaches. Designs based on land facets are not biased toward data-rich areas and can be applied where no maps of land cover exist.

  1. SEA for a land use plan in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørnøv, Lone; Pizzol, Massimo; Larsen, Sanne Vammen

    2017-01-01

    In the Skive municipality, an SEA including a Life Cycle Assessment was done for proposed renewable energy activities. The comparison of six alternatives led to selection of a ‘climate smart’ alternative with more production of wind energy than initially planned. The SEA also led to measures...

  2. An integrated GIS-based interval-probabilistic programming model for land-use planning management under uncertainty--a case study at Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shasha; Zhou, Min; Guan, Xingliang; Tao, Lizao

    2015-03-01

    A large number of mathematical models have been developed for supporting optimization of land-use allocation; however, few of them simultaneously consider land suitability (e.g., physical features and spatial information) and various uncertainties existing in many factors (e.g., land availabilities, land demands, land-use patterns, and ecological requirements). This paper incorporates geographic information system (GIS) technology into interval-probabilistic programming (IPP) for land-use planning management (IPP-LUPM). GIS is utilized to assemble data for the aggregated land-use alternatives, and IPP is developed for tackling uncertainties presented as discrete intervals and probability distribution. Based on GIS, the suitability maps of different land users are provided by the outcomes of land suitability assessment and spatial analysis. The maximum area of every type of land use obtained from the suitability maps, as well as various objectives/constraints (i.e., land supply, land demand of socioeconomic development, future development strategies, and environmental capacity), is used as input data for the optimization of land-use areas with IPP-LUPM model. The proposed model not only considers the outcomes of land suitability evaluation (i.e., topography, ground conditions, hydrology, and spatial location) but also involves economic factors, food security, and eco-environmental constraints, which can effectively reflect various interrelations among different aspects in a land-use planning management system. The case study results at Suzhou, China, demonstrate that the model can help to examine the reliability of satisfying (or risk of violating) system constraints under uncertainty. Moreover, it may identify the quantitative relationship between land suitability and system benefits. Willingness to arrange the land areas based on the condition of highly suitable land will not only reduce the potential conflicts on the environmental system but also lead to a lower

  3. Agriculture: Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land Use and agriculture. Information about land use restrictions and incentive programs.Agricultural operations sometimes involve activities regulated by laws designed to protect water supplies, threatened or endangered plants and animals, or wetlands.

  4. Risk-based design of process plants with regard to domino effects and land use planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakzad, Nima; Reniers, Genserik

    2015-12-15

    Land use planning (LUP) as an effective and crucial safety measure has widely been employed by safety experts and decision makers to mitigate off-site risks posed by major accidents. Accordingly, the concept of LUP in chemical plants has traditionally been considered from two perspectives: (i) land developments around existing chemical plants considering potential off-site risks posed by major accidents and (ii) development of existing chemical plants considering nearby land developments and the level of additional off-site risks the land developments would be exposed to. However, the attempts made to design chemical plants with regard to LUP requirements have been few, most of which have neglected the role of domino effects in risk analysis of major accidents. To overcome the limitations of previous work, first, we developed a Bayesian network methodology to calculate both on-site and off-site risks of major accidents while taking domino effects into account. Second, we combined the results of risk analysis with Analytic Hierarchical Process to design an optimal layout for which the levels of on-site and off-site risks would be minimum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated Facilities and Infrastructure Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisz Westlund, Jennifer Jill

    2017-03-01

    Our facilities and infrastructure are a key element of our capability-based science and engineering foundation. The focus of the Integrated Facilities and Infrastructure Plan is the development and implementation of a comprehensive plan to sustain the capabilities necessary to meet national research, design, and fabrication needs for Sandia National Laboratories’ (Sandia’s) comprehensive national security missions both now and into the future. A number of Sandia’s facilities have reached the end of their useful lives and many others are not suitable for today’s mission needs. Due to the continued aging and surge in utilization of Sandia’s facilities, deferred maintenance has continued to increase. As part of our planning focus, Sandia is committed to halting the growth of deferred maintenance across its sites through demolition, replacement, and dedicated funding to reduce the backlog of maintenance needs. Sandia will become more agile in adapting existing space and changing how space is utilized in response to the changing requirements. This Integrated Facilities & Infrastructure (F&I) Plan supports the Sandia Strategic Plan’s strategic objectives, specifically Strategic Objective 2: Strengthen our Laboratories’ foundation to maximize mission impact, and Strategic Objective 3: Advance an exceptional work environment that enables and inspires our people in service to our nation. The Integrated F&I Plan is developed through a planning process model to understand the F&I needs, analyze solution options, plan the actions and funding, and then execute projects.

  6. Mapping Ecosystem Services for Land Use Planning, the Case of Central Kalimantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarga, Elham; Hein, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Indonesia is subject to rapid land use change. One of the main causes for the conversion of land is the rapid expansion of the oil palm sector. Land use change involves a progressive loss of forest cover, with major impacts on biodiversity and global CO2 emissions. Ecosystem services have been proposed as a concept that would facilitate the identification of sustainable land management options, however, the scale of land conversion and its spatial diversity pose particular challenges in Indonesia. The objective of this paper is to analyze how ecosystem services can be mapped at the provincial scale, focusing on Central Kalimantan, and to examine how ecosystem services maps can be used for a land use planning. Central Kalimantan is subject to rapid deforestation including the loss of peatland forests and the provincial still lacks a comprehensive land use plan. We examine how seven key ecosystem services can be mapped and modeled at the provincial scale, using a variety of models, and how large scale ecosystem services maps can support the identification of options for sustainable expansion of palm oil production.

  7. Mapping ecosystem services for land use planning, the case of Central Kalimantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarga, Elham; Hein, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Indonesia is subject to rapid land use change. One of the main causes for the conversion of land is the rapid expansion of the oil palm sector. Land use change involves a progressive loss of forest cover, with major impacts on biodiversity and global CO2 emissions. Ecosystem services have been proposed as a concept that would facilitate the identification of sustainable land management options, however, the scale of land conversion and its spatial diversity pose particular challenges in Indonesia. The objective of this paper is to analyze how ecosystem services can be mapped at the provincial scale, focusing on Central Kalimantan, and to examine how ecosystem services maps can be used for a land use planning. Central Kalimantan is subject to rapid deforestation including the loss of peatland forests and the provincial still lacks a comprehensive land use plan. We examine how seven key ecosystem services can be mapped and modeled at the provincial scale, using a variety of models, and how large scale ecosystem services maps can support the identification of options for sustainable expansion of palm oil production.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  9. Determinants of arbuscular mycorrhizal communities - soil properties or land use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansa, J.; Erb, A.; Oberholzer, H.-R.; Šmilauer, P.; Egli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi accompanied terrestrial plants since some 500 million years of their evolution and are now widespread in all continents and virtually all soils of the world. They establish symbiotic interactions with a majority of extant higher plant species including most economically important plants. They are heavily implicated in plant nutrition, plant-soil carbon cycling, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Under field conditions, AM fungi usually form multispecies communities both in the soils and in plant roots, and it is becoming well established that various human interventions like cropping, crop rotation, tillage, and fertilization may all drive changes in the community composition of these fungi and, consequently, in the symbiotic benefits to the plants. Most of current evidence is stemming from individual short and long-term field trials, and the different studies usually employed diverse approaches, limiting the comparability of results across sites. Large scale sampling designs using unified research methods across different soil types and land use systems have hardly been employed so far. However, this would be imperative to allow direct comparisons of the effects of various environmental conditions (soil type, climate) and human land use practices on the indigenous soil-borne symbiotic microbes in general and the AM fungi in particular. To contribute to filling this gap, we conducted molecular profiling of AM communities in more than 150 Swiss agricultural soils, developed on a range of parent materials, covering a wide range of soil properties such as pH value, texture, carbon content and altitude, and including highly productive fields through alpine pastures. This study indicated strong correlations between AM fungal community patterns and features like soil pH and texture, as well as some consistent shifts in fungal communities due to specific aspects of land use like tillage or fertilization. These results thus appear to

  10. Land use and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-07-01

    This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

  11. Implementing Geographic Information System For Land Use And Spatial Planning

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, a local government has to improve their own financial ability in order to enhance the quality of life of the local community. Although, the local governments have successfully increased their own earnings, they have not yet optimized the potential income. Moreover, regarding to Wagner’s Law, the government budget has to improve through the years simply as the public needs increased. Based on this condition, the local government should prepare strategic policies by using creativit...

  12. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-10-20

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans.

  13. Development of an Integrated GIS and Land Use Planning Course: Impacts of Hybrid Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports an action research undertaken at Queensland University of Technology. It evaluates the effectiveness of the integration of geographic information systems (GIS) within the substantive domains of an existing land use planning course in 2011. Using student performance, learning experience survey, and questionnaire survey data, it…

  14. Land use systems analysis as a tool in land use planning : with special reference to North and West African agro-ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenbooden, van N.

    1995-01-01

    The various multidisciplinary projects presented in this thesis, in hindsight, all contributed to a new approach to land use planning. Hence, their results are placed in a holistic perspective via this approach. Part A presents a method for characterizing land use on the basis of transect

  15. Land use systems analysis as a tool in land use planning, with special reference to North and West African agro-ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenbooden, van N.

    1995-01-01

    Results of multidisciplinary projects have contributed to a new approach in land use planning. Part A presents a survey method for characterizing land use, and an interactive multiple-goal linear programming (MGLP) model for quantifying relations in agro-ecosystems. In Part B, nutrient relations in

  16. Achieving a Sustainable Urban Form through Land Use Optimisation: Insights from Bekasi City’s Land-Use Plan (2010–2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Trias Handayanto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cities worldwide have been trying to achieve a sustainable urban form to handle their rapid urban growth. Many sustainable urban forms have been studied and two of them, the compact city and the eco city, were chosen in this study as urban form foundations. Based on these forms, four sustainable city criteria (compactness, compatibility, dependency, and suitability were considered as necessary functions for land use optimisation. This study presents a land use optimisation as a method for achieving a sustainable urban form. Three optimisation methods (particle swarm optimisation, genetic algorithms, and a local search method were combined into a single hybrid optimisation method for land use in Bekasi city, Indonesia. It was also used for examining Bekasi city’s land-use-plan (2010–2030 after optimising current (2015 and future land use (2030. After current land use optimisation, the score of sustainable city criteria increased significantly. Three important centres of land use (commercial, industrial, and residential were also created through clustering the results. These centres were slightly different from centres of the city plan zones. Additional land uses in 2030 were predicted using a nonlinear autoregressive neural network with external input. Three scenarios were used for allocating these additional land uses including sustainable development, government policy, and business-as-usual. Future land use allocation in 2030 found that the sustainable development scenario showed better performance compared to government policy and business-as-usual scenarios.

  17. Dynamism of Transportation and Land Use Interaction in Urban Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Rajesh J.; Katti, B. K.

    2012-10-01

    Transportation in urban areas is highly complex and the urban transport system is intricately linked with urban form and spatial structure. Urban transit is an important dimension of mobility, notably in high density areas. The spatial separation of human activities which creates the need for travel and goods transport is the underlying principle of transport analysis and forecasting. To understand the complex relationships between transportation and land use and to help the urban planning process, several models have been developed. Many theories, models are developed by different authors on land use and transportation interaction, which clearly indicate that change in land use transformation have a greater impact on transportation. Similarly, introducing new transportation facility or strengthening of existing transport facility makes an impact on the abutting land. In cities like Delhi, Navi Mumbai, Ahmedabad, introducing of new mass transport system or strengthening of existing transportation system had given greater impact on surrounding development. In this Paper the major theoretical approaches to explain the two-way interaction of land use and transport in metropolitan areas are summarized. The paper also reviews research on the two-way interaction between urban land use and transport, i.e. the location and mobility responses of private actors (households and firms, travelers) to changes in the urban land use and transport system at the urban regional level.

  18. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  19. Energy and land use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  20. Trend in Land Use/Land Cover Change Detection by RS and GIS Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poongothai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to effects of Land Use / Land Cover Changes (LU/LCC is the quantitative method, to expound the impact of land use/land cover changes in Manimuktha sub-watershed of Vellar basin, Tamilnadu, India. The relationship between Land Use Changes and its trend is analysed using IRS IC LISS III and PAN merged data. Further, the preparation of LU/LC map using Survey of India (SOIToposheet for the year 1972 has come in handy to know the past land use pattern. Similarly, the Land Use/Land Cover (LU/LC map of various years, namely, 1996, 2003 and 2007, which was obtained from Institute of Remote Sensing, Anna University (IRS and digitized, using Arc GIS 9.1 software. About 52.89 per cent of land is devoted to agricultural practices under agriculture and cropland has a major impact over the hydrological processes of the basin. Hence, the information obtained from change detection of LU/LC aids in providing optimal solutions for the selection, planning, implementation and monitoring of development schemes to meet the increasing demands of human needs has lead to land management.

  1. Digital Problems and Strategies of Partial Revision in Overall Plan of Land Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The technical route of partial revision in overall plan of land use is briefly described.It is pointed out that problems of area measuring in the technical route are mainly due to the digital process.The digital problems of partial revision in overall plan of land use are presented as follows:the maps are not proofread before digitalization;the coordinate matching and projection transformation are not conducted on the maps;the information is asymmetrical pre and post the digitalization;the location lacks precision;the result maps are substandard.The causes of these problems are analyzed,which cover the following aspects.The lack of united management regulations;uneven working abilities of the staff in the compilation units;unawareness of the importance of map digilalization;poor basic conclitions of the original plan maps.At last,the relevant suggestions are put forward,for instance,releasing the national united management methods and technical criteria,establishing industrial admittance system and qualification system of complication units,setting up the mechanism of supervising digitalized results and controlling the quality,conducting coordinate matching and projection transformation and unifying the specification and mode of the results of maps so as to provide technical support for the overall plan of land use,play the micro-regulating role of land use and take a leading role in the sustainable development of social economy.

  2. Constraints and opportunities for climate adaptation in regional water and land use planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werners, S.E.; Tàbara, J.D.; Dai, X.; Flachner, Z.; Neufeldt, H.; McEvoy, D.; West, J.; Cots, F.; Trombi, G.; Leemans, R.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the literature on adaptation is rich in detail on impacts, vulnerability and constraints to climate adaptation, less is known about the conditions that facilitate adaptation in practice. We examined the constraints and opportunities for adaptation in water and land use planning in three

  3. Opportunities and Constraints for Climate Adaptation in Regional Water and Land Use Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werners, S.E.; West, J.; Leemans, R.; Tabara, J.D.; Dai, X.; Flachner, Z.; Neufeldt, H.; McEvoy, D.; Cots, F.; Trombi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the literature on adaptation is rich in detail on the impacts of, vulnerability to, and constraints of climate adaptation, less is known about the conditions that facilitate adaptation in practice. We examined the constraints and opportunities for adaptation in water and land use planning in

  4. US Forest Service National Forest Lands with Nationally Designated Management or Use Limitations 

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting an area depicting National Forest System land parcels that have management or use limits placed on them by legal authority....

  5. US Forest Service National Forest Lands with Nationally Designated Management or Use Limitations: Legal Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting the status of areas showing National Forest System land parcels that have management or use limits placed on them by legal...

  6. 30 CFR 780.23 - Reclamation plan: Land use information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... description under paragraph (a) of this section in conjunction with other environmental resources information... variety of uses, giving consideration to soil and foundation characteristics, topography, vegetative cover...

  7. 30 CFR 784.15 - Reclamation plan: Land use information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... description under paragraph (a) of this section in conjunction with other environmental resources information... variety of uses, giving consideration to soil and foundation characteristics, topography, vegetative cover...

  8. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  9. Neil Armstrong At Lunar Landing Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, on July 20,1969, Neil Armstrong, shown here with NASA Langley Research Centers Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) Simulator, became the first human to walk on the moon after practicing with the simulator in May of 1969. Training with the simulator, part of Langleys Lunar Research Facility, allowed the Apollo astronauts to study and safely overcome problems that could have occurred during the final 150-foot descent to the surface of the moon. NASA needed such a facility in order to explore and develop techniques for landing the LEM on the moons surface, where gravity is only one-sixth as strong as on the Earth, as well as to determine the limits of human piloting capabilities in the new surroundings. This unique facility, completed in 1965 and now a National Historic Landmark, effectively canceled all but one-sixth of Earths gravitational force by using an overhead cable system.

  10. Lunar launch and landing facilities and operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Florida Institute of Technology established an Interdisciplinary Design Team to design a lunar based facility whose primary function involves launch and landing operations for future moon missions. Both manned and unmanned flight operations were considered in the study with particular design emphasis on the utilization (or reutilization) of all materials available on the moon. This resource availability includes man-made materials which might arrive in the form of expendable landing vehicles as well as in situ lunar minerals. From an engineering standpoint, all such materials are considered as to their suitability for constructing new lunar facilities and/or repairing or expanding existing structures. Also considered in this design study was a determination of the feasibility of using naturally occurring lunar materials to provide fuel components to support lunar launch operations. Conventional launch and landing operations similar to those used during the Apollo Program were investigated as well as less conventional techniques such as rail guns and electromagnetic mass drivers. The Advanced Space Design team consisted of students majoring in Physics and Space Science as well as Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical and Ocean Engineering.

  11. Interim Land Use Plan Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The continued grazing of cattle on grasslands and marsh acquired by the Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge will be designed to retard the development of undesirable...

  12. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities

  13. Fort Benning Land-Use Planning and Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    loblolly stands, even-aged shelterwoods are probably most appropriate, supplemented by a modest acreage of planta - tions. The longleaf stands should...Buck/doe ratios. f. Indices of reproductive potential. j. Abomasal parasite counts. h. Kidney fat index. 68 Annual statistical comparisons of these

  14. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  15. Risk-based design of process plants with regard to domino effects and land use planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakzad, Nima, E-mail: nkhakzad@gmail.com [Safety and Security Science Group (S3G), Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, TU Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Reniers, Genserik [Safety and Security Science Group (S3G), Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, TU Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Antwerp Research Group on Safety and Security (ARGoSS), Faculty of Applied Economics, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Research Group CEDON, Campus Brussels, KULeuven, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A Bayesian network methodology has been developed to estimate the total probability of major accidents in chemical plants. • Total probability of accidents includes the probability of individual accidents and potential domino effects. • The methodology has been extended to calculate on-site and off-site risks. • The results of the risk analysis have been used in a multi-criteria decision analysis technique to risk-based design of chemical plants. - Abstract: Land use planning (LUP) as an effective and crucial safety measure has widely been employed by safety experts and decision makers to mitigate off-site risks posed by major accidents. Accordingly, the concept of LUP in chemical plants has traditionally been considered from two perspectives: (i) land developments around existing chemical plants considering potential off-site risks posed by major accidents and (ii) development of existing chemical plants considering nearby land developments and the level of additional off-site risks the land developments would be exposed to. However, the attempts made to design chemical plants with regard to LUP requirements have been few, most of which have neglected the role of domino effects in risk analysis of major accidents. To overcome the limitations of previous work, first, we developed a Bayesian network methodology to calculate both on-site and off-site risks of major accidents while taking domino effects into account. Second, we combined the results of risk analysis with Analytic Hierarchical Process to design an optimal layout for which the levels of on-site and off-site risks would be minimum.

  16. Mountain Land Use Planning of Metropolitan Suburbs: the Case of the Jinyun Mountain and Its Surrounding area, Chongqing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Jingan; WEI Chaofu; XIE Deti

    2005-01-01

    Open space of metropolitan suburbs in mountain region, has been increasingly becoming the coupling mosaic structure of industrial actions and landscape behaviors. However, the local governments, when making land use planning, often aim at economic development, and rarely refer to the coordination of compatibilities and conflicts between industrial actions and landscape behaviors in the mosaic structure. In this study land use in the Jinyun Mountain and its surrounding area, Chongqing is adjusted by gray multi-objective programming approach and local-level decision-making process to cope with conflicts between objectives for human welfare and objectives for landscape conservation. The results indicate that: 1) the compatibilities and conflicts among different behavior characters and different landscape types result in the compatibilities of landscape to human behavior; 2) a land use planning in the study area is produced based on the sustainable land use and social-eco development, which pays more attention to the resources and environment constraints and economic objectives, and follows the distribution law of rare resources; 3) in the study area, cultivated land of 1,207.27 ha can meet the demands for food and byproducts by the residents there, orchard land and forestland of 632.55 ha, 2,276.61 ha, respectively can provide enough space for the local people to improve their living structure and meet their demands for recreational activities, and urban residential land, rural residential land, mining land and transportation land of 1,107.60 ha, 120.27 ha, 162.48 ha, 100.91 ha, respectively can satisfy the resident's economic development and infrastructures; 4) the equilibrium among industrial actions, landscape accessibility and ecological conservation can be obtained by analyzing the possible impacts of human activities on landscape ecological process in open space of metropolitan suburbs in mountain areas.

  17. Automated survey of 8000 plan checks at eight facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Bernard, Damian A; Chu, James C H; Kirk, Michael C; Hamilton, Russell J; Lei, Yu; Driewer, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    To identify policy and system related weaknesses in treatment planning and plan check work-flows. The authors' web deployed plan check automation solution, PlanCheck, which works with all major planning and record and verify systems (demonstrated here for mosaiq only), allows them to compute violation rates for a large number of plan checks across many facilities without requiring the manual data entry involved with incident filings. Workflows and failure modes are heavily influenced by the type of record and verify system used. Rather than tackle multiple record and verify systems at once, the authors restricted the present survey to mosaiq facilities. Violations were investigated by sending inquiries to physicists running the program. Frequent violations included inadequate tracking in the record and verify system of total and prescription doses. Infrequent violations included incorrect setting of patient orientation in the record and verify system. Peaks in the distribution, over facilities, of violation frequencies pointed to suboptimal policies at some of these facilities. Correspondence with physicists often revealed incomplete knowledge of settings at their facility necessary to perform thorough plan checks. The survey leads to the identification of specific and important policy and system deficiencies that include: suboptimal timing of initial plan checks, lack of communication or agreement on conventions surrounding prescription definitions, and lack of automation in the transfer of some parameters.

  18. Integrating Building Energy Efficiency with Land Use and Transportation Planning in Jinan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Duduta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth occurring in the urban regions of China, it is critical to address issues of sustainability through practices that engender holistic energy efficient solutions. In this paper, we present results from a collaborative design project carried out with planning officials from the city of Jinan (population 3.4 million, for the Luokou district, a 3.1 km2 (1.2 mi2 area to the north of the CBD that is expected to house 100,000–130,000 people by 2020. By integrating sustainable building design, land use, urban design, and transportation, our proposal identified opportunities for improving energy efficiency that might have been overlooked by considering buildings and transportation separately. Mixed land uses and walkable neighborhoods were proposed along with highly differentiated street designs, intended to carry different traffic loads and prioritize diverse travel modes. Street widths and building heights were adjusted to maximize the potential for passive solar heating and daylight use within buildings. The district’s environmental performance, analyzed using building energy evaluation and traffic micro simulation models, showed that the design would reduce energy loads by over 25% compared to business as usual. While the proposal complied with national and local policies, and had far better energy performance than conventional designs, the proposal ultimately was not accepted by local officials because initial costs to the developers were higher than for conventional designs.

  19. Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning - proceedings from a training workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandewall, Mats [ed.

    1999-07-01

    This document summarises the outcome of a training workshop, 'Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning', that was organised in Vietnam and Lao PDR during April 1999. The workshop was arranged by researchers from SLU, Umeaa in cooperation with SIDA and it's CCB programme, The National Board of Forestry and concerned government institutions in Lao PDR - The national Programme for Shifting Cultivation Stabilisation, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry , and in Vietnam - the Forest Inventory and Planning Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The main purpose of this paper are: (1) to review and conclude the outcome of the workshop to all those who have participated or been concerned with it; (2) to summarise an evaluation of the somewhat unique arrangement, with participants from different sectors, administrative levels, gender and countries; and (3) to present 'the APM approach' on land use planning, which was put forward, tested and discussed during the workshop.

  20. Application of land-use planning criteria for the control of major accident hazards: A case-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozzani, V.; Bandini, R.; Basta, C.; Christou, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Land-use planning (LUP) with respect to major accident hazards is one of the more important requirements of Directive 96/82/EC (the so-called Seveso II Directive). Different approaches were developed by the Member States of the European Union in order to implement this aspect of the Directive. This

  1. Management plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.; Pratt, D.R.

    1991-08-01

    The DOE/RL 89-19, United States Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1989), requires the Hanford Site to prepare an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) by November 9, 1991. The DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (1991), provides additional guidance and requires implementation of the EMP within 36 months of the effective data of the rule. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each US Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials to prepare an EMP. This EMP is to identify and discuss two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. At the Hanford Site, the site-wide EMP will consist of the following elements: (1) A conceptual plan addressing effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance; (2) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) site-wide environmental surveillance program; (3) Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) effluent monitoring program consisting of the near-field operations environmental monitoring activities and abstracts of each Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP). This management plan addresses the third of these three elements of the EMP, the FEMPs.

  2. Climate change and the use of renewable energies. A challenge for land-use planning; Klimawandel und Nutzung von regenerativen Energien als Herausforderungen fuer die Raumordnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufeld, Walter (ed.)

    2013-10-01

    For spatial planning and especially land-use planning, the issues of climate protection, adaptation to the impacts of climate change and the use of renewable energies represent key challenges for the 21st century. The resulting questions call for a revaluation of instruments and methods applied in land-use planning. Moreover, it is necessary to identify land-use conflicts arising from these challenges and to strive for spatially attuned solutions. In this context, land-use planning represents an important interdisciplinary tool for coordinating actions and developing an overall spatial strategy. This report summarises the findings of the Bavarian ARL working group ''Climate Change and the Use of Renewable Energies: A Challenge for Land-Use Planning''. Drawing on their backgrounds in practice and/or scientific research, the authors throw light on currently pressing challenges and their implications for planning in Bavaria. Particular emphasis is placed on the question of the contribution spatial planning can make to climate-adapted development and the implementation of the Energiewende (energy transition).

  3. Analysis the Purposes of Land Use Planning on the Hard Coal Tailing Dumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zástĕrová, Petra; Niemiec, Dominik; Marschalko, Marian; Durd'ák, Jan; Duraj, Miloš; Yilmaz, Işik; Drusa, Marian

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this publication is to analyse the purposes of land use planning on hard coal tailing dumps. This issue is very topical because there are 46 tailing dumps and 281 reservoirs in the Ostrava-Karvina Mining District. They significantly affect the landscape of this region. A major problem is solving problems of reclamation of these geological environment. This means that it is necessary to think about it and start to solve it. It is clear that such reclamation is not simple both economic as well as environmental point of view. It is necessary to think carefully about what purpose would be tailing dump or reservoirs to utilize in a given location.

  4. Disaggregate land uses and walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConville, Megan E; Rodríguez, Daniel A; Clifton, Kelly; Cho, Gihyoug; Fleischhacker, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Although researchers have explored associations between mixed-use development and physical activity, few have examined the influence of specific land uses. This study analyzes how the accessibility, intensity, and diversity of nonresidential land uses are related to walking for transportation. Multinomial logistic regression was used to investigate associations between walking for transportation and neighborhood land uses in a choice-based sample of individuals (n=260) in Montgomery County MD. Land uses examined included banks, bus stops, fast-food restaurants, grocery stores, libraries, rail stations, offices, parks, recreation centers, non-fast-food restaurants, retail, schools, sports facilities, night uses, physical activity uses, and social uses. Exposure to these uses was measured as the street distance from participants' homes to the closest instance of each land use (accessibility); the number of instances of each land use (intensity); and the number of different land uses (diversity). Data were collected from 2004-2006 and analyzed in 2009-2010. After adjusting for individual-level characteristics, the distances to banks, bus stops, fast-food restaurants, grocery stores, rail stations, physical activity uses, recreational facilities, restaurants, social uses and sports facilities were associated negatively with transportation walking (ORs [95% CI] range from 0.01 [0.001, 0.11] to 0.91 [0.85, 0.97]). The intensities of bus stops, grocery stores, offices, and retail stores in participants' neighborhoods were associated positively with transportation walking (ORs [95% CI] range from 1.05 [1.01, 1.08] to 5.42 [1.73, 17.01]). Land-use diversity also was associated positively with walking for transportation (ORs [95% CI] range from 1.39 [1.20, 1.59] to 1.69 [1.30, 2.20]). The accessibility and intensity of certain nonresidential land uses, along with land-use diversity, are positively associated with walking for transportation. A careful mix of land uses in a

  5. An integrated agro-economic and agro-ecological framework for land use planning and policy analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The growing concern about land resource management and the associated decline in land qualities, has led to the realisation that land use planning and policy problems cannot be addressed adequately through a single discipline. This awareness has resulted in renewed attention for integrated,

  6. Demographic factors and land-use planning in the small islands of Southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliani, Lamberto; Rossi, Orazio

    1992-09-01

    Since the end of the 1970s, the southern European countries have shown an exceptional reduction in fertility rate. From the highest levels among the developed nations, these countries dropped beneath the substitution rate level: in Greece there is an average of about 1.5 children per woman, and Italy (starting three to four years ago), with 1.3 children per woman, is now the country with the lowest fecundity rate in the world. Land-use planning in southern European small islands therefore requires substantial revision. In the areas where western civilization began, which are highly populated and have a long history, cultural and ethnic aspects of tradition are fundamental to environmental management and to the defense of historical heritage. They also place a strong value on sustaining tourism, the most relevant economic activity, that allows them to survive and maintain a high welfare level. For some decades they have had populations with a marked presence of young people and high emigration rates, but now they are fast becoming dominated by the elderly and must prepare for a period of fast reduction in youth of the workforce, while the peripheral areas of Asia and Africa are entering a sudden demographic growth phase. The demographic structure has also been deeply altered both by previous migrations and by random variations, as usually happens in all small communities. Social services for younger and older people have had to be adapted rapidly, reorganizing high-school management, hospital and health-care structures, in-house assistance, and so on. There is a need to rethink the job market and favor the immigration of highly specialized workers, which is a necessity for technical evolution. Sustainable development is constrained nowadays not only by the scarcity of natural resources, but also by the quality and quantity of human resources. Proper policies for population and land-use planning are highly correlated factors; they have to be considered with respect

  7. Land-use planning for phosphate mining and resource areas: the central Florida case. A workshop synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J. R.; Toner, W. J.; Guernsey, J. L.; Rifkin, E.

    1980-05-01

    On July 19-20, 1978, a workshop was conducted in Bartow, Florida, on the topic of land-use and reclamation planning in the local phosphate mining region. More than 100 participants attended the workshop representing the phosphate mining industry, environmental groups, research organizations, planning agencies, news media, and governmental regulatory agencies. Various aspects of the environmental and land-use impacts of phosphate mining, together with the state-of-the-art of mitigating adverse impacts, were discussed. The participants were required to work cooperatively to develop a series of alternative land-use plans for a selected mining site that was the focus of a half-day field trip. Overall, the participants developed a number of rational land-use and reclamation plans for the site that were considered acceptable by the majority of the group. There was general agreement that the most valuable aspect of the workshop was the opportunity for individuals with such diverse interests to work cooperatively on a common problem and develop acceptable solutions.

  8. Land Use and Land Cover, Land Use as of 2007 of City of Ashland, WI (due to zoning re-writes reflecting Comprehensive Plan), Published in 2007, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, City of Ashland.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Land...

  9. Models of reforestation productivity and carbon sequestration for land use and climate change adaptation planning in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Trevor J; Neumann, Craig R; Meyer, Wayne S; Moon, Travis; Bryan, Brett A

    2016-10-01

    Environmental management and regional land use planning has become more complex in recent years as growing world population, climate change, carbon markets and government policies for sustainability have emerged. Reforestation and agroforestry options for environmental benefits, carbon sequestration, economic development and biodiversity conservation are now important considerations of land use planners. New information has been collected and regionally-calibrated models have been developed to facilitate better regional land use planning decisions and counter the limitations of currently available models of reforestation productivity and carbon sequestration. Surveys of above-ground biomass of 264 reforestation sites (132 woodlots, 132 environmental plantings) within the agricultural regions of South Australia were conducted, and combined with spatial information on climate and soils, to develop new spatial and temporal models of plant density and above-ground biomass productivity from reforestation. The models can be used to estimate productivity and total carbon sequestration (i.e. above-ground + below-ground biomass) under a continuous range of planting designs (e.g. variable proportions of trees and shrubs or plant densities), timeframes and future climate scenarios. Representative spatial models (1 ha resolution) for 3 reforestation designs (i.e. woodlots, typical environmental planting, biodiverse environmental plantings) × 3 timeframes (i.e. 25, 45, 65 years) × 4 possible climates (i.e. no change, mild, moderate, severe warming and drying) were generated (i.e. 36 scenarios) for use within land use planning tools.

  10. Region 9 Facility Response Plan (FRP) - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  11. PK-12 Public Educational Facilities Master Plan Evaluation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    21st Century School Fund, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Proper planning of school facilities is critical for all school districts no matter how large or small, whether major construction is in the works or the district is managing enrollment declines. When school districts properly plan for their school facilities they have better schools, more public use and higher value for public spending. This…

  12. Water in urban planning, Salt Creek Basin, Illinois water management as related to alternative land-use practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Andrew Maute

    1970-01-01

    regarded as an area of potential recharge to the shallow aquifers. Preservation of the effectiveness of these potential recharge areas should be considered in land-use planning. Salt Creek is polluted in times of both low and high flow. Most communities in the basin in Du Page County discharge their treated sewage into the creek, whereas those in Cook County transfer their sewage to plants of the Metropolitan Sanitary District outside the basin. During periods of high runoff, combined storm runoff and overflow from sanitary sewers enter the creek. Such polluted water detracts from the stream's esthetic and recreational potential and poses a threat to ground-water supplies owing to induced recharge of polluted water to shallow aquifers. Alternative approaches .to the pollution problem include improvement of the degree of sewage treatment, detention and treatment of storm runoff, dilution of sewage through flow augmentation, or transfer of sewage from the basin to a central treatment plant. To result in an enhanced environment, the streambed would have to be cleansed of accumulated sludge deposits. The overbank flooding in Salt Creek basin every 2 to 3 years presents problems because of encroachments and developments on the flood plains. Flood plains in an urban area can be managed by identifying them, by recognizing that either their natural storage capacity or equivalent artificial capacity is needed to accommodate floods, and by planning land use accordingly. Examples of effective floodplain management include (1) preservation of greenbelts or regional parks along stream courses, (2) use of flood plains for recreation, parking lots. or other low-intensity uses, (3) use of flood-proofed commercial buildings, and (4) provision for compensatory storage to replace natural storage capacity. Results of poor flood-plain management include uncontrolled residential development and encroachment by fill into natural storage areas where no compensatory storage has been

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  14. Microzonation in Urban Areas, Basic Element for Land-Use Planning, Risk Management and Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Morales, G. F.; Dávalos Sotelo, R.; Castillo Aguilar, S.; Mora González, I.; Lermo Samaniego, J. F.; Rodriguez, M.; García Martínez, J.; Suárez, M. Leonardo; Hernández Juan, F.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the results of microzonification of the natural hazards for different metropolitan areas and highlights the importance of integrating these results in urban planning. The cities that have been covered for the definition of danger in the state of Veracruz are: Orizaba, Veracruz and Xalapa, as part of the production of a Geological and Hydrometeorology Hazards Atlas for the state of Veracruz, financed by the Funds for the Prevention of Natural Disasters FOPREDEN and CONACYT. The general data of each metropolitan area was integrated in a geographic information system (GIS), obtaining different theme maps, and maps of dynamic characteristics of soils in each metropolitan area. For the planning of an urban area to aspire to promote sustainable development, it is essential to have a great deal of the details on the pertinent information and the most important is that that has to do with the degree of exposure to natural phenomena. In general, microzonation investigations consider all natural phenomena that could potentially affect an area of interest and hazard maps for each of potential hazards are prepared. With all the data collected and generated and fed into a SIG, models were generated which define the areas most threatened by earthquake, flood and landslide slopes. These results were compared with maps of the main features in the urban zones and a qualitative classification of areas of high to low hazard was established. It will have the basic elements of information for urban planning and land use. This information will be made available to the authorities and the general public through an Internet portal where people can download and view maps using free software available online.;

  15. Equip the warrior instead of manning the equipment: land use and transport planning support in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. te Brömmelstroet

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the embedding of land use and transport instruments—Planning Support Systems (PSS), models and tools—in Dutch planning practice, in order to shed light on how planning practitioners perceive these instruments and to ascertain the reasons and manner of their (lack of) utilization.

  16. Advancing Land-Sea Conservation Planning: Integrating Modelling of Catchments, Land-Use Change, and River Plumes to Prioritise Catchment Management and Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Pressey, Robert L; Ban, Natalie C; Brodie, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced changes to river loads of nutrients and sediments pose a significant threat to marine ecosystems. Ongoing land-use change can further increase these loads, and amplify the impacts of land-based threats on vulnerable marine ecosystems. Consequently, there is a need to assess these threats and prioritise actions to mitigate their impacts. A key question regarding prioritisation is whether actions in catchments to maintain coastal-marine water quality can be spatially congruent with actions for other management objectives, such as conserving terrestrial biodiversity. In selected catchments draining into the Gulf of California, Mexico, we employed Land Change Modeller to assess the vulnerability of areas with native vegetation to conversion into crops, pasture, and urban areas. We then used SedNet, a catchment modelling tool, to map the sources and estimate pollutant loads delivered to the Gulf by these catchments. Following these analyses, we used modelled river plumes to identify marine areas likely influenced by land-based pollutants. Finally, we prioritised areas for catchment management based on objectives for conservation of terrestrial biodiversity and objectives for water quality that recognised links between pollutant sources and affected marine areas. Our objectives for coastal-marine water quality were to reduce sediment and nutrient discharges from anthropic areas, and minimise future increases in coastal sedimentation and eutrophication. Our objectives for protection of terrestrial biodiversity covered species of vertebrates. We used Marxan, a conservation planning tool, to prioritise interventions and explore spatial differences in priorities for both objectives. Notable differences in the distributions of land values for terrestrial biodiversity and coastal-marine water quality indicated the likely need for trade-offs between catchment management objectives. However, there were priority areas that contributed to both sets of objectives. Our

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  18. Land use planning for sustainable development of peri-urban zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović-Miljković Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration that growth of urban population has impacts on land use and that managing urban population change is one of the most important contemporary challenges, this paper deals with the sustainable development of peri-urban zones which represent important an environment where employment opportunities are developed and resources exploited (particularly agricultural resources and environment where important recreational and leisure activities could be pursued. Within the review of current concepts and planning practices, the concepts of multifunctional agriculture and multifunctional landscapes in peri-urban zones are pointed out, as well as EU Developing Periurban Projects. The paper particularly focuses on the current situation in Serbia, where there is no specific legal basis for the planning of peri-urban areas, although there are positive examples of strategies, regulations and planning documents which treat agriculture and greenery in peri-urban zones in a sustainable manner.

  19. Land use impacts of low-carbon energy system transition - the case of UK bioenergy deployment under the Carbon Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konadu, D. D.; Sobral Mourao, Z.; Lupton, R.; Skelton, S.

    2015-12-01

    The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change has developed four low-carbon energy transition pathways - the Carbon Plan - towards achieving the legally binding 80% territorial greenhouse gas emissions reduction, stipulated in the 2008 Climate Change Act by 2050. All the pathways require increase in bioenergy deployment, of which a significant amount could be indigenously sourced from crops. But will increased domestic production of energy crops conflict with other land use and ecosystem priorities? To address this question, a coupled analysis of the four energy transition pathways and land use has been developed using an integrated resource accounting platform called ForeseerTM. The two systems are connected by the bioenergy component, and are projected forward in time to 2050, under different scenarios of energy crop composition and yield, and accounting for various constraints on land use for agriculture and ecosystem services. The results show between 7 and 61% of UK agricultural land could be required to meet bioenergy deployment projections under different combinations of crop yield and compositions for the transition pathways. This could result in competition for land for food production and other socio-economic and ecological land uses. Consequently, the potential role of bioenergy in achieving UK emissions reduction targets may face significant deployment challenges.

  20. Pimp Your Landscape - a Generic Approach for Integrating Regional Stakeholder Needs into Land Use Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Fürst

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces Pimp your landscape, a tool that was developed for evaluating the effects of changes in land use patterns. The main application field is to support interactions and communication among actors in spatial planning. With this tool, different land use pattern alternatives can be visualized in a short time, and their impact on land use services can be evaluated immediately. Also, spatial training and environmental education with regard to sustainable land use management can be supported. The tool was developed in an iterative process, in close cooperation and over intensive exchanges with end-users. A resulting feature is the provision of two different modi oriented on the professional background and skills of the users. The biggest advantage of Pimp your landscape is the simple entry and handling. However, the system also offers the possibility to go in-depth and work with complex rule sets. The presented paper introduces the development background and development process of Pimp your landscape and describes the tool's resulting concept and actual usage. Finally, possible constraints of the use of the system and potential workarounds are discussed.

  1. Anomaly in the rainfall-runoff behaviour of the Meuse catchment. Climate, land-use, or land-use management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fenicia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the time variability of catchment characteristics in the Meuse basin through its effect on catchment response. The approach uses a conceptual model to represent rainfall-runoff behaviour of this catchment, and evaluates possible time-dependence of model parameters. The main hypothesis is that conceptual model parameters, although not measurable quantities, are representative of specific catchment attributes (e.g. geology, land-use, land management, topography. Hence, we assume that eventual trends in model parameters are representative of catchment attributes that may have changed over time. The available hydrological record involves ninety years of data, starting in 1911. During this period the Meuse catchment has undergone significant modifications. The catchment structural modifications, although documented, are not available as "hard-data". Hence, our results should be considered as "plausible hypotheses". The main motivation of this work is the "anomaly" found in the rainfall runoff behaviour of the Meuse basin, where ninety years of rainfall-runoff simulations show a consistent overestimation of the runoff in the period between 1930 and 1965. Different authors have debated possible causes for the "anomaly", including climatic variability, land-use change and data errors. None of the authors considered the way in which the land is used by for instance agricultural and forestry practises. This aspect influenced the model design, which has been configured to account for different evaporation demand of growing forest. As a result of our analysis, we conclude that the lag time of the catchment has decreased significantly over time, which we attribute to more intensive drainage and river training works. Furthermore, we hypothesise that forest rotation has had a significant impact on the evaporation of the catchment. These results contrast with previous studies, where the effect of land-use change on

  2. Land use scenarios for greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian; Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2011-01-01

    Urban planning and development in Denmark can be characterised by a relatively strong planning framework. Projections of the future demand for urban development as well as decisions on how and where to accommodate this demand is part of the planning process and reflected in strategic- and local...... development plans. Land use scenarios based on empirically derived dynamics of urban growth are practically never applied. This may be explained by the in-consistency between the logic of spatial master planning - and the organic or driver-dependent character of urban growth assumed by land use modelling...... approaches. However, modelling approaches do offer a methodology to explore the pressures in an urban region, as well as an approach to understand urban development patterns outside the ‘spatial masterplan’. In this context we will present the results of a modelling exercise addressing future land use change...

  3. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  4. Polyrational property: rules for the many uses of land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Davy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Land uses are what land users do. When spatial planners and other policymakers promote or preclude certain land uses, they interfere with the rights of the users of land, most notably with property. The technical term for what connects land uses, planning, and property is land policy. My paper has a simple message: Good land policy provides a diversity of land uses with plural property relations. No single kind of property rules fits the purposes of all types of land uses. A detached single family house is not like a community garden, nor a highway like a retail chain. Each land use needs its own property “fingerprint.” In everyday practice, private and common property relations often accommodate a wide variety of demands made by the owners and users of land. Many theories of property and land policy, however, fail to recognize plural property relations. The simple message of my paper seeks to reconcile practice and theory. A polyrational theory of planning and property identifies eight types of land uses, each type needing its own kind of property rules. The eight types of land uses are: insular, opportunistic, kinship, collaborative, corporate, structural, container, and environmental uses of land. Polyrational land policy makes sure that desirable land uses are enveloped by appropriate property relations.

  5. Delivering planning objectives through regionalbased land-use planning and land policy instruments : An assessment of recent experiences in the Dutch provinces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straalen, Fennie M.; Janssen-Jansen, Leonie B.; van den Brink, Adri

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the extent to which the introduction of four new regional planning and land policy instruments in the Netherlands improves the delivery of regional planning objectives. On the basis of case-study research, we identify why and to what extent the Dutch regional authorities-the pro

  6. Land administration, planning and human rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Hvingel, Line Træholt; Galland, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    with a special focus on less developed countries struggling to build adequate systems for governing the RRRs in land. In doing so, the paper conceives planning as a key function and means of land administration systems by which human rights should be underpinned in solving concrete land issues....

  7. Biomass turnover time in terrestrial ecosystems halved by land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Fetzel, Tamara; Plutzar, Christoph; Kastner, Thomas; Lauk, Christian; Mayer, Andreas; Niedertscheider, Maria; Körner, Christian; Haberl, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is not well quantified. Biomass turnover time is a crucial parameter in the global carbon cycle, and contributes to the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate. Biomass turnover time varies substantially in time and space, but its determinants are not well known, making predictions of future global carbon cycle dynamics uncertain. Land use--the sum of activities that aim at enhancing terrestrial ecosystem services--alters plant growth and reduces biomass stocks, and is hence expected to affect biomass turnover. Here we explore land-use-induced alterations of biomass turnover at the global scale by comparing the biomass turnover of the actual vegetation with that of a hypothetical vegetation state with no land use under current climate conditions. We find that, in the global average, biomass turnover is 1.9 times faster with land use. This acceleration affects all biomes roughly equally, but with large differences between land-use types. Land conversion, for example from forests to agricultural fields, is responsible for 59% of the acceleration; the use of forests and natural grazing land accounts for 26% and 15% respectively. Reductions in biomass stocks are partly compensated by reductions in net primary productivity. We conclude that land use significantly and systematically affects the fundamental trade-off between carbon turnover and carbon stocks.

  8. Landing Site Selection and Surface Traverse Planning using the Lunar Mapping & Modeling Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Chang, G.; Bui, B.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Kim, R.; Dodge, K.; Malhotra, S.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP), is a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools for users to access mapped lunar data products (including image mosaics, digital elevation models, etc.) from past and current lunar missions (e.g., Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Apollo, etc.), and to perform in-depth analyses to support lunar surface mission planning and system design for future lunar exploration and science missions. It has been widely used by many scientists mission planners, as well as educators and public outreach (e.g., Google Lunar XPRICE teams, RESOLVE project, museums etc.) This year, LMMP was used by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI)'s Lunar Exploration internship program to perform lighting analysis and local hazard assessments, such as, slope, surface roughness and crater/boulder distribution to research landing sites and surface pathfinding and traversal. Our talk will include an overview of LMMP, a demonstration of the tools as well as a summary of the LPI Lunar Exploration summer interns' experience in using those tools.

  9. Investigation of connections among physical, social and economic factors in case of optimal Land Use System Planning in the Egri-Bükkalja Foothill Area of North Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, Anna; Utasi, Zoltán; Tóth, Antal; Csabai Kitti, Edina; Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Hegyi, Balázs; Tamás Hegyi, Péter; Pásztor, László; Mika, János

    2016-04-01

    empirical methods (analysis of documents, interviews and field works). We pointed out that landscape factors change intensively in north-south direction in the Egri-Bükkalja Foothill Area. A smaller zonation system can be recognised inside this microlandscape units. Different optimal possibilities are guaranteed for planning of land use systems in the edge of middle-height mountain areas, in pediments and in the boundary between pediment and low plain areas. We have explored connection among landscape factors and socio-economic facilities and their processes of three settlements and we have explained spatial differences as well. We could explain land-use changes during last 230 years inside this microlandscape unit. Our research work effected new scientific results in this microlandscape unit and our results can be built up into different settlement development plans, and the processing of agricultural or landscape protection development processes in pediments in the future.

  10. 78 FR 33705 - Postdecisional Administrative Review Process for Occupancy or Use of National Forest System Lands...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... mineral materials. ``Suspension'' is defined as ``a temporary revocation or cancellation of a written... Occupancy or Use of National Forest System Lands and Resources AGENCY: USDA, Forest Service. ACTION: Final... Forest System (NFS) lands and resources. The appeal process for decisions related to occupancy or use...

  11. Aspects of the Land Use Planning System in the U.K. : With Special Reference to Housing

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, Christine M.E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the basic principles behind the UK land use planning system are set out and the changes in legislation since the 1947 Town and Country Planning Act and the mechanisms for implementation discussed. The ways in which the benefits of planning have been allocated between different groups over the last fifty years are then examined. Finally, the paper looks at the specifics of planning for housing and the impact of the system on output and prices.

  12. An agent based approach for simulating complex systems with spatial dynamicsapplication in the land use planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimazahra BARRAMOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research a new agent based approach for simulating complex systems with spatial dynamics is presented. We propose architecture based on coupling between two systems: multi-agent systems and geographic information systems. We also propose a generic model of agent-oriented simulation that we will apply to the field of land use planning. In fact, simulating the evolution of the urban system is a key to help decision makers to anticipate the needs of the city in terms of installing new equipment and opening new urbanization’ areas to install the new population.

  13. LAND USE PLANNING FOR BEEKEEPING USING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM IN SUKABUMI REGENCY, WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varian Triantomo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beekeeping is one of the alternative businesses that can be developed without converting the existing land use. Deveoping the business of beekeeping should consider the biophysically suitable area for bees themselves and also for the bee forage availability. The objective of this study was to provide the direction of development area for beekeeping. The methods used consist ofa combination of remote sensing, geographic information system, and analytical hierarchy process. The recommended area for beekeeping in Sukabumi regency consists of two areas: forest and dry land agriculture area. The protected area has two priorities: The first priority area for beekeeping is 3,335.52 ha (6.4%, while second priority is 48,415.22 ha (93.6% that covered 14 sub-districts. The cultivation area has three priorities: First priority area is 1,163.92 ha, second priorityarea is 6,044.98 ha, and third priority area is 2,651.21 ha that covered 9 sub-districts. Based on result of analysis with the existing beekeeping in Sukabumi regency, local government of Sukabumi regency or local farmer could develop program for beekeeping in such as sub district: Cibadak, Cicurug, Cidahu, Ciemas, Cikidang, Ciracap, Cisolok, Kabandungan, Kadudampit, Kalapanunggal, Nagrak, Pelabuhan Ratu, Sukabumi, Sukaraja, Jampang Kulon, Pabuaran, Sagaranten, Surade, and Tegalbuleud.

  14. Horticultural therapy--aspects of land use for the mentally handicapped. A system of planning for the requirements of the mentally handicapped gardener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, T; Underhill, C

    1979-01-01

    An increasing number of facilities for the mentally handicapped use horticulture, agriculture and gardening in their training programmes. This paper contains a review of: (1) some aspects of land use as a medium for leisure, rehabilitation, therapy and training for the mentally handicapped, (2) employment, both sheltered and open, in land use as reflected in a recent survey, (3) the variety of knowledge available through the medium of land use. The main emphasis of the paper deals with: (1) the need for planning, (2) a suggested planning system that assists the instructor in understanding the requirements of the mentally handicapped gardener when he approaches a given job, (3) some problems peculiar to land use work with the mentally handicapped. In conclusion the authors briefly examine: (1) the need for assessment, (2) the need to distinguish between production and training, (3) suggestions towards an expansion of the planning system to take in other areas of the horticultural unit than were originally described, (4) social activities connected with the horticultural activities described, (5) the hierarchy identified through the use of a particular planning system.

  15. Planning Network of Sports Facilities in the Context of Montenegro Case Study: Herceg-Novi, Podgorica and Danilovgrad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetislav G. Popović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sports facilities of a city through the a long history of development of the city, starting with ancient Greece and Rome, had been evermore recognized as important areas of the city, the place of communication and interaction between people, places of unwinding everyday social life, so-called point of the urban gatherings. In addition to the social aspect, facilities for sport are often involved in the formation of the visual identity of a city. The land intended for sport and recreation are areas which are in the planning document designed to develop sports and recreational facilities, outdoors or indoors. Globalisation and the transition effects in Montenegro contributed faster transformation of society. This paper explores the urban parameters for the planning of sports and recreational zones in the city. During the transition period, the last 25 years, the system of planning and land management has experienced a major transformation in terms improper planning development of sports facilities, not supporting sports and recreation needs of the residents. For central and coastal region of Montenegro, it is characteristic rapid urbanization with significant migration and dominant construction of residential blocks and tourist facilities on the coast. The planning area for residential, has not been accompanied by adequate network of sports facilities. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the existing network of sports facilities in Herceg-Novi, Danilovgrad and Podgorica can meet the needs of the residents, as well as to provide recommendations for the further development of the network of sports facilities.

  16. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-02-25

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED’s guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA

  17. The Influence of Urban Land-Use and Public Transport Facilities on Active Commuting in Wellington, New Zealand: Active Transport Forecasting Using the WILUTE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joreintje Dingena Mackenbach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has numerous physical and mental health benefits, and active commuting (walking or cycling to work can help meet physical activity recommendations. This study investigated socioeconomic differences in active commuting, and assessed the impact of urban land-use and public transport policies on active commuting in the Wellington region in New Zealand. We combined data from the New Zealand Household Travel Survey and GIS data on land-use and public transport facilities with the Wellington Integrated Land-Use, Transportation and Environment (WILUTE model, and forecasted changes in active commuter trips associated with changes in the built environment. Results indicated high income individuals were more likely to commute actively than individuals on low income. Several land-use and transportation factors were associated with active commuting and results from the modelling showed a potential increase in active commuting following an increase in bus frequency and parking fees. In conclusion, regional level policies stimulating environmental factors that directly or indirectly affect active commuting may be a promising strategy to increase population level physical activity. Access to, and frequency of, public transport in the neighbourhood can act as a facilitator for a more active lifestyle among its residents without negatively affecting disadvantaged groups.

  18. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  19. The Examination of Real Property Tax Exemptions: An Example of Land Use Planning for Fiscal Gain. Exchange Bibliography No. 172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Larry R. G.

    This selected bibliography focuses on property tax exemptions in urban areas and on the ability of cities to generate property tax revenues. It begins with a review of some relationships between the property tax and land use planning. Then, the role of the property tax as one of several devices employed in fiscally-oriented planning is examined.…

  20. Planning and Designing Safe Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Those who manage physical education, athletic, and recreation programs have a number of legal duties that they are expected to carry out. Among these are an obligation to take reasonable precautions to ensure safe programs and facilities for all participants, spectators, and staff. Physical education and sports facilities that are poorly planned,…

  1. Land Use and Land Cover, Existing land use derived from orthoimagery. Ground-truthing from discussion with local plan commission members., Published in 2000, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Portage County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2000. It is described...

  2. Land use-based landscape planning and restoration in mine closure areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fu, Meichen; Hassani, Ferri P; Zeng, Hui; Geng, Yuhuan; Bai, Zhongke

    2011-05-01

    Landscape planning and restoration in mine closure areas is not only an inevitable choice to sustain mining areas but also an important path to maximize landscape resources and to improve ecological function in mine closure areas. The analysis of the present mine development shows that many mines are unavoidably facing closures in China. This paper analyzes the periodic impact of mining activities on landscapes and then proposes planning concepts and principles. According to the landscape characteristics in mine closure areas, this paper classifies available landscape resources in mine closure areas into the landscape for restoration, for limited restoration and for protection, and then summarizes directions for their uses. This paper establishes the framework of spatial control planning and design of landscape elements from "macro control, medium allocation and micro optimization" for the purpose of managing and using this kind of special landscape resources. Finally, this paper applies the theories and methods to a case study in Wu'an from two aspects: the construction of a sustainable land-use pattern on a large scale and the optimized allocation of typical mine landscape resources on a small scale.

  3. Sustainable Planning of Land Use Changes in farming areas under ecological protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montero-García, F.; Montero-Riquelme, F.; Brasa-Ramos, A.; Carsjens, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Land use has been changing in the last decades because of agricultural intensification and land abandonment which implies deterioration in the optimum habitat structure and quality. Habitat degradation and loss, resulting from changes in land use remain significant drivers of biodiversity loss. Thes

  4. Mapping Ecosystem Services for Land Use Planning, the Case of Central Kalimantan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumarga, E.; Hein, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Indonesia is subject to rapid land use change. One of the main causes for the conversion of land is the rapid expansion of the oil palm sector. Land use change involves a progressive loss of forest cover, with major impacts on biodiversity and global CO2 emissions. Ecosystem services have been propo

  5. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  6. Developing a Cell-Based Spatial Optimization Model for Land-Use Patterns Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a cell-based spatial optimization model compatible with the ArcGIS platform, termed Dynamically Dimensioned Search Landscape Optimization Planning model (DDSLOP, for landscape planning. The development of the proposed model was based on the Dynamically Dimensioned Search Algorithm, which can efficiently find an optimal global solution within the massive solution space inherent to multi-dimensional analysis. Therefore, the DDSLOP model can reveal landscape pattern scenarios suited to specific managerial purposes at a cellular level. To evaluate the DDSLOP model, we applied it to a landscape planning initiative that focused on the conservation of three bird species in the National Taiwan University Highland Experimental Farm (NTU-HEF. We compared the proposed model with the Land-Use Pattern Optimization-library (LUPOlib, which was used in the optimization of landscapes at a patch level. The results of the comparison revealed that our fine scale optimization method has better flexibility, and can therefore form landscape structures, which, overall, provides not only better individual habitats for the target species, but also landscape patterns that foster high habitat connectivity, both important aspects of conservation efforts.

  7. A technique on automatic land-use database reconstruction based on scanning land-use map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaojuan; GONG Huili; YIN Lianwang; SUN Yonghua; YANG Lingli; WANG Yanggang

    2006-01-01

    Although a land-cover database is very important to national land use including urban planning and land-use management, it is very laborious and time-consuming to build through digitization of paper land-use maps (1:10000) and data input by hand. Here we propose a new, high-level, automatic technique to build a land-use database, which has proved useful and practical in building a land-use database of Baotou City.

  8. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H.; Hart, Lynette A.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs’ roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans’ Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  9. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H; Hart, Lynette A

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans' Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  10. Agro-forest landscape and the 'fringe' city: a multivariate assessment of land-use changes in a sprawling region and implications for planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Luca

    2014-08-15

    The present study evaluates the impact of urban expansion on landscape transformations in Rome's metropolitan area (1500 km(2)) during the last sixty years. Landscape composition, structure and dynamics were assessed for 1949 and 2008 by analyzing the distribution of 26 metrics for nine land-use classes. Changes in landscape structure are analysed by way of a multivariate statistical approach providing a summary measure of rapidity-to-change for each metric and class. Land fragmentation increased during the study period due to urban expansion. Poorly protected or medium-low value added classes (vineyards, arable land, olive groves and pastures) experienced fragmentation processes compared with protected or high-value added classes (e.g. forests, olive groves) showing larger 'core' areas and lower fragmentation. The relationship observed between class area and mean patch size indicates increased fragmentation for all uses of land (both expanding and declining) except for urban areas and forests. Reducing the impact of urban expansion for specific land-use classes is an effective planning strategy to contrast the simplification of Mediterranean landscape in peri-urban areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fuzzy Multi-fractional Programming for Land Use Planning in Agricultural Production System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a multi-objective linear fractional programming (MOLFP approach for multi-objective linear fuzzy goal programming (MOLFGP problem. Here, we consider a problem in which a set of pair of goals are optimized in ratio rather than optimizing them individually. In particular, we consider the optimization of profit to cash expenditure and crop production in various seasons to land utilization as a fractional objectives and used remaining goals in its original form. Further, the goals set in agricultural production planning are conflicting in nature; thus we use the concept of conflict and nonconflict between goals for computation of appropriate aspiration level. The method is illustrated on a problem of agricultural production system for comparison with Biswas and Pal [1] method to show its suitability.

  12. Improving sand and gravel utilization and land-use planning. - 3D-modelling gravel resources with geospatial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolstad Libach, Lars; Wolden, Knut; Dagestad, Atle; Eskil Larsen, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    The Norwegian aggregate industry produces approximately 14 million tons of sand and gravel aggregates annually to a value of approximately 100 million Euros. Utilization of aggregates are often linked to land-use conflicts and complex environmental impacts at the extraction site. These topics are managed on a local municipal level in Norway. The Geological Survey of Norway has a database and a web map service with information about sand and gravel deposits with considerable volumes and an importance evaluation. Some of the deposits covers large areas where the land-use conflicts are high. To ease and improve land-use planning, safeguard other important resources like groundwater and sustainable utilization of sand and gravel resources - there is a need for more detailed information of already mapped important resources. Detailed 3D-models of gravel deposits is a tool for a better land-use- and resource management. By combining seismic, GPR and resistivity geophysical profile data, borehole data, quaternary maps and lidar surface data, it has been possible to make 3D-models of deposits and to further research the possibilities for distinguishing different qualities and volumes. Good datasets and a detailed resource map is a prerequisite to assess geological resources for planners, extractors and neighbours. Future challenges lies in use of, often old, geophysical data, and combining these. What kind of information is it possible to grasp from depth-data that actually argues for a more detailed delineation of resources?

  13. Urban Land Use by Illegal Armed Groups in Medellin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    Land Use Planning, Fifth Edition (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2006). 2 Ibid., p. 10. 3 A GIS-based urban field research effort was...hypothesis, see Ricardo Aricapa, Comuna 13: crónica de una Guerra urbana (Borough 13: chronicle of an urban war) (Medellín: University of Antioquia, 2005...5 de diciembre de 1919,: Se funda SCADTA‖ in Planeta, 50 días que cambiaron la historia de Colombia (Bogotá: Planeta, 2004), pp. 163-166

  14. Navigating trade-offs in land-use planning: integrating human well-being into objective setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M. Adams

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for development of natural resources, which can be accompanied by environmental degradation. Planning for multiple land uses requires navigating trade-offs between social, economic, and environmental outcomes arising from different possible futures. To explore these trade-offs, we use the Daly River catchment, in Australia's Northern Territory, as a case study. The catchment contains areas of priority for both conservation and development. In response to the challenge of navigating the required trade-offs, the Daly River Management Advisory Committee (DRMAC initiated a land-use plan for the region. Both development and conservation of natural resources in the catchment will affect human well-being and the long-term provisioning of ecosystem services in diverse ways. To understand some of these impacts, an innovative engagement process was designed to elicit the relative importance of key factors to residents' well-being. The process identified 19 well-being factors grouped into four domains: biodiversity, socio-cultural, recreational, and commercial. Overall, the highest-ranked well-being factors were in the social-cultural and biodiversity domains while commercial values were ranked the least important. Respondents reported low satisfaction with commercial factors as well, noting concerns over environmental impacts from existing developments and sustainability of future developments. We identified differences in the reported importance values for several types of stakeholders, most notably between indigenous respondents and those employed in the agricultural sectors. Indigenous respondents placed greater importance on biodiversity and socio-cultural factors. Agricultural respondents placed greater importance on commercial factors. The outcomes of our engagement were integrated into DRMAC's process of objective-setting to ensure that objectives for each domain were included in land-use planning. Our results can also

  15. Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

  16. Hydrogeochemical and geophysical investigation of the Istanbul Tuzla-Icmeler spring area for environmental and land use planning purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Tolga; Ozürlan, Gülcin; Cekirge, Nevin

    2007-09-01

    The spring waters of Tuzla-Icmeler are on the Marmara Sea coast in Tuzla town of Istanbul city. The springs discharge a natural sodium chloride mineral water that consumed for ages for therapeutic purposes attributed to their chemical properties. Development of springs commenced during the Ottoman times and a surface collection structure was built at the discharge point of the main spring. Two deep wells were drilled to tap mineral water within the past decades. The bottled water of these springs is also sold for a couple of years and its consumption as a beverage is increasing. The geochemical properties of these springs were investigated by several researchers in the past. This study comprises geochemical and geophysical measurements performed between July 2001 and July 2002 in order to construct a conceptual hydrogeological model for environmental and land use planning purposes. The seasonal evaluation of Tuzla-Icmeler (mineral spring) shows that the chemical properties fluctuate from the beginning of summer until the beginning of winter. This indicates that the overdraft of water during the summer season causes the movement and mix of normal groundwater with the mineralized groundwater. As a result, mixing of less mineralized groundwater decreases the salinity of mineralized groundwater. Using the site-specific hydrogeological, geochemical and geophysical data, zones of protection areas were delineated in order to prevent a possible pollution access to the springs and surroundings from nearby dockyards, dwellings and vehicle traffic. For this purpose, a new land use plan was proposed using the existing settlement sustainability plans.

  17. Implementing Natural Resources Cadastral Plan in Pasargadae District of Iran by Using Quick Bird Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhdari, G. H.; Deilami, K.; Firooznia, E.

    2015-12-01

    Natural Resources are essential for security and sustainable development of each country. Therefore, in order to reach sustainable development, conservation as well as optimum utilization of natural resources, executing of natural resources cadastral plan is necessary and essential. Governments conduct lands management in Iran, so there is a need for comprehensive plan with arranged program for best evaluation. In this research as a pilot, Pasargadae city is opted. Pasargadae region is located in north-east of Shiraz in Fars province with Latitude and longitude of 30° 15 ´ 53 ° N and 53° 13 ´ 29 ° E respectively. In order to generate the cadastral maps, Firstly, images from QuickBird satellite with 50-60 centimeters resolution were georeferenced by utilizing ground control points with accurate GPS coordinates. In addition to satellite images, old paper maps with 1:10000 scale in local coordinate system from agriculture ministry in 1963 were digitized according to 1:25000 scale map from army geographical organization with AutoCad software. Beside, paper maps with 1:50000 scale and Google Earth were used to find the changes during time. All the above maps were added to QuickBird images as new layers by using ArcMap software. These maps also were utilized to determine the different land-uses. Thus, by employing ArcMap software lands divide into 2 groups: firstly, lands with official document, which is owned by either natural or legal persons, and secondly national lands under different uses such as forestry, range management and desertification plans. Consequently, the generation of cadastral maps leads to better difference between private and national lands. In addition, producing cadastral maps prevent the destruction and illegal possession of natural lands by individuals.

  18. Identification of biomes affected by marginal expansion of agricultural land use induced by increased crop consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Jesper Hedal

    2009-01-01

    to characterise these areas. The present study ascribes so-called biomes (natural potential vegetation) to the areas affected by agricultural expansion in order to provide a basis for assessing the environmental impacts from land use in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA). The methodology builds...... on agricultural statistics and maps of global agricultural areas and the global distribution of biomes. The application of the method is illustrated with four examples. The results indicate that agricultural expansion on land suited for crop cultivation (cultivable land) typically affects forest biomes...... or potential grassland/steppe, whereas expansion on land suited for grazing but not for crop cultivation (grazable land) typically occurs on potential shrubland or a few other biomes depending on the region. Some uncertainty applies to the results but it is concluded that it is feasible to identify biomes...

  19. [Evaluation of land resources carrying capacity of development zone based on planning environment impact assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shi-Feng; Zhang, Ping; Jiang, Jin-Long

    2012-02-01

    Assessment of land resources carrying capacity is the key point of planning environment impact assessment and the main foundation to determine whether the planning could be implemented or not. With the help of the space analysis function of Geographic Information System, and selecting altitude, slope, land use type, distance from resident land, distance from main traffic roads, and distance from environmentally sensitive area as the sensitive factors, a comprehensive assessment on the ecological sensitivity and its spatial distribution in Zhangzhou Merchants Economic and Technological Development Zone, Fujian Province of East China was conducted, and the assessment results were combined with the planning land layout diagram for the ecological suitability analysis. In the Development Zone, 84.0% of resident land, 93.1% of industrial land, 86.0% of traffic land, and 76. 0% of other constructive lands in planning were located in insensitive and gently sensitive areas, and thus, the implement of the land use planning generally had little impact on the ecological environment, and the land resources in the planning area was able to meet the land use demand. The assessment of the population carrying capacity with ecological land as the limiting factor indicated that in considering the highly sensitive area and 60% of the moderately sensitive area as ecological land, the population within the Zone in the planning could reach 240000, and the available land area per capita could be 134.0 m2. Such a planned population scale is appropriate, according to the related standards of constructive land.

  20. A synoptic approach for analyzing erosion as a guide to land-use planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M.; Hines, Walter G.; Rickert, David A.; Beach, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    A synoptic approach has been devised to delineate the relationships that exist' between physiographic factors, land-use activities, and resultant erosional problems. The approach involves the development of an erosional-depositional province map and a numerical impact matrix for rating the potential for erosional problems. The province map is prepared by collating data on the natural terrain factors that exert the dominant controls on erosion and deposition in each basin. In addition, existing erosional and depositional features are identified and mapped from color-infrared, high-altitude aerial imagery. The axes of the impact matrix are composed of weighting values for the terrain factors used in developing the map and by a second set of values for the prevalent land-use activities. The body of the matrix is composed of composite erosional-impact ratings resulting from the product of the factor sets. Together the province map and problem matrix serve as practical tools for estimating the erosional impact of human activities on different types of terrain. The approach has been applied to the Molalla River basin, Oregon, and has proven useful for the recognition of problem areas. The same approach is currently being used by the State of Oregon (in the 208 assessment of nonpoint-source pollution under Public Law 92-500) to evaluate the impact of land-management practices on stream quality.

  1. Land use scenarios for greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian; Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2011-01-01

    development plans. Land use scenarios based on empirically derived dynamics of urban growth are practically never applied. This may be explained by the in-consistency between the logic of spatial master planning - and the organic or driver-dependent character of urban growth assumed by land use modelling...... approaches. However, modelling approaches do offer a methodology to explore the pressures in an urban region, as well as an approach to understand urban development patterns outside the ‘spatial masterplan’. In this context we will present the results of a modelling exercise addressing future land use change...... the Dutch-based Research Institute for Knowledge Systems (RIKS), which has a lot of parallels with the MOLAND approach, known from various research applications. As we are new to land use modelling, this exercise should also illustrate the possibilities of non-modelling experts to elaborate a practical...

  2. Distribution of Land Use to Purify Contaminated Groundwater by Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizumi, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Kinouchi, T.; Tase, N.; Fukami, K.

    2006-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by nitrate results from over-fertilizing and/or inadequate disposal of livestock excreta has been large-scale problem in agricultural area. Because nitrate is primarily transported to streams via ground water flow, explaining actual condition of groundwater is needed to propose an effective measure for the conservation and restoration of sound nitrogen cycle in agricultural river catchments. The purpose of this research was to clarify a triangular relationship between the groundwater quality and flow system, river water quality and land use. The experimental field is located on a slope from Tsukuba tableland to bottomland, which is a part of Nishi- Yata River watershed in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. The site area is about 0.0675 square kilometers and the altitude varies from 24 m to 19 m. Land use of tableland, bottomland and intermediate between them are forestland, paddy field and cropland, respectively. Groundwater quality and level were monitored for the year 2004. During the study period significant differences were not observed in groundwater ionic concentrations. Relative high concentrations of dissolved nitrate were detected in cropland (3 - 43 mg/l) and forestland (74 - 179 mg/l). It revealed that there was a purification zone in the paddy field and the area around its 2-4m and denitrification eliminates nitrate-nitrogen. The pressure head converted into hydraulics head, and the groundwater flow were calculated. According to the results, it seems that groundwater flow from tableland to the riverbed through bottomland. It is presumed that groundwater cultivated in cropland with chemical fertilizer pass through the purification zone of nitrate. On the other hand, it is assumed that groundwater containing nitrate originated from inadequate disposal of livestock excreta discharge from forestland does not pass through the depth of this spot. It is suggested that considering flow system of groundwater to manage distribution of land use

  3. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... must be achieved through the use of fixed-wing, aircraft-based application platforms. For dispersant... paragraph (i)(3) of this section. Any dispersants identified in a response plan must be of a type listed on... fire monitor-type applicators, adequacy of performance criteria must be documented by presentation...

  4. Maintenance Implementation Plan for the Grout Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoakum, A.K.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is to describe how the Grout Treatment Facility will implement the requirements established by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter 2.0 Nuclear Facilities (DOE 1990). The plan provides a blueprint for a disciplined approach to implementation and compliance. Each element of the order is prioritized, categorized, and then placed into one of three phases for implementation.

  5. land use changes and its effects on the provision of social facilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    lines of the water company while others had interruptions in the flow of water. Again residents had difficulties disposing of refuse and waste water from their homes. Open spaces ..... training traditional land owners about their management of ...

  6. Strategic Planning for Land Use under Extreme Climate Changes: A Case Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme weather caused by global climate change affects slope-land in Taiwan, causing soil loss, floods, and sediment hazards. Although Taiwan is a small island, the population density is ranked second highest worldwide. With three-fourths of the island area being slope-land, soil and water conservation (SWC is crucial. Therefore, because of the impact of climate and social change, the means of maintaining sustainable development of slope-land and the safety of the living environment in Taiwan is a developing and crucial issue. This study applied four foresight analysis tools that covered both qualitative and quantitative aspects, including international trend analysis, a focus group, the Delphi method, and a strategy roadmap. By combining the four analysis tools, we developed corresponding strategies to address climate change for use as references for policy-makers. The findings of this study can contribute to consensus-forming among multiple stakeholders on the sustainable development of soil and water resources and to devising foresight strategies for SWC in short-term, middle-term, and long-term bases. Ultimately, the goal of “considering climate and socioeconomic change, watershed resources being managed on a multiple-use basis to avoid disasters and to sustain SWC” can be realized by the year 2025.

  7. Detecting Anthropogenic and Climate Change Induced Land Cover and Land Use Change in the Vicinity of an Oil/gas Facility in Northwestern Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Engstrom, R.; Epstein, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are changing dramatically due to changes in climate, vegetation and human activities. Northwestern Siberia is one of the regions which has been undergoing various land cover and land use changes associated primarily with animal husbandry and oil/gas development. These changes have been exacerbated by warming climatic conditions over the last fifty years. In this study, we investigated land cover and land use changes associated with oil and gas development southeast of the city of Nadym within the context of climate change based on multi-source and multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. The impacts of land use on surface vegetation, radiation, and hydrological properties were evaluated using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), albedo and the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). The results from a comparison between high spatial resolution imagery acquired in1968 and 2006 indicate that the vegetation cover was reduced in areas disturbed by oil and gas development. Vegetation cover increased in natural landscapes over the same period,. Water logging was found along the linear structures near the oil/gas development, while in natural landscapes the drying of thermokarst lakes is evident due to permafrost degradation. Derived indices suggest that the direct impacts associated with infrastructure development are mostly within 100 m distance from the disturbance source. While these impacts are rather localized they persist for decades despite partial recovery of vegetation after the initial disturbance.

  8. Study On Affordable Housing Land Planning Based On Mixed-Use Development%基于混合功能发展的保障性住宅用地规划研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    In view of mixed-use development of urban land, the paper analyzes suitable mixed development land typies with affordable housing such as a class of industrial land,cultural facilities land, commercial and business facilities land, transportation facilities land and so on, for the different characteristics of the mixed land use in the city old districts and new districts, it proposes different strategies to plan affordable housing mixed-use land in order to improve the efficiency of land use and come true the objectives of low-income groups uniform distribution in the city.%  本文从城市用地混合功能发展的角度出发,分析研究了一类工业用地、文化设施用地、商业服务业设施用地、交通设施用地等适宜与保障性住宅混合发展的用地类型,针对城市老城区和新区中土地混合使用的不同特点,提出规划保障性住宅混合用地的不同策略,提高土地使用效率,实现低收入群体在城市中均匀分布的目标。

  9. Sophisticated test facility to detect land mines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, W. de; Lensen, H.A.; Janssen, Y.H.L.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the Dutch government humanitarian demining project 'HOM-2000', an outdoor test facility has been realized to test, improve and develop detection equipment for land mines. This sophisticated facility, allows us to access and compare the performance of the individual and of a combi

  10. Evaluating the Effects of Land Use Planning for Non-Point Source Pollution Based on a System Dynamics Approach in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Peng; Li, Wei; Liu, Nianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization is proceeding rapidly in several developing countries such as China. This accelerating urbanization alters the existing land use types in a way that results in more Non-Point Source (NPS) pollution to local surface waters. Reasonable land use planning is necessary. This paper compares seven planning scenarios of a case study area, namely Wulijie, China, from the perspective of NPS pollution. A System Dynamics (SD) model was built for the comparison to adequately capture the planning complexity. These planning scenarios, which were developed by combining different land use intensities (LUIs) and construction speeds (CSs), were then simulated. The results show that compared to scenario S1 (business as usual) all other scenarios will introduce more NPS pollution (with an incremental rate of 22%-70%) to Wulijie. Scenario S6 was selected as the best because it induced relatively less NPS pollution while simultaneously maintaining a considerable development rate. Although LUIs represent a more critical factor compared to CSs, we conclude that both LUIs and CSs need to be taken into account to make the planning more environmentally friendly. Considering the power of SD in decision support, it is recommended that land use planning should take into consideration findings acquired from SD simulations.

  11. Does Land Tenure Security Promote Manure Use by Farm Households in Vietnam?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Thanh Nguyen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Facing widespread poverty and land degradation, Vietnam started a land reform in 1993 as part of its renovation policy package known as “Doi Moi”. This paper examines the impacts of improved land tenure security, via this land reform, on manure use by farm households. As manure potentially improves soil fertility by adding organic matter and nutrients to the soil surface, it might contribute to improving soil productive capacity and reversing land degradation. Random effect regression models are applied to a panel dataset of 133 farm households in the Northern Uplands of Vietnam collected in 1993, 1998, and 2006. The results confirm that land tenure security has positive effects on manure use, but the levels of influence differ depending on whether the land has been privatized or whether the land title has already been issued. In addition, manure use is also influenced by the number of cattle and pigs, the education level and ethnicity of household heads, farm land size and non-farm income. The findings suggest that speeding up land privatization and titling, encouraging cattle and pig rearing, and improving education would promote manure use in farm production. However, careful interpretation of our research findings is required as land privatization, together with economic growth and population pressure, might lead to overuse of farm inputs.

  12. Quota Restrictions on Land Use for Decelerating Urban Sprawl of Mega City: A Case Study of Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqian Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mega cities of China are faced with great pressure from conflict between huge land demand for construction use and limited resources. To improve this situation, it is necessary to slow the increasing rate of built-up land and even reduce the existing built-up land by improving land use efficiency. Herein, land use planning with urban sprawl deceleration is proposed. Land quotas are important tools for the control of land use planning in China, but the current quotas are mainly in the form of increment, thus cannot support land use planning with urban sprawl deceleration. To address these issues, we developed a model named “current-plan-requirement response (CPRR”, to optimize the land quotas. With this model, we investigated the current status of land use, the process of land use planning, and the requirements of land use planning with urban sprawl deceleration in Shanghai. It was found that the current land quotas have provided somewhat inhabited conversion of arable land to built-up land, but scarcely any regulation of land use efficiency or protection of natural environment. Then, the land quotas were optimized and quota management recommendations were made. The optimized land quotas included four aspects of quotas: arable land protection, ecological conservation, scale constraint on built-up land and economical and intensive land use. These new land quotas could be used to guide reduction of built-up land and increase ecological land in China’s mega cities. It might also be beneficial for easing conflict between supply and demand of built-up land, for building an eco-friendly city land-use structure.

  13. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

  14. 12 CFR 555.200 - How may I use or participate with others to use electronic means and facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How may I use or participate with others to use electronic means and facilities? 555.200 Section 555.200 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION..., electronic means or facilities to perform any function, or provide any product or service, as part of an...

  15. 40 CFR 35.925-1 - Facilities planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.925-1 Section... Facilities planning. That, if the award is for step 2, step 3, or step 2=3 grant assistance, the facilities planning requirements in § 35.917 et seq. have been met. ...

  16. Utilizing coal remaining resources and post-mining land use planning based on GIS-based optimization method : study case at PT Adaro coal mine in South Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Anis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coal mining activities may cause a series of environmental and socio-economic issues in communities around the mining area. Mining can become an obstacle to environmental sustainability and a major hidden danger to the security of the local ecology. Therefore, the coal mining industry should follow some specific principles and factors in achieving sustainable development. These factors include geological conditions, land use, mining technology, environmental sustainability policies and government regulations, socio-economic factors, as well as sustainability optimization for post-mining land use. Resources of the remains of the coal which is defined as the last remaining condition of the resources and reserves of coal when the coal companies have already completed the life of the mine or the expiration of the licensing contract (in accordance with government permission. This research uses approch of knowledge-driven GIS based methods mainly Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP and Fuzzy logic for utilizing coal remaining resources and post-mining land use planning. The mining area selected for this study belongs to a PKP2B (Work Agreement for Coal Mining company named Adaro Indonesia (PT Adaro. The result shows that geologically the existing formation is dominated by Coal Bearing Formation (Warukin Formation which allows the presence of remains coal resource potential after the lifetime of mine, and the suitability of rubber plantation for the optimization of land use in all mining sites and also in some disposal places in conservation areas and protected forests.

  17. 40 CFR 35.2030 - Facilities planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.2030 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2030 Facilities planning. (a) General. (1) Facilities planning consists of those necessary plans and studies which directly relate to...

  18. Methodological Challenges of Identifying Ultimate Land Use Changes Caused by Biofuel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Kløverpris, Jesper; Nielsen, Per Henning

    2007-01-01

    that is only poorly dealt with by LCA methods. Even though the use of land, or change of land cover and its eco-systems, is acknowledged to be a very important impact of human activities, a methodology for assessing this impact category has not yet  been properly developed within LCA. Some LCA scientists have......-of-the-art is that such inventories typically include data from crop production in the country in which the crop is used  (or from where it is exported) and, thereby, the inventories do not necessarily consider crop and land displacements through market mechanisms and do, thus, not identify the land ultimately affected...

  19. 76 FR 62694 - Appeal of Decisions Relating to Occupancy or Use of National Forest System Lands and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... Decisions Relating to Occupancy or Use of National Forest System Lands and Resources AGENCY: USDA, Forest... regulations governing occupancy or use of National Forest System (NFS) lands and resources. The appeal process... lands and resources to appeal certain Forest Service decisions with regard to the issuance, approval, or...

  20. Identifying and locating land irrigated by center-pivot irrigation systems using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R. O.

    1980-01-01

    A methodology for using Landsat imagery for the identification and location of land irrigated by center-pivot irrigation systems is presented. The procedure involves the use of sets of Landsat band 5 imagery taken separated in time by about three weeks during the irrigation season, a zoom transfer scope and mylar base maps to record the locations of center pivots. Further computer processing of the data has been used to obtain plots of center-pivot irrigation systems and tables indicating the distribution and growth of systems by county for the state of Nebraska, and has been found to be in 95% agreement with current high-altitude IR photography. The information obtainable can be used for models of ground-water aquifers or resource planning.

  1. Hanford Site waste tank farm facilities design reconstitution program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollert, F.R.

    1994-09-06

    Throughout the commercial nuclear industry the lack of design reconstitution programs prior to the mid 1980`s has resulted in inadequate documentation to support operating facilities configuration changes or safety evaluations. As a result, many utilities have completed or have ongoing design reconstitution programs and have discovered that without sufficient pre-planning their program can be potentially very expensive and may result in end-products inconsistent with the facility needs or expectations. A design reconstitution program plan is developed here for the Hanford waste tank farms facility as a consequence of the DOE Standard on operational configuration management. This design reconstitution plan provides for the recovery or regeneration of design requirements and basis, the compilation of Design Information Summaries, and a methodology to disposition items open for regeneration that were discovered during the development of Design Information Summaries. Implementation of this plan will culminate in an end-product of about 30 Design Information Summary documents. These documents will be developed to identify tank farms facility design requirements and design bases and thereby capture the technical baselines of the facility. This plan identifies the methodology necessary to systematically recover documents that are sources of design input information, and to evaluate and disposition open items or regeneration items discovered during the development of the Design Information Summaries or during the verification and validation processes. These development activities will be governed and implemented by three procedures and a guide that are to be developed as an outgrowth of this plan.

  2. Methodological approaches to developing a plan of land and economic unit of the settlement

    OpenAIRE

    Dorosh, O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with problematic of legislation, the legal relations regulated by which are associated with the use of land in the settlements of Ukraine. Methodological approaches on the development of the plan on land-economic settlements unit have been suggested. It is proved that the land management documentation provides an effective planning of the territorial development of urban and rural settlements.

  3. Study on the Programming Standard for Ecological Rescue in General Land Use Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Wei; Hao Jinmin; Zhang Qiuping

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims at establishing the operation idea based on the analysis of the connotation, principles and reference indexes for programming standard for ecological rescue. The paper puts forward that the programming standard should take into account the natural, social and economic reference indexes, and modifies the scale and distribution of the ecological rescue according to the order of ecological safety, social safety and economic development. The paper suggests that the land planning department should strengthen the study and datum accumulation in order to establish the technology regulations of programming standard of the ecological rescue.

  4. The Promise of Wisconsin's 1999 Comprehensive Planning Law: Land-Use Policy Reforms to Support Active Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Joseph; Keyes, Sheila D

    2008-06-01

    Weaving together the disciplines of planning and policy change with the emerging research of active living, this article explores the competing interests and underlying political forces behind the design and passage of Wisconsin's Comprehensive Planning Law of 1999. While Wisconsin's law remains a work in progress, it illustrates the contemporary policy battles over land use and smart growth and the resurgence of the property-rights movement. It further highlights the influence of smart-growth coalitions and policy networks on planning reform. The authors suggest that planning practitioners and active-living proponents can adapt and transfer these policy lessons from Wisconsin to address the complex relationships of the built environment, physical activity, and the nation's current obesity problem through state and local planning reforms.

  5. Gambia Land Use Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This series of three-period land use land cover (LULC) datasets (1975, 2000, and 2013) aids in monitoring change in West Africa’s land resources (exception is...

  6. Geographic access to family planning facilities and the risk of unintended and teenage pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, David C; Klerman, Lorraine V; Johnson, Kay A; Chang, Chiang-Hua; Marth, Nancy

    2007-03-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that greater geographic access to family planning facilities is associated with lower rates of unintended and teenage pregnancies. State Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and natality files in four states were used to locate unintended and teenage births, respectively. Geographic availability was measured by cohort travel time to the nearest family planning facility, the presence of a family planning facility in a ZIP area, and the supply of primary care physicians and obstetric-gynecologists. 83% of the PRAMS cohort and 80% of teenagers lived within 15 min or less of a facility and virtually none lived more than 30 min. Adjusted odds ratios did not demonstrate a statistically significant trend to a higher risk of unintended pregnancies with longer travel time. Similarly there was no association with unintended pregnancy and the presence of a family planning facility within the ZIP area of maternal residence, or with the supply of physicians capable of providing family planning services. Both crude and adjusted relative rates of teenage pregnancies were significantly lower with further distance from family planning sites and with the absence of a facility in the ZIP area of residence. In adjusted models, the supply of obstetricians-gynecologists and primary care physicians was not significantly associated with decreased teen pregnancies. This study found no relationship between greater geographic availability of family planning facilities and a risk of unintended pregnancies. Greater geographic availability of family planning services was associated with a higher risk of teenage pregnancy, although these results may be confounded by facilities locating in areas with greater family planning needs.

  7. Considering wind energy in regional planning guidelines and communal land-use planning; Die Beruecksichtigung der Windenergie in der Richt- und Nutzungsplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soguel, R. [Atelier North and Robyr, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Henz, H.R. [Metron Raumplanung AG, Brugg (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This report made for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the situation in Switzerland regarding the planning guidelines required at regional and communal level that are required for the granting of permission to build wind energy installations. Various types of wind turbines and wind farms are described and topics such as planning tools, landscape protection and promotional concepts are discussed. The role of the Swiss Cantons in the promotion of wind energy is examined and the question of how to integrate wind energy plant into cantonal and communal planning guidelines is looked at. This working guide introduces two schemes that demonstrate how the planning process for the construction of wind farms can be co-ordinated with the development of land-use plans. Examples of current cantonal guidelines are presented in the appendix to the report.

  8. Spatial analysis methods and land-use planning models for rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Ludwiczak

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The work presents a brief report of the main results of a study carried out by the Spatial Engineering Division of the Department of Agricultural Economics and Engineering of the University of Bologna, within a broader PRIN 2005 research project concerning landscape and economic analysis, planning and programming. In particular, the study focuses on the design of spatial analysis methods aimed at building knowledge frameworks of the various natural and anthropic resources of rural areas. The goal is to increase the level of spatial and information detail of common databases, thus allowing higher accuracy and effectiveness of the analyses needed to achieve the goals of new generation spatial and agriculture planning. Specific in-depth analyses allowed to define techniques useful in order to reduce the increase in survey costs. Moreover, the work reports the main results regarding a multicriteria model for the analysis of the countryside defined by the research. Such model is aimed to assess the various agricultural, environmental and landscape features, vocations, expressions and attitudes, and support the definition and implementation of specific and targeted planning and programming policies.

  9. GPRsurvey as a part of land-use planning in Levi, Finnish Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupila, Juho

    2010-05-01

    The need for detailed information regarding overlying soil layers in townplanning areas has become an important issue, especially in certain areas of Finnish Lapland where the lack of usable soil materials is obvious. Use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a fast and cost-effective method of determining the structure of subsurface layers and quantity of soil material above the bedrock surface. This environmental project was carried out by the Geological Survey of Finland together with local enterprises, environmental authorities and an EU structural fund. One of the goals of the project was to use GPR to determine the thickness of soil layers and the differences in material above the bedrock level in certain target areas of the project. The study area is located in the municipality of Kittilä, in the center of the Levi ski resort. The study area (total size of 28 hectares) and surroundings are under fast townplanning and there are, for example, plans for a hotel, apartments and underground garages and service routes, thus it is very important to determine the volume of quarrying. As well, the quality and quantity of existing soil is valid data for the reuse of materials and upcoming construction. One drilling program has already been executed in the area (11 boreholes), so GPR profiles were planned based on this drilling data, soil mapping data and data collected from the townplanning map of the area. According to these earlier drillings and soil mapping, most of the soil in the study area was morainic, so the antenna for the GPR-survey was set at 100 MHz. The positioning method used in this project was VRS-GPS (Virtual Reference Station Global Positioning System), which is a very accurate positioning system to use. Accuracy can be as good as a few centimeters. After the GPR-survey, secondary drilling program was carried out according to the GPR-profiles, thus the total amount of collected data from the planning area was 23 boreholes and 3500 meters of GPR

  10. Disposal facilities on land for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes: guidance on requirements for qauthorisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This document, published by the Environmental Agency, contains guidance on the principles and requirements against which applications for authorisation to build or operate a land-based specialised disposal facility for solid low or intermediate level wastes, will be assessed, with the aim of protecting the public from hazards which may arise from their disposal to the environment. The guide provides information on terms used, the framework governing radioactive waste disposal and the Agencies` expectations of applicants, including radiological and technical requirements. (UK).

  11. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  12. Tailoring a non-path-dependent model for environmental risk management and polycentric urban land-use planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakieh, Yousef; Salmanmahiny, Abdolrassoul; Mirkarimi, Seyed Hamed

    2017-02-01

    This study attempts to develop a non-path-dependent model for environmental risk management and polycentric urban land-use planning in Gorgan Township area, Iran. Applying three suitability layers of environmental risk (soil erosion, flood risk, fire risk, and land susceptibility), urbanization potential, and integrated surface (environmental risk plus urbanization potential layers), a non-path-dependent Cellular Automata-Markov Chain (CA-MC) model was configured to execute three scenarios of polycentric urban growth allocation. Specifically, the modeling approach improved the traditional functionality of the CA-MC model from a prediction algorithm into an innovative land allocation tool. Besides, due to its flexibility, the non-path-dependent model was able to explicitly include different characteristics of the landscape structure ranging from physical land attributes to landscape functions and processes (natural hazards). Accordingly, three polycentric urban growth allocation efforts were undertaken and compared in terms of connectivity and compactness of the resultant patterns and consumption of other land resources. Based on results, the polycentric allocation procedure based on integrated suitability layer produced a more manageable pattern of urban landscape, while the growth option based on environmental risk layer was more successful for protecting farmlands against excessive urbanization. This study suggests that polycentric urban land-use planning under the strategy of rural land development programs is an available option for designing an urban landscape with lower exposure to natural hazards and more economic benefits to rural residents. Finally, the non-path-dependent modeling is a recommended approach, when highly flexible and interactive decision-support systems as well as trend-breaking scenarios are desired.

  13. The application of ERTS-1 data to the land use planning process. [Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, J. L.; Kiefer, R. W.; Kuhlmey, E. L.; Niemann, B. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Land resource data has been extracted on a percent of cell basis from ERTS imagery, RB-57 color infrared imagery and best available conventional sources for a 10,000 square kilometer test area in eastern Wisconsin. First, the data from the three sources is compared on a spatial basis for a 300 square kilometer portion of the test area. For those land resource variables associated with cover, ERTS derived resource data compared favorably with both the RB-57 and conventional data. Second, the effect of the data source on land use decisions is examined. Three interstate highway corridors are located through the same region based upon data extracted from each of the three sources. A policy of preserving natural environmental systems was used as a basis for the corridors selection in each case. The resulting three corridors compare favorably.

  14. Development of Facilities Master Plan and Laboratory Renovation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Andrea D

    2011-10-03

    Funding from this grant has allowed Morehouse School of Medicine to complete its first professionally developed, comprehensive campus master plan that is in alignment with the recently completed strategic plan. In addition to master planning activities, funds were used for programming and designing research renovations, and also to supplement other research facility upgrades by providing lighting and equipment. The activities funded by this grant will provide the catalyst for substantial improvement in the School's overall facilities for biomedical education and research, and will also provide much of the information needed to conduct a successful campaign to raise funds for proposed buildings and renovations.

  15. Multi-objective decisions in land-use planning involving chemical sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, B.; Bertelsen, I.; Burchard, V.

    1999-01-01

    , societal and company aspects. Focus is laid on the safety related items, and objectives and attributes related to safety are discussed in detail. An approachbased on efficient frontier curves has been used for comparison of alternatives having land-use pattern as variable. In the development of the method...

  16. Remote sensing applications for urban planning - The LUMIS project. [Land Use Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, C. K.; Landini, A. J.; Diegert, C.

    1975-01-01

    The Santa Monica mountains of Los Angeles consist primarily of complexly folded sedimentary marine strata with igneous and metamorphic rocks at the eastern end of the mountains. With the increased development of the Santa Monicas, a study was conducted to determine the critical land use data items in the mountains. Two information systems developed in parallel are described. One capitalizes on the City's present computer line printer system, and the second utilizes map overlay techniques on an interactive computer terminal. Results concerning population, housing, and land improvement illustrate the successful linking of ordinal and nominal data files in the interactive system.-

  17. Remote sensing applications for urban planning - The LUMIS project. [Land Use Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, C. K.; Landini, A. J.; Diegert, C.

    1975-01-01

    The Santa Monica mountains of Los Angeles consist primarily of complexly folded sedimentary marine strata with igneous and metamorphic rocks at the eastern end of the mountains. With the increased development of the Santa Monicas, a study was conducted to determine the critical land use data items in the mountains. Two information systems developed in parallel are described. One capitalizes on the City's present computer line printer system, and the second utilizes map overlay techniques on an interactive computer terminal. Results concerning population, housing, and land improvement illustrate the successful linking of ordinal and nominal data files in the interactive system.-

  18. How to build science-action partnerships for local land-use planning and management: lessons from Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cockburn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The gap between scientific knowledge and implementation in the fields of biodiversity conservation, environmental management, and climate change adaptation has resulted in many calls from practitioners and academics to provide practical solutions responding effectively to the risks and opportunities of global environmental change, e.g., Future Earth. We present a framework to guide the implementation of science-action partnerships based on a real-world case study of a partnership between a local municipality and an academic institution to bridge the science-action gap in the eThekwini Municipal Area, South Africa. This partnership aims to inform the implementation of sustainable land-use planning, biodiversity conservation, environmental management, and climate change adaptation practice and contributes to the development of human capacity in these areas of expertise. Using a transdisciplinary approach, implementation-driven research is being conducted to develop several decision-making products to better inform land-use planning and management. Lessons learned through this partnership are synthesized and presented as a framework of enabling actions operating at different levels, from the individual to the interorganizational. Enabling actions include putting in place enabling organizational preconditions, assembling a functional well-structured team, and actively building interpersonal and individual collaborative capacity. Lessons learned in the case study emphasize the importance of building collaborative capacity and social capital, and paying attention to the process of transdisciplinary research to achieve more tangible science, management, and policy objectives in science-action partnerships. By documenting and reflecting on the process, this case study provides conceptual and practical guidance on bridging the science-action gap through partnerships.

  19. Assessing land use by cattle in heterogeneous environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristina Sant'Anna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this note is to describe preliminary results on assessment of land use by cattle, obtained in a pilot study using Geographic Information System (GIS. The research was carried out on a semi-natural pasture in Sweden, where the geographic positions of one cow were recorded during 25 consecutive days during summer. The cow, wearing a GPS collar, was integrated in a herd of 53 Hereford cattle. Each location point registered for the animal was considered as a sampling unit (N=3,097. The spatial distribution of ground declivity, water sources, cattle tracks, and classes of woody vegetation cover (forest, grassland with trees and open grassland were recorded. The storage, processing and data analysis were carried out using the Idrisi and GS+ softwares. Three occupation zones were identified in function of the variation in the space used by the animal, which were occupied in a cyclical pattern; with the animal moving from one zone to another in cycles of five days. It was also clear that the cattle distribution in the area was neither random nor uniform, and it was affected by environmental characteristics that act as conditioners on its distribution. These preliminary results suggest that definition of zones of occupation and the environmental conditioners are promising tools to understand the land use by cattle

  20. Meta-language for land use classification systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This presentation provides an overview of a meta-language for land use classification. It also explains why land use can’t always be determined from imagery, and why land use is not the same as land cover, zoning or planning - though...

  1. Criteria for Incorporating the Guidelines of the Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) in Territorial Land Use Planning: Study Case for the Colombian Pacific Coastal Area

    OpenAIRE

    Ángela López Rodrí­guez; Paula Cristina Sierra-Correa; Pilar Lozano-Rivera

    2013-01-01

    In Colombia, Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) has been implemented through the “National Environmental Policy of the Oceanic Spaces and Coastal and Insular Areas of Colombia-PNAOCI” (Acronyms in Spanish), whose guidelines have considered the need to include marine and coastal ecosystems in land use planning. ICZM, as a special planning approach, can contribute to territorial land use planning of the municipalities located in coastal areas, because it can provide guidelines for the co...

  2. Loss of secondary-forest resilience by land-use intensification in the Amazon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovac, A.C.; Pena Claros, M.; Kuijper, T.W.M.; Bongers, F.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how land-use intensification affects forest resilience is a key for elucidating the mechanisms underlying regeneration processes and for planning more sustainable land-use systems. Here, we evaluate how the intensification of a swidden cultivation system affects secondary-forest resili

  3. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  4. Upper Mississippi River Land Use Allocation Plan. Master Plan for Public Use Development and Resource Management. Parts 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    master plan will be an appendix deta and assistance from the Region 3 office of the U.S. the Corps of Engineers natural resc Fish and Wildlife Service...The Missi traffic to reach this area. Minneapolis, then, is the widen until it reaches Lake Peg head of navigation on the Mississippi. This area natural...8217Minneapofis’ Sh II Index.- toPlte 0 5 0 1 0 2 FIGUR \\-1 ~8 v * 7_1YA,~. peg 4~4 N -< .Wisconsin,,:.i 0 -Stillwaterk ANHdo’ tpr- ISt PaulI stng- ’ 7 ’kt< -$ A

  5. An integrated assessment of Porcupine caribou seasonal distribution, movements, and habitat preferences for regional land use planning in northern Yukon Territory, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Ryder

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to improve understanding of Porcupine caribou herd distribution, movements, and habitat preferences to assist with developing a regional land use plan for the North Yukon Planning Region, Yukon Territory. Three different methods were used to identify current and historical patterns of caribou distribution and habitat preferences within the region to prioritize conservation areas. Two of the approaches focused on incorporating information on caribou distribution and migrations from scientific and local knowledge, while the third focused on identifying and mapping habitats suitable for supporting caribou. Local knowledge dating back to the 1930s and two decades of satellite telemetry data confirmed that most of the planning region is used by the Porcupine caribou herd and highlighted areas of concentrated use. Maps of suitable winter habitat derived from expert opinion ratings of habitat use did not agree with the other information sources. The local knowledge and satellite telemetry analyses were used to identify spatially explicit priority areas for caribou conservation and the results were applied to develop conservation recommendations for a draft regional land use plan. The plan will be submitted to government approval bodies for review in the spring of 2007. The success in implementing conservation strategies for the Porcupine caribou herd will be reviewed and evaluated following adoption of a final approved plan.

  6. 77 FR 5528 - Trust Land Consolidation Draft Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Office of the Secretary Trust Land Consolidation Draft Plan AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior... fractional interests in these lands. We are seeking comments on the draft plan for accomplishing these goals. DATES: Submit comments by March 19, 2012. ADDRESSES: Send comments on the draft plan to: Elizabeth...

  7. Combining a fuzzy matter-element model with a geographic information system in eco-environmental sensitivity and distribution of land use planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ke; Chen, Xinming; Zhu, Wenjuan

    2011-04-01

    Sustainable ecological and environmental development is the basis of regional development. The sensitivity classification of the ecological environment is the premise of its spatial distribution for land use planning. In this paper, a fuzzy matter-element model and factor-overlay method were employed to analyze the ecological sensitivity in Yicheng City. Four ecological indicators, including soil condition,, water condition,, atmospheric conditions and biodiversity were used to classify the ecological sensitivity. The results were categorized into five ranks: insensitive, slightly sensitive, moderately sensitive, highly sensitive and extremely sensitive zones. The spatial distribution map of environmental sensitivity for land use planning was obtained using GIS (Geographical Information System) techniques. The results illustrated that the extremely sensitive and highly sensitive areas accounted for 14.40% and 30.12% of the total area, respectively, while the moderately sensitive and slightly sensitive areas are 25.99% and 29.49%, respectively. The results provide the theoretical foundation for land use planning by categorizing all kinds of land types in Yicheng City.

  8. Combining a Fuzzy Matter-Element Model with a Geographic Information System in Eco-Environmental Sensitivity and Distribution of Land Use Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Zhu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable ecological and environmental development is the basis of regional development. The sensitivity classification of the ecological environment is the premise of its spatial distribution for land use planning. In this paper, a fuzzy matter-element model and factor-overlay method were employed to analyze the ecological sensitivity in Yicheng City. Four ecological indicators, including soil condition,, water condition,, atmospheric conditions and biodiversity were used to classify the ecological sensitivity. The results were categorized into five ranks: insensitive, slightly sensitive, moderately sensitive, highly sensitive and extremely sensitive zones. The spatial distribution map of environmental sensitivity for land use planning was obtained using GIS (Geographical Information System techniques. The results illustrated that the extremely sensitive and highly sensitive areas accounted for 14.40% and 30.12% of the total area, respectively, while the moderately sensitive and slightly sensitive areas are 25.99% and 29.49%, respectively. The results provide the theoretical foundation for land use planning by categorizing all kinds of land types in Yicheng City.

  9. Consequential life cycle inventory modelling of land use induced by crop consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Jesper Hedal

    The purpose of the present PhD project was to identify the mechanisms governing global land use consequences of increased crop demand in a given location and, based on this conceptual analysis, to present and demonstrate a method proposal for construction of land use data that can be used in life...... cycle assessments involving crop consumption. Increased demand for a given crop can be met by intensification, expansion, and/or by displacement of other crops or pastures. The last option will reduce the supply of other agricultural products, which may then be replaced elsewhere. Such displacement......-replacement mechanisms are governed by the availability of suitable agricultural land and several economic conditions, such as transport and trade costs. To estimate the land use response to an increase in crop demand, economic modelling can be used. In this project, the economic equilibrium model GTAP (Global Trade...

  10. Land use mapping from CBERS-2 images with open source tools by applying different classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhouse-García, Antonio J.; Rangel-Peraza, Jesús Gabriel; Bustos-Terrones, Yaneth; García-Ferrer, Alfonso; Mesas-Carrascosa, Francisco J.

    2016-02-01

    Land cover classification is often based on different characteristics between their classes, but with great homogeneity within each one of them. This cover is obtained through field work or by mean of processing satellite images. Field work involves high costs; therefore, digital image processing techniques have become an important alternative to perform this task. However, in some developing countries and particularly in Casacoima municipality in Venezuela, there is a lack of geographic information systems due to the lack of updated information and high costs in software license acquisition. This research proposes a low cost methodology to develop thematic mapping of local land use and types of coverage in areas with scarce resources. Thematic mapping was developed from CBERS-2 images and spatial information available on the network using open source tools. The supervised classification method per pixel and per region was applied using different classification algorithms and comparing them among themselves. Classification method per pixel was based on Maxver algorithms (maximum likelihood) and Euclidean distance (minimum distance), while per region classification was based on the Bhattacharya algorithm. Satisfactory results were obtained from per region classification, where overall reliability of 83.93% and kappa index of 0.81% were observed. Maxver algorithm showed a reliability value of 73.36% and kappa index 0.69%, while Euclidean distance obtained values of 67.17% and 0.61% for reliability and kappa index, respectively. It was demonstrated that the proposed methodology was very useful in cartographic processing and updating, which in turn serve as a support to develop management plans and land management. Hence, open source tools showed to be an economically viable alternative not only for forestry organizations, but for the general public, allowing them to develop projects in economically depressed and/or environmentally threatened areas.

  11. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-03-08

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

  12. Use of Library Facilities: Behavioral Research as a Tool for Library Space Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Joy K.; Montanelli, Dale S.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the literature of librarianship and related behavioral research to identify evaluation methods that have been successfully applied to the analysis of library space planning. The discussion covers the appropriate conditions for the use of various evaluation techniques, including questionnaires, interviews, behavior mapping, time budgets,…

  13. Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, A.

    1995-12-31

    What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

  14. The Application of Scenario Analysis in the Overall Planning of Land Use:A Case Study of Shangluo City in Shaanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Pi-ling; YANG Hai-juan

    2012-01-01

    The overall planning of land use is a complex process of joint action of social system, natural and economic conditions. On the basis of summarizing the existing researches, we select Shaanxi’s Shangluo City, located in the Qinba mountainous area as the study object, to expound the concept and steps of scenario analysis based on land use change data, under the guidance of ecological safety and sustainable development theory. We design four different scenarios of land use planning program in Shangluo City during the period 2006-2020, and use grey linear programming model to analyze each scenario. The results show that the scenario analysis is feasible in the adjustment of land use structure in Shangluo City; operable in the determining of land use planning program on a macro-municipal scale.

  15. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn D Rode

    Full Text Available Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013 when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia, highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  16. Land protection plan: Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This land protection plan was the result of several years of planning by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State of New Jersey, local governments, and...

  17. Taming Data to Make Decisions: Using a Spatial Fuzzy Logic Decision Support Framework to Inform Conservation and Land Use Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, T.; Baker, B.; Degagne, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    With the abundance of data sources, analytical methods, and computer models, land managers are faced with the overwhelming task of making sense of a profusion of data of wildly different types. Luckily, fuzzy logic provides a method to work with different types of data using language-based propositions such as "the landscape is undisturbed," and a simple set of logic constructs. Just as many surveys allow different levels of agreement with a proposition, fuzzy logic allows values reflecting different levels of truth for a proposition. Truth levels fall within a continuum ranging from Fully True to Fully False. Hence a fuzzy logic model produces continuous results. The Environmental Evaluation Modeling System (EEMS) is a platform-independent, tree-based, fuzzy logic modeling framework. An EEMS model provides a transparent definition of an evaluation model and is commonly developed as a collaborative effort among managers, scientists, and GIS experts. Managers specify a set of evaluative propositions used to characterize the landscape. Scientists, working with managers, formulate functions that convert raw data values into truth values for the propositions and produce a logic tree to combine results into a single metric used to guide decisions. Managers, scientists, and GIS experts then work together to implement and iteratively tune the logic model and produce final results. We present examples of two successful EEMS projects that provided managers with map-based results suitable for guiding decisions: sensitivity and climate change exposure in Utah and the Colorado Plateau modeled for the Bureau of Land Management; and terrestrial ecological intactness in the Mojave and Sonoran region of southern California modeled for the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan.

  18. Assessing driving forces of land use and land cover change by a mixed-method approach in north-eastern Ghana, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleemann, Janina; Baysal, Gülendam; Bulley, Henry N N; Fürst, Christine

    2017-03-20

    Land use and land cover change (LULCC) is the result of complex human-environmental interactions. The high interdependencies in social-ecological systems make it difficult to identify the main drivers. However, knowledge of key drivers of LULCC, including indirect (underlying) drivers which cannot be easily determined by spatial or economic analyses, is essential for land use planning and especially important in developing countries. We used a mixed-method approach in order to detect drivers of LULCC in the Upper East Region of northern Ghana by different qualitative and quantitative methods which were compared in a confidence level analysis. Viewpoints from experts help to answer why the land use is changing, since many triggering effects, especially non-spatial and indirect drivers of LULCC, are not measurable by other methodological approaches. Geo-statistical or economic analyses add to validate the relevance of the expert-based results. First, we conducted in-depth interviews and developed a list of 34 direct and indirect drivers of LULCC. Subsequently, a group of experts was asked in a questionnaire to select the most important drivers by using a Likert scale. This information was complemented by remote sensing analysis. Finally, the driver analysis was compared to information from literature. Based on these analyses there is a very high confidence that population growth, especially in rural areas, is a major driver of LULCC. Further, current farming practice, bush fires, livestock, the road network and climate variability were the main direct drivers while the financial capital of farmers and customary norms regarding land tenure were listed as important indirect drivers with high confidence. Many of these driving forces, such as labour shortage and migration, are furthermore interdependent. Governmental laws, credits, the service by extension officers, conservational agriculture and foreign agricultural medium-scale investments are currently not driving

  19. Integrated mined-area reclamation and land use planning. Volume 3B. A case study of surface mining and reclamation planning: international minerals and chemical corporation, phosphate operations, Polk County, Florida. [Land reclamation and use planning for phosphate operations in Polk County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J R; Brown, L A; Fountain, R C

    1977-02-01

    The reports in this series are designed primarily to familiarize professional land use and resource planners with the range of possibilities and effective procedures for achieving integrated mining, reclamation, and land use planning. These reports are based on a research program which included an extensive literature review, the compilation and analysis of case study data, and close coordination and interaction with related government programs. In Volume 3, A Guide to Mined Area Reclamation Technology for Reclamation and Land Use Planners, the method used to reclaim land in each of several mineral industries are discussed in relation to the physical and cultural constraints that must be considered in planning a reclamation program. Much of the information for this document was obtained from case studies conducted in several mining districts. Volume 3B presents data from a case study of surface mining and reclamation planning, International Minerals and Chemical Corporation, Phosphate Operations, Polk County, Florida.

  20. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1997-03-06

    The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

  1. Sites Requiring Facility Response Plans, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2006) [facility_response_plan_sites_la_EPA_2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Locations of facilities in Louisiana requiring Oil Pollution Act (OPA) Facility Response Plans (FRP). The dataset was provided by the Region 6 OSCARS program....

  2. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  3. Sustainable Land Use in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Džatko

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Present land use planning level in Slovakia is resulting from the gradual knowledge evolution from soil survey and land evaluation to the sustainable land resources exploitation modelling. Particular attention is concentrated to the quantification of sustainable land use system parameters in different pedo-ecological conditions. The fundamental basis for the solution of these questions is detailed database not only about soils and land components properties, but about both, real and potential crop yields on representative set of fields, including basic economic soil management data as well. The specific aims of land use efficiency modelling are expressed in the synthesis of both the ecological and economic assessment of soil and land productivity potential. Sustainable land use and farming system models with the economic efficiency calculations are the final results. The set of presented models and maps including economic efficiency calculation enables to apply new concepts of sustainable land use in wider rate as well in agrarian landscape managing.

  4. Spatially Explicit Landscape-Level Ecological Risks Induced by Land Use and Land Cover Change in a National Ecologically Representative Region in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Yang, Jianxin; Tang, Wenwu

    2015-11-09

    Land use and land cover change is driven by multiple influential factors from environmental and social dimensions in a land system. Land use practices of human decision-makers modify the landscape of the land system, possibly leading to landscape fragmentation, biodiversity loss, or environmental pollution-severe environmental or ecological impacts. While landscape-level ecological risk assessment supports the evaluation of these impacts, investigations on how these ecological risks induced by land use practices change over space and time in response to alternative policy intervention remain inadequate. In this article, we conducted spatially explicit landscape ecological risk analysis in Ezhou City, China. Our study area is a national ecologically representative region experiencing drastic land use and land cover change, and is regulated by multiple policies represented by farmland protection, ecological conservation, and urban development. We employed landscape metrics to consider the influence of potential landscape-level disturbance for the evaluation of landscape ecological risks. Using spatiotemporal simulation, we designed scenarios to examine spatiotemporal patterns in landscape ecological risks in response to policy intervention. Our study demonstrated that spatially explicit landscape ecological risk analysis combined with simulation-driven scenario analysis is of particular importance for guiding the sustainable development of ecologically vulnerable land systems.

  5. Spatially Explicit Landscape-Level Ecological Risks Induced by Land Use and Land Cover Change in a National Ecologically Representative Region in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Land use and land cover change is driven by multiple influential factors from environmental and social dimensions in a land system. Land use practices of human decision-makers modify the landscape of the land system, possibly leading to landscape fragmentation, biodiversity loss, or environmental pollution—severe environmental or ecological impacts. While landscape-level ecological risk assessment supports the evaluation of these impacts, investigations on how these ecological risks induced by land use practices change over space and time in response to alternative policy intervention remain inadequate. In this article, we conducted spatially explicit landscape ecological risk analysis in Ezhou City, China. Our study area is a national ecologically representative region experiencing drastic land use and land cover change, and is regulated by multiple policies represented by farmland protection, ecological conservation, and urban development. We employed landscape metrics to consider the influence of potential landscape-level disturbance for the evaluation of landscape ecological risks. Using spatiotemporal simulation, we designed scenarios to examine spatiotemporal patterns in landscape ecological risks in response to policy intervention. Our study demonstrated that spatially explicit landscape ecological risk analysis combined with simulation-driven scenario analysis is of particular importance for guiding the sustainable development of ecologically vulnerable land systems.

  6. Should Climatologists and Spatial Planners Interact? Weather regulation as an ecosystem service to be considered in the land-use planning field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Mathieu; De Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; Strada, Susanna; Stéfanon, Marc; Torre, André

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, climate considerations have received increasing attention from urban designers and land-use planners. Because of legal binding requirements and/or a growing awareness regarding climate change, scholars and practitioners have already started to think about urban designs and land-use patterns that may contribute to face the climate change challenge. (e.g. Bulkeley, 2006; Shaw et al., 2007; Davoudi et al., 2009) The thorough analysis of spatial planning documents - e.g. SCoT (Schéma de Cohérence Territoriale) adopted in the Île-de-France Region (i.e. Paris region) - we have made and will report on has revealed the two main ways through which climate change action is thought about and for which measures are encouraged at the territorial level: 1. via mitigation strategy, i.e. solutions to either limit atmospheric greenhouse gases emissions or to capture them (e.g. urban structures that aim at limiting transportation-related emissions by promoting compact settlements, bioclimatic principles in urban and architectural designs that aim at reducing energetic consumption). Such solutions will in fine affect the global level of CO2 in the atmosphere, and thereby contribute to limit global warming. Local/regional effects may however not be felt by citizens and decision makers as they depend on the magnitude of the changes at the global scale; 2. via adaptation strategy, i.e. solutions to cope with adverse local/regional consequences of climate change. The global climate in this case is seen as a driver of local changes. Actions will be undertaken to moderate negative impacts of global climate change, potentially at costs, by reducing the vulnerability of local human communities and biological ecosystems on the concerned area (e.g. flood prevention systems, countermeasures to urban heat islands). We can wonder whether this traditional way of approaching the climate change action, based on a double mitigation-adaptation strategy, does not restrain the

  7. An Empirical Study on Transit-Oriented Low-Carbon Urban Land Use Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Yi; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Liang;

    2016-01-01

    Low-carbon urban development is a hot spot of global concerns for fighting against climate change for China, transportation sector has a significant contribution to urban CO2 emissions, while the emissions are still increasing. Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) strategies provide a novel approac...... for urban planners to facilitate the urban carbon mitigation from transportation sector in long-term. While TOD strategies are emerging cases, they are merely qualitatively discussed in China, lacking practical indicators and quantitative verification for supporting the real urban plan...... the layer structure changes and residents migration at about 1km accuracy. Secondly, accessibility was selected as an indicator for urban transportation and estimated by method based on Time Cost Weighted Distance. Finally, the effectiveness of TOD was investigated by evaluating the integration between...... in Shanghai, as well as the practical guidance to low carbon urban planning in developing countries....

  8. Emergency Landing Planning for Damaged Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Plaunt, Christian John; Smith, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last 15 years on building adaptive control systems to assist pilots in flying damaged aircraft. Once a pilot has regained control of a damaged aircraft, the next problem is to determine the best site for an emergency landing. In general, the decision depends on many factors including the actual control envelope of the aircraft, distance to the site, weather en route, characteristics of the approach path, characteristics of the runway or landing site, and emergency facilities at the site. All of these influence the risk to the aircraft, to the passengers and crew, and to people and property on the ground. We describe an ongoing project to build and demonstrate an emergency landing planner that takes these various factors into consideration and proposes possible routes and landing sites to the pilot, ordering them according to estimated risk. We give an overview of the system architecture and input data, describe our preliminary modeling of risk, and describe how we search the space of landing sites and routes.

  9. 18 CFR 1304.206 - Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities. 1304.206 Section 1304.206 Conservation of....206 Requirements for community docks, piers, boathouses, or other water-use facilities. (a)...

  10. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenaeu, Joseph D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leitch, Rosalyn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glantz, Clifford S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Landine, Guy P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bryant, Janet L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, John [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Mathers, Gemma [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Rodger, Robert [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Johnson, Christopher [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  11. Land use land cover change detection using remote sensing application for land sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakeristanan, Maha Letchumy; Md Said, Md Azlin

    2012-09-01

    Land falls into the category of prime resources. Land use and land cover changes are identified as the prime issue in global environmental changes. Thus, it is necessary to initiate the land change detection process for land sustainability as well as to develop a competent land use planning. Tropical country like Malaysia has been experiencing land use and land cover changes rapidly for the past few decades. Thus, an attempt was made to detect the land use and land cover changes in the capital of the Selangor, Malaysia, Shah Alam over 20 years period (1990 - 2010). The study has been done through remote sensing approach using Earth Sat imagery of December 1990 and SPOT satellite imageries of March 2000 and December 2010. The current study resulted that the study area experienced land cover changes rapidly where the forest area occupied about 24.4% of Shah Alam in 1990 has decreased to 13.6% in 2010. Built up land have increased to 29.18% in 2010 from 12.47% in 1990. Other land cover classes such as wet land, wasteland and agricultural land also have undergone changes. Efficient land management and planning is necessary for land sustainability in Shah Alam.

  12. Determinants of Medicare plan choices: are beneficiaries more influenced by premiums or benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Paul D; Buntin, Melinda B

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of Medicare beneficiaries to premiums and benefits when selecting healthcare plans after the introduction of Part D. We matched respondents in the 2008 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey to the Medicare Advantage (MA) plans available to them using the Bid Pricing Tool and previously unavailable data on beneficiaries' plan choices. We estimated a 2-stage nested logit model of Medicare plan choice decision making, including the decision to choose traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare or an MA plan, and for those choosing MA, which specific plan they chose. Beneficiaries living in areas with higher average monthly rebates available from MA plans were more likely to choose MA rather than FFS. When choosing MA plans, beneficiaries are roughly 2 to 3 times more responsive to dollars spent to reduce cost sharing than reductions in their premium. We calculated an elasticity of plan choice with respect to the monthly MA premium of -0.20. Beneficiaries with lower incomes are more sensitive to plan premiums and cost sharing than higher-income beneficiaries. MA plans appear to have a limited incentive to aggressively price their products, and seem to compete primarily over reduced beneficiary cost sharing. Given the limitations of the current plan choice environment, policies designed to encourage the selection of lower-cost plans may require increasing premium differences between plans and providing the tools to enable beneficiaries to easily assess those differences.

  13. 78 FR 65700 - Notice of Availability of the Utah Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan Amendments and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... lands or National Forest System lands identified as having the highest value to maintaining sustainable...: Three Corners/Browns Park--50,100 acres Diamond Mountain--110,300 acres Little Mountain/Halfway...

  14. Quantifying Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Stocks for Future GHG Mitigation, Sustainable Land-Use Planning and Adaptation to Climate Change in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, M.; van Bellen, S.

    2016-12-01

    Based on various databases, carbon stocks of terrestrial ecosystems in the boreal and arctic biomes of Quebec were quantified as part of an evaluation of their capacity to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and estimate their vulnerability with respect to recent climate change and land use changes. The results of this project are contributing to the establishment of the Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation as well as the 2013-2020 Climate Change Action Plan of the Quebec Ministry of Environment, which aim to adapt the Quebec society to the effects of climate change and the reduction of GHG emissions. The total carbon stock of the soils of the forest and peatland ecosystems of Quebec was quantified at 18.00 Gt C or 66.0 Gt CO2-equivalent, of which 95% corresponds to the boreal and arctic regions. The mean carbon mass per unit area (kg C m-2) of peatlands is about nine times higher than that of forests, with values of 100,0 kg C m-2 for peatlands and 10,9 kg C m-2 for forest stands. In 2013, total anthropogenic emissions in Quebec were quantified at 82.6 Mt CO2-equivalent (Environment Canada, 2015), or 1.25‰ of the total Quebec ecosystem carbon stock. The total stock thus represents the equivalent of about 800 years of anthropogenic emissions at the current rate, divided between 478 years for peatlands and 321 years for forest soils. Future GHG mitigation policies and sustainable land-use planning should be supported by scientific data on terrestrial ecosystems carbon stocks. An increase in investments in peatland, wetland and forest conservation, management and rehabilitation may contribute to limit greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore essential, that, following the objectives of multiple international organisations, the management of terrestrial carbon stocks becomes part of the national engagement to reduce GHG emissions.

  15. Long-Range Facilities - Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-31

    time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the...sternwheeler “Mark Twain” for Disneyland and fabrication of eight 52 foot submarines for the Disneyland “Navy.” This was followed by fabrication of the masts...reconstruction. This long-range plan provides a baseline against which the funds required for reconstruction can be balanced against a definite structure

  16. The Blackwater NWR inundation model. Rising sea level on a low-lying coast: land use planning for wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curt; Clark, Inga; Guntenspergen, Glenn; Cahoon, Don; Caruso, Vincent; Hupp, Cliff; Yanosky, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (BNWR), on the Eastern Shore of Chesapeake Bay (figure 1), occupies an area less than 1 meter above sea level. The Refuge has been featured prominently in studies of the impact of sea level rise on coastal wetlands. Most notably, the refuge has been sited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as a key example of 'wetland loss' attributable to rising sea level due to global temperature increase. Comparative studies of aerial photos taken since 1938 show an expanding area of open water in the central area of the refuge. The expanding area of open water can be shown to parallel the record of sea level rise over the past 60 years. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) manages the refuge to support migratory waterfowl and to preserve endangered upland species. High marsh vegetation is critical to FWS waterfowl management strategies. A broad area once occupied by high marsh has decreased with rising sea level. The FWS needs a planning tool to help predict current and future areas of high marsh available for waterfowl. 'Wetland loss' is a relative term. It is dependant on the boundaries chosen for measurement. Wetland vegetation, zoned by elevation and salinity (figure 3), respond to rising sea level. Wetlands migrate inland and upslope and may vary in areas depending on the adjacent land slopes. Refuge managers need a geospatial tool that allows them to predict future areas that will be converted to high and intertidal marsh. Shifts in location and area of coverage must be anticipated. Viability of a current marsh area is also important. When will sea level rise make short-term management strategies to maintain an area impractical? The USGS has developed an inundation model for the BNWR centered on the refuge and surrounding areas. Such models are simple in concept, but they require a detailed topographic map upon which to superimpose future sea level positions. The new system of LIDAR mapping of land and

  17. Land use planning and social equity in North Carolina's compensatory wetland and stream mitigation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Stewart, Audrey

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Clean Water Act requires compensatory mitigation for wetland and stream damage through restoration of damaged aquatic ecosystems. We evaluate the North Carolina's Ecosystem Enhancement Program (EEP), a state agency responsible for compensatory mitigation. We compare communities gaining and losing aquatic resources during mitigation, finding new types of socioeconomic disparities that contradict previous studies of mitigation program behavior. We find average distances between impact and mitigation sites for streams (43.53 km) and wetlands (50.3 km) to be larger in North Carolina than in off-site mitigation programs in other regions previously studied. We also find that aquatic resources in the State are lost from urbanized areas that are more affluent, white, and highly educated, and mitigated at sites in rural areas that are less affluent, less well educated, and have a higher percentage of minorities. We also analyze the relationship between urban growth indicators and EEP accumulation of compensation sites. Growth indicators and long-term population projections are uncorrelated with both projected transportation impacts and advance mitigation acquired by the EEP, suggesting that growth considerations can be more effectively incorporated into the EEP's planning process. We explore the possibility that spatial mismatches could develop between watersheds that are rapidly growing and those that are gaining mitigation. We make recommendations for ways that regulators incorporate growth indicators into the mitigation planning process.

  18. Land Use Planning and Social Equity in North Carolina's Compensatory Wetland and Stream Mitigation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendor, Todd; Stewart, Audrey

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Clean Water Act requires compensatory mitigation for wetland and stream damage through restoration of damaged aquatic ecosystems. We evaluate the North Carolina's Ecosystem Enhancement Program (EEP), a state agency responsible for compensatory mitigation. We compare communities gaining and losing aquatic resources during mitigation, finding new types of socioeconomic disparities that contradict previous studies of mitigation program behavior. We find average distances between impact and mitigation sites for streams (43.53 km) and wetlands (50.3 km) to be larger in North Carolina than in off-site mitigation programs in other regions previously studied. We also find that aquatic resources in the State are lost from urbanized areas that are more affluent, white, and highly educated, and mitigated at sites in rural areas that are less affluent, less well educated, and have a higher percentage of minorities. We also analyze the relationship between urban growth indicators and EEP accumulation of compensation sites. Growth indicators and long-term population projections are uncorrelated with both projected transportation impacts and advance mitigation acquired by the EEP, suggesting that growth considerations can be more effectively incorporated into the EEP's planning process. We explore the possibility that spatial mismatches could develop between watersheds that are rapidly growing and those that are gaining mitigation. We make recommendations for ways that regulators incorporate growth indicators into the mitigation planning process.

  19. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  20. Aligning land use with land potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current agricultural land use is dominated by an emphasis on provisioning services by applying energy-intensive inputs through relatively uniform production systems across variable landscapes. This approach to agricultural land use is not sustainable. Integrated agricultural systems (IAS) are uphe...

  1. Evaluating the effects of urbanization and land-use planning using ground-water and surface-water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R.J.; Steuer, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Why are the effects of urbanization a concern? As the city of Middleton, Wisconsin, and its surroundings continue to develop, the Pheasant Branch watershed (fig.l) is expected to undergo urbanization. For the downstream city of Middleton, urbanization in the watershed can mean increased flood peaks, water volume and pollutant loads. More subtly, it may also reduce water that sustains the ground-water system (called "recharge") and adversely affect downstream ecosystems that depend on ground water such as the Pheasant Branch Springs (hereafter referred to as the Springs). The relation of stormwater runoff and reduced ground-water recharge is complex because the surface-water system is coupled to the underlying ground-water system. In many cases there is movement of water from one system to the other that varies seasonally or daily depending on changing conditions. Therefore, it is difficult to reliably determine the effects of urbanization on stream baseflow and spring flows without rigorous investigation. Moreover, mitigating adverse effects after development has occurred can be expensive and administratively difficult. Overlying these concerns are issues such as stewardship of the resource, the rights of the public, and land owners' rights both of those developing their land and those whose land is affected by this development. With the often- contradictory goals, a scientific basis for assessing effects of urbanization and effectiveness of mitigation measures helps ensure fair and constructive decision-making. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Middleton and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, completed a study that helps address these issues through modeling of the hydrologic system. This Fact Sheet discusses the results of this work.

  2. Land use impacts on transport : how land use factors affect travel behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litman, T.

    2005-11-16

    The relationship between land use patterns and travel behaviour was examined with reference to the ability of land use management strategies to achieve transportation planning objectives. The study examined how land use factors such as density, regional accessibility, roadway connectivity affect per capita motor vehicle ownership and use; mode split; non-motorized travel; and accessibility by people who are physically or economically disadvantaged. The social, economic and environmental impacts that result from higher travel were discussed with reference to the degree to which conventional planning accounts for this increased travel. Alternatives for improving mobility in urban and suburban areas were presented. It was concluded that travel behaviour can change by promoting more efficient use of existing roadway capacity, by improving travel options and providing incentives to use alternative transport modes. It was suggested that strategies such as Smart Growth and New Urbanism can be applied in a variety of land use scenarios, including urban, suburban and rural areas to help achieve transportation planning objectives. 122 refs., 16 tabs., 12 figs.

  3. Lands with Wilderness Characteristics, Resource Management Plan Constraints, and Land Exchanges: Cross-Jurisdictional Management and Impacts on Unconventional Fuel Development in Utah's Uinta Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

    2012-10-01

    Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those

  4. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  5. Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec

    2013-09-30

    This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or

  6. Retrieval of land parameters by multi-sensor information using the Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernetskiy, Maxim; Gobron, Nadine; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Disney, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    Upcoming satellite constellations will substantially increase the amount of Earth Observation (EO) data, and presents us with the challenge of consistently using all these available information to infer the state of the land surface, parameterised through Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). A promising approach to this problem is the use of physically based models that describe the processes that generate the images, using e.g. radiative transfer (RT) theory. However, these models need to be inverted to infer the land surface parameters from the observations, and there is often not enough information in the EO data to satisfactorily achieve this. Data assimilation (DA) approaches supplement the EO data with prior information in the form of models or prior parameter distributions, and have the potential for solving the inversion problem. These methods however are computationally expensive. In this study, we show the use of fast surrogate models of the RT codes (emulators) based on Gaussian Processes (Gomez-Dans et al, 2016) embedded with the Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System (EO-LDAS) framework (Lewis et al 2012) in order to estimate the surface of the land surface from a heterogeneous set of optical observations. The study uses time series of moderate spatial resolution observations from MODIS (250 m), MERIS (300 m) and MISR (275 m) over one site to infer the temporal evolution of a number of land surface parameters (and associated uncertainties) related to vegetation: leaf area index (LAI), leaf chlorophyll content, etc. These parameter estimates are then used as input to an RT model (semidiscrete or PROSAIL, for example) to calculate fluxes such as broad band albedo or fAPAR. The study demonstrates that blending different sensors in a consistent way using physical models results in a rich and coherent set of land surface parameters retrieved, with quantified uncertainties. The use of RT models also allows for the consistent prediction of fluxes

  7. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  8. The connection between long-term and short-term risk management strategies: examples from land-use planning and emergency management in four European case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenger-Berninghoff, K.; Cortes, V. J.; Sprague, T.; Aye, Z. C.; Greiving, S.; Głowacki, W.; Sterlacchini, S.

    2014-04-01

    The need for continuous adaptation to complex and unforeseen events requires enhancing the links between planning and preparedness phases to reduce future risks in the most efficient way. In this context, the legal-administrative and cultural context has to be taken into account. This is why four case study areas of the CHANGES1 project (Nehoiu Valley in Romania, Ubaye Valley in France, Val Canale in Italy, and Wieprzówka catchment in Poland) serve as examples to highlight currently implemented risk management strategies for land-use planning and emergency preparedness. The strategies described in this paper were identified by means of exploratory and informal interviews in each study site. Results reveal that a dearth or, in very few cases, a weak link exists between spatial planners and emergency managers. Management strategies could benefit from formally intensifying coordination and cooperation between emergency services and spatial planning authorities. Moreover, limited financial funds urge for a more efficient use of resources and better coordination towards long-term activities. The research indicates potential benefits to establishing or, in some cases, strengthening this link and provides suggestions for further development in the form of information and decision support systems as a key connection point. Aside from the existent information systems for emergency management, it was found that a common platform, which integrates involvement of these and other relevant actors could enhance this connection and address expressed stakeholder needs. 1 Marie Curie ITN CHANGES - Changing Hydro-meteorological Risks as Analyzed by a New Generation of European Scientists.

  9. Land-use change and floods: what do we need most, research or management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollan, Arne

    2002-01-01

    Land-cover change (urbanisation, deforestation, and cultivation) results in increased flood frequency and severity. Mechanisms include reduced infiltration capacity, lower soil porosity, loss of vegetation, and forest clearing, meaning lower evapotranspiration. Major research challenges lie in quantification of effects in terms of flood characteristics under various conditions, ascertaining the combined effects of gradual changes over long time periods, and developing model tools suitable for land-use management. Large floods during the 1990s gave a new focus on these problems. Reference is made to the Norwegian HYDRA research programme on human impacts on floods and flood damage. The paper concludes that land-use change effects on floods are most pronounced at small scale and for frequent flood magnitudes. Model simulations of effects of land-use change can now be used to reduce flood risk. Modern flood management strategies have abandoned the position that dams and dikes are the only answers to mitigating flood disasters. Today, the strategic approach is more often: do not keep the water away from the people, keep people away from the water. Flood management strategies should include flood warnings, efficient communication, risk awareness, civil protection and flood preparedness routines, effective land-use policies, flood risk mapping, ... as well as structural measures.

  10. Anomaly in the rainfall-runoff behaviour of the Meuse catchment. Climate, land-use, or land-use management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenicia, F.; Savenije, H.H.G.; Avdeeva, Y.

    2009-01-01

    OA-Fund TU Delft The objective of this paper is to investigate the time variability of catchment characteristics in the Meuse basin through its effect on catchment response. The approach uses a conceptual model to represent rainfall-runoff behaviour of this catchment, and evaluates possible

  11. NIF conventional facilities construction health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, D W

    1998-05-14

    The purpose of this Plan is to outline the minimum health and safety requirements to which all participating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and non-LLNL employees (excluding National Ignition Facility [NIF] specific contractors and subcontractors covered under the construction subcontract packages (e.g., CSP-9)-see Construction Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility [CSP] Section I.B. ''NIF Construction Contractors and Subcontractors'' for specifics) shall adhere to for preventing job-related injuries and illnesses during Conventional Facilities construction activities at the NIF Project. For the purpose of this Plan, the term ''LLNL and non-LLNL employees'' includes LLNL employees, LLNL Plant Operations staff and their contractors, supplemental labor, contract labor, labor-only contractors, vendors, DOE representatives, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, and others such as visitors, students, consultants etc., performing on-site work or services in support of the NIF Project. Based upon an activity level determination explained in Section 1.2.18, in this document, these organizations or individuals may be required by site management to prepare their own NIF site-specific safety plan. LLNL employees will normally not be expected to prepare a site-specific safety plan. This Plan also outlines job-specific exposures and construction site safety activities with which LLNL and non-LLNL employees shall comply.

  12. TERRITORIAL NETWORKS AND PLANNING: LAND PLANNING IN METROPOLITAN BILBAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Helena Sguizzardi Abascal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article argues that the territorial planning is nowadays fundamental instrument to the definition of strategic areas of opportunity, and also, articulating instrument of distinct territory scales (from local to regional. It is restored the importance of distinct levels of planning, listed in chain, of a more general level of regional coverage to specific and local levels. It is demonstrated the importance of this articulation not only for dealing with urgencies in the intra-urban territory ordering to promote the compact city, but also, to develop cities and regions, enhancing the implementation of decentralized and solidary supply chains that characterize a network organization. It is proposed that, the planning instruments and strategic ordering of the territory, aimed at decentralization and creation of new towns or focusing on the redevelopment and recycling of uses and activities in cities and regions in decline with degraded areas, allowing decisions of strategic importance that determine lines, axes and opportunity areas, targets of economic, and social development, and therefore it starts to concentrate investment in infrastructure, serving to enhance the implementation of urban network centers and supply chains, which benefits with the larger planning of urban and regional territory. Because of it, the analysis object is the strategic territorial planning that has been developed and implemented specifically in Spain, underlying plans and actions of urban regeneration, as exemplified by the process is still ongoing in the city of Bilbao, the region north of the country.

  13. Study on the Land Use Planning Target Oriented to Market Economy%面向市场经济的土地利用规划目标研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁珍; 师学义; 唐臣燕

    2012-01-01

    从规划的本质入手,对市场经济条件下规划目标的特性进行了剖析,并对规划目标确定进行了初步探讨.研究表明:市场经济条件下,政治目标是制定规划目标的指导方针,市场力是土地利用优化配置最有效的引导力.土地利用规划目标的制定应以政治目标为前提,宏观经济政策和市场需求为导向,以土地资源优化配置为中心,以解决人地矛盾和协调土地与经济发展关系为重点,针对市场经济条件下土地利用特点开展.%According to the essence of land use planning, the features of land use planning target under the market economy conditions were exposed, and the setting up of planning target was probed into. As indicated by the studies, under the market economy, the land use planning target is guided by political goals, and the optimization of land use configuration is effectively driven by market demand. Thus the land use planning target should be formulated based on the premise of political goals, oriented to macroeconomic policies and market demand, and with the optimal allocation of land resources as the center, so as to resolve the contradiction between human and land and coordinate the relationship between land and economic development, and the target is carried out according to the land use characteristics of market economy.

  14. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S J

    2002-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was originally prepared in 1997 in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported NIF Critical Decision 3, approval to initiate construction (DOE, 1997a). The plan was updated in 1998 to reflect realized risks such as the finding and successful clean up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF excavation during initial construction and the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship (DOE, 1996b) by a group of non-governmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The current update of the Risk Management Plan brings it into compliance with the applicable DOE Orders and Standards and addresses new risks, such as assuring safety during the period when construction, special equipment installation, and commissioning are occurring simultaneously at the NIF site, and the extensive use of models to manage technical performance risk. The objectives of the updated plan are to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting performance and regulatory requirements, ES&H, cost, and schedule; (2) Assess or the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H, costs, and schedule; and (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk.

  15. Climate change in the four corners and adjacent regions: Implications for environmental restoration and land-use planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J. [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the workshop proceedings on Climate Change in the Four Corners and Adjacent Regions: Implications for Environmental Restoration and Land-Use Planning which took place September 12-14, 1994 in Grand Junction, Colorado. The workshop addressed three ways we can use paleoenvironmental data to gain a better understanding of climate change and its effects. (1) To serve as a retrospective baseline for interpreting past and projecting future climate-induced environmental change, (2) To differentiate the influences of climate and humans on past environmental change, and (3) To improve ecosystem management and restoration practices in the future. The papers presented at this workshop contained information on the following subjects: Paleoclimatic data from the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, climate change and past cultures, and ecological resources and environmental restoration. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation upon natural populations and ecosystems. Final report. [Ecological perspectives in land use planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Accomplishments throughout a 10-year period summarized include: a study of the effects of radiation from a ..gamma.. source on the ecology of the El Verde rain forest in Puerto Rico, with emphasis on the role of secondary succession in the recovery of forest ecosystems following irradiation; the effects of light and temperature on gaseous exchange in trees using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ as a tracer in Palcourea; the nature of the sensitivity of pine trees to ionizing radiation and the possible synergistic effects of elevated ozone levels on radiosensitivity; the combined effects of radioactive and thermal effluents on plant communities of a swamp hardwood forest; and the development of a new conceptual approach to the evaluation of environmental quality, with emphasis on ecological perspectives in land use planning. (CH)

  17. Land Protection Plan: Swan Valley Conservation Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Land Protection Plan for Swan Valley Conservation Area provides a description of the project, a description of the area and its resources, threats to the...

  18. Land Protection Plan: Dakota Grassland Conservation Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Land Protection Plan for Dakota Grassland Conservation Area provides a description of the project, a description of the area and its resources, threats to the...

  19. 48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... research facilities acquired by educational institutions. 235.015-70 Section 235.015-70 Federal Acquisition... acquired by educational institutions. (a) Definitions. As used in this subsection— (1) Research facility... 31.3. (b) Policy. (1) Educational institutions are to furnish the facilities necessary to...

  20. Land Use Classification using Support Vector Machine and Maximum Likelihood Algorithms by Landsat 5 TM Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas TAATI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, remote sensing images have been identified and exploited as the latest information to study land cover and land uses. These digital images are of significant importance, since they can present timely information, and capable of providing land use maps. The aim of this study is to create land use classification using a support vector machine (SVM and maximum likelihood classifier (MLC in Qazvin, Iran, by TM images of the Landsat 5 satellite. In the pre-processing stage, the necessary corrections were applied to the images. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the 2 algorithms, the overall accuracy and kappa coefficient were used. The evaluation results verified that the SVM algorithm with an overall accuracy of 86.67 % and a kappa coefficient of 0.82 has a higher accuracy than the MLC algorithm in land use mapping. Therefore, this algorithm has been suggested to be applied as an optimal classifier for extraction of land use maps due to its higher accuracy and better consistency within the study area.

  1. Land use scenarios for greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian; Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2012-01-01

    Urban planning and development in Denmark can be characterised by a relatively strong planning framework. Land use scenarios based on empirically derived dynamics of urban growth are practically never applied. However, modelling approaches do offer a methodology to explore the pressures in an urban...... region, as well as an approach to understand urban development patterns outside the ‘spatial masterplan’. In this context we will present the results of a modelling exercise addressing future land use change in the metropolitan area of Copenhagen, Denmark, and the impact of the current regional planning...

  2. Evaluation of the application of ERTS-1 data to the regional land use planning process. [Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Investigators have concentrated on efforts toward assessing the achievements of the current ERTS-1 research so that significant results could be incorporated into the updated version of their ERTS-B research proposal. Significant progress was made in the development of operational mechanisms, linking the research community at the University and the operation agencies of the State of Wisconsin. Efforts have been made to finalize a report which is being prepared for the State of Wisconsin Department of Administration, evaluating the applicability of ERTS-1 to the planning needs of the State of Wisconsin. This document is intended to assess the degree of utility of the satellite for providing information which has been designated by state planners as essential to their needs. This effort is considered highly significant to the overall research program since a situation has been created in which a prime potential user of ERTS type data has been given the opportunity to determine the direction of the research.

  3. Urban Land-banking Planning: A New Instrument to Regulate Urban Land Supply-demand of Nanjing City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tu Xiaosong; Pu Lijie; Huang Xianjin; Jin Xiaobin

    2008-01-01

    It is the major purpose of the paper to present the urban land-banking planning and its functions of promoting the urban land-banking system and land use administration. The urban land-banking system has the potential attribute of acting as an irreplaceable role in urban land administration, but its unexpected function-deviation has impacted its implementation effect in China. A few city governments are attempting to deal with the problem by the urban land-banking planning which is expected to contribute to the extension of urban function, optimization of urban patterns, promotion of urban core competitiveness and overall construction of the urban value chain. In this paper, we primarily discuss the necessity, functions, purposes and main contents of the urban land-banking planning. Subsequently, the implementing situation of the urban land-banking system in Nan-jing is analyzed, including its integrated mode, spatio-temporal quantitative distribution and main characteristics. Finally, the background and targets including total, compositions, space, and regulation points are gradually introduced to present the Nanjing land-banking planning version 2.

  4. Pattern of Family Planning Methods used by Antenatal Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of Family Planning Methods used by Antenatal Patients in Owo,Nigeria. ... Information obtained from the respondents with the aid of the study instrument ... The reasons for getting pregnant were desire to have more children (79%), and ...

  5. Land-use planning for nearshore ecosystem services—the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    The 2,500 miles of shoreline and nearshore areas of Puget Sound, Washington, provide multiple benefits to people—"ecosystem services"—including important fishing, shellfishing, and recreation industries. To help resource managers plan for expected growth in coming decades, the U.S. Geological Survey Western Geographic Science Center has developed the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model (PSEPM). Scenarios of urban growth and shoreline modifications serve as model inputs to develop alternative futures of important nearshore features such as water quality and beach habitats. Model results will support regional long-term planning decisions for the Puget Sound region.

  6. The motives for accepting or rejecting waste infrastructure facilities: shifting the focus from the planners’ perspective to fairness and community commitment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolsink, M.; Devilee, J.

    2009-01-01

    In environmental planning, decision making on land use for infrastructure increasingly causes conflicts, particularly with regard to contested waste facilities. Risk management and perceptions have become crucial. Empirical investigations of these conflicts brought clear advancement in the fields of

  7. The motives for accepting or rejecting waste infrastructure facilities: shifting the focus from the planners’ perspective to fairness and community commitment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolsink, M.; Devilee, J.

    2009-01-01

    In environmental planning, decision making on land use for infrastructure increasingly causes conflicts, particularly with regard to contested waste facilities. Risk management and perceptions have become crucial. Empirical investigations of these conflicts brought clear advancement in the fields of

  8. A Checklist for Planning Community College Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Frank P.

    It is noted that in any planning process for community colleges, physical facilities are only an adjunct to the instructional program, and any types of facilities that evolve should be based on the nature of the students, the curriculum, and the general philosophy and operation of the college. A list is presented as a suggested guide for questions…

  9. An integrated planning and decision support system (IPDSS) for land consolidation: theoretical framework and application of the land-redistribution modules

    OpenAIRE

    Demetris Demetriou; John Stillwell; Linda See

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new planning support system currently under development for land consolidation in Cyprus called LACONISS (LAnd CONsolidation Integrated Support System). The system’s structural framework is outlined and the core land redistribution sub-system called LandSpaCES (Land Spatial Consolidation Expert System) is exemplified using a case study. Model evaluation indicates that the results provide a close fit to those derived by independent human experts. Alternative solutions a...

  10. 78 FR 16567 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Non-Rule Making Action To Change Land Use From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... To Change Land Use From Aeronautical to Non-Aeronautical at Mobile Downtown Airport, Mobile, Alabama... by the Mobile Airport Authority. The airport layout plan update, if approved, would change the land... Commercial Development. The location of the land relative to existing or anticipated aircraft noise...

  11. National Ignition Facility (NIF) operations procedures plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantrom, D.

    1998-05-06

    The purpose of this Operations Procedures Plan is to establish a standard procedure which outlines how NIF Operations procedures will be developed (i.e , written, edited, reviewed, approved, published, revised) and accessed by the NIF Operations staff who must use procedures in order to accomplish their tasks. In addition, this Plan is designed to provide a guide to the NIF Project staff to assist them in planning and writing procedures. Also, resource and scheduling information is provided.

  12. Evaluation of the application of ERTS-1 data to the regional land use planning process. [Northeast Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Green, T., III; Hanson, G. F.; Kiefer, R. W.; Niemann, B. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Employing simple and economical extraction methods, ERTS can provide valuable data to the planners at the state or regional level with a frequency never before possible. Interactive computer methods of working directly with ERTS digital information show much promise for providing land use information at a more specific level, since the data format production rate of ERTS justifies improved methods of analysis.

  13. 40 CFR 35.917 - Facilities planning (step 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facilities planning (step 1). 35.917... Facilities planning (step 1). (a) Sections 35.917 through 35.917-9 establish the requirements for facilities plans. (b) Facilities planning consists of those necessary plans and studies which directly relate to...

  14. Spatial landuse planning using land evaluation and dynamic system to define sustainable area of paddy field: Case study in Karawang Regency, West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiatmaka, Widiatmaka; Ambarwulan, Wiwin; Firmansyah, Irman; Munibah, Khursatul; Santoso, Paulus B. K.

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia is the country with the 4th largest population in the worlds; the population reached more than 237 million people. With rice as the staple food for more than 95 percent of the population, there is an important role of paddy field in Indonesian food security. Actually, paddy field in Java has produced 52,6% of the total rice production in Indonesia, showing the very high dependence of Indonesia on food production from paddy fields in Java island. Karawang Regency is one of the regions in West Java Province that contribute to the national food supply, due to its high soil fertility and its high extent of paddy field. Dynamics of land use change in this region are high because of its proximity to urban area; this dynamics has led to paddy field conversion to industry and residential landuse, which in turn change the regional rice production capacity. Decreasing paddy field landuse in this region could be serve as an example case of the general phenomena which occurred in Javanese rice production region. The objective of this study were: (i) to identify the suitable area for paddy field, (ii) to modelize the decreasing of paddy field in socio-economic context of the region, and (iii) to plan the spatial priority area of paddy field protection according to model prediction. A land evaluation for paddy was completed after a soil survey, while IKONOS imagery was analyzed to delineate paddy fields. Dynamic system model of paddy field land use is built, and then based on the model built, the land area of paddy field untill 2040 in some scenarios was developped. The research results showed that the land suitability class for paddy fields in Karawang Regency ranged from very suitable (S1) to marginally suitable (S3), with various land characteristics as limiting factors. The model predicts that if the situation of paddy field land use change continues in its business as usual path, paddy field area that would exist in the region in 2040 will stay half of the recent

  15. An integrated multi-criteria scenario evaluation web tool for participatory land-use planning in urbanized areas: The Ecosystem Portfolio Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiosa, Bill; Forney, William M.; Hearn,, Paul P.; Hogan, Dianna M.; Strong, David R.; Swain, Eric D.; Esnard, Ann-Margaret; Mitsova-Boneva, D.; Bernknopf, R.; Pearlstine, Leonard; Gladwin, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Land-use land-cover change is one of the most important and direct drivers of changes in ecosystem functions and services. Given the complexity of the decision-making, there is a need for Internet-based decision support systems with scenario evaluation capabilities to help planners, resource managers and communities visualize, compare and consider trade-offs among the many values at stake in land use planning. This article presents details on an Ecosystem Portfolio Model (EPM) prototype that integrates ecological, socio-economic information and associated values of relevance to decision-makers and stakeholders. The EPM uses a multi-criteria scenario evaluation framework, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis and spatially-explicit land-use/land-cover change-sensitive models to characterize changes in important land-cover related ecosystem values related to ecosystem services and functions, land parcel prices, and community quality-of-life (QoL) metrics. Parameters in the underlying models can be modified through the interface, allowing users in a facilitated group setting to explore simultaneously issues of scientific uncertainty and divergence in the preferences of stakeholders. One application of the South Florida EPM prototype reported in this article shows the modeled changes (which are significant) in aggregate ecological value, landscape patterns and fragmentation, biodiversity potential and ecological restoration potential for current land uses compared to the 2050 land-use scenario. Ongoing refinements to EPM, and future work especially in regard to modifiable sea level rise scenarios are also discussed.

  16. Merging facility and financial planning: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, R; Hoffman, S

    1988-01-01

    This article seeks to help hospital administrators and boards (especially planning and finance committees) balance facility and financial aspects of a construction project by planning for each concurrently. It recommends that the process start with formal strategic plans, and that facility and capital plans be advanced interactively, thus maintaining flexibility to ensure that the hospital's objectives can be met within manageable financial limits. The authors suggest that the project thus delivered will be the most effective and efficient project possible within defined constraints. And, once planned, the project will be ready for implementation--false starts will be eliminated.

  17. Park Land and Nature Preserves, Park facilities are maintained by Johnson County Parks and Recreation Department and includes all parks with in Johnson County, Published in Not Provided, Johnson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Park Land and Nature Preserves dataset current as of unknown. Park facilities are maintained by Johnson County Parks and Recreation Department and includes all parks...

  18. GeoSurf - geoelectric soil modelling for a sustainable land use and efficient planning of shallow geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertermann, David; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone; Kübert, Markus; Schmidt, David; Di Sipio, Eloisa; Müller, Johannes; Schwarz, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Due to the increased demand of biomaterials and renewable primary products the world's soil is intensively effected. Land usage needs to be efficient, space-saving and sustainable. To fulfil these needs soil properties have to be analysed and mapped. Furthermore the shortage of resources will boost the role of renewable energy sources within all energy supplying systems. Also for very shallow geothermal systems (e.g. collectors or heat baskets) detailed information of soil properties are necessary. The most important parameters for characterisation of the soil body are grain size distribution, bulk density and moisture content. Within this project geoelectric measurements more than 50 m wide and 20 m deep cross-sections were made. The above-named soil properties and the thermal conductivity were determined as well. The soil parameters were analysed regarding their effects on thermal- and electric conductivity. With the results of these geoelectric cross-sections in comparison with the measured soil texture, reliable statements about the existing soil properties and a deduction of its thermal conductivity can be made. Within the uppermost meters of the ground, thermal conductivity is mainly driven by soil type. So reasonable recommendations of soil properties and its thermal conductivity are possible only by measuring the electrical conductivity. With these measurements also clear and demonstrative soil models can be illustrated. The electrical conductivity provides expedient information about the soil that opens up the opportunity for clear recommendations about sustainable land use and for site-specific installation of very shallow geothermal system. Also predictions for other soil controlled investigations are possible.

  19. Scenario Simulation and the Prediction of Land Use and Land Cover Change in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiran Han

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Land use and land cover (LULC models are essential for analyzing LULC change and predicting land use requirements and are valuable for guiding reasonable land use planning and management. However, each LULC model has its own advantages and constraints. In this paper, we explore the characteristics of LULC change and simulate future land use demand by combining a CLUE-S model with a Markov model to deal with some shortcomings of existing LULC models. Using Beijing as a case study, we describe the related driving factors from land-adaptive variables, regional spatial variables and socio-economic variables and then simulate future land use scenarios from 2010 to 2020, which include a development scenario (natural development and rapid development and protection scenarios (ecological and cultivated land protection. The results indicate good consistency between predicted results and actual land use situations according to a Kappa statistic. The conversion of cultivated land to urban built-up land will form the primary features of LULC change in the future. The prediction for land use demand shows the differences under different scenarios. At higher elevations, the geographical environment limits the expansion of urban built-up land, but the conversion of cultivated land to built-up land in mountainous areas will be more prevalent by 2020; Beijing, however, still faces the most pressure in terms of ecological and cultivated land protection.

  20. International Coalition Land Use/Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set is a product of an effort to update Minnesota's 1969 land use inventory. The project was funded in 1989 by the State Legislature per recommendation...

  1. Planning voor Stad en Land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, M.C.; Brink, van den A.; Heinen, J.; Kragting, J.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    In dit boek wordt ingegaan op de aard en aanpak van omgevingsvraagstukken, zoals die zich voordoen op het spanningsveld van stad en land en van ruimte en milieu in Nederland. De aanpak in het landelijk gebied wordt toegelicht aan de hand van een aantal concrete voorbeelden op regionaal niveau

  2. Policy implications in developing a land use management information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The current land use map for the city of Los Angeles was developed by the guesstimation process and provides single stage information for each level in the critical geographical hierarchy for land use planning management. Processing and incorporation of LANDSAT data in the land use information system requires special funding; however, computergraphic maps are able to provide a viable information system for city planning and management.

  3. Aircraft landing using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  4. 土地利用规划中的环境影响评价%Analysis of Environmental Impact Assessment in Land Use Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程超; 王延青

    2012-01-01

    土地利用规划的环境影响评价能减少规划实施对各种环境要素及其所构成的生态系统可能造成的影响,并为科学决策提供依据。介绍了土地利用规划环境影响评价的工作程序与指标体系,并对其不确定性的来源及其特点进行了分析,提出了做好土地利用规划环境影响评价的建议与措施,为环境影响评价在土地利用规划中的应用奠定基础。%Environmental impact assessment of land use planning can reduce the impact of the planning implementation on all kinds of environment factors and their ecological systems and provide basis for scientific decision-making.This paper introduces working procedure and indicator system of environmental impact assessment in land use planning,analyzes the sources of uncertainty and its characteristics and puts forward suggestions and measures for accomplishing environmental impact assessment in land use planning to lay a foundation for the application of environmental impact assessment to land use planning.

  5. Methodological proposal for defining mining vocation in Venezuelan land-use planning; Propuesta metodologica para definir la vocacion minera en el contexto del ordenamiento territorial venezolano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladares Salinas, R. Y.; Dall Pozzo, F.; Castillo Padron, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Mining is an economic activity which is necessary to provide raw materials for the different socio-productive networks of the country. Its application depends on the mineralogical occurrence offered by the geological conditions of an area and requires planning due to the fact that it needs to be located in a geographical space and the environment fragility of this space and the socio-economic and political-institutional legislation at a given moment all have to be taken into account. Therefore, the objective of this research consists of a proposal for a methodological model to define areas with mining adapted to the Venezuelan context of land-use planning, in order to assign mining uses to the most appropriate areas for that goal, considering the selection, assessment and integration of a series of variables and indicators adjusted to the thematic information available. (Author)

  6. Consequential life cycle inventory modelling of land use induced by crop consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Jesper Hedal

    -replacement mechanisms are governed by the availability of suitable agricultural land and several economic conditions, such as transport and trade costs. To estimate the land use response to an increase in crop demand, economic modelling can be used. In this project, the economic equilibrium model GTAP (Global Trade......The purpose of the present PhD project was to identify the mechanisms governing global land use consequences of increased crop demand in a given location and, based on this conceptual analysis, to present and demonstrate a method proposal for construction of land use data that can be used in life...

  7. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  8. Evaluating collaborative planning: a case study of the Haida Gwaii land and resource management plan

    OpenAIRE

    Astofooroff, Nikki Kristen

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on a case study of land use planning on Haida Gwaii, which is an internationally significant region for both ecological and cultural reasons. Haida Gwaii has recently undergone a land use planning process based on an innovative collaborative planning model that engages First Nations and other stakeholders in consensus-based negotiations to reach agreement. It is important to evaluate this innovative process, and to learn lessons from it that can be used to develop guidelin...

  9. Evaluation of radiocaesium wash-off by soil erosion from various land uses using USLE plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Radiocaesium wash-off associated with soil erosion in different land use was monitored using USLE plots in Kawamata, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Parameters and factors relating to soil erosion and (137)Cs concentration in the eroded soil were evaluated based on the field monitoring and presented. The erosion of fine soil, which is defined as the fraction of soil overflowed along with discharged water from a sediment-trap tank, constituted a large proportion of the discharged radiocaesium. This indicated that the quantitative monitoring of fine soil erosion is greatly important for the accurate evaluation of radiocaesium wash-off. An exponential relationship was found between vegetation cover and the amount of eroded soil. Moreover, the radiocaesium concentrations in the discharged soil were greatly affected by the land use. These results indicate that radiocaesium wash-off related to vegetation cover and land use is crucially important in modelling radiocaesium migration.

  10. Application of EIA/SEA system in land use planning: Experience from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Božidar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the experience and current status of EIA/SEA procedures and assessment methodologies in Serbia, aiming to propose strategies that can lead to effective integration of the SEA in spatial planning. Institutional and practical problems with regard to the regulations of EIA/SEA were considered. Experience from the past decade shows that implementation of EIA system in Serbia has not been effective as expected. New legislation on EIA and SEA is harmonized with corresponding EU Directives. First steps in the application of the SEA show that the main issues are screening, scooping and decision making. According to the research results, it is suggested that extra evaluation processes should be incorporated into current assessment procedures to improve their scientific validity and integrity.

  11. 新版城市用地分类标准实施后的混合用地规划对策初探%The Planning Countermeasures of Mixed-use Land after the Implementation of the New Edition of the Code for Classification of Urban Land Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任利剑; 运迎霞

    2014-01-01

    新颁布实施的《城市用地分类与规划建设用地标准(GB50137-2011)》通过明确混合用地定性原则、拓展部分用地兼容性及增强分类系统开放性等方式体现了土地混合使用理念,但在指导混合用地的规划编制与管理实践方面仍存在不足之处。本文通过借鉴相关成熟经验,结合新版用地分类标准和我国规划体系特点,从总规、控规、修规三个层面初步探讨了混合用地的规划应对方法。%Code for classification of urban land use and planning standards of development land GB50137-2011 was enforced since January, 2012. The code embodies the idea of mixed-use by way of deifning the nature of mixed-use land, expanding the compatibility of some land type, and enhancing the openness of classiifcation system. However, there are still some shortcomings in guiding the planning and management practices of mixed-use land. Referring to the experiences abroad, this paper points out that the utilization of mixed-use land should be based on the revised code and the features of our urban planning system, then it renders suggestions on countermeasures to improve the planning methods from the aspects of master plan, regulatory plan and site plan.

  12. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  13. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  14. Two Case Studies Using Mock-Ups for Planning Adult and Neonatal Intensive Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Hignett

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two case studies using a 5-step protocol to determine functional space requirements for cardiac and neonatal intensive care clinical activities. Functional space experiments were conducted to determine the spatial requirements (defined as the minimumsized rectangle to encompass the Link Analysis. The data were collected with multi-directional filming and analysed frame-by-frame to plot the movements between the nurses and other components in the space. The average clinical functional space for the adult critical care unit was 22.83m2 (excluding family and hygiene space and in-room storage. The average functional clinical space for neonatal intensive care unit was 13.5m2 (excluding circulation and storage. The use of the 5-step protocol is reviewed, with limitations in case study 1 addressed in case study 2. The findings from both case studies have been incorporated into government guidance and achieved knowledge transfer by being implemented in building design.

  15. From Carbon Projects to Better Land-Use Planning: Three Latin American Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Rival

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available I start with a discussion of the limits of the United Nations’ Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and cobenefits (REDD+ program and the need to embed forest carbon within integrated ecosystem services on a landscape scale. By comparing a REDD+ project with two non-REDD+ projects, I show that there are diverse ways of applying the Earth system governance lens to address the continuing deterioration of goods and services provided by ecological systems. I then compare the valuation of ecosystem services and the governance of their provision in the three projects under review: Bolsa Floresta in the state of Amazonas, Brazil; Araçuaí Sustentável in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil; and the Yasuní–Ishpingo Tambococha Tiputini Initiative in Ecuador. I show how each project has given birth to innovative mixed policies based on citizen mobilization. These dynamic hybrid policies are uniquely fitted to the particular ecological, historical, sociocultural, and political contexts in which they took root, contexts they help to transform. I conclude that result-based payment systems such as those envisaged for REDD+ have the potential to increase the production of additional carbon absorption capacity. However, they are not always appropriate or cost effective, nor do they substitute for command-and-control instruments, or for popular mobilization.

  16. Use of documentary sources on past flood events for flood risk management and land planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cœur, Denis; Lang, Michel

    2008-09-01

    The knowledge of past catastrophic events can improve flood risk mitigation policy, with a better awareness against risk. As such historical information is usually available in Europe for the past five centuries, historians are able to understand how past society dealt with flood risk, and hydrologists can include information on past floods into an adapted probabilistic framework. In France, Flood Risk Mitigation Maps are based either on the largest historical known flood event or on the 100-year flood event if it is greater. Two actions can be suggested in terms of promoting the use of historical information for flood risk management: (1) the development of a regional flood data base, with both historical and current data, in order to get a good feedback on recent events and to improve the flood risk education and awareness; (2) the commitment to keep a persistent/perennial management of a reference network of hydrometeorological observations for climate change studies.

  17. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  18. 76 FR 8479 - National Forest System Land Management Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... sustainable management of NFS lands. The vision for the proposed rule. The Forest Service mission is to..., benefits, and uses on NFS lands. Issues included, for example: Climate change; insects and disease... development of a shared vision for the unit, as well as an understanding of how and why planning decisions...

  19. Sustainability of Land Use Promoted by Construction-to-Ecological Land Conversion: A Case Study of Shenzhen City, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yunfei Peng; Jing Qian; Fu Ren; Wenhui Zhang; Qingyun Du

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and rapid urban growth present great challenges to the sustainable utilization of land resources. This paper discusses the on-going process of construction-to-ecological land conversion (CELC) in terms of three aspects: land use, environmental effects, and system responses. CELC is compared to other current land conversion strategies in China. Taking Shenzhen City as an example, this paper introduces five areas in which CELC has been implemented since 2009, including basic ...

  20. 77 FR 21161 - National Forest System Land Management Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Land Management Planning; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 68 / Monday, April 9, 2012... National Forest System Land Management Planning AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule and record... land management planning rule (planning rule). The new planning rule guides the development, amendment...

  1. Land-use Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  2. 75 FR 77654 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Land Use Plan Amendment and an Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... (BLM) El Centro Field Office and Imperial County, California, intend to prepare a joint Environmental..., biological resources, recreation, cultural resources, water resources, geological resources, land use, noise... available for public review at the Bureau of Land Management, El Centro Field Office, 1661 South 4th Street...

  3. Planning voor Stad en Land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, M.

    2006-01-01

    In dit boek wordt zowel de theorie als de praktijk van de ruimtelijke planning vanuit verschillende invalshoeken belicht. Diverse actuele thema's zoals de Nota Ruimte, het gebiedsgericht beleid en de zorg voor omgevingskwaliteit worden besproken. De auteur illustreert de aanpak van ruimtelijke

  4. Planning voor Stad en Land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, M.

    2006-01-01

    In dit boek wordt zowel de theorie als de praktijk van de ruimtelijke planning vanuit verschillende invalshoeken belicht. Diverse actuele thema's zoals de Nota Ruimte, het gebiedsgericht beleid en de zorg voor omgevingskwaliteit worden besproken. De auteur illustreert de aanpak van ruimtelijke plann

  5. The Use of land evaluation information by land use planners and decision-makers; a case study in Santa Catarina, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacic, I.L.Z.; Rossiter, D.G.; Bregt, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    Land evaluation is the prediction of land performance over time under specific uses, to guide strategic land use decisions. Modern land evaluation has a 30 year history, yet the results have often been disappointing. Land users and planners have been reported to ignore land evaluations, perhaps refl

  6. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  7. Urban Land Use Change Detection Using Multisensor Satellite Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jin-Song; WANG Ke; LI Jun; DENG Yan-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Due to inappropriate planning and management, accelerated urban growth and tremendous loss in land, especially cropland, have become a great challenge for sustainable urban development in China, especially in developed urban area in the coastal regions; therefore, there is an urgent need to effectively detect and monitor the land use changes and provide accurate and timely information for planning and management. In this study a method combining principal component analysis (PCA) of multiseusor satellite images from SPOT (systeme pour l'observation de la terre or earth observation satellite)-5 muttispectral (XS) and Landsat-7 enhanced thematic mapper (ETM) panchromatic (PAN) data, and supervised classification was used to detect and analyze the dynamics of land use changes in the city proper of Hangzhou. The overall accuracy of the land use change detection was 90.67% and Kappa index was 0.89. The results indicated that there was a considerable land use change (10.03% of the total area) in the study area from 2001 to 2003, with three major types of land use conversions: from cropland into bnilt-up land, construction site, and water area (fish pond). Changes from orchard land into built-up land were also detected. The method described in this study is feasible and useful for detecting rapid land use change in the urban area.

  8. Serial Analysis of Ten Precipitation-Based Indices by Land Use in Semiarid Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Rodríguez-Moreno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Open ecosystems in Mexico are under increasing pressure, due particularly to the expansion of cities and agricultural activities. These developments occur without integrating biodiversity concerns in land use planning and result in extensive fragmentation and transformation of the landscapes. The semiarid region of Mesa Central was characterized using ten precipitation-based indices. Using multivariate statistical and geostatistical spatial analysis techniques, the influence of those indices on five land use strata was explored. Land use analysis indicated that the maximum values of the five significant precipitation-based indices were found in Grasslands, Agricultural Use, and Shrubs; minimum values were characteristic of substrates Secondary Desert Vegetation and Other Use. Our results suggest that the greatest number of extreme precipitation events is likely to occur in open ecosystems and consequently will have a strong influence on landscaping and land use. The semivariogram analysis and geostatistical layers demand attention from research institutions, policy makers, researchers, and food producers to take the appropriate and coordinated actions to propose scenarios to deal with climate change. Perhaps this study can stimulate thought concerning research endeavours aimed at promoting initiatives for biodiversity conservation and planning programs for climate change mitigation.

  9. Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

  10. Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

  11. A trend analysis of global fire activity. Is it land use or climate the main driver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistinas, Ioannis; Oom, Duarte; Silva, Joao M. N.; Lopez-Saldaña, Gerardo; Pereira, Jose M. C.

    2016-04-01

    We perform a global trend analysis of active fire counts at 0.5o spatial resolution, using 156 months (January 2001 - December 2013) of MODIS Climate Modelling Grid data (TERRA). We use the Contextual Mann-Kendall (CMK) test to assess the statistical significance at cell level and found that 13% of the global land area displays statistically significant active fire count trends, with a slight predominance of negative trends (50.63% of the total significant cells). We perform the same trend analysis with the unexplained variability (residuals) between active fires and the Fire Weather Index (FWI) that is used as a proxy for climate. There is agreement between the main patterns from the trend analysis coming from the residuals and the active fire trends, implying that the main contemporary fire trends are not climate driven. Spatially coherent patches with significant trends were found in all continents (with the obvious exception of Antarctica). The majority of significant trends occur in areas of high fire incidence, and both increasing and decreasing trends appear to be associated with land use change processes. The analysis reveals large negative trends at the Sahel and between Russia and Kazakhstan, whereas a massive and coherent positive trend appears in southeastern Asia. Smaller patches of positive trends appear in southeastern United States and in Mexico, as well as in Brazil and between Argentina and Paraguay, and in Asia in India. There are also negative trends in Brazil, Argentina and in Australia. The study highlights the land use activities as the main driver of these trends, but also the need for data driven analyses and longer time series for future studies in order to gain better knowledge on fire occurrence.

  12. Facility Safety Plan B360 Complex CMLS-411r0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G

    2007-01-08

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) policy is that all operations must be planned and performed safely for the protection of workers, the public, the environment, and limit possible loss to property, facilities and equipment assigned to this directorate. In addition to observing LLNL policies contained in the ''Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Manual'', LLNL workers will comply with applicable federal, state, and local regulations when conducting any activity that the Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences (CMLS) Directorate has managerial control or oversight. Management has determined that the safety controls specified within this Facility Safety Plan (FSP) must also be followed to ensure that the operation is successfully performed efficiently and safely within this facility. Any operations conducted in this Complex that involve activities not commonly performed by the public require an Integration Work Sheet (IWS) or IWS/Safety Plan (IWS/SP) that specifically assesses the responsibilities, hazards and controls to conduct the operation safely. Everyone who enters this area (including students, workers, visitors, and consultants) must follow the applicable requirements in this FSP. Each person is expected to protect himself/herself and others from injury or illness. Regular facility occupants are expected to guide and govern visitors and assist new or temporary occupants in understanding and following this plan. When there are any doubts regarding the safety of any phase of work, workers and others will check with the facility manager. Changes to this FSP will be approved by the Facility Associate Director (AD). This will undergo triennial review to establish, at a minimum, that its contents are appropriate and adequate for current operations. The Hazards Control ES&H Team assists management in instituting and maintaining a minimum-risk and environmentally sound work environment

  13. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA{reg_sign} canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA{reg_sign}, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities.

  14. WRF Simulation over the Eastern Africa by use of Land Surface Initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwa, V. N.; Case, J.; Limaye, A. S.; Zavodsky, B.; Kabuchanga, E. S.; Mungai, J.

    2014-12-01

    The East Africa region experiences severe weather events associated with hazards of varying magnitude. It receives heavy precipitation which leads to wide spread flooding and lack of sufficient rainfall in some parts results into drought. Cases of flooding and drought are two key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Service (KMS). The source of heat and moisture depends on the state of the land surface which interacts with the boundary layer of the atmosphere to produce excessive precipitation or lack of it that leads to severe drought. The development and evolution of precipitation systems are affected by heat and moisture fluxes from the land surface within weakly-sheared environments, such as in the tropics and sub-tropics. These heat and moisture fluxes during the day can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content. Therefore, it is important to represent the land surface state as accurately as possible in numerical weather prediction models. Improved modeling capabilities within the region have the potential to enhance forecast guidance in support of daily operations and high-impact weather over East Africa. KMS currently runs a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in real time to support its daily forecasting operations, invoking the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) dynamical core. They make use of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / National Weather Service Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) to manage and produce the WRF-NMM model runs on a 7-km regional grid over Eastern Africa.SPoRT and SERVIR provide land surface initialization datasets and model verification tool. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) provide real-time, daily soil initialization data in place of interpolated Global Forecast System soil moisture and temperature data. Model verification is done using the Model Evaluation Tools (MET) package, in order

  15. Land use planning in the Netherlands; finding a balance between rural development and protection of the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Vlist, M.J. [Department of Physical Planning and Rural Development, Agricultural University Wageningen, Generaal Foulkesweg 13, Wageningen 6703 BJ (Netherlands)

    1998-06-15

    In the Netherlands rural development is subjected to several forms of planning. Three planning systems exist: spatial planning, environmental planning and water management. However, the origins of these systems cannot be found in problems of rural development, but in the problems of urbanization and industrialization. The planning systems can be seen as reactions to different aspects of these societal processes. The physical environment of rural areas as a joint object of planning is a new phenomenon. Integrating rural development and the problems linked to it such as nonpoint pollution by agriculture, in the systems of planning, mentioned before, turned out to be a difficult task. New regional strategies emerged to tackle this problem: ammonia reduction plans and the blue-knit strategy. Both strategies offer an interesting perspective in finding a balance between rural development and protection of the physical environment

  16. Planning quality analysis from the perspective of land use%基于土地利用视角的土地利用总体规划质量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵源; 黄成敏

    2013-01-01

    土地利用总体规划是一项全局性和战略性的工作,其质量好坏,不仅关系着土地资源能否得到合理利用,还关系着经济社会的可持续发展.本研究从土地利用视角出发,建立了土地利用与规划效果之间的经验联系,提出由土地利用形态、土地利用结构、土地利用行为、土地利用程度、土地利用功能和土地利用布局6方面内容所组成的分析体系.在此基础上综合评价规划质量,并以四川省乐山市金口河区为例,对其新近编制完成的县级土地利用总体规划质量进行了评判.结果表明,该规划的质量等级为优,符合土地利用目标要求,能够促进区域土地资源的优化配置.本研究旨在利用此种方法,为土地利用总体规划管理实践提供一定的方法支撑,切实提高规划的编制质量和实施效果.%Land use planning is generally a strategic process.The quality of land use planning directly influences the rational use of land resources and the sustainability of socio-economic development.Current studies have focused mainly on the external effects of land use planning such as comprehensive benefits and environmental impacts,while ignoring the inherited attributes and characteristics of land use.This study in fact showed that even such evaluation studies were incomplete.The empirical relationship between land use and planning was established from the perspective of land use in this paper.A 6-aspect analytical framework was constructed for evaluating land use plan.The aspects of the framework included whether or not (1) land use form was stable; (2) land use structure was rational; (3) land use behavior was orderly; (4) land use degree was changeable; (5) land use function was improvable; and (6) land use layout was reasonable.Based on this 6-aspect framework,a comprehensive evaluation system was proposed and applied to a newly completed general land use planning in Jinkouhe District,Leshan City

  17. SENSING URBAN LAND-USE PATTERNS BY INTEGRATING GOOGLE TENSORFLOW AND SCENE-CLASSIFICATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid progress of China’s urbanization, research on the automatic detection of land-use patterns in Chinese cities is of substantial importance. Deep learning is an effective method to extract image features. To take advantage of the deep-learning method in detecting urban land-use patterns, we applied a transfer-learning-based remote-sensing image approach to extract and classify features. Using the Google Tensorflow framework, a powerful convolution neural network (CNN library was created. First, the transferred model was previously trained on ImageNet, one of the largest object-image data sets, to fully develop the model’s ability to generate feature vectors of standard remote-sensing land-cover data sets (UC Merced and WHU-SIRI. Then, a random-forest-based classifier was constructed and trained on these generated vectors to classify the actual urban land-use pattern on the scale of traffic analysis zones (TAZs. To avoid the multi-scale effect of remote-sensing imagery, a large random patch (LRP method was used. The proposed method could efficiently obtain acceptable accuracy (OA = 0.794, Kappa = 0.737 for the study area. In addition, the results show that the proposed method can effectively overcome the multi-scale effect that occurs in urban land-use classification at the irregular land-parcel level. The proposed method can help planners monitor dynamic urban land use and evaluate the impact of urban-planning schemes.

  18. Integration and use of Microgravity Research Facility: Lessons learned by the crystals by vapor transport experiment and Space Experiments Facility programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizer, Barbara L.

    1992-01-01

    The Crystals by Vapor Transport Experiment (CVTE) and Space Experiments Facility (SEF) are materials processing facilities designed and built for use on the Space Shuttle mid deck. The CVTE was built as a commercial facility owned by the Boeing Company. The SEF was built under contract to the UAH Center for Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). Both facilities include up to three furnaces capable of reaching 850 C minimum, stand-alone electronics and software, and independent cooling control. In addition, the CVTE includes a dedicated stowage locker for cameras, a laptop computer, and other ancillary equipment. Both systems are designed to fly in a Middeck Accommodations Rack (MAR), though the SEF is currently being integrated into a Spacehab rack. The CVTE hardware includes two transparent furnaces capable of achieving temperatures in the 850 to 870 C range. The transparent feature allows scientists/astronauts to directly observe and affect crystal growth both on the ground and in space. Cameras mounted to the rack provide photodocumentation of the crystal growth. The basic design of the furnace allows for modification to accommodate techniques other than vapor crystal growth. Early in the CVTE program, the decision was made to assign a principal scientist to develop the experiment plan, affect the hardware/software design, run the ground and flight research effort, and interface with the scientific community. The principal scientist is responsible to the program manager and is a critical member of the engineering development team. As a result of this decision, the hardware/experiment requirements were established in such a way as to balance the engineering and science demands on the equipment. Program schedules for hardware development, experiment definition and material selection, flight operations development and crew training, both ground support and astronauts, were all planned and carried out with the understanding that the success of the program science

  19. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  20. Relationship of the Ben Franklin Dam Alternative to Water and Land Uses, Plans, Policies, and Controls for the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    at Hanford ? c) Would the dam introduce hydraulic or seismic problems relevant to underground waste repository siting? An analysis for DOE by C.H...FINAL controls for the Hanford Reach of the Columbia 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) 9. PERFORMING...Identify by block number) A HANFORD REACH LAND USE COLUNBIA RIVER ENVIRONNENTAL IMPACT WASHINGTON (STATE) BEN FRANKLIN DAM SIL AWTNAnW (Oinemu iM Mem

  1. Land Use and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    The overall purpose of this training session is to familiarize Central American project cooperators with the remote sensing and image processing research that is being conducted by the NASA research team and to acquaint them with the data products being produced in the areas of Land Cover and Land Use Change and carbon modeling under the NASA SERVIR project. The training session, therefore, will be both informative and practical in nature. Specifically, the course will focus on the physics of remote sensing, various satellite and airborne sensors (Landsat, MODIS, IKONOS, Star-3i), processing techniques, and commercial off the shelf image processing software.

  2. Increase of geodiversity by historical land use in the Maashorst area (SE-Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, J. M.; Seijmonsbergen, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Maashorst area (SW Netherlands) is part of an extensive region in Northwestern Europe underlain by predominantly Late Glacial aeolian coversand deposits. The natural geodiversity was determined by the characteristic elements of coversand geomorphology (ridges and planes) and the western Peel fault (horst and graben). The geodiversity should increase by the impact of (pre)historical land management on soils and landforms. Regional deforestation, mainly related to forest grazing and shifting cultivation, started in the Neolithic. The main impact on the landscape was degradation of umbric to carbic podzols and of deciduous forest to heaths on well drained land surfaces. On valley bottoms and in geomorphological depressions, soil wetting was responsible for the transformation of umbric gleysols to histic gleysols or even histosols. The introduction of sedentary agriculture started in the Bronze Age around 1000 BC without more impact on landscape properties than continuing soil acidification and forest degradation. In fact, no drastic environmental changes have been registered till the end of the 10th century. Commercial clear cutting of forest during the 11th - 13th century resulted in the first major extension of driftsand landscapes. During this time, land use was dominated by shallow stable agriculture. Farmers, using the heath for the production of organic manure, had to introduce management measures to protect the heath land and to stabilize the environmental disaster, sand drifting caused by clear cutting. The introduction of the deep stable agriculture in the middle of the 18th century resulted in degradation of heath. Farmers started with digging sods of the humic topsoil. These form of plaggen manure included a mineral fraction and caused the accumulation of plaggic deposits on arable land. The practices of the deep stable agriculture ended around 1900 AD by the introduction of chemical fertilizers and urban compost. The heath lands lost their production

  3. Planning Considerations for a Mars Sample Receiving Facility: Summary and Interpretation of Three Design Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, David W.; Allen, Carlton C.; Bass, Deborah S.; Buxbaum, Karen L.; Campbell, James K.; Lindstrom, David J.; Miller, Sylvia L.; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.

    2009-10-01

    It has been widely understood for many years that an essential component of a Mars Sample Return mission is a Sample Receiving Facility (SRF). The purpose of such a facility would be to take delivery of the flight hardware that lands on Earth, open the spacecraft and extract the sample container and samples, and conduct an agreed-upon test protocol, while ensuring strict containment and contamination control of the samples while in the SRF. Any samples that are found to be non-hazardous (or are rendered non-hazardous by sterilization) would then be transferred to long-term curation. Although the general concept of an SRF is relatively straightforward, there has been considerable discussion about implementation planning. The Mars Exploration Program carried out an analysis of the attributes of an SRF to establish its scope, including minimum size and functionality, budgetary requirements (capital cost, operating costs, cost profile), and development schedule. The approach was to arrange for three independent design studies, each led by an architectural design firm, and compare the results. While there were many design elements in common identified by each study team, there were significant differences in the way human operators were to interact with the systems. In aggregate, the design studies provided insight into the attributes of a future SRF and the complex factors to consider for future programmatic planning.

  4. Planning considerations for a Mars Sample Receiving Facility: summary and interpretation of three design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, David W; Allen, Carlton C; Bass, Deborah S; Buxbaum, Karen L; Campbell, James K; Lindstrom, David J; Miller, Sylvia L; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A

    2009-10-01

    It has been widely understood for many years that an essential component of a Mars Sample Return mission is a Sample Receiving Facility (SRF). The purpose of such a facility would be to take delivery of the flight hardware that lands on Earth, open the spacecraft and extract the sample container and samples, and conduct an agreed-upon test protocol, while ensuring strict containment and contamination control of the samples while in the SRF. Any samples that are found to be non-hazardous (or are rendered non-hazardous by sterilization) would then be transferred to long-term curation. Although the general concept of an SRF is relatively straightforward, there has been considerable discussion about implementation planning. The Mars Exploration Program carried out an analysis of the attributes of an SRF to establish its scope, including minimum size and functionality, budgetary requirements (capital cost, operating costs, cost profile), and development schedule. The approach was to arrange for three independent design studies, each led by an architectural design firm, and compare the results. While there were many design elements in common identified by each study team, there were significant differences in the way human operators were to interact with the systems. In aggregate, the design studies provided insight into the attributes of a future SRF and the complex factors to consider for future programmatic planning.

  5. Simulating Land-Use Change using an Agent-Based Land Transaction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, M. M.; van Dijk, J.; Alam, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    obviously an important driver for nature expansion, but without a strict zoning plan imposed by a government, it is difficult to achieve a continuous, defragmented nature area. Lastly, the model suggests that with time the trend in ever-increasing farm sizes is gradually levelling out. The decision rules that determine the behaviours of the individual agents in the model (selling land, buying land, or none of the two) are calibrated on historical census records, using multi-nominal logistic regression. Because estimating who will sell and who will buy can only be done with a limited certainty, our model reproduces the volatility / uncertainty in who will do what and when. This makes that each specific future scenario can have numerous realizations of reality. Our stakeholders (including, besides policy makers, also local farmers and nature organizations) indicate that this aspect of the model strongly contributes to its credibility. Nevertheless, within different scenarios certain (spatial) trends are distinguishable, so that the model is -besides credible - also useful for exploring future trends.

  6. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  7. San Juan National Forest Land Management Planning Support System (LMPSS) requirements definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, L. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The role of remote sensing data as it relates to a three-component land management planning system (geographic information, data base management, and planning model) can be understood only when user requirements are known. Personnel at the San Juan National Forest in southwestern Colorado were interviewed to determine data needs for managing and monitoring timber, rangelands, wildlife, fisheries, soils, water, geology and recreation facilities. While all the information required for land management planning cannot be obtained using remote sensing techniques, valuable information can be provided for the geographic information system. A wide range of sensors such as small and large format cameras, synthetic aperture radar, and LANDSAT data should be utilized. Because of the detail and accuracy required, high altitude color infrared photography should serve as the baseline data base and be supplemented and updated with data from the other sensors.

  8. Lands with Wilderness Characteristics, Resource Management Plan Constraints, and Land Exchanges: Cross-Jurisdictional Management and Impacts on Unconventional Fuel Development in Utah's Uinta Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Robert [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ruple, John [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Holt, Rebecca [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Tanana, Heather [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); McNeally, Phoebe [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Tribby, Clavin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - Allowance for Facilities Planning and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowance under § 35.2025 for facilities planning and design. The Step 2+3, Step 3 and Step 7 grant... reimburse the grantee for costs actually incurred for facilities planning or design. Rather, the allowance... for Facilities Planning and Design Building cost Allowance as a percentage of building cost* $100,000...

  10. Planning as a learning process : a strategy for planning land use programmes at local level with special reference to the uplands of Java

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, van den, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Introduction

    The challenge for land use management in the nineties is to initiate a people- centered development process which creates opportunities for local people to make their own choices about which development strategy to follow. This need is felt in particular for upland areas where government initiated blue- print programmes for land use management have a record of failure. The major reason is that these programmes are often no...

  11. 24 CFR 960.205 - Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... information from drug treatment facility. 960.205 Section 960.205 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Admission § 960.205 Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility. (a) Purpose. This section addresses a PHA's authority to request and obtain information from drug abuse...

  12. Recycling Facilities - Mine Drainage Treatment/Land Recycling Project Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Mine Drainage Treatment/Land Reclamation Locations are clean-up projects that are working to eliminate some form of abandoned mine. The following sub-facility types...

  13. Quantifying uncertainty in urban flooding analysis caused by the combined effect of climate and land use change scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.-W. Jung

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available How will the combined impacts of land use change and climate change influence changes in urban flood frequency and what is the main uncertainty source of the results? We attempt to answer to these questions in two catchments with different degrees of urbanization, the Fanno catchment with 84% urban land use and the Johnson catchment with 36% urban land use, both located in the Pacific Northwest of the US. Five uncertainty sources – general circulation model (GCM structures, future greenhouse gas (GHG emission scenarios, land use change scenarios, natural variability, and hydrologic model parameters – are considered to compare the relative source of uncertainty in flood frequency projections. Two land use change scenarios conservation and development, representing possible future land use changes are used for analysis. Results show the highest increase in flood frequency under the combination of medium high GHG emission (A1B and development scenarios, and the lowest increase under the combination of low GHG emission (B1 and conservation scenarios. Although the combined impact is more significant to flood frequency change than individual scenarios, it does not linearly increase flood frequency. Changes in flood frequency are more sensitive to climate change than land use change in the two catchments for 2050s (2040–2069. Shorter term flood frequency change, 2 and 5 year floods, is highly affected by GCM structure, while longer term flood frequency change above 25 year floods is dominated by natural variability. Projected flood frequency changes more significantly in Johnson creek than Fanno creek. This result indicates that, under expected climate change conditions, an adaptive urban planning based on the conservation scenario could be more effective in less developed Johnson catchment than in the already developed Fanno catchment.

  14. The connection between long-term and short-term risk management strategies for flood and landslide hazards: examples from land-use planning and emergency management in four European case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenger-Berninghoff, K.; Cortes, V. J.; Sprague, T.; Aye, Z. C.; Greiving, S.; Głowacki, W.; Sterlacchini, S.

    2014-12-01

    Adaptation to complex and unforeseen events requires enhancing the links between planning and preparedness phases to reduce future risks in the most efficient way. In this context, the legal-administrative and cultural context has to be taken into account. This is why four case study areas of the CHANGES1 project (Nehoiu Valley in Romania, Ubaye Valley in France, Val Canale in Italy, and Wieprzówka catchment in Poland) serve as examples to highlight currently implemented risk management strategies for land-use planning and emergency preparedness. The focus is particularly on flood and landslide hazards. The strategies described in this paper were identified by means of exploratory and informal interviews in each study site. Results reveal that a dearth or, in very few cases, a weak link exists between spatial planners and emergency managers. Management strategies could benefit from formally intensifying coordination and cooperation between emergency services and spatial planning authorities. Moreover, limited financial funds urge for a more efficient use of resources and better coordination towards long-term activities. The research indicates potential benefits to establishing or, in some cases, strengthening this link through contextual changes, e.g., in organizational or administrative structures, that facilitate proper interaction between risk management and spatial planning. It also provides suggestions for further development in the form of information and decision support systems as a key connection point. 1 Marie Curie ITN CHANGES - Changing Hydro-meteorological Risks as Analyzed by a New Generation of European Scientists

  15. Cities as selective land predators? A lesson on urban growth, deregulated planning and sprawl containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantoni, Andrea; Grigoriadis, Efstathios; Sateriano, Adele; Venanzoni, Giuseppe; Salvati, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates changes in the use of land caused by the expansion of an informal city in the Mediterranean region (Athens, Greece) and it proposes a simplified methodology to assess selective land take at the scale of municipalities. The amount of land take over twenty years (1987-2007) for cropland, sparsely vegetated areas and natural land was compared with the surface area of the respective class at the beginning of the study period (1987). Indicators of selective land take by class were correlated with socioeconomic indicators at the scale of municipalities to verify the influence of the local context and the impact of urban planning on land take processes. Evidence indicates that urban expansion into fringe land consumes primarily cropland and sparse vegetation in the case of the Athens' metropolitan region. Cropland and sparse vegetation were consumed proportionally more than the respective availability in 16 municipalities out of 60. Agricultural land take was positively correlated with population density and growth rate, rate of participation to the job market and road density. Sparse vegetation land take was observed in municipalities with predominance of high density settlements. As a result of second-home expansion in coastal municipalities, natural land was converted to urban use in proportion to the availability in the landscape. Urban planning seems to have a limited impact on selective land take.

  16. 土地利用规划环境影响评价研究%Research on impact assessment of land use planning environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慎甫

    2016-01-01

    This paper discussed the significance of land use planning environmental assessment,analyzed the connotation of land use planning en-vironmental assessment,from the environment problems,land use planning types,space systems and other aspects,put forward the basic princi-ples of evaluation content selection,helpful to improve the land utilization,realized the economic,social and environmental benefit maximization.%论述了土地利用规划环境评价的意义,分析了进行土地利用规划环境评价的内涵,从环境问题、土地规划类型、空间体系等方面,提出了选择评价内容的基本原则,有利于提高土地的利用率,实现经济、社会、环境效益的最大化.

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant land management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    On October 30, 1992, the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act became law. This Act transferred the responsibility for the management of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WILWA) from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of Energy. In accordance with sections 3(a)(1) and (3) of the Act, these lands {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}are withdrawn from all forms of entry, appropriation, and disposal under the public land laws{hor_ellipsis}{close_quotes}and are reserved for the use of the Secretary of Energy {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}for the construction, experimentation, operation, repair and maintenance, disposal, shutdown, monitoring, decommissioning, and other activities, associated with the purposes of WIPP as set forth in the Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Act of 1980 and this Act.{close_quotes}. As a complement to this LMP, a MOU has been executed between the DOE and the BLM, as required by section 4(d) of the Act. The state of New Mexico was consulted in the development of the MOU and the associated Statement of Work (SOW).

  18. Land use effects on climate in China as simulated by a regional climate model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO XueJie; ZHANG DongFeng; CHEN ZhongXin; J.S.PAL; F. GIORGI

    2007-01-01

    A regional climate model (RegCM3)nested within ERA40 re-analyzed data is used to investigate the climate effects of land use change over China. Two 15-year simulations (1987-2001),one with current land use and the other with potential vegetation cover without human intervention, are conducted for a domain encompassing China. The climate impacts of land use change are assessed from the difference between the two simulations. Results show that the current land use (modified by anthropogenic activities) influences local climate as simulated by the model through the reinforcement of the monsoon circulation in both the winter and summer seasons and through changes of the surface energy budget. In winter. Land use change leads to reduced precipitation and decreased surface air temperature south of the Yangtze River, and increased precipitation north of the Yangtze River. Land use change significantly affects summer climate in southern China, yielding increased precipitation over the region, decreased temperature along the Yangtze River and increased temperature in the South China area (south-end of China).In summer, a reduction of precipitation over northern China and a temperature rise over Northwest China are also simulated. Both daily maximum and minimum temperatures are affected in the simulations. In general, the current land use in China leads to enhanced mean annual precipitation and decreased annual temperature over south China along with decreased precipitation over North China.

  19. Land use effects on climate in China as simulated by a regional climate model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.PAL; F.GIORGI

    2007-01-01

    A regional climate model (RegCM3) nested within ERA40 re-analyzed data is used to investigate the climate effects of land use change over China. Two 15-year simulations (1987―2001), one with current land use and the other with potential vegetation cover without human intervention, are conducted for a domain encompassing China. The climate impacts of land use change are assessed from the difference between the two simulations. Results show that the current land use (modified by anthropogenic ac- tivities) influences local climate as simulated by the model through the reinforcement of the monsoon circulation in both the winter and summer seasons and through changes of the surface energy budget. In winter, land use change leads to reduced precipitation and decreased surface air temperature south of the Yangtze River, and increased precipitation north of the Yangtze River. Land use change signifi- cantly affects summer climate in southern China, yielding increased precipitation over the region, de- creased temperature along the Yangtze River and increased temperature in the South China area (south-end of China). In summer, a reduction of precipitation over northern China and a temperature rise over Northwest China are also simulated. Both daily maximum and minimum temperatures are affected in the simulations. In general, the current land use in China leads to enhanced mean annual precipitation and decreased annual temperature over south China along with decreased precipitation over North China.

  20. 77 FR 12792 - Notice of Forest Service Land Management Plans To Be Amended To Incorporate Greater Sage-Grouse...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Incorporate Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Measures AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice, Request... statements to incorporate greater sage-grouse conservation measures into land use plans and land management... related to the greater sage-grouse planning effort by any of the following methods: Rocky Mountain...

  1. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy facilities... affected public and private parties will be involved in the planning process. ...

  2. Prediction of land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam, using multifactorial correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thinh Hong Phi; Ludmila Aleksandrovna Strokova

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial correlation analysis is a new method used to predict the land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation. This article introduces and applies the method to establish the function of the surface settlement rate (Vs) and the function of the time-dependent surface settlement (St) caused by groundwater exploitation, based on data acquired at three land subsidence monitoring stations in the Hanoi area of Vietnam. Comparison with actual monitoring data indicates that the prediction results are relatively close to the monitoring data. From this, we conclude that multifactorial correlation analysis is a reliable method and can be used to predict future land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi.

  3. Land Use Changes in Northeast China Driven by Human Activities and Climatic Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zongming; LIU Zhiming; SONG Kaishan; ZHANG Bai; ZHANG Sumei; LIU Dianwei; REN Chunying; YANG Fei

    2009-01-01

    Human-induced land use/cover change (LUCC) forms an important component of global environmental change. Therefore, it is important to study land use/cover and its change at local, regional and global scales. In this pa-per we conducted the study of land use change in Northeast China, one of the most important agricultural zones of the nation. From 1986 to 2000, according to the study results obtained from Landsat images, widespread changes in land use/cover took place in the study area. Grassland, marsh, water body and woodland decreased by 9864, 3973, 1367 and 10,052km2, respectively. By comparison, paddy field, dry farmland, and built-up land expanded by 7339, 17193 and 700km2, respectively. Those changes bore an interactive relationship with the environment, especially climate change.On the one hand, climate warming created a potential environment for grassland and marsh to be changed to farmland as more crops could thrive in the warmer climate, and for dry farmland to paddy field. On the other hand, the changed surface cover modified the local climate. Those changes, in turn, have adversely influenced the local environment by accelerating land degradation. In terms of socio-economie driving forces, population augment, regional economic de-velopment, and national and provincial policies were confirmed as main driving factors for land use change.

  4. Public Lands, Other, This would include all counties owned by Chippewa County that are not Forest or Park. Most lands obtained through tax deed., Published in 2013, Not Applicable scale, Chippewa County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Public Lands, Other dataset current as of 2013. This would include all counties owned by Chippewa County that are not Forest or Park. Most lands obtained through tax...

  5. Evaluation of surface properties and atmospheric disturbances caused by post-dam alterations of land use/land cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemichael, A. T.; Hossain, F.; Pielke, R., Sr.

    2014-09-01

    This study adopted a differential land-use/land-cover (LULC) analysis to evaluate dam-triggered land-atmosphere interactions for a number of LULC scenarios. Two specific questions were addressed: (1) can dam-triggered LULC heterogeneities modify surface and energy budget, which, in turn, change regional convergence and precipitation patterns? (2) How extensive is the modification in surface moisture and energy budget altered by dam-triggered LULC changes occurring in different climate and terrain features? The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 6.0) was set up for two climatologically and topographically contrasting regions: the American River watershed (ARW), located in California, and the Owyhee River watershed (ORW), located in eastern Oregon. For the selected atmospheric river precipitation event of 29 December 1996 to 3 January 1997, simulations of three pre-defined LULC scenarios are performed. The definition of the scenarios are (1) the "control" scenario, representing the contemporary land use, (2) the "pre-dam" scenario, representing the natural landscape before the construction of the dams and (3) the "non-irrigation" scenario, representing the condition where previously irrigated landscape in the control is transformed to the nearby land-use type. Results indicated that the ARW energy and moisture fluxes were more extensively affected by dam-induced changes in LULC than the ORW. Both regions, however, displayed commonalities in the modification of land-atmosphere processes due to LULC changes, with the control-non-irrigation scenario creating more change than the control-pre-dam scenarios. These commonalities were: (1) the combination of a decrease in temperature (up to 0.15 °C) and an increase at dew point (up to 0.25 °C) was observed; (2) there was a larger fraction of energy partitioned to latent heat flux (up to 10 W m-2) that increased the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere and resulted in a larger convective available

  6. Evaluation of surface properties and atmospheric disturbances caused by post-dam alterations of land-use/land-cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemichael, A. T.; Hossain, F.; Pielke, R., Sr.

    2014-05-01

    This study adopted a differential land-use/land-cover (LULC) analysis to evaluate dam-triggered land-atmosphere interactions for a number of LULC scenarios. Two specific questions were addressed: (1) can dam-triggered LULC heterogeneities modify surface and energy budget which, in turn, change regional convergence and precipitation patterns? and (2) how extensive is the modification in surface moisture and energy budget altered by dam-triggered LULC changes occurring in different climate and terrain features? The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 6.0) was set up for two climatologically and topographically contrasting regions: the American River Watershed (ARW) located in California and the Owyhee River Watershed (ORW) located in eastern Oregon. For the selected atmospheric river precipitation event of 29 December 1996 to 3 January 1997, simulations of three pre-defined LULC scenarios are performed. The definition of the scenarios are: (1) the control scenario representing the contemporary land-use, (2) the pre-dam scenario representing the natural landscape before the construction of the dams and (3) the non-irrigation scenario representing the condition where previously irrigated landscape in the control is transformed to the nearby land-use type. Results indicated that the ARW energy and moisture fluxes were more extensively affected by dam-induced changes in LULC than the ORW. Both regions, however, displayed commonalities in the modification of land-atmosphere processes due to LULC changes, with the control-non-irrigation scenario creating more change than the control-pre-dam scenarios. These commonalities were: (1) the combination of a decrease in temperature (up to 0.15 °C) and an increase in dewpoint (up to 0.25 °C) was observed, (2) there was a larger fraction of energy partitioned to latent heat flux (up to 10 W m-2) that increased the amount of water vapor to the atmosphere and resulted in a larger convective available potential

  7. Planning for long, wide conservation corridors on private lands in the Oak Ridges Moraine, Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, Graham S; Eagles, Paul F J

    2007-06-01

    We explored the role of conservation biology in the planning of a natural-heritage system that includes long, wide conservation corridors situated primarily on private lands, and established to connect natural core areas in the Oak Ridges Moraine of Ontario, Canada. We based our review on government documents, semi-structured interviews with participants involved in this land-use planning process, and our involvement with the issue from 1990 through 2002. Conservation biology had a major influence on the outcome of the land-use planning process for this moraine. The landform was identified as an area of value by the environmental movement within the context of a number of ongoing government studies that began in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Conservation biologists and planners in government, the environmental movement, and the private sector carried out work related to conservation biology, including inventories and the development and application of criteria for the delineation of core areas and conservation corridors. Once the political timing was favorable (2001-2002), decision makers linked the science of conservation biology to planning policies and law in Ontario. The Oak Ridges Moraine land-use planning process was precedent setting in Canada, and possibly internationally. To our knowledge this is the first time long, wide conservation corridors on private lands were regulated through land-use-planning legislation and led to restrictions on urban development and aggregate resource extraction.

  8. Neutralization of potential land mine hazards by abrasive waterjet use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David A.; Fossey, Robert D.; Thompson, S. J.

    1998-09-01

    A method of neutralizing landmines in which the integrity of the surrounding terrain is retained is herein described. High pressure waterjets which can be used to detect the presence of landmines can then be used to remove the soil and other cover in a plane immediately adjacent to and around the mine so that the side of the mine can be visually inspected through a remote television camera. At that time the flow of water is channeled through a line in which small particles of sand are added to the waterjet which is at a pressure of between 3,000 and 10,000 psi depending on the device which is used. Jet flow rates are on the order of 5 gpm depending on the nozzle configuration used. By bringing this abrasive stream in along a lateral plane through the mine it is possible to intersect, and neutralize, the fusing systems most likely to be used to initiate the charge, in a single pass. At higher flow rates, as the cut is made the jet will generate significant turbulence in the mine body, sufficient to remove a considerable quantity of the explosive which is resident within the mine at the same time as the mine is being dissected. The precision of cut achievable is shown by the longitudinal cutting into two parts of live detonators, as well as representative mine bodies.

  9. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-29

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  10. 40 CFR 49.10711 - Federal Implementation Plan for the Astaris-Idaho LLC Facility (formerly owned by FMC Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dressed with crushed slag or not), or other non-mobile permanent surface. (B) The digging of solid slag in..., unavoidable breakdown of technology, beyond the control of the owner or operator of the Astaris-Idaho facility... control technology to be implemented at the source along with an analysis of alternative...

  11. Historical review of the use of motorized vehicles on lands administered by Izembek Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to review and describe the historical use of motorized vehicles within lands administered by the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, with...

  12. Land Competition and Land-Use Change:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vongvisouk, Thoumthone

    are affecting livelihoods in northern Laos. The research engages a range of approaches, theories and concepts, including political ecology, polycentric resource governance, land-change science, regime shifts in land systems, land sparing versus land sharing, and the sustainable livelihood framework. During...... software. Quantitative data was compiled in a Microsoft Access database and analyzed in Excel. Land-use and livelihood changes are taking place rapidly in the study sites. Overall, land-use change underwent transformation away from subsistence shifting cultivation to cash crops, intensive agriculture......, and industrial tree plantations but shifting cultivation still remains an important land-use system. Land conversion from shifting cultivation for subsistence to commercial crops is most clearly seen in areas with good infrastructure (e.g. road network). This conversion is partly in response to market demands...

  13. GEO-ECOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION WITH OIL PRODUCTS EMITTED BY RAILROAD FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senyushchenkova Irina Mikhaylovna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Linear railroad facilities have been producing an adverse impact on the environment by polluting it with oil products for an extensive period of time. The authors of the article consider several mechanisms of contamination and the pattern of its spread into soils. Currently, areas that used to be unsuitable for development as urban lands for geological or environmental reasons are now being intensively developed. The study is exemplified by a city outstretched onto the complex terrain. Complex topography contemplates geological, tectonics-related, hydrological conditions, exogenous processes and anthropogenic factors. In this connection, the main purpose of the study is to analyze the geo-ecological factors that impact urban lands in complex geo-morphological conditions with a view to their functional use against minimal environmental risks to assure the most favorable conditions for humans. Towards this end, the authors have applied the following theoretical and practical methods of research, including a pilot study, namely (1 the geomorphological analysis of urban lands, (2 the monitoring and analysis of the anthropogenic impact produced onto various constituents of the environment, and (3 development of methods of functional use of urban lands in complex geomorphological conditions. The authors have monitored contaminated lands to develop their recommendations for their development in complex geomorphological conditions, namely: 1. Urban development planning should be performed with consideration for the geomorphological elements taken as a whole, as they are closely connected to one another. 2. Selection of methods of rehabilitation of urban lands must be preceded by the zoning of the territory based on its geological and environmental properties.

  14. Drivers of land cover and land use changes in St. Louis metropolitan area over the past 40 years characterized by remote sensing and census population data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaitijiang, Maitiniyazi; Ghulam, Abduwasit; Sandoval, J. S. Onésimo; Maimaitiyiming, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we explored the spatial and temporal patterns of land cover and land use (LCLU) and population change dynamics in the St. Louis Metropolitan Statistical Area. The goal of this paper was to quantify the drivers of LCLU using long-term Landsat data from 1972 to 2010. First, we produced LCLU maps by using Landsat images from 1972, 1982, 1990, 2000, and 2010. Next, tract level population data of 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2010 were converted to 1-km square grid cells. Then, the LCLU maps were integrated with basic grid cell data to represent the proportion of each land cover category within a grid cell area. Finally, the proportional land cover maps and population census data were combined to investigate the relationship between land cover and population change based on grid cells using Pearson's correlation coefficient, ordinary least square (OLS), and local level geographically weighted regression (GWR). Land cover changes in terms of the percentage of area affected and rates of change were compared with population census data with a focus on the analysis of the spatial-temporal dynamics of urban growth patterns. The correlation coefficients of land cover categories and population changes were calculated for two decadal intervals between 1970 and 2010. Our results showed a causal relationship between LCLU changes and population dynamics over the last 40 years. Urban sprawl was positively correlated with population change. However, the relationship was not linear over space and time. Spatial heterogeneity and variations in the relationship demonstrate that urban sprawl was positively correlated with population changes in suburban area and negatively correlated in urban core and inner suburban area of the St. Louis Metropolitan Statistical Area. These results suggest that the imagery reflects processes of urban growth, inner-city decline, population migration, and social spatial inequality. The implications provide guidance for sustainable urban

  15. 1st or 2nd generation bioethanol-impacts of technology integration & on feed production and land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Niclas Scott; Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    with the poorest bio synthesis efficiency and as such the area demand for their production is relatively high. Preservation of the proteins in the biomass such as in feed by-products from bioethanol production is of paramount importance in developing sustainable utilisation of biomass in the energy sector......."1st or 2nd generation bioethanol-impacts of technology integration & on feed production and land use" Liquid bio fuels are perceived as a means of mitigating CO2 emissions from transport and thus climate change, but much concern has been raised to the energy consumption from refining biomass...... to liquid fuels. Integrating technologies such that waste stream can be used will reduce energy consumption in the production of bioethanol from wheat. We show that the integration of bio refining and combined heat an power generation reduces process energy requirements with 30-40 % and makes bioethanol...

  16. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  17. Landform transformation on the urban fringe of Bangkok: the need to review land-use planning processes with consideration of the flow of fill materials to developing areas

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Y.; Thaitakoo, D.; Takeuchi,K.

    2008-01-01

    For large Asian cities situated on deltaic lowlands, landform transformation is essential for both agrarian and urban development. Understanding landform transformation processes and patterns is important for landscape planning in areas of mixed urban–rural land use on the periphery of these cities. We examined landform transformation processes and patterns in Bangkok at three scales: (1) meso-scale quantitative landform analysis on the urban fringe of Bangkok using aerial photograph interpre...

  18. Trends in land use and land cover change in the protected and communal areas of the Zambezi Region, Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwi, Jonathan Mutau; Kaetsch, Christoph; Graz, Friedrich Patric; Chirwa, Paxie; Manda, Samuel

    2017-05-01

    Land management decisions have extensively modified land use and land cover in the Zambezi Region. These decisions are influenced by land tenure classifications, legislation, and livelihoods. Land use and land cover change is an important indicator for quantifying the effectiveness of different land management strategies. However, there has been no evidence on whether protected or communal land tenure is more affected by land use and land cover changes in southern Africa and particularly Namibia. Our study attempted to fill this gap by analyzing the relationship between land use and land cover change and land tenure regimes stratified according to protected and communal area in the Zambezi Region. Multi-temporal Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery were used to determine the temporal dynamics of land use and land cover change from 1984 to 2010. The landscape showed distinctive modifications over the study period; broad trends include the increase in forest land after 1991. However, changes were not uniform across the study areas. Two landscape development stages were deduced: (1) 1984-1991 represented high deforestation and gradual increase in shrub land; (2) 1991-2000 and 2000-2010 represented lower deforestation and slower agropastoral expansion. The results further show clear patterns of the dynamics, magnitude, and direction of land use and land cover change by tenure regime. The study concluded that land tenure has a direct impact on land use and land cover, since it may restrict some activities carried out on the land in the Zambezi Region.

  19. Sustainability of Land Use Promoted by Construction-to-Ecological Land Conversion: A Case Study of Shenzhen City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Peng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization and rapid urban growth present great challenges to the sustainable utilization of land resources. This paper discusses the on-going process of construction-to-ecological land conversion (CELC in terms of three aspects: land use, environmental effects, and system responses. CELC is compared to other current land conversion strategies in China. Taking Shenzhen City as an example, this paper introduces five areas in which CELC has been implemented since 2009, including basic farmland protection zones, mining areas, ecological corridors, inefficient industrial zones, and urban villages. This paper argues that Shenzhen’s CELC model can improve the ecological environment, control urban sprawl, and promote sustainable land use and, thus, serve as an example for other cities in China.

  20. Spatial variability of the Rotterdam urban heat island as influenced by urban land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, Bert G.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Hove, L. W. A.; Jacobs, C. M. J.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Novel bicycle traverse meteorological measurements were made in Rotterdam to assess the spatial variation of temperature during a tropical day. Nocturnal spatial urban temperature differences of 7 K were found to be related to city morphology. During midday measurements, the downtown was up to 1.2 K warmer than the surrounding rural area while a city park was 4.0 K cooler than downtown. A regression analysis showed that the nocturnal measured urban heat island (UHI) can be linked to land use, namely vegetation, built-up area, and water and is most significant for vegetation. From the traverse observation data, a multiple linear regression model was constructed and independently validated with 3 year summertime UHI statistics derived from four urban fixed meteorological stations and two fixed rural stations. Wind rose analysis shows that UHI is strongest from easterly directions and that the temperature signal of the WMO station is influenced from urban directions. A regression model reproduced the nighttime spatial variability of the UHI within a fractional bias of 4.3% and was used to derive an UHI map of Rotterdam and surroundings. This map shows that high-density urban configurations lacking greenery or close to large water bodies are vulnerable to high nocturnal temperatures during heat waves. The UHI map can be used as a valuable planning tool for mitigating nocturnal urban heat stress or identifying neighborhoods at risk during heat waves.

  1. UNESCO World Heritage Site Hallstatt: Rockfall hazard and risk assessment as basis for a sustainable land-use planning- a case study from the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzner, Sandra; Mölk, Michael; Schiffer, Michael; Gasperl, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In times of decreasing financial resources, the demand for the investment in protection measures with a positive return on investment is of high importance. Hazard and risk assessments are essential tools in order to ensure an economically justifiable application of money in the implementation of preventive measures. Many areas in the Eastern Alps are recurrently affected by rockfall processes which pose a significant hazard to settlements and infrastructures. Complex tectonic, lithological and geomorphologic settings require a sufficient amount of effort to map and collect high quality data to perform a reliable hazard and risk analysis. The present work summarizes the results of a detailed hazard and risk assessment performed in a community in the Northern Calcareous Alps (Upper Austroalpine Unit). The community Hallstatt is exposed to very steep limestone cliffs, which are highly susceptible towards future, in many parts high magnitude rock failures. The analysis of the record of former events shows that since 1652 several rockfall events damaged or destroyed houses and killed or injured some people. Hallstatt as a Unesco World Heritage Site represents a very vulnerable settlement, the risk being elevated by a high frequency tourism with greater one million visitors per year. Discussion will focus on the applied methods to identify and map the rockfall hazard and risk, including a magnitude-frequency analysis of events in the past and an extrapolation in the future as well as a vulnerability analysis for the existing infrastructure under the assumed events for the determined magnitude-frequency scenarios. Furthermore challenges for a decision making in terms of a sustainable land use planning and implementation of preventive measures will be discussed.

  2. Developing land use scenario dynamics model by the integration of system dynamics model and cellular automata model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Chunyang; SHI; Peijun; CHEN; Jin; Li; Xiaobing; PAN; Ya

    2005-01-01

    Modeling land use scenario changes and its potential impacts on the structure and function of the ecosystem in the typical regions are helpful to understanding the interactive mechanism between land use system and ecological system. A Land Use Scenario Dynamics (LUSD) model by the integration of System Dynamics (SD) model and Cellular Automata (CA) model is developed with land use scenario changes in northern China in the next 20 years simulated in this paper. The basic idea of LUSD model is to simulate the land use scenario demands by using SD model at first, then allocate the land use scenario patterns at the local scale with the considerations of land use suitability, inheritance ability and neighborhood effect by using CA model to satisfy the balance between land use scenario demands and supply. The application of LUSD model in northern China suggests that the model has the ability to reflect the complex behavior of land use system at different scales to some extent and is a useful tool for assessing the potential impacts of land use system on ecological system. In addition, the simulated results also indicate that obvious land use changes will take place in the farming-pastoral zone of northern China in the next 20 years with cultivated land and urban land being the most active land use types.

  3. Capo Verde, Land Use Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This series of three-period land use land cover (LULC) datasets (1975, 2000, and 2013) aids in monitoring change in West Africa’s land resources (exception is...

  4. Land Management and Means of Planning Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents an overall understanding of the Land Management Paradigm for Sustainable Development. It is argued that such an understanding is important for facilitating a holistic approach to the management of land, properties, and natural resources being the key assets of any nation...... the historical and cultural developments of the European countries. Finally, the paper presents a short overview of the Danish approach to planning and landuse management as an example of a planning led approach placing the decision-making power especially at the local level. This concept of decentralization...... comprises a finely tuned relationship between a strong national authority and autonomous municipal councils. The purpose is to solve the tasks at the lowest possible level so as to combine responsibility for decision-making with accountability for financial, social, and environmental consequences. To put...

  5. Land Management and Means of Planning Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    the historical and cultural developments of the European countries. Finally, the paper presents a short overview of the Danish approach to planning and landuse management as an example of a planning led approach placing the decision-making power especially at the local level. This concept of decentralization......The paper presents an overall understanding of the Land Management Paradigm for Sustainable Development. It is argued that such an understanding is important for facilitating a holistic approach to the management of land, properties, and natural resources being the key assets of any nation...... comprises a finely tuned relationship between a strong national authority and autonomous municipal councils. The purpose is to solve the tasks at the lowest possible level so as to combine responsibility for decision-making with accountability for financial, social, and environmental consequences. To put...

  6. Spatial patterns of urban land use growth in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using digitized land use maps of Beijing in 1982, 1992 and 1997 and employing GIS spatial analysis techniques, this paper conducts an empirical study on the spatial differentiation and spatial patterns of urban land use growth in Beijing in the period of 1982-1997. It is observed that urban land use growth in Beijing went beyond the control of urban planning, in terms of the extraordinary high growth rate and undesired spatial pattern. The rate of urban expansion after 1982, which was predominated by growth of industrial land, was extraordinary high compared to its historical period. While its growth centers have been actively shifting toward the northern part, rather than toward the southern and eastern parts as designated by the latest General Plan (1991-2010) of Beijing, its spatial pattern of urban land use growth in general was in distinct concentric sprawl, which seriously violated the General Plan of Beijing.

  7. Multiple Natural Hazards Assessment and Comparison to Planned Land Use in an Andean Touristic Site within the Riskscape Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Jaque Castillo, Edilia

    2017-04-01

    The Andes of central Chile are a natural environment characterized by multiple natural hazards (mass movements, volcanic hazards, seismic hazards, snow avalanches to name a few). The totality of these hazards, according to the notion of Müller-Mahn et al. an in relation to vulnerable entities, spans a riskscape. Spatial planning should take this riskscape into account in order to ensure a save an resilient regional development. However, as frequently observed in developing or newly developed countries, such precaution measures are only hardly realized. Spatial planing tends to be reactive to private inversion, opportunistic and frequently clientelistic. This results in spatial structures whose future development is vulnerable to natural disasters. The contribution analyses these circumstances within a riskscape in central Chile. Within the VIII. Region, close to the volcanic complex Nevados de Chillan, a touristic development around a Hotel for winter sports is established. However, the place is affected by a multitude of natural hazards. The contribution, on the basis of primary and secondary data, first provides hazard maps for several natural hazards. Secondly, the individual hazard maps are merged to an overall hazard map. This overall hazard map is related to the vulnerable entities to span a riskscape. The vulnerable entities are settlements, but also tourist infrastructures. Then, the contribution compares how a precautions spatial planning could have avoided putting vulnerable entities at risk, which spatial structure - especially regarding tourism - is actually found and which challenges for spatial development do exist. It reveals that the most important tourist infrastructures are found particularly at places, characterized by a high overall hazard. Furthermore, it will show that alternatives at economically equally attractive sites, but with a much smaller overall hazard, would have existed. It concludes by discussing possible reasons for this by

  8. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Riparian Buffer Land Cover by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of different land cover types within 15- and 50-meters of hydrologically connected streams, rivers, and other water...

  9. Urban land grab or fair urbanization? : Compulsory land acquisition and sustainable livelihoods in Hue, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Quang, P.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization often goes hand in hand with a growing demand for housing, urban infrastructure and other facilities that are necessary for sustainable urban development. This has created numerous pressures on land, especially in peri-urban areas where land, traditionally used for agriculture, is still

  10. Urban land grab or fair urbanization? : Compulsory land acquisition and sustainable livelihoods in Hue, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Quang, P.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization often goes hand in hand with a growing demand for housing, urban infrastructure and other facilities that are necessary for sustainable urban development. This has created numerous pressures on land, especially in peri-urban areas where land, traditionally used for agriculture, is still

  11. The emergence of urban land use patterns driven by dispersion and aggregation mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Decraene

    Full Text Available We employ a cellular-automata to reconstruct the land use patterns of cities that we characterize by two measures of spatial heterogeneity: (a a variant of spatial entropy, which measures the spread of residential, business, and industrial activity sectors, and (b an index of dissimilarity, which quantifies the degree of spatial mixing of these land use activity parcels. A minimalist and bottom-up approach is adopted that utilizes a limited set of three parameters which represent the forces which determine the extent to which each of these sectors spatially aggregate into clusters. The dispersion degrees of the land uses are governed by a fixed pre-specified power-law distribution based on empirical observations in other cities. Our method is then used to reconstruct land use patterns for the city state of Singapore and a selection of North American cities. We demonstrate the emergence of land use patterns that exhibit comparable visual features to the actual city maps defining our case studies whilst sharing similar spatial characteristics. Our work provides a complementary approach to other measures of urban spatial structure that differentiate cities by their land use patterns resulting from bottom-up dispersion and aggregation processes.

  12. 77 FR 44144 - National Forest System Land Management Planning; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... Forest Service 36 CFR Part 219 RIN 0596-AD02 National Forest System Land Management Planning; Correction...) published a National Forest System land management planning rule in the Federal Register, on April 9, 2012..., Subpart A--National Forest System Land Management Planning (36 CFR part 219, subpart A). One technical...

  13. 25 CFR 170.403 - What IRR Program funds can be used for transportation planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... planning? 170.403 Section 170.403 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads Program Facilities Transportation Planning § 170.403 What IRR Program funds can be used for transportation...

  14. Federal Facility Security: Staffing Approaches Used by Selected Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    those employed within the real estate industry ($29,110), casino hotels ($27,830), and amusement parks ($26,340). Compared with unarmed security guards...the use of security guards and experience in changing a security workforce, among other criteria . The selected agencies and private sector firms are...Smithsonian); and • Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We selected these agencies based on several criteria , including dispersed geographic

  15. Land Competition and Land-Use Change:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vongvisouk, Thoumthone

    software. Quantitative data was compiled in a Microsoft Access database and analyzed in Excel. Land-use and livelihood changes are taking place rapidly in the study sites. Overall, land-use change underwent transformation away from subsistence shifting cultivation to cash crops, intensive agriculture......Land competition and land-use changes are taking place in many developing countries as the demand for land increases. These changes are leading to changes in the livelihood conditions of rural people. The Government of Laos (GoL), on the one hand, aims to increase forest protection. On the other......, and industrial tree plantations but shifting cultivation still remains an important land-use system. Land conversion from shifting cultivation for subsistence to commercial crops is most clearly seen in areas with good infrastructure (e.g. road network). This conversion is partly in response to market demands...

  16. Optimization of Map Compilation for County-level Land Consolidation Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on practice of the land consolidation planning in Changfeng County of Hefei City,taking full account of reality of land consolidation and its significance as livelihood project,we analyzed map compilation procedure.In combination with actual effect of land consolidation,we carried out consolidation assessment of same elements by overall planning method,and optimized the map compilation for county-level land consolidation planning.Results show that planning map of land consolidation potential is to be improved and legends should be merged.After consolidation of legends,it is convenient to apply in potential planning map and solve complicated problem of reading maps.

  17. Joint accessibility design: framework developed with practitioners to integrate land use and transport planning in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatemeier, T.; Bertolini, L.

    2008-01-01

    In both the scientific and the professional communities, the need to integrate transport and land use policies to achieve more sustainable mobility patterns is widely recognized. Three challenges to attaining integrated strategies are identified. The first challenge is to find a common language and

  18. 76 FR 40390 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Land Use Plan Amendment, Environmental Impact Statement and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... Centro Field Office, 1661 S. 4th Street, El Centro, California 92243. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... resources, cultural resources, water resources, geological resources and hazards, land use, noise... scoping meetings in El Centro and Ocotillo, California, on January 5th and 6th, 2011, respectively. The...

  19. Contingency planning for nuclear plants: an approach for use in industrial plants and hazardous products storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Werneck de, E-mail: paulo@pwerneck.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil); Hora, Antonio Ferreira da, E-mail: dahora@vm.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is establishing a basic system model for the development of contingency plans for emergencies. This includes the identification of agents involved in aid and assistance planning, pointing out communication chains among them, the delegation of action coordination and control, as well as the composition and structure of crisis centers equipped with physical and technological resources, the development of emergency procedures, the training of the teams involved, drill planning, and a policy for interactions with community members and the media in the course of a crisis. This paper aims at proposing actions in case an emergency affects the surroundings areas to the accident site. The outlined propositions are not to be adopted only under nuclear or radiological emergencies, since Brazil has specific legislation for this purpose, as established in the Brazilian Nuclear Program Protection System (SIPRON), in addition to the structures and contingency plans currently implemented, validated and periodically tested. (author)

  20. Quantifying the heat flux regulation of metropolitan land use/land cover components by coupling remote sensing modeling with in situ measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wenhui; Dou, Yinyin; Zhang, Chi; Chi, Wenfeng; Liu, Ailin; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Renhua; Liu, Jiyuan

    2015-01-01

    the effects of urban land use/land cover with regard to surface radiation and heat flux regulation is important to ecological planning and heat stress mitigation. To retrieve the spatial pattern of heat fluxes in the Beijing metropolitan area, China, a remote sensing-based energy balance model was calibrated with synchronously measured energy fluxes including net radiation, latent heat flux (LE), and sensible heat flux (H). Our model calibration approach avoided the uncertainties due to subjective judgments in previous empirical parameterization methods. The land surface temperature (LST), H, and Bowen ratio (β) of Beijing were found to increase along the outskirt-suburban-urban gradient, with strong spatial variation. LST and H were negatively correlated with vegetation fraction cover (VFC). For example, the modern high-rise residential areas with relatively higher VFC had lower H and β than the traditional low-rise residential areas. Our findings that indicate thermal dissipation through vegetation transpiration might play an important role in urban heat regulation. Notably, the thermal dissipating strength of vegetation (calculated as LE/VFC) declined exponentially with increased VFC. For the purpose of heat stress regulation, we recommend upgrading the traditional low-rise residential areas to modern high-rise residential areas and focusing urban greenery projects in areas whose VFC < 0.1, where the heat regulating service by urban vegetation could be twice as effective as in other places.

  1. Impact of Land Use Change over North America as simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, A.; Sushama, L.; Beltrami, H.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the biogeophysical impacts of human-induced land cover change, particularly crops, on the regional climate of North America, using the fifth generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5). To this effect, two simulations are performed with CRCM5 with different land cover datasets - one corresponding to the potential vegetation (i.e. without land use change) and the other corresponding to current land use. Most of the land use changes are concentrated over the US mid-west and south-central Canada, where forests and grasses have been replaced by crops. This transformation changes the surface parameters, particularly vegetation fractional area, leaf area index, albedo, roughness length and rooting depth among other variables, in the regions where land cover change takes place in these simulations. Both simulations span the 1988-2012 period and are driven by ERA-Interim at the lateral boundaries. The sea surface temperature and sea ice cover that vary inter-annually are also taken from ERA-Interim. Results suggest that regions where forests/grasses were replaced by crops generally show increases in albedo, particularly during the spring, fall and winter seasons, with the increase in albedo being largest for winter. This higher increase in albedo during winter is due to a snow-mediated positive feedback. The increased albedo values during winter, spring and fall are reflected in the cooler 2 meter temperature obtained in the simulation with land use change, compared to that with potential vegetation. Some cooling is observed in the summer for the simulation with land use change, mostly due to the increased latent heat fluxes. Increases in precipitation are noted for these regions, but are not statistically significant.

  2. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for K area spent fuel storage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunacek, G.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400. 1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in WHC-EP-0438-1, A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the second revision to the original annual report. Long-range integrity ofthe effluent monitoring systenu shall be ensured with updates of this report whenever a new process or oper&ion introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimwn of every three years.

  4. 25 CFR 170.405 - Can tribal transportation planning funds be used for road construction and other projects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads Program Facilities Transportation Planning § 170.405 Can tribal transportation planning... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can tribal transportation planning funds be used for road...

  5. The Statistical Significance Test of Regional Climate Change Caused by Land Use and Land Cover Variation in West China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hanjie; SHI Weilai; CHEN Xiaohong

    2006-01-01

    The West Development Policy being implemented in China is causing significant land use and land cover (LULC) changes in West China. With the up-to-date satellite database of the Global Land Cover Characteristics Database (GLCCD) that characterizes the lower boundary conditions, the regional climate model RIEMS-TEA is used to simulate possible impacts of the significant LULC variation. The model was run for five continuous three-month periods from 1 June to 1 September of 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997, and the results of the five groups are examined by means of a student t-test to identify the statistical significance of regional climate variation. The main results are: (1) The regional climate is affected by the LULC variation because the equilibrium of water and heat transfer in the air-vegetation interface is changed. (2) The integrated impact of the LULC variation on regional climate is not only limited to West China where the LULC varies, but also to some areas in the model domain where the LULC does not vary at all. (3) The East Asian monsoon system and its vertical structure are adjusted by the large scale LULC variation in western China, where the consequences are the enhancement of the westward water vapor transfer from the east oast and the relevant increase of wet-hydrostatic energy in the middle-upper atmospheric layers. (4) The ecological engineering in West China affects significantly the regional climate in Northwest China, North China and the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River; there are obvious effects in South, Northeast, and Southwest China, but minor effects in Tibet.

  6. Climate or land-use change? Complexities in the attribution of trends in river flow records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, S.; Murphy, C.; Noone, S.; Wilby, R. L.; Hall, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uncertainty associated with projections of regional climate change and the challenge of developing adaptation responses are heightening interest in trend detection from observations. In many studies, attribution of detected trends in river flow has been based on the assessment of correlations with large scale modes of climate variability, with too little emphasis being placed on understanding non-climatic changes within the catchment. The River Boyne in Ireland has been cited as exhibiting a climate driven increase in river flows associated with a shift towards positive anomalies in the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) from the mid to late 1970s. However, metadata suggests that the catchment was subjected to extensive arterial drainage during the period 1969-86. This was installed to improve land drainage and reduce the frequency/ extent of overland flooding, particularly through river straightening and channel deepening, complicating the attribution of change linked to climatic drivers. This study uses river flow records from the pre-drainage period along with meteorological data to calibrate conceptual rainfall runoff models in order to reconstruct continuous flow series spanning the pre- and post-drainage eras. Model parameter and structure uncertainties were explored via a suite of conceptually and structurally diverse models. Archival rainfall records dating from the late 1800s were used to further extend the flow series. Reconstructed flows are analyzed for both monotonic and step changes using a variety of statistical tests. Emphasis is placed on a moving windows approach to assess the evolution of trends throughout the reconstructed series. Our results show that the variability of trends (direction, magnitude and significance) is heavily dependent on the choice of record start and end dates. Rather than being associated with a change point in the NAOI, the mid 1970s step change is shown to coincide with the documented changes in arterial drainage

  7. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  8. A grey multi-objective programming approach for sustainable land-use in the Miyun Reservoir Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Huai-cheng; ZHANG Zhen-xing; YU Yong

    2004-01-01

    Miyun Reservoir is the most important water source to Beijing City. Land-use of the basin plays a great role in the protection of water resources. Hence a sustainable land-use planning is required to optimize land-use structure and protect water resources in the basin. Based on the complete land-use system analysis in Miyun, a grey multi-objective programming to basin land-use(GMOPBLU)model was developed and applied to land-use planning. Two alternatives were produced and analyzed by means of interactive adjustment and scenario analysis. The results showed the GMOPBLU model is a valuable approach for basin land-use planning.

  9. Optimalisasi Alokasi Penggunaan Lahan di Sub DAS Ambang: Pendekatan Analitikal Hirarki Proses dan Goal Programming (Optimalization of Land Use Planning in Ambang Sub-Watershed: Analytical Hierarchy Process and Goal Programming Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresno Agus Hendarto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The purpose of land use planning on a river basin or a watershed is "to promote the accomplishment of service wide objectives and targets" subject to the lands potential and the public's desires. This paper aimed to describe a representative formulation of the analitical hierarchi process and linear programming application and show how it may be modified for goal programming. The purposive sampling was used to collect primary data. From five persons were represented each stakeholders on a watershed. The secondary data was collected from the report of each stakeholders and internet. The results show that goal programing had generated considerable interest as a tool for land use planning in multiple goal situations. It does present problems in terms of somewhat difficult data requirements-linearity in its usual form, possible inferior solutions, and lack of explicit recognition of tradeoffs. Keywords:  ambang watershed, linear program, analytical hierarchy process, goal programming, land use planning

  10. 76 FR 70162 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for a Possible Land Use Plan Amendment To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... public land laws, including the mining laws, except the sale provisions of the FLPMA. The segregative... fisheries, land and realty, hydrology, soils, sociology and economics. Native American Tribal...

  11. Land use change modelling: current practice and research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Schot, P.; Dijst, M.J.; Veldkamp, A.

    2004-01-01

    Land use change models are tools to support the analysis of the causes and consequences of land use dynamics. Scenario analysis with land use models can support land use planning and policy. Numerous land use models are available, developed from different disciplinary backgrounds. This paper reviews

  12. Project summary plan for HTGR recycle reference facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, B.J.

    1979-11-01

    A summary plan is introduced for completing conceptual definition of an HTGR Recycle Reference Facility (HRRF). The plan describes a generic project management concept, often referred to as the requirements approach to systems engineering. The plan begins with reference flow sheets and provides for the progressive evolution of HRRF requirements and definition through feasibility, preconceptual, and conceptual phases. The plan lays end-to-end all the important activities and elements to be treated during each phase of design. Identified activities and elements are further supported by technical guideline documents, which describe methodology, needed terminology, and where relevant a worked example.

  13. Planning as a learning process : a strategy for planning land use programmes at local level with special reference to the uplands of Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduction

    The challenge for land use management in the nineties is to initiate a people- centered development process which creates opportunities for local people to make their own choices about which development strategy to follow. This n

  14. Planning as a learning process. A strategy for planning land use programmes at local level with special reference to the uplands of Java.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den A.I.

    1992-01-01

    IntroductionThe challenge for land use management in the nineties is to initiate a people- centered development process which creates opportunities for local people to make their own choices about which development strategy to follow. This need is felt in particular for upland areas

  15. Planning as a learning process : a strategy for planning land use programmes at local level with special reference to the uplands of Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduction

    The challenge for land use management in the nineties is to initiate a people- centered development process which creates opportunities for local people to make their own choices about which development strategy to follow. This

  16. Measuring the Externality Effects of Commercial Land Use on Residential Land Value: A Case Study of Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two contrasting theories purport to explain the effects of neighborhood non-residential use on residential property values. In traditional zoning theory, separating land from commercial land use is considered to protect residential environments from negative externalities such as noise, litter, and congestion. By contrast, contemporary planning principles including Smart Growth emphasize positive impacts of mixed land use on residential environment, which lead to more walkable and sustainable communities. This study attempts to empirically investigate how positive and negative externalities of commercial land use, referred to as “proximity effects” and “disamenity effects” respectively, affect residential land values. Using data gathered in Seoul, we pay attention to two particular aspects of commercial land use: spatial concentration and neighborhood scale. Spatial concentration is determined by the number of commercial employees present in the buffer zone around an individual residential parcel. We model four geographically distinct neighborhood scales as we compare spatial concentrations in and across commercial zones. Quadratic regression analyses of our data show the trade-off relationship that a higher spatial concentration of commercial land use in a neighborhood initially results in increased residential land values, but drops off beyond a threshold level by excessive noise or crowding.

  17. Historical Carbon Dioxide Emissions Caused by Land-Use Changes are Possibly Larger than Assumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Sitch, S.; Pongratz, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Ciais, P.; Poulter, B.; Bayer, A. D.; Bondeau, A.; Calle, L.; Chini, L. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 20% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The overall magnitude of this sink is constrained by the difference between emissions, the rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the ocean sink. However, the land sink is actually composed of two largely counteracting fluxes that are poorly quantified: fluxes from land-use change andCO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic global vegetation model simulations suggest that CO2 emissions from land-use change have been substantially underestimated because processes such as tree harvesting and land clearing from shifting cultivation have not been considered. As the overall terrestrial sink is constrained, a larger net flux as a result of land-use change implies that terrestrial uptake of CO2 is also larger, and that terrestrial ecosystems might have greater potential to sequester carbon in the future. Consequently, reforestation projects and efforts to avoid further deforestation could represent important mitigation pathways, with co-benefits for biodiversity. It is unclear whether a larger land carbon sink can be reconciled with our current understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. Our possible underestimation of the historical residual terrestrial carbon sink adds further uncertainty to our capacity to predict the future of terrestrial carbon uptake and losses.

  18. Historical carbon dioxide emissions caused by land-use changes are possibly larger than assumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Sitch, S.; Pongratz, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Ciais, P.; Poulter, B.; Bayer, A. D.; Bondeau, A.; Calle, L.; Chini, L. P.; Gasser, T.; Fader, M.; Friedlingstein, P.; Kato, E.; Li, W.; Lindeskog, M.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Robertson, E.; Viovy, N.; Yue, C.; Zaehle, S.

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 20% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The overall magnitude of this sink is constrained by the difference between emissions, the rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the ocean sink. However, the land sink is actually composed of two largely counteracting fluxes that are poorly quantified: fluxes from land-use change and CO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic global vegetation model simulations suggest that CO2 emissions from land-use change have been substantially underestimated because processes such as tree harvesting and land clearing from shifting cultivation have not been considered. As the overall terrestrial sink is constrained, a larger net flux as a result of land-use change implies that terrestrial uptake of CO2 is also larger, and that terrestrial ecosystems might have greater potential to sequester carbon in the future. Consequently, reforestation projects and efforts to avoid further deforestation could represent important mitigation pathways, with co-benefits for biodiversity. It is unclear whether a larger land carbon sink can be reconciled with our current understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. Our possible underestimation of the historical residual terrestrial carbon sink adds further uncertainty to our capacity to predict the future of terrestrial carbon uptake and losses.

  19. Analyzing the performance of the planning system by use of AAPM TG 119 test cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, L; Raj, N Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar; Pandey, Manish Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to create AAPM TG 119 test plans for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the Monaco planning system. The results were compared with the published studies, and the performance of the Monaco planning system was analyzed. AAPM TG 119 proposed a set of test cases called multi-target, mock prostate, mock head and neck and C-shape to ascertain the overall accuracy of IMRT planning, measurement, and analysis. We used these test cases to investigate the performance of the Monaco planning system for the complex plans. For these test cases, we created IMRT plans with static multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and dynamic MLC by using 7-9 static beams as explained in TG-119. VMAT plans were also created with a 320° arc length and a single or double arc. The planning objectives and dose were set as described in TG 119. The dose prescriptions for multi-target, mock prostate, mock head and neck, and C-shape were taken as 50, 75.6, 50 and 50 Gy, respectively. All plans were compared with the results of TG 119 and the study done by Mynampati et al. Point dose and fluence measurements were done with a CC13 chamber and ArcCHECK phantom, respectively. Gamma analysis was done for the calculated and measured dose. Using the Monaco planning system, we achieved the goals mentioned in AAPM TG-119, and the plans were comparable to those of other studies. A comparison of point dose and fluence showed good results. From these results, we conclude that the performance of the Monaco planning system is good for complex plans.

  20. A Comparative Study of Land Cover Classification by Using Multispectral and Texture Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Qadri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to find out the importance of machine vision approach for the classification of five types of land cover data such as bare land, desert rangeland, green pasture, fertile cultivated land, and Sutlej river land. A novel spectra-statistical framework is designed to classify the subjective land cover data types accurately. Multispectral data of these land covers were acquired by using a handheld device named multispectral radiometer in the form of five spectral bands (blue, green, red, near infrared, and shortwave infrared while texture data were acquired with a digital camera by the transformation of acquired images into 229 texture features for each image. The most discriminant 30 features of each image were obtained by integrating the three statistical features selection techniques such as Fisher, Probability of Error plus Average Correlation, and Mutual Information (F + PA + MI. Selected texture data clustering was verified by nonlinear discriminant analysis while linear discriminant analysis approach was applied for multispectral data. For classification, the texture and multispectral data were deployed to artificial neural network (ANN: n-class. By implementing a cross validation method (80-20, we received an accuracy of 91.332% for texture data and 96.40% for multispectral data, respectively.