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Sample records for planktonic diatom ditylum

  1. Sexual reproduction in the marine centric diatom Ditylum brightwellii (Bacillariophyta)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koester, Julie A; Brawley, Susan H; Karp-Boss, Lee; Mann, David G

    2007-01-01

    Ditylum brightwellii (T. West) Grunow in Van Heurck is now a model organism for population genetic studies of marine phytoplankton, but observations of sexual reproduction in this species are sparse and there are...

  2. Interactions of algal ligands, metal complexation and availability, and cell responses of the diatom Ditylum brightwellii with a gradual increase in copper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijstenbil, J.W.; Gerringa, L.J.A.

    2002-01-01

    A continuous culture experiment was conducted to study interactions between copper-binding ligands released by light- limited Ditylum brightwellii, and toxic effects of Cu. on this diatom. Over 6 months, the Cu concentration in the medium has been increased in seven steps (3-173 nM). At each Cu. add

  3. Planktonic diatoms of Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinwand, Jerry F.

    1969-01-01

    The major species of diatoms in surface collections from Lake Ontario in September 1964 were Asterionella formosa, Fragilaria crotonensis, and Tabellaris fenestrata. Dominant species in the deep-water samples were Stephanodiscus astraea, S. astraea var. mintula, and F. crotonensis. The diatom flora in surface collections varied among several stations in the eastern end of the lake.

  4. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lazarus

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18O (climate and carbon cycle records (∂(13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2. Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all p<.001, but only weakly over the earlier Cenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  5. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18)O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂(13)C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all pplanktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  6. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂18O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p2 were only moderately higher than today. Diversity is strongly correlated to both ∂13C and pCO2 over the last 15 my (for both: r>.9, detrended r>.6, all prisk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  7. Arctic Diatoms - Diversity, Plankton Interactions and Poulation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammilehto, Anna

    are often dominated by diatoms. They are single-celled, eukaryotic algae, which play an essential role in ocean carbon and silica cycles. Many species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo produce a neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA), which can be transferred to higher levels in food webs causing amnesic...

  8. Plankton composition in the coastal waters between Jaigarh and Rajapur along west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.R.S.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, V.R.; Devassy, V.P.

    Diatoms dominated the phytoplankton population in the Konkan coastal waters. Rhizosolenia spp., Ceratulinia sp., Ditylum spp., Navicula sp. and Thalassiothrix spp. were the dominant diatoms observed in this area. Blue-green algae and flagellates...

  9. A novel type of colony formation in marine planktonic diatoms revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunčica Bosak

    Full Text Available Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM, we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8-100 nm are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6-1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0-2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the

  10. Competitive advantage and higher fitness in native populations of genetically structured planktonic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildever, Sirje; Sefbom, Josefin; Lips, Inga; Godhe, Anna

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that the planktonic diatom Skeletonema from neighbouring areas are genetically differentiated despite absence of physical dispersal barriers. We revisited two sites, Mariager Fjord and Kattegat, NE Atlantic, and isolated new strains. Microsatellite genotyping and F-statistics revealed that the populations were genetically differentiated. An experiment was designed to investigate if populations are locally adapted and have a native competitive advantage. Ten strains from each location were grown individually in native and foreign water to investigate differences in produced biomass. Additionally, we mixed six pairs, one strain from each site, and let them grow together in native and foreign water. Strains from Mariager Fjord and Kattegat produced higher biomass in native water. In the competition experiment, strains from both sites displayed higher relative abundance and demonstrated competitive advantage in their native water. The cause of the differentiated growth is unknown, but could possibly be attributed to differences in silica concentration or viruses in the two water types. Our data show that dispersal potential does not influence the genetic structure of the populations. We conclude that genetic adaptation has not been overruled by gene flow, but instead the responses to different selection conditions are enforcing the observed genetic structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dynamics of the marine planktonic diatom family Chaetocerotaceae in a Mediterranean coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Sunčica; Godrijan, Jelena; Šilović, Tina

    2016-10-01

    The planktonic diatoms belonging to two genera Chaetoceros and Bacteriastrum, included within the family Chaetocerotaceae, are ecologically important as they represent an important component of the phytoplankton in the coastal regions and are often among bloom-forming taxa. We analysed the chaetocerotacean species composition and abundances in the coastal area of northeastern Adriatic in a biweekly study conducted from September 2008 to October 2009 with the aim of investigating seasonal dynamics and species succession on a fine temporal scale and determining the most important ecological factors influencing their distribution. The study identified seven Chaetoceros and three Bacteriastrum species as major phytoplankton components showing the clear annual succession and two types of blooms (one species/multi species) governed by differing ecological conditions. Autumn bloom was composed of 20 chaetocerotacean species with Chaetoceros contortus and Chaetoceros vixvisibilis alternating in dominance. The summer period was characterized by spreading of freshwater from the Po River up to the eastern coast increasing availability of phosphate which triggered the monospecific Chaetoceros vixvisibilis bloom. We explained the chaetocerotacean dominant species succession pattern by the environmental parameters, with the temperature, salinity and phosphate availability as most important factors driving the species seasonality.

  12. Seasonal Variation in Abundance and Species Composition of a Planktonic Diatom Assemblage Including Viable Cells on the Bottom in Matsushima Bay, Northeastern Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ICHINOMIYA Mutsuo; TANIGUCHI Akira

    2003-01-01

    Seasonal variation in abundance and species composition of a planktonic diatom assemblage distributed in the water column and also settled on the bottom was investigated for the shallow coastal water in Matsushima Bay on the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan during the period from October 1999 to September 2000. A spring bloom of diatoms began in April when nutrient concentrations started to increase, indicating the importance of nutrients. Viable cells of Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira spp., which were the dominant species in the water column throughout the year, were also always abundant in the bottom sediment. Both populations in the water column and on the bottom fluctuated essentially in parallel.For the planktonic diatoms in shallow coastal waters to maintain their vegetative populations in the water column, it would be advantageous for them to have a seeding population of viable cells on the bottom that are easily resuspended into the upper photic layer.

  13. Planktonic diatoms of the Zuari estuary, Goa (west coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Redekar, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    number during premonsoon season was from 840 to 11400 /1. Minimum number of cells was recorded in May and maximum in February. During monsoon 1994 the total diatom ceil number varied from 20 to 1600 /1 with the minimum value being recorded in July...

  14. Effects of temperature on growth and lipid synthesis of diatom Chaetoceros Curvisetus and the Northern Adriatic (Mediteranean) plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Tihana; Gašparović, Blaženka; Godrijan, Jelena; Maric, Daniela; Djakovac, Tamara; Mlakar, Marina

    2017-04-01

    Phytoplankton is the major primary producer in the world. Marine phytoplankton lives in a rather changing environment, with variations in temperature, light, salinity, nutrient availability, etc. In such changing environment phytoplankton should live, grow and reproduce, and, in order to achieve that, they fix carbon and nutrients to produce biomolecules (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates). Lipids are a good indicator of organic matter (OM) processes in the seas and oceans, also good bioindicators for OM origin, and phytoplankton adaptations to environmental stress. Marine lipids are produced by organisms, mostly in phototrophic part of the seas and oceans, and their crucial producer is phytoplankton. We were interested to see how the increasing temperature and different nutrient availability affect quantitative and qualitative lipid and lipid classes production by plankton community. To test how marine phytoplankton would respond to predicted increasing temperature we conducted monoculture batch experiments in laboratory on model diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus at five different temperatures from 10 to 30C. Also we conducted experiments in phosphorous replete and deplete conditions mimicking eutrophic and oligotrophic marine conditions. We have chosen Chaetoceros curvisetus as a model culture since it is a major component of Northern Adriatic (NA) phytoplankton, but also Chaetoceros genus of diatoms is most abundant in wide range of marine ecosystems. We also conducted annual sampling of the NA particulate matter that covers the same temperature range as for the batch experiments. NA samples were taken on two stations with different nutrient supply that were characterized as oligotrophic and mesotrophic stations. Samples were taken from 2013 to 2014 on a monthly basis. Lipid classes were characterized with thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection. Data are supported by particulate organic carbon (POC), chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations and

  15. Composition of diatom communities and their contribution to plankton biomass in the naturally iron-fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, Marine; Leblanc, Karine; Armand, Leanne K; Christaki, Urania; Georges, Clément; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Quéguiner, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    In the naturally iron-fertilized surface waters of the northern Kerguelen Plateau region, the early spring diatom community composition and contribution to plankton carbon biomass were investigated and compared with the high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) surrounding waters. The large iron-induced blooms were dominated by small diatom species belonging to the genera Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) and Thalassiosira, which rapidly responded to the onset of favorable light-conditions in the meander of the Polar Front. In comparison, the iron-limited HNLC area was typically characterized by autotrophic nanoeukaryote-dominated communities and by larger and more heavily silicified diatom species (e.g. Fragilariopsis spp.). Our results support the hypothesis that diatoms are valuable vectors of carbon export to depth in naturally iron-fertilized systems of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our results corroborate observations of the exported diatom assemblage from a sediment trap deployed in the iron-fertilized area, whereby the dominant Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) cells were less efficiently exported than the less abundant, yet heavily silicified, cells of Thalassionema nitzschioides and Fragilariopsis kerguelensis Our observations emphasize the strong influence of species-specific diatom cell properties combined with trophic interactions on matter export efficiency, and illustrate the tight link between the specific composition of phytoplankton communities and the biogeochemical properties characterizing the study area.

  16. "Dinoflagellate Sterols" in marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, José-Luis; Wikfors, Gary H

    2011-10-01

    Sterol compositions for three diatom species, recently shown to contain sterols with side chains typically found in dinoflagellates, were determined by HPLC and ¹H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The centric diatom Triceratium dubium (=Biddulphia sp., CCMP 147) contained the highest percentage of 23-methylated sterols (37.2% (24R)-23-methylergosta-5,22-dienol), whereas the pennate diatom Delphineis sp. (CCMP 1095) contained the cyclopropyl sterol gorgosterol, as well as the 27-norsterol occelasterol. The sterol composition of Ditylum brightwellii (CCMP 358) was the most complex, containing Δ⁰- and Δ⁷-sterols, in addition to the predominant Δ⁵-sterols. A pair of previously unknown sterols, stigmasta-5,24,28-trienol and stigmasta-24,28-dienol, were detected in D. brightwellii and their structures were determined by NMR spectroscopic analysis and by synthesis of the former sterol from saringosterol. Also detected in D. brightwellii was the previously unknown 23-methylcholesta-7,22-dienol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of the nitrogen status on copper accumulation and pools of metal-binding peptides in the planktonic diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijstenbil, J.W.; Dehairs, F.; Ehrlich, R.; Wijnholds, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of the algal cellular nitrogen status on the defence against copper toxicity were studied in batch cultures of the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, grown in coastal seawater (Oosterschelde, SW Netherlands; 30 parts per thousand salinity). The media represented nutrient-poor (summer)

  18. Missouri River Environmental Inventory. Measurements of the Species Diversity of Planktonic and Microbenthic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    is distinctly unfavorable to plankton development. In fas; flowing streams only those forits which can attach themselves by a gelatinous mass or stalks...abundant diatom genera in the plankton samples collected during November, 1972. .. ................ 67 31. The two most abundant species of ciliates...flagellates in the plankton samples collected during November, 1972 .. .............. 69 33. The five most abundant diatom genera in the benthos samples

  19. Colloquium on diatom-copepod interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.; Ianora, A.; Miralto, A.;

    2005-01-01

    From 3 to 6 November 2002, a colloquium was convened at the Benthos Laboratory of the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn on Ischia, Italy, with the goal of evaluating the present status of the effects of diatoms on their main consumers, planktonic copepods, and to develop future research strategies...

  20. Arctic Diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammilehto, Anna

    are often dominated by diatoms. They are single-celled, eukaryotic algae, which play an essential role in ocean carbon and silica cycles. Many species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo produce a neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA), which can be transferred to higher levels in food webs causing amnesic...... as vectors for DA to higher levels in the arctic marine food web, posing a possible risk also to humans. DA production in P. seriata was, for the first time, found to be induced by chemical cues from C. finmarchicus, C. hyperboreus and copepodite stages C3 and C4, suggesting that DA may be related to defense...... against grazing. This thesis also quantified population genetic composition and changes of the diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus spring bloom using microsatellite markers. Diatom-dominated spring blooms in the Arctic are the key event of the year, providing the food web with fundamental pulses of organic...

  1. Comparison between sedimentary and living diatoms in Lago Maggiore (N. Italy: implications of using transfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona MUSAZZI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available We compared the recent history of living planktonic diatom assemblages in Lago Maggiore with the remains found in the topmost section of 14 sediment cores taken from the lake. Sediment samples showed a marked domination of planktonic taxa, but a significant proportion of benthic taxa was found in cores collected close to river mouths. Between-core variability in diatom assemblage and in diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentration was also estimated. The implications of our results for calibration data sets relating environmental variables to diatom assemblages are also discussed.

  2. Ecological composition and distribution of the diatoms from the Laguna Superior, Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ruiz, José Luis; Tapia-Garcia, Margarito; Licea, Sergio; Figueroa-Torres, María Guadalupe; Esquivel, Alfonso; Herrera-Galindo, Jorge Eduardo; González-Fernández, José Manuel; González-Macias, Maria Del Carmen

    2011-07-01

    A taxonomic study of diatoms was carried out in a tropical coastal lagoon. Material for this study consists of water samples obtained from February-March 1992 to November-December 2000. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed the presence of 373 taxa of which the families Bacillariaceae (67 species) and Chaetocerotaceae (37 species) were the most abundant groups. The species Skeletonema costatum, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Coscinodiscus radiatus var. radiatus, Ditylum brightwellii, Thalassiosira eccentrica and Entomoneis alata were found associated with moderate water quality and forming blooms. In addition, a regional comparison between Mexico and South America of the identified species is given. For practical handling, indicative values obtained from their ecological composition are incorporated as well as a code of the floristic list. Achecklist of the species and their occurrence are given.

  3. The recent eutrophication of Baldeggersee (Switzerland) as assessed by fossil diatom assemblages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotter, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Diatom analyses with an annual resolution were carried out on varves of the hypertrophic Baldeggersee (Central Swiss Plateau) for the timespan ad 1885 to 1993. They reveal seven major changes in the dominant planktonic diatoms. As a result of progressive nutrient enrichment, Baldeggersee changed in

  4. Colonisation and community structure of benthic diatoms on artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... benthic and epiphytic species, whilst planktonic genera are less prevalent owing to their ... and Mclntire, 1990). River systems, from headwaters to estuaries, represent ... diatoms from a substratum over time (Lane, 2003). Artificial substrata .... (CyberScan Series 600, Eutech Instruments, Singapore). Flow.

  5. Fecal pellets: role in sedimentation of pelagic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, H J

    1971-10-01

    Membrane-enclosed fecal pellets of planktonic herbivores were sampled at several depths in the Baltic Sea (459 meters deep) and off Portugal (4000 meters deep) by means of a Simonsen multinet. Pellets contained mainly empty shells of planktonic diatoms and silicoflagellates. Two kinds of fecal pellets were found, those with the remains of one species (for example, Thalassiosira baltica) and those with the remains of several species (for example, Chaetoceros, Achnanthes, and Thalassiosira). Siliceous skeletons were protected from dissolution during settling by a membrane around the pellet.

  6. A 1000-yr record of environmental change in NE China indicated by diatom assemblages from maar lake Erlongwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luo; Rioual, Patrick; Panizzo, Virginia N.; Lu, Houyuan; Gu, Zhaoyan; Chu, Guoqiang; Yang, Deguang; Han, Jingtai; Liu, Jiaqi; Mackay, Anson W.

    2012-07-01

    Past environmental changes based on diatom relative abundances have been inferred from the maar Lake Erlongwan in northeast China. The limnology of Lake Erlongwan is affected by the strongly seasonal regional climate. The composition of diatom assemblages, in turn, responds to changes in the seasonal duration of ice cover in winter, water-column turnover in spring and autumn, and thermal stratification in summer. Statistical analysis of the sedimentary diatom assemblages reveals three significant stratigraphic zones over the past 1000 yr. The highest abundance of the planktonic species Discostella species occurs between AD 1050 and 1400 and suggests an annual ice-free period of long duration and well-developed summer stratification of the water column. This planktonic diatom peak between ca. AD 1150 and 1200 suggests that this period was the warmest over the past 1000 yr. The interval between AD 1400 and 1800 is marked by a decline in planktonic diatoms and suggests shorter duration of the ice-free season, weaker water stratification and possibly generally cold conditions. After AD 1800 relative abundances of planktonic diatoms, including Puncticulata praetermissa and Asterionella formosa, increase again, which indicates lengthening of the duration of the annual ice-free period and a stronger overturn of the water column. All these data imply that the pattern of the seasons is different between the MWP and the 20th century.

  7. Factors affecting diatom dynamics in the alpine lakes of Colbricon (Northern Italy: a 10-year survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea SQUARTINI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic diatom fluctuations, their diversity and relationships with environmental variables were analyzed for ten consecutive years in Colbricon Superiore and Inferiore, two small high-mountain lakes located in the Paneveggio-Pale di S. Martino Natural Park (Trento, Italy offering the rare opportunity to study two lakes differing only by area and volume and being in this respect in a ratio of 2:1 and 3:1 respectively. The lakes were monitored and sampled monthly, during ten ice-free periods, from 1998 to 2007, to correlate water chemical and physical characteristics with the recorded diversity and abundance of planktonic diatoms. 55 taxa of Bacillariophyceae were found, among which Cyclotella spp., Tabellaria flocculosa and Fragilaria spp. were dominant. Both chemical data and diatom community composition are consistent with well buffered mesotrophic lakes. We found statistical evidence that the development of diatoms was strongly related to the variation of water temperature. Furthermore, several different signatures of the diatom-enviroment relationships arose between the two lakes as e.g., a negative correlation between diatom development and water transparency was occurring in the larger lake only. As a result, the average diatom density recorded over the 10 years period were 1.17 fold higher than in the lower lake which corresponds to a 1.65 fold higher biomass. A size-dependent tighter response of the phytoplankton to chemical parameters appears to operate in the smaller waterbody compared to the larger one.

  8. Spatial distribution of plankton in Riau islands province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu, I. P.; Pratiwi, N. T. M.; Iswantari, A.; Hariyadi, S.; Mulyawati, D.; Subhan, B.; Arafat, D.; Santoso, P.; Sastria, M.

    2017-01-01

    Riau Islands which is located at 4ºLU - 1ºLS and 104ºBT - 107ºBT, consist of around 3200 islands. It has high marine biodiversity, especially micro-plankton. Biodiversity of marine phytoplankton is usually dominated by diatom and zooplankton by micro-crustacean and early stage of marine biota. Nowadays, biodiversity of micro-plankton is an important study to identify their origin and potential as alien and invasive species. The aim of this research was to determine the biodiversity of marine micro-plankton in Riau Islands. This research was conducted in 14 small islands (Karanggerih, Pemping, Panjang, Melur, Palantuah, Dendun, Mantang, Bunut, Kelong, Mercusuar, Tokong Hiu Kecil, Tokong Hiu Besar, Karimun, Penyengat) in Riau Islands Province. Samples of micro-plankton were collected from surface water using plankton net. Samples were observed under light microscope and identified morphologically. Biodiversity index was calculated. There were found 20-34 taxa of phytoplankton and 10-17 taxa of zooplankton in all sites. Phytoplankton was dominated by Bacillariophyceae group and zooplankton by Crustacean and Protozoa groups. This result is expected for biodiversity bank information and further research.

  9. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-14

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  10. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bowler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  11. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  12. Diatom-Based Material Production Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    diatom cell walls. ............................................................... 19! Fig. 12 Setup for sieving diatom cell walls on the left, metal ...of diatom biomass. .............. 15! Table 4 P1 and P2 step details for cleaning of diatom cell walls at the farm. .................. 19! Table 5...are the most silicified and have the most intricate structures . Diatom valves are used to identify diatoms based on their morphology. Diatom

  13. Assessment of water quality based on diatom indices in a small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-02

    Apr 2, 2016 ... for water quality changes over short time scales. Diatoms have .... A CyberScan Series 600 portable ... estuary section of the river were sampled from Sites E1 to E3 ..... the indices were developed or were planktonic forms (e.g..

  14. Barium in planktonic foraminifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, D.W.; Boyle, E.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Reconstructions of Ba distributions in ancient oceanic surface waters could provide new insight into paleoceanographic change. Calcite shells of planktonic foraminifera potentially provide a means of reconstructing such paleo-Ba distributions if lattice-bound Ba can be determined on shells recovered from deep-sea cores. Planktonic foraminifera shells from a series of cores were purified of non-lattice-bound Ba associated with organic or sedimentary phases by a combination of physical agitation, oxidative-reductive steps, acid leaches, and a novel alkaline-DTPA step to dissolve barite. A sequential dissolution of a large sample of cleaned shells of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides conglobatus indicates homogeneous distribution of Ba in the shell material. Comparison of shells from sediments, sediment traps, and plankton tows indicates no significant differences in the Ba content of the purified shells. Variation in foraminiferal Ba contents between the Pacific, Atlantic, and Mediterranean Sea is consistent with the trend in surface seawater Ba. The calculated distribution coefficient for Ba incorporation in five species based on these data is 0.19 {plus minus} 0.05. Several species of the non-spinose planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia have Ba/Ca ratios ranging from 2 to 13 {mu}mol; these high Ba contents might be explained by differences in the way these foraminifera precipitate their shells. A temporal record of Ba/Ca in samples of Globigerinoides and Orbulina from a core in the northwest Atlantic suggests that the Ba concentration of surface waters at this site has not changed by more than 20% over the last 14 kyr.

  15. Dynamics of Dissolved and Particulate Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in Mesocosms Inoculated with Different Densities of the Diatom Skeletonema marinoi

    OpenAIRE

    Georg Pohnert; Charles Vidoudez; Jens Christian Nejstgaard; Hans Henrik Jakobsen

    2011-01-01

    A survey of the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA) of manipulated plankton communities is presented here. PUA are phytoplankton-derived metabolites that are proposed to play an important role in chemically mediated plankton interactions. Blooms of different intensities of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi were generated in eight mesocosms filled with water from the surrounding fjord by adding different amounts of a starting culture and nutrients. This set-up allowed us to follow PUA p...

  16. Quantifying the Cenozoic marine diatom deposition history: links to the C and Si cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudie, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms are, today, among the world's main primary producers as well as the main organic carbon exporter to the deep sea despite the fact that they were a very minor component of the plankton at the beginning of the Cenozoic. They are also the main silica exporter to the deep sea, thus balancing global chemical weathering. This study reviews their global Cenozoic depositional pattern in order to understand the modality and the context of their rise to dominance, but also to understand how diatom evolution affected the Cenozoic functioning of the ocean's biological pump. After two short-lived major abundance peaks near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and in the late Oligocene, diatom abundance in sediments shifted in the middle Miocene to globally higher values which have largely persisted to the modern day. These quantitative findings provide support for the hypothesis according to which diatoms, through their ecological role in the ocean's biological carbon pump, have contributed to the Cenozoic changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide pressure and consequently to changes in the global climate state. Additionally, correlations between diatom abundance peaks and shifts in seawater strontium and osmium isotopic composition hint at a strong control of the silicate weathering on diatom deposition.

  17. Dynamics of Dissolved and Particulate Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in Mesocosms Inoculated with Different Densities of the Diatom Skeletonema marinoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Pohnert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA of manipulated plankton communities is presented here. PUA are phytoplankton-derived metabolites that are proposed to play an important role in chemically mediated plankton interactions. Blooms of different intensities of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi were generated in eight mesocosms filled with water from the surrounding fjord by adding different amounts of a starting culture and nutrients. This set-up allowed us to follow PUA production of the plankton community over the entire induced bloom development, and to compare it with the natural levels of PUA. We found that S. marinoi is a major source for the particulate PUA 2,4-heptadienal and 2,4-octadienal (defined as PUA released upon wounding of the diatom cells during the entire bloom development. Just before, and during, the decline of the induced diatom blooms, these PUA were also detected in up to 1 nM concentrations dissolved in the water. In addition, we detected high levels of the PUA 2,4-decadienal that was not produced by the diatom S. marinoi. Particulate decadienal correlated well with the cell counts of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis sp. that also developed in the fertilized mesocosms. Particulate decadienal levels were often even higher than those of diatom-derived PUA, indicating that PUA sources other than diatoms should be considered when it comes to the evaluation of the impact of these metabolites.

  18. Dynamics of dissolved and particulate polyunsaturated aldehydes in mesocosms inoculated with different densities of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoudez, Charles; Nejstgaard, Jens Christian; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-03-11

    A survey of the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA) of manipulated plankton communities is presented here. PUA are phytoplankton-derived metabolites that are proposed to play an important role in chemically mediated plankton interactions. Blooms of different intensities of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi were generated in eight mesocosms filled with water from the surrounding fjord by adding different amounts of a starting culture and nutrients. This set-up allowed us to follow PUA production of the plankton community over the entire induced bloom development, and to compare it with the natural levels of PUA. We found that S. marinoi is a major source for the particulate PUA 2,4-heptadienal and 2,4-octadienal (defined as PUA released upon wounding of the diatom cells) during the entire bloom development. Just before, and during, the decline of the induced diatom blooms, these PUA were also detected in up to 1 nM concentrations dissolved in the water. In addition, we detected high levels of the PUA 2,4-decadienal that was not produced by the diatom S. marinoi. Particulate decadienal correlated well with the cell counts of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis sp. that also developed in the fertilized mesocosms. Particulate decadienal levels were often even higher than those of diatom-derived PUA, indicating that PUA sources other than diatoms should be considered when it comes to the evaluation of the impact of these metabolites.

  19. Partitioning of organic production in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conan, P.; Søndergaard, Morten; Kragh, T.

    2007-01-01

    and a constant low net production of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) across the nutrient gradient. The production of DOP was low in the P-limited (-Si) bags; however, with a surplus of inorganic P, most of the assimilated P (74% to 85%) was recovered as new DOP. The consequence was a huge range...... limitation as the initial conditions. The experiment lasted 21 days in August. Addition of silicate (+Si) resulted in diatom dominance, while a more diverse community was present in treatments with no added Si (-Si). Addition of inorganic nutrients in a N:P gradient from 64 to 4 either conserved the initial...... N limitation or forced the plankton communities to P limitation. Per added limiting nutrient, the diatom-dominated bags produced more particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the other bags. However, the relative partitioning of net production to POC and DOC did not differ...

  20. Relationship between petroleum hydrocarbon and plankton in a mesocosm experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was carried out from May 26 to June 1, 1998 at the location of bon to the ecosystem, furthermore, to estimate the environmental capacity. In the experiment, it is found that the petroleum hydrocarbon can, in some degree, enhance the growth of diatom, but inhibit the growth of dinoflagellate. In general, the petroleum hydrocarbon can inhibit the growth of both phytoplankton and zooplankton, and can also inhibit the growth of total plankton (including phytoplankton and zooplankton) as well. A kinetic model was presented to estimate the uptake/release rate constants of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton, and thereafter, the uptake and release rate constants ( k1, k2),bioconcentration factor (BCF) as well as the petroleum hydrocarbon influenced uptake and release rate constants of nutrients by phytoplankton (kup, krel) were obtained. The results imply that the bioconcentration of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton is fairly large and petroleum hydrocarbon caused no significant influence on the uptake of N- NO3, but significant influence on that of P- PO4. In addition,the application of kinetic model for the bioconcentration of volatile organic toxic compound by organism suggests that the uptake of petroleum hydrocarbon by plankton was an important process for the environmental capacity of petroleum hydrocarbon.

  1. Plankton Production Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-30

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00... Crustacea ), the group that contributes the major part of the biomass of zooplankton collected with plankton nets in salt- and freshwater. The basis of...windows to the large Russian-language marine- biological literature by publishing this translation. The observations are not subject to becoming outdated

  2. The Microscopic World of Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultany, Molly; Bixby, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    For students in biology, chemistry, or environmental science, diatoms offer excellent insight into watershed health and human impact on the environment. Diatoms are found globally in virtually every habitat that has sunlight and moisture, including polar seas, tropical streams, and on moist soils and mosses. Studying diatoms as biological…

  3. Interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with diatoms: regulated protease excretion for specific algal lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Paul

    Full Text Available Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors.

  4. Diatom community biodiversity in an Alpine protected area: a study in the Maritime Alps Natural Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca BONA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of the "All Taxa Biodiversity Inventories" (ATBIs coordinated by the European Distributed Institute of Taxonomy (EDIT, we analysed diatom communities colonizing different habitats of the Valasco Valley (Maritime Alps Natural Park. The aim of this research was to shed light on the diatom richness in an Alpine context through i the collection of data concerning diatom communities inhabiting an unexplored watershed of the Maritime Alps Natural Park, including all of the most important aquatic habitats (comparison among river, springs and peat bogs and assemblages (epilithic and epiphytic diatom communities; ii analysis of the main environmental factors driving the development of diatom communities in different habitats. We completed a list of 174 diatom taxa. In general, river samples were poorer in terms of species richness than spring and peat bog ones, probably due to the selective role of the fast flow, while springs sheltered the highest biodiversity of the Valasco Valley. Peat bog communities were mainly composed of acidophilous taxa, sometimes planktonic and forming colonies. Epilithic and epiphytic samples did not show significant differences in terms of composition and biodiversity, even though it was statistically possible to identify indicator species for each assemblage. The study also highlighted the presence of several taxa included in the German Red List as endangered or decreasing, especially in the epiphytic samples. Since the water nutrient level and substrate geology were similar among habitats, the main environmental factors shaping Valasco diatom communities were water velocity and pH.

  5. Seasonal changes of viable diatom resting stages in bottom sediments of Xiamen Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-ping; Sun, Lin; Gao, Ya-hui; Zhou, Qian-qian; Zheng, Min-hua; Li, Bin-qian; Yu, Yang; Lu, Dou-ding

    2009-02-01

    The seasonal abundance of planktonic diatoms in the water column of Xiamen Bay, China, was investigated monthly during 2007 and 2008, and the viability of their resting stages in the bottom sediments was estimated using the extinction dilution method (most probable number method, MPN). The dominant genera in the planktonic diatom community were Skeletonema, Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira, whose viable resting stages were also the most abundant in the sediments. The highest concentration of viable diatom resting stages occurred 1 to 2 months after the maximum cell density of diatom communities occurred in the water column. The viability of Skeletonema resting cells increased in the sediments in either April or May at each station before the start of a Skeletonema bloom in June or July, suggesting that the germination of resting cells suspended in water could have influenced the blooming of Skeletonema species in the summer. Canonical correspondence analysis and multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the MPN of viable diatom resting stages was negatively correlated with silicate ( p concentration ( p > 0.05). The distribution of viable Chaetoceros resting spores and viable Skeletonema resting cells was different, possibly due to the different silicate cost in sea water during the formation of resting spores and resting cells, and also their survival ability in unfavorable environments.

  6. Ocean acidification decreases plankton respiration: evidence from a mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilling, Kristian; Paul, Allanah J.; Virkkala, Niklas; Hastings, Tom; Lischka, Silke; Stuhr, Annegret; Bermúdez, Rafael; Czerny, Jan; Boxhammer, Tim; Schulz, Kai G.; Ludwig, Andrea; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are reducing the pH in the world's oceans. The plankton community is a key component driving biogeochemical fluxes, and the effect of increased CO2 on plankton is critical for understanding the ramifications of ocean acidification on global carbon fluxes. We determined the plankton community composition and measured primary production, respiration rates and carbon export (defined here as carbon sinking out of a shallow, coastal area) during an ocean acidification experiment. Mesocosms ( ˜ 55 m3) were set up in the Baltic Sea with a gradient of CO2 levels initially ranging from ambient ( ˜ 240 µatm), used as control, to high CO2 (up to ˜ 1330 µatm). The phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates, diatoms, cyanobacteria and chlorophytes, and the zooplankton community by protozoans, heterotrophic dinoflagellates and cladocerans. The plankton community composition was relatively homogenous between treatments. Community respiration rates were lower at high CO2 levels. The carbon-normalized respiration was approximately 40 % lower in the high-CO2 environment compared with the controls during the latter phase of the experiment. We did not, however, detect any effect of increased CO2 on primary production. This could be due to measurement uncertainty, as the measured total particular carbon (TPC) and combined results presented in this special issue suggest that the reduced respiration rate translated into higher net carbon fixation. The percent carbon derived from microscopy counts (both phyto- and zooplankton), of the measured total particular carbon (TPC), decreased from ˜ 26 % at t0 to ˜ 8 % at t31, probably driven by a shift towards smaller plankton (export, and consequently did not work as a negative feedback mechanism for increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  7. Spring-time dynamics of diatom communities in landfast and underlying platelet ice in Terra Nova Bay, Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggiomo, Maria; Poulin, Michel; Mangoni, Olga; Lazzara, Luigi; De Stefano, Mario; Sarno, Diana; Zingone, Adriana

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the composition of diatom communities in annual fast ice and their variations over time during the 1999 austral spring in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica). Diatoms varied along the ice core in both cell abundance and species composition, with a minimum in the lower layer and a peak in the platelet ice. Planktonic species constituted in total about 98% of the diatom assemblage in the surface layers of the ice core down to the thickness of 220 cm. In the bottom ice and the underlying platelet-ice layer, the contribution of planktonic diatoms was lower (60% and 65%, respectively) at the beginning of the sampling period, and then decreased further to reach 30% in the bottom ice, where a remarkable biomass increase over time was caused by in situ growth and accumulation of benthic species. By contrast in the platelet-ice layer only small changes were recorded in the composition of the diatom assemblage, which was mainly constituted by the bloom of Fragilariopsis nana. The benthic species are generally not found in the water column, while species in the platelet-ice layer presumably constitute the seed for the initial plankton bloom during the ice-free periods in Terra Nova Bay.

  8. Some aspects of the origin of diatoms and their subsequent evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, F E

    1981-01-01

    This paper briefly explores the idea that morphological variation in diatoms was and is restricted during the formation of new siliceous elements at each cell division by the constraints imposed by enclosure in a non-malleable "tube" of silica against which the protoplast is maintained by internal pressure. This allows little scope for variation and thus diatoms from a very early geological period have retained basic morphological forms which arose during the original burst of evolution when the siliceous elements were in some way more plastic. The radiation of distinctive basic morphological forms into the plankton, epiphyton and epipelon is also touched upon.

  9. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Kuczynska; Malgorzata Jemiola-Rzeminska; Kazimierz Strzalka

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvestin...

  10. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kuczynska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  11. Insights into global diatom distribution and diversity in the world’s ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Malviya, Shruti

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta) constitute one of the most diverse and ecologically important groups of phytoplankton. They are considered to be particularly important in nutrient-rich coastal ecosystems and at high latitudes, but considerably less so in the oligotrophic open ocean. The Tara Oceans circumnavigation collected samples from a wide range of oceanic regions using a standardized sampling procedure. Here, a total of ∼12 million diatom V9-18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) ribotypes, derived from 293 sizefractionated plankton communities collected at 46 sampling sites across the global ocean euphotic zone, have been analyzed to explore diatom global diversity and community composition. We provide a new estimate of diversity of marine planktonic diatoms at 4,748 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Based on the total assigned ribotypes, Chaetoceros was the most abundant and diverse genus, followed by Fragilariopsis, Thalassiosira, and Corethron. We found only a few cosmopolitan ribotypes displaying an even distribution across stations and high abundance, many of which could not be assigned with confidence to any known genus. Three distinct communities from South Pacific, Mediterranean, and Southern Ocean waters were identified that share a substantial percentage of ribotypes within them. Sudden drops in diversity were observed at Cape Agulhas, which separates the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, and across the Drake Passage between the Atlantic and Southern Oceans, indicating the importance of these ocean circulation choke points in constraining diatom distribution and diversity. We also observed high diatom diversity in the open ocean, suggesting that diatoms may be more relevant in these oceanic systems than generally considered.

  12. Oceanic nitrogen reservoir regulated by plankton diversity and ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-09-20

    The average nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio of marine phytoplankton (16N:1P) is closely matched to the nutrient content of mean ocean waters (14.3N:1P). This condition is thought to arise from biological control over the ocean's nitrogen budget, in which removal of bioavailable nitrogen by denitrifying bacteria ensures widespread selection for diazotrophic phytoplankton that replenish this essential nutrient when it limits the growth of other species. Here we show that in the context of a realistic ocean circulation model, and a uniform N:P ratio of plankton biomass, this feedback mechanism yields an oceanic nitrate deficit more than double its observed value. The critical missing phenomenon is diversity in the metabolic N:P requirement of phytoplankton, which has recently been shown to exhibit large-scale patterns associated with species composition. When we model these variations, such that diazotrophs compete with high N:P communities in subtropical regions, the ocean nitrogen inventory rises and may even exceed the average N:P ratio of plankton. The latter condition, previously considered impossible, is prevented in the modern ocean by shallow circulations that communicate stoichiometric signals from remote biomes dominated by diatoms with low N:P ratios. Large-scale patterns of plankton diversity and the circulation pathways connecting them are thus key factors determining the availability of fixed nitrogen in the ocean.

  13. Metabolomics and proteomics reveal impacts of chemically mediated competition on marine plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulson-Ellestad, Kelsey L.; Jones, Christina M.; Roy, Jessie; Viant, Mark R.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Kubanek, Julia; Nunn, Brook L.

    2014-01-01

    Competition is a major force structuring marine planktonic communities. The release of compounds that inhibit competitors, a process known as allelopathy, may play a role in the maintenance of large blooms of the red-tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces potent neurotoxins that negatively impact coastal marine ecosystems. K. brevis is variably allelopathic to multiple competitors, typically causing sublethal suppression of growth. We used metabolomic and proteomic analyses to investigate the role of chemically mediated ecological interactions between K. brevis and two diatom competitors, Asterionellopsis glacialis and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The impact of K. brevis allelopathy on competitor physiology was reflected in the metabolomes and expressed proteomes of both diatoms, although the diatom that co-occurs with K. brevis blooms (A. glacialis) exhibited more robust metabolism in response to K. brevis. The observed partial resistance of A. glacialis to allelopathy may be a result of its frequent exposure to K. brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. For the more sensitive diatom, T. pseudonana, which may not have had opportunity to evolve resistance to K. brevis, allelopathy disrupted energy metabolism and impeded cellular protection mechanisms including altered cell membrane components, inhibited osmoregulation, and increased oxidative stress. Allelopathic compounds appear to target multiple physiological pathways in sensitive competitors, demonstrating that chemical cues in the plankton have the potential to alter large-scale ecosystem processes including primary production and nutrient cycling. PMID:24889616

  14. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J; Walne, Anthony W; Hays, Graeme C

    2017-02-10

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity.

  15. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J.; Walne, Anthony W.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2017-02-01

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity.

  16. Fossilized diatoms in meteorites from recent falls in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Wallis, Jamie; Wickramarathne, Keerthi; Samaranayake, Anil; Williams, George; Jerman, Gregory; Wallis, D. H.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2013-09-01

    On December 29, 2012, a bright yellow and green fireball was observed to disintegrate over the Polonnaruwa District of North Central, Sri Lanka. Many low density, black stones were recovered soon after the observed fall from rice paddy fields near the villages of Aralaganwila and Dimbulagala. These stones were initially studied by optical microscopy methods at the Medical Research Institute in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Soon thereafter, samples were sent to the UK and to the United States. More extensive Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy studies were then carried out at Cardiff University and the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The physico-chemical properties, elemental abundances, mineralogy and stable isotope data clearly indicate that these stones are non-terrestrial. Freshly fractured interior surfaces of the black stones have also been observed to contain the remains of fossilized diatom. Many of the diatom frustules are clearly embedded in the meteorite rock matrix and exhibit nitrogen levels below the EDX detection limits. Some of the fossil diatoms are araphid marine pennates and planktonic forms that are inconsistent with conditions associated with rice paddy fields. These observations indicate the fossilized diatoms are indigenous to the meteorites rather than post-arrival biological contaminants. The carbon content and mineralogy suggests that these stones may represent a previously ungrouped clan of carbonaceous meteorites. The extremely low density (~0.6) of the stones and their observed mineralogy was inconsistent with known terrestrial rocks (e.g., pumice, diatomite and fulgurites). The minerals detected suggest that the parent body of the Polonnaruwa stones may have been the nucleus of a comet. These observations are interpreted as supporting the Hoyle-Wickramasinghe Panspermia hypothesis and the hypothesis that diatoms and other microorganisms might be capable of living and growing in water ice and brines in comets.

  17. High diatom production and export in stratified waters - A potential negative feedback to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Alan E. S.; Villareal, Tracy A.

    2013-12-01

    It is widely held that increased stratification and reduced vertical mixing in the ocean driven by global warming will promote the replacement of diatoms by smaller phytoplankton and lead to an overall decrease in productivity and carbon export. Here we present contrary evidence from a synergy of modern observations and palaeo-records that reveal high diatom production and export from stratified waters. Diatom adaptations to stratified waters include the ability to grow in low light conditions in deep chlorophyll maxima; vertical migrations between nutricline depths and the surface, and symbioses with N2-fixing cyanobacteria in diatom-diazotroph associations (DDA). These strategies foster the maintenance of seed populations that may then exploit mixing events induced by storms or eddies, but may also inherently promote blooms. Recent oceanographic observations in the subtropical gyres, at increasingly high temporal and spatial resolutions, have monitored short-lived but often substantial blooms and export of stratified-adapted diatoms including rhizosolenids and the diazotroph-associated Hemiaulus hauckii. Aggregate formation by such diatoms is common and promotes rapid settling thereby minimizing water column remineralization and optimizing carbon flux. Convergence zones associated with oceanic fronts or mesoscale features may also generate substantial flux of stratified-adapted diatom species. Conventional oceanographic observing strategies and sampling techniques under-represent such activity due to the lack of adequate capability to sample the large sized diatoms and colonies involved, the subsurface location of many of these blooms, their common development in thin global warming. However, the key genera involved in such potential feedbacks are underrepresented in both laboratory and field studies and are poorly represented in models. Our findings suggest that a reappraisal is necessary of the way diatoms are represented as plankton functional types (PFTs) in

  18. Diatoms as Proxies for Abrupt Events in the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, W.; Abbott, D. H.; Recasens, C.; Breger, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Hudson River estuary has been subject to many abrupt events throughout its history including hurricanes, droughts and pluvials. Hurricanes in particular are rare, discrete events that if fingerprinted can be used to develop better age models for Hudson River sediments. Proxies use observed physical characteristics or biological assemblages (e.g. diatom and foraminiferal assemblages) as tools to reconstruct past conditions prior to the modern instrumental record. Using a sediment core taken from the Hudson River (CDO2-29A), in New York City, drought and pluvial layers were selected based on Cs-137 dating while hurricane layers were determined from occurrences of tropical to subtropical foraminifera. Contrary to previous studies (Weaver, 1970, Weiss et al, 1978), more than sixty different diatom species have been identified using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cosmopolitan, hurricane and drought assemblages have begun to be identified after observing multiple layers (Table 1). Tropical foraminifera dominated by Globigerinoides ruber pink were also found in a hurricane layer that we infer was deposited during Hurricane Belle in 1976. More diatom abundance analyses and cataloged SEM pictures will provide further insight into these proxies. Table 1 Diatom Genera and Species Environment Clarification Cyclotella caspia Planktonic, marine-brackish Cosmopolitan Karayevia clevei Freshwater Cosmopolitan Melosira sp Planktonic, marine Cosmopolitan Thalassiosira sp Marine, brackish Cosmopolitan Staurosirella leptostauron Benthic, freshwater Cosmopolitan Actinoptychus senarius Planktonic or benthic, freshwater to brackish Hurricane and pluvial layers Amphora aff. sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Nitzschia sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Gomphonema sp Freshwater Hurricane layers only Surirella sp Marine-brackish Drought layer only Triceratium sp Marine Drought layer only Other Genera and species Environment Clarification

  19. Fluxes of diatoms in the Dona Paula Bay, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Garg, A.; Bhaskar, P.V.

    (Smetacek, 1985; Alldredge and Gotschalk, 1988; Riebesell, 1989; Tallberg and Heiskanen, 1998), and large fluxes of diatoms have been attributed to several processes, including the resting phase (Smetacek, 1985), loss of water column stability due to changes... volume or plasma volume. Limnol. Oceanogr., 12, 411–418. Tallberg,P. and Heiskanen,A.S. (1998) Species-specific phytoplankton sedimentation in relation to primary production along an inshore-offshore gradient in the Baltic Sea. J. Plankton Res., 20, 2053...

  20. Diatomic gasdynamic lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Predictions from a numerical model of the vibrational relaxation of anharmonic diatomic oscillators in supersonic expansions are used to show the extent to which the small anharmonicity of gases like CO can cause significant overpopulations of upper vibrational states. When mixtures of CO and N2 are considered, radiative gain on many of the vibration-rotation transitions of CO is predicted. Experiments are described that qualitatively verify the predictions by demonstrating laser oscillation in CO-N2 expansions. The resulting CO-N2 gasdynamic laser displays performance characteristics that equal or exceed those of similar CO2 lasers.

  1. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600-2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500-542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600-1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000-542 Mya).

  2. Modern diatom, cladocera, chironomid, and chrysophyte cyst assemblages as quantitative indicators for the reconstruction of past environmental conditions in the Alps. I. Climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotter, A.F.; Birks, H.J.B.; Hofmann, W.; Marchetto, A.

    1997-01-01

    Diatom, chrysophyte cyst, benthic cladocera, planktonic cladocera, and chironomid assemblages were studied in the surface sediments of 68 small lakes along an altitudinal gradient from 300 to 2350 m in Switzerland. In addition, 43 environmental variables relating to the physical limnology, geography

  3. Effect of pressure on silica solubility of diatom frustules in the oceans: Results from long-term laboratory and field incubations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loucaides, S.; Koning, E.; Van Capellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    The oceanic cycle of silicon (Si) has been studied extensively due to its close coupling to the oceanic carbon cycle and the biological CO2 pump. The oceanic Si cycle is dominated by the uptake of dissolved silicate (dSi) by planktonic organisms, predominantly diatoms, which use it to synthesize sil

  4. Effect of pressure on silica solubility of diatom frustules in the oceans: Results from long-term laboratory and field incubations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loucaides, S.; Koning, E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    The oceanic cycle of silicon (Si) has been studied extensively due to its close coupling to the oceanic carbon cycle and the biological CO2 pump. The oceanic Si cycle is dominated by the uptake of dissolved silicate (dSi) by planktonic organisms, predominantly diatoms, which use it to synthesize sil

  5. Assessing the effects of climate and volcanism on diatom and chironomid assemblages in an Andean lake near Quito, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical Andes are undergoing climate changes that rival those occurring anywhere else on the planet, and are likely to have profound consequences for ecosystems. Paleolimnological investigations of remote mountain lakes can provide details of past environmental change, especially where monitoring data are absent. Here, we reconstruct fossil diatom and chironomid communities spanning the last several hundred years from an Andean lake located in an ecological reserve near Quito, Ecuador. Both diatoms and chironomids recorded assemblage shifts reflective of changing climate conditions. The diatoms are likely responding primarily to temperature-related limnological changes, recording an increase in the number of planktonic taxa in the most recent sediments. This change is consistent with warmer conditions that result in enhanced periods of thermal stratification, allowing planktonic species to proliferate. The chironomids appear to respond mainly to a change in precipitation regime, recording a greater number of terrestrial and semi-terrestrial taxa that have been transported to the lake. A thick tephra deposit at the base of the sediment core affected both diatom and chironomid assemblages. The diatoms registered a change in species composition highlighting the ability of certain taxa to rapidly colonize new environments. In contrast, the chironomids showed a marked drop in abundance immediately following the tephra, but no change in species composition. In both cases the ecological response was short-lived, illustrating the resiliency of the lake to return to baseline conditions following volcanic inputs.

  6. Partitioning of organic production in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conan, P.; Søndergaard, Morten; Kragh, T.;

    2007-01-01

    N limitation or forced the plankton communities to P limitation. Per added limiting nutrient, the diatom-dominated bags produced more particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the other bags. However, the relative partitioning of net production to POC and DOC did not differ...... and a constant low net production of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) across the nutrient gradient. The production of DOP was low in the P-limited (-Si) bags; however, with a surplus of inorganic P, most of the assimilated P (74% to 85%) was recovered as new DOP. The consequence was a huge range...... diagenetic "maturation" process but can be produced almost immediately. Both the nutrient regime and phytoplankton community composition affected the production and composition of new DOM in this experiment...

  7. Stuart R. Stidolph diatom atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidolph, S.R.; Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Smith, K.E.L.; Kraberg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Stuart R. Stidolph Diatom Atlas" is a comprehensive volume of diatom taxa identified and micrographed by Stuart R. Stidoph during the 1980s and 1990s. The samples were collected from marine coasts of various geographic regions within tropical and subtropical climates. The plates included within this report have never been published and are being published by the USGS as an online reference so that others may have access to this incredible collection.

  8. Controlling dynamics in diatomic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Praveen Kumar; Harjinder Singh

    2007-09-01

    Controlling molecular energetics using laser pulses is exemplified for nuclear motion in two different diatomic systems. The problem of finding the optimized field for maximizing a desired quantum dynamical target is formulated using an iterative method. The method is applied for two diatomic systems, HF and OH. The power spectra of the fields and evolution of populations of different vibrational states during transitions are obtained.

  9. Towards a representative periphytic diatom sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to acquire a representative periphytic diatom sample for river water quality monitoring has been recognised in the development of existing diatom indices, important in the development and employment of diatom monitoring tools for the Water Framework Directive. In this study, a nested design with replication is employed to investigate the magnitude of variation in diatom biomass, composition and Trophic Diatom Index at varying scales within a small chalk river. The study shows that the use of artificial substrates may not result in diatom communities that are typical of the surrounding natural substrates. Periphytic diatom biomass and composition varies between artificial and natural substrates, riffles and glides and between two stretches of the river channel. The study also highlights the existence of high variation in diatom frustule frequency and biovolume at the individual replicate scale which may have implications for the use of diatoms in routine monitoring.

  10. Ecological Stoichiometry of Ocean Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Allison R; Martiny, Adam C

    2017-08-30

    Marine plankton elemental stoichiometric ratios can deviate from the Redfield ratio (106C:16N:1P); here, we examine physiological and biogeochemical mechanisms that lead to the observed variation across lineages, regions, and seasons. Many models of ecological stoichiometry blend together acclimative and adaptive responses to environmental conditions. These two pathways can have unique molecular mechanisms and stoichiometric outcomes, and we attempt to disentangle the two processes. We find that interactions between environmental conditions and cellular growth are key to understanding stoichiometric regulation, but the growth rates of most marine plankton populations are poorly constrained. We propose that specific physiological mechanisms have a strong impact on plankton and community stoichiometry in nutrient-rich environments, whereas biogeochemical interactions are important for the stoichiometry of the oligotrophic gyres. Finally, we outline key areas with missing information that is needed to advance understanding of the present and future ecological stoichiometry of ocean plankton. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. DIMETHYLSULFIDE PRODUCTION BY PLANKTON COMMUNITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KWINT, RLJ; KRAMER, KJM

    1995-01-01

    The trends of dimethylsulphide (DMS) production by plankton communities in mesocosm systems were studied under various conditions. The results show that the DMS concentration in the water column can be highly variable over time, even within days, and under apparently identical conditions. DMS releas

  12. Effect of hydrological variability on diatom distribution in Poyang Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kuimei; Liu, Xia; Chen, Yuwei

    2016-04-01

    Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, and it has a seasonal flooding cycle that significantly changes the water level every year. The aim of this paper was to explain how these hydrological changes influence diatom populations in Poyang Lake. The yearly hydrological cycle can be divided into 4 phases: low water-level phase, increasing water-level phase, high water-level phase and decreasing water-level phase. Variations in the abundance of planktonic diatoms were studied using quarterly monitoring data collected from January 2009 to October 2013. Generally, diatoms were dominant in Poyang Lake and accounted for more than 50% of the total phytoplankton biomass except in July 2009 (26%) and January 2012 (35%). Aulacoseira granulata and Surirella robusta were the predominant species in all four phases, and they accounted for 25.02% to 56.89% and 5.07% to 14.78% of the total phytoplankton biomass, respectively. A redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that changes in physico-chemical parameter were related to the water level, and changes in diatom biomass were related to nitrite levels and pH. These results indicate that changes in environmental parameters related to both seasonal variations and water-level fluctuations caused variations in diatom biomass and community composition in Poyang Lake. Furthermore, extreme hydrological events can have diff erent influences on the diatom community composition in the main channel and lentic regions. This research provides data on the diatom variations in Poyang Lake and will be useful for establishing biological indicators of environmental change and protecting Poyang Lake in the future.

  13. Effect of hydrological variability on diatom distribution in Poyang Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kuimei; Liu, Xia; Chen, Yuwei

    2017-01-01

    Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, and it has a seasonal flooding cycle that significantly changes the water level every year. The aim of this paper was to explain how these hydrological changes influence diatom populations in Poyang Lake. The yearly hydrological cycle can be divided into 4 phases: low water-level phase, increasing water-level phase, high water-level phase and decreasing water-level phase. Variations in the abundance of planktonic diatoms were studied using quarterly monitoring data collected from January 2009 to October 2013. Generally, diatoms were dominant in Poyang Lake and accounted for more than 50% of the total phytoplankton biomass except in July 2009 (26%) and January 2012 (35%). Aulacoseira granulata and Surirella robusta were the predominant species in all four phases, and they accounted for 25.02% to 56.89% and 5.07% to 14.78% of the total phytoplankton biomass, respectively. A redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that changes in physico-chemical parameter were related to the water level, and changes in diatom biomass were related to nitrite levels and pH. These results indicate that changes in environmental parameters related to both seasonal variations and water-level fluctuations caused variations in diatom biomass and community composition in Poyang Lake. Furthermore, extreme hydrological events can have different influences on the diatom community composition in the main channel and lentic regions. This research provides data on the diatom variations in Poyang Lake and will be useful for establishing biological indicators of environmental change and protecting Poyang Lake in the future.

  14. COMPARISON OF SIMPLE AND MULTIMETRIC DIATOM-BASED INDICES FOR GREAT LAKES COASTLINE DISTURBANCE(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavie, Euan D; Kireta, Amy R; Kingston, John C; Sgro, Gerald V; Danz, Nicholas P; Axler, Richard P; Hollenhorst, Thomas P

    2008-06-01

    Because diatom communities are subject to the prevailing water quality in the Great Lakes coastal environment, diatom-based indices can be used to support coastal-monitoring programs and paleoecological studies. Diatom samples were collected from Great Lakes coastal wetlands, embayments, and high-energy sites (155 sites), and assemblages were characterized to the species level. We defined 42 metrics on the basis of autecological and functional properties of species assemblages, including species diversity, motile species, planktonic species, proportion dominant taxon, taxonomic metrics (e.g., proportion Stephanodiscoid taxa), and diatom-inferred (DI) water quality (e.g., DI chloride [Cl]). Redundant metrics were eliminated, and a diatom-based multimetric index (MMDI) to infer coastline disturbance was developed. Anthropogenic stresses in adjacent coastal watersheds were characterized using geographic information system (GIS) data related to agricultural and urban land cover and atmospheric deposition. Fourteen independent diatom metrics had significant regressions with watershed stressor data; these metrics were selected for inclusion in the MMDI. The final MMDI was developed as the weighted sum of the selected metric scores with weights based on a metric's ability to reflect anthropogenic stressors in the adjacent watersheds. Despite careful development of the multimetric approach, verification using a test set of sites indicated that the MMDI was not able to predict watershed stressors better than some of the component metrics. From this investigation, it was determined that simpler, more traditional diatom-based metrics (e.g., DI Cl, proportion Cl-tolerant species, and DI total phosphorus [TP]) provide superior prediction of overall stressor influence at coastal locales.

  15. Relationship between diatom thanatocoenoses and anthropogenically-induced environmental changes in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.; Hirose, K.; Sako, M.; Irizuki, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Seto Inland Sea (SIS), which is surrounded by Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku islands, is the largest enclosed sea in Japan. Water and bottom environments there deteriorated due to various anthropogenically-induced environmental changes from 1955 to 1973 (e.g. Yanagi, 2008). Then, several effluents have been regulated since the 1980s. Diatoms are one of important unicellular algae as a primary producer in waters. As diatoms respond rapidly to the nutrient supply in waters, they are good indicator of eutrophication. Thus, we clarified the spatio-temporal changes of diatom thanatocoenoses in Harima-Nada, eastern part of the SIS, and compared them with previous results in other areas in the SIS (Hirose et al., 2008; Hirose and Gotoh, 2009; Sako et al., unpublished data) to discuss the relationship between diatom thanatocoenoses and degree of anthropogenically-induced environmental changes in the SIS. The surface and/or core sediments were collected from the northern, northwestern, and southern parts of Harima-Nada. We conducted 14C, 210Pb and 137Cs dating of cores, diatom analysis, CHNS analysis, and grain size analysis of sediment samples. The results showed that marine environments in all areas of Harima-Nada deteriorated recently and the abundance of planktonic diatoms increased due to intense eutrophication. The comparison with the present and previous studies lead that Neodelphineis pelagica, small Thalassiosira spp., and resting spores of Chaetoceros spp. dominated other taxa in the most areas of the SIS since the mid-20th century, and the relative frequencies of the latter two taxa seem to be useful indicators for evaluating modern marine conditions. References: Yanagi (2008) Kouseisha-Kouseikaku Co., pp. 130; Hirose and Gotoh (2009) Diatom, 25, p. 21-36; Hirose et al. (2008) The Quaternary Research, 47, 287-296.

  16. Relationship Between Surface Sediment Diatoms and Summer Water Quality in Shallow Lakes of the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Dong YANG; Xu-Hui DONG; Guang GAO; Hong-Xi PAN; Jing-Lu WU

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between surface sediment diatoms and summer water quality was investigated at 49 lakes in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River. Lakes ranging from oligomesotrophic to hypereutrophic were examined, providing an obvious nutrient gradient. With the shift from mesotrophic to eutrophic levels, diatom multi-ecotypes dominated by epiphytic and facultative planktonic taxa were replaced by nutrient-tolerant planktonic taxa, such as Cyclotella meneghiniana Skvortzow, C. atomus Hustedt,Cyclostephanos Round, and Stephanodiscus Ehrenberg etc., reflecting the nutrient changes in the lake.The relationship between diatoms and summer water quality indices was explored further using numeric analysis. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) with forward selection and a Monte Carlo permutation test revealed that of all 25 summer water environmental variables, total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll a (Chzl a), Secchi depth (SD), dissolved inorganic phosphorus, C1-, SO42-, Mg2+, CO32-, and water depth were significant variables (P<0.05) in explaining diatom distributions. Of these, TP, Chl a, SD, and C1-, were the most important variables. The result of the correlation analysis also showed that a significant correlation exists among these variables, implying that these indices are either interconnected or independent in explaining the diatom data. For phosphorus-limited sites, TP was the most significant variable affecting the diatoms, also affecting changes in Chl a, SD, and iron concentrations. The independence of Chl a may be related to algal competition induced by lake eutrophication, resulting in the feedback to diatom community.In addition to TP, SD can be related to sediment disturbance by wave action and the growth of macrophytes in large shallow lakes. These relationships between diatom ecotypes and water quality provide the basis for a future quantitative reconstruction of historic lake nutrient evolution in the study area and will also provide a

  17. Paulsenella Chatton (Dinophyta), ectoparasites of marine diatoms: development and taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drebes, G.; Schnepf, E.

    1988-09-01

    All members of the dinophyte Paulsenella are ectoparasites on marine planktonic diatoms. At present three species are known, two of which are described here for the first time. The taxonomy of the type species, P. chaetoceratis, is paid critical attention. The species are clearly distinguished by their host specificity and additionally by differences in morphology, especially of the trophonts. Using clonal cultures the life cycles of the three species are compared. The vegetative development may be interrupted by formation of temporary and resting cysts. In ageing cultures, stages with nuclear cyclosis occur, believed to indicate meiosis. In P. vonstoschii, the meiospores are capable of developing into resting cysts. As yet, knowledge on sexual reproduction is still incomplete.

  18. Intraseasonal patterns in coastal plankton biomass off central Chile derived from satellite observations and a biochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Fabian A.; Spitz, Yvette H.; Batchelder, Harold P.; Correa-Ramirez, Marco A.

    2017-10-01

    Subseasonal (5-130 days) environmental variability can strongly affect plankton dynamics, but is often overlooked in marine ecology studies. We documented the main subseasonal patterns of plankton biomass in the coastal upwelling system off central Chile, the southern part of the Humboldt System. Subseasonal variability was extracted from temporal patterns in satellite data of wind stress, sea surface temperature, and chlorophyll from the period 2003-2011, and from a realistically forced eddy-resolving physical-biochemical model from 2003 to 2008. Although most of the wind variability occurs at submonthly frequencies (biomass is within the intraseasonal band (30-90 days). The strongest intraseasonal coupling between wind and plankton is in spring-summer, when increased solar radiation enhances the phytoplankton response to upwelling. Biochemical model outputs show intraseasonal shifts in plankton community structure, mainly associated with the large fluctuations in diatom biomass. Diatom biomass peaks near surface during strong upwelling, whereas small phytoplankton biomass peaks at subsurface depths during relaxation or downwelling periods. Strong intraseasonally forced changes in biomass and species composition could strongly impact trophodynamics connections in the ecosystem, including the recruitment of commercially important fish species such as common sardine and anchovy. The wind-driven variability of chlorophyll concentration was connected to mid- and high-latitude atmospheric anomalies, which resemble disturbances with frequencies similar to the tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation.

  19. Continental diatom biodiversity in stream benthos declines as more nutrients become limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passy, Sophia I

    2008-07-15

    Biodiversity of both terrestrial ecosystems and lacustrine phytoplankton increases with niche dimensionality, which can be determined by the number of limiting resources (NLR) in the environment. In the present continental study, I tested whether niche dimensionality and, with this species, richness scale positively with NLR in running waters. Diatom richness in 2,426 benthic and 383 planktonic communities from 760 and 127 distinct localities, respectively, was examined as a function of NLR, including basic cations, silica, iron, ammonia, nitrate, and dissolved phosphorus. The patterns found in the two communities were opposite: as more resources became limiting, diatom richness declined in the benthos but increased in the phytoplankton. The divergence of benthic from both planktonic and terrestrial communities is attributed to the complex spatial organization of the benthos, generating strong internal resource gradients. Differential stress tolerance among benthic diatoms allows substantial overgrowth, which greatly reduces nutrient transport to the biofilm base and can be supported only by high ambient resource levels. Therefore, niche dimensionality in the benthos increases with the number of resources at high supply. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation of the well documented phenomenon of increased species richness after fertilization in freshwater as opposed to terrestrial ecosystems. Clearly, however, new theoretical approaches, retaining resource availability as an environmental constraint but incorporating a trade-off between tolerance and spatial positioning, are necessary to address coexistence in one of the major producer communities in streams, the algae.

  20. The effect of antibiotics on diatom communities

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.; Anil, A.C.

    Effect of antibiotics (penicillin (P), streptomycin (S) and chloramphenicol (C)) on benthic diatom communities was evaluated using a modified extinction–dilution method. The high antibiotic combinations (2PSC and PSC) reduced diatoms by 99...

  1. Diatom genomics: genetic acquisitions and mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, R Ellen R; Kilian, Oliver; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2004-12-29

    Diatom algae arose by two-step endosymbiosis. The complete genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has now been sequenced, allowing us to reconstruct the remarkable intracellular gene transfers that occurred during this convoluted cellular evolution.

  2. Diversity of assimilatory nitrate reductase genes from plankton and epiphytes associated with a seagrass bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhitya, Anita; Thomas, Florence I M; Ward, Bess B

    2007-11-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reductase gene fragments were isolated from epiphytes and plankton associated with seagrass blades collected from Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Nitrate reductase genes from diatoms (NR) and heterotrophic bacteria (nasA) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two sets of degenerate primers. A total of 129 NR and 75 nasA clones from four clone libraries, two from each of epiphytic and planktonic components, were sequenced and aligned. In addition, genomic DNA sequences for the NR fragment were obtained from Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii diatom cultures. Rarefaction analysis with an operational taxonomic unit cut-off of 6% indicated that diversity of the NR and nasA clone libraries were similar, and that sequencing of the clone libraries was not yet saturated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 121 of the 129 NR clones sequenced were similar to diatom sequences. Of the eight non-diatom sequences, four were most closely related to the sequence of Chlorella vulgaris. Introns were found in 8% of the Tampa Bay NR sequences; introns were also observed in S. costatum, but not T. weissflogii. Introns from within the same clone library exhibited close similarity in nucleotide sequence, position and length; the corresponding exon sequences were unique. Introns from within the same component were similar in position and length, but not in nucleotide sequence. These findings raise questions about the function of introns, and mechanisms or time evolution of intron formation. A large cluster of 14 of the 75 nasA sequences was similar to sequences from Vibrio species; other sequences were closely related to sequences from Alteromonas, alpha-proteobacteria and Marinomonas-like species. Biogeographically consistent patterns were observed for the nasA Tampa Bay sequences compared with sequences from other locations: for example, Tampa Bay sequences were similar to those from the South Atlantic Bight, but not the Barents Sea. The

  3. Communities structure of the planktonic halophiles in the solar saltern of Sfax, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2009-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the main planktonic halophilic micro-organisms (heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, phytoplankton, ciliates) and metazooplankton were investigated in six ponds of increasing salinity in the solar salt works of Sfax, Tunisia, from January to December 2003. Marked changes in the composition and biomass of the communities were found along the salinity gradient, especially at salinities of 150 and 350. Autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates characterized the less salted ponds. Planktonic biomass was the highest at intermediate salinity as a consequence of a bloom of Ochromonas. Species richness of phytoplankton, ciliates and zooplankton greatly decrease above a salinity of 150 and typical halophiles ( Dunaliella salina, cyanobacteria, Fabrea salina and Artemia salina) were found between 150 and 350 salinity. In this environment, F. salina appeared more adapted than the brine shrimp to survive during phytoplankton blooms. The halophilic plankton was however almost entirely composed of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the crystallizers. We thus observed a progressive disappearance of the autotrophic planktonic communities along the salinity gradient. Multivariate analysis of the communities provides evidence that ponds represent discrete aquatic ecosystems within this salt works.

  4. Mixotrophy in the Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David A.; Mitra, Aditee

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhizaria, are mixotrophic owing to their retention of functional algal organelles or maintenance of algal endosymbionts. Phototrophy among the microzooplankton may increase gross growth efficiency and carbon transfer through the microzooplankton to higher trophic levels. Characteristic assemblages of mixotrophs are associated with warm, temperate, and cold seas and with stratification, fronts, and upwelling zones. Modeling has indicated that mixotrophy has a profound impact on marine planktonic ecosystems and may enhance primary production, biomass transfer to higher trophic levels, and the functioning of the biological carbon pump.

  5. Storage compound production by phototrophic diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, P.R.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2015-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method for producing an enriched diatom culture, comprising subjecting a starting culture comprising one or more diatom species to selective pressure, thus giving a competitive advantage to storage compound producing species of diatoms, by subjecting said starting cult

  6. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  7. Mixotrophy in the marine plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David;

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic...... waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhizaria, are mixotrophic owing to their retention of functional algal organelles or maintenance of algal...

  8. Iron fertilization and the structure of planktonic communities in high nutrient regions of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéguiner, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    In this review article, plankton community structure observations are analyzed both for artificial iron fertilization experiments and also for experiments dedicated to the study of naturally iron-fertilized systems in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean in the POOZ (Permanently Open Ocean Zone) and the PFZ (Polar Frontal Zone). Observations made in natural systems are combined with those from artificially perturbed systems, in order to evaluate the seasonal evolution of pelagic communities, taking into account controlling factors related to the life cycles and the ecophysiology of dominant organisms. The analysis considers several types of planktonic communities, including both autotrophs and heterotrophs. These communities are spatially segregated owing to different life strategies. A conceptual general scheme is proposed to account for these observations and their variability, regardless of experiment type. Diatoms can be separated into 2 groups: Group 1 has slightly silicified fast growing cells that are homogeneously distributed in the surface mixed layer, and Group 2 has strongly silicified slowly growing cells within discrete layers. During the growth season, Group 1 diatoms show a typical seasonal succession of dominant species, within time windows of development that are conditioned by physical factors (light and temperature) as well as endogenous specific rhythms (internal clock), and biomass accumulation is controlled by the availability of nutrients. Group 1 diatoms are not directly grazed by mesozooplankton which is fed by protozooplankton, linking the microbial food web to higher trophic levels. Instead, successive dominant species of Group 1 are degraded via bacterial activity at the end of their growth season. Organic detritus fragments feed protozooplankton and mesozooplankton. The effective silicon pump leads to the progressive disappearance of silicic acid in surface waters. In contrast, Group 2 is resistant to grazing

  9. The Diatom Stratigraphy of Rawapening Lake, Implying Eutrophication History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Retnaningsih Soeprobowati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The use of diatoms to reconstruct past ecological conditions in lakes is well established. Diatoms are microscopic algae that forms siliceous frustules which allow them to preserve well in sediments. Rawapening Lake is one of 15 Indonesian lakes identified as 2010-2014 National Priority Lakes. Naturally, Rawapening is a tectono-volcanic lake. In the early 1900s, the sole outlet of the lake, Tuntang River, was impounded for hydroelectricity, irrigation and fisheries. Since then Rawapening had become a semi natural lake. The main problem of Rawapening Lake is blooming of water hyacinth that reduce lake function. This research was conducted in order to reconstruct the nutrient history of Rawapening Lake, Java. Approach: Sediment samples were taken from four sites and were sliced every 0.5 cm for diatom analysis and bulked across 2-5 cm for 210Pb radiometric dating of sediment. Diatom analysis consisted of three steps: the digestion process to separate the diatoms from the sediment; preparation and mounting of diatom residues onto slides and identification-enumeration. Results: The diatom-inferred condition of Rawapening Lake may be divided into four phases represented by zone 1 (1967-1974, zone 2 (1974-1983, zone 3 (1984-1990 and zone 4 (1990-2008. The predominance of Synedra from 1967 to present indicates that Rawapening Lake has been fresh and meso-eutrophic throughout. Zone 1 is also characterized by Fragilaria capucina Desm, Luticola goeppertiana (Bleisch Mann, Mayamae atomus (Kutzing Lange-Bertalot, Navicula radiosa Kutzing, Nitzschia palea (Kutzing W. Smith and in one site, Tryblionella apiculata Gregory, that reflect eutrophic, but clear waters. An increase in epiphytic Gomphonema spp. in zone 2 marks an increase in aquatic macrophyte plants, perhaps in response to high nutrient levels. This change is followed promptly by an increase in acidophilous Eunotia spp. reflecting high organic production. A transition to a diatom

  10. Dynamic diatom response to changing climate 0–1.2 Ma at Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Snyder

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Lake El'gygytgyn sediment record contains an abundant diatom flora through most intervals of the lake's history, providing a means to create and test hypotheses concerning the lake's response to changing climates. The 0–1.2 Ma core interval is characterized by shifts in the dominant planktonic genera and events of exceptional concentration and diversity. Warm interglacial intervals have enhanced concentration and diversity of the plankton. This response is most extreme during exceptional events corresponding to marine isotope stages (MIS 11 and 31. Diatom concentration and diversity also increase during some cold intervals (e.g., MIS 2, suggesting conditions of lake circulation and nutrient cycling promoting diatom production during these events. Short intervals of low plankton concentration accompanied by shifts in the dominant genus of the lake suggest conditions during certain cold events generate a severe impact on plankton production. The absence of these events during extended intervals of low summer insolation variability suggests a muted cold-event response of the lake system linked to regional climate.

  11. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay.

  12. A paleolimnological assessment of acidification and liming effects on diatom assemblages in a Swedish lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renberg, I. (Umea Univ. (Sweden)); Hultberg, H. (Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goteborg (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    In Sweden, ca 6000 lakes have been limed to mitigate acidification. Lysevatten in southwestern Sweden was limed in 1974 and 1986 and has better historical pH and fish records than most other, similar forest lakes. Historical data were compared with diatom analyses of a sediment core to assess to what extent diatom-inferred pH reflects the known pH history. The diatom-inferred pH history agrees well with the development known from documentary sources, although the sediment record is slightly smoothed. Both the historical and sediment records show that the acidification, with acid episodes that caused severe damage to lake biota, began during the 1940s and became acute in the 1960s, with pH values of 4.5-4.9. Prior to acidification, the lake water pH was between 6 and 7, and the lake had a planktonic Cyclotella flora. The liming increased pH to 7.5 and resulted in the expansion of Achnanthes minutissima, Cymbella microcephala, and Synedra acus. The reacidification is reflected by a decrease in abundance of these species. Neither the liming in 1974 or the liming in 1986 restored the preacidification diatom flora; there was no recovery of Cyclotella. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Chemical ecology of marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Emily R; Poulin, Remington X; Mojib, Nazia; Kubanek, Julia

    2016-07-28

    Covering: January 2013 to online publication December 2014This review summarizes recent research in the chemical ecology of marine pelagic ecosystems, and aims to provide a comprehensive overview of advances in the field in the time period covered. In order to highlight the role of chemical cues and toxins in plankton ecology this review has been organized by ecological interaction types starting with intraspecific interactions, then interspecific interactions (including facilitation and mutualism, host-parasite, allelopathy, and predator-prey), and finally community and ecosystem-wide interactions.

  14. Hydromechanical signals in the plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre

    2001-01-01

    The distance at which plankters can detect and thus interact with each other depends on their sensitivity, size, and motion, as well as the hydrodynamic characteristics of their behaviour. Through a simple consideration of the distribution of forces exerted on the ambient fluid by different...... plankton behaviours, it is possible to deduce the spatial scale over-which the associated hydromechanical disturbance propagates. At low Reynolds numbers, for passive sinking or for a feeding current, the associated hydromechanical velocity, u, attenuates with distance, r, as u proportional to a Ur(-1...

  15. The predictive skill of species distribution models for plankton in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Philipp; Kiørboe, Thomas; Licandro, Priscilla; Payne, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Statistical species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to project spatial relocations of marine taxa under future climate change scenarios. However, tests of their predictive skill in the real-world are rare. Here, we use data from the Continuous Plankton Recorder program, one of the longest running and most extensive marine biological monitoring programs, to investigate the reliability of predicted plankton distributions. We apply three commonly used SDMs to 20 representative plankton species, including copepods, diatoms, and dinoflagellates, all found in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas. We fit the models to decadal subsets of the full (1958-2012) dataset, and then use them to predict both forward and backward in time, comparing the model predictions against the corresponding observations. The probability of correctly predicting presence was low, peaking at 0.5 for copepods, and model skill typically did not outperform a null model assuming distributions to be constant in time. The predicted prevalence increasingly differed from the observed prevalence for predictions with more distance in time from their training dataset. More detailed investigations based on four focal species revealed that strong spatial variations in skill exist, with the least skill at the edges of the distributions, where prevalence is lowest. Furthermore, the scores of traditional single-value model performance metrics were contrasting and some implied overoptimistic conclusions about model skill. Plankton may be particularly challenging to model, due to its short life span and the dispersive effects of constant water movements on all spatial scales, however there are few other studies against which to compare these results. We conclude that rigorous model validation, including comparison against null models, is essential to assess the robustness of projections of marine planktonic species under climate change. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Wigner-Witmer diatomic eigenfunction

    CERN Document Server

    Hornkohl, James O; Parigger, Christian G

    2015-01-01

    Born and Oppenheimer reported an approximate separation of molecular eigenfunctions into electronic, vibrational, and rotational parts, but at the end of their paper showed that the two angles describing rotation of the nuclei in a diatomic molecule are exactly separable. A year later in a two-part work devoted strictly to diatomic molecules, Wigner and Witmer published (1) an exact diatomic eigenfunction and (2) the rules correlating the electronic state of a diatomic molecule to the orbital and spin momenta of the separated atoms. The second part of the Wigner-Witmer paper became famous for its correlation rules, but, oddly, the exact eigenfunction from which their rules were obtained received hardly any attention. Using three fundamental symmetries, we give a derivation of the Wigner-Witmer diatomic eigenfunction. Applications of our derivations are fundamental to predicting accurate diatomic molecular spectra that we compare with recorded spectra for diagnostic purposes, such as measurements of molecular ...

  17. Prospects for commercial production of diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jaw-Kai; Seibert, Michael

    2017-01-18

    In this review, a simple procedure that portends the open-pond growth of commercially viable diatoms is discussed. We examined a number of topics relevant to the production and harvesting of diatoms as well as topics concerning the production of bioproducts from diatoms. Among the former topics, we show that it is currently possible to continuously grow diatoms and control the presence of invasive species without chemical toxins at an average annual yield of 132 MT dry diatoms ha-1 over a period of almost 5 years, while maintaining the dominancy of the optimal diatom species on a seasonal basis. The dominant species varies during the year. The production of microalgae is essentially agriculture, but without the ability to control invasive species in the absence of herbicides and insecticides, pollution and production costs would be prohibitive. Among the latter topics are the discussions of whether it is better to produce lipids and then convert them to biofuels or maximize the production of diatom biomass and then convert it to biocrude products using, for example, hydrothermal processes. It is becoming increasingly evident that without massive public support, the commercial production of microalgal biofuels alone will remain elusive. While economically competitive production of biofuels from diatoms will be difficult, when priority is given to multiple high-value products, including wastewater treatment, and when biofuels are considered co-products in a systems approach to commercial production of diatoms, an economically competitive process will become more likely.

  18. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm, yielding pH values (on the total scale from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1 prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2 first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3 second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.

  19. Scalar transport by planktonic swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2012-11-01

    Nutrient and energy transport in the ocean is primarily governed by the action of physical phenomena. In previous studies it has been suggested that aquatic fauna may significantly contribute to this process through the action of the induced drift mechanism. In this investigation, the role of planktonic swarms as ecosystem engineers is assessed through the analysis of scalar transport within a stratified water column. The vertical migration of Artemia salina is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. The scalar transport of fluorescent dye is visualized and quantified through planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms enhances scalar transport relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present. Funded by the BSF program (2011553).

  20. The velocity of light intensity increase modulates the photoprotective response in coastal diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Giovagnetti

    Full Text Available In aquatic ecosystems, the superimposition of mixing events to the light diel cycle exposes phytoplankton to changes in the velocity of light intensity increase, from diurnal variations to faster mixing-related ones. This is particularly true in coastal waters, where diatoms are dominant. This study aims to investigate if coastal diatoms differently activate the photoprotective responses, xanthophyll cycle (XC and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ, to cope with predictable light diel cycle and unpredictable mixing-related light variations. We compared the effect of two fast light intensity increases (simulating mixing events with that of a slower increase (corresponding to the light diel cycle on the modulation of XC and NPQ in the planktonic coastal diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. During each light treatment, the photon flux density (PFD progressively increased from darkness to five peaks, ranging from 100 to 650 µmol photons m-2 s-1. Our results show that the diel cycle-related PFD increase strongly activates XC through the enhancement of the carotenoid biosynthesis and induces a moderate and gradual NPQ formation over the light gradient. In contrast, during mixing-related PFD increases, XC is less activated, while higher NPQ rapidly develops at moderate PFD. We observe that together with the light intensity and its increase velocity, the saturation light for photosynthesis (Ek is a key parameter in modulating photoprotection. We propose that the capacity to adequately regulate and actuate alternative photoprotective 'safety valves' in response to changing velocity of light intensity increase further enhances the photophysiological flexibility of diatoms. This might be an evolutionary outcome of diatom adaptation to turbulent marine ecosystems characterized by unpredictable mixing-related light changes over the light diel cycle.

  1. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J.; Walne, Anthony W.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2017-01-01

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity. PMID:28186097

  2. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2016-08-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics of such communities, researchers need accurate and rapid techniques for detecting plankton species. We evaluated the diversity of eukaryotic plankton over a salinity gradient by applying a metagenomics tool at the Nakdong River estuary in Korea. Environmental samples were collected on three dates during summer and autumn of 2011 at the Eulsukdo Bridge at the mouth of that river. Amplifying the 18S rDNA allowed us to analyze 456 clones and 122 phylotypes. Metagenomic sequences revealed various taxonomic groups and cryptic genetic variations at the intra- and inter-specific levels. By analyzing the same station at each sampling date, we observed that the phylotypes presented a salinity-related pattern of diversity in assemblages. The variety of species within freshwater samples reflected the rapid environmental changes caused by freshwater inputs. Dinophyceae phylotypes accounted for the highest proportion of overall diversity in the seawater samples. Euryhaline diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed in the freshwater, brackish and seawater samples. The biological data for species composition demonstrate the transitional state between freshwater and seawater. Therefore, this metagenomics information can serve as a biological indicator for tracking changes in aquatic environments.

  3. The diatom-derived aldehyde decadienal affects life cycle transition in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis through nitric oxide/ERK signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Castellano, Immacolata; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are fatty-acid-derived metabolites produced by some microalgae, including different diatom species. PUAs are mainly produced as a wound-activated defence mechanism against microalgal predators or released from senescent cells at the end of a bloom. PUAs, including 2,4-trans-decadienal (DD), induce deleterious effects on embryonic and larval development of several planktonic and benthic organisms. Here, we report on the effects of DD on larval development and m...

  4. Discovery of two novel viruses expands the diversity of single-stranded DNA and single-stranded RNA viruses infecting a cosmopolitan marine diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kei; Tomaru, Yuji

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that diatom viruses are an important factor affecting diatom population dynamics, which in turn are important in considering marine primary productivity. The marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros tenuissimus Meunier is a cosmopolitan species and often causes blooms off the western coast of Japan. To date, two viruses, C. tenuissimus DNA virus (CtenDNAV) type I and CtenRNAV type I, have been identified that potentially affect C. tenuissimus population dynamics in the natural environment. In this study, we successfully isolated and characterized two additional novel viruses (CtenDNAV type II and CtenRNAV type II). This paper reports the basic characteristics of these new viruses isolated from surface water or sediment from the Hiroshima Bay, Japan. The physiological and morphological characteristics of the two new viruses were similar to those of the previously isolated viruses. However, the amino acid sequences of the structural proteins of CtenDNAV type II and CtenRNAV type II were clearly distinct from those of both type I viruses, with identity scores of 38.3% and 27.6%, respectively. Our results suggest that at least four genetically distinct viruses sharing the same diatom host are present in western Japan and affect the population dynamics of C. tenuissimus. Moreover, the result that CtenRNAV type II lysed multiple diatom species indicates that RNA viruses may affect various diatom populations in the natural environment.

  5. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen;

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 10(12) mol Si per year, which makes them t...

  6. Diatom Identification : a Double Challenge Called ADIAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buf, Hans du; Bayer, Micha; Droop, Stephen; Head, Ritchie; Juggins, Steve; Fischer, Stefan; Bunke, Horst; Wilkinson, Michael; Roerdink, Jos; Pech-Pacheco, José; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Shahbazkia, Hamid; Ciobanu, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the project ADIAC (Automatic Diatom Identification and Classification), which started in May 1998 and which is financed by the European MAST (Marine Science and Technology) programme. The main goal is to develop algorithms for an automatic identification of diatoms using image

  7. GLOBEC NEP Vertical Plankton Tow (VPT) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) California Current Program Vertical Plankton Tow (VPT) Data For more information, see...

  8. GLOBEC NEP MOCNESS Plankton (MOC1) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) California Current Program MOCNESS Plankton (MOC1) Data The MOCNESS is based on the Tucker Trawl...

  9. the vertical migration behaviour of estuarine plankton

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of investigations on the vertical migration behaviour of estuarine zooplankton have been ... This behaviour is particularly well-marked in the plankton of estuaries. Some of the .... time during the night and descended before dawn.

  10. Localised mixing and heterogeneity in the plankton food web in a frontal region of the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Joøgen; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2014-01-01

    the diatom communities at 10 m and > 100 m (in the deep chlorophyll maximum, DCM) than in other parts of the frontal region. Thorpe displacements supported the hypothesis of elevated mixing intensities around these stations, as did vertical mixing rates inferred from stratification and vertical current shear...... influence the plankton food web, as indicated by elevated values/concentrations of (1) primary production, (2) variable fluorescence (F-v/F-m) and (3) total seston. In addition, the fraction of the total biomass of both copepods and nauplii found closest to the DCM in the frontal region correlated...

  11. Latest Pliocene and Quaternary diatom floras of the Lake Tahoe basin, California and Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starratt, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    Despite an active research program at Lake Tahoe, few attempts have been made to understand the conditions that existed within the watershed prior to European contact. A greater understanding of the Quaternary history of the basin would not only benefit local stakeholders, but would also enhance the knowledge of the entire Truckee River system. Lake Tahoe has been called one of the most oligotrophic lakes in the world. Historically, the lake has contained low levels of phosphorus (5 g/L) and nitrogen (100 g/L). As a result, the abundance of phytoplankton and zooplankton is also low. Over the past century anthropogenic inputs have caused parts of the lake to become seasonally mesotrophic. The impact of climate variability on the nutrient load in the lake is poorly known. Detailed analysis of the pre-European contact record is necessary in order to unravel the complex interaction between natural and human inputs to the watershed. Dredge samples collected from slump blocks and surface sediments in the deep basin and surface samples collected at a number of sites around the margin of Lake Tahoe have been analyzed for diatoms and chrysophyte stomatocysts. The deep lake basin diatom flora is dominated by planktonic, oligotrophic, alkaliphilic taxa such as Cyclotella bodanica and C. ocellata. Planktonic and obligate planktonic taxa ( Aulacoseira distans, Fragilaria crotonensis, Stephanodiscus spp.) found close to shore and benthic taxa are representative of oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions ( Frustulia rhomboides, Tetracyclus glans, Achnanthes minutissima, Epithemia spp., Rhopalodia gibba, Meridion circulare). Several samples of diatomaceous sediment collected near Tahoe City, California, on the west side of the lake, contain taxa that are representative of shallow, more eutrophic conditions and at least one of these samples contains late Pliocene taxa ( Tertiarius sp., Pliocaenicus sp.), which suggests that at least locally, the lake at that time was shallower and was

  12. Gelatinous plankton: irregularities rule the world (sometimes)

    OpenAIRE

    Boero, F.; Bouillon, J; GRAVILI C.; Miglietta, M. P.; Parsons, T. R.; Piraino, S.

    2008-01-01

    In spite of being one of the most relevant components of the biosphere, the plankton-benthos network is still poorly studied as such. This is partly due to the irregular occurrence of driving phenomena such as gelatinous plankton pulses in this realm. Gelatinous plankters rely on their life cycles and histories to exploit temporarily abundant resources with an undeniable, but often overlooked, impact on marine food webs. Dramatic increases of gelatinous filter-feeders and/or carnivores (both ...

  13. VARIASI SPESIES DIATOM PADA TIPE PERAIRAN BERBEDA UNTUK KEPENTINGAN FORENSIK SEBAGAI PETUNJUK KEMATIAN AKIBAT TENGGELAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Arifiani Purnomo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine diatom species in Unda River, BadungRiver, Lake Beratan, estuarine and marine waters of Padang Galak, that can be used to indicatedeath scene caused by drowning. Waters collected to 50 liters by using plankton net and carriedin a 25 ml glass bottle. The results of the research found that there were 60 species diatom from26 genera, 23 families, 2 orders, and 1 class. Among the 60 species in this research, can beindicate as 12 species are typical species of Unda River, 5 species are typical species of BadungRiver, 1 species is typical of Lake Beratan, 9 species are typical of Padang Galak Estuary, and 19species are typical to Padang Galak Sea. Among the typical species in every research site, thereare one species that has higher number: Fragilaria sp. 1 in Unda River, Gomphonema sp. 3 inBadung River. Cymbella sp. 3 in Lake Beratan, Cyclotella sp., in Padang Galak Estuarine, andCocconeis sp. 2 in Padang Galak Sea.Keywords: forensic, diatom, river, lake, sea

  14. PRELIMINARY PLANKTON INVESTIGATIONS IN THE GRAVEL PIT AND WINTERPONDS NEAR JAGODNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tomec

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of plankton populations have been performed in the gravel pit and two winterponds near the place Jagodno, Novo Čiće, in the vicinity of Velika Gorica. Our goal was to examine plankton composition of the gravel pit and winterponds, two ecosystems characterized by specific life–conditions which change with time and space. Investigations were conducted during June 2007. Plankton samples were collected from water surface layer at four locations (two locations in the gravel pit and one location in each of two winterponds. Along with plankton sample collecting, measurements were made of some physico–chemical parameters (water temperature, pH–values and dissolved oxygen content in water. Water temperature at two sampling locations in the gravel pit and one location at each of the winterponds depended on the surrounding air temperature, and ranged from 22.5ºC to 23.6ºC. pH–reaction was alkaline, ranging from 8. 23 to 9. 02. Dissolved oxygen content in the gravel pit was around 10 mg/O2; in winterponds it ranged from 7.6 to 9.7 mg/O2 (Table 1. At the gravel pit locations total number of 32 phytoplankton species were determined; in winterponds were determined 37 (microphytic species? while zooplankton was represented in the phytoplankton community composition at the four locations with 5 species. Phytoplankton species determined in the samples from two gravel pit locations belonged to the system groups Dinophyta, Chrysophyta and Chlorophyta while in the samples from winterpond locations, along with the mentioned system groups, were found as well the representatives from the groups Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria and Euglenophyta. Zooplankton species belonged to the groups Rotatoria, Cladocera and Copepoda (Table 2. In gravel pit locations dominated diatoms or Bacillarophyceae while in winterponds the majority of phytoplankton mass consisted of the representatives of the species Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria and Euglenophyta. Qualitative

  15. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Legendre, Louis; Guidi, Lionel; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Jamet, Dominique; Mousseau, Laure; Pedrotti, Maria-Luiza; Picheral, Marc; Gorsky, Gabriel; Sardet, Christian; Stemmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available). Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche) weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model) characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  16. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Romagnan

    Full Text Available Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes and larger (i.e. macroplankton organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available. Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  17. The presence of pollutant hydrocarbons in estuarine epipelic diatom populations. II. Diatom slimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.; Eglinton, G.

    1979-01-01

    Diatom slime in sediment from the Severn intertidal estuary was analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) and aliphatic hydrocarbons, using computerized capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The distributions of these substances in diatoms were compared with those in the underlying sediment and in a sediment-free diatom population. Aliphatic hydrocarbon distribution in slime was about the same as that of separated diatoms and sediment, while PAH distribution in slime was about that of the sediment alone. These results suggest a loss of PAH's from the coalesced sediment in the slime, probably either by a photo-oxidative or catabolic process. 34 references, 2 tables.

  18. Diatoms as paleoecological indicators of environmental change in the Lake Czechowskie catchments ecosystem (Northern Tuchola Pinewoods, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Zawiska, Izabela; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka Maria; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated four cores of biogenic sediments from the lakes located in close vicinity. Three cores are situated along a transect in the Lake Czechowskie basin from its deepest point towards a former lake bay. The fourth sediment core was retrieved from the nearby Trzechowskie paleolake. Lake Czechowskie is located in the northern part of the Tuchola Pinewoods District (Northern Poland) in a young glacial landscape. At present, the majority of the area is forested or used for agriculture. The main focus was of the study was Late Glacial and early Holocene period. We performed diatom, Cladocera and pollen analyses, the chronology was established by varve counting, confirmed by AMS 14C dating and Laacher See Tephra (Wulf et. all 2013). In this study we focused on the results of diatom analyses. Diatom assemblages are integrated indicators of environmental change because their distributions are closely linked to water quality parameters including such as nutrient availability. At the beginning of Allerød there are more eutrophic diatom taxa such as Staurosira construens, Pseudostaurosira brevistriata, Staurosira pinnata. These species are widely distributed in the littoral mainly freshwater, many of which are species of epiphytic, preferring water rich in nutrients. At the end of the Allerød we observe significant changes within diatom assemblages. The increase of planktonic Cyclotella comensis together with the decrease of benthic Stauroseria construens indicate the shortening of time with ice cove on the lake and longer time with summer stratification. In the Younger Dryas cooling we can see the increase of the abundance of diatom Staurosira construens which indicate cold spring and late ice-out (Bradbury et al., 2002). At the early Holocene planktonic diatoms increase in particular Cyclotella comensis, Punciculata radiosa and Cyclotella praetermissa. Some of Aulacoseira species at the end of Younger Dryas. The Holocene sediments showed no

  19. Digitisation of the South African diatom collection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Molen, J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This presentation gives the background of the Diatom collection as well as an overview of the collection content. The two phases of the digitisation process are described in detail...

  20. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz A. Bromke

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity.

  1. Response of diatoms and silicoflagellates to climate change in the Santa Barbara Basin during the past 250 years and the rise of the toxic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David; Field, David B.; Finney, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms and silicoflagellate assemblages were examined in two year-increments of varved samples spanning the interval from 1748 through 2007 in Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) box core SBBC0806 to determine the timing and impact of possible 20th century warming on several different components of the plankton. Diatoms (Thalassionema nitzschioides =TN) and silicoflagellates (Distephanus speculum s.l. =DS) indicative of cooler waters and a shallow thermocline begin to decline in the 1920s and persistently compose a lower percentage of the assemblage in the SBB by about 1940. Prior to 1940, TN constituted on average ~30% of the Chaetoceros-free diatom sediment assemblage and DS on average ~36% of the silicoflagellate assemblage. Between 1940 and 1996 these relative abundances were ~20% (TN) and ~8% (DS). These results are consistent with results from planktonic foraminifera and radiolarians that indicate an influence of 20th century warming on marine ecosystems before most scientific observations began. Cooling of surface waters coincident with the one of the strongest La Niña events of the 20th century (and a return to negative PDO conditions) in late 1998 brought about a return to pre-1940 values of these cool water taxa (TN ~31%, DS ~25%). However, this recent regional cooling appears to have been accompanied by profound changes in the diatom assemblage. Pseudo-nitzschia australis, and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries, diatom species associated with domoic acid, a neurotoxin that causes shellfish poisoning and marine mammal deaths, rapidly became dominant in the SBB sediment record at the time of the regional cooling (1999) and increased substantially in numbers as a bloom-forming taxon (relative to Chaetoceros spores) in 2003. Prior to 2003 diatom blooms recorded in the SBB sediment record consisted predominantly of Chaetoceros spores and less commonly of Rhizosolenia-related species (Neocalyptrella robusta and R. setigera). Fecal pellets dominated by valves of P. australis

  2. Responses of marine plankton to pollutant stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, M.

    The thesis analyses effects of pollutants on natural plankton communities on the basis of three independent mesocosm experiments and a series of laboratory experiments performed in Denmark and Greenland. The work focus on integrating functional and structural measures of community responses to re...... with examples of work done on natural communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Abiotic conditions such as UV light and nutrient concentrations are shown to influence pollutant effects.......The thesis analyses effects of pollutants on natural plankton communities on the basis of three independent mesocosm experiments and a series of laboratory experiments performed in Denmark and Greenland. The work focus on integrating functional and structural measures of community responses...

  3. SEAMAP Spring 2016 Plankton Survey (R21601, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2016 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  4. SEAMAP Fall 2014 Plankton Survey (GU1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2014 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  5. SEAMAP Spring 2015 Plankton Survey (GU1501, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  6. SEAMAP 2015 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1504, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  7. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  8. Planktonic foraminifera from core tops of western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    A set of seven core tops from western equatorial Indian ocean were analysed for planktonic foraminifera, which has yielded 20 planktonic foraminiferal species. Among them Globorotalia menardii, Globigerinoides sacculifer and G. ruber constitute...

  9. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  10. Direct versus indirect climate controls on Holocene diatom assemblages in a sub-tropical deep, alpine lake (Lugu Hu, Yunnan, SW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yang, Xiangdong; Anderson, Nicholas John; Dong, Xuhui

    2016-07-01

    The reconstruction of Holocene environmental changes in lakes on the plateau region of southwest China provides an understanding of how these ecosystems may respond to climate change. Fossil diatom assemblages were investigated from an 11,000-year lake sediment core from a deep, alpine lake (Lugu Hu) in southwest China, an area strongly influenced by the southwest (or the Indian) summer monsoon. Changes in diatom assemblage composition, notably the abundance of the two dominant planktonic species, Cyclotella rhomboideo-elliptica and Cyclostephanos dubius, reflect the effects of climate variability on nutrient dynamics, mediated via thermal stratification (internal nutrient cycling) and catchment-vegetation processes. Statistical analyses of the climate-diatom interactions highlight the strong effect of changing orbitally-induced solar radiation during the Holocene, presumably via its effect on the lake's thermal budget. In a partial redundancy analysis, climate (solar insolation) and proxies reflecting catchment process (pollen percentages, C/N ratio) were the most important drivers of diatom ecological change, showing the strong effects of climate-catchment-vegetation interactions on lake functioning. This diatom record reflects long-term ontogeny of the lake-catchment ecosystem and suggests that climatic changes (both temperature and precipitation) impact lake ecology indirectly through shifts in thermal stratification and catchment nutrient exports.

  11. Cadmium and lead interaction with diatom surfaces: A combined thermodynamic and kinetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélabert, A.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Schott, J.; Boudou, A.; Feurtet-Mazel, A.

    2007-08-01

    This work is devoted to the physico-chemical study of cadmium and lead interaction with diatom-water interfaces for two marine planktonic ( Thalassiosira weissflogii, TW; Skeletonema costatum, SC) and two freshwater periphytic species ( Achnanthidium minutissimum, AMIN; Navicula minima, NMIN) by combining adsorption measurements with surface complexation modeling. Adsorption kinetics was studied as a function of pH and initial metal concentration in sodium nitrate solution and in culture media. Kinetic data were consistent with a two-step mechanism in which the loss of a water molecule from the inner coordination sphere of the metal is rate limiting. Reversible adsorption experiments, with 3 h of exposure to metal, were performed as a function of pH (2-9), metal concentration in solution (10 -9-10 -3 M), and ionic strength (10 -3-1.0 M). While the shape of pH-dependent adsorption edge is similar among all four diatom species, the constant-pH adsorption isotherm and maximal binding capacities differ. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities ( μ) revealed negative surface potential for AMIN diatom, however, the absolute value of μ decreases with increase of [Pb 2+] aq suggesting the metal adsorption on negative surface sites. These observations allowed us to construct a surface complexation model (SCM) for cadmium and lead binding by diatom surfaces that postulates the Constant Capacitance of the electric double layer and considers Cd and Pb complexation with mainly carboxylic and, partially, silanol groups. In the full range of investigated Cd concentration, the SCM is able to describe the concentration of adsorbed metal as a function of [Cd 2+] aq without implying the presence of high affinity, low abundance sites, that are typically used to model the metal interactions with natural multi-component organic substances. At the same time, Cd fast initial reaction requires the presence of "highly reactive sites" those concentration represents only 2.5-3% of the

  12. Planktonic interactions and chaotic advection in Langmuir circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bees, Martin Alan; Mezic, I.; McGlade, J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of unsteady laminar flows for planktonic communities is investigated. Langmuir circulation is used, as a typical medium-scale structure, to illustrate mechanisms for the generation of plankton patches. Two behaviours are evident: chaotic regions that help to spread plankton and locally c...... coherent regions that do not mix with the chaotic regions and which persist for long periods of time. The interaction of populations of phytoplankton with zooplankton is discussed, taking into account the variations in plankton buoyancy....

  13. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic VC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechkivska, Olha; Morse, Michael D

    2013-12-19

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy has been applied to diatomic VC, providing the first optical spectrum of this molecule. The ground state is determined to be a (2)Δ3/2 state that arises from the 1σ(2)1π(4)2σ(2)1δ(1) configuration. The r0" ground-state bond length is 1.6167(3) Å. The manifold of excited vibronic states in the visible portion of the spectrum is quite dense, but two possible vibrational progressions have been identified. It is noted that VC joins CrC, NbC, and MoC as species in which the metal ns-based 3σ orbital is unoccupied, resulting in large dipole moments in the ground states of these molecules. In the corresponding 5d metal carbides, however, the 3σ orbital is occupied, leading to different ground electronic states of the 5d congeners, TaC and WC.

  14. Diatom-Specific Oligosaccharide and Polysaccharide Structures Help to Unravel Biosynthetic Capabilities in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gügi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are marine organisms that represent one of the most important sources of biomass in the ocean, accounting for about 40% of marine primary production, and in the biosphere, contributing up to 20% of global CO2 fixation. There has been a recent surge in developing the use of diatoms as a source of bioactive compounds in the food and cosmetic industries. In addition, the potential of diatoms such as Phaeodactylum tricornutum as cell factories for the production of biopharmaceuticals is currently under evaluation. These biotechnological applications require a comprehensive understanding of the sugar biosynthesis pathways that operate in diatoms. Here, we review diatom glycan and polysaccharide structures, thus revealing their sugar biosynthesis capabilities.

  15. Application of normalized biomass size spectra to laser optical plankton counter net intercomparisons of zooplankton distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, A. W.; Harvey, M.

    2006-05-01

    The optical plankton counter (OPC) and recently the laser OPC (LOPC) have been used primarily in two measurement applications: (1) identification of specific zooplankton species and (2) changes in zooplankton community structure using size-based spectral measurements. The normalized biomass size spectra (NBSS) are one representation of the size-based approach. The present study is based on utilizing the NBSS to describe the conditions or characteristics of the zooplankton community that allow a reasonable intercomparison of net samples and LOPC measurements made simultaneously for data collected during two oceanographic cruises carried out in the Lower Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence in spring 2001 and 2002, respectively. NBSS linear slopes plankton material such as diatom aggregates and gelatinous material (present during or immediately following blooms) that are less present in nets and are not intercomparable with LOPC measurements. Conversely, slopes >-0.7, or more "blue water" conditions, indicate the potential for reasonable intercomparison of the two methods. This observation applies to smaller-sized zooplankton such as copepodites of Calanus spp. with equivalent spherical diameter gelatinous material and reasonable intercomparisons between LOPC and net were obtained for both sampling years. The LOPC signals produced by Calanus spp. (IV-VI) were larger and more easily separated.

  16. Laboratory and field studies of polonium and plutonium in marine plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.C. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: richard.c.wilson@westlakes.ac.uk; Watts, S.J.; Vives i Batlle, J.; McDonald, P. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Uptake experiments were successfully undertaken for polonium and plutonium in the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. Experiments were complemented with a field study which yielded concentration factors for these radionuclides for plankton samples collected in the eastern Irish Sea. The uptake experiment produced uptake half times of 0.8 and 0.6 days for plutonium and polonium, respectively. Concentration factors of 3.1 x 10{sup 5} l kg{sup -1} for plutonium and 2.4 x 10{sup 5} l kg{sup -1} for polonium were consistent with those suggested by the IAEA for phytoplankton. Concentration factors derived from the field study were 2 x 10{sup 3} l kg{sup -1} for plutonium and 1.4 x 10{sup 4} l kg{sup -1} for polonium and were more consistent with IAEA values for zooplankton rather than phytoplankton. The maximum calculated dose rate due to Po and Pu in plankton sampled in the field was 0.12 {mu}Gy h{sup -1}. In applying the laboratory-derived phytoplankton CF values for Po and Pu, higher dose rates, in the range 6-11 {mu}Gy h{sup -1}, were calculated. The latter values are well below the UNSCEAR and IAEA review value of 400 {mu}Gy h{sup -1}, and are also below the Environment Agency marine action level of 40 {mu}Gy h{sup -1}.

  17. Laboratory and field studies of polonium and plutonium in marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R C; Watts, S J; Vives i Batlle, J; McDonald, P

    2009-08-01

    Uptake experiments were successfully undertaken for polonium and plutonium in the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. Experiments were complemented with a field study which yielded concentration factors for these radionuclides for plankton samples collected in the eastern Irish Sea. The uptake experiment produced uptake half times of 0.8 and 0.6 days for plutonium and polonium, respectively. Concentration factors of 3.1 x 10(5) l kg(-1) for plutonium and 2.4 x 10(5) l kg(-1) for polonium were consistent with those suggested by the IAEA for phytoplankton. Concentration factors derived from the field study were 2 x 10(3) l kg(-1) for plutonium and 1.4 x 10(4) l kg(-1) for polonium and were more consistent with IAEA values for zooplankton rather than phytoplankton. The maximum calculated dose rate due to Po and Pu in plankton sampled in the field was 0.12 microGyh(-1). In applying the laboratory-derived phytoplankton CF values for Po and Pu, higher dose rates, in the range 6-11 microGyh(-1), were calculated. The latter values are well below the UNSCEAR and IAEA review value of 400 microGyh(-1), and are also below the Environment Agency marine action level of 40 microGyh(-1).

  18. Factors affecting egg ratios in planktonic rotifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Gulati, R.D.; Nandini, S.

    2005-01-01

    Edmondson’s egg ratio (number of amictic eggs per female) is an important life history variable, which has been in wide use to understand and predict patterns of population growth in planktonic rotifers under field conditions. It is also useful as an indicator of the health of rotifers under culture

  19. Nutrient-enrichment effect on plankton composition:

    OpenAIRE

    Malej, Alenka; Mozetič, Patricija; Turk, Valentina

    1998-01-01

    Three enrichment experiments were conduced in order to analyze the development of plankton biomass and species composition as a response to different nutrient regimes. The additions of all nutrients had the most profound effect on phytoplankton biomass increase, whereas picoplankton abundance decreased continuously in all treatments. Initially dominating phytoplanktonic groups and species expanded significantly towards the end of experiments...

  20. Seasonal dynamics of plankton communities coupled with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal dynamics of plankton communities coupled with environmental factors ... In this study, we studied the influence of the physical-chemical and biological ... which are well related to changes in algae diversity and abundance, noting that ... The “top-down” effect of planktivorous fish on the zooplankton is a significant ...

  1. Micro- and nanotechnologies in plankton research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Javeed Shaikh

    2015-05-01

    A better understanding of the vast range of plankton and their interactions with the marine environment would allow prediction of their large-scale impact on the marine ecosystem, and provide in-depth knowledge on pollution and climate change. Numerous technologies, especially lab-on-a-chip microsystems, are being used to this end. Marine biofouling is a global issue with significant economic consequences. Ecofriendly polymer nanotechnologies are being developed to combat marine biofouling. Furthermore, nanomaterials hold great potential for bioremediation and biofuel production. Excellent reviews covering focused topics in plankton research exist, with only a handful discussing both micro- and nanotechnologies. This work reviews both micro- and nanotechnologies applied to broad-ranging plankton research topics including flow cytometry, chemotaxis/toxicity assays, biofilm formation, marine antifouling/fouling-release surfaces and coatings, green energy, green nanomaterials, microalgae immobilization, and bioremediation. It is anticipated that developments in plankton research will see engineered exploitation of micro- and nanotechnologies. The current review is therefore intended to promote micro-/nanotechnology researchers to team up with limnologists/oceanographers, and develop novel strategies for understanding and green exploitation of the complex marine ecosystem.

  2. Influence of plankton community structure on the sinking velocity of marine aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, L. T.; Boxhammer, T.; Larsen, A.; Hildebrandt, N.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-08-01

    About 50 Gt of carbon is fixed photosynthetically by surface ocean phytoplankton communities every year. Part of this organic matter is reprocessed within the plankton community to form aggregates which eventually sink and export carbon into the deep ocean. The fraction of organic matter leaving the surface ocean is partly dependent on aggregate sinking velocity which accelerates with increasing aggregate size and density, where the latter is controlled by ballast load and aggregate porosity. In May 2011, we moored nine 25 m deep mesocosms in a Norwegian fjord to assess on a daily basis how plankton community structure affects material properties and sinking velocities of aggregates (Ø 80-400 µm) collected in the mesocosms' sediment traps. We noted that sinking velocity was not necessarily accelerated by opal ballast during diatom blooms, which could be due to relatively high porosity of these rather fresh aggregates. Furthermore, estimated aggregate porosity (Pestimated) decreased as the picoautotroph (0.2-2 µm) fraction of the phytoplankton biomass increased. Thus, picoautotroph-dominated communities may be indicative for food webs promoting a high degree of aggregate repackaging with potential for accelerated sinking. Blooms of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi revealed that cell concentrations of 1500 cells/mL accelerate sinking by about 35-40%, which we estimate (by one-dimensional modeling) to elevate organic matter transfer efficiency through the mesopelagic from 14 to 24%. Our results indicate that sinking velocities are influenced by the complex interplay between the availability of ballast minerals and aggregate packaging; both of which are controlled by plankton community structure.

  3. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 cbm each were exposed to different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm, yielding pH values (on the total scale from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30 days experiment passed three distinct phases: (1 prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2 first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3 second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, an important diatom marker. There are strong indications for these correlations being mediated indirectly through taxonomic changes and the natural development of the communities in the mesocosms exposed to different pCO2 levels. While diatoms increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids. The significant positive correlations between most PUFAs and pCO2 reflected treatment-dependent differences in the community composition between the mesocosms rather than a direct positive effect of pCO2 on specific fatty acids.

  4. Epiphytic diatoms along environmental gradients in Western European shallow lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco, S.; Cejudo-Figueiras, C.; Álvarez-Blanco, I.; Van Donk, E.; Gross, E.M.; Hansson, L-A.; Irvine, K.; Jeppesen, E.; Kairesalo, T.; Moss, B.; Nõges, T.; Bécares, E.

    2014-01-01

    European shallow lakes; epiphyton; Bacillariophyta; bioindication; eutrophication; total phosphorus Diatom-based assays have been successfully associated worldwide with the trophic status of lakes. Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between epiphytic diatoms and nutrient load in shallow

  5. Colonization of diatom aggregates by the dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiselius, P.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Abundance and vertical distribution of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans were studied during a diatom bloom in the Benguela current. Video observations showed the occurrence of abundant Chaetoceros spp. aggregates colonized by N. scintillans. The diatom aggregates were formed by regular...

  6. Diatoms: a fossil fuel of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Orly; Dinamarca, Jorge; Hochman, Gal; Falkowski, Paul G

    2014-03-01

    Long-term global climate change, caused by burning petroleum and other fossil fuels, has motivated an urgent need to develop renewable, carbon-neutral, economically viable alternatives to displace petroleum using existing infrastructure. Algal feedstocks are promising candidate replacements as a 'drop-in' fuel. Here, we focus on a specific algal taxon, diatoms, to become the fossil fuel of the future. We summarize past attempts to obtain suitable diatom strains, propose future directions for their genetic manipulation, and offer biotechnological pathways to improve yield. We calculate that the yields obtained by using diatoms as a production platform are theoretically sufficient to satisfy the total oil consumption of the US, using between 3 and 5% of its land area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biofilm diatom community structure: Influence of temporal and substratum variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    . delicatula and Amphora (TableIIa–d).ANOVAalsorevealedsignificantsub- stratum variations with respect to months (Table III). Diatomdistributionencounteredonthetestsubstrata Figure 4. Cluster dendrogram based on density of diatoms from the ambient water. a... suggested that pennate diatoms dominate the diatom fouling community irrespective of the nature of the sub- stratum and the exposure period. The dominance of pennate diatoms has also been reported in biofouling on test coupons exposed in the Arabian Sea...

  8. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms survive in dark, anoxic sediment layers for months to decades. Our investigation reveals a correlation between the dark survival potential of marine diatoms and their ability to accumulate NO3− intracellularly. Axenic strains of benthic and pelagic diatoms that stored 11–274 mM NO3− in th...

  9. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms survive in dark, anoxic sediment layers for months to decades. Our investigation reveals a correlation between the dark survival potential of marine diatoms and their ability to accumulate NO3− intracellularly. Axenic strains of benthic and pelagic diatoms that stored 11–274 mM NO3− in th...

  10. Fossil Diatoms in a New Carbonaceous Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, J.; Wallis, D. H.; Samaranayake, Anil

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery for the first time of diatom frustules in a carbonaceous meteorite that fell in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka on 29 December 2012. Contamination is excluded by the circumstance that the elemental abundances within the structures match closely with those of the surrounding matrix. There is also evidence of structures morphologically similar to red rain cells that may have contributed to the episode of red rain that followed within days of the meteorite fall. The new data on "fossil" diatoms provide strong evidence to support the theory of cometary panspermia.

  11. Specificity of lipoxygenase pathways supports species delineation in the marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Lamari

    Full Text Available Oxylipins are low-molecular weight secondary metabolites derived from the incorporation of oxygen into the carbon chains of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Oxylipins are produced in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages where they are involved in a broad spectrum of actions spanning from stress and defense responses, regulation of growth and development, signaling, and innate immunity. We explored the diversity in oxylipin patterns in the marine planktonic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. This genus includes several species only distinguishable with the aid of molecular markers. Oxylipin profiles of cultured strains were obtained by reverse phase column on a liquid chromatograph equipped with UV photodiode detector and q-ToF mass spectrometer. Lipoxygenase compounds were mapped on phylogenies of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia inferred from the nuclear encoded hyper-variable region of the LSU rDNA and the plastid encoded rbcL. Results showed that the genus Pseudo-nitzschia exhibits a rich and varied lipoxygenase metabolism of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, with a high level of specificity for oxylipin markers that generally corroborated the genotypic delineation, even among genetically closely related cryptic species. These results suggest that oxylipin profiles constitute additional identification tools for Pseudo-nitzschia species providing a functional support to species delineation obtained with molecular markers and morphological traits. The exploration of the diversity, patterns and plasticity of oxylipin production across diatom species and genera will also provide insights on the ecological functions of these secondary metabolites and on the selective pressures driving their diversification.

  12. Self-sedimented diatom mats as agents of exceptional fossil preservation in the Oligocene Florissant lake beds, Colorado, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ian C.; Chant, Loraine S.

    2000-03-01

    Microbial mats play a major role in the formation of exceptionally preserved fossil deposits by overgrowing and binding organic remains and sedimentary particles. This minimizes hydrodynamic and biological disruption of dead organisms and sedimentary laminae, but published works all implicate prokaryotic cyanobacteria as the microbial agent. However, exceptionally well preserved macrofossils of the Oligocene Florissant lake beds (Colorado, United States) are enveloped in matted aggregations of mucous-secreting, pennate diatom frustules. It is suggested that the macrobiota became entrapped in mucous-secreting mats of surface water blooms of planktonic diatoms in lake Florissant. As the mats and the incorporated macrobiota were sedimented out of the water column, the mucosic mats and their associated bacterial communities arrested decay and promoted preservation of refractory tissues. Thus, by a completely different mechanism, the diatom mats fulfilled the same preservational role previously suggested for cyanobacterial mats. This hitherto unrecognized mode of preservation may be an important causative factor in the formation of exceptionally preserved lacustrine fossil biotas.

  13. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    Full Text Available Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways.

  14. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Wielsch, Natalie; Hupfer, Yvonne; Mönch, Bettina; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Heintzmann, Rainer; Werz, Oliver; Svatoš, Aleš; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways.

  15. Modelling emergent trophic strategies in plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Aksnes, Dag L.; Berge, Terje;

    2015-01-01

    Plankton are typically divided into phytoplankton and zooplankton in marine ecosystem models. Yet, most protists in the photic zone engage in some degree of phagotrophy, and it has been suggested that trophic strategy is really a continuum between pure phototrophs (phytoplankton) and pure...... phagotrophs (unicellular zooplankton). Such a continuum of trophic strategies is well represented by trait-based modelling techniques. A key model ingredient is the size of individual cells, as size constrains affinities for nutrient uptake, photosynthesis and active encounter with other cells. We outline...... a general trait-based model of a unicellular planktonic organism where size is a central trait and where nutrient uptake, photosynthesis and phagotrophy are determined by investments into these functions and by the physical constraints imposed by organism size. This framework provides simple predictions...

  16. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  17. Climate-mediated dance of the plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Climate change will unquestionably influence global ocean plankton because it directly impacts both the availability of growth-limiting resources and the ecological processes governing biomass distributions and annual cycles. Forecasting this change demands recognition of the vital, yet counterintuitive, attributes of the plankton world. The biomass of photosynthetic phytoplankton, for example, is not proportional to their division rate. Perhaps more surprising, physical processes (such as deep vertical mixing) can actually trigger an accumulation in phytoplankton while simultaneously decreasing their division rates. These behaviours emerge because changes in phytoplankton division rates are paralleled by proportional changes in grazing, viral attack and other loss rates. Here I discuss this trophic dance between predators and prey, how it dictates when phytoplankton biomass remains constant or achieves massive blooms, and how it can determine even the sign of change in ocean ecosystems under a warming climate.

  18. Tight Coupling of Glaciecola spp. and Diatoms during Cold-Water Phytoplankton Spring Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Scheibner, Markus; Sommer, Ulrich; Jürgens, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Early spring phytoplankton blooms can occur at very low water temperatures but they are often decoupled from bacterial growth, which is assumed to be often temperature controlled. In a previous mesocosm study with Baltic Sea plankton communities, an early diatom bloom was associated with a high relative abundance of Glaciecola sequences (Gammaproteobacteria), at both low (2°C) and elevated (8°C) temperatures, suggesting an important role for this genus in phytoplankton-bacteria coupling. In this study, the temperature-dependent dynamics of free-living Glaciecola spp. during the bloom were analyzed by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization using a newly developed probe. The analysis revealed the appearance of Glaciecola spp. in this and in previous spring mesocosm experiments as the dominating bacterial clade during diatom blooms, with a close coupling between the population dynamics of Glaciecola and phytoplankton development. Although elevated temperature resulted in a higher abundance and a higher net growth rate of Glaciecola spp. (Q10 ∼ 2.2), their growth was, in contrast to that of the bulk bacterial assemblages, not suppressed at 2°C and showed a similar pattern at 8°C. Independent of temperature, the highest abundance of Glaciecola spp. (24.0 ± 10.0% of total cell number) occurred during the peak of the phytoplankton bloom. Together with the slightly larger cell size of Glaciecola, this resulted in a ∼30% contribution of Glaciecola to total bacterial biomass. Overall, the results of this and previous studies suggest that Glaciecola has an ecological niche during early diatom blooms at low temperatures, when it becomes a dominant consumer of phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic matter.

  19. The structure and evolution of plankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Alan R.

    New understanding of the circulation of ancient oceans is not yet matched by progress in our understanding of their pelagic ecology, though it was the planktonic ecosystems that generated our offshore oil and gas reserves. Can we assume that present-day models of ecosystem function are also valid for ancient seas? This question is addressed by a study of over 4000 plankton samples to derive a comprehensive, global description of zooplankton community structure in modern oceans: this shows that copepods form only 50% of the biomass of all plankton, ranging from 70% in polar to 35% in tropical seas. Comparable figures are derived from 14 other taxonomic categories of zooplankton. For trophic groupings, the data indicate globally: geletinous predators - 14%; gelatinous herbivores - 4%; raptorial predators - 33%; macrofiltering herbivores - 20%; macrofiltering omnivores - 25%; and detritivores - 3%. A simple, idealized model for the modern pelagic ecosystem is derived from these percentages which indicates that metazooplankton are not the most important consumers of pico- and nano-plankton production which itself probably constitutes 90% of primary production in warm oceans. This model is then compared with candidate life-forms available in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic oceans to determine to what extent it is also valid for ancient ecosystems: it is concluded that it is probably unnecessary to postulate models fundamentally differing from it in order to accommodate the life-forms, both protozoic and metazoic, known to have populated ancient seas. Remarkably few life-forms have existed which cannot be paralleled in the modern ocean, which contains remarkably few life-forms which cannot be paralleled in the Palaeozoic ocean. As a first assumption, then, it is reasonable to assume that energy pathways were similar in ancient oceans to those we study today.

  20. Evaluation of European diatom trophic indices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lototskaya, A.A.; Verdonschot, P.F.M.; Coste, M.; Vijver, van de B.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater diatoms are considered to be reliable indicators of the trophic status of rivers and lakes. In the past 30 years, a number of indicator indices have been developed and used for the assessment of trophic conditions all over Europe. It is however still not clear whether the ecologic signatu

  1. Planktonic foraminiferal biogeography in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean: Contribution from CPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilland, Julie; Fabri-Ruiz, Salomé; Koubbi, Philippe; Monaco, Claire Lo; Cotte, Cédric; Hosie, Graham W.; Sanchez, Sophie; Howa, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Southern Ocean-Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) Survey, the oceanic regions around Crozet and Kerguelen Islands were investigated in February-March 2013. Living planktonic Foraminifera (LPF) were collected in the upper mixed layer with a CPR along a 2160 nautical mile sea transect that crossed main hydrological fronts in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. In the SO-CPR database, mean total abundances of Foraminifera occurring during late austral summer are highly variable at an inter-annual scale, from 10 to 250 ind.m-3, representing 10-40% of the total zooplankton abundance, respectively. In the Southern Ocean, major inter-annual changes in zooplankton community structure were already reported. In this study, we describe the large scale distributional pattern of individual planktonic foraminiferal species living in near-surface waters of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, and we attempt to explain why major spatial variability in relative species abundances occurs during a late austral summer. In February-March 2013, LPF total abundances recorded between 42.86°S and 56.42°S ranged from 0 to a maximum of 258 ind.m-3. In the Open Ocean Zone, the LPF community was composed of four major species (Globigerinita uvula, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Globigerina bulloides). Generally, LPF total abundances are supposed to mirror primary production induced by hydrological fronts or induced by topography near Crozet and Kerguelen Islands. However, during late austral summer 2013, high foraminiferal abundances in the upper mixed layer did not always match the pattern of near-surface primary production (high Chl-a concentration areas delineated from satellite imagery). Low LPF standing stocks in late austral summer in the Southern Ocean contrasted with the presence of high densities of heavily silicified diatoms. This suggests that the late bloom

  2. Phytoplankton and littoral epilithic diatoms in high mountain lakes of the Adamello-Brenta Regional Park (Trentino, Italy and their relation to trophic status and acidification risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica TOLOTTI

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A survey of phytoplankton and littoral epilithic diatom communities was carried out on 16 high mountain lakes in the Adamello- Brenta Regional Park (NE Italy as part of a wider research project aimed to the limnological characterisation of the seldom-studied lakes in this Alpine Region. The regional study was supplemented by the analysis of seasonal variations in two representative lakes. The principal goals of this paper are 1 to identify the most important environmental variables regulating patterns in the species composition of both phytoplankton and littoral diatoms, 2 to evaluate whether these algal communities can be used to improve trophic classification and 3 whether they can facilitate monitoring of diffuse human impacts (e.g. airborne pollution on high altitude lakes. The relevance to monitoring is based on the acid sensitivity of all lakes studied, as indicated by the very low average alkalinity values (4-97 μeq l-1 recorded during the investigation period. Chlorophyll-a concentrations and phytoplankton biovolume recorded in the lakes were very low, with maxima in the deep-water layers and in late summer. Phytoplankton communities were dominated by flagellated algae (Chrysophyceae and Dinophyceae. Several coccal green algae were present, while planktonic diatoms were almost completely absent. Littoral diatom communities were dominated by alpine and acidophilous taxa (mainly belonging to the genera Achnanthes and Eunotia. Trophic classification based on phytoplankton and littoral diatoms, respectively, ascribed all lakes to the oligotrophic range. In both algal communities species indicative of acidified conditions were found. Multivariate analyses indicated that both the regional distribution and seasonal variation of phytoplankton are mainly driven by nutrient concentration. Diatoms are predominantly affected by geochemical characteristics including pH and mineralization level.

  3. Benthic Epiphytic Diatoms in Deep-sea Southern Ocean Sediments as a New Tool for Reconstructing Antarctic Paleoclimatic and Paleoceanographic History: Implications of Floating 'Macroalgal Biotic Oases'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, D. M.; Porter, N.; OConnell, S.

    2014-12-01

    A new paleobiological proxy for Antarctic paleoclimate history provides insight into past extent of open marine shelves on Wilkes Land margin, and calls for reassessment of IRD interpretations in the deep-sea. Marine, epiphytic benthic diatoms that grow attached to macroalgae (seaweed) are recovered in Miocene sediment from DSDP Site 269. They suggest periodic presence of floating rafts or 'biotic oases' in the Southern Ocean comprising buoyant macroalgae, attached benthic diatoms, and biota associated with this displaced coastal community. Macroalgae attach to the substrate with a holdfast, a multi-fingered structure that serves as an anchor. Uprooted holdfasts attached to buoyant macroalgae can raft sedimentary particles, some large (>50 kg), into the deep-sea. In addition, a rich biota of associated invertebrates live in cavities within the holdfast, the dispersal of which may explain the biogeographic distribution of organisms on Subantarctic islands. The stratigraphic occurrence of large, benthic epiphytic diatoms of genera Arachnoidiscus, Isthmia, Rhabdonema, Gephyra, Trigonium, and smaller Achnanthes, Cocconeis, Grammatophora, and Rhaphoneis in sediment cores from DSDP Site 269 reflect a rich, productive epiphytic diatom flora that maintained its position in the photic zone attached to their buoyant seaweed hosts. Amphipods and other herbivores grazed the benthic diatoms and produced diatom-rich fecal pellets that were delivered to the sea-floor. The discontinuous stratigraphic occurrence of the epiphytic diatoms, amongst the background of planktonic diatoms in Core 9 of DSDP Site 269, suggests environmental changes induced by either warm or cold events may have controlled the production and/or release of the macroalgae into the deep-sea. Warm events led to increased shelf areas, and cold events led to formation of ice on the macroalgae to increase their buoyancy and lift-off. Complicating the distinction between warm and cold events is the potential for the

  4. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded DNA virus infecting the marine diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11 isolated from western Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kimura

    Full Text Available Diatoms are significant organisms for primary production in the earth's aquatic environment. Hence, their dynamics are an important focus area in current studies. Viruses are a great concern as potential factors of diatom mortality, along with other physical, chemical, and biological factors. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Csp07DNAV that lyses the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11. This paper examines the physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics of Csp07DNAV. The virus was isolated from a surface water sample that was collected at Hiroshima Bay, Japan. It was icosahedral, had a diameter of 34 nm, and accumulated in the nuclei of host cells. Rod-shaped virus particles also coexisted in the host nuclei. The latent period and burst size were estimated to be <12 h and 29 infectious units per host cell, respectively. Csp07DNAV had a closed circular single-stranded DNA genome (5,552 nucleotides, which included a double-stranded region and 3 open reading frames. The monophyly of Csp07DNAV and other Bacilladnavirus group single-stranded DNA viruses was supported by phylogenetic analysis that was based on the amino acid sequence of each virus protein. On the basis of these results, we considered Csp07DNAV to be a new member of the genus Bacilladnavirus.

  5. Environmental changes in the Amur Bay (Japan/East Sea) during the last 150 years revealed by examination of diatoms and silicoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoy, Ira; Prushkovskaya, Irina; Aksentov, Kirill; Astakhov, Anatoly

    2015-06-01

    Siliceous unicellular microalgae — diatoms and silicoflagellates from sediments in Amur Bay were analyzed with high temporal resolution to examine changes over the last 150 years. The age of sediments was estimated from unsupported 210Pb controlled by 137Cs. Siliceous microalgae examined in each cm of two sediment cores demonstrated significant changes in the ecological structure of the assemblages that reflected changes in sedimentation conditions. During the years 1860-1910 the sediments accumulated under the great influence of river runoff. For about the next 50 years the number of freshwater species and marine benthic diatoms in sediments sharply declined, which is probably connected with the weakening of the effects of river runoff due to deforestation. Since the early 1960s the sedimentation conditions in the Amur Bay changed significantly. Marine planktonic diatoms and silicoflagellates began to prevail in sediments and this reflects increasing microphytoplankton productivity. One consequence of this was the formation of seasonal bottom hypoxia in Amur Bay. The ecological structure of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages indicates that the sea level began to rise since the early 1960s and this corresponds to the water and air temperature increase in the area for that period. The obtained data suggest that the environmental changes over the last 150 years in Armur Bay are associated with the weakening of river runoff due to deforestation, sea level rise caused by global warming, and the increase of siliceous microplankton productivity that resulted in the formation of seasonal bottom hypoxia.

  6. Plankton in the open Mediterranean Sea: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siokou-Frangou, I.; Christaki, U.; Mazzocchi, M. G.; Montresor, M.; Ribera D'Alcalá, M.; Vaqué, D.; Zingone, A.

    2009-11-01

    We present an overview of the plankton studies conducted during the last 25 years in the epipelagic offshore waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This quasi-enclosed sea is characterized by a rich and complex physical dynamics that includes unique thermohaline features, particular multilayer circulation, topographic gyres, and meso- and sub-mesoscale activity. Recent investigations have basically confirmed the long-recognised oligotrophic character of this sea, which enhances along both the west-east, and the north-south directions. Nutrient availability is low, especially for phosphorous (N:P up to 60), although limitation may be relaxed by inputs from highly populated coasts and from the atmosphere. Phytoplankton biomass as chl-a, generally displays low values (less than 0.2 μg chl-a l-1) over large areas, with a modest late winter increase. A large bloom (up to 3 μg l-1) throughout the late winter and early spring is only observed in the NW area. Relatively high biomass peaks are also recorded in fronts and cyclonic gyres. A deep chlorophyll maximum is a~permanent feature for the whole basin (except during the late winter mixing). It progressively deepens from the Alboran Sea (30 m) to the easternmost Levantine basin (120 m). Primary production reveals a similar west-east decreasing trend and ranges from 59 to 150 g C m-2 y-1 (in situ measurements). Overall the basin is largely dominated by small-sized autotrophs, microheterotrophs and egg-carrying copepod species. The phytoplankton, the microbial (both autotrophic and heterotrophic) and the zooplankton components reveal a considerable diversity and variability over spatial and temporal scales, the latter less explored though. Examples are the wide diversity of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, the multifarious role of diatoms or picoeukaryotes, and the distinct seasonal or spatial patterns of the species-reach copepod genera or families which dominate in the basin. Major dissimilarities between western and

  7. Plankton in the open Mediterranean Sea: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Siokou-Frangou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the plankton studies conducted during the last 25 years in the epipelagic offshore waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This quasi-enclosed sea is characterized by a rich and complex physical dynamics with distinctive traits, especially in regard to the thermohaline circulation. Recent investigations have basically confirmed the long-recognised oligotrophic nature of this sea, which increases along both the west-east and the north-south directions. Nutrient availability is low, especially for phosphorous (N:P up to 60, though this limitation may be buffered by inputs from highly populated coasts and from the atmosphere. Phytoplankton biomass, as chl a, generally displays low values (less than 0.2 μg chl a l−1 over large areas, with a modest late winter increase. A large bloom (up to 3 μg l−1 is observed throughout the late winter and spring exclusively in the NW area. Relatively high biomass values are recorded in fronts and cyclonic gyres. A deep chlorophyll maximum is a permanent feature for the whole basin, except during the late winter mixing. It is found at increasingly greater depths ranging from 30 m in the Alboran Sea to 120 m in the easternmost Levantine basin. Primary production reveals a west-east decreasing trend and ranges between 59 and 150 g C m−2 y−1 (in situ measurements. Overall, the basin is largely dominated by small autotrophs, microheterotrophs and egg-carrying copepod species. The microorganisms (phytoplankton, viruses, bacteria, flagellates and ciliates and zooplankton components reveal a considerable diversity and variability over spatial and temporal scales, although the latter is poorly studied. Examples are the wide diversity of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, the multifarious role of diatoms or picoeukaryotes, and the distinct seasonal or spatial patterns of the species-rich copepod genera or families which dominate the

  8. Taxonomic and Environmental Variability in the Elemental Composition and Stoichiometry of Individual Dinoflagellate and Diatom Cells from the NW Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Segura-Noguera

    Full Text Available Here we present, for the first time, the elemental concentration, including C, N and O, of single phytoplankton cells collected from the sea. Plankton elemental concentration and stoichiometry are key variables in phytoplankton ecophysiology and ocean biogeochemistry, and are used to link cells and ecosystems. However, most field studies rely on bulk techniques that overestimate carbon and nitrogen because the samples include organic matter other than plankton organisms. Here we used X-ray microanalysis (XRMA, a technique that, unlike bulk analyses, gives simultaneous quotas of C, N, O, Mg, Si, P, and S, in single-cell organisms that can be collected directly from the sea. We analysed the elemental composition of dinoflagellates and diatoms (largely Chaetoceros spp. collected from different sites of the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean Sea. As expected, a lower C content is found in our cells compared to historical values of cultured cells. Our results indicate that, except for Si and O in diatoms, the mass of all elements is not a constant fraction of cell volume but rather decreases with increasing cell volume. Also, diatoms are significantly less dense in all the measured elements, except Si, compared to dinoflagellates. The N:P ratio of both groups is higher than the Redfield ratio, as it is the N:P nutrient ratio in deep NW Mediterranean Sea waters (N:P = 20-23. The results suggest that the P requirement is highest for bacterioplankton, followed by dinoflagellates, and lowest for diatoms, giving them a clear ecological advantage in P-limited environments like the Mediterranean Sea. Finally, the P concentration of cells of the same genera but growing under different nutrient conditions was the same, suggesting that the P quota of these cells is at a critical level. Our results indicate that XRMA is an accurate technique to determine single cell elemental quotas and derived conversion factors used to understand and model ocean biogeochemical

  9. COPEPOD: The Coastal & Oceanic Plankton Ecology, Production, & Observation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal & Oceanic Plankton Ecology, Production, & Observation Database (COPEPOD) provides NMFS scientists with quality-controlled, globally distributed...

  10. A global diatom database – abundance, biovolume and biomass in the world ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leblanc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton identification and abundance data are now commonly feeding plankton distribution databases worldwide. This study is a first attempt to compile the largest possible body of data available from different databases as well as from individual published or unpublished datasets regarding diatom distribution in the world ocean. The data obtained originate from time series studies as well as spatial studies. This effort is supported by the Marine Ecosystem Model Inter-Comparison Project (MAREMIP, which aims at building consistent datasets for the main Plankton Functional Types (PFT in order to help validate biogeochemical ocean models by using carbon (C biomass derived from abundance data. In this study we collected over 293 000 individual geo-referenced data points with diatom abundances from bottle and net sampling. Sampling site distribution was not homogeneous, with 58% of data in the Atlantic, 20% in the Arctic, 12% in the Pacific, 8% in the Indian and 1% in the Southern Ocean. A total of 136 different genera and 607 different species were identified after spell checking and name correction. Only a small fraction of these data were also documented for biovolumes and an even smaller fraction was converted to C biomass. As it is virtually impossible to reconstruct everyone's method for biovolume calculation, which is usually not indicated in the datasets, we decided to undertake the effort to document, for every distinct species, the minimum and maximum cell dimensions, and to convert all the available abundance data into biovolumes and C biomass using a single standardized method. Statistical correction of the database was also adopted to exclude potential outliers and suspicious data points. The final database contains 90 648 data points with converted C biomass. Diatom C biomass calculated from cell sizes spans over eight orders of magnitude. The mean diatom biomass for individual locations, dates and depths is 141.19 μg C l

  11. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...... distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead...

  12. Bulk Sediment and Diatom Silica Carbon Isotope Composition from Coastal Marine Sediments off East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, S.; Leng, M.J.; Kendrick, C.P.; Cremer, H.; Wagner, B.

    2013-01-01

    Organic carbon occluded in diatom silica is assumed to be protected from degradation in the sediment. δ13C from diatom carbon (δ13C(diatom)) therefore potentially provides a signal of conditions during diatom growth. However, there have been few studies based on δ13C(diatom). Numerous variables can

  13. A diatom gene regulating nitric-oxide signaling and susceptibility to diatom-derived aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Assaf; Bidle, Kay D; Kwityn, Clifford; Hirsh, Donald J; Thompson, Stephanie M; Callow, James A; Falkowski, Paul; Bowler, Chris

    2008-06-24

    Diatoms are unicellular phytoplankton accounting for approximately 40% of global marine primary productivity [1], yet the molecular mechanisms underlying their ecological success are largely unexplored. We use a functional-genomics approach in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to characterize a novel protein belonging to the widely conserved YqeH subfamily [2] of GTP-binding proteins thought to play a role in ribosome biogenesis [3], sporulation [4], and nitric oxide (NO) generation [5]. Transgenic diatoms overexpressing this gene, designated PtNOA, displayed higher NO production, reduced growth, impaired photosynthetic efficiency, and a reduced ability to adhere to surfaces. A fused YFP-PtNOA protein was plastid localized, distinguishing it from a mitochondria-localized plant ortholog. PtNOA was upregulated in response to the diatom-derived unsaturated aldehyde 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DD), a molecule previously shown to regulate intercellular signaling, stress surveillance [6], and defense against grazers [7]. Overexpressing cell lines were hypersensitive to sublethal levels of this aldehyde, manifested by altered expression of superoxide dismutase and metacaspases, key components of stress and death pathways [8, 9]. NOA-like sequences were found in diverse oceanic regions, suggesting that a novel NO-based system operates in diatoms and may be widespread in phytoplankton, providing a biological context for NO in the upper ocean [10].

  14. Heteronuclear diatomics in diffuse and translucent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Weselak, T

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse and translucent molecular clouds fill a vast majority of the interstellar space in the galactic disk being thus the most typical objects of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Recent advances in observational techniques of modern optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy led to detection of many features of atomic and molecular origin in spectra of such clouds. Molecular spectra of heteronuclear diatomic molecules, ie. OH, OH+, CH CH+, CN, NH, CO play an important role in understanding chemistry and physical conditions in environments they do populate. A historical review of astronomical observations of interstellar molecules is presented. Recent results based on visual and ultraviolet observations of molecular features in spectra of reddened, early type OB-stars are presented and discussed. Appearance of vibrational-rotational spectra with observed transitions based on high-quality spectra, are also presented. Relations between column densities of heteronuclear diatomics (based on the recommended oscillator st...

  15. Nanoplasmonic photonic crystal diatoms and phytoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mark P.; Hajiaboli, Ahmadreza; Hiltz, Jonathan; Gonzalez, Timothy; Singh, Gursimranbir; Lennox, R. Bruce

    2011-03-01

    Evidence is emerging that silica-containing plant cells (phytoliths) and single cell micro-organisms (diatoms) exhibit optical properties reminiscent of photonic crystals. In the latter biosilicates, these properties appear to arise from light interactions with the intricate periodic patterns of micro- and nano-pores called foramina that are distributed over the frustule (outer silica shell). In this report, we show that Nitzschia Closterium pennate diatom frustules can be used to template arrays of nanoplasmonic particles to confer more complex physical properties, as shown by simulation and experiment. Selective templating of silver and gold nanoparticles in and around the array of pores was achieved by topochemical functionalization with nanoparticles deposited from solution, or by differential wetting/dewetting of evaporated gold films. The nanoplasmonic diatom frustules exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering from chemisorbed 4-aminothiophenol. Thermally induced dewetting of gold films deposited on a frustule produces two classes of faceted gold nanoparticles. Larger particles of irregular shape are distributed with some degree of uniaxial anisotropy on the surface of the frustule. Smaller particles of more uniform size are deposited in a periodic manner in the frustule pores. It is thought that surface curvature and defects drive the hydrodynamic dewetting events that give rise to the different classes of nanoparticles. Finite difference time domain calculations on an idealized nanoplasmonic frustule suggest a complex electromagnetic field response due to coupling between localized surface plasmon modes of the nanoparticles in the foramina and an overlayer gold film.

  16. Vitamin B1 and B12 uptake and cycling by plankton communities in coastal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eKoch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While vitamin B12 has recently been shown to co-limit the growth of coastal phytoplankton assemblages, the cycling of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems is poorly understood as planktonic uptake rates of vitamins B1 and B12 have never been quantified in tandem in any aquatic ecosystem. The goal of this study was to establish the relationships between plankton community composition, carbon fixation, and B-vitamin assimilation in two contrasting estuarine systems. We show that, although B-vitamin concentrations were low (pM, vitamin concentrations and uptake rates were higher within a more eutrophic estuary and that vitamin B12 uptake rates were significantly correlated with rates of primary production. Eutrophic sites hosted larger bacterial and picoplankton abundances with larger carbon normalized vitamin uptake rates. Although the >2 µm phytoplankton biomass was often dominated by groups with a high incidence of vitamin auxotrophy (dinoflagellates and diatoms, picoplankton (< 2 µm were always responsible for the majority of B12-vitamin uptake. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary users of vitamins among the picoplankton during this study. Nutrient/vitamin amendment experiments demonstrated that, in the Summer and Fall, vitamin B12 occasionally limited or co-limited the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass together with nitrogen. Combined with prior studies, these findings suggest that picoplankton are the primary producers and users of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems and that rapid uptake of B-vitamins by heterotrophic bacteria may sometimes deprive larger phytoplankton of these micronutrients and thus influence phytoplankton species succession.

  17. Vitamin B1 and B12 Uptake and Cycling by Plankton Communities in Coastal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Florian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K.; Goleski, Jennifer A.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    While vitamin B12 has recently been shown to co-limit the growth of coastal phytoplankton assemblages, the cycling of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems is poorly understood as planktonic uptake rates of vitamins B1 and B12 have never been quantified in tandem in any aquatic ecosystem. The goal of this study was to establish the relationships between plankton community composition, carbon fixation, and B-vitamin assimilation in two contrasting estuarine systems. We show that, although B-vitamin concentrations were low (pM), vitamin concentrations and uptake rates were higher within a more eutrophic estuary and that vitamin B12 uptake rates were significantly correlated with rates of primary production. Eutrophic sites hosted larger bacterial and picoplankton abundances with larger carbon normalized vitamin uptake rates. Although the >2 μm phytoplankton biomass was often dominated by groups with a high incidence of vitamin auxotrophy (dinoflagellates and diatoms), picoplankton (B12-vitamin uptake. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary users of vitamins among the picoplankton during this study. Nutrient/vitamin amendment experiments demonstrated that, in the Summer and Fall, vitamin B12 occasionally limited or co-limited the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass together with nitrogen. Combined with prior studies, these findings suggest that picoplankton are the primary producers and users of B-vitamins in some coastal ecosystems and that rapid uptake of B-vitamins by heterotrophic bacteria may sometimes deprive larger phytoplankton of these micronutrients and thus influence phytoplankton species succession. PMID:23091470

  18. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related

  19. Preservation potential of ancient plankton DNA in Pleistocene marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boere, A.C.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; de Lange, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Coolen, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that ancient plankton DNA can be recovered from Holocene lacustrine and marine sediments, including from species that do not leave diagnostic microscopic fossils in the sediment record. Therefore, the analysis of this so-called fossil plankton DNA is a promising approach fo

  20. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related t

  1. Detection of typhoid fever by diatom-based optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Viji; Muthukumar, Anbazhagi; Nagamony, Ponpandian; Chinnuswamy, Viswanathan

    2017-06-02

    Surface-modified diatom substrates are employed for the development of immunocomplex-based optical biosensor for diagnosis of typhoid. Biosensor has been prepared by covalent immobilization of Salmonella typhi antibody onto the crosslinked diatom substrates via glutaraldehyde. Photoluminescent (PL) studies revealed good specificity and ability of conjugated diatom substrates to distinguish complementary (S. typhi) and non-complementary (Escherichia coli) antigens. The immunocomplexed biosensor showed detection limit of 10 pg. The excellent performance of biosensor is associated to its large surface-to-volume ratio, good photoluminescent property, and biocompatibility of diatom frustules, which enhances the antibody immobilization and facilitates the nucleophilic electron transfer between antibody and conjugated diatom surface. Hence, immunocomplexed diatom substrates are considered to be a suitable platform for the environmental monitoring of water-borne pathogen S. typhi.

  2. Climate variance influence on the non-stationary plankton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Juan Carlos; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Bonnet, Delphine

    2013-08-01

    We examined plankton responses to climate variance by using high temporal resolution data from 1988 to 2007 in the Western English Channel. Climate variability modified both the magnitude and length of the seasonal signal of sea surface temperature, as well as the timing and depth of the thermocline. These changes permeated the pelagic system yielding conspicuous modifications in the phenology of autotroph communities and zooplankton. The climate variance envelope, thus far little considered in climate-plankton studies, is closely coupled with the non-stationary dynamics of plankton, and sheds light on impending ecological shifts and plankton structural changes. Our study calls for the integration of the non-stationary relationship between climate and plankton in prognostic models on the productivity of marine ecosystems.

  3. Diatom flora in subterranean ecosystems: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Falasco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In scarcity of light and primary producers, subterranean ecosystems are generally extremely oligotrophic habitats, receiving poor supplies of degradable organic matter from the surface. Human direct impacts on cave ecosystems mainly derive from intensive tourism and recreational caving, causing important alterations to the whole subterranean environment. In particular, artificial lighting systems in show caves support the growth of autotrophic organisms (the so-called lampenflora, mainly composed of cyanobacteria, diatoms, chlorophytes, mosses and ferns producing exocellular polymeric substances (EPSs made of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. This anionic EPSs matrix mediates to the intercellular communications and participates to the chemical exchanges with the substratum, inducing the adsorption of cations and dissolved organic molecules from the cave formations (speleothems. Coupled with the metabolic activities of heterotrophic microorganisms colonising such layer (biofilm, this phenomenon may lead to the corrosion of the mineral surfaces. In this review, we investigate the formation of biofilms, especially of diatom-dominated ones, as a consequence of artificial lighting and its impacts on speleothems. Whenever light reaches the subterranean habitat (both artificially and naturally a relative high number of species of diatoms may indeed colonise it. Cave entrances, artificially illuminated walls and speleothems inside the cave are generally the preferred substrates. This review focuses on the diatom flora colonising subterranean habitats, summarizing the information contained in all the scientific papers published from 1900 up to date. In this review we provide a complete checklist of the diatom taxa recorded in subterranean habitats, including a total of 363 taxa, belonging to 82 genera. The most frequent and abundant species recorded in caves and other low light subterranean habitats are generally aerophilic and

  4. Seasonal variations in fouling diatom communities on the Yantai coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuiyun; Wang, Jianhua; Yu, Yang; Liu, Sujing; Xia, Chuanhai

    2015-03-01

    Fouling diatoms are a main component of biofilm, and play an important role in marine biofouling formation. We investigated seasonal variations in fouling diatom communities that developed on glass slides immersed in seawater, on the Yantai coast, northern Yellow Sea, China, using microscopy and molecular techniques. Studies were conducted during 2012 and 2013 over 3, 7, 14, and 21 days in each season. The abundance of attached diatoms and extracellular polymeric substances increased with exposure time of the slides to seawater. The lowest diatom density appeared in winter and the highest species richness and diversity were found in summer and autumn. Seasonal variation was observed in the structure of fouling diatom communities. Pennate diatoms Cylindrotheca, Nitzschia, Navicula, Amphora, Gomphonema, and Licmophora were the main fouling groups. Cylindrotheca sp. dominated in the spring. Under laboratory culture conditions, we found that Cylindrotheca grew very fast, which might account for the highest density of this diatom in spring. The lower densities in summer and autumn might result from the emergence of fouling animals and environmental factors. The Cylindrotheca sp. was identified as Cylindrotheca closterium using18S rDNA sequencing. The colonization process of fouling diatoms and significant seasonal variation in this study depended on environmental and biological factors. Understanding the basis of fouling diatoms is essential and important for developing new antifouling techniques.

  5. The influence of land use on water quality and diatom community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of land use on water quality and diatom community structures ... associated with agricultural, urban and natural (reference) adjacent land use respectively. ... Five diatom response indices (Generic Diatom Index, Specific Pollution ...

  6. Diatoms of the microphytobenthic community: Population structure in a tropical intertidal sand flat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C

    , Pleurosigma and Thalassiothrix. Wind stimulated the resuspension of the sediment, along with pennate diatoms, down to 5 cm depth. Correlation of chlorophyll-a with diatom cell numbers, which has been generally used as an indicator of diatom abundance, revealed...

  7. Climate Variability Drives Plankton Community Composition Changes: the 2010-2011 El Nino to La Nina Transition Around Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Peter A.; Bonham, Pru; Thomson, Paul; Rochester, Wayne; Doblin, Martina A.; Waite, Anya M.; Richardson, Anthony; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    The strong La Nina of 2010-2011 provided an opportunity to investigate the ecological impacts of El Nino-Southern Oscillation on coastal plankton communities using the nine national reference stations around Australia. Based on remote sensing and across the entire Australian region 2011 (La Nina) was only modestly different from 2010 (El Nino) with the average temperature declining 0.2 percent surface chlorophyll a up 3 percent and modelled primary production down 14 percent. Other changes included a poleward shift in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Along the east coast, there was a reduction in salinity, increase in nutrients, Chlorophytes and Prasinophytes (taxa with chlorophyll b, neoxanthin and prasinoxanthin). The southwest region had a rise in the proportion of 19-hexoyloxyfucoxanthin; possibly coccolithophorids in eddies of the Leeuwin Current and along the sub-tropical front. Pennate diatoms increased, Ceratium spp. decreased and Scrippsiella spp. increased in 2011. Zooplankton biomass declined significantly in 2011. There was a reduction in the abundance of Calocalanus pavo and Temora turbinata and increases in Clausocalanus farrani, Oncaea scottodicarloi and Macrosetella gracilis in 2011. The changes in the plankton community during the strong La Nina of 2011 suggest that this climatic oscillation exacerbates the tropicalization of Australia.

  8. The Continuous Plankton Recorder: concepts and history, from Plankton Indicator to undulating recorders [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, P. C.; Colebrook, J. M.; Matthews, J. B. L.; Aiken, J.; Continuous Plankton Recorder Team

    2003-08-01

    Alister Hardy conceived the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey in the 1920s as a means of mapping near-surface plankton in space and time, interpreting the changing fortunes of the fisheries and relating plankton changes to hydrometeorology and climatic change. The seed he planted has grown to become the most extensive long-term survey of marine organisms in the world and the breadth of his vision becomes ever more apparent. The survey has now run for over 70 years and its value increases with every passing decade. Operating from ‘ships of opportunity’ the machines used are robust, reliable and easy to handle. Wherever possible, all the sampling and analytical methods have not been changed to maintain the consistency of the time series. Computerisation and the development of new statistical approaches have increased our ability to handle the large quantities of information generated and enhance the sensitivity of the data analyses. This overview, based on almost 900 papers, recounts the various phases in the history of the survey. It starts with the Indicator Survey (1921-1934), the deployment of the first CPR on the Discovery Expedition (1924-1927) and the early CPR survey in the North Sea (1931-1939). The survey reopened in 1946 after the Second World War and expanded across the North Atlantic to North America from 1959. Taxonomic studies were initiated and an emphasis was placed on patterns of distribution, which were seen to reflect the varying oceanographic conditions. The years 1968-1976 saw further expansion with operations even in the American Great Lakes, publication of a Plankton Atlas and initial evidence for a downward trend in plankton biomass. At about this time electronic instrumentation was attached to CPRs to make additional measurements and work was started on the development of a new generation of undulating Continuous Plankton and Environmental Recorders (CPERs). In 1976 the survey moved to Plymouth. Scientific priorities in the UK

  9. Comprehensive Model of Annual Plankton Succession Based on the Whole-Plankton Time Series Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Baptiste Romagnan; Louis Legendre; Lionel Guidi; Jean-Louis Jamet; Dominique Jamet; Laure Mousseau; Maria-Luiza Pedrotti; Marc Picheral; Gabriel Gorsky; Christian Sardet; Lars Stemmann

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phy-toplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankt...

  10. Using flow cytometry for counting natural planktonic bacteria and understanding the structure of planktonic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Gasol

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is rapidly becoming a routine methodology in aquatic microbial ecology. The combination of simple to use bench-top flow cytometers and highly fluorescent nucleic acid stains allows fast and easy determination of microbe abundance in the plankton of lakes and oceans. The different dyes and protocols used to stain and count planktonic bacteria as well as the equipment in use are reviewed, with special attention to some of the problems encountered in daily routine practice such as fixation, staining and absolute counting. One of the main advantages of flow cytometry over epifluorescence microscopy is the ability to obtain cell-specific measurements in large numbers of cells with limited effort. We discuss how this characteristic has been used for differentiating photosynthetic from non-photosynthetic prokaryotes, for measuring bacterial cell size and nucleic acid content, and for estimating the relative activity and physiological state of each cell. We also describe how some of the flow cytometrically obtained data can be used to characterize the role of microbes on carbon cycling in the aquatic environment and we prospect the likely avenues of progress in the study of planktonic prokaryotes through the use of flow cytometry.

  11. Diatom community structure on in-service cruise ship hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, Kelli Zargiel; Koka, Abhishek; Lund, Geir; Swain, Geoffrey

    2014-10-01

    Diatoms are an important component of marine biofilms found on ship hulls. However, there are only a few published studies that describe the presence and abundance of diatoms on ships, and none that relate to modern ship hull coatings. This study investigated the diatom community structure on two in-service cruise ships with the same cruise cycles, one coated with an antifouling (AF) system (copper self-polishing copolymer) and the other coated with a silicone fouling-release (FR) system. Biofilm samples were collected during dry docking from representative areas of the ship and these provided information on the horizontal and vertical zonation of the hull, and intact and damaged coating and niche areas. Diatoms from the genera Achnanthes, Amphora and Navicula were the most common, regardless of horizontal ship zonation and coating type. Other genera were abundant, but their presence was more dependent on the ship zonation and coating type. Samples collected from damaged areas of the hull coating had a similar community composition to undamaged areas, but with higher diatom abundance. Diatom fouling on the niche areas differed from that of the surrounding ship hull and paralleled previous studies that investigated differences in diatom community structure on static and dynamically exposed coatings; niche areas were similar to static immersion and the hull to dynamic immersion. Additionally, diatom richness was greater on the ship with the FR coating, including the identification of several new genera to the biofouling literature, viz. Lampriscus and Thalassiophysa. These results are the first to describe diatom community composition on in-service ship hulls coated with a FR system. This class of coatings appears to have a larger diatom community compared to copper-based AF systems, with new diatom genera that have the ability to stick to ship hulls and withstand hydrodynamic forces, thus creating the potential for new problematic species in the biofilm.

  12. On the potential for terrestrial diatom communities and diatom indices to identify anthropic disturbance in soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonelli, Marta; Wetzel, Carlos E.; Ector, Luc; Teuling, Ryan; Pfister, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of studies focuses on aquatic diatoms’ ecology and their use in the assessment of water quality. Little is known about terrestrial diatoms’ ecological behaviour and sensitivity to environmental factors. We hypothesise that terrestrial diatom communities can serve as a proxy of anth

  13. On the potential for terrestrial diatom communities and diatom indices to identify anthropic disturbance in soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonelli, Marta; Wetzel, Carlos E.; Ector, Luc; Teuling, Ryan; Pfister, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    A large amount of studies focuses on aquatic diatoms’ ecology and their use in the assessment of water quality. Little is known about terrestrial diatoms’ ecological behaviour and sensitivity to environmental factors. We hypothesise that terrestrial diatom communities can serve as a proxy of

  14. Offshore influence of coastal upwelling off Mauritania, NW Africa, as recorded by diatoms in sediment traps at 2195 m water depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Carina B.; Romero, Oscar E.; Wefer, Gerold; Gabric, Albert J.

    1998-06-01

    Downward flux and taxonomic composition of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages were determined from sediment trap samples off Cap Blanc (CB1, NW Africa) over a 1-year period (March 1988-March 1989) and compared to the assemblages in the underlying surface sedi ment. Trap content was composed of biogenic and lithogenic material. The dominant constituents of the biogenic fraction were calcium carbonate, biogenic opal, and organic matter. Coccolithophorids, planktonic foraminifera and pteropods contributed to the CaCO 3 flux; opal derived mainly from diatoms. During the sampling year prominent total flux maxima occurred in spring and summer. Highest diatom flux values were reached in March-April (20.1×10 5 valves m -2 d -1) and July-August (22.9×10 5 valves m -2 d -1) in coincidence with the total flux pattern. Radiolaria showed three distinct peaks: in autumn (16×10 4 shells m -2 d -1), spring (˜11×10 4 shells m -2 d -1) and summer (10×10 4 shells m -2 d -1). The flux pattern of silicoflagellates differed greatly from those of the other groups and from the total particle flux, with highest values between October 1988 and March 1989. For all microorganisms surveyed, September was the month of lowest production. We identified a total of 166 diatom taxa and 3 silicoflagellate species. Off Cap Blanc, upwelling occurs year-round, and "giant filaments" of relatively high pigment concentration develop and persist throughout the year with substantial seasonal and interannual variations. We show that the shifts in siliceous phytoplankton do reflect both the seaward displacement of the coastal upwelling center and the periods of relaxation when oligotrophic waters prevail. Accumulation rates in the surface sediment were calculated to be 1.36×10 8 valves m -2 yr -1 for diatoms and 1.05×10 6 skeletons m -2 yr -1 for silicoflagellates. Most of the diatoms found in the water column at 2195 m also occurred in the sediment surface, with a slight enrichement of robust

  15. HPLC analysis of nonprotein thiols in planktonic diatoms: Pool size, redox state and response to copper and cadmium exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijstenbil, J.W.; Wijnholds, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A sensitive method was developed to analyze low molecular weight thiols involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in phytoplankton. The aims of this study were to (1) separate and measure all relevant thiols in a single HPLC run; (2) measure redox states of the thiols and (3) identify specifi

  16. Ubiquitous healthy diatoms in the deep sea confirms deep carbon injection by the biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí, Susana; González-Gordillo, Jose I.; Vaqué, Dolors; Estrada, Marta; Cerezo, Maria I.; Salazar, Guillem; Gasol, Josep M.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    The role of the ocean as a sink for CO2 is partially dependent on the downward transport of phytoplankton cells packaged within fast-sinking particles. However, whether such fast-sinking mechanisms deliver fresh organic carbon down to the deep bathypelagic sea and whether this mechanism is prevalent across the ocean awaits confirmation. Photosynthetic plankton, directly responsible for trapping CO2 in organic form in the surface layer, are a key constituent of the flux of sinking particles and are assumed to die and become detritus upon leaving the photic layer. Research in the 1960-70's reported the occasional presence of well-preserved phytoplankton cells in the deep ocean, but these observations, which could signal at rapid sinking rates, were considered anecdotal. Using new developments we tested the presence of healthy phytoplankton cells in the deep sea (2000 to 4000 m depth) along the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition, a global expedition sampling the bathypelagic zone of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. In particular, we used a new microplankton sampling device, the Bottle-Net, 16S rDNA sequences, flow cytometric counts, vital stains and experiments to explore the abundance and health status of photosynthetic plankton cells between 2,000 and 4,000 m depth along the Circumnavigation track. We described the community of microplankton (> 20μm) found at the deep ocean (2000-4000 m depth), surprisingly dominated by phytoplankton, and within this, by diatoms. Moreover, we report the ubiquitous presence of healthy photosynthetic cells, dominated by diatoms, down to 4,000 m in the deep dark sea. Decay experiments with surface phytoplankton suggested that the large proportion (18%) of healthy photosynthetic cells observed, on average, in the dark ocean, requires transport times from few days to few weeks, corresponding to sinking rates of 124 to 732 m d-1, comparable to those of fast sinking aggregates and faecal pellets. These results confirm the

  17. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (< 10 % of the metabarcodes can be unambiguously assigned to planktonic taxa. These organisms live exclusively in the surface ocean and the recovered barcodes thus represent an allochthonous component deposited with the rain of organic remains from the surface ocean. We take advantage of the planktonic foraminifera portion of the metabarcodes to establish to what extent the structure of the surface ocean biota is preserved in sedimentary eDNA. We show that planktonic foraminifera DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of

  18. A toy model for a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a toy model for a diatomic molecule which is based on coupling electronic and nuclear spins to a rigid rotor. Despite its simplicity, the model can be used scientifically to analyze and understand complex molecular hyperfine spectra. In addition, the model has educational value as a number of fundamental symmetries and conservation laws of the molecule can be studied. Because of its simple structure, the model can be readily implemented as a computer program with comparatively short computing times on the order of a few seconds.

  19. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  20. Interference patterns and extinction ratio of the diatom Coscinodiscus granii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibohm, Christian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Ellegaard, M.;

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical verification of the nature and position of multiple interference points of visible light transmitted through the valve of the centric diatom species Coscinodiscus granii. Furthermore, by coupling the transmitted light into an optical fiber and moving the dia...... the diatom valve between constructive and destructive interference points, an extinction ratio of 20 dB is shown...

  1. Copepod reproduction is unaffected by diatom aldehydes or lipid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutz, Jörg; Koski, Marja; Jonasdottir, Sigrun

    2008-01-01

    production of Temora longicornis were measured for six different diatom species as well as for a nondiatom control diet (Rhodomonas sp.). The experiments were accompanied by determinations of fatty acids, sterols, and polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA) in the food. Although diatoms were generally ingested...

  2. Epiphytic Diatoms along Environmental Gradients in Western European Shallow Lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco, Saul; Cejudo-Figueiras, Cristina; Alvarez-Blanco, Irene; van Donk, Ellen; Gross, Elisabeth M.; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Irvine, Kenneth; Jeppesen, Erik; Kairesalo, Timo; Moss, Brian; Noges, Tiina; Becares, Eloy

    2014-01-01

    Diatom-based assays have been successfully associated worldwide with the tropic status of lakes. Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between epiphytic diatoms and nutrient load in shallow lakes and wetlands. We examine the relative importance of environmental factors in explaining the st

  3. Preparation and method of study of fossil diatoms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    to be exercised during the preparation of the samples A method for the preparation of strewn slides is then explained A detailed procedure for the study of diatom-strewn slides under the microscope, using the "England finder", is described, and a note on diatom...

  4. Contributions of the Diatom flora of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giffen, MH

    1966-01-01

    Full Text Available The diatom flora of the marine littoral of South African coatal river estuaries is very superficially known. In a previous contribution (Giffen 1963) the author dealt with the diatoms of the Eastern Cape Province estuaries namely the Gulu River...

  5. A contribution to the epipsammic diatom flora of Estonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the modern epipsammic diatom flora in Lake Karujärv, Saaremaa Island, Estonia revealed seventy-one taxa representing thirty-one genera. The identity of all taxa is documented with light micrographs. Most abundant taxa of the epipsammic diatom community were Achnanthidium minutissimum sens

  6. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Nunes-Nesi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved.

  7. The last glacial-interglacial cycle in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania: testing diatom response to climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Reed

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lake Ohrid is a site of global importance for palaeoclimate research. This study presents results of diatom analysis of a ca. 136 ka sequence, Co1202, from the northeast of the lake basin. It offers the opportunity to test diatom response across two glacial-interglacial transitions and within the Last Glacial, while setting up taxonomic protocols for future research. The results are outstanding in demonstrating the sensitivity of diatoms to climate change, providing proxy evidence for temperature change marked by glacial-interglacial shifts between the dominant planktonic taxa, Cyclotella fottii and C. ocellata, and exact correlation with geochemical proxies to mark the start of the Last Interglacial at ca. 130 ka. Importantly, diatoms show much stronger evidence in this site for warming during MIS3 than recorded in other productivity-related proxies, peaking at ca. 39 ka, prior to the extreme conditions of the Last Glacial maximum. In the light of the observed patterns, and from the results of analysis of early Holocene sediments from a second core, Lz1120, the lack of a response to Late Glacial and early Holocene warming from ca. 14.7–6.9 ka suggests the Co1202 sequence may be compromised during this phase. After ca. 7.4 ka, there is evidence for enhanced nutrient enrichment compared to the Last Interglacial, followed by a post-Medieval loss of diversity which is consistent with cooling, but not definitive. Taxonomically, morphological variability in C. fottii shows no clear trends linked to climate, but an intriguing change in central area morphology occurs after ca. 48.7 ka, coincident with a tephra layer. In contrast, C. ocellata shows morphological variation in the number of ocelli between interglacials, suggesting climatically-forced variation or evolutionary selection pressure. The application of a simple dissolution index does not track preservation quality very effectively, underlining the importance of

  8. Regulated growth of diatom cells on self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Koichi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We succeeded in regulating the growth of diatom cells on chemically modified glass surfaces. Glass surfaces were functionalized with -CF3, -CH3, -COOH, and -NH2 groups using the technique of self-assembled monolayers (SAM, and diatom cells were subsequently cultured on these surfaces. When the samples were rinsed after the adhesion of the diatom cells on the modified surfaces, the diatoms formed two dimensional arrays; this was not possible without the rinsing treatment. Furthermore, we examined the number of cells that grew and their motility by time-lapse imaging in order to clarify the interaction between the cells and SAMs. We hope that our results will be a basis for developing biodevices using living photosynthetic diatom cells.

  9. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules.

  10. Applications of Diatoms as Potential Microalgae in Nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Ali Akbar; Akbari, Fariba; Ghorakhlu, Mohamad Moradi; de la Guardia, Miguel; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae, which present in nearly every water habitat make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications such as oil explora-tion, forensic examination, environmental indication, biosilica pattern generation, toxicity testing and eutrophication of aqueous ecosystems. Methods Essential information on diatoms were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of diatoms on biosynthesis and bioremediation. Results In this review, we present the recent progress in this century on the application of diatoms in waste degradation, synthesis of biomaterial, biomineraliza-tion, toxicity and toxic effects of mineral elements evaluations. Conclusion Diatoms can be considered as metal toxicity bioindicators and they can be applied for biomineralization, synthesis of biomaterials, and degradation of wastes. PMID:23678445

  11. Applications of Diatoms as Potential Microalgae in Nanobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Yari Khosroushahi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae, which present in nearly every water habitat make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications such as oil explora­tion, forensic examination, environmental indication, biosilica pattern generation, toxicity testing and eutrophication of aqueous ecosystems. Methods: Essential information on diatoms were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of diatoms on biosynthesis and bioremediation. Results: In this review, we present the recent progress in this century on the application of diatoms in waste degradation, synthesis of biomaterial, biomineraliza­tion, toxicity and toxic effects of mineral elements evaluations. Conclusion: Diatoms can be considered as metal toxicity bioindicators and they can be applied for biomineralization, synthesis of biomaterials, and degradation of wastes.

  12. Plankton biodiversity of Dharamtar creek adjoining Mumbai harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    The phytoplankton and zooplankton diversity of Dharamtar creek, a vital system adjoining the Mumbai harbour were assessed to obtain baseline information. A total of 58 genera of phytoplankton were encountered from the area, which included 46 diatoms...

  13. Variation partitioning of diatom species data matrices: Understanding the influence of multiple factors on benthic diatom communities in tropical streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bere, Taurai, E-mail: tbere2015@gmail.com; Mangadze, Tinotenda; Mwedzi, Tongai

    2016-10-01

    Elucidating the confounding influence of multiple environmental factors on benthic diatom communities is important in developing water quality predictive models for better guidance of stream management efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relative impact of metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations in, addition to nutrient enrichment and organic pollution, on diatom taxonomic composition with the view to improve stream diatom-based water quality inference models. Samples were collected twice at 20 sampling stations in the tropical Manyame Catchment, Zimbabwe. Diatom, macroinvertebrate communities and environmental factors were sampled and analysed. The variations in diatom community composition explained by different categories of environmental factors were analysed using canonical correspondence analysis using variance partitioning (partial CCA). The following variations were explained by the different predictor matrices: nutrient levels and organic pollution - 10.4%, metal pollution - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. Thus, factors other than nutrient levels and organic pollution explain additional significant variation in these diatom communities. Development of diatom-based stream water quality inference models that incorporate metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations, where these are key issues, is thus deemed necessary. - Highlights: • Confounding influences of multiple environmental factors on diatom communities are elucidated. • Variation explained: nutrients + organic pollution - 10.4%, metals - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. • Calibration of existing or development of new indices may be necessary.

  14. Diatom Milking: A Review and New Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Vinayak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of human populations and the growth of cities contribute to the depletion of natural resources, increase their cost, and create potential climatic changes. To overcome difficulties in supplying populations and reducing the resource cost, a search for alternative pharmaceutical, nanotechnology, and energy sources has begun. Among the alternative sources, microalgae are the most promising because they use carbon dioxide (CO2 to produce biomass and/or valuable compounds. Once produced, the biomass is ordinarily harvested and processed (downstream program. Drying, grinding, and extraction steps are destructive to the microalgal biomass that then needs to be renewed. The extraction and purification processes generate organic wastes and require substantial energy inputs. Altogether, it is urgent to develop alternative downstream processes. Among the possibilities, milking invokes the concept that the extraction should not kill the algal cells. Therefore, it does not require growing the algae anew. In this review, we discuss research on milking of diatoms. The main themes are (a development of alternative methods to extract and harvest high added value compounds; (b design of photobioreactors; (c biodiversity and (d stress physiology, illustrated with original results dealing with oleaginous diatoms.

  15. Importance of sampling frequency when collecting diatoms

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Naicheng

    2016-11-14

    There has been increasing interest in diatom-based bio-assessment but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of how to capture diatoms’ temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency (ASF). To cover this research gap, we collected and analyzed daily riverine diatom samples over a 1-year period (25 April 2013–30 April 2014) at the outlet of a German lowland river. The samples were classified into five clusters (1–5) by a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method based on similarity between species compositions over time. ASFs were determined to be 25 days at Cluster 2 (June-July 2013) and 13 days at Cluster 5 (February-April 2014), whereas no specific ASFs were found at Cluster 1 (April-May 2013), 3 (August-November 2013) (>30 days) and Cluster 4 (December 2013 - January 2014) (<1 day). ASFs showed dramatic seasonality and were negatively related to hydrological wetness conditions, suggesting that sampling interval should be reduced with increasing catchment wetness. A key implication of our findings for freshwater management is that long-term bio-monitoring protocols should be developed with the knowledge of tracking algal temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency.

  16. Importance of sampling frequency when collecting diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Naicheng; Faber, Claas; Sun, Xiuming; Qu, Yueming; Wang, Chao; Ivetic, Snjezana; Riis, Tenna; Ulrich, Uta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    There has been increasing interest in diatom-based bio-assessment but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of how to capture diatoms’ temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency (ASF). To cover this research gap, we collected and analyzed daily riverine diatom samples over a 1-year period (25 April 2013–30 April 2014) at the outlet of a German lowland river. The samples were classified into five clusters (1–5) by a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method based on similarity between species compositions over time. ASFs were determined to be 25 days at Cluster 2 (June-July 2013) and 13 days at Cluster 5 (February-April 2014), whereas no specific ASFs were found at Cluster 1 (April-May 2013), 3 (August-November 2013) (>30 days) and Cluster 4 (December 2013 - January 2014) (management is that long-term bio-monitoring protocols should be developed with the knowledge of tracking algal temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency.

  17. An investigation of the fine structure, cell surface carbohydrates, and appeal of the diatom Extubocellulus sp. as prey for small flagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Cereceda, M; Williams, R; Guinea, A; Novarino, G

    2007-01-01

    The fine structure and surface exopolymers of a coastal planktonic nanodiatom of the sparsely reported genus Extubocellulus were studied respectively by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy in conjunction with fluorescent lectins. Monitoring the suitability of the species as prey food for other protists was also investigated by video microscopy coupled with digital film. Cells are rectangular in girdle view, with a pervalvar axis longer than the apical axis. Valves are almost circular with a diameter of 2.8 to 3.6 microm. The valve face bears randomly distributed areolae (ca. 50 in 10 microm), which may be either open or occluded. Two small raised ocelluli occur at the apices, with a rim devoid of perforations and about 6-7 porelli. Glucose and N-acetyl-glucosamine moieties present on the surface of the live diatom were labelled with fluorescent lectins, and a differential pattern of distribution for both carbohydrates was observed. The potential role of fluorescent lectins as cellular probes of taxonomic value in small diatoms is compared with that of nucleotide and antibody probes. We provide the first illustrative evidence of the presence of Extubocellulus sp. in the cytoplasm of the nanoflagellate Goniomonas amphinema and of the egestion of diatom frustules. Results obtained are discussed in the light of the present knowledge of the role of carbohydrate-protein interactions in phagocytosis of prey by free-living protozoa.

  18. THE PARADOX OF THE PLANKTON: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE PROMOTES BLOOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: The 'paradox of the plankton' refers to commensalism as well as symbiosis, predation, and impacts of non equilibrium conditions between two planktoniccompetitors. In regards to commensalism, phytoplankton can release organic carbon that enhances growth of its ba...

  19. Life spans of planktonic foraminifers: New sight through sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Mazumder, A.

    Maastrichtian planktic foraminifera: LIFE SPANS OF PLANKTONIC FORAMINIFERS 133 methodological comparisons, intraspecific variability, and evidence for photosynthesis. Mar. Micropal. 36: 169-188. Kawahata, II., Nishimura, A. and Gagan, M.K. 2002. Seasonal...

  20. Hydrographic and Plankton Data, 1960-1965 (NODC Accession 7101194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1952/63 the Institute of Oceanography undertook an extensive seasonal survey of hydrography and plankton in the south-west Indian Ocean as part of the...

  1. Planktonic algae and cyanoprokaryotes as indicators of ecosystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-07

    Oct 7, 2013 ... 1Unit for Environmental Science and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa. 2South African ... this study a survey of planktonic autotrophs of the dams in the. Mooi River ..... Spirulina sp. ✓. ✓.

  2. THE PARADOX OF THE PLANKTON: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE PROMOTES BLOOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: The 'paradox of the plankton' refers to commensalism as well as symbiosis, predation, and impacts of non equilibrium conditions between two planktoniccompetitors. In regards to commensalism, phytoplankton can release organic carbon that enhances growth of its ba...

  3. Living planktonic foraminifera of the Wadge bank, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    Twenty three species of living planktonic Foraminifera belonging to 11 genera have been studied from the Wadge Bank area off southern tip of the Indian peninsula. The fauna is characterized by species such as Globigerinoides conglobatus, G...

  4. Recent planktonic foraminifera from the sediment off Karwar and Mangalore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    of planktonic foraminifera from the shore towards the slope, indicative of a regulated sediment discharge and rate of sedimentation in the area. All the species represented are typical warm-water fauna, with one exception. Undoubted, though rare, @i...

  5. PLANKTON OF UST-KURA REGION OF THE CASPIAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Dzhalilov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Plankton of Ust-Kura region of the Caspian Sea is studied in 2009–2011. Forty-eight species of planktonic ciliates, 17 species of Cladocera, 3 species of rotifers and 2 species of copepods are registered during the studies. Species diversity of all groups strongly influences the Kura River defining seawater desalination this site. The vast majority of species of plankton community refers to freshwater representatives or eurybiontic species able to exist in a wide range of salinity.Methods.Collected samples for evaluation were examined diatomaceous plankton partially invivo, and then fixed with 4% formalin with addition of dye "Benqalrose". Further processing of the samples was carried out under laboratory conditions.Results. During the study 43 species of ciliates, 3 species of rotifers, 17 species of Cladocera and 2 species of copepods and their larval stages was noted (Table 1 . As seen from Table 1, the distribution of planktonic ciliates to collection points was fairly even and ranged from a minimum number of species reported by Article 1 (22 species to a maximum at station 5 (31 species. It should also be noted that the vast majority mentioned in plankton ciliates are typical planktontam is distributed fairly evenly throughout the studied waters. Random plankton species, such as representatives of Condylostoma and Amphisiella were marked in shallow water stations 4 and 5. Apparently their presence in the samples is due to the temporary transfer of benthic plankton under the influence of the wave factor.

  6. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Jurgens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated ......(3), >50 mum s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing....

  7. Strong seasonal effect of moderate experimental warming on plankton respiration in a temperate estuarine plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Satya; Nydahl, Anna; Anton, Peter; Wikner, Johan

    2013-12-01

    Climate change projections forecast a 1.1-6.4 °C global increase in surface water temperature and a 3 °C increase for the Baltic Sea. This study examined the short-term interactive effects of a realistic future temperature increase (3 °C) on pelagic respiration and bacterioplankton growth and phytoplankton photosynthesis in situ. This study was undertaken throughout a full seasonal cycle in the northern Baltic Sea. We found marked positive short-term effects of temperature on plankton respiration but no significant effect on bacterioplankton growth or phytoplankton photosynthesis. Absolute respiration rates remained similar to other comparable environments at the in situ temperature. With the 3 °C temperature increase, respiration rates in situ increased up to 5-fold during the winter and 2-fold during the summer. A maximum seasonal Q10 value of 332 was observed for respiration during the cold winter months (twater ≈ 0 °C), and summer Q10 values were comparatively high (9.1). Q10 values exhibited a significant inverse relationship to water temperature during winter. Our results thereby suggest that plankton respiration in this coastal zone is more temperature sensitive than previously reported. In addition, field data indicated that plankton respiration switched from being temperature limited to being limited by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) after the simulated temperature increase. Assuming that our observations are relevant over longer time scales, climate change may worsen hypoxia, increase CO2 emissions and create a more heterotrophic food web in coastal zones with a high load of riverine DOC.

  8. Ocean plankton. Determinants of community structure in the global plankton interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Colin, Sébastien; Carcillo, Fabrizio; Chaffron, Samuel; Ignacio-Espinosa, J Cesar; Roux, Simon; Vincent, Flora; Bittner, Lucie; Darzi, Youssef; Wang, Jun; Audic, Stéphane; Berline, Léo; Bontempi, Gianluca; Cabello, Ana M; Coppola, Laurent; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; d'Ovidio, Francesco; De Meester, Luc; Ferrera, Isabel; Garet-Delmas, Marie-José; Guidi, Lionel; Lara, Elena; Pesant, Stéphane; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez, Pablo; Sebastian, Marta; Souffreau, Caroline; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Gorsky, Gabriel; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; Sullivan, Matthew B; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-05-22

    Species interaction networks are shaped by abiotic and biotic factors. Here, as part of the Tara Oceans project, we studied the photic zone interactome using environmental factors and organismal abundance profiles and found that environmental factors are incomplete predictors of community structure. We found associations across plankton functional types and phylogenetic groups to be nonrandomly distributed on the network and driven by both local and global patterns. We identified interactions among grazers, primary producers, viruses, and (mainly parasitic) symbionts and validated network-generated hypotheses using microscopy to confirm symbiotic relationships. We have thus provided a resource to support further research on ocean food webs and integrating biological components into ocean models.

  9. Contribution to the Themed Section: Scaling from individual plankton to marine ecosystems HORIZONS Small bugs with a big impact: linking plankton ecology with ecosystem processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of these microscopic organisms shape plankton population dynamics, distributions, and ecosystem functions. Key features of the marine environment place constraints on the ecology and evolution of plankton. Understanding these constraints is critical in developing a mechanistic understanding and predictive capacity......As an introduction to the following Themed Section on the significance of planktonic organisms to the functioning of marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles we discuss the ramifications size imparts on the biology of plankton. We provide examples of how the characteristics...

  10. Plankton respiration in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carol; Serret, Pablo; Tilstone, Gavin; Teira, Eva; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2002-05-01

    Concurrent measurements of dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), size fractionated primary production ( 14C PP), nitrogen uptake, nutrients, chlorophyll a concentration, and heterotrophic and autotrophic bacterial abundance were collected from the upper 200 m of a latitudinal (32°S-48°N) transect in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean during May/June 1998. The mean mixed layer respiration rate was 2.5±2.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=119) for the whole transect, 2.2±1.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=32) in areas where chlorophyll a was dissolved oxygen consumption, was 0.8 ( n=11). At the time of the study, plankton community respiration exceeded GP in the picoautotroph dominated oligotrophic regions (Eastern Tropical Atlantic [15.5°S-14.2°N] and North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre [21.5-42.5°N]), which amounted to 50% of the stations sampled along the 12,100 km transect. These regions also exhibited high heterotrophic: autotrophic biomass ratios, higher turnover rates of phytoplankton than of bacteria and low f ratios. However, the carbon supply mechanisms required to sustain the rates of respiration higher than GP could not be fully quantified. Future research should aim to determine the temporal balance of respiration and GP together with substrate supply mechanisms in these ocean regions.

  11. Local fluid transport by planktonic swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    Energy transport in the ocean occurs through an intricate set of pathways mainly powered by physical phenomena. The hypothesis that vertical migrations of aquatic fauna may contribute to this process through the action of the induced drift mechanism has been investigated in recent years. Microscale measurements by Kunze et al. (1), in Saanich Inlet have shown the presence of high kinetic energy dissipation rates in the vicinity of vertically migrating krill swarms. However, it remains uncertain if energy is being introduced at scales large enough to induce the transport of fluid across surfaces of equal density. Within this context, the present study aims to provide experimental insight of fluid transport by planktonic swarms. The vertical migration of Artemia salina is triggered and controlled by means of a system of stationary and translating luminescent signals. High speed flow visualizations elucidate the competing effects of upward drift by the passive sections of the organisms and downward flow induced by the appendages. The resulting fluid transport is assessed by using PIV at different stages of the migration. The kinetic energy spectrum is computed using velocity correlation functions to determine the length scales at which the animals introduce energy to the flow.

  12. Diatom-based label-free optical biosensor for biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viji, S; Anbazhagi, M; Ponpandian, N; Mangalaraj, D; Jeyanthi, S; Santhanam, P; Devi, A Shenbaga; Viswanathan, C

    2014-10-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae, which fabricates ornate biosilica shells called frustules that possess a surface rich in reactive silanol (Si-OH) groups. The intrinsic patterned porous structure of diatom frustules at nanoscale can be exploited in the effective detection of biomolecules. In this study, the frustules of a specific diatom Amphora sp. has been functionalized to detect bovine serum albumin (BSA). The functionalization of the diatom frustule substrate is achieved by using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APES). The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results showed an ornately patterned surface of the frustule valve ordered at nanoscale. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirmed the N-H bending and stretching of the amine group after amine functionalization. The emission peaks in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the amine-functionalized diatom biosilica selectively enhanced the intensity by a factor of ten when compared to that of a bare diatom biosilica. The result showed a significant quenching of PL intensity of BSA at around 445 nm due to the interaction of amine-functionalized diatom-BSA protein complex. The detection limit was found to be 3 × 10(-5) M of BSA protein. Hence, the study proves that the functionalized frustule of Amphora sp. is an effective quantitative analytical tool for optical label-free biosensing applications.

  13. Diatom (Bacillariophyta) community response to water quality and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Paul M.; Butcher, Jason T.; Gerovac, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Aquatic algal communities are sensitive to environmental stresses and are used as indicators of water quality. Diatoms were collected from three streams that drain the Great Marsh at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Diatom communities, water chemistry, and land use were measured at each site to test the hypothesis that differences in land use indirectly affect diatom communities, through changes in water quality. Relationships among these variables were examined by correlation, cluster, and detrended correspondence analysis. Several water chemistry variables were correlated to several land-use categories. Diatom species diversity was most variable in disturbed areas with poorer water quality and was correlated with land use and total alkalinity, total hardness, and specific conductance. Sites within each stream were grouped in terms of their diatom assemblage by both cluster and detrended correspondence analysis with but two exceptions in Dunes Creek. Diatom communities in the three streams responded to land use through its effects on water quality. The results of this study demonstrate the use of diatom assemblages as indicators of water quality, which can be linked to land use in a watershed.

  14. Diatom feeding across trophic guilds in tidal flat nematodes, and the importance of diatom cell size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Tom; Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; De Geyter, Ellen; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Sabbe, Koen; De Troch, Marleen

    2014-09-01

    We examine the capacity of nematodes from three feeding types (deposit feeder, epistrate feeder, predator) to utilize microphytobenthos (MPB), and assess whether diatom cell size and consumer body size are important drivers of their feeding. We analyzed natural stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in abundant nematode genera and a variety of carbon sources at an estuarine intertidal flat. All nematodes had δ13C indicating that MPB is their major carbon source. δ15N, however, demonstrated that only one deposit and one epistrate feeder genus obtained most of their carbon from direct grazing on MPB, whereas other deposit feeders and predators obtained at least part of their carbon by predation on MPB grazers. We then performed a microcosm experiment in which equal cell numbers of each of three differently sized strains of the pennate diatom Seminavis were offered as food to four, one and one genera of deposit feeders, epistrate feeders and predators, respectively. Previous studies have shown that all but the epistrate feeder ingest whole diatoms, whereas the epistrate feeder pierces cells and sucks out their contents. Most genera showed markedly higher carbon absorption from medium and large cells than from small ones. When considering the number of cells consumed, however, none of the nematodes which ingest whole cells exhibited a clear preference for any specific diatom size. The epistrate feeder was the smallest nematode taxon considered here, yet it showed a marked preference for large cells. These results highlight that the feeding mechanism is much more important than consumer size as a driver of particle size selection in nematodes grazing MPB.

  15. Evolution and field application of a plankton imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsen, Andrew Walker

    Understanding the processes controlling the distribution and abundance of zooplankton has been a primary concern of oceanographers and has driven the development of numerous technologies to more accurately quantify these parameters. This study investigates the potential of a new plankton imaging sensor, the shadowed image particle profiling and evaluation recorder (SIPPER), that I helped develop at the University of South Florida, to address that concern. In the first chapter, results from the SIPPER are compared against concurrently sampling plankton nets and the optical plankton counter (OPC), the most widely used optical zooplankton sampling sensor in the field. It was found that plankton nets and the SIPPER sampled robust and hard-bodied zooplankton taxa similarly while nets significantly underestimated the abundance of fragile and gelatinous taxa imaged by the SIPPER such that nets might underestimate zooplankton biomass by greater than 50%. Similarly, it was determined that the OPC misses greater than a quarter of resolvable particles due to coincident counting and that it can not distinguish between zooplankton and other abundant suspended particles such as marine snow and Trichodesmium that are difficult to quantify with traditional sampling methods. Therefore the standard method of using net samples to ground truth OPC data should be reevaluated. In the second chapter, a new automated plankton classification system was utilized to see if it was possible to use machine learning methods to classify SIPPER-imaged plankton from a diverse subtropical assemblage on the West Florida Shelf and describe their distribution during a 24 hour period. Classification accuracy for this study was similar to that of other studies in less diverse environments and similar to what could be expected by a human expert for a complex dataset. Fragile plankton taxa such as larvaceans, hydromedusae, sarcodine protoctists and Trichodesmium were found at significantly higher

  16. Spatial paradigms of lotic diatom distribution: A landscape ecology perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passy, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial distributional patterns of benthic diatoms and their relation to current velocity were investigated in an unshaded cobble-bottom reach of White Creek (Washington County, NY). On 27 August 1999, diatoms were sampled and current velocity and depth were measured on a regular square sampling grid with a grain size of 0.01 m2, interval of 0.5 m, and extent of 16 m2. The relative abundance of the 18 common diatom species enumerated in the 81 samples was subjected to detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). The first axis (DCA1) explained 51% of the variance in diatom data and separated the samples according to current regimes. The spatial autocorrelation of DCA1 sample scores in deposition and erosion regions of White Creek was determined by Moran's I statistic to indicate patch size. In White Creek the patch length of all diatom communities was more than 3.1 m, whereas the patch width was 1 m in the deposition region and 0.5 m in the erosion region. There were 5 dominant diatom taxa, Achnanthes minutissima Ku??tz. et vars, Fragilaria capucina Dezmazie??res et vars, F. crotonensis Kitt., Diatoma vulgaris Bory, and Synedra ulna (Nitz.) Ehr. et vars. The patch length of the dominant species varied from 1 to more than 4.1 m, whereas the patch width, if defined, was 0.5 m. Achnanthes minutissima and F. capucina, the two diatom species with the highest relative abundance, displayed spatially structured patches of low abundance and comparatively random patches of high abundance, suggesting broad scale abiotic control of species performance in low abundance regions and finer scale biotic control of high abundance areas. Another objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that higher current velocities, which generally impede immigration, would increase randomness and complexity (i.e. homogeneity of diatom distributional patterns). The spatial complexity in low versus high velocity transects was determined by calculating the respective fractal dimension (D) of DCA

  17. Interactions of bacteria with diatoms: Influence on natural marine biofilms.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; DeCosta, P.M.; Anil, A.C.; Sawant, S.S.

    in this study cannot be ruled out. In the case of Vibrio species, a clear trend was noticed for V. cholerae in the ‘initial’ 2-day old biofilm community. V. cholerae was the only Vibrio species that showed a similar trend as diatoms, i.e., maximum abundance... was associated with sharp decrease in silicate and nitrate concentrations in most of the cases (Suppl. Fig. 3), reflecting utilization by the growing fouling diatom community. Effect of streptomycin and chloramphenicol on fouling diatom communities Pre...

  18. Molecular structure of diatomic lanthanide compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The molecular constants of selected diatomic lanthanide compounds(LaH, LaO, LaF, EuH, EuO, EuF, EuS, GdO, GdF, GdH, YbH, YbO, YbF, YbS, LuH, LuO and LuF) have been calcu-lated by using relativistic small-core pseudopotentials and optimized(14s13p10d8f6g)/ [6s6p5d4f3g] valence basis sets. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data, with exception of YbO and LuF. The reasons for the discrepancies in case of YbO are due to a complicated mixing of configurations in the ground state, whereas in case of LuF the binding energy estimated by experimentalists appears to be too low.

  19. Star Trek replicators and diatom nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Ryan W; Gordon, Richard

    2003-08-01

    Diatoms are single celled algae, the 10(5)-10(6) species of which create a wide variety of three-dimensional amorphous silica shells. If we could get them to produce useful structures, perhaps by compustat selection experiments (i.e. forced evolution of development or evodevo), their exponential growth in suspension cultures could compete with the lithography techniques of present day nanotechnology, which have limited 3D capabilities. Alternatively, their fine detail could be used for templates for MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems), or their silica deposition systems isolated for guiding silica deposition. A recent paper has demonstrated that silica can be replaced atom for atom without change of shape--a step towards the Star Trek replicator.

  20. Magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hummon, Matthew T; Stuhl, Benjamin K; Collopy, Alejandra L; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The development of the magneto-optical trap revolutionized the fields of atomic and quantum physics by providing a simple method for the rapid production of ultracold, trapped atoms. A similar technique for producing a diverse set of dense, ultracold diatomic molecular species will likewise transform the study of strongly interacting quantum systems, precision measurement, and physical chemistry. We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). Using a quasicycling optical transition we observe transverse Doppler cooling of a YO molecular beam to a temperature of 5 mK, limited by interaction time. With the addition of an oscillating magnetic quadrupole field we demonstrate a transverse magneto-optical trap and achieve temperatures of 2 mK.

  1. Molecular structure of diatomic lanthanide compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晓燕; 刘文剑; MichaelDolg

    2002-01-01

    The molecular constants of selected diatomic lanthanide compounds (LaH, LaO, LaF, EuH, EuO, EuF, EuS, GdO, GdF, GdH, YbH, YbO, YbF, YbS, LuH, LuO and LuF) have been calculated by using relativistic small-core pseudopotentials and optimized (14s13p10d8f6g)/ [6s6p5d4f3g] valence basis sets. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data, with exception of YbO and LuF. The reasons for the discrepancies in case of YbO are due to a complicated mixing of configurations in the ground state, whereas in case of LuF the binding energy estimated by experimentalists appears to be too low.

  2. The dilemma of disappearing diatoms: Incorporating diatom dissolution data into palaeoenvironmental modelling and reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryves, David B.; Battarbee, Richard W.; Fritz, Sherilyn C.

    2009-01-01

    Taphonomic issues pose fundamental challenges for Quaternary scientists to recover environmental signals from biological proxies and make accurate inferences of past environments. The problem of microfossil preservation, specifically diatom dissolution, remains an important, but often overlooked, source of error in both qualitative and quantitative reconstructions of key variables from fossil samples, especially those using relative abundance data. A first step to tackling this complex issue is establishing an objective method of assessing preservation (here, diatom dissolution) that can be applied by different analysts and incorporated into routine counting strategies. Here, we establish a methodology for assessment of diatom dissolution under standard light microscopy (LM) illustrated with morphological criteria for a range of major diatom valve shapes. Dissolution data can be applied to numerical models (transfer functions) from contemporary samples, and to fossil material to aid interpretation of stratigraphic profiles and taphonomic pathways of individual taxa. Using a surface sediment diatom-salinity training set from the Northern Great Plains (NGP) as an example, we explore a variety of approaches to include dissolution data in salinity inference models indirectly and directly. Results show that dissolution data can improve models, with apparent dissolution-adjusted error (RMSE) up to 15% lower than their unadjusted counterparts. Internal validation suggests improvements are more modest, with bootstrapped prediction errors (RMSEP) up to 10% lower. When tested on a short core from Devils Lake, North Dakota, which has a historical record of salinity, dissolution-adjusted models infer higher values compared to unadjusted models during peak salinity of the 1930s-1940s Dust Bowl but nonetheless significantly underestimate peak values. Site-specific factors at Devils Lake associated with effects of lake level change on taphonomy (preservation and re

  3. Using diatom assemblages and sulphur in sediments to uncover the effects of historical mining on Lake Arnoux (Quebec, Canada: A retrospective of economic benefits versus environmental debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brian Hamilton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring changes in environmental conditions is increasingly important as the Canadian economic infrastructure ramps up exploration and mining development in the more inaccessible northern regions of Canada. Governments are concurrently assessing effects from past mining activities and absorbing the economic cost to society with on-going remediation and monitoring initiatives. The abandoned Aldermac mine in northwestern Quebec, mined from 1932–1943, is an excellent case study for assessing the state of environmental and economic effects of past mining operations. A paleolimnological approach, using diatoms as environmental proxies, was used to evaluate the spatial and temporal impacts on aquatic receiving environments. Based on the inferences drawn from diatom assemblages in Lake Arnoux, prior to mining activity, lake water pH was similar to that of surrounding lakes (circumneutral to weakly acidic. After mining operations terminated, changes in pH and alkalinity in Lake Arnoux coincided with distinct increases in sediment sulphur content. Across a 30- to 40-year span (circa 1940 to 1970s a significant decline in phytoplankton flora coincided with lake acidification and increased clarity of the water column. This resulted in an increase in the benthic diatom population (>90%, replacing the planktonic diatoms. Observed shifts in environmental proxies are concurrent with one, and possibly two, reported tailings pond breaches at the abandoned mine site. Adverse effects of the abandoned Aldermac mine on nearby ecosystems, combined with pressure from local citizens and environmental groups, forced responsible accountability for site restoration led by the Quebec government. Based on the historical period of economic growth, the financial benefits of the Aldermac mine were significant and justify the current pay-it-backward costs for environmental remediation. However, it has now been documented that the pay-it-backward model is not sustainable in

  4. Modified Ribose Receptor Response in Isolated Diatom Frustules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, Carly R.

    2011-08-26

    Diatoms are a distinctive group of microalgae with the unique ability to produce a highly-ordered biosilica matrix, known as the frustule. Diatoms hold significant potential in the biotechnology field as a silica scaffold for embedding proteins. In this study, we analyzed the funtionalization of biosilica with a receptor complex through genetic modification of the diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana. Through the use of Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), the receptor was shown to remain active in transformed frustules after the inner cellular contents were removed. In addition to protein functionality, growth conditions for T. pseudonana were optimized. Untransformed cultures receiving aeration grew more rapidly than stagnant untransformed cultures. Surprisingly, transformed cultures grew more quickly than untransformed cultures. This study demonstrates isolated diatom frustules provide an effective scaffold for embedded receptor complexes. Through this research, we provide the groundwork for the development of new biosensors for use in diagnostics and environmental remediation.

  5. Diatoms - nature materials with great potential for bioapplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medarević Đorđe P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are widespread unicellular photosynthetic algae that produce unique highly ordered siliceous cell wall, called frustule. Micro- to nanoporous structure with high surface area that can be easily modified, high mechanical resistance, unique optical features (light focusing and luminescence and biocompatibility make diatom frustule as a suitable raw material for the development of devices such as bio- and gas sensors, microfluidic particle sorting devices, supercapacitors, batteries, solar cells, electroluminescent devices and drug delivery systems. Their wide availability in the form of fossil remains (diatomite or diatomaceous earth as well as easy cultivation in the artificial conditions further supports use of diatoms in many different fields of application. This review focused on the recent achievements in the diatom bioapplications such as drug delivery, biomolecules immobilization, bio- and gas sensing, since great progress was made in this field over the last several years.

  6. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Reed P; DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B

    2016-09-20

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise.

  7. The relevance of diatoms for water quality assessment in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relevance of diatoms for water quality assessment in South Africa: A ... Deliberate determination of responses to management strategies or impacts arising from a ... may be established to augment the current use of invertebrate indicators.

  8. Acidification counteracts negative effects of warming on diatom silicification

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, Alexandra

    2016-10-24

    Diatoms are a significant group contributing up to 40 % of annual primary production in the oceans. They have a special siliceous cell wall that, acting as a ballast, plays a key role in the sequestration of global carbon and silica. Diatoms dominate primary production in the Arctic Ocean, where global climate change is causing increases in water temperature and in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we show that as water temperature increases diatoms become stressed, grow to smaller sizes, and decrease their silicification rates. But at higher pCO2, as the pH of seawater decreases, silica incorporation rates are increased. In a future warmer Arctic ocean diatoms may have a competitive advantage under increased ocean acidification, as increased pCO2 counteracts the adverse effects of increasing temperature on silicification and buffers its consequences in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and silica.

  9. Diatoms - nature materials with great potential for bioapplications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Medarević Đorđe P; Lošić Dušan; Ibrić Svetlana R

    2016-01-01

    ... (light focusing and luminescence) and biocompatibility make diatom frustule as a suitable raw material for the development of devices such as bio- and gas sensors, microfluidic particle sorting devices, supercapacitors, batteries...

  10. Comparing optical properties of different species of diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibohm, Christian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Su, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are single cellular algae encapsulate d in an external wall of micro-structured porous silica called the frustule. Diatoms are present in all water environments and contribute with 20-25 % of the global primary production of oxygen by photosynthesis. The appearance of the frustule is very...... species dependent with huge variety in size, shape, and micro- structure. We have experimentally investigated optical properties of frustules of several species of diatoms to further understand light harvesting properties together with commo n traits, effects and differences between the different...... analysis software. The software uses parameters which are extracted from experimental im ages as basis for simulation and allows us to extract the influence of the different elements of the frustule. The information could be used both for predicting optical properties of diatoms and by changing frustule...

  11. Light Manipulation by Single Cells: The Case of Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo De Tommasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous monocellular microalgae, responsible for about 20–25% of the global oxygen produced by photosynthesis. Living in environments where sunlight is not so easily accessible, evolution shaped diatoms in order to exploit light with high efficiency. In particular, diatoms are provided with an external, micro- and nanopatterned silica shell, the frustule, surprisingly similar to artificial photonic crystals and able to manipulate light in many different ways. The present paper reviews the most relevant studies on optical and photonic properties of diatoms that have been performed throughout the last years making use of SEM characterizations, transmittance measurements at different wavelengths, holographic microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the predictive support of different numerical simulation algorithms.

  12. Key drivers of seasonal plankton dynamics in cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies off East Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Laiolo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale eddies in the south west Pacific region are prominent ocean features that represent distinctive environments for phytoplankton. Here we examine the seasonal plankton dynamics associated with averaged cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (CE and ACE, respectively off eastern Australia. We do this through building seasonal climatologies of mixed layer depth and surface chlorophyll-a for both CE and ACE by combining remotely sensed sea surface height (TOPEX/Poseidon, Envisat, Jason-1, and OSTM/Jason-2, remotely sensed ocean colour (GlobColour and in situ profiles of temperature, salinity and pressure from Argo floats. Using the CE and ACE seasonal climatologies, we assimilate the surface chlorophyll-a data into both a single (WOMBAT, and multi-phytoplankton class (EMS biogeochemical model to investigate the level of complexity required to simulate the phytoplankton chlorophyll-a. For the two eddy types, the data assimilation showed both biogeochemical models only needed one set of parameters to represent phytoplankton but needed different parameters for zooplankton. To assess the simulated phytoplankton behavior we compared EMS model simulations with a ship-based experiment that involved incubating a winter phytoplankton community sampled from below the mixed layer under ambient and two higher light intensities with and without nutrient enrichment. By the end of the 5-day field experiment, large diatom abundance was four times greater in all treatments compared to the initial community, with a corresponding decline in pico-cyanobacteria. The experimental results were consistent with the simulated behavior in CE and ACE, where the seasonal deepening of the mixed layer during winter produced a rapid increase in large phytoplankton. Our model simulations suggest that CE off East Australia are not only characterized by a higher chlorophyll-a concentration compared to ACE, but also by a higher concentration of large phytoplankton (i.e. diatoms due

  13. Differential effects of planktonic and biofilm MRSA on human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Kelly R; James, Garth A; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E; Stewart, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria colonizing chronic wounds often exist as biofilms, yet their role in chronic wound pathogenesis remains unclear. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms induce apoptosis in dermal keratinocytes, and given that chronic wound biofilms also colonize dermal tissue, it is important to investigate the effects of bacterial biofilms on dermal fibroblasts. The effects of a predominant wound pathogen, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, on normal, human, dermal fibroblasts were examined in vitro. Cell-culture medium was conditioned with equivalent numbers of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus and then fed to fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast response was evaluated using scratch, viability, and apoptosis assays. The results suggested that fibroblasts experience the same fate when exposed to the soluble products of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus, namely limited migration followed by death. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that fibroblast production of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases were differentially affected by planktonic and biofilm-conditioned medium. Planktonic-conditioned medium induced more interleukin-6, interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, heparin-bound epidermal growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and metalloproteinase-3 production in fibroblasts than the biofilm-conditioned medium. Biofilm-conditioned medium induced more tumor necrosis factor-α production in fibroblasts compared with planktonic-conditioned medium, and suppressed metalloproteinase-3 production compared with controls.

  14. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R.; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia’s southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species. PMID:27687507

  15. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2016-09-30

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia's southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species.

  16. Diatoms and Water Quality of Telaga Warna Dieng, Java Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnaningsih Soeprobowati, Tri; Widodo Agung Suedy, Sri; Hadiyanto

    2017-02-01

    Diatoms are popular name for Bacillariophyte, the microalgae with the specific characteristic of silicious cell walls that well preserved in the sediments. The different diatoms assemblage in the sediment layers indicate different environment at the time of the diatoms live and deposited. Telaga Warna is small lake in Dieng Plateau. Telaga means lake, Warna means colour. It is called Telaga Warna because previously have 4 colours i.e. red, white, blue, and yellow which was influenced by weather, time, and site of view. This study aims to analysis the diatoms communities and water quality of Telaga Warna Dieng, Java, Indonesia. Coring conducted at three different locations. Water sampling carried out on all three spots. Analysis of diatoms consist of three stages: digestion, preparation, and identification of diatoms. There were 59 diatoms species found in Telaga Warna Dieng that were belong to 9 groups diatoms of centric, arafid, eunotoid, birafid, monorafid, birafid, epitemid, nitzschioid, and surirelloid. Eunotia, Pinnularia, and Melosira were the dominant genus from Telaga Warna. The water quality parameters that exceeded Indonesia Water Quality Standard were pH (2.2 – 5.4), Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu. Based on the abundance of species Eunotia and Pinnularia in Telaga Warna Dieng indicates that water tends to be acidic. The dominance of Melosira indicates waters rich in nitrogen. Based on the total concentration of nitrogen and phosphorous, Telaga Warna was in an eutrophic – hipereutrophic conditions with total nitrogen concentration > 1.9 mg/L and total phosphorus concentration > 0.1 mg/L.

  17. Effect of ageing on survival of benthic diatom propagules

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Mitbavkar, S.; DeSilva, M.S.; Hegde, S.; DeCosta, P.M.; Meher, S.S.; Banerjee, D.

    for conservation of diatom and dinoflagellate resting stages in Kolj? Fjord (McQuoid et al., 2002). However, the present study area is an intertidal sandflat with minimum chances of anoxic zones occurring in sediment. Thus a minimum amount of metabolic activity... unfavorable for vegetative growth, many diatoms form resting stages to survive cell degradation or death (Anderson, 1975; Malone, 1980; Hargraves and French, 1983; Fryxell, 1990). Various external factors like availability of nutrients (N, P, Fe, Si...

  18. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussman, Ryan D; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Ferroproteins arose early in Earth's history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world's oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III) permease); iron storage (ferritin); iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6) and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases). Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of paralogs. This

  19. Production of silver nanoparticles by the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishkerman, Asher; Arad (Malis), Shoshana

    2017-05-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) are the most species-rich group of algae, they are single-celled characterized by a silicified cell wall called a frustule. Diatoms are diverse in shape with many distinct features like raphe and fultoportulae. The diatom cell wall morphology and its hierarchy structure make it a unique unicellular organism for nanotechnology research and applications. Diatom cells are a promising system for green synthesis of nanomaterials like metallic nanoparticles (NPs), nanostructured polymers and other nanomaterials. The production of NPs is achieved today by using methods like attrition or pyrolysis. The cost and the toxic substances often used in these common methods of NPs synthesis limit their applications. Therefore, NPs biosynthesis by diatom cultures, which can be done at ambient CO2 concentrations, temperature and pressure, offers a sustainable alternative solution. In this work, we examined the formation of silver NPs (AgNPs) by the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum cultivated at 25°C for a period of 8 days. Using this approach, diatom cultures were either grown throughout the duration of the experiment in an artificial seawater (ASW)-f/2 medium enriched with 1 ppm Ag+ or grown in an ASW-f/2 medium where similar silver ion concentrations were added on experimental day 4. We found that 1 ppm Ag+ reduces the P. tricornutum growth by up to 50% as compared with the control. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) showed the presence of AgNPs nanoparticles with different sizes and chemical composition associated with the diatom frustules and extracellular polymeric substances.

  20. Transitional Description of Diatomic Molecules in U(4) Vibron Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin; PAN Feng

    2004-01-01

    U(3)-O(4) transitional description of diatomic molecules in the U(4) vibron model is studied by using the algebraic Bethe ansatz, in which the O(4) limit is a special case of the theory. Vibrational band-heads of some typical diatornic molecules are fitted by both transitional theory and the O(4) limit within the same framework. The results show that there are evident deviations from the O(4) limit in description of vibrational spectra of some diatomic molecules.

  1. Epilithic diatoms (Bacillariophycae) from streams in Ramsar, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Soltanpour-Gargari, Ali; Lodenius, Martin; Hinz, Friedel

    2011-01-01

    Epilithic diatoms were identified from five small streams and one canal in Ramsar, northwest Iran. Atotal of 155 diatom taxa belonging to 37 genera were found and only two species remained unidentified (Fragilaria sp. and Nitzschia sp.). Achnanthes, Nitzschia, Navicula, Cocconeis, Melosira, Amphora, Craticula, Diatoma, Surirella, Cymbella, Diploneis and Entomoneis were among the most abundant genera. Eighty seven taxa were recorded for the first time in Iran. Thirty two of the genera belong t...

  2. Ecosystemic Postglacial Succession of Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Canada) Inferred by Oxygen Isotope Composition of Lacustrine Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narancic, B.; Chapligin, B.; Meyer, H.; Pienitz, R.

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, a 82 cm long sediment core (Ni2B) was drilled at Nettilling Lake. We use a multi-proxy paleolimnological approach to study the sedimentary records preserved in Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Canada) in order to reconstruct the postglacial environmental history of the lake watershed. 31 samples of biogenic silica were purified, their contamination assessed and corrected for and subsequently analysed for the oxygen isotope composition (δ18Odiatom). Additionally, the diatom assemblage from 35 samples was quantified under the light microscope with x 1000 magnification. Our chronology extends to ~ BC 1200 yrs based on radiometric dating 210Pd and 14C from bulk sediment. Downcore variations in δ18Odiatom values show a marine-lacustrine transition. The samples from the marine-brackish zone show a higher isotopic composition (27.5‰, 58.5cm depth, ²middle Holocene²) than the samples from the lacustrine section (21.7‰, 1.5cm, 2002 AD). The transition zone can be distinguished by values between these extremes, too (23.4‰, 33cm, ~1240 BC). This likely reflects changes in the water source, from more isotopically enriched marine water in the past to more depleted and cold lacustrine water. The diatom assemblage reflects the same transition. The marine-brackish zone contains polyhalobous-mesohalobous benthic species (e.g. Trachyneis aspera, Gomphonemopsis aestuarii, G. pseudexigua,Cocconeis scutellum) which have a salinity preference between 35‰ to 5‰, indicating a shallow, littoral environment. The transition zone is characterized by a sharp rise of alkaliphilous freshwater benthic taxa (e.g. Staurosirelle pinnata, Staurosira construens, Staurosira brevistriata). The diatom flora of the upper zone is characterized by halophobous planktonic and benthic species (e.g. Cylotella rossii, Cyclotella pseudostelligera, Tabelaria floculosa, Encyonema silesiacum, Nitzschia perminuta). The δ18Odiatom and the diatom assemblage record from Nettilling Lake register

  3. Study of diatoms/aqueous solution interface. I. Acid-base equilibria and spectroscopic observation of freshwater and marine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélabert, A.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Schott, J.; Boudou, A.; Feurtet-Mazel, A.; Mielczarski, J.; Mielczarski, E.; Mesmer-Dudons, N.; Spalla, O.

    2004-10-01

    This work reports on a concerted study of diatom-water interfaces for two marine planktonic ( Thalassiosira weissflogii= TW, Skeletonema costatum= SC) and two freshwater periphytic species ( Achnanthidium minutissimum= AMIN, Navicula minima= NMIN). Proton surface adsorption was measured at 25°C, pH of 3 to 11 and ionic strength of 0.001 to 1.0 M via potentiometric titration using a limited residence time reactor. Electrophoretic mobility of living cells and their frustules was measured as a function of pH and ionic strength. Information on the chemical composition and molecular structure of diatoms surfaces was obtained using FT-IR (in situ attenuated total reflectance) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The surface area of living cells and their frustules in aqueous solutions was quantified using Small Angle X-ray Scattering Spectroscopy (SAXS). These observations allowed us to identify the nature and to determine the concentration of the major surface functional groups (carboxyl, amine and silanol) responsible for the amphoteric behavior of cell surfaces in aqueous solutions. Taking into account the relative proportion of surface sites inferred from XPS and FT-IR measurements, a surface complexation model of diatom-solution interfaces was generated on the basis of surface titration results. The cell-normalized ratios of the three major surface sites {>COOH}: {>NH 3}: {>SiOH} are 1:1:0.1, 1:10:0, 1:1:0.4 and 1:1:0.3 for TW, SC, AMIN and NMIN, respectively. The total amount of proton/hydroxyl active surface sites for investigated species ranges from 1 (NMIN) to 9 (SC) mmol/g dry weight. Normalization of these site densities to the area of siliceous skeleton yields values between 0.3 (NMIN) and 0.9 mmol/m 2 (SC) which are an order of magnitude higher than corresponding values for organic-free frustules or amorphous silica. This suggests that the amphoteric properties and possibly the affinity for metal adsorption of diatom cultures are essentially

  4. Micro-photoluminescence of single living diatom cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDuff, Paul; Roesijadi, Guritno; Rorrer, Gregory L

    2016-11-01

    Diatoms are single-celled microalgae that possess a nanostructured, porous biosilica shell called a frustule. This study characterized the micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) emission of single living cells of the photosynthetic marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in response to UV laser irradiation at 325 nm using a confocal Raman microscope. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum had two primary peaks, one centered at 500-510 nm, which was attributed to the frustule biosilica, and a second peak at 680 nm, which was attributed to auto-fluorescence of photosynthetic pigments. The portion of the μ-PL emission spectrum associated with biosilica frustule in the single living diatom cell was similar to that from single biosilica frustules isolated from these diatom cells. The PL emission by the biosilica frustule in the living cell emerged only after cells were cultivated to silicon depletion. The discovery of the discovery of PL emission by the frustule biosilica within a single living diatom itself, not just its isolated frustule, opens up future possibilities for living biosensor applications, where the interaction of diatom cells with other molecules can be probed by μ-PL spectroscopy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Radiocarbon dating of diatom-bound organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatte, C.; Hodgins, G.; Jull, T.; Cruz, R.; Lange, T.; Biddulph, D.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new method for obtaining radiocarbon dates for the proteins intrinsic to diatom frustules (sillafin). By asserting age models for sediment cores that lack calcium carbonate, this method will improve interpretations of diatom-based paleoproxies either marine or lacustrine. In preparation for radiocarbon dating by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, diatoms were first concentrated out of the sediment. Through chemical and physical treatments that will be discussed and compared here, diatoms frustules are then freed of any surface-bound organic matter. Compounds intrinsic to diatoms frustules are then released from their opal matrix by HF dissolution. Since we have eliminated any of potentially contaminating organic matter, this method differs from approaches based on specific compounds extraction from a complex organic mixture by preparative chromatography such as proposed by Ingalls et al. (2004, Mar. Chem). The advantage of our method is that it does not require heavy cost investment. The method was applied to samples from a marine core collected in the Southern Ocean, that spans the last climatic cycle. Diatoms rich sediments from a Holocene lacustrine/palustrine record from Texas were also investigated. We report on the radiocarbon dating results obtained on organic matter at each step of the chemical treatment, from bulk to sillafin and their interpretation.

  6. Developing diatoms for value-added products: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weiqi; Wichuk, Kristine; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður

    2015-12-25

    As a major primary producer in marine environments, diatoms have been considered as promising feedstocks for their applications in functional foods, bioactive pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. This review focuses on the biotechnology potential of diatoms for value-added products like carotenoids. The impact of abiotic environmental stresses, such as intensity and quality of incident light, nutrient deficiency and silicon depletion, on diatoms has been examined to determine key factors that affect the growth performance and the accumulation of valuable compounds. Previous studies suggested that adaptive evolution could be an efficient method to improve the diatom productivity of valuable compounds. Light emitting diode (LED)-based photobioreactors were introduced and proposed as a promising new technology for producing quality products from diatoms. Currently available molecular biology tools were also summarized and discussed in relation to their application in the production of carotenoids and other valuable products. Taken together, systems biology and synthetic biology approaches have the potential to address the challenges faced while working toward the industrial application of diatoms.

  7. The diatom molecular toolkit to handle nitrogen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogato, Alessandra; Amato, Alberto; Iudicone, Daniele; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata; d'Alcalà, Maurizio Ribera

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient concentrations in the oceans display significant temporal and spatial variability, which strongly affects growth, distribution and survival of phytoplankton. Nitrogen (N) in particular is often considered a limiting resource for prominent marine microalgae, such as diatoms. Diatoms possess a suite of N-related transporters and enzymes and utilize a variety of inorganic (e.g., nitrate, NO3(-); ammonium, NH4(+)) and organic (e.g., urea; amino acids) N sources for growth. However, the molecular mechanisms allowing diatoms to cope efficiently with N oscillations by controlling uptake capacities and signaling pathways involved in the perception of external and internal clues remain largely unknown. Data reported in the literature suggest that the regulation and the characteristic of the genes, and their products, involved in N metabolism are often diatom-specific, which correlates with the peculiar physiology of these organisms for what N utilization concerns. Our study reveals that diatoms host a larger suite of N transporters than one would expected for a unicellular organism, which may warrant flexible responses to variable conditions, possibly also correlated to the phases of life cycle of the cells. All this makes N transporters a crucial key to reveal the balance between proximate and ultimate factors in diatom life.

  8. Marine Polysaccharide Networks and Diatoms at the Nanometric Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Mišić Radić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite many advances in research on photosynthetic carbon fixation in marine diatoms, the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms of extracellular polysaccharide production remain significant challenges to be resolved at the molecular scale in order to proceed toward an understanding of their functions at the cellular level, as well as their interactions and fate in the ocean. This review covers studies of diatom extracellular polysaccharides using atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging and the quantification of physical forces. Following a brief summary of the basic principle of the AFM experiment and the first AFM studies of diatom extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, we focus on the detection of supramolecular structures in polysaccharide systems produced by marine diatoms. Extracellular polysaccharide fibrils, attached to the diatom cell wall or released into the surrounding seawater, form distinct supramolecular assemblies best described as gel networks. AFM makes characterization of the diatom polysaccharide networks at the micro and nanometric scales and a clear distinction between the self-assembly and self-organization of these complex systems in marine environments possible.

  9. Molecular Fossils as Time Indicators for the Evolution of Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampen, S. W.; Schouten, S.; Muyzer, G.; Abbas, B.; Rowland, S. J.; Moldowan, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Bacillariophyta (diatoms) are one of the most abundant divisions of phytoplankton, and contribute to almost 50% of the primary productivity of today's oceans. However, their ecological dominance is relatively young and little is known about the exact pace of their rapid evolution. DNA analyses on diatoms and the use of molecular clock calculations can help to reconstruct their evolution, but this molecular clock rate needs to be calibrated against the fossil record to determine the mutation rate. Until now, diatom silica skeletons have been used for reconstructing the evolution of diatoms, but their use is limited due to destruction by diagenesis. Molecular fossils may prove to be more useful for time reconstruction. To search for suitable compounds, we have analyzed both the lipid composition and 18S rRNA sequences of ca. 100 marine diatoms. This revealed that some specific phylogenetic clusters within the diatoms produce specific organic compounds, so-called diatom biomarkers. One group of diatom biomarkers are the C25 highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkenes (1,2). HBI biosynthesis evolved independently at least twice in the diatoms. The first group of HBI producers consists of the centric diatoms of the genus Rhizosolenia, the second group comprises pennate diatoms of the genera Haslea, Navicula and Pleurosigma. Based on the constructed phylogenetic tree it is likely that the HBI biosynthesis evolved first in the older group of centric diatoms (i.e. the Rhizosolenia genus). The fossil record was studied to determine the geological occurrence of C25 HBI alkenes, and this data set shows that HBI biosynthesis evolved ca. 91.5 My ago, so we can date the evolution of the genus Rizosolenia to ca. 91.5 My. With this information, we can now accurately predict the mutation rate of the 18S rDNA gene to 1% per 14.8 My for Rhizosolenia, which is substantially faster than the 1% per 18-26 My reported previously for diatoms in general. Another specific biomarker is 24

  10. Responses of diatom communities to hydrological processes during rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Naicheng; Faber, Claas; Ulrich, Uta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    The importance of diatoms as a tracer of hydrological processes has been recently recognized (Pfister et al. 2009, Pfister et al. 2011, Tauro et al. 2013). However, diatom variations in a short-term scale (e.g., sub-daily) during rainfall events have not been well documented yet. In this study, rainfall event-based diatom samples were taken at the outlet of the Kielstau catchment (50 km2), a lowland catchment in northern Germany. A total of nine rainfall events were caught from May 2013 to April 2014. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) revealed that diatom communities of different events were well separated along NMDS axis I and II, indicating a remarkable temporal variation. By correlating water level (a proxy of discharge) and different diatom indices, close relationships were found. For example, species richness, biovolume (μm3), Shannon diversity and moisture index01 (%, classified according to van Dam et al. 1994) were positively related with water level at the beginning phase of the rainfall (i.e. increasing limb of discharge peak). However, in contrast, during the recession limb of the discharge peak, diatom indices showed distinct responses to water level declines in different rainfall events. These preliminary results indicate that diatom indices are highly related to hydrological processes. The next steps will include finding out the possible mechanisms of the above phenomena, and exploring the contributions of abiotic variables (e.g., hydrologic indices, nutrients) to diatom community patterns. Based on this and ongoing studies (Wu et al. unpublished data), we will incorporate diatom data into End Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA) and select the tracer set that is best suited for separation of different runoff components in our study catchment. Keywords: Diatoms, Rainfall event, Non-metric multidimensional scaling, Hydrological process, Indices References: Pfister L, McDonnell JJ, Wrede S, Hlúbiková D, Matgen P, Fenicia F, Ector L, Hoffmann L

  11. The paleoclimatology of Lake Baikal: A diatom synthesis and prospectus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Anson W.

    2007-06-01

    The paleoclimatic archive held in Lake Baikal sediments is of significant importance, given the lake's position in one of the world's most continental regions where there are few continuous, high quality records spanning the Quaternary. Here I review diatom and associated biogenic silica records from Lake Baikal sediments and provide a paleoclimatic synthesis of changes at various timescales over the Quaternary. I initially highlight major climatic and hydrological aspects of Lake Baikal, as understanding the contemporary system (both regionally and within the lake) are fundamental to understanding past change interpreted from the sedimentary archive. In this respect, special attention is given to factors that can affect the integrity of the diatom record, most notably dissolution processes. These mechanisms are likely to have had a relatively greater impact on the preservation of diatom valves during glacial periods because of overall lower diatom productivity. Lower diatom numbers and relative increased dissolution during cold periods explains the lack of diatoms and low biogenic silica concentrations found in the lake sediments during glacial periods. The biogenic record highlights the nature of the 100 ka cycle especially during the last 800 ka, although there is also a strong precessional component. Further work is needed to reassess biological responses in Lake Baikal with respect to different orbital forcing mechanisms, together with their impacts on evolution and speciation of diatoms. The biological record from Lake Baikal confirms that the last interglacial in central Asia lasted approximately 10.5 ka. Productivity in the lake (as inferred from diatom biovolume accumulation rates) exhibits millennial-scale variability with the occurrence of centennial-scale reductions in diatom biomass throughout the last interglacial period. The most severe reduction in diatom biomass (at c. 120 ka BP) is concurrent with millennial-scale cooling in the North Atlantic

  12. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Darling, Kate F.; Lecroq-Bennet, Béatrice; Winther Pedersen, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Pawlowski, Jan; Mulitza, Stefan; de Vargas, Colomban; Kucera, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA) in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of the entire pelagic community, including non-fossilized taxa, thus opening new avenues for paleoceanographic and paleoecological studies.

  13. Effects of sea surface warming on marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Boyce, Daniel G; Hofmann, Matthias; Matthiessen, Birte; Sommer, Ulrich; Worm, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Ocean warming has been implicated in the observed decline of oceanic phytoplankton biomass. Some studies suggest a physical pathway of warming via stratification and nutrient flux, and others a biological effect on plankton metabolic rates; yet the relative strength and possible interaction of these mechanisms remains unknown. Here, we implement projections from a global circulation model in a mesocosm experiment to examine both mechanisms in a multi-trophic plankton community. Warming treatments had positive direct effects on phytoplankton biomass, but these were overcompensated by the negative effects of decreased nutrient flux. Zooplankton switched from phytoplankton to grazing on ciliates. These results contrast with previous experiments under nutrient-replete conditions, where warming indirectly reduced phytoplankton biomass via increased zooplankton grazing. We conclude that the effect of ocean warming on marine plankton depends on the nutrient regime, and provide a mechanistic basis for understanding global change in marine ecosystems.

  14. Coaggregation between freshwater bacteria within biofilm and planktonic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, A H; McBain, A J; Ledder, R G; Handley, P S; Gilbert, P

    2003-03-14

    The coaggregation ability of bacteria isolated from a freshwater biofilm was compared to those derived from the coexisting planktonic population. Twenty-nine morphologically distinct bacterial strains were isolated from a 6-month-old biofilm, established in a glass tank under high-shear conditions, and 15 distinct strains were isolated from the associated re-circulating water. All 44 strains were identified to genus or species level by 16S rDNA sequencing. The 29 biofilm strains belonged to 14 genera and 23.4% of all the possible pair-wise combinations coaggregated. The 15 planktonic strains belonged to seven genera and only 5.8% of all the possible pair-wise combinations coaggregated. Therefore, compared to the planktonic population, a greater proportion of the biofilm strains coaggregated. It is proposed that coaggregation influences biofilm formation and species diversity in freshwater under high shear.

  15. Prey switching behaviour in the planktonic copepod Acartia tonsa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Saiz, E.; Viitasalo, M.

    1996-01-01

    . Based on earlier observations, we also hypothesized that turbulence changes food selection towards motile prey. We tested these hypotheses by examining feeding rates and behaviour in adult females of A. tonsa feeding in mixtures of 2 prey organisms, a diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii) and a ciliate...... (Strombidium sulcatum). Our data demonstrate prey switching in A. tonsa, both in terms of behaviour and in terms of feeding rates on the alternative prey. The time allocated to ambush and suspension feeding changed with the composition of the food, and clearance of diatoms was, accordingly, negatively related...

  16. Effects of continuous chlorination on entrained estuarine plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, S.J.; Foulk, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Technical report: The effects of continuous chlorination in running sea water on entrained plankton were examined. The concentration of ATP was used as an indicator of biomass because: it is present in all living cells; the concentration is proportional to the living biomass; and dead cells lose ATP rapidly. Effects were measured by bioluminescence; luciferin-luciferase reagents from firefly lanterns were used to analyze ATP concentration. Results indicate that ATP measurement is an accurate, effective means of evaluating damage done to planktonic organisms by continuous chlorination. Further studies of the effects of low-concentration, continuous chlorination are recommended. (13 references, 1 table)

  17. Proceedings of the Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) Workshop in Mexico City (12–18 February 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Gulati, R.D.; Nandini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plankton is an important constituent of aquatic ecosystems, dominated in freshwater ecosystems by diverse groups of bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, and zooplankton. The Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) has made noteworthy headway in understanding ecosystem dynamics through a series of formal PEG meetin

  18. Early Cretaceous Tectonism and Diatoms in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ki-Hong CHANG; Sun-Ok PARK

    2008-01-01

    The Early Cretaceous Sindong Group, a non-marine molasse, unconformably overlies the folded earliest Cretaceous Myogok Formation. The tectonism that folded the Jaseong Synthem including the Myogok and other formations is here called the Nakdong-Jaeryeonggang (N-J) tectonism. The Oknyeobong and Dabokni Formations are discussed to show that they belong to the Jaseong Synthem. The Dabokni Formation yielded fossil diatoms whose age has been referred as the "earliest Cretaceous" based on the geologically constrained age of the fossil-bearing deposit. The age of the N-J tectonism appears Barremian as it is between the Hauterivian Myogok Formation and the Aptian Sindong Group with the TPN (Trigonioides-Plicatounio-Nippononaia) fauna. The N-J tectonism, an orogeny, quite deformed pre-Aptian strata in Korea, but can hardly find its reported equivalent in NE China. A revised correlation table shows that the Jaseong- Sindong sequence corresponds to the Jehol Group of China. The Sindong-Hayang transition was characterized by basin migration and dextral rotation probably caused by the Tan-Lu fault system in a broad sense.

  19. Classification of marine diatoms using pigment ratio suites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Peng; YU Zhigang; DENG Chunmei; LIU Shuxia; ZHEN Yu

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are widely distributed in many temperate areas and some species frequently form extensive blooms in spring.Hence,monitoring the variations of specific genera or species of diatoms is necessary for studying phytoplankton population dynamics in marine ecosystems.To test whether pigment ratios can be used to identify diatoms at a below-class taxonomic level,we analyzed 14 species/strains of diatoms isolated from Chinese seas using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).We normalized all pigment concentrations to total chlorophyll a to calculate the ratios of pigment to chlorophyll a,and calculated the ratios between accessory pigments (or pigment sums).Cluster analysis indicated that these diatoms could be classified into four clusters in terms of three accessory pigment ratios:chlorophyll c2:chlorophyll c1,fucoxanthin:total chlorophyll c and diadinoxanthin:diatoxanthin.The classification results matched well with those of biological taxonomy.To test the stability of the classification,pigment data from one species,cultured under different light intensities,and five new species/strains were calculated and used for discriminant analysis.The results show that the classification of diatom species using pigment ratio suites was stable for the variations of pigment ratios of species cultured in different light intensities.The introduction of new species,however,may confuse the classification within the current scheme.Classification of marine diatoms using pigment ratio suites is potentially valuable for the fine chemotaxonomy of phytoplankton at taxonomic levels below class and would advance studies on phytoplankton population dynamics and marine ecology.

  20. Progressive changes in the Western English Channel foster a reorganization in the plankton food web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Molinero, J.C.; Coombs, S.

    2015-01-01

    . (2013) drive a profound restructuration of the plankton community modifying the phenology and the dominance of key planktonic groups including fish larvae. Consequently, the slow but deep modifications detected in the plankton community highlight a climate driven ecosystem shift in the Western English...

  1. The species concept in a marine diatom: LSU rDNA–based phylogenetic differentiation in Skeletonema marinoi/dohrnii (Bacillariophyceae) is not reflected in morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Marianne; Godhe, Anna; Härnström, Karolina;

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous marine diatom genus Skeletonema includes several newly described species. This paper presents a study of morphology and LSU sequence diversity of one of these new species, Skeletonema marinoi. The 15 monoclonal strains (from the Swedish west coast, the Swedish east coast, Portugal...... dohrnii. In the original description of these two species, they were differentiated by the structure of the girdle bands. However, the girdle band types of both species were found within single samples of almost all clones of S. marinoi in this study. The LSU-based phylogeny is consistent with the split...... and Canada) included in the study showed differences in LSU rDNA sequence within the morphospecies, with differences seen even among clones established from a single plankton net sample. Morphologically, all clones were indistinguishable from each other and from the closely related species Skeletonema...

  2. Planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the late Neogene of Crete (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachariasse, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    A planktonic foraminiferal zonation is established for the Middle/Upper Miocene - Pliocene interval in Crete. It is based upon the investigation of samples from 29 sections. Eight zones are distinguished. A comparison with samples from other Neogene sections from Italy, Spain, Algeria, and the islan

  3. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, Peter R.; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; Van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia's southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying

  4. Holocene planktonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments off Kerala Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Twenty-two planktonic foraminifers were identified from a few samples collected aboard INS KISTNA at 9~'N and 76~'E, at 89 metres depth from the bottom sediment-water interface. A few of the more characteristic features of each are described. Some...

  5. Biophysical Modeling of Cross-Shore Plankton Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ecosystems are influenced by cross-shore flows. Processes that create coastal plankton distributions are not well understood, even though possible mechanisms of plankton transport in the surf zone have been investigated. Our data from a rip-channeled beach show that concentrations of zooplankton and phytoplankton are higher in the surf zone than offshore. To examine how plankton are transported toward the shore, we used a coupled biophysical model, comprised of Delft3D wave/flow simulations and an individual-based model for tracking plankton. Model results indicate that onshore delivery of zooplankton is enhanced by Stokes drift, wave-driven bottom boundary streaming, alongshore topographic variability, and turbulence-dependent sinking behavior of zooplankton. Phytoplankton sinking may also be accelerated by turbulence, but the mechanism differs from that which affects zooplankton. Turbulence has the potential to increase phytoplankton growth rates. Therefore, the phytoplankton transport model includes turbulence-induced sinking velocity and growth rate, although the latter appears to have little influence on phytoplankton distributions. Modeled phytoplankton concentrations in the surf zone are much lower than expected, although the zooplankton transport model qualitatively reproduced our observations. Thus, there must be other possible factors influencing phytoplankton transport, some of which will be discussed.

  6. Ether lipids of planktonic archae in the marine water column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; Schouten, S.; King, L.L.; Wakeham, S.G.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    Acyclic and cyclic biphytanes derived from the membrane ether lipids of archaea were found in water column particulate and sedimentary organic matter from several oxic and anoxic marine environments. Compound-specific isotope analyses of the carbon skeletons suggest that planktonic archaea utilize a

  7. Global marine plankton functional type biomass distributions : Phaeocystis spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, M.; O'Brien, C.; Peloquin, J.; Schoemann, V.; Breton, E.; Estrada, M.; Gibson, J.; Karentz, D.; Van Leeuwe, M. A.; Stefels, J.; Widdicombe, C.; Peperzak, L.

    2012-01-01

    The planktonic haptophyte Phaeocystis has been suggested to play a fundamental role in the global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulphur, but little is known about its global biomass distribution. We have collected global microscopy data of the genus Phaeocystis and converted abundance data to

  8. Biodiversity of plankton by species oscillations and chaos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Weissing, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Biodiversity has both fascinated and puzzled biologists(1). In aquatic ecosystems, the biodiversity puzzle is particularly troublesome, and known as the 'paradox of the plankton'(2). Competition theory predicts that, at equilibrium, the number of coexisting species cannot exceed the number of limiti

  9. Assessing Plankton and Particles with an Autonomous Imaging LOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Artemia , provided by the Hubbs Research Institute, were introduced. Images of these zooplankton, acquired in April 2008 in the SIO pier flume, are shown...long), and an Artemia (~ 0.8 mm long).] 3 Laser Optical Plankton Counter The final operational software was

  10. The effect of fish on plankton dynamics : a theoretical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Rinaldi, S.; Kuznetsov, Y.A.

    2000-01-01

    We present an expansion of a classical minimal Daphnia–algae model to account for effects of fish as a top predator. Our analyses suggest that in most situations, the plankton should show hysteresis in response to predation pressure by fish. Thus, there exist two distinct regimes, one in which

  11. Plankton bioindicators of environmental conditions in coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj, Deevesh A.; Hossain, Md A.; Ye, Qifeng; Qin, Jian G.; Leterme, Sophie C.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are characterised by strong spatial gradient of environmental parameters, especially hypersalinity, and are prone to anthropogenic disturbance. The Coorong (South Australia) is an inverse estuarine coastal lagoon separated from the sea by sand dunes. It is exposed to extreme water quality changes that affect its aquatic communities. Here, we used plankton as indicators of extreme environmental fluctuations to monitor and manage the environmental health of such complex systems. We defined the relationship of different plankton communities with water quality fluctuations and determined plankton species suitable for monitoring the ecosystem health. Two distinct communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton were identified, with salinity and nutrients being the principal factors impacting species distribution. Thus, two sets of indicator species were selected based on the different communities observed. Polychaete and gastropod larvae were positive indicators, showing salinity range restriction of brackish to marine. The distribution Acartia cf. fancetti represented healthy hypersaline conditions (salinity 40-60), while Cyclophora sp. and Scrippsiella sp. were negative indicators, correlating with extreme salinity and ammonia levels. The implementation of planktonic organisms as environmental indicators provided a constructive tool for the management of ecosystem health of the Coorong and will be applicable to similar coastal lagoons.

  12. Plankton Respiration from the Cellular to the Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Hull, T.; Kitidis, V. A.; Ostle, C.; Serret, P.; Tilstone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of marine plankton respiration provide an important constraint on the magnitude of the biological carbon pump and global elemental nutrient cycles, yet respiration remains one of the least constrained terms in models of metabolism, gas exchange and carbon mass balance. This is due in part to the difficulty in measuring both total oceanic respiration and that attributable to specific plankton groups or size classes and the resulting lack of earth observation algorithms. Respiration in the surface layer of the ocean is usually estimated from either the consumption of dissolved oxygen in a contained sample volume or from enzymatic proxies such as INT, and is less frequently determined from mixed layer oxygen utilisation, allometric equations or biomass / abundance spectra.As part of a tracer release (SF6) experiment in the Mauritanian upwelling and a seasonal study of UK shelf sea biogeochemistry, we measured plankton respiration using a range of methods which span time and space scales from cells to the mixed layer and hours to years. This presentation will compare and contrast these concurrent measurements with a view to assessing the range of variability in respiration relative to that in primary production alongside measures of parameters such as plankton community structure and organic carbon availability which may lead to this variability. In addition, by comparing between systems and between seasons in the same system, and utilising the available global dataset, we aim to test predictive empirical models of respiration in an attempt to extrapolate to the basin scale.

  13. The evolution of diatoms and their biogeochemical functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoiston, Anne-Sophie; Ibarbalz, Federico M; Bittner, Lucie; Guidi, Lionel; Jahn, Oliver; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Bowler, Chris

    2017-09-05

    In contemporary oceans diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that typically dominate in upwelling regions and at high latitudes. They also make significant contributions to sporadic blooms that often occur in springtime. Recent surveys have revealed global information about their abundance and diversity, as well as their contributions to biogeochemical cycles, both as primary producers of organic material and as conduits facilitating the export of carbon and silicon to the ocean interior. Sequencing of diatom genomes is revealing the evolutionary underpinnings of their ecological success by examination of their gene repertoires and the mechanisms they use to adapt to environmental changes. The rise of the diatoms over the last hundred million years is similarly being explored through analysis of microfossils and biomarkers that can be traced through geological time, as well as their contributions to seafloor sediments and fossil fuel reserves. The current review aims to synthesize current information about the evolution and biogeochemical functions of diatoms as they rose to prominence in the global ocean.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Morphological and transcriptomic evidence for ammonium induction of sexual reproduction in Thalassiosira pseudonana and other centric diatoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric R Moore; Briana S Bullington; Alexandra J Weisberg; Yuan Jiang; Jeff Chang; Kimberly H Halsey

    2017-01-01

    The reproductive strategy of diatoms includes asexual and sexual phases, but in many species, including the model centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, sexual reproduction has never been observed...

  15. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  16. Bound-free Spectra for Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that prediction of radiative heating of entering space craft requires explicit treatment of the radiation field from the infrared (IR) to the vacuum ultra violet (VUV). While at low temperatures and longer wavelengths, molecular radiation is well described by bound-bound transitions, in the short wavelength, high temperature regime, bound-free transitions can play an important role. In this work we describe first principles calculations we have carried out for bound-bound and bound-free transitions in N2, O2, C2, CO, CN, NO, and N2+. Compared to bound ]bound transitions, bound-free transitions have several particularities that make them different to deal with. These include more complicated line shapes and a dependence of emission intensity on both bound state diatomic and atomic concentrations. These will be discussed in detail below. The general procedure we used was the same for all species. The first step is to generate potential energy curves, transition moments, and coupling matrix elements by carrying out ab initio electronic structure calculations. These calculations are expensive, and thus approximations need to be made in order to make the calculations tractable. The only practical method we have to carry out these calculations is the internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction (icMRCI) method as implemented in the program suite Molpro. This is a widely used method for these kinds of calculations, and is capable of generating very accurate results. With this method, we must first of choose which electrons to correlate, the one-electron basis to use, and then how to generate the molecular orbitals.

  17. Seasonal plankton variability in Chilean Patagonia fjords: Carbon flow through the pelagic food web of Aysen Fjord and plankton dynamics in the Moraleda Channel basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, H. E.; Castro, L.; Daneri, G.; Iriarte, J. L.; Silva, N.; Vargas, C. A.; Giesecke, R.; Sánchez, N.

    2011-03-01

    recognizable particles contributing to the particulate organic carbon flux. The topographic constriction sills partially modulated the exchange of oceanic waters (Subantarctic Surface Water) with freshwater river discharges along the Moraleda Channel. This exchange affects salinity and nutrient availability and, thus, the plankton structure. The north microbasin was dominated by a seasonal alternation of the classical (spring) and microbial (winter) food webs. However, in the south microbasin, productivity was low and the system was dominated year-round by large inputs of glacier-derived, silt-rich freshwater carrying predominantly small-sized diatoms ( Skeletonema spp) and bacteria. When superimposed upon this scenario, highly variable (seasonal) solar radiation and photoperiods could exacerbate north-south differences along Moraleda Channel.

  18. The effect of bacteria on diatom community structure - The 'antibiotics' approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.; Anil, A.C.

    aminoglycoside) and chloramphenicol, antibiotics that can potentially affect protein synthesis in diatom organelles and photosynthesis, were also used for comparison. The changes in diatom community structure and the resistant and tolerant bacterial fractions...

  19. Growth inhibition of periphytic diatoms by methanol extracts of sponges and holothurians

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mokashe, S.S.; Garg, A; Anil, A; Wagh, A

    Crude methanol extracts of a holothurian Holothuria leucospilota, and two sponges Craniella sp. and Ircinia ramosa were tested for their inhibitory effects on the growth of two marine diatoms, Navicula subinflata and N. crucicula, by diatom plating...

  20. Fouling diatom community with reference to substratum variability in tropical marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Wagh, A.B.

    form encountered. The paper deals with the qualitative and quantitative aspects of diatom colonization, their community structure, and correlation between the prevailing diatom population in the environment and that in the fouling community...

  1. [Community Structure Characteristics of Diatom in Reservoirs Located in the South of Jiangsu Province, China and Its Control Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie; Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Guang-wei; Jin, Ying-wei; Cui, Yang; Xu, Hai; Zhu, Meng-yuan; Xia, Ming-fang; Chen, Wei-min

    2016-05-15

    In order to understand the community structure characteristics of Bacillariophyta and its controlling factors in reservoirs located in the Southeast, China, in the geographic background of hills landscape and humid climate, 18 reservoirs were investigated in June, 2015, during the period with high risk of diatom bloom, covering water quality, and the community structures of phytoplankton. The correlations between Bacillariophyta and other planktons with nutrients, water depth, storage capacity, etc. were analyzed. The results showed that, 10 reservoirs reached the light extent of diatom bloom ( density between 100 x 10⁴-1,000 x 10⁴ cells · L⁻¹ reservoirs in this area were generally in mesotrophic or eutrophic state with considerably high total nitrogen concentrations; total phosphorus and trophic level index were both closely correlated with Bacillariophyta biomass. Phormidium in Cyanophyta was the dominating generus among phytoplankton in terms of density; with respect to biomass, Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta were the top three phylum, and Bacillariophyta accounted for 46. 8% of the total phytoplankton biomass, becoming the most important one resulting in abnormal propagation of algae; Synedra (51.5%) and Cyclotella (21.4%) were the main dominating genera in Bacillariophyta, together with Achnanthes and Melosira. Deep water was favored by Bacillariophyta to dominate among different phyla. Larger ratio between catchment and reservoir storage capacity, on the other hand, caused the increase of trophic level and chlorophyll, and benefited the shift of dominating phytoplankton from Bacillariophyta to Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta, by which, the risk of algae bloom would be increased. It reveals that to alleviate the risk of algae bloom and protect drinking water resources, catchment management is crucial for the studied reservoirs. And the establishment of nutrient reduction strategies needs to consider the features of each individual reservoir, i

  2. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of a diatom alga Synedra acus and comparative analysis of diatom mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Galachyants, Yuri P; Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Petrova, Darya P; Sherbakova, Tatyana A; Zakharova, Yuliya R; Likhoshway, Yelena V; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Grachev, Mikhail A

    2010-06-01

    The first two mitochondrial genomes of marine diatoms were previously reported for the centric Thalassiosira pseudonana and the raphid pennate Phaeodactylum tricornutum. As part of a genomic project, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the freshwater araphid pennate diatom Synedra acus. This 46,657 bp mtDNA encodes 2 rRNAs, 24 tRNAs, and 33 proteins. The mtDNA of S. acus contains three group II introns, two inserted into the cox1 gene and containing ORFs, and one inserted into the rnl gene and lacking an ORF. The compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.9-kb-long intergenic region, which contains repeat sequences. Comparison of the three sequenced mtDNAs showed that these three genomes carry similar gene pools, but the positions of some genes are rearranged. Phylogenetic analysis performed with a fragment of the cox1 gene of diatoms and other heterokonts produced a tree that is similar to that derived from 18S RNA genes. The introns of mtDNA in the diatoms seem to be polyphyletic. This study demonstrates that pyrosequencing is an efficient method for complete sequencing of mitochondrial genomes from diatoms, and may soon give valuable information about the molecular phylogeny of this outstanding group of unicellular organisms.

  3. Duo: a general program for calculating spectra of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Yurchenko, Sergei N; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    Duo is a general, user-friendly program for computing rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. Duo solves the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the motion of the nuclei not only for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states (typical for the ground state of closed-shell diatomics) but also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states (typical for open-shell diatomics and excited states). Possible couplings include spin-orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin-spin. Corrections due to non-adiabatic effects can be accounted for by introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born-Oppenheimer breakdown curves. Duo requires user-specified potential energy curves and, if relevant, dipole moment, coupling and correction curves. From these it computes energy levels, line positions and line intensities. Several analytic forms plus interpolation and extrapolation options are available for representation of the curves. ...

  4. Genome engineering empowers the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daboussi, Fayza; Leduc, Sophie; Maréchal, Alan; Dubois, Gwendoline; Guyot, Valérie; Perez-Michaut, Christophe; Amato, Alberto; Falciatore, Angela; Juillerat, Alexandre; Beurdeley, Marine; Voytas, Daniel F; Cavarec, Laurent; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-05-29

    Diatoms, a major group of photosynthetic microalgae, have a high biotechnological potential that has not been fully exploited because of the paucity of available genetic tools. Here we demonstrate targeted and stable modifications of the genome of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using both meganucleases and TALE nucleases. When nuclease-encoding constructs are co-transformed with a selectable marker, high frequencies of genome modifications are readily attained with 56 and 27% of the colonies exhibiting targeted mutagenesis or targeted gene insertion, respectively. The generation of an enhanced lipid-producing strain (45-fold increase in triacylglycerol accumulation) through the disruption of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene exemplifies the power of genome engineering to harness diatoms for biofuel production.

  5. Planktonic food web structure at a coastal time-series site: II. Spatiotemporal variability of microbial trophic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Paige E.; Campbell, Victoria; Gellene, Alyssa G.; Hu, Sarah K.; Caron, David A.

    2017-03-01

    The grazing activities of phagotrophic protists on various microbial assemblages play key roles in determining the amount of carbon available for higher trophic levels and for export out of the photic zone. However, comparisons of the proportion of carbon consumed from the phytoplankton (cyanobacteria+photosynthetic eukaryotes) and heterotrophic bacteria (bacteria+archaea, excluding cyanobacteria) are rare. In this study, microbial community composition, phytoplankton growth and mortality rates (total chlorophyll a, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and photosynthetic picoeukaryotes), and bacterial mortality rates were measured seasonally from 2012 to 2014 in the surface waters of three environmentally distinct sites in the San Pedro Channel, off the coast of southern CA, USA. Higher nutrient concentrations at the nearshore site supported community standing stocks that were 1.3-4.5x those found offshore, yet average growth and grazing rates of the phytoplankton and bacterial assemblages were generally similar between sites and across seasons. Thus, the amount of carbon consumed by the grazer assemblage was largely dictated by prey standing stocks. Heterotrophic bacteria constituted an important source of carbon for microbial consumers, particularly at the two offshore sites where bacterial carbon consumed was roughly equivalent to the amount of phytoplankton carbon consumed. Carbon removal by grazers at the nearshore station was predominantly from the diatoms, which were the primary component of the photosynthetic community at that site. This study highlights the significant contribution of protistan-bacterial trophic interactions to planktonic food webs and provides unique community composition and turnover data to inform biogeochemical models.

  6. Prevalence of diatom frustules in non-vegetarian foodstuffs and its implications in interpreting identification of diatom frustules in drowning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Law Yen; Jayaprakash, P T

    2007-07-20

    Detection of diatom frustules in bone marrow (diatom test) is used for diagnosing ante-mortem drowning where the usual signs of drowning are not present in dead bodies recovered from water. However, controversies over the reliability of diatom test results are continuing. There have been indications on the possibilities of diatoms entering into systemic circulation from atmospheric air, food and drink. While diatoms have been demonstrated in the gut content of edible marine forms such as shrimps and clams, the present study, for the first time, provides empirical evidence on the prevalence as well as abundance of diatom frustules in the samples of cooked non-vegetarian foodstuffs that impend human consumption in Kelantan, Malaysia. It is found that 50 g each of cleaned and cooked prawns and of clams impending human consumption contain about 8360 and 29,054 diatom frustules, respectively. A person accustomed to prawn and clam food would be ingesting an estimated 2 million diatoms in a single year. Considering the suggestion that detection of five diatom frustules in 10 g of bone marrow would suffice for concluding drowning as mode of death, and the fact that there is yet no proof that diatom frustules do not enter into the human systemic circulation through the digestive tract, the estimated number of diatom frustules routinely ingested acquires significance since entry of a few of such ingested frustules into the systemic circulation can lead to false positive test results. The findings of this research raise two important issues: first, population based routine food related diatom ingestion requires to be estimated, and, second, studies have to be initiated to categorically prove or disprove the possibility of entry of diatom frustules into the systemic circulation via the digestive tract.

  7. Parasitic chytrids could promote copepod survival by mediating material transfer from inedible diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagami, M.; Helmsing, N.R.; Van Donk, E.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms form large spring blooms in lakes and oceans, providing fuel for higher trophic levels at the start of the growing season. Some of the diatom blooms, however, are not grazed by filter-feeding zooplankton like Daphnia due to their large size. Several of these large diatoms are susceptible to

  8. Moss-inhabiting diatom communities from Heard Island, sub-Antarctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandeVijver, B.; Beyens, L.; Vincke, S.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we list 192 diatom taxa, collected from bryophyte samples from Heard Island (52degrees05'S, 73degrees30'E). The Heard Island diatom flora shows a marked similarity to those of the Crozet and Kerguelen archipelagos, and is quite dissimilar to the moss-dwelling diatom flora of Macquarie

  9. Parasitic chytrids could promote copepod survival by mediating material transfer from inedible diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagami, M.; Helmsing, N.R.; Van Donk, E.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms form large spring blooms in lakes and oceans, providing fuel for higher trophic levels at the start of the growing season. Some of the diatom blooms, however, are not grazed by filter-feeding zooplankton like Daphnia due to their large size. Several of these large diatoms are susceptible to

  10. Coherent control of mesoscopic superpositions in a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Suranjana

    2011-01-01

    A phase controlled wave packet, recently used in experiment of wave packet interferometry of a diatomic molecule, is investigated to obtain mesoscopic superposition structures, useful in quantum metrology. This analysis provides a new way of obtaining sub-Planck scale structures at smaller time scale of revival dynamics. We study a number of situations for delineating the smallest interference structures and their control by tailoring the relative phase between two subsidiary wave packets. We also find the most appropriate state, so far, for high precision parameter estimation in a system of diatomic molecule.

  11. Relativistic Effects Break Periodicity in Group 6 Diatomic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Lei; Hu, Han-Shi; Li, Wan-Lu; Wei, Fan; Li, Jun

    2016-02-03

    The finding of the periodic law is a milestone in chemical science. The periodicity of light elements in the Periodic Table is fully accounted for by quantum mechanics. Here we report that relativistic effects change the bond multiplicity of the group 6 diatomic molecules M2 (M = Cr, Mo, W, Sg) from hextuple bonds for Cr2, Mo2, W2 to quadruple bonds for Sg2, thus breaking the periodicity in the nonrelativistic domain. The same trend is also found for other superheavy-element diatomics Rf2, Db2, Bh2, and Hs2.

  12. Paleoclimate change in the Nakuru basin, Kenya, at 119 - 109 ka derived from δ18Odiatom and diatom assemblages and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Andreas; Deino, Alan; Leng, Melanie; Gasse, Francoise

    2016-04-01

    A 4.5m-thick diatomite bed deposited during the cold interval of the penultimate interglacial at ~119 - 109 ka documents a period in which a deep freshwater lake filled the Nakuru basin in the Central Kenya Rift (CKR), East Africa. Palaeohydrological conditions of the basin are reconstructed for the paleolake highstand using δ18Odiatom and characterization of diatom assemblages. The age of the diatomite deposit is established by precise 40Ar/39Ar-dating of intercalated pumice tuffs. The paleolake experienced multiple hydrological fluctuations on sub-orbital (~1,500 to 2,000 years) time scales. The magnitude of the δ18Odiatom change (+/- 3‰) and significant changes in the plankton-littoral ratio of the diatom assemblage (+/- 25%) suggest that the paleolake record can be interpreted in the context of long-term climatic change in East Africa. Using 40Ar/39Ar age control and nominal diatomite-sedimentation rates we establish a simplified age model of paleohydrological vs. climatic change, from which we conclude that more humid conditions prevailed in equatorial East Africa during the late Pleistocene over a relatively long time interval of several thousands years. Then, extreme insolation at eccentricity maximum and weakened zonal air-pressure gradients in the tropics favored intensified ITCZ-like convection over East Africa and deep-freshwater lake conditions.

  13. Diatomáceas indicadoras de paleoambientes do Quaternário de Dois Irmãos, Recife, PE, Brasil Diatoms as indicators of paleoenvironments during the Quaternary at Dois Irmãos, Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giane Soares de Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho apresenta o levantamento da diatomoflórula identificada em sedimentos do Quaternário da Lagoa das Diatomáceas (Dois Irmãos, Recife, baseado em um testemunho de sondagem com 4,5 m, tendo sido analisadas amostras com intervalos de 10 em 10 cm. Foram identificados 46 táxons, distribuídos em 19 gêneros, 40 espécies e seis variedades. A coluna estratigráfica esteve composta por gêneros epífitos (Actinella, Amphora, Cocconeis Eunotia, Fragilaria, Frustulia, Gomphonema e Rhopalodia, bentônicos (Navicula, Neidium, Nitzschia e Surirella e planctônicos (Aulacoseira, Cyclotella e Skeletonema. A maioria das espécies é oligoalóbia e litoral, destacando-se em termos de freqüência e abundância: Actinella brasiliensis, Anomoeoneis serians, Eunotia pectinalis, Frustulia rhomboides, sugerindo uma deposição de sedimentos em ambiente limnético. O predomínio de espécies epífitas em determinadas profundidades confirma a presença de macrófitas durante uma parte do período de deposição. Das espécies identificadas sete são consideradas de ambiente marinho: Cocconeis heteroidea, Cocconeis scutellum, Diploneis decipiens, Nitzschia scalaris, Nitzschia sigma, Skeletonema costatum e Surirella heideni as quais ocorreram de forma esporádica.A study of fossil diatoms from Lagoa das Diatomáceas (Dois Irmãos, Recife was carried out based on a 4.5-meter-long core sample. Samples were analyzed at 10 cm intervals. A total of 46 taxa were identified in 19 genera, 40 species and six varieties. The stratigraphic column was composed of epiphytic (Actinella, Amphora, Cocconeis Eunotia, Fragilaria, Frustulia, Gomphonema and Rhopalodia, benthic (Navicula, Neidium, Nitzschia, Surirella, and planktonic (Aulacoseira, Cyclotella and Skeletonema genera. Actinella brasiliensis, Anomoeoneis serians, Eunotia pectinalis and Frustulia rhomboides are oligohalobe, littoral species with high frequency and abundance, which suggests sediment deposition in a

  14. Plankton food-webs: to what extent can they be simplified?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico D'Alelio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is a hugely diverse community including both unicellular and multicellular organisms, whose individual dimensions span over seven orders of magnitude. Plankton is a fundamental part of biogeochemical cycles and food-webs in aquatic systems. While knowledge has progressively accumulated at the level of single species and single trophic processes, the overwhelming biological diversity of plankton interactions is insufficiently known and a coherent and unifying trophic framework is virtually lacking. We performed an extensive review of the plankton literature to provide a compilation of data suitable for implementing food-web models including plankton trophic processes at high taxonomic resolution. We identified the components of the plankton community at the Long Term Ecological Research Station MareChiara in the Gulf of Naples. These components represented the sixty-three nodes of a plankton food-web. To each node we attributed biomass and vital rates, i.e. production, consumption, assimilation rates and ratio between autotrophy and heterotrophy in mixotrophic protists. Biomasses and rates values were defined for two opposite system’s conditions; relatively eutrophic and oligotrophic states. We finally identified 817 possible trophic links within the web and provided each of them with a relative weight, in order to define a diet-matrix, valid for both trophic states, which included all consumers, fromn anoflagellates to carnivorous plankton. Vital rates for plankton resulted, as expected, very wide; this strongly contrasts with the narrow ranges considered in plankton system models implemented so far. Moreover, the amount and variety of trophic links highlighted by our review is largely excluded by state-of-the-art biogeochemical and food-web models for aquatic systems. Plankton models could potentially benefit from the integration of the trophic diversity outlined in this paper: first, by using more realistic rates; second, by better

  15. Influence of river influx on phytoplankton community during fall inter–monsoon in the coastal waters off Kakinada, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sooria, P.M.; Reny, P.D.; Jagadeesan, L.; Nair, M.

    ) cells l sup(-1)). Phytoplankton community was formed by larger diatoms in October 2007, dominated by Hemidiscus hardmannianus and Ditylum brightwellii (300-500 mu m in diameter) whereas in October 2006 smaller diatoms such as Lioloma elongatum (2-4 mu m...

  16. Morphological controls on cannibalism in a planktonic marine phagotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Claire M; Flynn, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    The ingestion preferences of planktonic protozoa influence the structure and succession of microbial communities and thus biogeochemical cycling within aquatic environments. Some predatory ciliates and flagellates are reported to switch to cannibalism when no suitable non-self prey items are available for consumption. However, the importance of cannibalism as a survival strategy, and its ubiquity within the planktonic protozoa is not known. We report the first attempt to quantify cannibalism in a phagotrophic marine dinoflagellate (Oxyrrhis marina). Cannibalistic Oxyrrhis cells seldom comprised >2% of any experimental population, including those in which all non-self prey items had been grazed to extinction. Such 'prey-deplete' cultures became dominated by homogeneous populations of highly motile Oxyrrhis that were morphologically unable (too similar in size) to cannibalise. That cannibalism can only occur when 'victim' and 'cannibal' cell size-classes of sufficient difference collide, suggests that cannibalism may be of limited use as a long-term survival strategy in phagotrophic protozoa.

  17. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J

    2006-01-01

    Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light......-driven proton translocation across the cell membrane. So far, proteorhodopsin genes have been well documented only in proteobacteria and a few other bacterial groups. Here we report the presence and distribution of proteorhodopsin genes in Archaea affiliated with the order Thermoplasmatales, in the ocean......'s upper water column. The genomic context and phylogenetic relationships of the archaeal and proteobacterial proteorhodopsins indicate its probable lateral transfer between planktonic Bacteria and Archaea. About 10% of the euryarchaeotes in the photic zone contained the proteorhodopsin gene adjacent...

  18. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Lionel; Chaffron, Samuel; Bittner, Lucie; Eveillard, Damien; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2016-04-28

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions.

  19. Control of plankton seasonal succession by adaptive grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Andersen, Ken Haste; Visser, Andre;

    2013-01-01

    on the effects of adaptive zooplankton grazing behavior on the seasonal succession of temperate plankton communities in an idealized community model consisting of a zooplankton grazer and two phytoplankton species, one motile and the other nonmotile. The grazer can switch between ambush feeding on motile cells...... or feeding-current feeding on nonmotile cells. The feeding-current behavior imposes an additional mortality risk on the grazer, whereas ambush feeding benefits from small-scale fluid turbulence. Grazer–phytoplankton feeding interactions are forced by light and turbulence and the grazer adopts the feeding...... behavior that optimizes its fitness. The adaptive grazing model predicts essential features of the seasonal plankton succession reported from temperate seas, including the vertical distribution and seasonal variation in the relative abundance of motile and nonmotile phytoplankton and the seasonal variation...

  20. Surficial Sedimentary Diatoms in Okinawa Trough and Its Response to Kuroshio Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Dongzhao; Fang Qi; Liao Lianzhao

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the relative contents of dominant diatom species and the distributive characteristics of tropical pelagic species and diatom assemblages, and also discusses the relations between the relative content of tropical pelagic species and Kuroshio Current and between the distribution of diatom assemblages and material sources. The results show that the limit of>20% relative content of tropical pelagic species is basically consistent with the demarcation of Kuroshio Current, and that the distributions of dominant diatom species and diatom assemblages reserve the records of their closer relations to material sources.

  1. The plankton multiplier—positive feedback in the greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, John; Barkmann, Wolfgang

    1993-01-01

    The plankton multiplier is a positive feedback mechanism linking the greenhouse effect and biological pump (Woods.J.D., Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, 1990). As pollution increases the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, the enhanced greenhouse effect induces radiative forcing of the ocean, which diminishes the depth of winter convection, reducing the annual resupply of nutrients to the euphotic zone and therefore the annual primary production. That weakens the biologic...

  2. Application of Statistical Learning Theory to Plankton Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Davis and S. M. Gallager A. R. Solow . Microaggregations of oceanic plankton observed by towed video microscopy. Science, 257:230-232, 1992. [33] C.S...correction. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 306, 2006. 162 [75] J. S. Jaffe, M. D. Ohman, and A. D. Roberts . OASIS in the sea: measurement of the acoustic...Engineering, pages 223-230, Wahington DC, 1991. [146] A. Solow , C. Davis, and Q. Hu. Estimating the txaonomic composition of a sample when individuals are

  3. Quantification of diatoms in biofilms: Standardisation of methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    in the analyses had the least influence on the quantification, whereas the method of removal was critical. The nylon brush was more efficient at recovering diatoms compared to a ceramic scraper. Direct microscopic enumeration of the community in the case of glass...

  4. Functionalized diatom silica microparticles for removal of mercury ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu, Jonas Addai-Mensah and Dusan Losic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatom silica microparticles were chemically modified with self-assembled monolayers of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS, 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTES and n-(2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMS, and their application for the adsorption of mercury ions (Hg(II is demonstrated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the functional groups (–SH or –NH2 were successfully grafted onto the diatom silica surface. The kinetics and efficiency of Hg(II adsorption were markedly improved by the chemical functionalization of diatom microparticles. The relationship among the type of functional groups, pH and adsorption efficiency of mercury ions was established. The Hg(II adsorption reached equilibrium within 60 min with maximum adsorption capacities of 185.2, 131.7 and 169.5 mg g-1 for particles functionalized with MPTMS, APTES and AEAPTMS, respectively. The adsorption behavior followed a pseudo-second-order reaction model and Langmuirian isotherm. These results show that mercapto- or amino-functionalized diatom microparticles are promising natural, cost-effective and environmentally benign adsorbents suitable for the removal of mercury ions from aqueous solutions.

  5. Investigation of Light Manipulation by the Ultrastructure of Marine Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-13

    metal -infused diatoms into electro-optical devices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Photonics, Bioinspired Design, biotemplate 16...pore-size modification by atomic layer deposition of metal and semiconductor oxides 10 , and also chemothermic reduction processes 7...materials to be engineered or biomineralized into diatomaceous cell walls for specialised luminescence purposes should be guided by the nature of

  6. Origin and evolution of the canal raphe system in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruck, Elizabeth C; Theriot, Edward C

    2011-11-01

    One lineage of pennate diatoms has a slit through the siliceous cell wall, called a "raphe," that functions in motility. Raphid pennate diatoms number in the perhaps tens of thousands of species, with the diversity of raphe forms potentially matching this number. Three lineages-the Bacillariales, Rhopalodiales, and Surirellales-possess a complex and presumably highly derived raphe that is physically separated from the cell interior, most often by a set of siliceous braces. Because the relationship among these three lineages is unclear, the number of origins of the canal raphe system and the homology of it and its constitutive parts among these lineages, is equally unclear. We reconstructed the phylogeny of raphid pennate diatoms and included, for the first time, members of all three canal raphid diatom lineages, and used the phylogeny to test specific hypotheses about the origin of the canal raphe. The canal raphe appears to have evolved twice, once in the common ancestor of Bacillariales and once in the common ancestor of Rhopalodiales and Surirellales, which form a monophyletic group in our analyses. These results recommend careful follow-up morphogenesis studies of the canal raphe in these two lineages to determine the underlying developmental basis for this remarkable case of parallel evolution.

  7. Decay of delayed light with the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.; Swart, J.

    Intact cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum do not show a smooth afterglow decay curve. After a sharp decline (0–150 msec), a maximum may occur after 4 sec at 17° or after 22 sec at 2°. This maximum is present after excitation with far red light of low intensity, which is absorbed primarily

  8. Enhancement of the reactive iron pool by marine diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Fischer, Astrid C.; Kroon, Koos J.; Buma, Anita G. J.; Wolterbeek, Bert Th.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Short term (2 days) laboratory experiments were performed to study the change in irradiance induced production of Fe(II) in seawater in the presence of two open oceanic Southern Ocean diatom species, Thalassiosira sp. and Chaetoceros brevis. Three irradiance conditions were applied: 1) UVB+UVA+VIS,

  9. Sedimentation of phytoplankton during a diatom bloom : Rates and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hansen, J.L.S.; Alldredge, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    nutrient depletion in culture experiments. The low particle stickiness recorded may be related to low formation rates by diatoms of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP), that occurred in low concentrations throughout the study period. Zooplankton grazing rate did not respond to the development...

  10. Mercury-induced genotoxicity in marine diatom (Chaetoceros tenuissimus)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarker, S.; Desai, S.R.; Verlecar, X.N.; Sarker, M.S.; Sarkar, A.

    In this paper, we present an evaluation of genotoxic responses in marine diatom, Chaetoceros tenuissimus, isolated from Kandla Creek (lat 23.03° N, long 70.22° E), Gujarat, India, in terms of impairment of DNA integrity as a function...

  11. Evolutionary genomics of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    KAUST Repository

    Mock, Thomas

    2017-01-17

    The Southern Ocean houses a diverse and productive community of organisms. Unicellular eukaryotic diatoms are the main primary producers in this environment, where photosynthesis is limited by low concentrations of dissolved iron and large seasonal fluctuations in light, temperature and the extent of sea ice. How diatoms have adapted to this extreme environment is largely unknown. Here we present insights into the genome evolution of a cold-adapted diatom from the Southern Ocean, Fragilariopsis cylindrus, based on a comparison with temperate diatoms. We find that approximately 24.7 per cent of the diploid F. cylindrus genome consists of genetic loci with alleles that are highly divergent (15.1 megabases of the total genome size of 61.1 megabases). These divergent alleles were differentially expressed across environmental conditions, including darkness, low iron, freezing, elevated temperature and increased CO2. Alleles with the largest ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions also show the most pronounced condition-dependent expression, suggesting a correlation between diversifying selection and allelic differentiation. Divergent alleles may be involved in adaptation to environmental fluctuations in the Southern Ocean.

  12. The Kinker diatom collection: discovery – exploration – exploitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Wolf, de H.

    2004-01-01

    Johannes Kinker (1823-1900) was a typical representative of the Victorian ‘amateur-savant’. As a wellto- do stockbroker he was able to invest considerable time and money into studies of nature, first entomology and subsequently diatoms. The latter subject flourished in the late 19th century and, amo

  13. Experimentally determined temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Arrieta, J. M.; Vaquer-Suyner, R.; Coello-Camba, A.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half of its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase the rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested, experimentally, the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest an experimental temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. This threshold is also validated by field measurements across a range of temperatures which suggested a temperature 5.4 °C beyond which Arctic plankton communities switch to heterotrophy. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  14. Experimentally determined temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half of its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase the rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested, experimentally, the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest an experimental temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. This threshold is also validated by field measurements across a range of temperatures which suggested a temperature 5.4 °C beyond which Arctic plankton communities switch to heterotrophy. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  15. Massive consumption of gelatinous plankton by Mediterranean apex predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Luis; Álvarez de Quevedo, Irene; Borrell, Assumpció; Aguilar, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus), spearfish (Tetrapturus belone) and swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola) also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), blue shark (Prionace glauca), leerfish (Lichia amia), bonito (Sarda sarda), striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba) and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga), amberjack (Seriola dumerili), blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus) were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage) and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish), most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing.

  16. Massive consumption of gelatinous plankton by Mediterranean apex predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cardona

    Full Text Available Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus, little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus, spearfish (Tetrapturus belone and swordfish (Xiphias gladius. Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix, blue shark (Prionace glauca, leerfish (Lichia amia, bonito (Sarda sarda, striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga, amberjack (Seriola dumerili, blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola, bullet tuna (Auxis rochei, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus, horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus, mackerel (Scomber scombrus and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish, most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing.

  17. Raman spectroscopic differentiation of planktonic bacteria and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusić, Dragana; Kampe, Bernd; Ramoji, Anuradha; Neugebauer, Ute; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Both biofilm formations as well as planktonic cells of water bacteria such as diverse species of the Legionella genus as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli were examined in detail by Raman microspectroscopy. Production of various molecules involved in biofilm formation of tested species in nutrient-deficient media such as tap water was observed and was particularly evident in the biofilms formed by six Legionella species. Biofilms of selected species of the Legionella genus differ significantly from the planktonic cells of the same organisms in their lipid amount. Also, all Legionella species have formed biofilms that differ significantly from the biofilms of the other tested genera in the amount of lipids they produced. We believe that the significant increase in the synthesis of this molecular species may be associated with the ability of Legionella species to form biofilms. In addition, a combination of Raman microspectroscopy with chemometric approaches can distinguish between both planktonic form and biofilms of diverse bacteria and could be used to identify samples which were unknown to the identification model. Our results provide valuable data for the development of fast and reliable analytic methods based on Raman microspectroscopy, which can be applied to the analysis of tap water-adapted microorganisms without any cultivation step.

  18. Effect of Industrial Effluent on the Growth of Marine Diatom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    higher volume of water could not affect the growth rate of phytoplankton. It is more important .... density at the start and the end of the growth period, and t is the time .... pulp mill effluents on estuarine phytoplankton ... Havunders. Serie Plankton.

  19. Diatom community structure on commercially available ship hull coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargiel, Kelli A; Coogan, Jeffrey S; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2011-10-01

    Diatoms are primary colonizers of both antifouling and fouling-release ship hull coatings. There are few published studies which report on diatom community development on modern ship hull coatings. This study reports diatom communities on eight commercial marine ship hull coatings exposed at three static immersion sites along the east coast of Florida, viz. Daytona, Sebastian, and Miami. The coatings tested were three ablative copper systems (Ameron ABC-3, International BRA-640, and Hempel Olympic 76600), two copper-free biocidal systems (E-Paint SN-1, Sherwin Williams HMF), and three fouling-release (FR) systems (International Intersleek 700, International Intersleek 900, and Hempel Hempasil). One hundred and twenty-seven species comprising 44 genera were identified, including some of the more commonly known foulers, viz. Achnanthes, Amphora, Cocconeis, Entomoneis, Licmophora, Melosira, Navicula, Nitzschia, Synedra, and Toxarium. A significant difference was seen among sites, with the more estuarine site, Sebastian, having lower overall diatom abundance and higher diversity than Daytona and Miami. Copper coatings were primarily fouled by Amphora delicatissima and Entomoneis pseudoduplex. Copper-free coatings were fouled by Cyclophora tenuis, A. delicatissima, Achnanthes manifera, and Amphora bigibba. FR surfaces were typified by C. tenuis, and several species of Amphora. The presence of C. tenuis is new to the biofouling literature, but as new coatings are developed, this diatom may be one of many that prove to be problematic for static immersion. Results show coatings can be significantly influenced by geographical area, highlighting the need to test ship hull coatings in locations similar to where they will be utilized.

  20. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (paluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated aluminium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Diatom proteomics reveals unique acclimation strategies to mitigate Fe limitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook L Nunn

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton growth rates are limited by the supply of iron (Fe in approximately one third of the open ocean, with major implications for carbon dioxide sequestration and carbon (C biogeochemistry. To date, understanding how alteration of Fe supply changes phytoplankton physiology has focused on traditional metrics such as growth rate, elemental composition, and biophysical measurements such as photosynthetic competence (Fv/Fm. Researchers have subsequently employed transcriptomics to probe relationships between changes in Fe supply and phytoplankton physiology. Recently, studies have investigated longer-term (i.e. following acclimation responses of phytoplankton to various Fe conditions. In the present study, the coastal diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, was acclimated (10 generations to either low or high Fe conditions, i.e. Fe-limiting and Fe-replete. Quantitative proteomics and a newly developed proteomic profiling technique that identifies low abundance proteins were employed to examine the full complement of expressed proteins and consequently the metabolic pathways utilized by the diatom under the two Fe conditions. A total of 1850 proteins were confidently identified, nearly tripling previous identifications made from differential expression in diatoms. Given sufficient time to acclimate to Fe limitation, T. pseudonana up-regulates proteins involved in pathways associated with intracellular protein recycling, thereby decreasing dependence on extracellular nitrogen (N, C and Fe. The relative increase in the abundance of photorespiration and pentose phosphate pathway proteins reveal novel metabolic shifts, which create substrates that could support other well-established physiological responses, such as heavily silicified frustules observed for Fe-limited diatoms. Here, we discovered that proteins and hence pathways observed to be down-regulated in short-term Fe starvation studies are constitutively expressed when T. pseudonana is

  2. Deciphering diatom biochemical pathways via whole-cell proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Brook L; Aker, Jocelyn R; Shaffer, Scott A; Tsai, Shannon; Strzepek, Robert F; Boyd, Philip W; Freeman, Theodore Larson; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Malmström, Lars; Goodlett, David R

    2009-06-03

    Diatoms play a critical role in the oceans' carbon and silicon cycles; however, a mechanistic understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success remains elusive. Completion of the Thalassiosira pseudonana genome provided 'blueprints' for the potential biochemical machinery of diatoms, but offers only a limited insight into their biology under various environmental conditions. Using high-throughput shotgun proteomics, we identified a total of 1928 proteins expressed by T. pseudonana cultured under optimal growth conditions, enabling us to analyze this diatom's primary metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Of the proteins identified, 70% are involved in cellular metabolism, while 11% are involved in the transport of molecules. We identified all of the enzymes involved in the urea cycle, thereby describing the complete pathway to convert ammonia to urea, along with urea transporters, and the urea-degrading enzyme urease. Although metabolic exchange between these pathways remains ambiguous, their constitutive presence suggests complex intracellular nitrogen recycling. In addition, all C(4) related enzymes for carbon fixation have been identified to be in abundance, with high protein sequence coverage. Quantification of mass spectra acquisitions demonstrated that the 20 most abundant proteins included an unexpectedly high expression of clathrin, which is the primary structural protein involved in endocytic transport. This result highlights a previously overlooked mechanism for the inter- and intra-cellular transport of nutrients and macromolecules in diatoms, potentially providing a missing link to organelle communication and metabolite exchange. Our results demonstrate the power of proteomics, and lay the groundwork for future comparative proteomic studies and directed analyses of specifically expressed proteins and biochemical pathways of oceanic diatoms.

  3. Plankton community structure: evaluation of analytical methods using model communities. Final report. [Effects of effluents on plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, W. B.

    1976-07-01

    The general purpose of this project was to provide information that might be of use to biologists who are investigating the effects of effluents on plankton. Although most applicable to non-persistent pollutants, such as thermal effluents, the methodology may be applied in some degree to nondegradable pollutants as well. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to provide some information about the relative effectiveness of certain representative affinity tests, in circumstances that would be analogous to those encountered in an impact investigation on plankton. In such a study, real data cannot be used, if the purpose is to show the efficiency of a test at detecting groups with known characteristics; artificial data must be employed in which those characteristics are built in. For that reason, a distribution model was to generate the data for computer analysis.

  4. Understanding amine catalyzed silica polymerization : diatoms as bioarchitects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Aubry, Sylvie; Lane, Pamela; Robinson, David B; Bauer, Christina A.; Zendejas, Frank; Tran, Huu; Lane, Todd W.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

    2007-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art biomimetic methodologies employed worldwide for the realization of self-assembled nanomaterials are adequate for certain unique applications, but a major breakthrough is needed if these nanomaterials are to obtain their true promise and potential. These routes typically utilize a 'top-down' approach in terms of controlling the nucleation, growth, and deposition of structured nanomaterials. Most of these techniques are inherently limited to primarily 2D and simple 3D structures, and are therefore limited in their ultimate functionality and field of use. Zeolites, one of the best-known and understood synthetic silica structures, typically possess highly ordered silica domains over very small length scales. The development of truly organized and hierarchical zeolites over several length scales remains an intense area of research world wide. Zeolites typically require high-temperature and complex synthesis routes that negatively impact certain economic parameters and, therefore, the ultimate utility of these materials. Nonetheless, zeolite usage is in the tons per year worldwide and is quickly becoming ubiquitous in its applications. In addition to these more mature aspects of current practices in materials science, one of the most promising fields of nanotechnology lies in the advent and control of biologically self-assembled materials, especially those involved with silica and other ceramics such as hydroxyapatite. Nature has derived, through billions of years of evolutionary steps, numerous methods by which fault-tolerant and mechanically robust structures can be created with exquisite control and precision at relatively low temperature ranges and pressures. Diatoms are one of the best known examples that exhibit this degree of structure and control known that is involved with the biomineralization of silica. Diatoms are eukaryotic algae that are ubiquitous in marine and freshwater environments. They are a dominant form of

  5. Effect of Bacterial Microbiota on the Silica Uptake of the Marine Diatom, Odontella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, E. J.; Kempnich, M.; Sison-Mangus, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diatoms are the most prolific primary producers in the ocean and are known to dominate the phytoplankton community when nutrients become available. Diatoms require silica for growth in order to produce their silica wall frustules. Studies pertaining to silica uptake in diatoms have recently become possible with the use of PDMPO [2-(4-pyridyl)-5{[4-dimethylaminoethyl-aminocarbamoyl]-methoxy}phenyl]oxazole], a dye which selectively binds to free silica and can effectively be used to demonstrate silica uptake and deposition in diatoms. Many factors affect the growth of diatoms, including their bacterial associates or microbiome. Some members of their microbiota can increase diatom growth while others stunt their growth and eventually lyse them. Bacteria-free diatoms, on the other hand, have significantly lower growth than diatoms associating with bacteria. Here we ask if the silica uptake of Odontella sp. was influenced by co-culture with various types of bacteria. Silicification was measured using spectrophotometry to calculate PDMPO concentration as a proxy for silica uptake. We found that axenic cultures have the lowest silica uptake while non-axenic diatoms and diatoms co-cultured with the bacteria from Bacteroidetes (Cellulophaga), Firmicutes (Planococcus) and Gamma-proteobacteria (Vibrio) have varying effects on the silica uptake of the 3 diatoms. This study adds another piece of evidence that bacteria can play an important role on the growth and development of the diatoms. This work suggests that different types of bacteria can have a profound effect on the survival and ecological success of diatoms and bacterial associates should be considered when studying diatom's biology and ecology.

  6. The structure and diversity of freshwater diatom assemblages from Franz Josef Land Archipelago: a northern outpost for freshwater diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Pla-Rabés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined diatom assemblages from 18 stream and pond samples in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago (FJL, the most northern land of Eurasia. More than 216 taxa were observed, revealing a rich circumpolar diatom flora, including many undescribed taxa. Widely distributed taxa were the most abundant by cell densities, while circumpolar taxa were the most species rich. Stream and pond habitats hosted different assemblages, and varied along a pH gradient. Diatoma tenuis was the most abundant and ubiquitous taxon. However, several circumpolar taxa such as Chamaepinnularia gandrupii, Cymbella botellus, Psammothidium sp. and Humidophila laevissima were also found in relatively high abundances. Aerophilic taxa were an important component of FJL diatom assemblages (Humidophila spp., Caloneis spp. and Pinnularia spp., reflecting the large and extreme seasonal changes in Arctic conditions. We predict a decrease in the abundance of circumpolar taxa, an increase in local (α- freshwater diatom diversity, but a decrease in regional diversity (circumpolar homogenization as a result of current warming trends and to a lesser extent the increasing human footprint in the region.

  7. The cross-shore distribution of plankton and particles southwest of Iceland observed with a Video Plankton Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, Astthor; Logemann, Kai; Marteinsdottir, Gudrun

    2016-07-01

    The high resolution distribution of plankton and particles along a transect extending from the coast and across the shelf southwest of Iceland was studied in relation to hydrographic features and chlorophyll a fluorescence in late May 2010-2013 with a Video Plankton Recorder. The different groups of plankton and particles showed distinctive distributional pattern. Decaying organic matter (marine snow) was a very significant component of the system. Calanus finmarchicus stayed generally shallower than egg carrying Pseudocalanus spp. Diel variability in depth distribution of C. finmarchicus was not evident. Ctenophores, jellies and fish larvae were most abundant above ~50 m depth. Ctenophores were relatively abundant across the whole transect, while jellies and fish larvae were mainly seen on the landward half of the transect. The data on distribution of copepods (mainly C. finmarchicus) were combined with the results of a numerical circulation model (CODE), thus obtaining an estimate of fluxes of copepods in the area. The results show that C. finmarchicus may be transported by currents both eastwards and westwards along the south coast, while retention on the bank is also possible. Based on the results of the synthesis of the distributional data and the CODE model, it is hypothesized that the populations off the south coast are at least partly self-sustained in the region.

  8. Plankton communities and summertime declines in algal abundance associated with low dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kurt D.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton populations in the Tualatin River in northwestern Oregon are an important component of the dissolved oxygen (DO) budget of the river and are critical for maintaining DO levels in summer. During the low-flow summer period, sufficient nutrients and a long residence time typically combine with ample sunshine and warm water to fuel blooms of cryptophyte algae, diatoms, green and blue-green algae in the low-gradient, slow-moving reservoir reach of the lower river. Algae in the Tualatin River generally drift with the water rather than attach to the river bottom as a result of moderate water depths, slightly elevated turbidity caused by suspended colloidal material, and dominance of silty substrates. Growth of algae occurs as if on a “conveyor belt” of streamflow, a dynamic system that is continually refreshed with inflowing water. Transit through the system can take as long as 2 weeks during the summer low-flow period. Photosynthetic production of DO during algal blooms is important in offsetting oxygen consumption at the sediment-water interface caused by the decomposition of organic matter from primarily terrestrial sources, and the absence of photosynthesis can lead to low DO concentrations that can harm aquatic life. The periods with the lowest DO concentrations in recent years (since 2003) typically occur in August following a decline in algal abundance and activity, when DO concentrations often decrease to less than State standards for extended periods (nearly 80 days). Since 2003, algal populations have tended to be smaller and algal blooms have terminated earlier compared to conditions in the 1990s, leading to more frequent declines in DO to levels that do not meet State standards. This study was developed to document the current abundance and species composition of phytoplankton in the Tualatin River, identify the possible causes of the general decline in algae, and evaluate hypotheses to explain why algal blooms diminish in midsummer. Plankton

  9. Trophic transfer of methylmercury and trace elements by tropical estuarine seston and plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrig, H. A.; Palermo, E. F. A.; Seixas, T. G.; Branco, C. W. C.; Moreira, I.; Malm, O.

    2009-10-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) and trace elements (TE), mercury, selenium, cadmium, lead and copper, were determined in a microbial loop composed by three size classes of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganism samples, 1.2-70 μm (seston, SPM), 70-290 μm (microplankton) and ≥290 μm (mesoplankton) from five sampling stations within a polluted eutrophic estuary in the Brazilian Southeast coast and one external point under the influence of the bay. TE concentrations were within the range reported for marine microorganisms from uncontaminated locations. Microplankton was primarily composed of proto-zooplankton and diatoms (>90%) while approximately 50% of mesoplankton was composed mainly of copepods. MeHg and TE in samples did not differ among the five sampling stations within the bay. Cd, Pb and Cu in seston were higher in the stations sampled inside Guanabara Bay (0.67 μg Cd g -1, 9.26 μg Pb g -1, 8.03 μg Cu g -1) than in the external one (0.17 μg Cd g -1, 3.98 μg Pb g -1 and 2.09 μg Cu g -1). Hg, MeHg and Se did not differ among the five points within the more eutrophic waters of the estuary and the external sampling station. The trophic transfer of MeHg and Se was observed between trophic levels from prey (seston and microplankton) to predator (mesoplankton). The successive amplification of the ratios of MeHg to Hg with increasing trophic levels from seston (43%), to microplankton (59%) and mesoplankton (77%) indicate that biomagnification may be occurring along the microbial food web. Selenium, that is efficiently accumulated by organisms through trophic transference, was biomagnified along the microbial food web, while Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu did not present the same behavior. Concentrations differed between the three size classes, indicating that MeHg and TE accumulation were size-dependent. MeHg and TE concentrations were not related to the taxonomic groups' composition of the planktonic microorganisms. Results suggest the importance of the role of the trophic

  10. Kinetic control on Zn isotope signatures recorded in marine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbberich, Michael; Vance, Derek

    2017-08-01

    Marine diatoms dominate the oceanic cycle of the essential micronutrient zinc (Zn). The stable isotopes of zinc and other metals are increasingly used to understand trace metal micronutrient cycling in the oceans. One clear feature of the early isotope data is the heavy Zn isotope signature of the average oceanic dissolved pool relative to the inputs, potentially driven by uptake of light isotopes into phytoplankton cells and export to sediments. However, despite the fact that diatoms strip Zn from surface waters across the Antarctic polar front in the Southern Ocean, the local upper ocean is not isotopically heavy. Here we use culturing experiments to quantify the extent of Zn isotope fractionation by diatoms and to elucidate the mechanisms driving it. We have cultured two different open-ocean diatom species (T. oceanica and Chaetoceros sp.) in a series of experiments at constant medium Zn concentration but at bioavailable medium Fe ranging from limiting to replete. We find that T. oceanica can maintain high growth rates and Zn uptake rates over the full range of bioavailable iron (Fe) investigated, and that the Zn taken up has a δ66Zn that is unfractionated relative to that of the bioavailable free Zn in the medium. The studied representative of the genus Chaetoceros, on the other hand, shows more significantly reduced Zn uptake rates at low Fe and records more variable biomass δ66Zn signatures, of up to 0.85‰ heavier than the medium. We interpret the preferential uptake of heavy isotopes at extremely low Zn uptake rates as potentially due to either of the following two mechanisms. First, the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), at low Fe levels, may preferentially scavenge heavy Zn isotopes. Second, the Zn uptake rate may be slow enough to establish pseudo-equilibrium conditions at the transporter site, with heavy Zn isotopes forming more stable surface complexes. Thus we find that, in our experiments, Fe-limitation exerts a key control that

  11. Using diatom indices for water quality assessment in a subtropical river, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiang; Sheldon, Fran; Bunn, Stuart E; Zhang, Quanfa

    2013-06-01

    Diatoms have been regularly used as bioindicators to assess water quality of surface waters. However, diatom-based indices developed for a specific geographic region may not be appropriate elsewhere. We sampled benthic diatom assemblages in the upper Han River, a subtropical river in China, to evaluate applicability of 14 diatom-based indices used worldwide for water quality assessment. A total of 194 taxa from 31 genera were identified in the dry season and 139 taxa from 23 genera in the wet season. During the dry season, significant relationships were found for all but one of the diatom-based indices (Index Diatom Artois-Picardie) with one or more physical and chemical variables including nutrients and ion concentrations in river waters. The Biological Diatom Index (IBD) and diatom-based eutrophication/pollution index (EPI-D) were strongly related to trophic status and ionic content, while Watanabe's Index was related to organic pollution and conductivity. Yet, the diatom indices showed weak relationships with physical and chemical variables during the wet season. It suggests that diatom-based indices developed in Europe can be applied with confidence as bioindicators of water quality in subtropical rivers of China, at least during base-flow conditions.

  12. Do diatoms run downhill? Using biodiversity of terrestrial and aquatic diatoms to identify hydrological connectivity between aquatic zones in Luxembourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, L.; Wetzel, C. E.; Martinez-Carreras, N.; Frentress, J.; Ector, L.; Hoffmann, L.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Diatoms are siliceous unicellular algae, and range in size between a few and more than 500 micrometers. Diatoms are spread worldwide, live in many aquatic habitats, have many life forms and their short generation time make them respond rapidly to environmental changes. Their taxonomic diversity represents a valuable tool to assess water quality as each taxon has specific responses to environmental factors. Recently, diatoms have been used as tracers to detect the onset/cessation of surface runoff through binary classification of terrestrial and aquatic species in the Attert basin in Luxembourg. In order to continue the validation of these first results, we have collected samples during rain events at different seasons of the year using automatic stream water samplers, grab samples of diatoms from various terrestrial and subaerial substrates (bryophytes, litter and leaves), as well as from aquatic habitats (epilithon, epipelon and drift samples). This new type of information will be used to constrain assumptions of the conventional tracer-based hydrograph separation technique (i.e. using geochemistry and stable isotopes). The first results concerning the diatom flora, based on 39 samples, revealed 152 species belonging to 38 genera. The most species-rich genera were Pinnularia (15.8% - 24 taxa), Eunotia (13.2% - 20 taxa), Gomphonema (8.6% - 13 taxa), Navicula (7.2% - 11 taxa) and Stauroneis (5.3% - 8 taxa). The flora are mainly composed of oligotrophic and/or acidophilic taxa (32.0%), ubiquitous (14.0%) or poorly known ecologically species (43.0%). The most important taxa found in drift samples were Fragilariforma virescens, Fragilaria capucina sensu lato, Planothidium lanceolatum, Eunotia minor, Achnanthidium kranzii, Karayevia oblongella and Eunotia incisa. In the riparian zone (n = 10), 102 species were observed, with Eunotia exigua var. tenella, Eunotia botuliformis and Pinnularia perirrorata being among the most frequent. Epilithic samples from the main channel

  13. Ecosystemic postglacial succession of Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Canada) inferred by the oxygen isotope composition and the assemblage of lacustrine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narancic, Biljana; Francus, Pierre; Chapligin, Bernhard; Meyer, Hanno; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    In 2012, a 82 cm long sediment core (Ni2B) was drilled at Nettilling Lake. We use a multi-proxy paleolimnological approach to study the sedimentary records preserved in Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Canada) in order to reconstruct the postglacial environmental history of the lake watershed. 31 samples of biogenic silica were purified, their contamination assessed and corrected for and subsequently analysed for the oxygen isotope composition (δ18Odiatom). Additionally, the diatom assemblage from 35 samples was quantified under the light microscope with x 1000 magnification. Our chronology extends to ˜ BC 1200 yrs based on 14C from bulk sediment. Downcore variations in δ18Odiatom values show a marine-lacustrine transition. The samples from the marine-brackish zone show a higher isotopic composition (27.5‰, 58.5cm depth, ″middle Holocene″) than the samples from the lacustrine section (21.7‰, 1.5cm, 2002 AD). The transition zone can be distinguished by values between these extremes, too (23.4‰, 33cm, ˜1240 BC). This likely reflects changes in the water source, from more isotopically enriched marine water in the past to more depleted and cold lacustrine water. The diatom assemblage reflects the same transition. The marine-brackish zone contains polyhalobous-mesohalobous benthic species (e.g. Trachyneis aspera, Gomphonemopsis aestuarii, G. pseudexigua,Cocconeis scutellum) which have a salinity preference between 35‰ to 5‰, indicating a shallow, littoral environment. The transition zone is characterized by a sharp rise of alkaliphilous freshwater benthic taxa (e.g. Staurosirelle pinnata, Staurosira construens, Staurosira brevistriata). The diatom flora of the upper zone is characterized by halophobous planktonic and benthic species (e.g. Cylotella rossii, Cyclotella pseudostelligera, Tabelaria floculosa, Encyonema silesiacum, Nitzschia perminuta). The δ18Odiatom and the diatom assemblage record from Nettilling Lake register changes in the oxygen

  14. Diatom community response to climate variability over the past 37,000 years in the sub-tropics of the Southern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembrow, Sarah C., E-mail: sarah.hembrow@scu.edu.au [School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Taffs, Kathryn H. [School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Atahan, Pia [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia); Parr, Jeff [School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Zawadzki, Atun; Heijnis, Henk [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is impacting global surface water resources, increasing the need for a deeper understanding of the interaction between climate and biological diversity. This is particularly the case in the Southern Hemisphere sub-tropics, where little information exists on the aquatic biota response to climate variations. Palaeolimnological techniques, in particular the use of diatoms, are well established and can significantly contribute to the understanding of climatic variability and the impacts that change in climate have on aquatic ecosystems. A sediment core from Lake McKenzie, Fraser Island (Australia), was used to investigate interactions between climate influences and aquatic ecosystems. This study utilises a combination of proxies including biological (diatom), geochemical and chronological techniques to investigate long-term aquatic changes within the perched-dune lake. A combination of {sup 210}Pb and AMS {sup 14}C dates showed that the retrieved sediment represented a history of ca. 37,000 cal. yBP. The sedimentation rate in Lake McKenzie is very low, ranging on average from 0.11 mm to 0.26 mm per year. A sediment hiatus was observed between ca. 18,300 and 14,000 cal. yBP suggesting a period of dry conditions at the site. The diatom record shows little variability over the period of record, with benthic, freshwater acidic tolerant species dominating. Relative abundance of planktonic species and geochemical results indicates a period of increased water depth and lake productivity in the early Holocene and a gradual decrease in effective precipitation throughout the Holocene. Results from this study not only support earlier work conducted on Fraser Island using pollen reconstructions but also demonstrate that diatom community diversity has been relatively consistent throughout the Holocene and late Pleistocene with only minor cyclical fluctuation evident. This record is consistent with the few other aquatic palaeoecological records from the Southern

  15. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (I. A Model of Adhesives Based on Chemical Characterization and Localization of Polysaccharides from the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes and Other Diatoms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, B. A.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-04-01

    Extracellular adhesives from the diatoms Achnanthes longipes, Amphora coffeaeformis, Cymbella cistula, and Cymbella mexicana were characterized by monosaccharide and methylation analysis, lectin-fluorescein isothiocyanate localization, and cytochemical staining. Polysaccharide was the major component of adhesives formed during cell motility, synthesis of a basal pad, and/or production of a highly organized shaft. Hot water-insoluble/hot 0.5 M NaHCO3-soluble anionic polysaccharides from A. longipes and A. coffeaeformis adhesives were primarily composed of galactosyl (64-70%) and fucosyl (32-42%) residues. In A. longipes polymers, 2,3-, t-, 3-, and 4-linked/substituted galactosyl, t-, 3-, 4-, and 2-linked fucosyl, and t- and 2-linked glucuronic acid residues predominated. Adhesive polysaccharides from C. cistula were EDTA-soluble, sulfated, consisted of 83% galactosyl (4-, 4,6-, and 3,4-linked/substituted) and 13% xylosyl (t-, 4f/5p-, and 3p-linked/substituted) residues, and contained no uronosyl residues. Ulex europaeus agglutinin uniformly localized [alpha](1,2)-L-fucose units in C. cistula and Achnanthes adhesives formed during motility and in the pads of A. longipes. D-Galactose residues were localized throughout the shafts of C. cistula and capsules of A. coffeaeformis. D-Mannose and/or D-glucose, D-galactose, and [alpha](t)-L-fucose residues were uniformly localized in the outer layers of A. longipes shafts by Cancavalia ensiformis, Abrus precatorius, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin, respectively. A model for diatom cell adhesive structure was developed from chemical characterization, localization, and microscopic observation of extracellular adhesive components formed during the diatom cell-attachment process.

  16. Advancing Access to New Technology for Sustained High Resolution Observations of Plankton: From Bloom Dynamics to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosik, H. M.; Olson, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The combination of ocean observatory infrastructure and automated submersible flow cytometry can provide unprecedented capability for sustained high resolution time series of plankton, including taxa that are harmful or early indicators of ecosystem response to environmental change. Over the past decade, we have developed the FlowCytobot series of instruments that exemplify this capability. FlowCytobot and Imaging FlowCytobot use a combination of laser-based scattering and fluorescence measurements and video imaging of individual particles to enumerate and characterize cells ranging from picocyanobacteria to large chaining-forming diatoms. The process of developing these complex instruments was streamlined by access to the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO), a cabled facility on the New England Shelf, where real time two-way communications and access to shore power expedited cycles of instrument evaluation and design refinement. Repeated deployments at MVCO, typically 6 months in duration, have produced multi-year high resolution (hourly to daily) time series that are providing new insights into dynamics of community structure such as blooms, seasonality, and possibly even trends linked to regional climate change. The high temporal resolution observations of single cell properties make it possible not only to characterize taxonomic composition and size structure, but also to quantify taxon-specific growth rates. To meet the challenge of broadening access to this enabling technology, we have taken a two-step approach. First, we are partnering with a few scientific collaborators interested in using the instruments in different environments and to address different applications, notably the detection and characterization of harmful algal bloom events. Collaboration at this stage ensured that these first users outside the developers' lab had access to technical know-how required for successful outcomes; it also provided additional feedback that could be

  17. Momentum autocorrelation function of a classic diatomic chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ming B., E-mail: mingbyu@gmail.com

    2016-10-23

    A classical harmonic diatomic chain is studied using the recurrence relations method. The momentum autocorrelation function results from contributions of acoustic and optical branches. By use of convolution theorem, analytical expressions for the acoustic and optical contributions are derived as even-order Bessel function expansions with coefficients given in terms of integrals of elliptic functions in real axis and a contour parallel to the imaginary axis, respectively. - Highlights: • Momentum autocorrelation function of a classic diatomic chain is studied. • It is derived as even-order Bessel function expansion using the convolution theorem. • The expansion coefficients are integrals of elliptic functions. • Addition theorem is used to reduce complex elliptic function to complex sum of real ones.

  18. Neural Network predictions of Diatomic and Triatomic Molecular Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake Laing, W.

    1997-11-01

    The arrangement of molecules in periodic systems offers an enhanced comprehension of trends in molecular properties, a more efficient method of sorting and searching of molecular databases, and bases for the prediction of new data. Neural networks have the ability to "learn" existing data and to forecast a large amount of new data without a smoothing equation.(R. Hefferlin, B. Davis, W. B. Laing, "The Learning and Prediction of Triatomic Molecular Data with Neural Networks," International Arctic Seminar 1997, Murmansk, Russia)(J. Wohlers, W. B. Laing, R. Hefferlin, and B. Daivs, "Least-Squares and Neural-Network Forecasting from Citical Data: Diatomic Molecular Internuclear Separations and Triatomic Heats of Atomization and Ionization Potentials," Advances in Molecular Similarity: JIA book series, in press) This report will present periodic systems of molecules as well as neural network predictions for additional properties of diatomic and triatomic molecules.

  19. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-10

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  20. Asymptotic behavior of subradiant states in homonuclear diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    McGuyer, Bart H; Iwata, Geoffrey Z; Tarallo, Marco G; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Moszynski, Robert; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Weakly bound molecules have physical properties without atomic analogues, even as the bond length approaches dissociation. In particular, the internal symmetries of homonuclear diatomic molecules result in the formation of two-body superradiant and subradiant excited states. While superradiance has been demonstrated in a variety of systems, subradiance is more elusive due to the inherently weak interaction with the environment. Transition mechanisms that are strictly forbidden for atoms become allowed just below the dissociation asymptote due to new selection rules associated with the subradiant states. Here we directly probe deeply subradiant states in ultracold diatomic strontium molecules and characterize their properties near the intercombination atomic asymptote via optical spectroscopy of doubly-forbidden transitions with intrinsic quality factors exceeding 10^(13). This precision measurement of subradiance is made possible by tightly trapping the molecules in a state-insensitive optical lattice and ach...

  1. Comparing optical properties of different species of diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibohm, Christian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Su, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    species dependent with huge variety in size, shape, and micro- structure. We have experimentally investigated optical properties of frustules of several species of diatoms to further understand light harvesting properties together with commo n traits, effects and differences between the different...... frustules. We have observed, when incident light interacts w ith the micro-structured frustule it is multiple diffracted giving rise to wavelength dependent multiple focal points and other optical effects. Experimental results have been simulated and well confirmed by free space FFT propagation routine...... analysis software. The software uses parameters which are extracted from experimental im ages as basis for simulation and allows us to extract the influence of the different elements of the frustule. The information could be used both for predicting optical properties of diatoms and by changing frustule...

  2. A Model of the Dynamics of Plankton Patchiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Ebenhöh

    1980-04-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the dynamics of plankton patchiness in the intermediate scale (1 km-10 km was developed. Mechanisms that may be important in the creation and destruction of patches were selected and modelled. Such mechanisms are: horizontal turbulent diffusion, noise in the vertical turbulence, vertical migration of the zooplankton combined with a velocity profile and consumption of zooplankton by fish in schools. Patchiness is described by thc usc of the moments of density distributions, coherence lengths and correlations of phytoplankton and zooplankton. These parameters are investigated as functions of time and, also, for their dependence on the parameters of the patch creation mechanisms.

  3. Bioavailability of autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Helle; Markager, Svend Stiig; Søndergaard, Morten

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) produced during a phytoplankton bloom. The experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities as batch growth experiments over approximately 30 days with nitrogen limitation. Five to six...... times during the exponential and stationary phases of each experimental bloom the bioavailability of DON was measured over 60 days together with DOC and oxygen consumption. The overall aim was to quantify remineralization of the added nitrate. The results showed that maximum 33 % of the added nitrate...

  4. Novel sex cells and evidence for sex pheromones in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinya; Beakes, Gordon; Idei, Masahiko; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Mann, David G

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms belong to the stramenopiles, one of the largest groups of eukaryotes, which are primarily characterized by a presence of an anterior flagellum with tubular mastigonemes and usually a second, smooth flagellum. Based on cell wall morphology, diatoms have historically been divided into centrics and pennates, of which only the former have flagella and only on the sperm. Molecular phylogenies show the pennates to have evolved from among the centrics. However, the timing of flagellum loss--whether before the evolution of the pennate lineage or after--is unknown, because sexual reproduction has been so little studied in the 'araphid' basal pennate lineages, to which Pseudostaurosira belongs. Sexual reproduction of an araphid pennate, Pseudostaurosira trainorii, was studied with light microscopy (including time lapse observations and immunofluorescence staining observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy) and SEM. We show that the species produces motile male gametes. Motility is mostly associated with the extrusion and retrieval of microtubule-based 'threads', which are structures hitherto unknown in stramenopiles, their number varying from one to three per cell. We also report experimental evidence for sex pheromones that reciprocally stimulate sexualization of compatible clones and orientate motility of the male gametes after an initial 'random walk'. The threads superficially resemble flagella, in that both are produced by male gametes and contain microtubules. However, one striking difference is that threads cannot beat or undulate and have no motility of their own, and they do not bear mastigonemes. Threads are sticky and catch and draw objects, including eggs. The motility conferred by the threads is probably crucial for sexual reproduction of P. trainorii, because this diatom is non-motile in its vegetative stage but obligately outbreeding. Our pheromone experiments are the first studies in which gametogenesis has been induced in diatoms by cell

  5. Cryopreservation studies on the marine diatom Navicula subinflata Grun

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Redekar, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    , Arbault and Delanoue (1994 ) on Porphyra linearis and Conavate and Lubian (1994 and 1995) on marine microalgae. The present work deals with the cryopreservation of the marine diatom Navicula subinflata and its response to growth after keeping in liquid.... and G. Delanoue 1994. Cryopre- servation of Porphyra linearis conchocelis phase. Cryptogamie. Algol. 15(1) : 65-72. Conavate, J. P. and L. M. Lubian 1994. Tolerance of six marine microalgae to the cryoprotectant dimethyl sulfoxide and Methanol...

  6. Novel sex cells and evidence for sex pheromones in diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diatoms belong to the stramenopiles, one of the largest groups of eukaryotes, which are primarily characterized by a presence of an anterior flagellum with tubular mastigonemes and usually a second, smooth flagellum. Based on cell wall morphology, diatoms have historically been divided into centrics and pennates, of which only the former have flagella and only on the sperm. Molecular phylogenies show the pennates to have evolved from among the centrics. However, the timing of flagellum loss--whether before the evolution of the pennate lineage or after--is unknown, because sexual reproduction has been so little studied in the 'araphid' basal pennate lineages, to which Pseudostaurosira belongs. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Sexual reproduction of an araphid pennate, Pseudostaurosira trainorii, was studied with light microscopy (including time lapse observations and immunofluorescence staining observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy and SEM. We show that the species produces motile male gametes. Motility is mostly associated with the extrusion and retrieval of microtubule-based 'threads', which are structures hitherto unknown in stramenopiles, their number varying from one to three per cell. We also report experimental evidence for sex pheromones that reciprocally stimulate sexualization of compatible clones and orientate motility of the male gametes after an initial 'random walk'. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The threads superficially resemble flagella, in that both are produced by male gametes and contain microtubules. However, one striking difference is that threads cannot beat or undulate and have no motility of their own, and they do not bear mastigonemes. Threads are sticky and catch and draw objects, including eggs. The motility conferred by the threads is probably crucial for sexual reproduction of P. trainorii, because this diatom is non-motile in its vegetative stage but obligately outbreeding. Our pheromone experiments

  7. Pigment signatures of some diatoms isolated from China seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The photosynthetic pigments of 12 species (14 strains) of cultured diatoms from six genera under specific conditions were examined by the HPLC. The diatom genera were Skeletonema, Thalassiosira, Chaetoceros, Nitzschia, Phaeodactylum and Meuniera. All strains were isolated from China seas and most of them were from the Jiaozhou Bay, China. Fifteen pigments were identified and eight of them were various chlorophyll a derivatives. Chlorophyll a, c2 and c1 and the carotenoids fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, diatoxanthin and β,β-carotene existed in all species. The ratios of each pigment to chlorophyll a were compared with the results in literatures. The pigment ratios of this study generally fall within the ranges reported by the literatures although the maximum ratio of fucoxanthin to chlorophyll a was higher and the ratios of chlorophyll c and diatoxanthin to chlorophyll a were low. The pigment ratios are useful to understanding the pigment signatures of diatoms in the Jiaozhou Bay, China, and to setting up the chemotaxonomic method ofphytoplankton in these sea areas.

  8. Models of the delayed nonlinear Raman response in diatomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Pearson, A.

    2011-07-01

    We examine the delayed response of a diatomic gas to a polarizing laser field with the goal of obtaining computationally efficient methods for use with laser pulse propagation simulations. We demonstrate that for broadband pulses, heavy molecules such as O2 and N2, and typical atmospheric temperatures, the initial delayed response requires only classical physics. The linear kinetic Green's function is derived from the Boltzmann equation and shown to be in excellent agreement with full density-matrix calculations. A straightforward perturbation approach for the fully nonlinear, kinetic impulse response is also presented. With the kinetic theory a reduced fluid model of the diatomic gas’ orientation is derived. Transport coefficients are introduced to model the kinetic phase mixing of the delayed response. In addition to computational rapidity, the fluid model provides intuition through the use of familiar macroscopic quantities. Both the kinetic and the fluid descriptions predict a nonlinear steady-state alignment after passage of the laser pulse, which in the fluid model is interpreted as an anisotropic temperature of the diatomic fluid with respect to motion about the polarization axis.

  9. Diatoms in acid mine drainage and their role in the formation of iron-rich stromatolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Adverse conditions in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system at the Green Valley mine, Indiana, limit diatom diversity to one species, Nitzschia tubicola. It is present in three distinct microbial consortia: Euglena mutabilis-dominated biofilm, diatom-dominated biofilm, and diatom-exclusive biofilm. E. mutabilis dominates the most extensive biofilm, with lesser numbers of N. tubicola, other eukaryotes, and bacteria. Diatom-dominated biofilm occurs as isolated patches containing N. tubicola with minor fungal hyphae, filamentous algae, E. mutabilis, and bacteria. Diatom-exclusive biofilm is rare, composed entirely of N. tubicola. Diatom distribution is influenced by seasonal and intraseasonal changes in water temperature and chemistry. Diatoms are absent in winter due to cool water temperatures. In summer, isolated patchy communities are present due to warmer water temperatures. In 2001, the diatom community expanded its distribution following a major rainfall that temporarily diluted the effluent, creating hospitable conditions for diatom growth. After several weeks when effluent returned to preexisting conditions, the diatom biofilm retreated to isolated patches, and E. mutabilis biofilm flourished. Iron-rich stromatolites underlie the biofilms and consist of distinct laminae, recording spatial and temporal oscillations in physicochemical conditions and microbial activity. The stromatolites are composed of thin, wavy laminae with partially decayed E. mutabilis biofilm, representing microbial activity and iron precipitation under normal AMD conditions. Alternating with the wavy layers are thicker, porous, spongelike laminae composed of iron precipitated on and incorporated into radiating colonies of diatoms. These layers indicate episodic changes in water chemistry, allowing diatoms to temporarily dominate the system.

  10. Comparison of diatom records of the Heinrich event 1 in the Western North Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Isabelle M; Abrantes, Fatima G [LNEG-Marine Geology Unit, Estrada da Portela - Alfragide, Apartado 7586 - 2720-866 Amadora (Portugal); Keigwin, Lloyd D, E-mail: igil@whoi.ed [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, McLean 207A, MS08, Woods Hole - Ma. 02543 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Heinrich event 1 (H1) is a climate event resulting from the release into the North Atlantic of a huge volume of sea ice and icebergs from the northern hemisphere ice sheets. We present here high-resolution diatom records from the Bermuda Rise (Sargasso Sea) and the Laurentian Fan (South of Newfoundland) to assess its impacts on North Atlantic surface circulation and its timing. The event is composed of three phases: the two first correspond to major pulses of Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) and the third phase relates to its immediate aftermath. At both sites, diatom abundances start to rise at 16.8 ka. This increase is marked by diatom species thriving in cold environments over the Laurentian Fan, while brackish and fresh water diatom species characterize this increase over the Bermuda Rise. This last record implies icebergs migration to subtropical latitudes and nutrient-rich meltwater to support such diatom productivity. During the second phase of the event, both sites record maximum diatom abundances, when sea ice conditions are dominant over the Laurentian Fan and the contribution of brackish-fresh water diatoms culminates over the Bermuda Rise. The persistence of lower salinity related diatom species over the Bermuda Rise suggests a continuous injection of cold fresh water by cold-core rings, as observed nowadays. The last phase witnesses the persistence of low salinity water over the Laurentian Fan, while a decrease towards the disappearance of diatoms in the sediment occurs over the Bermuda Rise. Regarding the relationship between IRD and diatom abundance, it appears that a critical amount of icebergs is necessary to stimulate diatom productivity. The disturbances induced by H1 appear to end {approx}14.6 ka over the Bermuda Rise, while over the Laurentian Fan, the high diatom production persists until 14.1 ka and the salinity anomaly until 13.8 ka.

  11. Sheldon Spectrum and the Plankton Paradox: Two Sides of the Same Coin. A trait-based plankton size-spectrum model

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A; Law, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Sheldon spectrum describes a remarkable regularity in aquatic ecosystems: the biomass density as a function of logarithmic body mass is approximately constant over many orders of magnitude. While size-spectrum models have explained this phenomenon for assemblages of multicellular organisms, this paper introduces a species-resolved size-spectrum model to explain the phenomenon in unicellular plankton. A Sheldon spectrum spanning the cell-size range of unicellular plankton necessarily consists of a large number of coexisting species covering a wide range of characteristic sizes. The coexistence of many phytoplankton species feeding on a small number of resources is known as the Paradox of the Plankton. Our model resolves the paradox by showing that coexistence is facilitated by the allometric scaling of four physiological rates. Two of the allometries have empirical support, the remaining two emerge from predator-prey interactions exactly when the abundances follow a Sheldon spectrum. Our plankton model is ...

  12. Complex dynamics in diatomic molecules. Part II: Quantum trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.-D. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cdyang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Weng, H.-J. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: principlex@yahoo.com.tw

    2008-10-15

    The second part of this paper deals with quantum trajectories in diatomic molecules, which has not been considered before in the literature. Morse potential serves as a more accurate function than a simple harmonic oscillator for illustrating a realistic picture about the vibration of diatomic molecules. However, if we determine molecular dynamics by integrating the classical force equations derived from a Morse potential, we will find that the resulting trajectories do not consist with the probabilistic prediction of quantum mechanics. On the other hand, the quantum trajectory determined by Bohmian mechanics [Bohm D. A suggested interpretation of the quantum theory in terms of hidden variable. Phys. Rev. 1952;85:166-179] leads to the conclusion that a diatomic molecule is motionless in all its vibrational eigen-states, which also contradicts probabilistic prediction of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we point out that the quantum trajectory of a diatomic molecule completely consistent with quantum mechanics does exist and can be solved from the quantum Hamilton equations of motion derived in Part I, which is based on a complex-space formulation of fractal spacetime [El Naschie MS. A review of E-Infinity theory and the mass spectrum of high energy particle physics. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2004;19:209-36; El Naschie MS. E-Infinity theory - some recent results and new interpretations. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2006;29:845-853; El Naschie MS. The concepts of E-infinity. An elementary introduction to the cantorian-fractal theory of quantum physics. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2004;22:495-511; El Naschie MS. SU(5) grand unification in a transfinite form. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2007;32:370-374; Nottale L. Fractal space-time and microphysics: towards a theory of scale relativity. Singapore: World Scientific; 1993; Ord G. Fractal space time and the statistical mechanics of random works. Chaos, Soiltons and Fractals 1996;7:821-843] approach to quantum

  13. Temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism: an experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Arrieta, J. M.; Coello, A.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2011-11-01

    Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested experimentally the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest a temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  14. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  15. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×1028 cells—approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  16. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2017-01-03

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×10(28) cells-approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  17. Environmental selection of planktonic methanogens in permafrost thaw ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevecoeur, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-08-01

    The warming and thermal erosion of ice-containing permafrost results in thaw ponds that are strong emitters of methane to the atmosphere. Here we examined methanogens and other Archaea, in two types of thaw ponds that are formed by the collapse of either permafrost peat mounds (palsas) or mineral soil mounds (lithalsas) in subarctic Quebec, Canada. Using high-throughput sequencing of a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA, we determined the taxonomic structure and diversity of archaeal communities in near-bottom water samples, and analyzed the mcrA gene transcripts from two sites. The ponds at all sites were well stratified, with hypoxic or anoxic bottom waters. Their archaeal communities were dominated by Euryarchaeota, specifically taxa in the methanogenic orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales, indicating a potentially active community of planktonic methanogens. The order Methanomicrobiales accounted for most of the mcrA transcripts in the two ponds. The Archaeal communities differed significantly between the lithalsa and palsa ponds, with higher alpha diversity in the organic-rich palsa ponds, and pronounced differences in community structure. These results indicate the widespread occurrence of planktonic, methane-producing Archaea in thaw ponds, with environmental selection of taxa according to permafrost landscape type.

  18. Quasi-planktonic behavior of foraging top marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, Alice; De Monte, Silvia; Kestenare, Elodie; Guinet, Christophe; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    Monitoring marine top predators is fundamental for assessing the health and functioning of open ocean ecosystems. Although recently tracking observations have substantially increased, factors determining the horizontal exploration of the ocean by marine predators are still largely unknown, especially at the scale of behavioral switches (1-100 km, days-weeks). It is commonly assumed that the influence of water movement can be neglected for animals capable of swimming faster than the current. Here, we challenge this assumption by combining the use of biologging (GPS and accelerometry), satellite altimetry and in-situ oceanographic data (ADCP and drifting buoys) to investigate the effect of the mesoscale ocean dynamics on a marine predator, the southern elephant seal. A Lagrangian approach reveals that trajectories of elephant seals are characterized by quasi-planktonic bouts where the animals are horizontally drifting. These bouts correspond to periods of increased foraging effort, indicating that in the quasi-planktonic conditions energy is allocated to diving and chasing, rather than in horizontal search of favourable grounds. These results suggest that mesoscale features like eddies and fronts may act as a focal points for trophic interactions not only by bottom-up modulation of nutrient injection, but also by directly entraining horizontal displacements of the upper trophic levels.

  19. Salinity controls on Na incorporation in Red Sea planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezger, E. M.; Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Brummer, G. J. A.; Reichart, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas several well-established proxies are available for reconstructing past temperatures, salinity remains challenging to assess. Reconstructions based on the combination of (in)organic temperature proxies and foraminiferal stable oxygen isotopes result in relatively large uncertainties, which may be reduced by application of a direct salinity proxy. Cultured benthic and planktonic foraminifera showed that Na incorporation in foraminiferal shell calcite provides a potential independent proxy for salinity. Here we present the first field calibration of such a potential proxy. Living planktonic foraminiferal specimens from the Red Sea surface waters were collected and analyzed for their Na/Ca content using laser ablation quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using the Red Sea as a natural laboratory, the calibration covers a broad range of salinities over a steep gradient within the same water mass. For both Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinoides sacculifer calcite Na/Ca increases with salinity, albeit with a relatively large intraspecimen and interspecimen variability. The field-based calibration is similar for both species from a salinity of 36.8 up to 39.6, while values for G. sacculifer deviate from this trend in the northernmost transect. It is hypothesized that the foraminifera in the northernmost part of the Red Sea are (partly) expatriated and hence should be excluded from the Na/Ca-salinity calibration. Incorporation of Na in foraminiferal calcite therefore provides a potential proxy for salinity, although species-specific calibrations are still required and more research on the effect of temperature is needed.

  20. Analysis and modeling of scale-invariance in plankton abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, J D

    1996-01-01

    The power spectrum, $S$, of horizontal transects of plankton abundance are often observed to have a power-law dependence on wavenumber, $k$, with exponent close to $-2$: $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ over a wide range of scales. I present power spectral analyses of aircraft lidar measurements of phytoplankton abundance from scales of 1 to 100 km. A power spectrum $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ is obtained. As a model for this observation, I consider a stochastic growth equation where the rate of change of plankton abundance is determined by turbulent mixing, modeled as a diffusion process in two dimensions, and exponential growth with a stochastically variable net growth rate representing a fluctuating environment. The model predicts a lognormal distribution of abundance and a power spectrum of horizontal transects $S(k)\\propto k^{-1.8}$, close to the observed spectrum. The model equation predicts that the power spectrum of variations in abundance in time at a point in space is $S(f)\\propto f^{-1.5}$ (where $f$ is the frequency...

  1. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissel J Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival dental plaque, as part of a mature biofilm, has been strongly implicated in the onset and progression of chronic periodontitis. In this study using DNA microarray we compared the global gene expression of a P. gingivalis biofilm with that of its planktonic counterpart grown in the same continuous culture. Results Approximately 18% (377 genes, at 1.5 fold or more, P-value P. gingivalis genome was differentially expressed when the bacterium was grown as a biofilm. Genes that were down-regulated in biofilm cells, relative to planktonic cells, included those involved in cell envelope biogenesis, DNA replication, energy production and biosynthesis of cofactors, prosthetic groups and carriers. A number of genes encoding transport and binding proteins were up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilm cells. Several genes predicted to encode proteins involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation were differentially regulated and may be important in the regulation of biofilm growth. Conclusion This study analyzing global gene expression provides insight into the adaptive response of P. gingivalis to biofilm growth, in particular showing a down regulation of genes involved in growth and metabolic activity.

  2. Temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism: an experimental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holding

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested experimentally the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest a temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  3. First planktonic foraminifera from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) of the Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, J.; Vergara, L.; Stock, H. W.

    1992-10-01

    Albian planktonic foraminifera have been found in the Caballos and "Villeta" formations at two localities in the Upper Magdalena Valley. This is the first documented record of Early Cretaceous planktonic foraminifera in Colombia. Hedbergellids and heterohelicids predominate; keeled forms are absent. The sedimentologic features and the associated microfauna indicate the onset of restricted environments from the middle Albian on.

  4. Distribution of planktonic foraminifera in waters of the submarine coral banks in southeast Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Balasubramanian, T.

    Twentyfive species of planktonic foraminifera are recorded from 36 plankton tows collected from waters of the submerged coral banks- Bassas de Pedro, Sesostris and Cora Divh-located at northern end of the Laccadive group of islands in southeastern...

  5. Patterns of diatom treatment in two coexisting species of filter-feeding freshwater gastropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnikova T.Ya.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess trophic partitioning among sympatric gastropod species in ancient lakes, we quantified diatoms in the guts of two coexistent Baikal gastropod species and tested for differences in species, size, and fracturing of large and small diatoms by taenioglossan radulae. In May 2010, the diatom Synedra acus dominated the littoral phytoplankton and gut contents of Baicalia turriformis and Teratobaikalia ciliata (Baicaliidae, both inhabiting the rocky Baikal littoral. In laboratory experiments, both ctenidial filter-feeding gastropods were fed with two diets of cultivated Synedra acus of different cell sizes: >150 μm and <100 μm. Field and laboratory studies revealed intact diatom cells (often with green chromatophores and fragmented frustules of diatoms <60 μm in the guts of both species. The two baicaliids varied in the number of ingested microalgae. In addition, they exhibited significantly different efficiencies for breaking large diatoms; B. turriformis broke large diatoms into more fragments than T. ciliata. The differences in the utilization of large and small diatoms by gastropods are discussed in terms of the relationships among coexisting species. Small diatom survival is considered from the view of interactions between producers and their consumers in the freshwater food web.

  6. How-to-Do-It: Diatoms: The Ignored Alga in High School Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Provides historical background, descriptions, uses and basis for identification of diatoms. Explains collection, dry-mount cleaning, and preparation procedures of the algae. Cites additional resources. (RT)

  7. How-to-Do-It: Diatoms: The Ignored Alga in High School Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Provides historical background, descriptions, uses and basis for identification of diatoms. Explains collection, dry-mount cleaning, and preparation procedures of the algae. Cites additional resources. (RT)

  8. Bioengineered Silicon Diatoms: Adding Photonic Features to a Nanostructured Semiconductive Material for Biomolecular Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Ilaria; Terracciano, Monica; Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Dardano, Principia; Martucci, Nicola M.; Lamberti, Annalisa; De Stefano, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Native diatoms made of amorphous silica are first converted into silicon structures via magnesiothermic process, preserving the original shape: electron force microscopy analysis performed on silicon-converted diatoms demonstrates their semiconductor behavior. Wet surface chemical treatments are then performed in order to enhance the photoluminescence emission from the resulting silicon diatoms and, at the same time, to allow the immobilization of biological probes, namely proteins and antibodies, via silanization. We demonstrate that light emission from semiconductive silicon diatoms can be used for antibody-antigen recognition, endorsing this material as optoelectronic transducer.

  9. Remodeling of intermediate metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orly Levitan; Jorge Dinamarca; Ehud Zelzion; Desmond S. Lun; L. Tiago Guerra; Min Kyung Kim; Joomi Kim; Benjamin A. S. Van Mooy; Debashish Bhattacharya; Paul G. Falkowski

    2015-01-01

    .... Using biochemical, physiological, bioinformatics, and reverse genetic approaches, we analyzed how the flux of carbon into lipids is influenced by nitrogen stress in a model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum...

  10. Grazing-induced changes in cell wall silicification in a marine diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondaven, Philippe; Gallinari, Morgane; Chollet, Sophie; Bucciarelli, Eva; Sarthou, Géraldine; Schultes, Sabine; Jean, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    In aquatic environments, diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) constitute a central group of microalgae which contribute to about 40% of the oceanic primary production. Diatoms have an absolute requirement for silicon to build-up their silicified cell wall in the form of two shells (the frustule). To date, changes in diatom cell wall silicification have been only studied in response to changes in the growth environment, with consistent increase in diatom silica content when specific growth rates decrease under nutrient or light limitations. Here, we report the first evidence for grazing-induced changes in cell wall silicification in a marine diatom. Cells grown in preconditioned media that had contained both diatoms and herbivores are significantly more silicified than diatoms grown in media that have contained diatoms alone or starved herbivores. These observations suggest that grazing-induced increase in cell wall silicification can be viewed as an adaptive reaction in habitats with variable grazing pressure, and demonstrate that silicification in diatoms is not only a constitutive mechanical protection for the cell, but also a phenotypically plastic trait modulated by grazing. In turn, our results corroborate the idea that plant-herbivore interactions, beyond grazing sensu stricto, contribute to drive ecosystem structure and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean.

  11. Temporal biomass dynamics of an Arctic plankton bloom in response to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification and carbonation, driven by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, have been shown to affect a variety of marine organisms and are likely to change ecosystem functioning. High latitudes, especially the Arctic, will be the first to encounter profound changes in carbonate chemistry speciation at a large scale, namely the under-saturation of surface waters with respect to aragonite, a calcium carbonate polymorph produced by several organisms in this region. During a CO2 perturbation study in 2010, in the framework of the EU-funded project EPOCA, the temporal dynamics of a plankton bloom was followed in nine mesocosms, manipulated for CO2 levels ranging initially from about 185 to 1420 μatm. Dissolved inorganic nutrients were added halfway through the experiment. Autotrophic biomass, as identified by chlorophyll a standing stocks (Chl a, peaked three times in all mesocosms. However, while absolute Chl a concentrations were similar in all mesocosms during the first phase of the experiment, higher autotrophic biomass was measured at high in comparison to low CO2 during the second phase, right after dissolved inorganic nutrient addition. This trend then reversed in the third phase. There were several statistically significant CO2 effects on a variety of parameters measured in certain phases, such as nutrient utilization, standing stocks of particulate organic matter, and phytoplankton species composition. Interestingly, CO2 effects developed slowly but steadily, becoming more and more statistically significant with time. The observed CO2 related shifts in nutrient flow into different phytoplankton groups (mainly diatoms, dinoflagellates, prasinophytes and haptophytes could have consequences for future organic matter flow to higher trophic levels and export production, with consequences for ecosystem productivity and atmospheric

  12. Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

    In addition to the several extreme environments on Earth, Space can be considered as just another exceptional environment with a unique mixture of stress factors comprising UV radiation, vacuum, desiccation, temperature, ionizing radiation and microgravity. Life that processes in these environments can depend on the life forms and their state of living. The question is whether there are different strategies for individual microorganisms compared to communities of the same organisms to cope with the different factors of their surroundings. Comparative studies of the survi-val of these communities called biofilms and planktonic cell samples of Deinococcus geothermalis stand at the focal point of the presented investigations. A biofilm is a structured community of microorganisms that live encapsulated in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances on a surface. Microorganisms living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties to cooperate than individually living microorganisms of the same species. An advantage of the biofilm is increased resistance to various chemical and physical effects, while the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of the cells protect the interior of the microbial consortium. The space experiment BOSS (Biofilm organisms surfing Space) as part the ESA experimental unit EXPOSE R-2 with a planned launch date in July 2014 will be subsequently mounted on the Russian Svesda module outside the ISS. An international team of scientists coordinated by Dr. P. Rettberg will investigate the hypothesis whether microorganisms organized as biofilm outmatch the same microorganisms exposed individually in the long-term survival of the harsh environmental conditions as they occur in space and on Mars. Another protective function in the samples could be dust par-ticles for instance Mars regolith simulant contained inside the biofilms or mixed with the planktonic cells, as additional shelter especially against the extraterrestrial UV

  13. Dispersed cells represent a distinct stage in the transition from bacterial biofilm to planktonic lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria assume distinct lifestyles during the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Increased levels of the intracellular messenger c-di-GMP determine the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth, while a reduction causes biofilm dispersal. It is generally assumed that cells dispersed from...... biofilms immediately go into the planktonic growth phase. Here we use single-nucleotide resolution transcriptomic analysis to show that the physiology of dispersed cells from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is highly different from those of planktonic and biofilm cells. In dispersed cells, the expression...... of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY and RsmZ is downregulated, whereas secretion genes are induced. Dispersed cells are highly virulent against macrophages and Caenorhabditis elegans compared with planktonic cells. In addition, they are highly sensitive towards iron stress, and the combination of a biofilm...

  14. Comparative metagenomics of bathypelagic plankton and bottom sediment from the Sea of Marmara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaiser, Achim; Zivanovic, Yvan; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2011-02-01

    To extend comparative metagenomic analyses of the deep-sea, we produced metagenomic data by direct 454 pyrosequencing from bathypelagic plankton (1000  m depth) and bottom sediment of the Sea of Marmara, the gateway between the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Seas. Data from small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene libraries and direct pyrosequencing of the same samples indicated that Gamma- and Alpha-proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, dominated the bacterial fraction in Marmara deep-sea plankton, whereas Planctomycetes, Delta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the most abundant groups in high bacterial-diversity sediment. Group I Crenarchaeota/Thaumarchaeota dominated the archaeal plankton fraction, although group II and III Euryarchaeota were also present. Eukaryotes were highly diverse in SSU rRNA gene libraries, with group I (Duboscquellida) and II (Syndiniales) alveolates and Radiozoa dominating plankton, and Opisthokonta and Alveolates, sediment. However, eukaryotic sequences were scarce in pyrosequence data. Archaeal amo genes were abundant in plankton, suggesting that Marmara planktonic Thaumarchaeota are ammonia oxidizers. Genes involved in sulfate reduction, carbon monoxide oxidation, anammox and sulfatases were over-represented in sediment. Genome recruitment analyses showed that Alteromonas macleodii 'surface ecotype', Pelagibacter ubique and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were highly represented in 1000  m-deep plankton. A comparative analysis of Marmara metagenomes with ALOHA deep-sea and surface plankton, whale carcasses, Peru subsurface sediment and soil metagenomes clustered deep-sea Marmara plankton with deep-ALOHA plankton and whale carcasses, likely because of the suboxic conditions in the deep Marmara water column. The Marmara sediment clustered with the soil metagenome, highlighting the common ecological role of both types of microbial communities in the degradation of organic matter and the completion of biogeochemical cycles.

  15. The effect of carbon subsidies on marine planktonic niche partitioning and recruitment during biofilm assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed eHall

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of resource availability on planktonic and biofilm microbial community membership is poorly understood. Heterotrophic bacteria derive some to all of their organic carbon (C from photoautotrophs while simultaneously competing with photoautotrophs for inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus (P or nitrogen (N. Therefore, C inputs have the potential to shift the competitive balance of aquatic microbial communities by increasing the resource space available to heterotrophs (more C while decreasing the resource space available to photoautotrophs (less mineral nutrients due to increased competition from heterotrophs. To test how resource dynamics affect membership of planktonic communities and assembly of biofilm communities we amended a series of flow-through mesocosms with C to alter the availability of C among treatments. Each mesocosm was fed with unfiltered seawater and incubated with sterilized microscope slides as surfaces for biofilm formation. The highest C treatment had the highest planktonic heterotroph abundance, lowest planktonic photoautotroph abundance, and highest biofilm biomass. We surveyed bacterial 16S rRNA genes and plastid 23S rRNA genes to characterize biofilm and planktonic community membership andstructure. Regardless of resource additions, biofilm communities had higher alpha diversity than planktonic communities in all mesocosms. Heterotrophic plankton communities were distinct from heterotrophic biofilm communities in all but the highest C treatment where heterotrophic plankton and biofilm communities resembled each other after 17 days. Unlike the heterotrophs, photoautotrophic plankton communities were different than photoautotrophic biofilm communities in composition in all treatments including the highest C treatment. Our results suggest that although resource amendments affect community membership and structure, microbial lifestyle (biofilm versus planktonic has a stronger influence on community composition.

  16. Plankton in Monterey Bay: Optimization of optical sensor data from autonomous underwater vehicles with applications in plankton community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Diane E.

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with oceanographic sensors demonstrate the capability to describe plankton communities in the marine environment. The vehicles collect data from the surface through the mixed layer for a variety of oceanographic parameters. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute operates the Dorado upper-water-column AUV. The Dorado AUV collects data for 32 size-classes, from 1.25 to 250 mum, using a laser in-situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST-100X) instrument. The objective of this study is to analyze data from AUVs and laboratory work to inform sampling methods with applications in targeting specific classes of plankton, particularly harmful algal bloom species. The results of this study show that specific combinations of LISST-100X size class channels can be combined to reconstruct fluorescence data. This project includes laboratory tests with monocultures of phytoplankton on both a backscattering sensor that detects chlorophyll at 695 nm and on the forward scattering LISST-100X sensor. The results show a linear relationship between backscattered chlorophyll concentration and cell density for four monocultures of phytoplankton. The forward scattering lab experiments show distinct organism signatures for three genera of phytoplankton tested as monocultures.

  17. Diatom-inferred hydrological changes and Holocene geomorphic transitioning of Africa's largest estuarine system, Lake St Lucia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M.; Humphries, M. S.; Kirsten, K. L.; Green, A. N.; Finch, J. M.; de Lecea, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    The diverse lagoons and coastal lakes along the east coast of South Africa occupy incised valleys that were flooded during the rise and subsequent stabilisation of relative sea-level during the Holocene. Sedimentary deposits contained within these waterbodies provide an opportunity to investigate complex hydrological and sedimentological processes, and examine sea-level controls governing system geomorphic evolution. In this paper, we combine diatom and sulfur isotope analyses from two sediment cores extracted from the northern sub-basins of Lake St Lucia, a large shallow estuarine lake that is today largely isolated from direct ocean influence behind a Holocene-Pleistocene barrier complex. Analyses allow the reconstruction of hydrological changes associated with the geomorphic development of the system over the mid-to late Holocene. The sedimentary sequences indicate that St Lucia was a shallow, partially enclosed estuary/embayment dominated by strong tidal flows prior to ∼6200 cal. BP. Infilling was initiated when sea-level rise slowed and stabilised around present day levels, resulting in the accumulation of fine-grained sediment behind an emergent proto-barrier. Diatom assemblages, dominated by marine benthic and epiphytic species, reveal a system structured by marine water influx and characterised by marsh and tidal flat habitats until ∼4550 cal. BP. A shift in the biological community at ∼4550 cal. BP is linked to the development of a back-barrier water body that supported a brackish community. Marine planktonics and enrichments in δ34S suggest recurrent, large-scale barrier inundation events during this time, coincident with a mid-Holocene sea-level highstand. Periodic marine incursions associated with episodes of enhanced storminess and overwash remained prevalent until ∼1200 cal. BP, when further barrier construction ultimately isolated the northern basins from the ocean. This study provides the first reconstruction of the palaeohydrological

  18. All New Faces of Diatoms: Potential Source of Nanomaterials and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerambika Mishra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nature’s silicon marvel, the diatoms have lately astounded the scientific community with its intricate designs and lasting durability. Diatoms are a major group of phytoplanktons involved in the biogeochemical cycling of silica and are virtually inherent in every environment ranging from water to ice to soil. The usage of diatoms has proved prudently cost effective and its handling neither requires costly materials nor sophisticated instruments. Diatoms can easily be acquired from the environment, their culture requires ambient condition and does not involve any costly media or expensive instruments, besides, they can be transported in small quantities and proliferated to a desirable confluence from that scratch, thus are excellent cost effective industrial raw material. Naturally occurring diatom frustules are a source of nanomaterials. Their silica bio-shells have raised curiosity among nanotechnologists who hope that diatoms will facilitate tailoring minuscule structures which are beyond the capabilities of material scientists. Additionally, there is a colossal diversity in the dimensions of diatoms as the frustule shape differs from species to species; this provides a scope for the choice of a particular species of diatom to be tailored to an exacting requisite, thus paving the way to create desired three dimensional nanocomposites. The present article explores the use of diatoms in various arenas of science, may it be in nanotechnology, biotechnology, environmental science, biophysics or biochemistry and summarizes facets of diatom biology under one umbrella. Special emphasis has been given to biosilicification, biomineralization and use of diatoms as nanomaterials’, drug delivery vehicles, optical and immune-biosensors, filters, immunodiagnostics, aquaculture feeds, lab-on-a-chip, metabolites, and biofuels.

  19. Impacts of combined overfishing and oil spills on the plankton trophodynamics of the West Florida shelf over the last half century of 1965-2011: A two-dimensional simulation analysis of biotic state transitions, from a zooplankton- to a bacterioplankton-modulated ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. J.; Lenes, J. M.; Darrow, B.; Parks, A.; Weisberg, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    Over 50 years of multiple anthropogenic perturbations, Florida zooplankton stocks of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico declined ten-fold, with increments of mainly dominant toxic dinoflagellate harmful algal blooms (HABs), rather than diatoms, and a shift in loci of nutrient remineralization and oxygen depletion by bacterioplankton, from the sea floor to near surface waters. Yet, lytic bacterial biomass and associated ammonification only increased at most five-fold over the same time period, with consequently little indication of new, expanded "dead zones" of diatom-induced hypoxia. After bacterial lysis of intact cells of these increased HABs, the remaining residues of zooplankton biomass decrements evidently instead exited the water column as malign aerosolized HAB asthma triggers, correlated by co-traveling mercury aerosols, within wind-borne sea sprays. To unravel the causal mechanisms of these inferred decadal food web transitions, a 36-state variable plankton model of algal, bacterial, protozoan, and copepod component communities replicated daily time series of each plankton group's representatives on the West Florida shelf (WFS) during 1965-2011. At the lower phytoplankton trophic levels, 52% of the ungrazed HAB increments, between 1965-1967 and 2001-2002 before recent oil spills, remained in the water column to kill fishes and fuel bacterioplankton. But, another 48% of the WFS primary production then left the ocean's surface as a harbinger of increased public health hazards during continuing sea spray exports of salts, HAB toxins, and Hg poisons. Following the Deepwater Horizon petroleum releases in 2010, little additional change of element partition among the altered importance of WFS food web components of the trophic pyramid then pertained between 2001-2002 and 2010-2011, despite when anomalous upwelled nutrient supplies instead favored retrograde benign, oil-tolerant diatoms over the HABs during 2010. Indeed, by 2011 HABs were back, with biomass

  20. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  1. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  2. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  3. Magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, J. F.; McCarron, D. J.; Norrgard, E. B.; Steinecker, M. H.; Demille, D.

    2014-08-01

    Laser cooling and trapping are central to modern atomic physics. The most used technique in cold-atom physics is the magneto-optical trap (MOT), which combines laser cooling with a restoring force from radiation pressure. For a variety of atomic species, MOTs can capture and cool large numbers of particles to ultracold temperatures (less than ~1 millikelvin) this has enabled advances in areas that range from optical clocks to the study of ultracold collisions, while also serving as the ubiquitous starting point for further cooling into the regime of quantum degeneracy. Magneto-optical trapping of molecules could provide a similarly powerful starting point for the study and manipulation of ultracold molecular gases. The additional degrees of freedom associated with the vibration and rotation of molecules, particularly their permanent electric dipole moments, allow a broad array of applications not possible with ultracold atoms. Spurred by these ideas, a variety of methods has been developed to create ultracold molecules. Temperatures below 1 microkelvin have been demonstrated for diatomic molecules assembled from pre-cooled alkali atoms, but for the wider range of species amenable to direct cooling and trapping, only recently have temperatures below 100 millikelvin been achieved. The complex internal structure of molecules complicates magneto-optical trapping. However, ideas and methods necessary for creating a molecular MOT have been developed recently. Here we demonstrate three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF), at a temperature of approximately 2.5 millikelvin, the lowest yet achieved by direct cooling of a molecule. This method is a straightforward extension of atomic techniques and is expected to be viable for a significant number of diatomic species. With further development, we anticipate that this technique may be employed in any number of existing and proposed molecular experiments, in applications

  4. Dehydroxylation and diagenetic variations in diatom oxygen isotope values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Justin P.; Wiedenheft, Wilson; Schwartz, Joshua M.

    2017-02-01

    Numerous studies have documented changes in the dissolution and reactivity of biogenic silica as it is transferred from the water column to sediment archives; here we present the first experimental data that demonstrate a physical mechanism by which the oxygen isotope (δ18Osil) values of biogenic silica (diatoms) are altered during early diagenesis. The δ18Osil value of diatom silica cultured at 19.3 °C was +31.9‰ ± 0.2‰ (n = 6); the same silica experimentally aged in an artificial seawater media at near silica saturation at 85 °C had an average δ18Osil value of +27.1‰ ± 0.6‰ (n = 20). The most significant change in the δ18Osil value was coincident with an initial reduction in the total silanol abundance, indicating that the timing of dehydroxylation reactions in natural sedimentary environments is associated with diagenetic changes in the recorded δ18Osil values. The rate of change in the experimental aging environment at 85 °C was rapid, with significant changes in both silanol abundance and δ18Osil values. Additionally, the silica-water fractionation relationship recorded by the experimentally-aged samples approaches the equilibrium quartz-water fractionation factor. The linear rate law was used to estimate the timing of these changes in low temperature environments; the initial and most significant change in silica reactivity and δ18Osil values is likely to occur on the order of 10's of years at 4 °C. Published silica-water fractionation factors for sedimentary diatoms most likely represent a combination of growth and diagenetic environments, and the δ18O value of diagenetic water needs to be addressed when using δ18Osil values to reconstruct paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental conditions.

  5. Carnivorous planktonic Difflugia (Protista, Amoebina Testacea) and their predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bo-Ping; Wang, Tian; Xu, Lei; Lin, Qiu Qi; Jinyu, Zhang; Dumont, Henri J

    2011-08-01

    Four planktonic species of Difflugia co-occurring in a south Chinese reservoir were found to be carnivorous, but the diet was widest in the largest species (D. tuberspinifera) and narrowest in the smallest (D. hydrostatica). It included rotifers, ciliates, dinoflagellates, floating eggs, and small particles associated with organic debris. Scavenging and cannibalism were also observed. Species with a collared test (D. biwae, D. mulanensis) showed a form of suction-feeding, while species with teeth on the pseudostome used these, together with their pseudopods, as "inverted crown corks", providing leverage for opening the lorica of their (rotifer) prey. Predators of Difflugia included cyclopoid copepods. In addition, the rotifers Asplanchna priodonta, Ploesoma hudsoni and, occasionally, big ciliates (Stentor sp.) all ingested their prey as a whole. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Ingestion and transfer of microplastics in the planktonic food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setälä, Outi; Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi; Lehtiniemi, Maiju

    2014-02-01

    Experiments were carried out with different Baltic Sea zooplankton taxa to scan their potential to ingest plastics. Mysid shrimps, copepods, cladocerans, rotifers, polychaete larvae and ciliates were exposed to 10 μm fluorescent polystyrene microspheres. These experiments showed ingestion of microspheres in all taxa studied. The highest percentage of individuals with ingested spheres was found in pelagic polychaete larvae, Marenzelleria spp. Experiments with the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the mysid shrimp Neomysis integer showed egestion of microspheres within 12 h. Food web transfer experiments were done by offering zooplankton labelled with ingested microspheres to mysid shrimps. Microscopy observations of mysid intestine showed the presence of zooplankton prey and microspheres after 3 h incubation. This study shows for the first time the potential of plastic microparticle transfer via planktonic organisms from one trophic level (mesozooplankton) to a higher level (macrozooplankton). The impacts of plastic transfer and possible accumulation in the food web need further investigations.

  7. Photosynthetic planulae and planktonic hydroids: contrasting strategies of propagule survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Pagliara

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Settlement delays can be important to prevent propagule waste when proper settling substrates are not immediately available. Under laboratory conditions, the planulae of Clytia viridicans underwent two alternative developmental patterns. Some settled on the bottom, forming a hydranth-gonotheca complex that produced up to four medusae and later either degenerated or gave rise to a hydroid colony. Other planulae settled right below the air-water interface, forming floating colonies that eventually fell to the bottom and settled. Halecium nanum released planulae with a rich population of symbiotic zooxanthellae that survived into a rearing jar for three months. After a long period of apparent quiescence (possibly fuelled by photosynthetic activities of zooxanthellae the planulae produced new colonies. Both photosynthetic planulae and settlement at the interface air-water allow a delay in the passage from a planktonic to a fully functional benthic life.

  8. Mathematical analysis of a nutrient-plankton system with delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehim, Mehbuba; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Muhammadhaji, Ahmadjan

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the interaction of nutrient-plankton is investigated in this paper. In order to account for the time needed by the phytoplankton to mature after which they can release toxins, a discrete time delay is incorporated into the system. Moreover, it is also taken into account discrete time delays which indicates the partially recycled nutrient decomposed by bacteria after the death of biomass. In the first part of our analysis the sufficient conditions ensuring local and global asymptotic stability of the model are obtained. Next, the existence of the Hopf bifurcation as time delay crosses a threshold value is established and, meanwhile, the phenomenon of stability switches is found under certain conditions. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  9. Scaling of fecundity, growth and development in marine planktonic copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Sabatini, M.

    1995-01-01

    We compiled information from the literature on female and egg sizes and maximum egg production, growth and developmental rates in marine planktonic copepods. While specific growth and developmental rates are invariant with body mass, weight- specific fecundity scales with female body mass(-0.......26) in both broadcast-spawning and egg-carrying copepods. Egg sizes increase with female size and, consequently, egg production rates (no. of eggs female(-1) d(-1)) are constant with size. Developmental rates were similar among egg-carrying and broadcast-spawning copepods, but the latter grow faster by 30...... to 50% and have weight-specific fecundities that are 2.5 times and egg production rates that are 7.5 times those of the former, Nauplii develop faster (by a factor of 2) but grow slower (by 20 to 40%) than copepodites in both spawning types. The main demographic implications of these findings are (1...

  10. Metabolic profiles of planktonic and biofilm cells of Candida orthopsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Regina Helena; Cataldi, Thaís Regiani; Franceschini, Livia Maria; Labate, Mônica Veneziano; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Palma, Mario Sérgio; Soares Mendes-Giannini, Maria José

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to understand which Candida orthopsilosis protein aids fungus adaptation upon its switching from planktonic growth to biofilm. Ion mobility separation within mass spectrometry analysis combination were used. Proteins mapped for different biosynthetic pathways showed that selective ribosome autophagy might occur in biofilms. Glucose, used as a carbon source in the glycolytic flux, changed to glycogen and trehalose. Candida orthopsilosis expresses proteins that combine a variety of mechanisms to provide yeasts with the means to adjust the catalytic properties of enzymes. Adjustment of the enzymes helps modulate the biosynthesis/degradation rates of the available nutrients, in order to control and coordinate the metabolic pathways that enable cells to express an adequate response to nutrient availability.

  11. Magnetic light cloaking control in the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Ohtsuka, S.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the light cloaking behavior of the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina under a magnetic field. Optical interferences in the multi-laminated guanine crystal layer beneath the dorsal body surface create a brilliant structural color, which can be almost entirely removed by changing the light reflection. In the investigation, we immersed segments of Sapphirina in seawater contained in an optical chamber. When the derived Sapphirina segments were attached to the container surface, they were inert to magnetic fields up to 300 mT. However, when the back plate segments were attached to the substrate at a point, with most of the plate floating in the seawater, the plate rotated oppositely to the applied magnetic field. In addition, the brilliant parts of the Sapphirina back plate rotated backward and forward by changing the magnetic field directions. Our experiment suggests a new model of an optical micro-electro-mechanical system that is controllable by magnetic fields.

  12. The Lagrangian Ensemble metamodel for simulating plankton ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. D.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a detailed account of the Lagrangian Ensemble (LE) metamodel for simulating plankton ecosystems. It uses agent-based modelling to describe the life histories of many thousands of individual plankters. The demography of each plankton population is computed from those life histories. So too is bio-optical and biochemical feedback to the environment. The resulting “virtual ecosystem” is a comprehensive simulation of the plankton ecosystem. It is based on phenotypic equations for individual micro-organisms. LE modelling differs significantly from population-based modelling. The latter uses prognostic equations to compute demography and biofeedback directly. LE modelling diagnoses them from the properties of individual micro-organisms, whose behaviour is computed from prognostic equations. That indirect approach permits the ecosystem to adjust gracefully to changes in exogenous forcing. The paper starts with theory: it defines the Lagrangian Ensemble metamodel and explains how LE code performs a number of computations “behind the curtain”. They include budgeting chemicals, and deriving biofeedback and demography from individuals. The next section describes the practice of LE modelling. It starts with designing a model that complies with the LE metamodel. Then it describes the scenario for exogenous properties that provide the computation with initial and boundary conditions. These procedures differ significantly from those used in population-based modelling. The next section shows how LE modelling is used in research, teaching and planning. The practice depends largely on hindcasting to overcome the limits to predictability of weather forecasting. The scientific method explains observable ecosystem phenomena in terms of finer-grained processes that cannot be observed, but which are controlled by the basic laws of physics, chemistry and biology. What-If? Prediction ( WIP), used for planning, extends hindcasting by adding events that describe

  13. A non-diatom plankton bloom controlled by copepod grazing and amphipod predation: Preliminary results from the LOHAFEX iron-fertilisation experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazzocchi, M.G.; Gonzalez, H.E.; Vandromme, P.; Borrione, I.; deAlcala, M.R.; Gauns, M.; Assmy, P.; Fuchs, B.; Klaas, C.; Martin, P.; Montresor, M.; Ramaiah, N.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    The most memorable LOHAFEX cruise came to an end on 17 March 2009 when RV Polarstern docked in the harbour of Punta Arenas (southern Chile) after successfully carrying out the longest iron fertilisation experiment so far (39 days). The two and a...

  14. Dissociation curves of diatomic molecules: A DC-DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Eunji; Kim, Min-Cheol [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nano-Bio Molecular Assemblies, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Burke, Kieron [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA, 92697 (United States)

    2015-12-31

    We investigate dissociation of diatomic molecules using standard density functional theory (DFT) and density-corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT) compared with CCSD(T) results as reference. The results show the difference between the HOMO values of dissociated atomic species often can be used as an indicator whether DFT would predict the correct dissociation limit. DFT predicts incorrect dissociation limits and charge distribution in molecules or molecular ions when the fragments have large HOMO differences, while DC-DFT and CCSD(T) do not. The criteria for large HOMO difference is about 2 ∼ 4 eV.

  15. Shedding Light on Diatom Photonics by means of Digital Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; De Stefano, L; De Stefano, M; Antonucci, A; Congestri, R; De Tommasi, E

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms are among the dominant phytoplankters in the worl's ocean, and their external silica investments, resembling artificial photonics crystal, are expected to play an active role in light manipulation. Digital holography allowed studying the interaction with light of Coscinodiscus wailesii cell wall reconstructing the light confinement inside the cell cytoplasm, condition that is hardly accessible via standard microscopy. The full characterization of the propagated beam, in terms of quantitative phase and intensity, removed a long-standing ambiguity about the origin of the light. The data were discussed in the light of living cell behavior in response to their environment.

  16. Extraction of high quality DNA from bloodstains using diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, S; Herold, J; Patzelt, D

    1995-01-01

    A simple method is described for the extraction of high quality DNA for PCR amplification. The DNA was extracted by using Chelex-100 ion exchange resin or a special cell lysis buffer containing proteinase K. For further purification the DNA was bound to silica in the presence of a chaotrophic agent. Hence it is possible to unlimitedly wash the bound DNA and inhibitory substances are removed. By using diatoms as a source of silicates, this method is very economical and can therefore be used as a routine method.

  17. Diatoms in peat – dominant producers in a changing environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokfelt, Ulla; Struyf, Eric; Randsalu, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Changes in hydrology and temperature can induce rapid changes in boreal wetland ecosystems. Factors such as hydrosere, permafrost, climate and human interference may disturb the prevailing mire vegetation, whereby a new dominant assemblage can develop. At the transition from one vegetation type...... content. Biogenic silica and other nutrients that would otherwise be lost during mineralization in runoff are in this way retained in the ecosystem. Our results imply that silica storage originating from diatoms can be expected to increase in today's rapidly changing boreal wetlands. The impacts...

  18. On the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of diatomic molecular resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, André, E-mail: andre.martinez@unibo.it; Sordoni, Vania, E-mail: vania.sordoni@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Bologna, Piazza di Porta San Donato, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We give a new reduction of a general diatomic molecular Hamiltonian, without modifying it near the collision set of nuclei. The resulting effective Hamiltonian is the sum of a smooth semiclassical pseudodifferential operator (the semiclassical parameter being the inverse of the square-root of the nuclear mass) and a semibounded operator localised in the elliptic region corresponding to the nuclear collision set. We also study its behaviour on exponential weights and give several applications where molecular resonances appear and can be well located.

  19. Patterns in planktonic metabolism in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Regaudie-de-Gioux

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic gross community production (GPP, net community production (NCP and community respiration (CR across the Mediterranean Sea was examined in two cruises, Thresholds 2006 and 2007, each crossing the Mediterranean from West to East to test for consistent variation along this longitudinal gradient in late spring to early summer. GPP averaged 2.4±0.4 mmol O2 m−3 d−1, CR averaged 3.8±0.5 mmol O2 m−3 d−1, and NCP averaged – 0.8±0.6 mmol O2 m−3 d−1 across the studied sections, indicative of a tendency for a net heterotrophic metabolism in late spring to early summer, prevalent across studied sections of the Mediterranean Sea as reflected in 70% of negative NCP estimates. The median P/R ratio was 0.6, also indicating a strong prevalence of heterotrophic communities (P/R<1 along the studied sections of the Mediterranean Sea. The communities tended to be net heterotrophic (i.e. P/R<1 at GPP less than 2.8 mmol O2 m−3 d−1. The Western Mediterranean tended to support a higher gross primary production and community respiration than the Eastern basin did, but these differences were not statistically significant (t-test, p>0.05. The net heterotrophy of the studied sections of the Mediterranean Sea indicates that allochthonous carbon should be important to subsidise planktonic metabolism during the late spring.

  20. Seasonal effects of cadmium accumulation in periphytic diatom communities of freshwater biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thi Thuy Duong [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)], E-mail: duongthuy0712@yahoo.com; Morin, Soizic [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas cedex (France); Herlory, Olivier [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)], E-mail: a.feurtet-mazel@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr; Coste, Michel [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas cedex (France); Boudou, Alain [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2008-10-20

    The relationships between diatom species and cadmium (Cd) accumulated in biofilms of the Riou-Mort River (SW, France) were studied in July 2004 and March 2005. Biofilms were sampled from artificial substrates immersed along a metallic pollution gradient during 20 days. Dynamics of diatom communities and cadmium accumulation were followed by collecting samples after 4, 7, 14 and 20 days of biofilm colonization. Cd accumulation in biofilms during experiment was significantly higher in Cd polluted station (Joanis) than in reference station (Firmi) for both seasons. Periphytic diatom composition varied between sites and seasons. At Firmi station, seasonal dynamics of diatom communities were stable with the dominance of Cyclotella meneghiniana and Melosira varians in July and Surirellabrebissonnii and Navicula gregaria in March. At Joanis station, diatom communities mainly responded to high levels of metal by a high proportion of small, adnate species. Positive correlations between Eolimna minima, Nitzschia palea, Encyonema minutum, Surirella angusta, and Gomphonema parvulum and cadmium accumulation were observed, indicating that these species are tolerant to high levels of cadmium. On the other hand, negative correlations of C. meneghiniana, N. gregaria, Navicula lanceolata, M. varians and Nitzschia dissipata with cadmium qualify them as sensitive diatom species. Periphytic diatom composition through the presence of specific species highlight metal tolerant indicator diatom groups which will be meaningful for biomonitoring pollution in natural aquatic systems.

  1. Studies on fouling diatoms from the Zuari Estuary, Goa (west coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Redekar, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    an increasing trend from 1st day to 4th day of settlement. However, maximum number of diatoms was recorded on 1st and 3rd day and minimum on 4th day. The number of diatoms was found to be minimum, whenever there was settlement of hydroids on the slides. Seasonal...

  2. Further contribution to the diatom flora of sewage enriched waters in southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schoeman, FR

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available The systematics and autecology of the diatoms observed in an algal sample from a maturation pond of the Walvis Bay (south west African coast) sewage works are discussed. Fourteen diatoms species are recorded. A new specie, Amphora subacutiuscula...

  3. Long-term pigment dynamics and diatom survival in dark sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veuger, B.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate survival of diatoms and long-term pigment dynamics in dark sediment, we incubated samples of homogenized, sieved, tidal-flat sediment for 1 yr in darkness. Microscopic observations revealed that some diatoms survived the full year in darkness and retained their pigments.

  4. Long-term pigment dynamics and diatom survival in dark sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veuger, B.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate survival of diatoms and long-term pigment dynamics in dark sediment, we incubated samples of homogenized, sieved, tidal-flat sediment for 1 yr in darkness. Microscopic observations revealed that some diatoms survived the full year in darkness and retained their pigments. Conc

  5. A diatom record of recent environmental change in Lake Duluti, northern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öberg, Helena; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Westerberg, Lars-Ove;

    2012-01-01

    ) Simonsen, Gomphonema parvulum (Kützing) Grunow and Nitzschia amphibia Grunow. All three cores display similar stratigraphic succession, but the relative ratio of habitats represented by the diatoms varies substantially between cores. Diatoms indicate that the oldest part of the record is characterized...

  6. Rotation-vibrational spectra of diatomic molecules and nuclei with Davidson interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, D J

    1998-01-01

    Complete rotation-vibrational spectra and electromagnetic transition rates are obtained for Hamiltonians of diatomic molecules and nuclei with Davidson interactions. Analytical results are derived by dynamical symmetry methods for diatomic molecules and a liquid-drop model of the nucleus. Numerical solutions are obtained for a many-particle nucleus with quadrupole Davidson interactions within the framework of the microscopic symplectic model. (author)

  7. A stress surveillance system based on calcium and nitric oxide in marine diatoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardi, A.; Formiggini, F.; Casotti, R.; De Martino, A.; Ribalet, F.; Miralto, A.; Bowler, C.

    2006-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, responsible for about 20% of global primary productivity. Study of the functional role of chemical signaling within phytoplankton assemblages is still in its infancy although recent reports in diatoms suggest the existence of chemical-based

  8. A stress surveillance system based on calcium and nitric oxide in marine diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardi, A.; Formiggini, F.; Casotti, R.; De Martino, A.; Ribalet, F.; Miralto, A.; Bowler, C.

    2006-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, responsible for about 20% of global primary productivity. Study of the functional role of chemical signaling within phytoplankton assemblages is still in its infancy although recent reports in diatoms suggest the existence of chemical-based

  9. $\\Delta I=4$ and $\\Delta I=8$ bifurcations in rotational bands of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Lalazissis, G A; Drenska, S B; Minkov, N; Raychev, P P; Roussev, R P; Bonatsos, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the recently observed $\\Delta I=4$ bifurcation seen in superdeformed nuclear bands is also occurring in rotational bands of diatomic molecules. In addition, signs of a $\\Delta I=8$ bifurcation, of the same order of magnitude as the $\\Delta I=4$ one, are observed both in superdeformed nuclear bands and rotational bands of diatomic molecules.

  10. A comparison of diatom colonization on natural and artificial substrata in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edyvean, R. G. J.; Rands, G. A.; Moss, B. L.

    1985-02-01

    Experiments to investigate diatom colonization on various substrata in seawater are described. No differences were found due to different methods of preparation of the substrata. Differences in the numbers of diatoms colonizing the different substrata emphasize the care needed in selecting a substratum on which to study the settlement of organisms, especially if the experiments are to be used for subsequent prediction.

  11. A stress surveillance system based on calcium and nitric oxide in marine diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardi, A.; Formiggini, F.; Casotti, R.; De Martino, A.; Ribalet, F.; Miralto, A.; Bowler, C.

    2006-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, responsible for about 20% of global primary productivity. Study of the functional role of chemical signaling within phytoplankton assemblages is still in its infancy although recent reports in diatoms suggest the existence of chemical-based

  12. Molecular fossils of diatoms : Applications in petroleum geochemistry and palaeoenvironmental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampen, S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330221574

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the major groups of algae which originated relatively recently and evolved in the Late Jurassic/Cretaceous. This thesis presents the results of a comprehensive study of diatom lipids in cultures and in the environment and their applications in the age determination of petroleum an

  13. Molecular fossils of diatoms: Applications in petroleum geochemistry and palaeoenvironmental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampen, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the major groups of algae which originated relatively recently and evolved in the Late Jurassic/Cretaceous. This thesis presents the results of a comprehensive study of diatom lipids in cultures and in the environment and their applications in the age determination of petroleum an

  14. A stress surveillance system based on calcium and nitric oxide in marine diatoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardi, A.; Formiggini, F.; Casotti, R.; De Martino, A.; Ribalet, F.; Miralto, A.; Bowler, C.

    2006-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, responsible for about 20% of global primary productivity. Study of the functional role of chemical signaling within phytoplankton assemblages is still in its infancy although recent reports in diatoms suggest the existence of chemical-based

  15. Efficiency of copper and cupronickel substratum to resist development of diatom biofilms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    -toxic (fiberglass > glass) compared to toxic (copper–Cu and cupro-nickel–Cu-Ni) substrata. Though the diatom recruitment on toxic substrata is noticed within 24 h, the multiplication of the settled diatoms was not significant, even with an increase in the exposure...

  16. Biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating Halomonas venusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Domènech, Òscar; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm development is characterized by distinct stages of initial attachment, microcolony formation and maturation (sessile cells), and final detachment (dispersal of new, planktonic cells). In this work we examined the influence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation on bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of an environmental strain isolated from microbial mats, Halomonas venusta MAT28. This strain was cultured either in an artificial biofilm in which the cells were immobilized on alginate beads (sessile) or as free-swimming (planktonic) cells. For the two modes of growth, conditions allowing or preventing PHA accumulation were established. Cells detached from alginate beads and their planktonic counterparts were used to study cell surface properties and cellular adhesion on polystyrene. Detached cells showed a slightly higher affinity than planktonic cells for chloroform (Lewis-acid) and a greater hydrophobicity (affinity for hexadecane and hexane). Those surface characteristics of the detached cells may explain their better adhesion on polystyrene compared to planktonic cells. Adhesion to polystyrene was not significantly different between H. venusta cells that had accumulated PHA vs. those that did not. These observations suggest that the surface properties of detached cells clearly differ from those of planktonic cells and that for at least the first 48 h after detachment from alginate beads H. venusta retained the capacity of sessile cells to adhere to polystyrene and to form a biofilm.

  17. Estructura comunitaria de diatomeas presentes en los sedimentos superficiales de ocho lagos andinos de Chile central Diatoms community structure in superficial sediments of eight Andean lakes of central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INGRID E ALVIAL

    2008-03-01

    exiguum, Achnanthidium minutissimum, Encyonema minutum, Pinnularia acidicola and Planothidium lanceolatum. In the assemblages from lakes Galletué, Icalma and Laja planktonic diatoms were more abundant, which are common in alkaline and mesotrophic waters, e.g., Asterionella formosa, Aulacoseira distans, Aulacoseira granulata, Cyclotella stelligera and Rhopalodia gibba

  18. Effect of Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events on the evolutionary trend of planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, A.; Ozaki, K.; Kawahata, H.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely thought that oceanic redox state is essential for the evolutionary history of life on the earth, and "anoxic events" have been proposed as one of the causal mechanisms for mass extinctions. During mid-Cretaceous, widely known as the extremely warm period, oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) occurred several times and they would have caused a substantial impact on the biosphere. Planktonic foraminifera are marine planktons with calcite tests and their productions constitute ~30-80% of the modern deep-marine calcite budget, thus they play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Previous study reported that planktonic foraminifera displayed the high turnover (extinction and speciation) rate at or near the major OAEs. However, the impact of Cretaceous OAEs on the evolutionary trend of planktonic foraminifera remains obscure. In this study, we investigated the role of spatiotemporal extent of anoxia on the evolutionary trend of planktonic foraminifera by assessing the extinction/speciation rate of planktonic foraminifera around Cretaceous OAEs. The number of foraminiferal species increased across the OAE1a and then showed a peak after this episode. Around OAE2, several planktonic foraminifera species became extinct and several speciated, however, long-term trends in foraminiferal evolution showed no drastic changes near the event. Therefore these results suggest that the ocean surface environment at OAEs would not have a direct effect on foraminiferal extinction/speciation. This interpretation is reinforced when considering the recent culturing results, which demonstrate that modern planktonic foraminifera have a high tolerance to extremely low dissolved oxygen levels than expected. Accumulating geochemical data also suggest a spatial heterogeneity of oceanic anoxia/euxinia during OAE2. These results lead us to conclude that Cretaceous OAEs would not directly related to planktonic foraminiferal extinction due to regional distribution of anoxia/euxinia.

  19. Response of diatom and dinoflagellate lifeforms to reduced phosphorus loading: A case study in the Thau lagoon, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, R. J.; Collos, Y.; Tett, P.; Scherer, C.; Bec, B.; Abadie, E.; Allen, M.; O'Brien, T.

    2015-09-01

    The basin of Thau in southern France is a shallow, weakly flushed lagoon which is an important location for oyster cultivation. Phytoplankton analyses were carried out in 1975-1976 and then (almost) continuously since 1987. We report an investigation of 'the balance of organisms' in phytoplankton in relation to reductions in phosphorus loading, using two new tools based on phytoplankton lifeforms: the Plankton Index for Phytoplankton (PIp); Euclidean distance in state-space. Our results show the utility of the tools for analysing changes in the 'balance of organisms' at the level of functional groups (in our study diatoms and dinoflagellates), but also illustrate the difficulties in demonstrating the reversal of human impacts resulting from eutrophication. The comparison between 1987-89 and 1976 showed the expected 'de-eutrophication' due to the reduction in dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP), with a decrease in dinoflagellate abundance. Since 1989, year-to-year variation in annual mean concentrations of DIP may have contributed to inter-annual variability in the balance of the two lifeforms, but the data suggest that the system has remained in a dynamically stable regime because: (1) there was no long-term trend in Euclidean distance from the reference; and (2) there was no increase in inter-annual variability about the time-series mean Euclidean distance suggesting there has been no decrease in resilience which might signal a regime change. Integrated management of human activities will be required to manage (and reduce) total P in the system. Monitoring phytoplankton and nutrients concentrations to determine how primary production and the balance of species respond to further changes in the nutrient status of the lagoon should be an integral part of any management programme.

  20. Biochemical and Genetic Engineering of Diatoms for Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ye Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of diatoms as a source of bioactive compounds has been recently explored. Diatom cells store a high amount of fatty acids, especially certain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. However, many aspects of diatom metabolism and the production of PUFAs remain unclear. This review describes a number of technical strategies, such as modulation of environmental factors (temperature, light, chemical composition of culture medium and culture methods, to influence the content of PUFAs in diatoms. Genetic engineering, a newly emerging field, also plays an important role in controlling the synthesis of fatty acids in marine microalgae. Several key points in the biosynthetic pathway of PUFAs in diatoms as well as recent progresses are also a critical part and are summarized here.

  1. Light interaction with nano-structured diatom frustule, from UV-A to NIR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibohm, Christian; Nielsen, Josefine Holm; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are found in nearly every aqueous environment and play a vital part of the global primary production system contributing with up to 25 % and are efficient light harvesting organisms. Unique to diatoms are the hard cell wall, called the frustule surrounding the single cell. The frustule...... is made from bio-synthesized silicate, perforated by wavelength sized features where the morphology of the nano-structured “greenhouse” is species dependent. Diatoms would therefore make for one of the most interesting “green” resources since it has not only potential as a biomass production system...... but also for nano-structured inorganic material. To understand the biological significance and to integrate diatomic frustules as active material in devices a fundamental understanding of how light interacts with the frustule is needed. In this study we focus on centric diatoms, i.e. having rotational...

  2. Biochemical and genetic engineering of diatoms for polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Ye; Lu, Yang; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng

    2014-01-07

    The role of diatoms as a source of bioactive compounds has been recently explored. Diatom cells store a high amount of fatty acids, especially certain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, many aspects of diatom metabolism and the production of PUFAs remain unclear. This review describes a number of technical strategies, such as modulation of environmental factors (temperature, light, chemical composition of culture medium) and culture methods, to influence the content of PUFAs in diatoms. Genetic engineering, a newly emerging field, also plays an important role in controlling the synthesis of fatty acids in marine microalgae. Several key points in the biosynthetic pathway of PUFAs in diatoms as well as recent progresses are also a critical part and are summarized here.

  3. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.;

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species...... store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom......-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly...

  4. Growth of fouling diatoms from the Zuari estuary, Goa (west coast of India) under different salinities in the laboratory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Redekar, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    of the diatoms was also found to be satisfactory at higher salinities of 25‰ and 35‰. Interestingly, diatoms which were not incubated also developed on the glass slide and this would possibly be due to the spores of such diatoms....

  5. The predictive skill of species distribution models for plankton in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, Philipp Georg; Kiørboe, Thomas; Licandro, Priscilla;

    2016-01-01

    Statistical species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to project spatial relocations of marine taxa under future climate change scenarios. However, tests of their predictive skill in the real-world are rare. Here, we use data from the Continuous Plankton Recorder program, one...... null models, is essential to assess the robustness of projections of marine planktonic species under climate change....... Plankton may be particularly challenging to model, due to its short life span and the dispersive effects of constant water movements on all spatial scales, however there are few other studies against which to compare these results. We conclude that rigorous model validation, including comparison against...

  6. Surf zone diatoms: A review of the drivers, patterns and role in sandy beaches food chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odebrecht, Clarisse; Du Preez, Derek R.; Abreu, Paulo Cesar; Campbell, Eileen E.

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of high biomass of diatoms in the surf zone is a characteristic feature of some sandy beaches where the wave energy is sufficiently high. A few species of diatoms, called surf diatoms, thrive in this harsh environment. The main processes driving the spatial and temporal distribution of surf diatoms as well as their standing biomass and growth were described twenty to thirty years ago based on studies conducted on the western coast of the United States of America and South African beaches. Since then, over fifty locations around the world have been reported to have surf diatom accumulations with most (three-quarters) of these being in the southern hemisphere. Their occurrence is controlled by physical and chemical factors, including wave energy, beach slope and length, water circulation patterns in the surf zone and the availability of nutrients to sustain the high biomass. The main forces driving the patterns of temporal variability of surf diatom accumulations are meteorological. In the short term (hours), the action of wind stress and wave energy controls the diatom accumulation. In the intermediate time scale (weeks to months), seasonal onshore winds of sufficient strength, as well as storm events are important. Furthermore, anthropogenic disturbances that influence the beach ecosystem as well as large-scale events, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, may lead to significant changes in surf diatom populations in the long term (inter-annual). Surf diatoms form the base of a short and very productive food chain in the inshore of the sandy beaches where they occur. However, the role of surf diatoms in the microbial food web is not clear and deserves further studies.

  7. Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, pressure, plankton, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and primary productivity data collected using CTD, bottle, and plankton net from the R/V Italica in the Ross Sea and Magellan Strait during 10th Italian Antarctic Expedition from 1994-11-13 to 1995-04-02 (NODC Accession 0068289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, pressure, plankton, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and primary productivity data collected using CTD, bottle, and plankton...

  8. Magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, J F; Norrgard, E B; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2014-01-01

    Laser cooling and trapping are central to modern atomic physics. The workhorse technique in cold-atom physics is the magneto-optical trap (MOT), which combines laser cooling with a restoring force from radiation pressure. For a variety of atomic species, MOTs can capture and cool large numbers of particles to ultracold temperatures (<1 mK); this has enabled the study of a wide range of phenomena from optical clocks to ultracold collisions whilst also serving as the ubiquitous starting point for further cooling into the regime of quantum degeneracy. Magneto-optical trapping of molecules could provide a similarly powerful starting point for the study and manipulation of ultracold molecular gases. Here, we demonstrate three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF), at a temperature of approximately 2.5 mK. This method is expected to be viable for a significant number of diatomic species. Such chemical diversity is desired for the wide array of existing and prop...

  9. Classical and quantum mechanics of diatomic molecules in tilted fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Carlos A; Kennerly, William W; Ezra, Gregory S

    2005-05-08

    We investigate the classical and quantum mechanics of diatomic molecules in noncollinear (tilted) static electric and nonresonant linearly polarized laser fields. The classical diatomic in tilted fields is a nonintegrable system, and we study the phase space structure for physically relevant parameter regimes for the molecule KCl. While exhibiting low-energy (pendular) and high-energy (free-rotor) integrable limits, the rotor in tilted fields shows chaotic dynamics at intermediate energies, and the degree of classical chaos can be tuned by changing the tilt angle. We examine the quantum mechanics of rotors in tilted fields. Energy-level correlation diagrams are computed, and the presence of avoided crossings quantified by the study of nearest-neighbor spacing distributions as a function of energy and tilting angle. Finally, we examine the influence of classical periodic orbits on rotor wave functions. Many wave functions in the tilted field case are found to be highly nonseparable in spherical polar coordinates. Localization of wave functions in the vicinity of classical periodic orbits, both stable and unstable, is observed for many states.

  10. Underwater locomotion strategy by a benthic pennate diatom Navicula sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiadao; Cao, Shan; Du, Chuan; Chen, Darong

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of diatom locomotion has been widely researched but still remains a hypothesis. There are several questionable points on the prevailing model proposed by Edgar, and some of the observed phenomena cannot be completely explained by this model. In this paper, we undertook detailed investigations of cell structures, locomotion, secreted mucilage, and bending deformation for a benthic pennate diatom Navicula species. According to these broad evidences, an updated locomotion model is proposed. For Navicula sp., locomotion is realized via two or more pseudopods or stalks protruded out of the frustules. The adhesion can be produced due to the pull-off of one pseudopod or stalk from the substratum through extracellular polymeric substances. And the positive pressure is generated to balance the adhesion because of the push-down of another pseudopod or stalk onto the substratum. Because of the positive pressure, friction is generated, acting as a driving force of locomotion, and the other pseudopod or stalk can detach from the substratum, resulting in the locomotion. Furthermore, this model is validated by the force evaluation and can better explain observed phenomena. This updated model would provide a novel aspect on underwater locomotion strategy, hence can be useful in terms of artificial underwater locomotion devices.

  11. Molecular basis of chromatic adaptation in pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstová, Miroslava; Bína, David; Koník, Peter; Gardian, Zdenko; Vácha, František; Litvín, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable adaptability of diatoms living in a highly variable environment assures their prominence among marine primary producers. The present study integrates biochemical, biophysical and genomic data to bring new insights into the molecular mechanism of chromatic adaptation of pennate diatoms in model species Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a marine eukaryote alga possessing the capability to shift its absorption up to ~700 nm as a consequence of incident light enhanced in the red component. Presence of these low energy spectral forms of Chl a is manifested by room temperature fluorescence emission maximum at 710 nm (F710). Here we report a successful isolation of the supramolecular protein complex emitting F710 and identify a member of the Fucoxanthin Chlorophyll a/c binding Protein family, Lhcf15, as its key building block. This red-shifted antenna complex of P. tricornutum appears to be functionally connected to photosystem II. Phylogenetic analyses do not support relation of Lhcf15 of P. tricornutum to other known red-shifted antenna proteins thus indicating a case of convergent evolutionary adaptation towards survival in shaded environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of benthos and plankton for Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern, Illinois, and Burns Harbor-Port of Indiana non-Area of Concern, Indiana, in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberry, Barbara C. Scudder; Templar, Hayley A.; Burns, Daniel J.; Dobrowolski, Edward G.; Schmude, Kurt L.

    2017-06-06

    During two seasonal sampling events in spring (June) and fall (August) of 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected benthos (benthic invertebrates) and plankton (zooplankton and phytoplankton) at three sites each in the Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern (AOC) in Illinois and in Burns Harbor-Port of Indiana, a non-AOC comparison site in Indiana. The study was done in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Samples were collected concurrently for physical and chemical parameters (specific conductance, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll-a, total and volatile suspended solids in water samples; particle size and volatile-on-ignition solids of sediment in dredge samples). The purpose of the study was to assess whether or not aquatic communities at the AOC were degraded in comparison to communities at the non-AOC, which was presumed to be less impaired than the AOC. Benthos were collected by using Hester-Dendy artificial substrate samplers and a Ponar® dredge sampler to collect composited grabs of bottom sediment; zooplankton were collected by using tows from depth to the surface with a 63-micrometer mesh plankton net; phytoplankton were collected by using whole water samples composited from set depth intervals. Aquatic communities at the AOC and the non-AOC were compared by use of univariate statistical analyses with metrics such as taxa richness (number of unique taxa), diversity, and a multimetric Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI, for artificial-substrate samples only) as well as by use of multivariate statistical analyses of taxa relative abundances.Although benthos communities at Waukegan Harbor AOC were not rated as degraded in comparison to the non-AOC, metrics for zooplankton and phytoplankton communities did show some impairment for the 2015 sampling. Across seasons, benthos richness and diversity were significantly higher and rated as less degraded at the AOC compared to the non

  13. Processing and characterization of diatom nanoparticles and microparticles as potential source of silicon for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Thi Duy Hanh [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Bonani, Walter [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Speranza, Giorgio [Center for Materials and Microsystems, PAM-SE, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento (Italy); Sglavo, Vincenzo; Ceccato, Riccardo [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Maniglio, Devid; Motta, Antonella [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Migliaresi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.migliaresi@unitn.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    Silicon plays an important role in bone formation and maintenance, improving osteoblast cell function and inducing mineralization. Often, bone deformation and long bone abnormalities have been associated with silica/silicon deficiency. Diatomite, a natural deposit of diatom skeleton, is a cheap and abundant source of biogenic silica. The aim of the present study is to validate the potential of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons as silicon-donor materials for bone tissue engineering applications. Raw diatomite (RD) and calcined diatomite (CD) powders were purified by acid treatments, and diatom microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by fragmentation of purified diatoms under alkaline conditions. The influence of processing on the surface chemical composition of purified diatomites was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Diatoms NPs were also characterized in terms of morphology and size distribution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS), while diatom MPs morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface area and microporosity of the diatom particles were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption methods. Release of silicon ions from diatom-derived particles was demonstrated using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES); furthermore, silicon release kinetic was found to be influenced by diatomite purification method and particle size. Diatom-derived microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) showed limited or no cytotoxic effect in vitro depending on the administration conditions. - Highlights: • Diatomite is a natural source of silica and has a potential as silicon-donor for bone regenerative applications. • Diatom particles derived from purified diatom skeletons were prepared by fragmentation under extreme alkaline condition. • Dissolution of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons in DI water depend on purification method

  14. Effects of Photoactivated Titanium Dioxide Nanopowders and Coating on Planktonic and Biofilm Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polo, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    . A running protocol for the photoactivation of TiO(2) was set up using the dye rhodamine B. The microorganisms studied were Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a Bacillus cereus-group as planktonic cells. P. aeruginosa biofilms were also studied at both the solid-liquid and the solid......-air interface. The TiO(2) nanopowder produced 1-log reduction of Bacillus sp. planktonic cells in 24 h, 2-log reduction of P. stutzeri planktonic cells in 30 min and 1-log reduction of P. aeruginosa planktonic cells in 2 h compared to non-photoactivated TiO(2) . TiO(2) thin film produced almost a complete...

  15. Distribution patterns of Recent planktonic foraminifera in surface sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and to map the distribution of 11 abundant and/or ecologically important planktonic foramini- feral species; (2) to evaluate the extent to which patterns of foraminiferal abundance and diversity in Recent bottom sediments reflect the details of surface...

  16. Pre-monsoon living planktonic foraminifera from the Southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Muralinath, A.S.

    . References BE, A. W. H. and HUTSON, W. H. (l977) Ecologic and biogeographic patterns of planktonic foraminiferal life and fossil assemblages. Micropaleontology, v. 23, pp. 369-414. COLBORN, J. G. (1975) Thermal structure of Indian Ocean. International Indian...

  17. Sediment traps as a new tool for estimation of longevity of planktonic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Sediment trap technique provides time series data of sinking particles (faunal and sediment) from surface to bottom of the sea. Besides many other applications, data can also be used to estimate life span of planktonic foraminifera. Based on rearing...

  18. Planktonic foraminifera from a quaternary deep sea core from the southern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Rao, P.S.; Pattan, J.N.

    An investigation on planktonic foraminifera and calcium carbonate content of a box core collected at a depth of 2556 m from the southern part of the Arabian sea indicates faunal changes depicting Quaternary climatic fluctuations. Based on the study...

  19. Plankton composition in two estuaries of the Konkan coast during premonsoon season

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.; Devassy, V.P.; Nair, V.R.

    Plankton composition of the Shastri and the Kajvi estuaries of the Konkan Coast were studied during the premonsoon season. Phytoplankton constituents were more abundant at the mid and upper reaches in the former whereas in the latter they were...

  20. Feedback control in a general almost periodic discrete system of plankton allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenshuang

    2014-01-01

    We study the properties of almost periodic solutions for a general discrete system of plankton allelopathy with feedback controls and establish a theorem on the uniformly asymptotic stability of almost periodic solutions.

  1. Seasonal dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton metabolism and PCO2 in a subarctic Greenland fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejr, Mikael K.; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2014-01-01

    We measured net planktonic community production (NCP), community respiration (CR), and gross primary production (GPP) in September, February, and May in a subarctic Greenland fjord influenced by glacial meltwater and terrestrial runoff. Potential controls of pelagic carbon cycling, including...

  2. PFR²: a curated database of planktonic foraminifera 18S ribosomal DNA as a resource for studies of plankton ecology, biogeography and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Darling, Kate F; Mahé, Frédéric; Audic, Stéphane; Ujiié, Yurika; Weiner, Agnes K M; André, Aurore; Seears, Heidi A; Wade, Christopher M; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Douady, Christophe J; Escarguel, Gilles; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-11-01

    Planktonic foraminifera (Rhizaria) are ubiquitous marine pelagic protists producing calcareous shells with conspicuous morphology. They play an important role in the marine carbon cycle, and their exceptional fossil record serves as the basis for biochronostratigraphy and past climate reconstructions. A major worldwide sampling effort over the last two decades has resulted in the establishment of multiple large collections of cryopreserved individual planktonic foraminifera samples. Thousands of 18S rDNA partial sequences have been generated, representing all major known morphological taxa across their worldwide oceanic range. This comprehensive data coverage provides an opportunity to assess patterns of molecular ecology and evolution in a holistic way for an entire group of planktonic protists. We combined all available published and unpublished genetic data to build PFR(2), the Planktonic foraminifera Ribosomal Reference database. The first version of the database includes 3322 reference 18S rDNA sequences belonging to 32 of the 47 known morphospecies of extant planktonic foraminifera, collected from 460 oceanic stations. All sequences have been rigorously taxonomically curated using a six-rank annotation system fully resolved to the morphological species level and linked to a series of metadata. The PFR(2) website, available at http://pfr2.sb-roscoff.fr, allows downloading the entire database or specific sections, as well as the identification of new planktonic foraminiferal sequences. Its novel, fully documented curation process integrates advances in morphological and molecular taxonomy. It allows for an increase in its taxonomic resolution and assures that integrity is maintained by including a complete contingency tracking of annotations and assuring that the annotations remain internally consistent.

  3. Growth and functioning of the microbial plankton community: effects of temperature, nutrients and light

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial plankton form the basis of the food web in aquatic habitats. Due to their vast abundances they influence the cycling of elements and the Earth’s climate at a global scale. This thesis aims at a better understanding of how environmental factors such as temperature and the availability of nutrients and light affect the growth and functioning of microbial plankton communities. The thesis combines experimental studies and mathematical modelling to address open questions in community eco...

  4. The influence of global warming on freshwater plankton communities in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    George, D. Glen

    1991-01-01

    The likely response of freshwater plankton to the direct and indirect effects of sustained global warming are summarized. The increase in CO2 posited by climatologists will have a direct effect on many biological processes, and an even more important indirect effect on the global climate. Lake plankton populations are relatively well buffered against sudden fluctuations in temperature but can react in unexpected ways to seasonal changes in the wind speed, with effects on seasonal growth and s...

  5. Investigation of the hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates using particle image Velocimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiao; Xiaoyan Li; Kitming Lam; Dongsheng Wang

    2012-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates has a significant influence on the interactions and flocculation kinetics of algae.However,characterization of the hydrodynamics of diatoms and diatom aggregates in water is rather difficult.In this laboratory study,an advanced visualization technique in particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of settling diatom aggregates.The experiments were conducted in a settling colunm filled with a suspension of fluorescent polymeric beads as seed tracers.A laser light sheet was generated by the PIV setup to illuminate a thin vertical planar region in the settling column,while the motions of particles were recorded by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera.This technique was able to capture the trajectories of the tracers when a diatom aggregate settled through the tracer suspension.The PIV results indicated directly the curvilinear feature of the streamlines around diatom aggregates.The rectilinear collision model largely overestimated the collision areas of the settling particles.Algae aggregates appeared to be highly porous and fractal,which allowed streamlines to penetrate into the aggregate interior.The diatom aggregates have a fluid collection efficiency of 10%-40%.The permeable feature of aggregates can significantly enhance the collisions and floculation between the aggregates and other small particles including algal cells in water.

  6. Seasonal and daily fluctuation of diatoms during spring tide periods in Kerkennah Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Ben brahim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study seasonal and the daily distribution of diatoms in the three tidal periods (flood, slack and ebb period during the spring tide. Methods: Water samples were taken and environmental variables were measured three times in each tidal period during 10 days of spring tide. Sampling was done in 2007 in Cercina station located in the western coast of Kerkennah (34°41'27'' N; 11°07'45'' E (Southern Tunisia. Results: Nutrients showed significant variation between seasons, increasing in spring and decreasing noticeably in autumn and winter. About 36 diatom species were found. Results revealed a remarkable abundance increase in spring and summer. Irregular differences in diatom abundances were revealed over the tidal periods, with the highest rates being detected during the flood and the ebb period, while the abundance rate was lowest during the slack period. This could presumably be attributed to the increase of nutrient supply of suspended particulate matter during water motion. The results revealed a correlation between diatom abundance and temperature, NO2 - , NO3 - , Si(OH4 and PO4 3 . Temperature seemed to be the most important factors which may influence the distribution and diatom abundance. Conclusions: Tide has various effects on the nutrients status and diatoms community (in terms of species composition, succession and abundance between different tidal periods. Fluctuation of diatoms was correlated with changes in the circulation of water bodies and changes in nutrient regime.

  7. Seasonal and daily lfuctuation of diatoms during spring tide periods in Kerkennah Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mounir Ben brahim; Wafa Feki-Sahnouna; Morsi Feki; Mabrouka Mahfoudi; Asma Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study seasonal and the daily distribution of diatoms in the three tidal periods (flood, slack and ebb period) during the spring tide. Methods:Water samples were taken and environmental variables were measured three times in each tidal period during 10 days of spring tide. Sampling was done in 2 007 in Cercina station located in the western coast of Kerkennah (34°41'27' N;11°07'45' E) (Southern Tunisia). Results:Nutrients showed significant variation between seasons, increasing in spring and decreasing noticeably in autumn and winter. About 36 diatom species were found. Results revealed a remarkable abundance increase in spring and summer. Irregular differences in diatom abundances were revealed over the tidal periods, with the highest rates being detected during the flood and the ebb period, while the abundance rate was lowest during the slack period. This could presumably be attributed to the increase of nutrient supply of suspended particulate matter during water motion. The results revealed a correlation between diatom abundance and temperature, NO2-, NO3-, Si(OH)4 and PO43. Temperature seemed to be the most important factors which may influence the distribution and diatom abundance. Conclusions:Tide has various effects on the nutrients status and diatoms community (in terms of species composition, succession and abundance) between different tidal periods. Fluctuation of diatoms was correlated with changes in the circulation of water bodies and changes in nutrient regime.

  8. Architecture and material properties of diatom shells provide effective mechanical protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christian E.; Merkel, Rudolf; Springer, Olaf; Jurkojc, Piotr; Maier, Christian; Prechtel, Kathrin; Smetacek, Victor

    2003-02-01

    Diatoms are the major contributors to phytoplankton blooms in lakes and in the sea and hence are central in aquatic ecosystems and the global carbon cycle. All free-living diatoms differ from other phytoplankton groups in having silicified cell walls in the form of two `shells' (the frustule) of manifold shape and intricate architecture whose function and role, if any, in contributing to the evolutionary success of diatoms is under debate. We explored the defence potential of the frustules as armour against predators by measuring their strength. Real and virtual loading tests (using calibrated glass microneedles and finite element analysis) were performed on centric and pennate diatom cells. Here we show that the frustules are remarkably strong by virtue of their architecture and the material properties of the diatom silica. We conclude that diatom frustules have evolved as mechanical protection for the cells because exceptional force is required to break them. The evolutionary arms race between diatoms and their specialized predators will have had considerable influence in structuring pelagic food webs and biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Environmental Monitoring: Inferring the Diatom Index from Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Joana Amorim; Apothéloz-Perret-Gentil, Laure; Cordonier, Arielle; Esling, Philippe; Pillet, Loïc; Pawlowski, Jan

    2015-07-07

    Diatoms are widely used as bioindicators for the assessment of water quality in rivers and streams. Classically, the diatom biotic indices are based on the relative abundance of morphologically identified species weighted by their autoecological value. Obtaining such indices is time-consuming, costly, and requires excellent taxonomic expertise, which is not always available. Here we tested the possibility to overcome these limitations using a next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach to identify and quantify diatoms found in environmental DNA and RNA samples. We analyzed 27 river sites in the Geneva area (Switzerland), in order to compare the values of the Swiss Diatom Index (DI-CH) computed either by microscopic quantification of diatom species or directly from NGS data. Despite gaps in the reference database and variations in relative abundance of analyzed species, the diatom index shows a significant correlation between morphological and molecular data indicating similar biological quality status for the majority of sites. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the potential of the NGS approach for identification and quantification of diatoms in environmental samples, opening new avenues toward the routine application of genetic tools for bioassessment and biomonitoring of aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Relationships between benthic diatom assemblages’ structure and selected environmental parameters in Slovak water reservoirs (Slovakia, Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidlerová D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study is to describe the structure of benthic diatom communities in 23 water reservoirs in Slovakia classified as heavily modified water bodies. Environmental variables together with biological data obtained during the routine biomonitoring of water reservoirs in Slovakia were explored and analysed to understand variability of benthic diatom communities and their relationships with environmental variables in order to obtain an integrated knowledge about their relevance as bioindicators for the Water Framework Directive-compliant ecological potential assessment. This study summarizes results from a four-year monitoring programme of water reservoirs surveyed during the period of 2011–2014. The performed survey and statistical analyses revealed the following: (i two main groups of reservoirs could be distinguished based on the purpose of their main use (multipurpose or drinking water-supply use; (ii multipurpose and drinking water-supply reservoirs differed in benthic diatom community structure, diatom water quality indices as well as in the principal environmental gradients structuring the diatom communities; (iii 5 distinct sub-groups of reservoirs could be identified differing in terms of diatom species composition and several environmental parameters; (iv the most significant environmental variables in explaining differences in diatom species composition in multipurpose reservoirs were mean depth and mean annual flow; in drinking water-supply reservoirs conductivity and water transparency.

  11. The evolution of advanced mechanical defenses and potential technological applications of diatom shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Christian E

    2005-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae with silicified cell walls, which exhibit a high degree of symmetry and complexity. Their diversity is extraordinarily high; estimates suggest that about 10(5) marine and limnic species may exist. Recently, it was shown that diatom frustules are mechanically resilient, statically sophisticated structures made of a tough glass-like composite. Consequently, to break the frustules, predators have to generate large forces and invest large amounts of energy. In addition, they need feeding tools (e.g., mandibles or gastric mills) which are hard, tough, and resilient enough to resist high stress and wear, which are bound to occur when they feed on biomineralized objects such as diatoms or other biomineralized protists. Indeed, many copepods feeding on diatoms possess, in analogy to the enamelcoated teeth of mammals, amazingly complex, silica-laced mandibles. The highly developed adaptations both to protect and to break diatoms indicate that selection pressure is high to optimize material properties and the geometry of the shells to achieve mechanical strength of the overall structure. This paper discusses the mechanical challenges which force the development of mechanical defenses, and the structural components of the diatom frustules which indicate that evolutionary optimization has led to mechanically sophisticated structures. Understanding the diatom frustule from the nanometer scale up to the whole shell will provide new insights to advanced combinations of nanostructured composite ceramic materials and lightweight architecture for technological applications.

  12. Investigation of the hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Lam, Kitming; Wang, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates has a significant influence on the interactions and flocculation kinetics of algae. However, characterization of the hydrodynamics of diatoms and diatom aggregates in water is rather difficult. In this laboratory study, an advanced visualization technique in particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of settling diatom aggregates. The experiments were conducted in a settling column filled with a suspension of fluorescent polymeric beads as seed tracers. A laser light sheet was generated by the PIV setup to illuminate a thin vertical planar region in the settling column, while the motions of particles were recorded by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This technique was able to capture the trajectories of the tracers when a diatom aggregate settled through the tracer suspension. The PIV results indicated directly the curvilinear feature of the streamlines around diatom aggregates. The rectilinear collision model largely overestimated the collision areas of the settling particles. Algae aggregates appeared to be highly porous and fractal, which allowed streamlines to penetrate into the aggregate interior. The diatom aggregates have a fluid collection efficiency of 10%-40%. The permeable feature of aggregates can significantly enhance the collisions and flocculation between the aggregates and other small particles including algal cells in water.

  13. Review--Interactions between diatoms and stainless steel: focus on biofouling and biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoulsi, J; Cooksey, K E; Dupres, V

    2011-11-01

    There is a considerable body of information regarding bacterially enhanced corrosion, however, this review focuses on diatoms (unicellular algae) whose contribution to biocorrosion is less well studied. The reasons why diatoms have been neglected in studies of biocorrosion in natural waters are discussed and the question whether diatoms should be considered as inert with respect of electrochemical processes is considered. A particular focus is given to the case of stainless steels (SS), which are widely used in variety of applications in natural waters. Basic information on the cell biology of diatoms is included in the review, particularly with respect to their ability to 'sense' and adhere to surfaces. Investigations at the nanoscale are reviewed as these studies provide information about the behavior of cells at interfaces. Recent advances include the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), although only a few studies have been applied to diatoms. Regarding the electrochemical behavior of SS, the mechanisms by which diatoms influence the potential ennoblement process is discussed. Such studies reveal the association of diatoms, in addition to bacteria, with biocorrosion processes.

  14. Seasonal variation of plankton communities influenced by environmental factors in an artificial lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuemei; YU Yuhe; ZHANG Tanglin; FENG Weisong; AO Hongyi; YAN Qingyun

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the seasonal variation in plankton community composition in an artificial lake.We conducted microscopic analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes to characterize the plankton community.The clustering of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) was then used to investigate the similarity of these plankton communities.DGGE fingerprinting revealed that samples collected at the different sites within a season shared high similarity and were generally grouped together.In contrast,we did not observe any seasonal variation based on microscopic analysis.Redundancy analysis (RDA) of the plankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in relation to environmental factors revealed that transparency was negatively correlated with the first axis (R=-0.931),and temperature and total phosphorus (TP) were positively correlated with the first axis (R=0.736 and R=0.660,respectively).In conclusion,plankton communities in the artificial lake exhibited significant seasonal variation.Transparency,phosphorus and temperature appear to be the major factors driving the differences in plankton composition.

  15. Seasonal variation of plankton communities influenced by environmental factors in an artificial lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemei; Yu, Yuhe; Zhang, Tanglin; Feng, Weisong; Ao, Hongyi; Yan, Qingyun

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the seasonal variation in plankton community composition in an artificial lake. We conducted microscopic analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA genes to characterize the plankton community. The clustering of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) was then used to investigate the similarity of these plankton communities. DGGE fingerprinting revealed that samples collected at the different sites within a season shared high similarity and were generally grouped together. In contrast, we did not observe any seasonal variation based on microscopic analysis. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of the plankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in relation to environmental factors revealed that transparency was negatively correlated with the first axis ( R=-0.931), and temperature and total phosphorus (TP) were positively correlated with the first axis ( R=0.736 and R=0.660, respectively). In conclusion, plankton communities in the artificial lake exhibited significant seasonal variation. Transparency, phosphorus and temperature appear to be the major factors driving the differences in plankton composition.

  16. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  17. The diatom-derived aldehyde decadienal affects life cycle transition in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis through nitric oxide/ERK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Immacolata; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are fatty-acid-derived metabolites produced by some microalgae, including different diatom species. PUAs are mainly produced as a wound-activated defence mechanism against microalgal predators or released from senescent cells at the end of a bloom. PUAs, including 2,4-trans-decadienal (DD), induce deleterious effects on embryonic and larval development of several planktonic and benthic organisms. Here, we report on the effects of DD on larval development and metamorphosis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Ciona larval development is regulated by the cross-talking of different molecular events, including nitric oxide (NO) production, ERK activation and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We report that treatment with DD at the competence larval stage results in a delay in metamorphosis. DD affects redox balance by reducing total glutathione and NO levels. By biochemical and quantitative gene expression analysis, we identify the NO-signalling network affected by DD, including the upregulation of ERK phosphatase mkp1 and consequent reduction of ERK phosphorylation, with final changes in the expression of downstream ERK target genes. Overall, these results give new insights into the molecular pathways induced in marine organisms after exposure to PUAs during larval development, demonstrating that this aldehyde affects key checkpoints of larval transition from the vegetative to the reproductive life stage.

  18. A Hard Day's Night: Diatoms continue recycling Photosystem II in the dark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine diatoms are photosynthetic, and thrive in environments where light fluctuates. Like all oxygenic photosynthetic organisms diatoms face a light-dependent inactivation of the Photosystem II complexes that photooxidize water to generate biosynthetic reductant. To maintain photosynthesis this photoinactivation must be countered by slow and metabolically expensive protein turnover, which is light dependent in cyanobacteria and in plants. We tracked daily cycles of the content, synthesis and degradation of Photosystem II, in a small and in a large marine diatom, under low and high growth light levels. We show that, unlike plants, diatoms maintain extensive cycling of Photosystem II proteins even in the dark. Photosystem II protein cycling saturates at low light, and continued cycling in dark periods, using energy from respiration, allows the diatoms to catch up to excess photoinactivation accumulated over the preceding illuminated period. The large diatom suffers only limited photoinactivation of Photosystem II, but cycling of Photosystem II protein exceeds Photosystem II inactivation, so the large diatom recycles functional Photosystem II units before they are inactivated. Through the diel cycle the contents of active Photosystem II centers and Photosystem II proteins change predictably, but are not correlated, generating large changes in the fraction of total PSII that is active at a given time or growth condition. We propose that dark and steady cycling of Photosystem II proteins is driven by the tight integration of chloroplastic and mitochondrial metabolism in diatoms. This ability for baseline, continuous Photosystem II repair could contribute to the success of diatoms in mixed water environments that carry them from illumination to darkness and back.

  19. Diatomáceas cêntricas de rios na região de abrangência da usina hidrelétrica de Salto Caxias, PR, (Bacia do rio Iguaçu Centric diatoms from rivers in the region to be dammed for the construction of the Salto Caxias hydroelectric power plant, Paraná State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Brassac

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se o inventário florístico das diatomáceas cêntricas dos rios da região a ser inundada para construção do reservatório da Usina Hidrelétrica de Salto Caxias, localizado a sudoeste do Estado do Paraná. Amostras planctônicas foram coletadas mensalmente, em 15 estações de coleta, no período compreendido entre março/97 e fevereiro/98. Foram identificados 19 táxons infragenéricos. Aulacoseira ambígua var. ambígua f. ambígua, A. granulata var. granulata, A. granulata var. angustíssima e Melosira varians foram registradas em pelo menos 85% das 171 amostras estudadas. Aulacoseira agassizii var. agassizii e Melosira undulata var. normanii são citações pioneiras para o Estado do Paraná, assim como Terpsinoe musica var. musica é registrado pela primeira vez em ambientes continentais paranaenses.The survey is a floristic inventory of centric diatoms from the region to be flooded by the construction of the Salto Caxias hydroelectric power plant reservoir, in southeast Paraná State, Brazil. Planktonic sampling was carried out monthly, from March/97 to February/98. Nineteen infrageneric taxa were identified. Aulacoseira ambígua var. ambígua, A. granulata var. granulata, A. granulata var. angustíssima and Melosira varians being the most common taxa, occuring in 85% of the 171 samples studied. Aulacoseira agassizii var. agassizii and Melosira undulata var. normanii are new records for the State of Paraná, and Terpsinoe musica var. musica registered for the first time in freshwater environments in this state.

  20. Volcanic ash fuels anomalous plankton bloom in subarctic northeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamme, Roberta C.; Webley, Peter W.; Crawford, William R.; Whitney, Frank A.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.; Emerson, Steven R.; Eriksen, Charles C.; Giesbrecht, Karina E.; Gower, Jim F. R.; Kavanaugh, Maria T.; Peña, M. Angelica; Sabine, Christopher L.; Batten, Sonia D.; Coogan, Laurence A.; Grundle, Damian S.; Lockwood, Deirdre

    2010-10-01

    Using multiple lines of evidence, we demonstrate that volcanic ash deposition in August 2008 initiated one of the largest phytoplankton blooms observed in the subarctic North Pacific. Unusually widespread transport from a volcanic eruption in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska deposited ash over much of the subarctic NE Pacific, followed by large increases in satellite chlorophyll. Surface ocean pCO2, pH, and fluorescence reveal that the bloom started a few days after ashfall. Ship-based measurements showed increased dominance by diatoms. This evidence points toward fertilization of this normally iron-limited region by ash, a relatively new mechanism proposed for iron supply to the ocean. The observations do not support other possible mechanisms. Extrapolation of the pCO2 data to the area of the bloom suggests a modest ˜0.01 Pg carbon export from this event, implying that even large-scale iron fertilization at an optimum time of year is not very efficient at sequestering atmospheric CO2.

  1. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  2. Low diversity of planktonic bacteria in the tropical ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milici, Mathias; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Wang, Hui; Jáuregui, Ruy; Camarinha-Silva, Amelia; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Plumeier, Iris; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Wurst, Mascha; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Simon, Meinhard; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of macro-organisms increases towards the equator, with almost no exceptions. It is the most conserved biogeographical pattern on earth and is thought to be related to the increase of temperature and productivity in the tropics. The extent and orientation of a latitudinal gradient of marine bacterioplankton diversity is controversial. Here we studied the euphotic zone of the Atlantic Ocean based on a transect covering ~12.000 km from 51°S to 47 °N. Water samples were collected at 26 stations at five depths between 20 and 200 m and sequentially filtered through 8 μm, 3 μm and 0,22 μm filters, resulting in a total of 359 samples. Illumina sequencing of the V5–V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a clear biogeographic pattern with a double inverted latitudinal gradient. Diversity was higher in mid-latitudinal regions of the Atlantic Ocean and decreased towards the equator. This pattern was conserved for bacteria from all three planktonic size fractions. Diversity showed a non-linear relationship with temperature and was negatively correlated with bacterial cell numbers in the upper depth layers (<100 m). The latitudinal gradients of marine bacterial diversity and the mechanisms that govern them are distinct from those found in macro-organisms.

  3. Standard filtration practices may significantly distort planktonic microbial diversity estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Cruz Padilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of biomass by filtration is a standard method for sampling planktonic microbes. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition of filtered biomass changes depending on sample volume. Using seawater from a marine oxygen minimum zone, we quantified the 16S rRNA gene composition of biomass on a prefilter (1.6 μm pore-size and a downstream 0.2 μm filter over sample volumes from 0.05 to 5 L. Significant community shifts occurred in both filter fractions, and were most dramatic in the prefilter community. Sequences matching Vibrionales decreased from ~40-60% of prefilter datasets at low volumes (0.05-0.5 L to less than 5% at higher volumes, while groups such at the Chromatiales and Thiohalorhabdales followed opposite trends, increasing from minor representation to become the dominant taxa at higher volumes. Groups often associated with marine particles, including members of the Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes, were among those showing the greatest increase with volume (4 to 27-fold. Taxon richness (97% similarity clusters also varied significantly with volume, and in opposing directions depending on filter fraction, highlighting potential biases in community complexity estimates. These data raise concerns for studies using filter fractionation for quantitative comparisons of aquatic microbial diversity, for example between free-living and particle-associated communities.

  4. Modeling physiological processes in plankton on enzyme kinetic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Packard

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Many ecologically important chemical transformations in the ocean are controlled by biochemical enzyme reactions in plankton. Nitrogenase regulates the transformation of N2 to ammonium in some cyanobacteria and serves as the entryway for N2 into the ocean biosphere. Nitrate reductase controls the reduction of NO3 to NO2 and hence new production in phytoplankton. The respiratory electron transfer system in all organisms links the carbon oxidation reactions of intermediary metabolism with the reduction of oxygen in respiration. Rubisco controls the fixation of CO2 into organic matter in phytoplankton and thus is the major entry point of carbon into the oceanic biosphere. In addition to these, there are the enzymes that control CO2 production, NH4 excretion and the fluxes of phosphate. Some of these enzymes have been recognized and researched by marine scientists in the last thirty years. However, until recently the kinetic principles of enzyme control have not been exploited to formulate accurate mathematical equations of the controlling physiological expressions. Were such expressions available they would increase our power to predict the rates of chemical transformations in the extracellular environment of microbial populations whether this extracellular environment is culture media or the ocean. Here we formulate from the principles of bisubstrate enzyme kinetics, mathematical expressions for the processes of NO3 reduction, O2 consumption, N2 fixation, total nitrogen uptake.

  5. Standard filtration practices may significantly distort planktonic microbial diversity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Cory C; Ganesh, Sangita; Gantt, Shelby; Huhman, Alex; Parris, Darren J; Sarode, Neha; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    Fractionation of biomass by filtration is a standard method for sampling planktonic microbes. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition of filtered biomass changes depending on sample volume. Using seawater from a marine oxygen minimum zone, we quantified the 16S rRNA gene composition of biomass on a prefilter (1.6 μm pore-size) and a downstream 0.2 μm filter over sample volumes from 0.05 to 5 L. Significant community shifts occurred in both filter fractions, and were most dramatic in the prefilter community. Sequences matching Vibrionales decreased from ~40 to 60% of prefilter datasets at low volumes (0.05-0.5 L) to less than 5% at higher volumes, while groups such at the Chromatiales and Thiohalorhabdales followed opposite trends, increasing from minor representation to become the dominant taxa at higher volumes. Groups often associated with marine particles, including members of the Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes, were among those showing the greatest increase with volume (4 to 27-fold). Taxon richness (97% similarity clusters) also varied significantly with volume, and in opposing directions depending on filter fraction, highlighting potential biases in community complexity estimates. These data raise concerns for studies using filter fractionation for quantitative comparisons of aquatic microbial diversity, for example between free-living and particle-associated communities.

  6. On the Occurrence of Four Diatom Taxa from Eastern India with a Taxonomic Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Prakash Keshri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms were collected from the Kotulpur area of West Bengal. Four diatom taxa, namely, Eunotia minor (Kützing Grunow, Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kützing Czarnecki, Lemnicola hungarica (Grunow Round and Basson, and Navicula radiosa Kützing were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and identified in light of modern diatom taxonomic trends. Except Eunotia minor, all these taxa are new records to Eastern India. A note on the taxonomy of Achnanthes pseudobiasolletiana as described by Gandhi and Eunotia serrata var. diadema (Ehr. R. M. Patrick as reported by Dwivedi and Misra has been added.

  7. Teratogenic Effects of Diatom Metabolites on Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Romano; Antonio Miralto; Adrianna Ianora

    2010-01-01

    The diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs), 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal, 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal, 2-trans,4-trans,7-octatrienal, 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal, as well as tridecanal were tested on early and later larval development in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. We also tested the effect of some of the more abundant diatom polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on development, in particular 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), one of the main precursors of diatom PUAs, as...

  8. Do diatoms percolate through soil and can they be used for tracing the origin of runoff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, Lenka; Cammeraat, Erik; Pfister, Laurent; Wetzel, Carlos; Klaus, Julian; Hissler, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Tracers are widely used to study the movement of water in a catchment. Because of depletion of scientific possibilities with most common tracer types, we proposed the use of diatoms as a natural tracer. Paradoxical results on the contribution of surface runoff to the storm hydrograph were obtained in pioneer research on this idea. Diatom transport via the subsurface flow to the stream would explain this paradox. Prerequisite for this is vertical transport of diatoms through soils, which is the topic of this study. Emphasis is on percolation behavior (speed of percolation, speed of percolation over time, and species distribution) of Pseudostaurosira sp. and Melosira sp. (Bacillariophyceae) through undisturbed soil columns of contrasting substrates. Co-objective is to study the flowpaths of water through the soil columns. Natural undisturbed soil columns were sampled in the Attert basin (Luxembourg) on schist, marl and sandstone substrates. Rain simulation experiments were performed to study vertical diatom transport. Rhodamine dye experiments were carried out to gain insight in the active flowpaths of water, and breakthrough experiments were performed to study the responses of the soil columns to applied water. Diatoms were transported through the soil columns of the three substrates. A vast majority of diatom percolation took place within the first 15 minutes, percolation hereafter was marginal but nevertheless present. Peaks in diatom percolation corresponded with a high flux caused by the addition of the diatom culture, but seepage of diatoms along the sides is unlikely according to the species distribution and the rhodamine dye experiment. Pseudostaurosira sp. percolated significantly better than Melosira sp. Significantly more diatoms percolated through the marl columns compared to the schist columns and variance within the sandstone group was very high. Absolute differences between substrates however, were marginal. Most preferential flowpaths were observed in

  9. Stable Langmuir solitons in plasma with diatomic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dvornikov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We study stable axially and spherically symmetric spatial solitons in plasma with diatomic ions. The stability of a soliton against collapse is provided by the interaction of induced electric dipole moments of ions with the rapidly oscillating electric field of a plasmoid. We derive the new cubic-quintic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which governs the soliton dynamics and numerically solve it. Then we discuss the possibility of implementation of such plasmoids in realistic atmospheric plasma. In particular, we suggest that spherically symmetric Langmuir solitons, described in the present work, can be excited at the formation stage of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures. The implication of our model for the interpretation of the results of experiments for the plasmoids generation is discussed.

  10. Asymmetric wave transmission in a diatomic acoustic/elastic metamaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bing; Tan, K. T., E-mail: ktan@uakron.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325-3903 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    Asymmetric acoustic/elastic wave transmission has recently been realized using nonlinearity, wave diffraction, or bias effects, but always at the cost of frequency distortion, direction shift, large volumes, or external energy. Based on the self-coupling of dual resonators, we propose a linear diatomic metamaterial, consisting of several small-sized unit cells, to realize large asymmetric wave transmission in low frequency domain (below 1 kHz). The asymmetric transmission mechanism is theoretically investigated, and numerically verified by both mass-spring and continuum models. This passive system does not require any frequency conversion or external energy, and the asymmetric transmission band can be theoretically predicted and mathematically controlled, which extends the design concept of unidirectional transmission devices.

  11. Quantum control of vibrational excitations in a heteronuclear diatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitansh Sharma; Purshotam Sharma; Harjinder Singh

    2007-09-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to obtain infrared laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation in a heteronuclear diatomic molecule. The problem of finding the optimized field is phrased as a maximization of a cost functional which depends on the laser field. A time dependent Gaussian factor is introduced in the field prior to evaluation of the cost functional for better field shape. Conjugate gradient method21,24 is used for optimization of constructed cost functional. At each instant of time, the optimal electric field is calculated and used for the subsequent quantum dynamics, within the dipole approximation. The results are obtained using both Morse potential as well as potential energy obtained using ab initio calculations.

  12. Spectral Analysis of Two Coupled Diatomic Rotor Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horace T. Crogman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous article the theory of frame transformation relation between Body Oriented Angular (BOA states and Lab Weakly Coupled states (LWC was developed to investigate simple rotor–rotor interactions. By analyzing the quantum spectrum for two coupled diatomic molecules and comparing it with spectrum and probability distribution of simple models, evidence was found that, as we move from a LWC state to a strongly coupled state, a single rotor emerges in the strong limit. In the low coupling, the spectrum was quadratic which indicates the degree of floppiness in the rotor–rotor system. However in the high coupling behavior it was found that the spectrum was linear which corresponds to a rotor deep in a well.

  13. Coupling of Photonic and Electronic Spin Catalyzed by Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Timothy

    2011-05-01

    Recent experiments involving the collisions of polarized photons or polarized electrons with simple diatomic molecules have shown novel ways in which the net spin of electrons can be converted into the net spin of photons following the collisions, or vice versa. I will discuss three recent experiments that illustrate such transformations: the production of nuclear rotational spin in nitrogen molecules excited by polarized electrons with the subsequent emission of polarized photons, the excitation by polarized electrons of rotational eigenstates of hydrogen molecules and the subsequent emission of circularly-polarized light, and the photolysis of hydrogen molecules by circularly-polarized light yielding photofragments that ``spin the wrong way.'' To our knowledge, these latter measurements represent the first observation of photofragment orientation by direct observation of the polarization of the photofragment fluoresence. Work supported by the NSF through grant PHY-0821385, the DOE through the use of the ALS at LBL, and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  14. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune orchitis by fossil diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustuoabad, Oscar D.; Meiss, Roberto P.; Molinolo, Alfredo R.; Mayer, Alejandro M. S.

    1985-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) induced in Swiss mice could be reduced by means of the utilization of micronized frustules of fossil diatoms (DS) containing 54% of SiO2. Experimental mice were sensitized with testicular Antigen (Ag) in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) inoculated twice, on day 0 and day 21. 100 μg of DS suspension was inoculated into sensitized mice 10 times, once every 4 days, subcutaneously, starting on day 7 after the first Ag inoculation. Mice receiving the DS treatment showed a diminution of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction, lower antibody titer and decreased incidence of testicular injury as well as reduced grade and extension of the lesions. Possible explanation of these results would suggest alteration of monocyte and/or macrophage normal behaviour as well as alteration of antibody synthesis by different mechanisms.

  15. Atom-diatom scattering dynamics of spinning molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyles, C. J. [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Floß, J.; Averbukh, I. Sh. [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Leibscher, M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-01-14

    We present full quantum mechanical scattering calculations using spinning molecules as target states for nuclear spin selective atom-diatom scattering of reactive D+H{sub 2} and F+H{sub 2} collisions. Molecules can be forced to rotate uni-directionally by chiral trains of short, non-resonant laser pulses, with different nuclear spin isomers rotating in opposite directions. The calculations we present are based on rotational wavepackets that can be created in this manner. As our simulations show, target molecules with opposite sense of rotation are predominantly scattered in opposite directions, opening routes for spatially and quantum state selective scattering of close chemical species. Moreover, two-dimensional state resolved differential cross sections reveal detailed information about the scattering mechanisms, which can be explained to a large degree by a classical vector model for scattering with spinning molecules.

  16. Rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules in strong electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Ferez, R; Schmelcher, P [Departamento de Fisica Moderna and Instituto ' Carlos I' de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong static electric field on the rovibrational spectra of diatomic heteronuclear molecules in a {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} electronic ground state. Using a hybrid computational technique combining discretization and basis set methods the full rovibrational equation of motion is solved. As a prototype for our computations we take the carbon monoxide molecule. For experimentally accessible field strengths we observe that while low-lying states are not significantly affected by the field, for highly excited states strong orientation and hybridization are achieved. We propose an effective rotor Hamiltonian, including the main properties of each vibrational state, to describe the influence of the electric field on the rovibrational spectra of a molecular system with a small coupling between its rotational and vibrational motions. This effective rotor approach goes significantly beyond the rigid rotor approach and is able to describe the effect of the electric field for highly excited states.

  17. Inhibition of embryonic development and fertilization in broadcast spawning marine invertebrates by water soluble diatom extracts and the diatom toxin 2-trans,4-trans decadienal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Gary S; Olive, Peter J W; Bentley, Matthew G

    2002-10-02

    Water soluble diatom extracts and the diatom aldehyde 2-trans,4-trans decadienal were assayed on the gametes and embryos of the broadcast spawning polychaetes Arenicola marina and Nereis virens and the echinoderms Asterias rubens and Psammechinus miliaris. Both crude cellular extracts and purified aldehyde were found to inhibit fertilization, embryogenesis and hatching success in a dose dependent manner. Intact diatom cells had no discernable effect on fertilization or development. Extracts of Skeletonema costatum were generally more effective than Nitzschia commutata in inhibiting development and fertilization. There was considerable interspecific variation in terms of toxin sensitivity. The polychaetes were more sensitive to the effects than the echinoderms. Within the polychaetes A. marina was the more tolerant in terms of developmental competence but N. virens had a higher fertilization rate. Echinoid embryos were more tolerant than asteroid embryos. This is the first study to present data on the inhibition of fertilization success by diatom extracts and aldehydes. Our observations are discussed in relation to temporal patterns in spawning and possible adaptive mechanisms to avoid diatom toxicity.

  18. Sheldon spectrum and the plankton paradox: two sides of the same coin-a trait-based plankton size-spectrum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José A; Delius, Gustav W; Law, Richard

    2017-05-25

    The Sheldon spectrum describes a remarkable regularity in aquatic ecosystems: the biomass density as a function of logarithmic body mass is approximately constant over many orders of magnitude. While size-spectrum models have explained this phenomenon for assemblages of multicellular organisms, this paper introduces a species-resolved size-spectrum model to explain the phenomenon in unicellular plankton. A Sheldon spectrum spanning the cell-size range of unicellular plankton necessarily consists of a large number of coexisting species covering a wide range of characteristic sizes. The coexistence of many phytoplankton species feeding on a small number of resources is known as the Paradox of the Plankton. Our model resolves the paradox by showing that coexistence is facilitated by the allometric scaling of four physiological rates. Two of the allometries have empirical support, the remaining two emerge from predator-prey interactions exactly when the abundances follow a Sheldon spectrum. Our plankton model is a scale-invariant trait-based size-spectrum model: it describes the abundance of phyto- and zooplankton cells as a function of both size and species trait (the maximal size before cell division). It incorporates growth due to resource consumption and predation on smaller cells, death due to predation, and a flexible cell division process. We give analytic solutions at steady state for both the within-species size distributions and the relative abundances across species.

  19. Ciliate community structure and interactions within the planktonic food web in two alpine lakes of contrasting transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerlander, Barbara; Koinig, Karin A; Rott, Eugen; Sommaruga, Ruben; Tartarotti, Barbara; Trattner, Florian; Sonntag, Bettina

    2016-11-01

    Climate warming is accelerating the retreat of glaciers and recently, many 'new' glacial turbid lakes have been created. In the course of time, the loss of the hydrological connectivity to a glacier causes, however, changes in their water turbidity and turns these ecosystems into clear ones.To understand potential differences in the food-web structure between glacier-fed turbid and clear alpine lakes, we sampled ciliates, phyto-, bacterio- and zooplankton in one clear and one glacial turbid alpine lake, and measured key physicochemical parameters. In particular, we focused on the ciliate community and the potential drivers for their abundance distribution.In both lakes, the zooplankton community was similar and dominated by the copepod Cyclops abyssorum tatricus and rotifers including Polyarthra dolichoptera, Keratella hiemalis, Keratella cochlearis and Notholca squamula. The phytoplankton community structure differed and it was dominated by the planktonic diatom Fragilaria tenera and the cryptophyte alga Plagioselmis nannoplanctica in the glacial turbid lake, while chrysophytes and dinoflagellates were predominant in the clear one.Ciliate abundance and richness were higher in the glacial turbid lake (∼4000-27 800 Ind L(-1), up to 29 species) than in the clear lake (∼570-7150 Ind L(-1), up to eight species). The dominant species were Balanion planctonicum, Askenasia cf. chlorelligera, Urotricha cf. furcata and Mesodinium cf. acarus. The same species dominated in both lakes, except for Mesodinium cf. acarus and some particle-associated ciliates, which occurred exclusively in the glacial turbid lake. The relative underwater solar irradiance (i.e. percentage of PAR and UVR at depth) significantly explained their abundance distribution pattern, especially in the clear water lake. In the glacial turbid lake, the abundance of the dominating ciliate taxa was mainly explained by the presence of predatory zooplankton.Our results revealed an unexpected high

  20. Diatom colonization on stainless steel panels in estuarine waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.

    carbon available on the immersed surface. Among microalgae, diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) are the first eukaryotic algae which colonize and dominate microcommunities in marine, brackish and freshwaters. According to Marzaiek et al.1 and Carlton...